WorldWideScience

Sample records for existing primary care

  1. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease: do they exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-04-21

    Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians is conducted. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one such chronic disease. Despite specialist care being essential, much IBD care could and probably should be delivered in primary care with continued collaboration between all stakeholders. Whilst most primary care physicians only have few patients currently affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD are helpful but they are not designed for the primary care setting. Few non-expert IBD management tools or guidelines exist compared with those used for other chronic diseases such as asthma and scant data have been published regarding the usefulness of such tools including IBD action plans and associated supportive literature. The purpose of this review is to investigate what non-specialist tools, action plans or guidelines for IBD are published in readily searchable medical literature and compare these to those which exist for other chronic conditions.

  2. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: Danish Cancer in Primary Care cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Henry Jensen,1,2 Marie Louise Tørring,1 Mette Bach Larsen,3 Peter Vedsted11Research Unit for General Practice, Research Centre for Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care, 2Section for General Medical Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, 3Department of Public Health Programs, Randers Regional Hospital, Randers NOE, Denmark Background: In this paper, we describe the settings, content, and possibilities of the Danish Cancer in Primary Care (CaP cohort as well as some of the key findings so far. Further, we describe the future potential of the cohort as an international resource for epidemiological and health services research studies. Methods: The CaP cohort comprises information from three Danish subcohorts set up in 2004–2005, 2007–2008, and 2010 on newly diagnosed cancer patients aged 18 years or older. General practitioner (GP-reported and patient-reported data from six questionnaires generated information on causes and consequences of delayed diagnosis of cancer, and these data were supplemented with complete information on, eg, death, migration, health care utilization, medication use, and socioeconomic data from Denmark's comprehensive health and administrative registers. The cohort is followed up in terms of emigration, death, hospitalization, medication, and socioeconomics, and data are updated regularly. Results: In total, we identified 22,169 verified incident cancer cases. Completed GP questionnaires were returned for 17,566 (79% of the verified cases, and patient questionnaires were completed by 8,937 (40% respondents. Patients with participating GPs did not differ from patients with nonparticipating GPs in regard to one-year survival, comorbidity, or educational level. However, compared with nonparticipating GPs, patients listed with participating GPs were more likely to be women, younger, to have a higher disposable income, to have more regional or distant spread of tumors, were also more likely to have

  3. Implementing family physician programme in rural Iran: exploring the role of an existing primary health care network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takian, Amirhossein; Doshmangir, Leila; Rashidian, Arash

    2013-10-01

    The primary health care (PHC) network contributed considerably to improving health outcomes in rural Iran. However, the health system suffers from inadequate responses to ever-increasing demands. In 2005, a reform comprised of a family physician (FP) programme and universal health insurance was implemented in all rural areas and cities with a population of <20 000. We explored the role of the pre-existing PHC network on the implementation of FP programme in rural Iran. We conducted a qualitative study involving 71 semi-structured interviews at national, provincial and local levels, and three focus group discussions at local level, plus a purposeful content analysis of documents of various types. We used a mixed inductive/deductive framework approach for data analysis. We identified seven main aspects related to the existing primary health network, which contributed to the implementation of FP programme: 'a respected and functioning PHC network', 'accessibility and geographical coverage', 'efficient hierarchy', 'the only possible host', 'a remedy for chronic challenges in the rural PHC', 'FP as the gatekeeper?' and 'the role of the private sector'. The existence of a functioning PHC was pivotal in driving policy makers' decision to implement FP programme. Implementing a new policy depends on its hosting context. In regards to FP programme and rural insurance in Iran, the existing PHC network proved to be a fundamental asset in facilitating the implementation of FP programme in rural areas.

  4. [Primary care in Ireland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2017-03-27

    Spanish doctors are still leaving the country to look for quality work. Ireland is not a country with many Spanish professionals but it is interesting to know its particular Health care system. Ireland is one of the countries with a national health care system, although it has a mixture of private health care insurance schemes. People have a right to health care if they have been living in Ireland at least for a year. Access to the primary care health system depends on age and income: free of charge for Category 1 and co-payments for the rest. This division generates great inequalities among the population. Primary Care doctors are self-employed, and they work independently. However, since 2001 they have tended to work in multidisciplinary teams in order to strengthen the Primary Care practice. Salary is gained from a combination of public and private incomes which are not differentiated. The role of the General Practitioner consists in the treatment of acute and chronic diseases, minor surgery, child care, etc. There is no coordination between Primary and Secondary care. Access to specialised medicine is regulated by the price of consultation. Primary Care doctors are not gatekeepers. To be able to work here, doctors must have three years of training after medical school. After that, Continuing Medical Education is compulsory, and the college of general practitioners monitors it annually. The Irish health care system does not fit into the European model. Lack of a clear separation between public and private health care generates great inequalities. The non-existence of coordination between primary and specialised care leads to inefficiencies, which Ireland cannot allow itself after a decade of economic crisis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of adding a new PCMH block rotation and resident team to existing longitudinal training within a certified PCMH: primary care residents’ attitudes, knowledge, and experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandarajah G

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gowri Anandarajah,1,2 Christopher Furey,1 Rabin Chandran,1 Arnold Goldberg,3,4 Fadya El Rayess,1 David Ashley,1 Roberta E Goldman,1,5 1Department of Family Medicine, 2Department of Medical Science, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, 3Department of Family Medicine, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, 4Department of Family Medicine, Leigh Valley Family Health Network, Allentown, PA, 5Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA Background: Although the patient-centered medical home (PCMH model is considered important for the future of primary care in the USA, it remains unclear how best to prepare trainees for PCMH practice and leadership. Following a baseline study, the authors added a new required PCMH block rotation and resident team to an existing longitudinal PCMH immersion and didactic curriculum within a Level 3-certified PCMH, aiming for “enhanced situated learning”. All 39 residents enrolled in a USA family medicine residency program during the first year of curricular implementation completed this new 4-week rotation. This study examines the effects of this rotation after 1 year. Methods: A total of 39 intervention and 13 comparison residents were eligible participants. This multimethod study included: 1 individual interviews of postgraduate year (PGY 3 intervention vs PGY3 comparison residents, assessing residents’ PCMH attitudes, knowledge, and clinical experience, and 2 routine rotation evaluations. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analyzed using immersion/crystallization. Rotation evaluations were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis of free text responses. Results: Authors analyzed 23 interviews (88% and 26 rotation evaluations (67%. Intervention PGY3s’ interviews revealed more nuanced understanding of PCMH concepts and more experience with system-level PCMH

  6. Effects of adding a new PCMH block rotation and resident team to existing longitudinal training within a certified PCMH: primary care residents' attitudes, knowledge, and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandarajah, Gowri; Furey, Christopher; Chandran, Rabin; Goldberg, Arnold; El Rayess, Fadya; Ashley, David; Goldman, Roberta E

    2016-01-01

    Although the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model is considered important for the future of primary care in the USA, it remains unclear how best to prepare trainees for PCMH practice and leadership. Following a baseline study, the authors added a new required PCMH block rotation and resident team to an existing longitudinal PCMH immersion and didactic curriculum within a Level 3-certified PCMH, aiming for "enhanced situated learning". All 39 residents enrolled in a USA family medicine residency program during the first year of curricular implementation completed this new 4-week rotation. This study examines the effects of this rotation after 1 year. A total of 39 intervention and 13 comparison residents were eligible participants. This multimethod study included: 1) individual interviews of postgraduate year (PGY) 3 intervention vs PGY3 comparison residents, assessing residents' PCMH attitudes, knowledge, and clinical experience, and 2) routine rotation evaluations. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analyzed using immersion/crystallization. Rotation evaluations were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis of free text responses. Authors analyzed 23 interviews (88%) and 26 rotation evaluations (67%). Intervention PGY3s' interviews revealed more nuanced understanding of PCMH concepts and more experience with system-level PCMH tasks than those of comparison PGY3s. More intervention PGY3s rated themselves "extremely prepared" to implement PCMH than comparison PGY3s; however, most self-rated "somewhat prepared". Their reflections demonstrated deeper understanding of PCMH implementation and challenges than comparison PGY3s but inadequate experience to directly see the results of successful solutions. Rotation evaluations from PGY1, PGY2, and PGY3s revealed strengths and several areas for improvement. Adding one 4-week block rotation to existing longitudinal training appears to improve residents' PCMH knowledge, skills, and

  7. Primary Care's Dim Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the chorus of approval for primary care emanating from every party to the health reform debate, one might suppose that the future for primary physicians is bright. Yet this is far from certain. And when one looks to history and recognizes that primary care medicine has failed virtually every conceivable market test in recent years, its…

  8. Incorporating Spirituality in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Kathleen S; Hay, Jennifer L; Lubetkin, Erica I

    2016-06-01

    Addressing cultural competency in health care involves recognizing the diverse characteristics of the patient population and understanding how they impact patient care. Spirituality is an aspect of cultural identity that has become increasingly recognized for its potential to impact health behaviors and healthcare decision-making. We consider the complex relationship between spirituality and health, exploring the role of spirituality in primary care, and consider the inclusion of spirituality in existing models of health promotion. We discuss the feasibility of incorporating spirituality into clinical practice, offering suggestions for physicians.

  9. Interaction of palliative care and primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amrita; Dzeng, Elizabeth; Cheng, M Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    Primary care physicians are often the first medical providers patients seek out, and are in an excellent position to provide primary palliative care. Primary palliative care encompasses basic skills including basic evaluation and management of symptoms and discussions about goals of care and advance care planning. Specialty palliative care consultation complements primary care by assisting with complex psychosocial-spiritual patient and family situations. This article reviews primary palliative care skill sets and criteria for when to consider referring patients to specialty palliative care and hospice services. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Acupuncture in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jun J; Kapur, Rahul

    2010-03-01

    Acupuncture, an ancient traditional Chinese medical therapy, is used widely around the world. When practiced by a certified provider, it is safe and patients often find it calming and relaxing. Animal and human studies have found a physiologic basis for acupuncture needling in that it affects the complex central and peripheral neurohormonal network. Although it is unclear whether acupuncture is beneficial over sham/placebo acupuncture, acupuncture care yields clinically relevant short- and long-term benefits for low back pain, knee osteoarthritis, chronic neck pain, and headache. The integration of acupuncture into a primary care setting also appears to be cost-effective. The practice of acupuncture in primary care requires rigorous training, financial discipline, and good communication skills. When done correctly, acupuncture is beneficial for both patients and providers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary palliative care in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L; English, Nancy K

    2017-03-01

    This article explores the 2014 Institute of Medicine׳s recommendation concerning primary palliative care as integral to all neonates and their families in the intensive care setting. We review trends in neonatology and barriers to implementing palliative care in intensive care settings. Neonatal primary palliative care education should address the unique needs of neonates and their families. The neonatal intensive care unit needs a mixed model of palliative care, where the neonatal team provides primary palliative care and the palliative subspecialist consults for more complex or refractory situations that exceed the primary team׳s skills or available time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Spirometry in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Allan L; Graham, Brian L; McFadden, Robin G; McParland, Colm; Moosa, Dilshad; Provencher, Steeve; Road, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) clinical guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specify that spirometry should be used to diagnose these diseases. Given the burden of asthma and COPD, most people with these diseases will be diagnosed in the primary care setting. The present CTS position statement was developed to provide guidance on key factors affecting the quality of spirometry testing in the primary care setting. The present statement may also be used to inform and guide the accreditation process for spirometry in each province. Although many of the principles discussed are equally applicable to pulmonary function laboratories and interpretation of tests by respirologists, they are held to a higher standard and are outside the scope of the present statement. PMID:23457669

  13. Primary care quality management in Uzbekistan.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Baymirova, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Uzbek government has a central role in primary care quality management. On paper, many quality management structures and procedures exist. Now, primary care practice should follow, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO) – has shown. The results have

  14. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    @hotmail.com, A.Ehigiegba@shell.com. KEYWORDS. Volunteer,. Obio Cottage. Hospital,. Participants,. Nigeria journal of. COMMUNITY MEDICINE. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care.

  15. Choosing a primary care provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Choosing a primary care provider URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001939.htm Choosing a primary care provider To ...

  16. Primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romualdez, A

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a short discussion of essential concepts in primary health care based on the Alma Ata Declaration of 1978 and a brief description of the Philippine Ministry of Health primary health program. The phrase primary health care implies that PHC is a package of goods to be delivered to people, whereas in fact it is an approach to health care which emphasizes community involvement and participation in health development. Community participation is too often taken to mean that communities should participate in programs designed, implemented, and run by health professionals. PHC however requires that health programs be designed, implemented, run by, and belong to the people of the community. External agencies and health professionals must find ways of becoming involved and participating in the community's programs. A thorough reorientation of health professionals, particularly doctors and nurses, away from technology and toward the ideals and wisdom of the people is needed if PHC is to succeed. PHC should provide the bridge between technological knowledge and indigenous wisdom. The national government is embarking on a nationwide PHC program, with structures being organized at national, regional, provincial, municipal, and barangay levels for PHC. The higher organizational levels are intended to ensure access to their available resources to complement resources at the lower levels, especially at the critical barangay level. Because over 70% of the national population lives in rural areas, the national government's effort through the Ministry of Health will stress rural needs and approaches. Different approaches will be needed for poor urban communities, and the Manila Health Department may be able to provide leadership for developing the new ideas needed to tailor health development programs to Filipino urban communities.

  17. Epigenetics and primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robert; Saul, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    Epigenetics, the study of functionally relevant chemical modifications to DNA that do not involve a change in the DNA nucleotide sequence, is at the interface between research and clinical medicine. Research on epigenetic marks, which regulate gene expression independently of the underlying genetic code, has dramatically changed our understanding of the interplay between genes and the environment. This interplay alters human biology and developmental trajectories, and can lead to programmed human disease years after the environmental exposure. In addition, epigenetic marks are potentially heritable. In this article, we discuss the underlying concepts of epigenetics and address its current and potential applicability for primary care providers.

  18. Integrating Palliative Care into Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Rosemary D

    2016-09-01

    Improved quality of life, care consistent with patient goals of care, and decreased health care spending are benefits of palliative care. Palliative care is appropriate for anyone with a serious illness. Advances in technology and pharmaceuticals have resulted in increasing numbers of seriously ill individuals, many with a high symptom burden. The numbers of individuals who could benefit from palliative care far outweighs the number of palliative care specialists. To integrate palliative care into primary care it is essential that resources are available to improve generalist palliative care skills, identify appropriate patients and refer complex patients to specialist palliative care providers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Antibiotics in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steciwko, Andrzej; Lubieniecka, Małgorzata; Muszyńska, Agnieszka

    2011-05-01

    Discovered in the forties of the twentieth century antimicrobial agents have changed the world. Currently, due to their overuse, we are threatened by the increasing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics, and soon we may face a threat of inability to fight these pathogens. For that reason, the world, European and national organizations introduce antibiotics protection programs. In Poland since 2004, the National Program of Protection of Antibiotics is being held. The concept of rational antibiotic therapy is associated not only with the appropriate choice of therapy or antimicrobial dosage but also with a reduction in costs associated with a refund of medicines. Antibiotics are prescribed mostly by primary care physicians (GP), and about one fifth of visits to family doctor's office ends with prescribing antimicrobial drug. These trends are probably related to both the difficulty in applying the differential diagnosis of viral and bacterial infection in a primary care doctor's office, as well as patient's conviction about the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in viral infections. However, although patients often want to influence the therapeutic decisions and ask their doctor for prescribing antimicrobial drug, the right conversation with a doctor alone is the critical component in satisfaction with medical care. Many countries have established standards to clarify the indications for use of antibiotics and thereby reduce their consumption. The next step is to monitor the prescribing and use of these drugs and to assess the rise of drug resistance in the area. In Poland, the recommendations regarding outpatient respiratory tract infections treatment were published and usage of antimicrobial agents monitoring has begun. However, lack of publications covering a broad analysis of antibiotic therapy and drug resistance on Polish territory is still a problem. Modem medicine has yet another tool in the fight against bacteria--they are bacteriophages. Phage therapy is

  20. Registered Nurses in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Cromp, DeAnn; Ladden, MaryJoan D.; Wagner, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    The years since the passage of the Affordable Care Act have seen substantial changes in the organization and delivery of primary care. These changes have emphasized greater team involvement in care and expansion of the roles of each team member including registered nurses (RNs). This study examined the roles of RNs in 30 exemplary primary care practices. We identified the emergence of new roles and activities for RNs characterized by greater involvement in face-to-face patient care and care m...

  1. Primary care guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ijäs, Jarja; Alanen, Seija; Kaila, Minna

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the adoption of the national Hypertension Guideline in primary care and to evaluate the consistency of the views of the health centre senior executives on the guideline's impact on clinical practices in the treatment of hypertension in their health centres. DESIGN: A cross......-sectional telephone survey. SETTING: All municipal health centres in Finland. SUBJECTS: Health centres where both the head physician and the senior nursing officer responded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Agreement in views of the senior executives on the adoption of clinical practices as recommended in the Hypertension...... Guideline. RESULTS: Data were available from 143 health centres in Finland (49%). The views of head physicians and senior nursing officers on the adoption of the Hypertension Guideline were not consistent. Head physicians more often than senior nursing officers (44% vs. 29%, p

  2. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Client Satisfaction with Antenatal Care Services in Primary Health Care. Centres in Sabon Gari Local Government Area, Kaduna State Nigeria. journal of. COMMUNITY MEDICINE. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. 1. 1. 1. M.B Sufiyan , A.A Umar , A. Shugaba . 1Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, ...

  3. Primary health care models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Judith Belle; French, Reta; McCulloch, Amy; Clendinning, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the knowledge and perceptions of fourth-year medical students regarding the new models of primary health care (PHC) and to ascertain whether that knowledge influenced their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Setting The Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario in London. Participants Fourth-year medical students graduating in 2009 who indicated family medicine as a possible career choice on their Canadian Residency Matching Service applications. Methods Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted between January and April of 2009. Data were analyzed using an iterative and interpretive approach. The analysis strategy of immersion and crystallization assisted in synthesizing the data to provide a comprehensive view of key themes and overarching concepts. Main findings Four key themes were identified: the level of students’ knowledge regarding PHC models varied; the knowledge was generally obtained from practical experiences rather than classroom learning; students could identify both advantages and disadvantages of working within the new PHC models; and although students regarded the new PHC models positively, these models did not influence their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Conclusion Knowledge of the new PHC models varies among fourth-year students, indicating a need for improved education strategies in the years before clinical training. Being able to identify advantages and disadvantages of the PHC models was not enough to influence participants’ choice of specialty. Educators and health care policy makers need to determine the best methods to promote and facilitate knowledge transfer about these PHC models. PMID:22518904

  4. Primary care research in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Kallestrup, Per

    2016-01-01

    histories from research-rich to resource-poor nations that illustrate the range of research development and capacity building. This book argues the importance of primary care research, especially to policy makers, decision makers and funders in informing best practice, training primary health care providers......International Perspectives on Primary Care Research examines how the evidence base from primary care research can strengthen health care services and delivery, tackle the growing burden of disease, improve quality and safety, and increase a person-centred focus to health care. Demonstrating...... the inter-professional nature of the discipline, the book also features a section on cross-nation organisations and primary care networks supporting research. National perspectives are offered from researchers in 20 countries that form part of the World Organization of Family Doctors, providing case...

  5. Allegheny County Primary Care Access

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The data on health care facilities includes the name and location of all the hospitals and primary care facilities in Allegheny County. The current listing of...

  6. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    2013-09-02

    Port Harcourt. ... Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 25 (2) 53-58. KEYWORDS. Healer shopping,. Discharge Against. Medical Advice,. Non- communicable diseases, epidemiological transition, Port.

  7. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COMMUNITY HEALTH. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. KEYWORDS ABSTRACT. Correspondence to: Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26 (2) 1-6. Facility User's Preference between the Free and the Bamako. Initiative (Drug Revolving Fund-Based) Health Services in Iwajowa Local Government, Oyo ...

  8. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    communicable diseases such as hypertension and transitions currently experienced in Sub-Saharan. 96. JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTH CARE VOL. 26, NO 1, MARCH 2014. KEYWORDS journal of. COMMUNITY MEDICINE. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine ...

  9. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vaccine for their children. journal of. COMMUNITY HEALTH. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26(2) 46-58. Correspondence to: Ijadunola M.Y. Department of Community Health, Faculty of Clinical Sciences,. College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University,.

  10. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    debut (20.8%), 40.8% had multiple sexual partners, 23.3% had sex under the influence of alcohol while. 34.2% didn't use ... PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26(2) 97-106. KEYWORDS. Risky sexual behaviour, young people, ..... 2010;15(1): Art. #505[cited consistent with ...

  11. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Up to 11 (7.2%) respondents in the non-BI LGA were not satisfied with the drug services in the health centers, compared ... improvement in primary health care services,. 8 ..... Naves J O, Silver LD. Evaluation of pharmaceutical assistance in public primary care in Brasilia, Brazil. Rev. Saude Publica. 2005; 39(2): 223-30. 21.

  12. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26 (1) 21-29. KEYWORDS. Household, expenditure,. Treatment, presumptive malaria,. Gimba ... A cross-sectional descriptive study conducted during community diagnosis posting of final year medical students of. Ahmadu Bello University ...

  13. The Coming Primary Care Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellner, Andrew L; Phillips, Russell S

    2017-04-01

    The United States has the most expensive, technologically advanced, and sub-specialized healthcare system in the world, yet it has worse population health status than any other high-income country. Rising healthcare costs, high rates of waste, the continued trend towards chronic non-communicable disease, and the growth of new market entrants that compete with primary care services have set the stage for fundamental change in all of healthcare, driven by a revolution in primary care. We believe that the coming primary care revolution ought to be guided by the following design principles: 1) Payment must adequately support primary care and reward value, including non-visit-based care. 2) Relationships will serve as the bedrock of value in primary care, and will increasingly be fostered by teams, improved clinical operations, and technology, with patients and non-physicians assuming an ever-increasing role in most aspects of healthcare. 3) Generalist physicians will increasingly focus on high-acuity and high-complexity presentations, and primary care teams will increasingly manage conditions that specialists managed in the past. 4) Primary care will refocus on whole-person care, and address health behaviors as well as vision, hearing, dental, and social services. Design based on these principles should lead to higher-value healthcare, but will require new approaches to workforce training.

  14. Primary Medical Care in Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpaci, Joseph L.

    Primary medical care in Chile: accessibility under military rule [Front Cover] [Front Matter] [Title Page] Contents Tables Figures Preface Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: The Restructuring of Medical Care Financing in Chile Chapter 3: Inflation and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 4: Help-Se...

  15. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1. Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our country. Promotion of quality has been fundamental part of primary care health services. Nevertheless variations in quality of care exist even in the developed countries. Accomplishment of quality in the primary care has some barriers like administration and directorial factors, absence of evidence-based medicine practice lack of continuous medical education. Quality of health care is no doubt multifaceted model that covers all components of health structures and processes of care. Quality in the primary care set up includes patient physician relationship, immunization, maternal, adolescent, adult and geriatric health care, referral, non-communicable disease management and prescribing (2. Most countries are recently beginning the implementation of quality assessments in all walks of healthcare. Organizations like European society for quality and safety in family practice (EQuiP endeavor to accomplish quality by collaboration. There are reported developments and experiments related to the methodology, processes and outcomes of quality assessments of health care. Quality assessments will not only contribute the accomplishment of the program / project but also detect the areas where obstacles also exist. In order to speed up the adoption of QA and to circumvent the occurrence of mistakes, health policy makers and family physicians from different parts of the world should share their experiences. Consensus on quality in preventive medicine implementations can help to yield

  16. Acupuncture in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Jun J.; Kapur, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient traditional Chinese medical therapy that is used widely around the world. When practiced by a certified provider, it is safe and often perceived as calming and relaxing for patients. Animal and human studies have found a physiological basis for acupuncture needling in that it affects the complex central and peripheral neuro-hormonal network. Although it is unclear whether acupuncture is beneficial over sham/placebo acupuncture, acupuncture care yields clinically rele...

  17. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTH CARE VOL. 26, NO 1, MARCH 2014. INTRODUCTION disability from complications of pregnancy and. 1 child birth. MI in birth preparedness is. Birth preparedness by a couple ensures that indispensible in rural communities where patriarchy appropriate care ...

  18. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  19. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Centres in Sabon Gari Local Government Area, Kaduna State Nigeria. journal of. COMMUNITY MEDICINE. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. 1. 1. 1. M.B Sufiyan , A.A Umar , A. Shugaba . 1Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. KEYWORDS. Assessment,. Client satisfaction, ANC,. PHC centers.

  20. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Primary Health Care Department, Ikpoba Okha Local Government Area, Benin City, Nigeria. 1. 2. Adam V.Y , Iseh A.E. ABSTRACT. Introduction. The level of accurate knowledge adolescents have about HIV/AIDS, is important to enhance effective preventive actions, which ultimately result in a decrease in the incidence of ...

  1. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Early detection and treatment of these morbidities could prevent deterioration. The aim of the survey was to determine and compare the prevalence of ..... interventions. Increasing the detection rate of mental morbidity in the community is fundamental. The inclusion of mental health care as a component of primary health ...

  2. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterobacter spp. 1. 0.6. Table V: Proportion of Respondent that enter the Ward with Handheld Device. Table VI: Proportion of Respondent that Disinfect Phones and what they Disinfect with. Table VII: Hand Hygiene Practices. JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTH CARE VOL. 27, NO 1, MARCH ...

  3. Scenarios cancer in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, L.F.J. van der; Schellevis, F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies predicted an increase in both the incidence and prevalence of cancer in the Netherlands. Other studies showed that cancer patients use primary care more frequently than non-cancer patients. Finally, during the “chronic phase” of the disease, task substitution from

  4. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    the children didnot receive BCG vaccine while spiritual homes was the pattern in 6.9 households. 22.9% did not receive measles vaccine. A total of 63 under-five deaths were reported in 53. Table VI shows the health-seeking behaviour of. 6. JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTH CARE VOL.

  5. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    Improving skilled attendants at birth: Experience in a primary health care facility in Rivers State, South-South Nigeria. 1. 2. Ordinioha B. , Seiyefa B. 1Community Medicine Department, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt. 2Department of Family Medicine, Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital, ...

  6. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    activities in the health centres ( Table 2) The study showed that community health extension workers were responsible for ... development goals for mothers and children as distant as it was 40 years ago when primary health care strategy was adopted for ... Most of them were very experienced, 50% of. The study (Table II) ...

  7. Primary care workforce development in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.; Heinemann, S.; Gress, S.; Schäfer, W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a large variation in the organization of primary care in Europe. In some health care systems, primary care is the gatekeeper to more specialized care, whilst in others patients have the choice between a wide range of providers. Primary care has increasingly become teamwork.

  8. Safety of medication use in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaniyan, Janice O; Ghaleb, Maisoon; Dhillon, Soraya; Robinson, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Medication errors are one of the leading causes of harmin health care. Review and analysis of errors have often emphasized their preventable nature and potential for reoccurrence. Of the few error studies conducted in primary care to date, most have focused on evaluating individual parts of the medicines management system. Studying individual parts of the system does not provide a complete perspective and may further weaken the evidence and undermine interventions. The aim of this review is to estimate the scale of medication errors as a problem across the medicines management system in primary care. Objectives were: To review studies addressing the rates of medication errors, and To identify studies on interventions to prevent medication errors in primary care. A systematic search of the literature was performed in PubMed (MEDLINE), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), Embase, PsycINFO, PASCAL, Science Direct, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, and CINAHL PLUS from 1999 to November, 2012. Bibliographies of relevant publications were searched for additional studies. Thirty-three studies estimating the incidence of medication errors and thirty-six studies evaluating the impact of error-prevention interventions in primary care were reviewed. This review demonstrated that medication errors are common, with error rates between 90%, depending on the part of the system studied, and the definitions and methods used. The prescribing stage is the most susceptible, and that the elderly (over 65 years), and children (under 18 years) are more likely to experience significant errors. Individual interventions demonstrated marginal improvements in medication safety when implemented on their own. Targeting the more susceptible population groups and the most dangerous aspects of the system may be a more effective approach to error management and prevention. Co-implementation of existing interventions at points within the system may offer time- and cost-effective options to

  9. Assessing primary care in Austria: room for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigler, Florian L; Starfield, Barbara; Sprenger, Martin; Salzer, Helmut J F; Campbell, Stephen M

    2013-04-01

    There is emerging evidence that strong primary care achieves better health at lower costs. Although primary care can be measured, in many countries, including Austria, there is little understanding of primary care development. Assessing the primary care development in Austria. A primary care assessment tool developed by Barbara Starfield in 1998 was implemented in Austria. This tool defines 15 primary care characteristics and distinguishes between system and practice characteristics. Each characteristic was evaluated by six Austrian primary care experts and rated as 2 (high), 1 (intermediate) or 0 (low) points, respectively, to their primary care strength (maximum score: n = 30). Austria received 7 out of 30 points; no characteristic was rated as '2' but 8 were rated as '0'. Compared with the 13 previously assessed countries, Austria ranks 10th of 14 countries and is classified as a 'low primary care' country. This study provides the first evidence concerning primary care in Austria, benchmarking it as weak and in need of development. The practicable application of an existing assessment tool can be encouraging for other countries to generate evidence about their primary care system as well.

  10. Financial incentive schemes in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillam S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Gillam Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Pay-for-performance (P4P schemes have become increasingly common in primary care, and this article reviews their impact. It is based primarily on existing systematic reviews. The evidence suggests that P4P schemes can change health professionals' behavior and improve recorded disease management of those clinical processes that are incentivized. P4P may narrow inequalities in performance comparing deprived with nondeprived areas. However, such schemes have unintended consequences. Whether P4P improves the patient experience, the outcomes of care or population health is less clear. These practical uncertainties mirror the ethical concerns of many clinicians that a reductionist approach to managing markers of chronic disease runs counter to the humanitarian values of family practice. The variation in P4P schemes between countries reflects different historical and organizational contexts. With so much uncertainty regarding the effects of P4P, policy makers are well advised to proceed carefully with the implementation of such schemes until and unless clearer evidence for their cost–benefit emerges. Keywords: financial incentives, pay for performance, quality improvement, primary care

  11. Costs of health care across primary care models in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Maude; Wodchis, Walter P; Barnsley, Jan; Laporte, Audrey

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between newly introduced primary care models in Ontario, Canada, and patients' primary care and total health care costs. A specific focus is on the payment mechanisms for primary care physicians, i.e. fee-for-service (FFS), enhanced-FFS, and blended capitation, and whether providers practiced as part of a multidisciplinary team. Utilization data for a one year period was measured using administrative databases for a 10% sample selected at random from the Ontario adult population. Primary care and total health care costs were calculated at the individual level and included costs from physician services, hospital visits and admissions, long term care, drugs, home care, lab tests, and visits to non-medical health care providers. Generalized linear model regressions were conducted to assess the differences in costs between primary care models. Patients not enrolled with a primary care physicians were younger, more likely to be males and of lower socio-economic status. Patients in blended capitation models were healthier and wealthier than FFS and enhanced-FFS patients. Primary care and total health care costs were significantly different across Ontario primary care models. Using the traditional FFS as the reference, we found that patients in the enhanced-FFS models had the lowest total health care costs, and also the lowest primary care costs. Patients in the blended capitation models had higher primary care costs but lower total health care costs. Patients that were in multidisciplinary teams (FHT), where physicians are also paid on a blended capitation basis, had higher total health care costs than non-FHT patients but still lower than the FFS reference group. Primary care and total health care costs increased with patients' age, morbidity, and lower income quintile across all primary care payment types. The new primary care models were associated with lower total health care costs for patients compared to the

  12. Psychotic symptoms in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfson, M; Weissman, M M; Leon, A C; Farber, L; Sheehan, D V

    1996-11-01

    Psychotic symptoms include a variety of disturbances in perception, reality testing, speech, and behavior. We examine the prevalence, distribution, treatment, and functional impairment associated with psychotic symptoms in primary care patients. Data are drawn from a recent study of adult primary care patients (N = 1001) in a large, urban, prepaid group practice. At the medical visit, patients completed a questionnaire that probed demographic characteristics, health status, and mental health care utilization. Following the visit, patients received a telephone-administered, structured psychiatric interview that included 11 psychotic symptoms. Medication prescription data were also available. Comparisons are presented of patients with and without psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven (3.7%) patients reported one or more psychotic symptoms, most commonly a belief that others were spying on or following them (n = 16). As compared with patients without psychotic symptoms, a larger proportion of the patients with psychotic symptoms reported mental health-related work loss (54.1% vs 17.9%, P < .0001), suicidal ideation (21.6% vs 2.6%, P < .0001), major depressive disorder (32.4% vs 6.3%, P < .0001), bipolar disorder (29.7% vs 1.2%, P < .0001), and several other mental disorders. An antipsychotic medication had been prescribed during the previous 17 to 20 months for only two (5.4%) of the patients with psychotic symptoms. Psychotic symptoms were relatively common (3.7%) in this practice and were strongly associated with functional impairment and affective, anxiety, or substance use disorders. Primary care physicians are encouraged to examine patients with these mental disorders for the presence of psychotic symptoms.

  13. Paediatric primary care in Europe: variation between countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Esso, Diego; del Torso, Stefano; Hadjipanayis, Adamos

    2010-01-01

    Although it is known that differences in paediatric primary care (PPC) are found throughout Europe, little information exists as to where, how and who delivers this care. The aim of this study was to collect information on the current existing situation of PPC in Europe....

  14. Many Primary Care Docs May Miss Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167370.html Many Primary Care Docs May Miss Prediabetes Fewer than 1 in ... 2017 MONDAY, July 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Most primary care doctors can't identify all 11 risk factors ...

  15. [Renewing primary health care in the Americas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macinko, James; Montenegro, Hernán; Nebot Adell, Carme; Etienne, Carissa

    2007-01-01

    At the 2003 meeting of the Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the PAHO Member States issued a mandate to strengthen primary health care (Resolution CD44. R6). The mandate led in 2005 to the document "Renewing Primary Health Care in the Americas. A Position Paper of the Pan American Health Organization/WHO [World Health Organization]," and it culminated in the Declaration of Montevideo, an agreement among the governments of the Region of the Americas to renew their commitment to primary health care (PHC). Scientific data have shown that PHC, regarded as the basis of all the health systems in the Region, is a key component of effective health systems and can be adapted to the range of diverse social, cultural, and economic conditions that exist. The new, global health paradigm has given rise to changes in the population's health care needs. Health services and systems must adapt to address these changes. Building on the legacy of the International Conference on Primary Health Care, held in 1978 in Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics), PAHO proposes a group of strategies critical to adopting PHC-based health care systems based on the principles of equity, solidarity, and the right to the highest possible standard of health. The main objective of the strategies is to develop and/or strengthen PHC-based health systems in the entire Region of the Americas. A substantial effort will be required on the part of health professionals, citizens, governments, associations, and agencies. This document explains the strategies that must be employed at the national, subregional, Regional, and global levels.

  16. Primary Care Clinics and Accountable Care Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Ortiz PhD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Accountable Care Organization (ACO is one of the new models of health care delivery in the United States. To date, little is known about the characteristics of health care organizations that have joined ACOs. We report on the findings of a survey of primary care clinics, the objective of which was to investigate the opinions of clinic management about participation in ACOs and the characteristics of clinic organizational structure that may contribute to joining ACOs or be willing to do so. Methods: A 27-item survey questionnaire was developed and distributed by mail in 3 annual waves to all Rural Health Clinics (RHCs in 9 states. Two dependent variables—participation in ACOs and willingness to join ACOs—were created and analyzed using a generalized estimating equation approach. Results: A total of 257 RHCs responded to the survey. A small percentage (5.2% of the respondent clinics reported that they were participating in ACOs. Rural Health Clinics in isolated areas were 78% less likely to be in ACOs (odds ratio = 0.22, P = .059. Nonprofit RHCs indicated a higher willingness to join an ACO than for-profit RHCs (B = 1.271, P = .054. There is a positive relationship between RHC size and willingness to join an ACO (B = 0.402, P = .010. Conclusion: At this early stage of ACO development, many RHC personnel are unfamiliar with the ACO model. Rural providers’ limited technological and human resources, and the lack of ACO development in rural areas, may delay or prevent their participation in ACOs.

  17. Ethical religion in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torry, Malcolm

    2017-07-01

    Religion is increasingly significant in UK society, and is highly significant for many patients and primary care practitioners. An important task for the practitioner is to ensure that the place of religion in the patient/practitioner relationship is treated with the same ethical seriousness as every other aspect of that relationship. The article finds the 'four principles of biomedical ethics' to be applicable, and recent GMC guidelines to be consistent with the four principles. The article applies the four principles to the particular case of practitioners wearing religious symbolism.

  18. 45 CFR 96.47 - Primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care. 96.47 Section 96.47 Public Welfare... and Tribal Organizations § 96.47 Primary care. Applications for direct funding of Indian tribes and tribal organizations under the primary care block grant must comply with 42 CFR Part 51c (Grants for...

  19. Integrating Bipolar Disorder Management in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M.; Goodrich, David E.; O’Donnell, Allison N.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing realization that persons with bipolar disorder may exclusively be seen in primary (general medical) care settings, notably because of limited access to mental health care and stigma in seeking mental health treatment. At least two clinical practice guidelines for bipolar disorder recommend collaborative chronic care models (CCMs) to help integrate mental health care to better manage this illness. CCMs, which include provider guideline support, self-management support, care management, and measurement-based care, are well-established in primary care settings, and may help primary care practitioners manage bipolar disorder. However, further research is required to adapt CCMs to support complexities in diagnosing persons with bipolar disorder, and integrate decision-making processes regarding medication safety and tolerability in primary care. Additional implementation studies are also needed to adapt CCMs for persons with bipolar disorder in primary care, especially those seen in smaller practices with limited infrastructure and access to mental health care. PMID:23001382

  20. Blueprint for an Undergraduate Primary Care Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Sara B; Demasi, Monica; Farren, Erin; Frankl, Susan; Gottlieb, Barbara; Hoy, Jessica; Johnson, Amanda; Kasper, Jill; Lee, Patrick; McCarthy, Claire; Miller, Kathe; Morris, Juliana; O'Hare, Kitty; Rosales, Rachael; Simmons, Leigh; Smith, Benjamin; Treadway, Katherine; Goodell, Kristen; Ogur, Barbara

    2016-07-12

    In light of the increasing demand for primary care services and the changing scope of health care, it is important to consider how the principles of primary care are taught in medical school. While the majority of schools have increased students' exposure to primary care, they have not developed a standardized primary care curriculum for undergraduate medical education. In 2013, the authors convened a group of educators from primary care internal medicine, pediatrics, family medicine, and medicine-pediatrics, as well as five medical students to create a blueprint for a primary care curriculum that could be integrated into a longitudinal primary care experience spanning undergraduate medical education and delivered to all students regardless of their eventual career choice.The authors organized this blueprint into three domains: care management, specific areas of content expertise, and understanding the role of primary care in the health care system. Within each domain, they described specific curriculum content, including longitudinality, generalism, central responsibility for managing care, therapeutic alliance/communication, approach to acute and chronic care, wellness and prevention, mental and behavioral health, systems improvement, interprofessional training, and population health, as well as competencies that all medical students should attain by graduation.The proposed curriculum incorporates important core features of doctoring, which are often affirmed by all disciplines but owned by none. The authors argue that primary care educators are natural stewards of this curriculum content and can ensure that it complements and strengthens all aspects of undergraduate medical education.

  1. A future for primary care for the Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewegen, Peter P; Jurgutis, Arnoldas

    2013-01-01

    Greece is hit hard by the state debt crisis. This calls for comprehensive reforms to restore sustainable and balanced growth. Healthcare is one of the public sectors needing reform. The European Union (EU) Task Force for Greece asked the authors to assess the situation of primary care and to make recommendations for reform. Primary healthcare is especially relevant in that it might increase the efficiency of the healthcare system, and improve access to good quality healthcare. Assessment of the state of primary care in Greece was made on the basis of existing literature, site visits in primary care and consultations with stakeholders. The governance of primary care (and healthcare in general) is fragmented. There is no system of gatekeeping or patient lists. Private payments (formal and informal) are high. There are too many physicians, but too few general practitioners and nurses, and they are unevenly spread across the country. As a consequence, there are problems of access, continuity, co-ordination and comprehensiveness of primary care. The authors recommend the development of a clear vision and development strategy for strengthening primary care. Stepped access to secondary care should be realised through the introduction of mandatory referrals. Primary care should be accessible through the lowest possible out-of-pocket payments. The roles of purchaser and provider of care should be split. Quality of care should be improved through development of clinical guidelines and quality indicators. The education of health professionals should put more emphasis on primary care and medical specialists working in primary care should be (re-)trained to acquire the necessary competences to satisfy the job descriptions to be developed for primary care professionals. The advantages of strong primary care should be communicated to patients and the wider public.

  2. Shoulder pain in primary care: frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadogan, Angela; Mohammed, Khalid D

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Frozen shoulder is a painful condition that follows a protracted clinical course. We aim to review the management of patients with a diagnosis of frozen shoulder who are referred for specialist orthopaedic evaluation against existing guidelines in primary care. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM Referrals and clinical records were reviewed for all patients referred for orthopaedic specialist assessment who received a specialist diagnosis of frozen shoulder. Diagnostic, investigation and management practices from a regional primary health care setting in New Zealand were compared with guideline-recommended management. RESULTS Eighty patients with frozen shoulder were referred for orthopaedic evaluation in the 13 month study period, mostly from general practice. Fifteen patients (19%) were identified as having a frozen shoulder in their medical referral. Most (99%) had received previous imaging. Seven patients (12%) had received guideline recommended treatment. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Education of all clinicians involved in patient management is important to ensure an understanding of the long natural history of frozen shoulder and provide reassurance that outcomes are generally excellent. HealthPathways now include more information regarding diagnosis, imaging and evidence-based management for frozen shoulder. LESSONS Frozen shoulder may be under-diagnosed among patients referred for orthopaedic review. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used and may identify occult and unrelated pathology in this age-group. When managed according to clinical guidelines, patients report significant clinical and functional improvement with most reporting 80% function compared with normal after 1 year. KEYWORDS Adhesive capsulitis; bursitis; injections; practice guideline; primary health care; ultrasound.

  3. Pediatric Primary Care as a Component of Systems of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    Systems of care should be defined in a manner that includes primary care. The current definition of systems of care shares several attributes with the definition of primary care: both are defined as community-based services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally competent, and family focused. However, systems of…

  4. Hypertension Management in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltermann, Birgitta; Kersting, Christine; Viehmann, Anja

    2016-03-11

    To improve hypertension control, this cluster randomized trial evaluated the effectiveness of physician manager education about hypertension management. After randomization at practice level, primary care physicians of the intervention arm, whose practices collaborated with a university department, participated in a three-session education on evidence-based hypertensiology and practice implementation strategies. The primary outcome was blood pressure (BP) control (ambulatory blood pressure [ABP] hypertension management. Following an intention-to-treat approach, data analyses included crude and adjusted generalized mixed models and sensitivity analyses. These took into account sex, age, ≥ hypertension-related disease and resistant hypertension (RH). The analysis included 103 of 169 patients from 22 practices. Overall, BP decrease was -8.2 systolic and -4.1 mmHg diastolic. The intervention had no effect on BP control (odds ratio 0.84 [95% CI 0.29-2.43]) and BP changes (interventional effect: systolic -2.48 mmHg [95% CI -7.24 to 2.29], diastolic -0.25 mmHg [95% CI 3.31 to 2.82]). Sensitivity analysis indicated effect modification in patients with RH. Intervention practices requested educational input on difficult cases, and newly implemented 3 practice strategies (14.5±2.6 versus 11.4±2.2; P=0.005). After the short follow-up of 5 months, the intervention had no impact on BP control but improved the use of practice strategies.

  5. Undergraduate students' perspectives on primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Jessica A; Barg, Frances K; Margo, Katherine

    2014-10-01

    Despite the need for more primary care physicians, the number of medical students choosing primary care careers remains lower than other specialties. While undergraduate premedical education is an essential component in the development of future physicians, little is known about undergraduate students' perspectives on becoming primary care physicians. To better understand the early factors in career selection, we asked premed and former premed students their perceptions of primary care. Open-ended, semistructured interviews were conducted with 58 undergraduate students who represented three different groups: those who were currently premed and science majors, those who were nonscience majors and were currently premed, and those who were formerly premed. Specifically, we asked, "Why do you think there is a shortage of people who go into primary care?" Undergraduates cited financial reasons, lack of "glamour," and the career being "uninteresting." Many believed that primary care lacked prestige, and others felt it had a negative stigma attached. Most had never even considered a career in primary care. A number of students also misunderstood what a career in primary care actually entailed. As early as freshman year in college, undergraduate students harbor misconceptions and negative opinions about primary care. Many of those who express interest in such a career seem to drop out of the premedical program. It is important to consider the early onset of these attitudes and a way to target this interested population when trying to address the shortage of primary care physicians. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Structure and organization of primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lember, M.; Cartier, T.; Bourgueil, Y.; Dedeu, T.; Hutchinson, A.; Kringos, D.

    2015-01-01

    The way primary care is structured establishes important conditions for both the process of care and its outcomes. In this chapter, the structure of primary care will be discussed according to three dimensions: governance, economic conditions and workforce development. Governance refers to the

  7. Primary care practice composition in 34 countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.; Heinemann, S.; Greß, S.; Schäfer, W.

    2015-01-01

    Health care needs in the population change through ageing and increasing multimorbidity. Primary health care might accommodate to this through the composition of practices in terms of the professionals working in them. The aim of this article is to describe the composition of primary care practices

  8. Multidisciplinary teamwork in US primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Karen; McElmurry, Beverly J; Kim, Mi Ja

    2007-08-01

    Primary health care (PHC) is a systems perspective for examining the provision of essential health care for all. A multidisciplinary collaborative approach to health care delivery is associated with effective delivery and care providers' enrichment. Yet data regarding multidisciplinary practice within PHC are limited. The purpose of this exploratory qualitative descriptive study was to better understand team-based PHC practice in the US. Aims included (a) describing nursing faculty involvement in PHC, (b) analyzing ways that multidisciplinary work was enacted, and (c) recommending strategies for multidisciplinary PHC practice. After institutional review board (IRB) protocol approval, data collection occurred by: (a) surveying faculty/staff in a Midwestern nursing college (N=94) about their PHC practice, and (b) interviewing a purposive sample of nursing faculty/staff identified with PHC (n=10) and their health professional collaborators (n=10). Survey results (28% return rate) were summarized, interview notes were transcribed, and a systematic process of content analysis applied. Study findings show team practice is valued because health issues are complex, requiring different types of expertise; and because teams foster comprehensive care and improved resource use. Mission, membership attributes, and leadership influence teamwork. Though PHC is not a common term, nurses and their collaborators readily associated their practice with a PHC ethos. PHC practice requires understanding community complexity and engaging with community, family, and individual viewpoints. Though supports exist for PHC in the US, participants identified discord between their view of population needs and the health care system. The following interpretations arise from this study: PHC does not explicitly frame health care activity in the US, though some practitioners are committed to its ethics; and, teamwork within PHC is associated with better health care and rewarding professional

  9. Pharmaceutical care in Brazil's primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Patricia Sodré; Costa, Ediná Alves; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Álvares, Juliana; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Leite, Silvana Nair

    2017-11-13

    To characterize the activities of clinical nature developed by pharmacists in basic health units and their participation in educational activities aiming at health promotion. This article is part of the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos - Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines - Services, 2015), a cross-sectional and exploratory study, of evaluative nature, consisting of a survey of information in a representative sample of cities, stratified by the Brazilian regions that constitute domains of study, and a subsample of primary health care services. The interviewed pharmacists (n=285) were responsible for the delivery of medicines and were interviewed in person with the use of a script. The characterization of the activities of clinical nature was based on information from pharmacists who declared to perform them, and on participation in educational activities aiming at health promotion, according to information from all pharmacists. The results are presented in frequency and their 95% confidence intervals. From the interviewed subjects, 21.3% said they perform activities of clinical nature. Of these, more than 80% considered them very important; the majority does not dispose of specific places to perform them, which hinders privacy and confidentiality in these activities. The main denominations were "pharmaceutical guidance" and "pharmaceutical care." The registration of activities is mainly made in the users' medical records, computerized system, and in a specific document filed at the pharmacy, impairing the circulation of information among professionals. Most pharmacists performed these activities mainly along with physicians and nurses; 24.7% rarely participated in meetings with the health team, and 19.7% have never participated. Activities of clinical nature performed by pharmacists in Brazil are still incipient. The difficulties found point out

  10. Primary care in Switzerland gains strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djalali, Sima; Meier, Tatjana; Hasler, Susann; Rosemann, Thomas; Tandjung, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    Although there is widespread agreement on health- and cost-related benefits of strong primary care in health systems, little is known about the development of the primary care status over time in specific countries, especially in countries with a traditionally weak primary care sector such as Switzerland. The aim of our study was to assess the current strength of primary care in the Swiss health care system and to compare it with published results of earlier primary care assessments in Switzerland and other countries. A survey of experts and stakeholders with insights into the Swiss health care system was carried out between February and March 2014. The study was designed as mixed-modes survey with a self-administered questionnaire based on a set of 15 indicators for the assessment of primary care strength. Forty representatives of Swiss primary and secondary care, patient associations, funders, health care authority, policy makers and experts in health services research were addressed. Concordance between the indicators of a strong primary care system and the real situation in Swiss primary care was rated with 0-2 points (low-high concordance). A response rate of 62.5% was achieved. Participants rated concordance with five indicators as 0 (low), with seven indicators as 1 (medium) and with three indicators as 2 (high). In sum, Switzerland achieved 13 of 30 possible points. Low scores were assigned because of the following characteristics of Swiss primary care: inequitable local distribution of medical resources, relatively low earnings of primary care practitioners compared to specialists, low priority of primary care in medical education and training, lack of formal guidelines for information transfer between primary care practitioners and specialists and disregard of clinical routine data in the context of medical service planning. Compared to results of an earlier assessment in Switzerland, an improvement of seven indicators could be stated since 1995. As a

  11. Withdrawing benzodiazepines in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lader, Malcolm; Tylee, Andre; Donoghue, John

    2009-01-01

    The use of benzodiazepine anxiolytics and hypnotics continues to excite controversy. Views differ from expert to expert and from country to country as to the extent of the problem, or even whether long-term benzodiazepine use actually constitutes a problem. The adverse effects of these drugs have been extensively documented and their effectiveness is being increasingly questioned. Discontinuation is usually beneficial as it is followed by improved psychomotor and cognitive functioning, particularly in the elderly. The potential for dependence and addiction have also become more apparent. The licensing of SSRIs for anxiety disorders has widened the prescribers' therapeutic choices (although this group of medications also have their own adverse effects). Melatonin agonists show promise in some forms of insomnia. Accordingly, it is now even more imperative that long-term benzodiazepine users be reviewed with respect to possible discontinuation. Strategies for discontinuation start with primary-care practitioners, who are still the main prescribers.This review sets out the stratagems that have been evaluated, concentrating on those of a pharmacological nature. Simple interventions include basic monitoring of repeat prescriptions and assessment by the doctor. Even a letter from the primary-care practitioner pointing out the continuing usage of benzodiazepines and questioning their need can result in reduction or cessation of use. Pharmacists also have a role to play in monitoring the use of benzodiazepines, although mobilizing their assistance is not yet routine. Such stratagems can avoid the use of specialist back-up services such as psychiatrists, home care, and addiction and alcohol misuse treatment facilities.Pharmacological interventions for benzodiazepine dependence have been reviewed in detail in a recent Cochrane review, but only eight studies proved adequate for analysis. Carbamazepine was the only drug that appeared to have any useful adjunctive properties for

  12. Occupational therapists in primary care health management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Giovana Furlan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The expansion of the working field of occupational therapists in non-hospital environments and asylums in the last few decades, which came along with the territorial health practices in the National Health System, shows the relationship between the possibilities of professional performance and the existing public policies, including management functions and services. Objectives: To characterize the role of occupational therapists in the management of primary health care in the Distrito Federal and the professional knowledge used in this practice. Method: This was a qualitative research with production and analysis of data carried out through ethnography. Data were produced with aid of observations, field diary, semi-structured interviews and literature review. The study subjects were two occupational therapists from the State Secretariat of Health of the Distrito Federal who work in the management of primary health care. Results: The expansion of the concept of health has resulted in the incorporation of different professionals to compose the management of service and programs. The role of occupational therapists depends on their knowledge about management, collective projects and integral health care. Occupational therapists of this study work on central management and welfare programs to specific populations. Conclusion: The research made it possible to analyze the expansion of the working space of occupational therapists, contributing to future discussions on professional training. It was evident that the formation of the professional core provides subsidies for a larger management practice, such as skills for group and team work, and the work with socially excluded people.

  13. Brief interventions for depression in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To assess existing, brief nonpharmacologic interventions that are available for primary care physicians with minimal training in psychotherapy to use in managing depression in adult patients. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE was searched from 1996 to 2007, EMBASE was searched from 1980 to 2007, and EBM Reviews was searched from 1999 to 2007. STUDY SELECTION Several randomized controlled trials were selected using specified criteria. Selected articles were subsequently appraised and qualitatively analyzed. SYNTHESIS Significant improvements on depression scales were found in 6 out of 8 studies (P bibliotherapy, websites based on cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), and CBT-based computer programs. Completion rates were highest when interventions were shorter, more structured, and included frequent contact or reminders from study staff. Validity limitations included small sample sizes, non-blinding of studies, and an uncertain degree of generalizability. CONCLUSION Bibliotherapy, CBT-based websites, and CBT-based computer programs might be effective in assisting primary care physicians who have minimal training in psychotherapy in treating adult patients with depression. Health care personnel contact with patients undergoing these interventions might result in increased effectiveness. Future research is warranted in this area, and despite several limitations, findings from this study could help guide efforts in the development and evaluation of such research. PMID:19675262

  14. Moving towards multidisciplinary primary care collaboration.

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, J.; Hingstman, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In Europe, many primary care professionals were traditionally organized in small-scaled practices. Nowadays, they are working more often in larger practices. This applies to general practitioners, but also to other professions, such as midwives or physical therapists. In addition, primary care professions are teaming up in multidisciplinary practices more and more, which should improve collaboration and coordination within the wider scope of primary care. In this study we investig...

  15. CPC Initiative - Participating Primary Care Practices

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Comprehensive Primary Care (CPC) initiative is a multi-payer initiative fostering collaboration between public and private health care payers to strengthen...

  16. VHA Support Service Center Primary Care Management Module (PCMM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Primary Care Management Module (PCMM) was developed to assist VA facilities in implementing Primary Care. PCMM supports both Primary Care and non-Primary Care...

  17. Effectiveness of Intensive Primary Care Interventions: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Samuel T; Peterson, Kim; Chan, Brian; Anderson, Johanna; Helfand, Mark

    2017-12-01

    Multicomponent, interdisciplinary intensive primary care programs target complex patients with the goal of preventing hospitalizations, but programs vary, and their effectiveness is not clear. In this study, we systematically reviewed the impact of intensive primary care programs on all-cause mortality, hospitalization, and emergency department use. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Database of Reviews of Effects from inception to March 2017. Additional studies were identified from reference lists, hand searching, and consultation with content experts. We included systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and observational studies of multicomponent, interdisciplinary intensive primary care programs targeting complex patients at high risk of hospitalization or death, with a comparison to usual primary care. Two investigators identified studies and abstracted data using a predefined protocol. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. A total of 18 studies (379,745 participants) were included. Three major intensive primary care program types were identified: primary care replacement (home-based; three RCTs, one observational study, N = 367,681), primary care replacement (clinic-based; three RCTs, two observational studies, N = 9561), and primary care augmentation, in which an interdisciplinary team was added to existing primary care (five RCTs, three observational studies, N = 2503). Most studies showed no impact of intensive primary care on mortality or emergency department use, and the effectiveness in reducing hospitalizations varied. There were no adverse effects reported. Intensive primary care interventions demonstrated varying effectiveness in reducing hospitalizations, and there was limited evidence that these interventions were associated with changes in mortality. While interventions could be grouped into categories, there was still substantial overlap

  18. Inadequate reimbursement for care management to primary care offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Luo, Zhehui; Alexanders, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health; however, primary care practices are often challenged to identify revenue to pay for it. This study explored the impact of direct reimbursement on the provision of care management in a primary care physician organization. Using data on expenses and health plan reimbursement during the initial 16 months of care management implementation at 5 practices, we calculated the percentage of related costs that were covered by payments. Qualitative data from interviews with practice members were used to identify their perceived barriers to care management reimbursement and the impact of current reimbursement strategies on service delivery. Direct reimbursement for care management covered only 21% of the costs. Reimbursement varied by care manager background, patient diagnoses, insurer, and indication for the visit. Barriers to gaining reimbursement included patient resistance to copay, clinician hesitation to bill for care management visits (for fear the patient may receive a bill), differential reimbursement policies of insurers, and general lack of reimbursement for care management in many cases. Although practice-level quality improvement incentives were an alternative means of supporting care management, because these incentives were not directly tied to the service of care management, they were used for other activities ultimately supporting patient care. This study highlights the need for sufficient reimbursement to initiate and maintain care management for patients in primary care as proposed for service reforms under the Affordable Care Act. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. Exploring patient safety culture in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.; van Melle, M.; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Setting. Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Participants.

  20. Primary care perspectives on prostate cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Northouse, Laurel L; Fagerlin, Angela; Garlinghouse, Carol; Demers, Raymond Y; Rovner, David R; Darwish-Yassine, May; Wei, John T

    2011-06-01

    Although the effectiveness of prostate cancer screening is controversial, screening rates have risen dramatically among primary care providers in the United States. The authors' findings suggest more collaboration among primary care and specialty organizations, especially with respect to decision aid endorsement, is needed to achieve more discriminatory and patient-centered prostate cancer screening.

  1. Suicidal ideation in German primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiborg, J.F.; Gieseler, D.; Lowe, B.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine suicidal ideation in a sample of German primary care patients. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study and included 1455 primary care patients who visited 1 of 41 general practitioners (GPs) working at 19 different sites. Suicidal ideation and psychopathology were

  2. Primary mental health care: Indications and obstacles

    OpenAIRE

    Y.G. Pillay; H. Subedar

    1992-01-01

    This paper considers indications and obstacles for the development of primary mental health care practice in both developed and under-developed countries. Both are considered as this represents the South African reality. While a significant body of literature has documented the need for primary mental health care, the obstacles (especially in terms of the commodification of health) to its fruition are seldom addressed.

  3. Third sector primary care for vulnerable populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, P; Dowell, A; Woodward, A

    2001-12-01

    This paper aims to describe and explain the development of third sector primary care organisations in New Zealand. The third sector is the non-government, non-profit sector. International literature suggests that this sector fulfils an important role in democratic societies with market-based economies, providing services otherwise neglected by the government and private for-profit sectors. Third sector organisations provided a range of social services throughout New Zealand's colonial history. However, it was not until the 1980s that third sector organisations providing comprehensive primary medical and related services started having a significant presence in New Zealand. In 1994 a range of union health centres, tribally based Mäori health providers, and community-based primary care providers established a formal network -- Health Care Aotearoa. While not representing all third sector primary care providers in New Zealand, Health Care Aotearoa was the best-developed example of a grouping of third sector primary care organisations. Member organisations served populations that were largely non-European and lived in deprived areas, and tended to adopt population approaches to funding and provision of services. The development of Health Care Aotearoa has been consistent with international experience of third sector involvement -- there were perceived "failures" in government policies for funding primary care and private sector responses to these policies, resulting in lack of universal funding and provision of primary care and continuing patient co-payments. The principal policy implication concerns the role of the third sector in providing primary care services for vulnerable populations as a partial alternative to universal funding and provision of primary care. Such an alternative may be convenient for proponents of reduced state involvement in funding and provision of health care, but may not be desirable from the point of view of equity and social cohesion

  4. Integrated primary health care in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawaine Powell Davies

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To fulfil its role of coordinating health care, primary health care needs to be well integrated, internally and with other health and related services. In Australia, primary health care services are divided between public and private sectors, are responsible to different levels of government and work under a variety of funding arrangements, with no overarching policy to provide a common frame of reference for their activities. Description of policy: Over the past decade, coordination of service provision has been improved by changes to the funding of private medical and allied health services for chronic conditions, by the development in some states of voluntary networks of services and by local initiatives, although these have had little impact on coordination of planning. Integrated primary health care centres are being established nationally and in some states, but these are too recent for their impact to be assessed. Reforms being considered by the federal government include bringing primary health care under one level of government with a national primary health care policy, establishing regional organisations to coordinate health planning, trialling voluntary registration of patients with general practices and reforming funding systems. If adopted, these could greatly improve integration within primary health care. Discussion: Careful change management and realistic expectations will be needed. Also other challenges remain, in particular the need for developing a more population and community oriented primary health care.

  5. The Impact of a Primary Care Education Program Regarding Cancer Survivorship Care Plans: Results from an Engineering, Primary Care, and Oncology Collaborative for Survivorship Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Haine, James E; Li, Zhanhai; Trowbridge, Elizabeth R; Kamnetz, Sandra A; Feldstein, David A; Sosman, James M; Wilke, Lee G; Sesto, Mary E; Tevaarwerk, Amye J

    2017-09-20

    Survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been recommended as tools to improve care coordination and outcomes for cancer survivors. SCPs are increasingly being provided to survivors and their primary care providers. However, most primary care providers remain unaware of SCPs, limiting their potential benefit. Best practices for educating primary care providers regarding SCP existence and content are needed. We developed an education program to inform primary care providers of the existence, content, and potential uses for SCPs. The education program consisted of a 15-min presentation highlighting SCP basics presented at mandatory primary care faculty meetings. An anonymous survey was electronically administered via email (n = 287 addresses) to evaluate experience with and basic knowledge of SCPs pre- and post-education. A total of 101 primary care advanced practice providers (APPs) and physicians (35% response rate) completed the baseline survey with only 23% reporting prior receipt of a SCP. Only 9% could identify the SCP location within the electronic health record (EHR). Following the education program, primary care physicians and APPs demonstrated a significant improvement in SCP knowledge, including improvement in their ability to locate one within the EHR (9 vs 59%, p primary care physician and APP knowledge in these areas, which are prerequisites for using SCP in clinical practice.

  6. Primary Health Care and Narrative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John W

    2015-01-01

    Primary health care has received a lot of attention since the Alma Ata Conference, convened by the World Health Organization in 1978. Key to the strategy to improve health care outlined at the Alma Ata conference is citizen participation in every phase of service delivery. Although the goals of primary health care have not been achieved, the addition of narrative medicine may facilitate these ends. But a new epistemology is necessary, one that is compatible with narrative medicine, so that local knowledge is elevated in importance and incorporated into the planning, implementation, and evaluation of health programs. In this way, relevant, sustainable, and affordable care can be provided. The aim of this article is to discuss how primary health care might be improved through the introduction of narrative medicine into planning primary health care delivery.

  7. [Primary health care contributes to global health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aabenhus, Mette Morre; Schriver, Michael; Kallestrup, Per

    2012-05-28

    Global health interventions often focus on specific diseases, thus forming vertical programmes. Studies show that vertical programmes perform poorly, which underlines the need for a horizontal basis: universal community-based primary health care, which improves health equity and outcomes. The diagonal approach supports an integrated patient-centered health-care system. The ''15% by 2015''-initiative suggests that vertical programmes invest 15% of their budgets in strengthening integrated primary health care. Strategies depend on local context.

  8. Health psychology in primary care: recent research and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thielke S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Thielke1, Alexander Thompson2, Richard Stuart31Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Puget Sound VA Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Over the last decade, research about health psychology in primary care has reiterated its contributions to mental and physical health promotion, and its role in addressing gaps in mental health service delivery. Recent meta-analyses have generated mixed results about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of health psychology interventions. There have been few studies of health psychology interventions in real-world treatment settings. Several key challenges exist: determining the degree of penetration of health psychology into primary care settings; clarifying the specific roles of health psychologists in integrated care; resolving reimbursement issues; and adapting to the increased prescription of psychotropic medications. Identifying and exploring these issues can help health psychologists and primary care providers to develop the most effective ways of applying psychological principles in primary care settings. In a changing health care landscape, health psychologists must continue to articulate the theories and techniques of health psychology and integrated care, to put their beliefs into practice, and to measure the outcomes of their work.Keywords: health psychology, primary care, integrated care, collaborative care, referral, colocation

  9. Uncommon Caring: Primary Males and Implicit Judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, James R.

    The caring and nurturing of children, which characterize primary education culture, have tended to shape a public perception of primary teaching as "women's work." Several social factors influence men's underrepresentation in the profession of primary education, such as parents not wanting their children exposed to "soft"…

  10. Food Safety - The Primary Objective of Human Society Existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabita Cornelia Adamov

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Food has played, plays and will play a decisive role in the existence and development of human society. The level of food quality, causes physical, social and moral society health. In this sense food security is an essential goal of economic and social development, being an essential component of security of life and national security. Evolution of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP, in terms of food security, was due not only changes in agriculture, but also came in response to the demands of society in general. Amoung these is growing concerns about hygiene and food safety and animal welfare. European consumers want safe and wholesome food and the EU wants to ensure that all its citizens consume food with high quality standards. Food safety policy has undergone an extensive refurbishment. The objective of this reform was to ensure that EU legislation on food safety is as complete as possible, and consumers benefit as much information about potential risks and measures to be taken to minimize them. The goal of a modern economy, is the correlation of quantitative and qualitative food production with consumer demand. It thus requires knowledge of the physiological needs of consumers, leading to demand for agricultural products.

  11. Recommendations from primary care providers for integrating mental health in a primary care system in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Bibhav; Tenpa, Jasmine; Thapa, Poshan; Gauchan, Bikash; Citrin, David; Ekstrand, Maria

    2016-09-19

    Globally, access to mental healthcare is often lacking in rural, low-resource settings. Mental healthcare services integration in primary care settings is a key intervention to address this gap. A common strategy includes embedding mental healthcare workers on-site, and receiving consultation from an off-site psychiatrist. Primary care provider perspectives are important for successful program implementation. We conducted three focus groups with all 24 primary care providers at a district-level hospital in rural Nepal. We asked participants about their concerns and recommendations for an integrated mental healthcare delivery program. They were also asked about current practices in seeking referral for patients with mental illness. We collected data using structured notes and analyzed the data by template coding to develop themes around concerns and recommendations for an integrated program. Participants noted that the current referral system included sending patients to the nearest psychiatrist who is 14 h away. Participants did not think this was effective, and stated that integrating mental health into the existing primary care setting would be ideal. Their major concerns about a proposed program included workplace hierarchies between mental healthcare workers and other clinicians, impact of staff turnover on patients, reliability of an off-site consultant psychiatrist, and ability of on-site primary care providers to screen patients and follow recommendations from an off-site psychiatrist. Their suggestions included training a few existing primary care providers as dedicated mental healthcare workers, recruiting both senior and junior mental healthcare workers to ensure retention, recruiting academic psychiatrists for reliability, and training all primary care providers to appropriately screen for mental illness and follow recommendations from the psychiatrist. Primary care providers in rural Nepal reported the failure of the current system of referral, which

  12. Learning the landscape: implementation challenges of primary care innovators around cancer survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Denalee; Hudson, Shawna V; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Howard, Jenna; Rubinstein, Ellen; Lee, Heather S; Overholser, Linda S; Shaw, Amy; Givens, Sarah; Burton, Jay S; Grunfeld, Eva; Parry, Carly; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2017-02-01

    This study describes the experiences of early implementers of primary care-focused cancer survivorship delivery models. Snowball sampling was used to identify innovators. Twelve participants (five cancer survivorship primary care innovators and seven content experts) attended a working conference focused on cancer survivorship population strategies and primary care transformation. Data included meeting discussion transcripts/field notes, transcribed in-depth innovator interviews, and innovators' summaries of care models. We used a multistep immersion/crystallization analytic approach, guided by a primary care organizational change model. Innovative practice models included: (1) a consultative model in a primary care setting; (2) a primary care physician (PCP)-led, blended consultative/panel-based model in an oncology setting; (3) an oncology nurse navigator in a primary care practice; and (4) two subspecialty models where PCPs in a general medical practice dedicated part of their patient panel to cancer survivors. Implementation challenges included (1) lack of key stakeholder buy-in; (2) practice resources allocated to competing (non-survivorship) change efforts; and (3) competition with higher priority initiatives incentivized by payers. Cancer survivorship delivery models are potentially feasible in primary care; however, significant barriers to widespread implementation exist. Implementation efforts would benefit from increasing the awareness and potential value-add of primary care-focused strategies to address survivors' needs. Current models of primary care-based cancer survivorship care may not be sustainable. Innovative strategies to provide quality care to this growing population of survivors need to be developed and integrated into primary care settings.

  13. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    healthcare providers in south-east Nigerian. Malaria. National population commission and ORC Macro. Journal.2009;8:22. 6. Amaghionyeodiwe LA. Determinants of the. 15. World Health Organisation. The African choice of health care provider in Nigeria. Health malaria report 2003. Available at. Care Management Science.

  14. Efficiency and administrative costs in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, A; Gravelle, H; Sutton, M

    2000-11-01

    We use a formal model to examine the implications of endogenous managerial effort for the interpretation and estimation of efficiency in health care organisations. The model is applied to investigate the doubling of the cost of administering primary care in England in real terms between 1989/1990 and 1994/1995. The main cost determinant was the number of general practitioners (GPs), and there were economies of scale but not of scope. Fund-holding had a positive but small effect on administrative costs, so that the recent abolition of fund-holding may do little to reduce primary care administrative costs. After allowing for changes in the numbers of primary care practitioners, the quality of primary care and the extent of fund-holding, most of the increase in costs was unexplained, and may reflect additional but unmeasured increases in the administrative burden associated with the 1990 reforms. There was little variation in relative efficiency across areas.

  15. Urine sampling techniques in symptomatic primary-care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anne; Aabenhus, Rune

    2016-01-01

    in primary care. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of urine culture from different sampling-techniques in symptomatic non-pregnant women in primary care. Methods: A systematic review was conducted by searching Medline and Embase for clinical studies conducted in primary care using......Background: Choice of urine sampling technique in urinary tract infection may impact diagnostic accuracy and thus lead to possible over- or undertreatment. Currently no evidencebased consensus exists regarding correct sampling technique of urine from women with symptoms of urinary tract infection...... seven studies investigating urine sampling technique in 1062 symptomatic patients in primary care. Mid-stream-clean-catch had a positive predictive value of 0.79 to 0.95 and a negative predictive value close to 1 compared to sterile techniques. Two randomized controlled trials found no difference...

  16. Substitution of Hospital Care with Primary Care: Defining the Conditions of Primary Care Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Johanna Maria van Hoof

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyse barriers and facilitators in substituting hospital care with primary care to define preconditions for successful implementation. Methods: A descriptive feasibility study was performed to collect information on the feasibility of substituting hospital care with primary care. General practitioners were able to refer patients, about whom they had doubts regarding diagnosis, treatment and/or the need to refer to hospital care, to medical specialists who performed low-complex consultations at general practitioner practices. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with general practitioners and medical specialists, focus groups and notes from meetings in the Netherlands between April 2013 and January 2014. Data were analysed using a conventional content analysis which resulted in categorised barriers, facilitators and policy adjustments, after which preconditions were formulated. Results: The most important preconditions were make arrangements on governmental level, arrange a collective integrated IT-system, determine the appropriate profile for medical specialists, design a referral protocol for eligible patients, arrange deliberation possibilities for general practitioners and medical specialists and formulate a diagnostic protocol. Conclusions: The barriers, facilitators and formulated preconditions provided relevant input to change the design of substituting hospital care with primary care.

  17. Substitution of Hospital Care with Primary Care: Defining the Conditions of Primary Care Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroese, Mariëlle Elisabeth Aafje Lydia; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke Dingena; Elissen, Arianne Mathilda Josephus; Meerlo, Ronald Johan; Hanraets, Monique Margaretha Henriëtte; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyse barriers and facilitators in substituting hospital care with primary care to define preconditions for successful implementation. Methods: A descriptive feasibility study was performed to collect information on the feasibility of substituting hospital care with primary care. General practitioners were able to refer patients, about whom they had doubts regarding diagnosis, treatment and/or the need to refer to hospital care, to medical specialists who performed low-complex consultations at general practitioner practices. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with general practitioners and medical specialists, focus groups and notes from meetings in the Netherlands between April 2013 and January 2014. Data were analysed using a conventional content analysis which resulted in categorised barriers, facilitators and policy adjustments, after which preconditions were formulated. Results: The most important preconditions were make arrangements on governmental level, arrange a collective integrated IT-system, determine the appropriate profile for medical specialists, design a referral protocol for eligible patients, arrange deliberation possibilities for general practitioners and medical specialists and formulate a diagnostic protocol. Conclusions: The barriers, facilitators and formulated preconditions provided relevant input to change the design of substituting hospital care with primary care. PMID:27616956

  18. Coordination of primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, D L; McAlister, W H

    1988-02-01

    Surveys were sent to family physicians in Illinois to determine knowledge and attitude concerning optometry. The respondents were knowledgeable in certain aspects of optometry. However, many need to become more aware of the optometrist as a health care provider.

  19. Quality measures for primary care of complex pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alex Y; Schrager, Sheree M; Mangione-Smith, Rita

    2012-03-01

    A well-recognized gap exists in assessing and improving the quality of care for medically complex patients. Our objective was to examine evidence for primary care based on the patient-centered medical home model and to identify valid and meaningful quality measures for use in complex pediatric patients. We conducted literature searches on Medline and the National Quality Measures Clearinghouse for existing measures, as well as evidence to inform the development of new quality measures. We used a 3-step process to select relevant sources from published literature: (1) the titles were screened by 2 independent reviewers; (2) the abstracts were reviewed for quality-of-care contents or constructs; and (3) full-text articles were obtained and reviewed for measure specification. All materials were reviewed for the Oxford Centre For Evidence-Based Medicine level of evidence and for relevance to primary care of complex pediatric patients. A national expert panel was convened to evaluate and rate the measures by using the Rand/University of California Los Angeles Appropriateness Method. We presented 74 quality measures to the expert panel for review and discussion. The panel rated and accepted 35 measures as valid and feasible for assessing primary care quality in complex pediatric patients. The final set of quality measures was grouped in the following domains: primary care-general (14), patient/family-centered care (8), chronic care (2), coordination of care (9), and transition of care (2). By using the patient-centered medical home framework of accessible, continuous, family-centered, coordinated, and culturally effective care, a national expert panel selected 35 primary care quality measures for complex pediatric patients.

  20. Perspectives of Primary Care Providers Toward Palliative Care for Their Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowels, David; Jones, Jacqueline; Nowels, Carolyn T; Matlock, Daniel

    The need for all providers to deliver basic palliative care has emerged as patients' needs outstrip the capacity of specialty palliative care. Many patients with complex illnesses have unmet needs and are seen in primary care more than other settings. We explore primary care providers' willingness and perceived capacity to provide basic palliative care, and their concerns and perceived barriers. We performed semistructured telephone interviews with 20 primary care providers about their perceptions of palliative care, including needs, practices, experiences, access, and what would be helpful for their practices to systematically provide basic palliative care. We identified 3 major themes: (1) Participants recognize palliative needs in patients with complex problems. (2) They reactively respond to those needs using practice and community resources, believing that meeting those needs at a basic level is within the scope of primary care. (3) They can identify opportunities to improve the delivery of a basic palliative approach in primary care through practice change and redesign strategies used in enhanced primary care environments. Systematic attention along the multidimensional domains of basic palliative care might allow practices to address unmet needs in patients with complex illnesses by using existing practice improvement models, strategies, and prioritization. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  1. A research agenda on patient safety in primary care. Recommendations by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Wim; Gaal, Sander; Bowie, Paul; Parker, Diane; Lainer, Miriam; Valderas, Jose M.; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Healthcare can cause avoidable serious harm to patients. Primary care is not an exception, and the relative lack of research in this area lends urgency to a better understanding of patient safety, the future research agenda and the development of primary care oriented safety programmes. Objective: To outline a research agenda for patient safety improvement in primary care in Europe and beyond. Methods: The LINNEAUS collaboration partners analysed existing research on epidemiology and classification of errors, diagnostic and medication errors, safety culture, and learning for and improving patient safety. We discussed ideas for future research in several meetings, workshops and congresses with LINNEAUS collaboration partners, practising GPs, researchers in this field, and policy makers. Results: This paper summarizes and integrates the outcomes of the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care. It proposes a research agenda on improvement strategies for patient safety in primary care. In addition, it provides background information to help to connect research in this field with practicing GPs and other healthcare workers in primary care. Conclusion: Future research studies should target specific primary care domains, using prospective methods and innovative methods such as patient involvement. PMID:26339841

  2. The primary health care service in Soweto

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Cur. (Nursing Administration) With the Declaration of Alma Ata in September, 1978, a new era in health care delivery, the primary health care era with its slogan of "health for all by the year 2000' dawned. Much thought had to be put into new legislation and reorganizing of health services in South Africa. Soweto, devastated by riots in 1976, suffered badly when all health care services collapsed. Out of this crisis was born a primary health care service that provides Soweto with prevent...

  3. Applying organizational behavior theory to primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullangi, Samyukta; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-03-01

    Addressing the mounting primary care shortage in the United States has been a focus of educators and policy makers, especially with the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 and the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in 2015, placing increased pressure on the system. The Association of American Medical Colleges recently projected a shortage of as many as 65,000 primary care physicians by 2025, in part because fewer than 20% of medical students are picking primary care for a career. We examined the issue of attracting medical students to primary care through the lens of organizational behavior theory. Assuming there are reasons other than lower income potential for why students are inclined against primary care, we applied various principles of the Herzberg 2-factor theory to reimagine the operational flow and design of primary care. We conclude by proposing several solutions to enrich the job, such as decreasing documentation requirements, reducing the emphasis on specialty consultations, and elevating physicians to a supervisory role.

  4. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study is to assess the awareness, attitude and willingness of artisans in Osun state to take part in. Community based ..... Educational Status. No formal education. Primary school. Secondary school. Tertiary school. 25. 95. 215. 52. 6.5. 24.5. 55.6. 13.4. Religion. Christianity. Islam. Others. 159. 225. 3. 41.1.

  5. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The objectives of this study are to assess contraceptive awareness, attitude and pattern of use among women aged 15-49 years in a Local Council Development ... JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTHCARE VOL 27 NO 1, MAR 2015. 104 .... 4.0. Relations. 8. 3.0. Mass media (TV, Radio, etc). 22.

  6. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE COMMUNITY MEDICINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5 to improving mood and helping to manage stress . physical activity a day at least five times a week . Sedentary lifestyle is associated with obesity, Greater health benefits can be experienced with. KEYWORDS. Practice,. Exercise,. Leisure,. Work- related,. Overweight,. Obesity. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary ...

  7. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    treatment for sexually transmitted diseases reported to ... Patients attending the sexually transmitted disease clinic of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, .... Female. 10. 20. Educational status. No education. Primary school completed. 4. 8. Secondary school completed. 20. 40. Tertiary education completed. 26. 52.

  8. Integrated Primary Care Information Database (IPCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Integrated Primary Care Information Database is a longitudinal observational database that was created specifically for pharmacoepidemiological and pharmacoeconomic studies, inlcuding data from computer-based patient records supplied voluntarily by general practitioners.

  9. Primary Palliative Care Education: A Pilot Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Thomas; Weisbrod, Neal; O'Connor, Alec; Quill, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    The demand for palliative services is outpacing the availability of specialist palliative care clinicians. One strategy to fill this gap is to improve "primary palliative care" skills and knowledge of all clinicians who care for seriously ill patients. Previous educational efforts have shown mixed results, and one possible explanation is unrecognized discordance of educational goals between those offering education and potential primary palliative care learners. The article describes the results and feasibility of a needs assessment survey comparing interest in palliative care education topics and settings among both palliative care specialists (PCS) and nonpalliative care specialists (NPCS). This is the first attempt to measure the perceived importance of primary palliative care topics and preferences about learning settings from the perspectives of both NPCS and PCS. The results suggest substantial areas of both concordant and discordant opinions with respect to educational topics and learning settings. Such data are essential to guide primary palliative care educational efforts. Future work will be needed to determine whether these results are consistent across diverse health systems and what variables influence educational preferences.

  10. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE COMMUNITY MEDICINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health care and reproductive health. It plays a major role in reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity. Access to family planning also has the and mortality. It confers important health and potential to control population growth and in the development benefits to individuals, families, long run reduce green house gas emission ...

  11. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    large extent can reduce financial barriers to options; including government budgetary health care access ..... managers and demand-side factors, such as. International Health Conference. New adverse selection in ... patients in the scheme, and patient demand for. Information Centre. 1995. insured services. Many previous ...

  12. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diabetes care, misunderstandings, external. Adolescence is the transition period before influences such as acceptance or rejection of the adulthood and it is categorized into three phases; patient by peers and the needs imposed by the early (10-13 years old), middle (14-16 years old) and. 3 disease itself. It is estimated that ...

  13. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    mania) and anxiety disorders (General anxiety, agoraphobia, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post traumatic stress disorder). Conclusion: Findings suggest that there is need to consider mental and psychological care of clients with HIV/AIDS to minimise the prevalence of psychiatric disorder among HIV ...

  14. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    to eat together and lying on the same bed with ocular have far reaching implications in terms of cancers patients. management, prognosis and mortality of ocular cancer. Such individuals may not access available. Further analysis indicates that respondents'. 3,9 education, gender and marital status have no health care ...

  15. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology. A cross-sectional survey of patients at the antiretroviral clinic of the Federal Medical Centre,. Makurdi, Nigeria, was conducted between June and August 2008. An adapted version of the RAND. Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire Long Form was used to assess seven dimensions of care: general satisfaction ...

  16. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    globally, (Ischaemic heart diseases, Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), which. 5 cerebrovascular diseases, lower ... tract infections, chronic obstructive than 86% of the world's population. Tobacco pulmonary diseases ... and delivery of smoking cessation services among health care workers in Abuja. A cross sectional ...

  17. [Geriatrics for internists in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, W; Hermens, T

    2011-08-01

    Internal medicine specialists involved in primary care will have a leading part in the treatment of geriatric patients with complex healthcare needs in the future. Approved models like specialized geriatric practices, ambulant or mobile geriatric rehabilitation and special geriatric services for nursing homes are available. Essential is a geriatric qualification that fits with the tasks of an internist in primary care. An incentive payment system has to be created for this purpose to improve the treatment of elderly patients.

  18. Primary mental health care: Indications and obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.G. Pillay

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers indications and obstacles for the development of primary mental health care practice in both developed and under-developed countries. Both are considered as this represents the South African reality. While a significant body of literature has documented the need for primary mental health care, the obstacles (especially in terms of the commodification of health to its fruition are seldom addressed.

  19. [Burnout and teamwork in primary care teams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà Falgueras, Maite; Cruzate Muñoz, Carlota; Orfila Pernas, Francesc; Creixell Sureda, Joan; González López, María Pilar; Davins Miralles, Josep

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of burnout and the perception of teamwork in Primary Care teams from Barcelona. Multicenter cross-sectional. Primary Health Care Teams from Barcelona. Institut Català de la Salut. All permanent employees or temporary professionals of all categories from 51 teams (N=2398). A total of 879 responses (36.7%) were obtained. The Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaire, with 3 dimensions, was sent by emotional exhaustion (AE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (RP). Burnout is considered present when two or more dimensions scored high marks. Perception of teamwork and evaluation of leaders was evaluated using an ad hoc questionnaire. The prevalence of burnout was17.2% (two or more dimensions affected), and 46.2% had at least one of the three dimensions with a high level. A high level of AE was found in 38.2%, of DP in 23.8%, and 7.7% had low RP. Almost half (49.2%) believe that teamwork is encouraged in their workplace. Social workers overall, have a higher average of dimensions affected at a high level, followed by administrative personnel, dentists, doctors and nurses (p<0.001). Permanent staff have a greater degree of emotional exhaustion (p<0.002). Those who rated their leaders worst and least rated teamwork had more emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and higher level of burnout in general (p<0.001). The level of burnout among professionals is considerable, with differences existing between occupational categories. Teamwork and appreciating their leaders protect from burnout. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Background: Quarry industry has become a major means of livelihood in Ebonyi state, but insufficient data exists on their operations and use of control measures like dust mask, with no serious attempt at comprehensive health education. The study sought to assess the effect of health education on the perception and ...

  1. Exploring primary care activities in ACT teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlip, Erik R; Williams, Nancy A; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Katon, Wayne

    2014-05-01

    People with serious mental illness often receive inadequate primary and preventive care services. Federal healthcare reform endorses team-based care that provides high quality primary and preventive care to at risk populations. Assertive community treatment (ACT) teams offer a proven, standardized treatment approach effective in improving mental health outcomes for the seriously mentally ill. Much is known about the effectiveness of ACT teams in improving mental health outcomes, but the degree to which medical care needs are addressed is not established. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which ACT teams address the physical health of the population they serve. ACT team leaders were invited to complete an anonymous, web-based survey to explore attitudes and activities involving the primary care needs of their clients. Information was collected regarding the use of health screening tools, physical health assessments, provision of medical care and collaboration with primary care systems. Data was analyzed from 127 team leaders across the country, of which 55 completed the entire survey. Nearly every ACT team leader believed ACT teams have a role in identifying and managing the medical co-morbidities of their clientele. ACT teams report participation in many primary care activities. ACT teams are providing a substantial amount of primary and preventive services to their population. The survey suggests standardization of physical health identification, management or referral processes within ACT teams may result in improved quality of medical care. ACT teams are in a unique position to improve physical health care by virtue of having medically trained staff and frequent, close contact with their clients.

  2. [Alcohol-related problems in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Nobutaro

    2015-09-01

    The approach to treating alcohol-related problems in primary care settings needs: 1) to recognize the incidence of alcohol-related problems in primary care settings; 2) to know the way of screening; 3) to know how to help patients; and 4) to know enough about treating alcoholism to appropriately refer patients for additional help. This article looks research evidence about the incidence of alcohol-related problems in primary care and recognition of incidence and way of screening of alcohol-related problems by primary care physicians in Japan. Then this article describes evidence-based as well as author's experience-based approach to treat the alcohol-related health problems in primary care settings. In line with the newly introduced law to prevent the alcohol-related health problems and the anticipating introduction of new specialty of general medicine, early intervention to alcohol-related problems in primary care settings will be much appreciated. To do so, enough amounts of education and research are needed.

  3. Diabetes care: model for the future of primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, L Michael; Tanzi, Maria G

    2010-01-01

    To review relevant trends threatening primary care and the evidence supporting use of nonphysicians in primary and chronic care of patients with diabetes. Current medical and pharmacy literature as selected by authors. The care needed by patients with diabetes does not fit well into our current medical model for primary care, and an adequate supply of physicians is not likely to be available for primary care roles in coming years. Patients with diabetes who are placed on evidence-based regimens, are educated about their disease, are coached in ways that motivate them to lose weight and adopt other therapeutic lifestyle changes, and are adhering to and persisting with therapy will soon have improved clinical parameters. These quickly translate into fewer hospitalizations and emergency department visits. A growing body of literature supports the use of pharmacists and other nonphysicians in meeting the needs of patients with diabetes. Pharmacists should join nurse practitioners, specially trained nurses, and physician assistants as integral members of the health care team in providing care to patients with diabetes and, by logical extension, other chronic conditions. Demand for primary care is likely to outstrip the available supply of generalist physicians in the coming years. In addition to nurse practitioners and physician assistants, pharmacists should be considered for key roles in future interdisciplinary teams that triage and provide direct care to patients, including those with diabetes and other chronic conditions.

  4. Characteristics of Older Adults in Primary Care Who May Benefit From Primary Palliative Care in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Nancy; Ritchie, Christine S; Wallhagen, Margaret I; Covinsky, Kenneth E; Cooper, Bruce A; Patel, Kanan; Stijacic Cenzer, Irena; Chapman, Susan A

    2017-09-13

    Older adults with advanced illness and associated symptoms may benefit from primary palliative care, but limited data exist to identify older adults in U.S. primary care to benefit from this care. To describe U.S. primary care visits among adults aged 65 years and older with advanced illness. Cross-sectional analysis of the National Ambulatory and Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys (2009-2011) was conducted using Chi-squared tests to compare visits without and with advanced illness with U.S. primary care defined by National Committee for Quality Assurance Palliative and End-of-Life Care Physician Performance Measurement Set International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for end-stage illness. Among visits by older adults to primary care, 7.9% visits were related to advanced illness. A higher proportion of advanced illness visits was among men vs. women (8.9% vs. 7.2%; P = 0.03) and adults aged 75 years and older, non-Hispanic whites (8.3%) and blacks (8.2%) vs. Hispanic (6.7%) and non-Hispanic other (2.5%) (P = 0.02), dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid, and from patient ZIP Codes with lower median household incomes (below $32,793). A higher percentage of visits with advanced illness conditions to primary care was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, dementia, and cancer, and symptoms reported with these visits were mostly pain, depression, anxiety, fatigue, and insomnia. In the U.S., approximately 8% primary care visits among older adults was related to advanced illness conditions. Advanced illness visits were most common among those most likely to be socioeconomically vulnerable and highlight the need to focus efforts for high-quality palliative care for these populations. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Global health and primary care research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beasley, J.W.; Starfield, B.; Weel, C. van; Rosser, W.W.; Haq, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    A strong primary health care system is essential to provide effective and efficient health care in both resource-rich and resource-poor countries. Although a direct link has not been proven, we can reasonably expect better economic status when the health of the population is improved. Research in

  6. Patient safety culture in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A constructive patient safety culture is a main prerequisite for patient safety and improvement initiatives. Until now, patient safety culture (PSC) research was mainly focused on hospital care, however, it is of equal importance in primary care. Measuring PSC informs practices on their

  7. Flipping primary health care: A personal story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mate, Kedar S; Salinas, Gilbert

    2014-12-01

    There is considerable interest in ideas borrowed from education about "flipping the classroom" and how they might be applied to "flipping" aspects of health care to reach the Triple Aim of improved health outcomes, improved experience of care, and reduced costs. There are few real-life case studies of "flipping health care" in practice at the individual patient level. This article describes the experience of one of the authors as he experienced having to "flip" his primary health care. We describe seven inverted practices in his care, report outcomes of this experiment, describe the enabling factors, and derive lessons for patient-centered primary care redesign. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Physical Profiling Performance of Air Force Primary Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-09

    MTF medical treatment facility OR odds ratio PCP primary care provider PHA Periodic Health Assessment SE standard error SME subject matter expert ...ascertain if predictors existed to augment PCP screening. This study was a cross-sectional, retrospective medical records review of active duty U.S. Air...Force (AF) members receiving care in an AF medical treatment facility (MTF) between October 31, 2013, and September 30, 2014, who had at least one

  9. [Attitude of primary care doctors to follow-up dyslipidemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Cerezo, C; Simón Martín, J; Fernández Jiménez, G; Rivera Franco, J

    2004-04-15

    To know the opinion of primary care physicians about the criteria that they use in the request of the laboratories tests of hyperlipidemia and to confirm the above-mentioned opinion with the parameters edited in some guides of clinical practice published on hyperlipidemia. Transverse and descriptive study. Accomplishment of 2 questionnaires, one by internal post and another one through personal or telephonic interview. Comparison of most important guides of clinical practice. Primary care of an area of Madrid. In the survey directed to all the 199 primary care physicians, 116 valid answers were obtained. In the survey directed to all 20 coordinators of the centers of primary care, 16 valid answers were obtained. The frequency, the percentage and the confidence interval. 109 (94%) of the primary care physicians request laboratories tests in the goal to exclude secondary reasons of hyperlipidemia. The LDL-cholesterol is considered to be a suitable test for the follow-up of the hyperlipidemia by 108 (93.0%) primary care physicians. According to the opinion of the coordinators, the year of edition and/or review of the existing guide in the center changes between 1992-2000. As strategy of improvement of the clinical practice it is necessary to realize and support an updated guide of clinical practice, where the suitable tests are defined to look for the etiología of hyperlipidemia, the determinations that must be requested for the initial control of the treatment and with which periodicity they are requested.

  10. Integrating mental health into primary care: a global perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Funk, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    ... for mental disorders is enormous 4. Primary care for mental health enhances access 5. Primary care for mental health promotes respect of human rights 6. Primary care for mental health is affordab...

  11. Diabetes care provision in UK primary care practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Hawthorne

    Full Text Available Although most people with Type 2 diabetes receive their diabetes care in primary care, only a limited amount is known about the quality of diabetes care in this setting. We investigated the provision and receipt of diabetes care delivered in UK primary care.Postal surveys with all healthcare professionals and a random sample of 100 patients with Type 2 diabetes from 99 UK primary care practices.326/361 (90.3% doctors, 163/186 (87.6% nurses and 3591 patients (41.8% returned a questionnaire. Clinicians reported giving advice about lifestyle behaviours (e.g. 88% would routinely advise about calorie restriction; 99.6% about increasing exercise more often than patients reported having received it (43% and 42% and correlations between clinician and patient report were low. Patients' reported levels of confidence about managing their diabetes were moderately high; a median (range of 21% (3% to 39% of patients reporting being not confident about various areas of diabetes self-management.Primary care practices have organisational structures in place and are, as judged by routine quality indicators, delivering high quality care. There remain evidence-practice gaps in the care provided and in the self confidence that patients have for key aspects of self management and further research is needed to address these issues. Future research should use robust designs and appropriately designed studies to investigate how best to improve this situation.

  12. Diabetes care provision in UK primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Gillian; Hrisos, Susan; Stamp, Elaine; Elovainio, Marko; Francis, Jill J; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Hunter, Margaret; Johnston, Marie; Presseau, Justin; Steen, Nick; Eccles, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    Although most people with Type 2 diabetes receive their diabetes care in primary care, only a limited amount is known about the quality of diabetes care in this setting. We investigated the provision and receipt of diabetes care delivered in UK primary care. Postal surveys with all healthcare professionals and a random sample of 100 patients with Type 2 diabetes from 99 UK primary care practices. 326/361 (90.3%) doctors, 163/186 (87.6%) nurses and 3591 patients (41.8%) returned a questionnaire. Clinicians reported giving advice about lifestyle behaviours (e.g. 88% would routinely advise about calorie restriction; 99.6% about increasing exercise) more often than patients reported having received it (43% and 42%) and correlations between clinician and patient report were low. Patients' reported levels of confidence about managing their diabetes were moderately high; a median (range) of 21% (3% to 39%) of patients reporting being not confident about various areas of diabetes self-management. Primary care practices have organisational structures in place and are, as judged by routine quality indicators, delivering high quality care. There remain evidence-practice gaps in the care provided and in the self confidence that patients have for key aspects of self management and further research is needed to address these issues. Future research should use robust designs and appropriately designed studies to investigate how best to improve this situation.

  13. A literature review: polypharmacy protocol for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to critically evaluate published protocols on polypharmacy in adults ages 65 and older that are currently used in primary care settings that may potentially lead to fewer adverse drug events. A review of OVID, CINAHL, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, Medline, and PubMed databases was completed using the following key words: protocol, guideline, geriatrics, elderly, older adult, polypharmacy, and primary care. Inclusion criteria were: articles in medical, nursing, and pharmacology journals with an intervention, protocol, or guideline addressing polypharmacy that lead to fewer adverse drug events. Qualitative and quantitative studies were included. Exclusion criteria were: publications prior to the year 1992. A gap exists in the literature. No standardized protocol for addressing polypharmacy in the primary care setting was found. Mnemonics, algorithms, clinical practice guidelines, and clinical strategies for addressing polypharmacy in a variety of health care settings were found throughout the literature. Several screening instruments for use in primary care to assess potentially inappropriate prescription of medications in the elderly, such as the Beers Criteria and the STOPP screening tool, were identified. However, these screening instruments were not included in a standardized protocol to manage polypharmacy in primary care. Polypharmacy in the elderly is a critical problem that may result in adverse drug events such as falls, hospitalizations, and increased expenditures for both the patient and the health care system. No standardized protocols to address polypharmacy specific to the primary care setting were identified in this review of the literature. Given the growing population of elderly in this country and the high number of medications they consume, it is critical to focus on the utilization of a standardized protocol to address the potential harm of polypharmacy in the primary care setting and evaluate its effects on

  14. Teaching Home-Based Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckrey, Jennifer M; Ornstein, Katherine A; Wajnberg, Ania; Kopke, M Victoria; DeCherrie, Linda V

    Despite the growing homebound population and the development of innovative models of care that work to bring care to people in their homes, home visits are not a routine part of education for many healthcare providers. This manuscript describes the experience of Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors teaching home-based primary care to learners of various disciplines and reports the results of a survey performed to assess trainee experience. Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors is the largest academic home-based primary care program in the country and trainees of various disciplines have nearly 1,700 contact days annually of directly supervised clinical teaching. In order to improve trainee education and meet our practice needs, trainees: 1) independently conduct urgent visits, 2) carry longitudinal panels of homebound patients, and 3) perform subspecialist consultations. Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors has exposed thousands of trainees to home-based primary care in the past 20 years and trainees report positive reviews of their experiences. As the need to train future providers in home-based primary care grows, we will be challenged to provide trainees with adequate exposure to multidisciplinary teams and to teach about the importance of continuity of care.

  15. Primary care for diabetes mellitus: perspective from older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong ELY

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Eliza Lai Yi Wong1, Jean Woo2, Elsie Hui3, Carrie Chan2, Wayne LS Chan2, Annie Wai Ling Cheung11School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2School of Public Health and Primary Care, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 3Medical and Geriatric Unit, Shatin Hospital, HK SAR, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Care of diabetes mellitus in the elderly requires an additional perspective to take into account impaired cognitive function, physical function, low level of education, and difficulty making lifestyle changes. Existing services tend to be driven by the views of tertiary and secondary care staff, rather than those of primary care staff and elderly patients. This study aimed to explore the attitudes and preferences of elderly patients with diabetes mellitus towards primary care (clinical care and community program.Method: Elderly patients with diabetes mellitus aged 60 years or above were recruited from governmental diabetes mellitus clinics and diabetes mellitus specific community centers. Three focus group discussions of 14 diabetic elderly patients were conducted and their perspectives on the new service model were assessed. Participants were interviewed according to an open-ended discussion guide which includes the following items: comments on existing clinic follow up and community program, motivation for joining the community program, and suggestions on further clinical services and community service program development.Results: Incapability of the current health service to address their special needs was a common concern in three focus group discussions. The majority highlighted the benefits of the new service program, that is, self-care knowledge and skill, attitudes to living with diabetes mellitus, and supportive network. Key facilitators included experiential learning, a group discussion platform

  16. Rainbows: a primary health care initiative for primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, Ailsa; Forde, Karen A; Krouzecky, Miriam; Shields, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Within the current Australian health system is the understanding of a need to change from the predominate biomedical model to incorporate a comprehensive primary health care centred approach, embracing the social contexts of health and wellbeing. Recent research investigated the benefits of the primary health care philosophy and strategies in relation to the Rainbows programme which addresses grief and loss in primary school aged students in Western Australia. A multidisciplinary collaboration between the Western Australian Departments of Health and Education enabled community school health nurse coordinators to train teacher facilitators in the implementation of Rainbows, enabling support for students and their parents. The results of this qualitative study indicate that all participants regard Rainbows as effective, with many perceived benefits to students and their families.

  17. Primary Care Physicians' Dementia Care Practices: Evidence of Geographic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Zlateva, Ianita; Delaney, Colleen; Kleppinger, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores primary care physicians' (PCPs) self-reported approaches and barriers to management of patients with dementia, with a focus on comparisons in dementia care practices between PCPs in 2 states. Design and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires were mailed to 600 randomly selected licensed PCPs in…

  18. Primary health care centres in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianarisoa, A O; Rampanjato, M

    1994-01-01

    In 1976, Madagascar promised to establish 1500 primary health care centers to be run by a community health agent. The communities selected sites for the centers, nominated health agent candidates, built and maintained the centers and accommodation for the health agents, supplied the centers, and undertook their operation. The government organized the recruitment and training of the agents, paid their wages, and provided equipment and drugs. The candidates were 18-28 years old and had completed two years of secondary education. Training lasted 14 months and enabled the new agents to provide basic health care in the curative, preventive, and educational fields. The health agents can deal with normal births, family planning, vaccination, and health education. In 1991 the country had 1935 facilities that were providing primary care. Some 85% of the health agents have remained in the primary health care centers for over 10 years; 50 agents have moved out to become nurses or midwives. Financial support for the program comes from the state and external donors. Of the 1500 planned primary health care centers, 461 stopped functioning, mostly because the communities concerned have not adequately built and maintained premises for the health agents. The primary health care centers are less frequently attended than formerly because equipment is aging and drugs are in short supply. Cost recovery should be widely adopted in the national health system. More in-service training should be provided for health agents, and more tours of inspection should be carried out. Community health workers should be managed entirely by the community, and the Ministry of Health should take charge of their training. Primary health care in Madagascar has largely proved its worth; if the economic handicaps can be overcome, the program is likely to contribute to the achievement of the health-for-all goals.

  19. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S DeJesus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferences for chronic disease care, hence, we conducted a study aimed at identifying these.Methods: A 20-item questionnaire, asking for patients’ and providers’ preferences and perceptions, was mailed out to 1000 randomly selected patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, identified through a diabetes registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prototypical prevalent chronic disease. Surveys were also sent to 42 primary care providers.Results: There were 254 (25.4% patient responders and 28 (66% provider responders. The majority of patients (>70% and providers (89% expressed willingness to have various aspects of diabetes care managed by a care manager. Although 75% of providers would be comfortable expanding the care manager role to other chronic diseases, only 39.5% of patient responders would be willing to see a care manager for other chronic problems. Longer length of time from initial diagnosis of diabetes was associated with decreased patient likelihood to work with a care manager.Conclusion: Despite study limitations, such as the lack of validated measures to assess perceptions related to care management, our results suggest that patients and providers are willing to collaborate with a care manager and that both groups have similar role expectations of a care manager.Keywords: care manager, collaborative care, patient preference, diabetes care

  20. Moral sensitivity in Primary Health Care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Zoboli, Elma Lourdes Campos Pavone; Vieira, Margarida M

    2017-04-01

    to characterize the profile and describe the moral sensitivity of primary health care nurses. this is a quantitative, transversal, exploratory, descriptive study. The data were collected through the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire translated and adapted to Brazil. 100 primary health care nurses participated, from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The data collection took place during the months of March and July 2016, in an online form. The analysis of the data occurred through descriptive statistical analysis. the nurses had an average moral sensitivity of 4.5 (out of 7). The dimensions with the greatest moral sensitivity were: interpersonal orientation, professional knowledge, moral conflict and moral meaning. the nurses of Rio Grande do Sul have a moderate moral sensitivity, which may contribute to a lower quality in Primary Health Care.

  1. Multiple somatic symptoms in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldberg, D. P.; Reed, G. M.; Robles, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective A World Health Organization (WHO) field study conducted in five countries assessed proposals for Bodily Stress Syndrome (BSS) and Health Anxiety (HA) for the Primary Health Care Version of ICD-11. BSS requires multiple somatic symptoms not caused by known physical pathology and associat...... without identifiable physical pathology. Although highly co-occurring with each other and with mood and anxiety disorders, BSS and HA represent distinct constructs that correspond to important presentations in primary care. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.......Objective A World Health Organization (WHO) field study conducted in five countries assessed proposals for Bodily Stress Syndrome (BSS) and Health Anxiety (HA) for the Primary Health Care Version of ICD-11. BSS requires multiple somatic symptoms not caused by known physical pathology and associated...

  2. [Dementia screening in primary care: critical review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contador, Israel; Fernández-Calvo, Bernardino; Ramos, Francisco; Tapias-Merino, Ester; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2010-12-01

    Primary care professionals need useful and simple tools to detect early cognitive impairment in patients with any clinical suspicion of dementia. AIM. This critical review attempts to analyze the psychometric properties of cognitive screening tests, commonly used for screening dementia in primary care setting, which have been adapted for Spanish speaking population in the Iberian Peninsula. Special emphasis has been placed on those instruments which met the following criteria: easy correction and short-term application (less than or equal to 10 minutes). Properties such as reliability, validity and especially the discriminating power of the instrument (older people with dementia vs. healthy older adults) have been detailed. The future of brief cognitive assessment in primary care setting requires the adaptation and validation of new tests for the Spanish population, improving the sensitivity of the tests in patients with mild cognitive impairment and searching for measures with an adequate cross-cultural validity.

  3. Effective communication with primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen

    2014-08-01

    Effective communication requires direct interaction between the hospitalist and the primary care provider using a standardized method of information exchange with the opportunity to ask questions and assign accountability for follow-up roles. The discharge summary is part of the process but does not provide the important aspects of handoff, such as closed loop communication and role assignments. Hospital discharge is a significant safety risk for patients, with more than half of discharged patients experiencing at least one error. Hospitalist and primary care providers need to collaborate to develop a standardized system to communicate about shared patients that meets handoff requirements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Connecticut 2009 Primary Care Survey: physician satisfaction, physician supply and patient access to medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseltine, Robert H; Katz, Matthew C; Geragosian, Audrey Honig

    2010-05-01

    To provide a more detailed evaluation of the attitudes and opinions of Connecticut's primary-care physicians, the practice environment in which care is provided, and how the evolving practice environment might affect the availability and quality of medical care in the state. Primary-care physicians affiliated with the Connecticut Chapter of the American College of Physicians (n = 1088), the Connecticut Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (n = 699), and the Connecticut Academy of Family Physicians (n = 376) were invited to participate in a brief online survey. Participation was limited to physicians who were actively engaged in primary-care medicine. Four hundred ninety-eight primary-care physicians practicing in Connecticut completed the survey resulting in an overall response rate of 23%. Primary-care physicians in Connecticut were generally satisfied with their careers in medicine, although 20% of respondents reported contemplating a career change because of the practice environment in the state. Statistically significant differences in satisfaction among primary-care specialists were observed, with pediatricians expressing greater satisfaction relative to family physicians and internists with hours worked, the Connecticut malpractice environment, level of administrative burden, income, and overall satisfaction. Analyses seeking to account for the greater levels of satisfaction among pediatricians relative to family physicians and internists identified income as a key explanatory factor. Problems related to access to care were also identified, with 23% of primary-care physicians reporting that they were not accepting new patients, and wait time for routine office visits for existing patients averaged 13.4 days. These data, combined with information from the US Census Bureau and the state licensure database, indicate that the potential new patient load tied to expanded insurance coverage under health reform may place a significant burden on primary-care

  5. Prenatal Care for Adolescents and attributes of Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Barbaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: evaluate prenatal care for adolescents in health units, in accordance with the attributes of Primary Health Care (PHC guidelines. METHOD: quantitative study conducted with health professionals, using the Primary Care Assessment Tool-Brazil to assess the presence and extent of PHC attributes. RESULTS: for all the participating units, the attribute Access scored =6.6; the attributes Longitudinality, Coordination (integration of care, Coordination (information systems and Integrality scored =6.6, and the Essential Score =6.6. Comparing basic units with family health units, the attribute scores were equally distributed; Accessibility scored =6.6, the others attributes scored =6.6; however, in the basic units, the Essential Score was =6.6 and, in the family health units, =6.6. CONCLUSION: expanding the coverage of family health units and the training of professionals can be considered strategies to qualify health care.

  6. PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Olesen, Frede

    that is vital to further improve palliative care in the primary sector.AIM. The aim of the study was to analyse the quality of palliative home care with focus on the GP's role based on evaluations by relatives of recently deceased cancer patients and professionals from both the primary and secondary health care......) The primary sector needs easy access to specialist advise, supervision and empowerment. 4) Better and easier communication pathways are important, both within the primary sector and across the sectors to improve accessibility.CONCLUSION. Our study shows a need for improvements in palliative home care...... and provides important knowledge about how these improvements are achieved.The GPs want closer supervision and improved shared care. They want to be key persons in palliative home care, but to fill this role it is vital that they take or are given the responsibility in a very transparent way, i.e.: A way...

  7. Managed care, consumerism, preventive medicine: does a causal connection exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, John A; Xie, Yang

    2006-07-01

    Managed care plans, and HMOs in particular, have long touted that their emphasis is on preventive care, to avoid expensive illness later in life. However, few articles in the contemporary literature adequately address this claim. The available evidence seems to support that HMOs do, in fact, provide greater access to preventive services, but the limitations of this research are substantial. This article discusses the scientific evidence on the relationships between managed care arrangements and the implications for preventive care in the current era, emphasizing consumer choices and less-restrictive plan structures.

  8. Retail clinics versus traditional primary care: Employee satisfaction guaranteed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Vanessa R; Hickman, Ronald L; Savrin, Carol L; Peterson, Rachel A

    2015-09-01

    To examine if differences exist in the levels of autonomy and job satisfaction among primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) employed in retail clinics versus traditional primary care settings. Data were collected from 310 primary care NPs who attended the American Association of NP's 28th Annual Conference in June 2013. Participants completed a demographic form, the Misener NP Job Satisfaction Scale, and the Dempster Practice Behavior Scale. Overall, there were no differences in job satisfaction or autonomy among NPs by practice setting. Retail NPs felt less valued and were less satisfied with social interaction, but more satisfied with benefits compared to NPs in traditional settings. NPs working in retail clinics were less likely to have intentions to leave current position compared to NPs in traditional practice settings. The results of this study enhance our current understanding of the linkages between levels of autonomy, job satisfaction, and practice setting among primary care NPs. The findings of this descriptive study offer valuable insights for stakeholders devoted to the development of the primary care workforce and identify modifiable factors that may influence retention and turnover rates among NPs. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. Care interrupted: Poverty, in-migration, and primary care in rural resource towns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kathleen; Webster, Fiona

    2017-10-01

    Internationally, rural people have poorer health outcomes relative to their urban counterparts, and primary care providers face particular challenges in rural and remote regions. Drawing on ethnographic fieldnotes and 14 open-ended qualitative interviews with care providers and chronic pain patients in two remote resource communities in Northern Ontario, Canada, this article examines the challenges involved in providing and receiving primary care for complex chronic conditions in these communities. Both towns struggle with high unemployment in the aftermath of industry closure, and are characterized by an abundance of affordable housing. Many of the challenges that care providers face and that patients experience are well-documented in Canadian and international literature on rural and remote health, and health care in resource towns (e.g. lack of specialized care, difficulty with recruitment and retention of care providers, heavy workload for existing care providers). However, our study also documents the recent in-migration of low-income, largely working-age people with complex chronic conditions who are drawn to the region by the low cost of housing. We discuss the ways in which the needs of these in-migrants compound existing challenges to rural primary care provision. To our knowledge, our study is the first to document both this migration trend, and the implications of this for primary care. In the interest of patient health and care provider well-being, existing health and social services will likely need to be expanded to meet the needs of these in-migrants. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijkerk, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder in which abdominal pain or discomfort is associated with a change in bowel habit, or with features of disordered defecation. Patients and doctors in primary care generally agree on IBS symptomatology and consider pain and bloating as its

  11. Primary care management of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Brittani Ledford; Davis, Stephanie C; Vess, Joy; Lebel, Joseph

    2015-02-15

    : Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder with genetic predisposition that affects as many as 1 in 100 individuals. Treatment is a lifelong, strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. Management by a primary care provider may lead to increased adherence and can minimize effects of nonadherence to the diet.

  12. Low Back Pain in Primary Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbæk, Lise; Munck, Anders; Hartvigsen, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Baseline description of a multicenter cohort study. Objective. To describe patients with low back pain (LBP) in both chiropractic and general practice in Denmark. Background. To optimize standards of care in the primary healthcare sector, detailed knowledge of the patient populations...

  13. Nurses improve migraine management in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Petra; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; de Jong, Gosse; Baarveld, Frans; van den Berg, J. S. Peter

    Introduction Migraine is a common disorder with a high burden. Adequate treatment results in improvement of quality of life. Migraine patients are mainly treated by general practitioners (GPs), but there is still room for improvement. This study investigated whether primary care nurses could improve

  14. Management of asthma in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honkoop, Pieter Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common non-communicable respiratory disease. In this thesis we analysed three different management strategies for adult patients with asthma in primary care. In the first, we targeted the currently recommended aim of ‘Controlled asthma’, which means patients experience hardly any

  15. Moving towards multidisciplinary primary care collaboration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, J.; Hingstman, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In Europe, many primary care professionals were traditionally organized in small-scaled practices. Nowadays, they are working more often in larger practices. This applies to general practitioners, but also to other professions, such as midwives or physical therapists. In addition,

  16. The Selection of Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Paul R.

    The Program in Medical Sciences (PIMS) is designed to combine the selection of a heterogeneous class without significant change in the educational environment as designed for a homogeneous class. The program is an attempt to equalize the allocation of resources of the medical profession and to provide primary care physicians to underserved areas.…

  17. Prevalence of inappropriate prescribing in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnhøj, Lisbeth; Thirstrup, Steffen; Kristensen, Mogens Brandt

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of inappropriate prescribing in primary care in Copenhagen County, according to the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) and to identify the therapeutic areas most commonly involved. SETTING: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 212 elderly ( >65 years...

  18. Primary care of adults with developmental disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, William F.; Berg, Joseph M.; Bradley, Elspeth; Cheetham, Tom; Denton, Richard; Heng, John; Hennen, Brian; Joyce, David; Kelly, Maureen; Korossy, Marika; Lunsky, Yona; McMillan, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To update the 2006 Canadian guidelines for primary care of adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and to make practical recommendations based on current knowledge to address the particular health issues of adults with DD. Quality of evidence Knowledgeable health care providers participating in a colloquium and a subsequent working group discussed and agreed on revisions to the 2006 guidelines based on a comprehensive review of publications, feedback gained from users of the guidelines, and personal clinical experiences. Most of the available evidence in this area of care is from expert opinion or published consensus statements (level III). Main message Adults with DD have complex health issues, many of them differing from those of the general population. Good primary care identifies the particular health issues faced by adults with DD to improve their quality of life, to improve their access to health care, and to prevent suffering, morbidity, and premature death. These guidelines synthesize general, physical, behavioural, and mental health issues of adults with DD that primary care providers should be aware of, and they present recommendations for screening and management based on current knowledge that practitioners can apply. Because of interacting biologic, psychoaffective, and social factors that contribute to the health and well-being of adults with DD, these guidelines emphasize involving caregivers, adapting procedures when appropriate, and seeking input from a range of health professionals when available. Ethical care is also emphasized. The guidelines are formulated within an ethical framework that pays attention to issues such as informed consent and the assessment of health benefits in relation to risks of harm. Conclusion Implementation of the guidelines proposed here would improve the health of adults with DD and would minimize disparities in health and health care between adults with DD and those in the general population

  19. Health promotion innovation in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra McManus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, the main focus of primary health care practices was to diagnose and treat patients. The identification of risk factors for disease and the prevention of chronic conditions have become a part of everyday practice. This paper provides an argument for training primary health care (PHC practitioners in health promotion, while encouraging them to embrace innovation within their practice to streamline the treatment process and improve patient outcomes. Electronic modes of communication, education and training are now commonplace in many medical practices. The PHC sector has a small window of opportunity in which to become leaders within the current model of continuity of care by establishing their role as innovators in the prevention, treatment and management of disease. Not only will this make their own jobs easier, it has the potential to significantly impact patient outcomes.

  20. Health promotion innovation in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Previously, the main focus of primary health care practices was to diagnose and treat patients. The identification of risk factors for disease and the prevention of chronic conditions have become a part of everyday practice. This paper provides an argument for training primary health care (PHC) practitioners in health promotion, while encouraging them to embrace innovation within their practice to streamline the treatment process and improve patient outcomes. Electronic modes of communication, education and training are now commonplace in many medical practices. The PHC sector has a small window of opportunity in which to become leaders within the current model of continuity of care by establishing their role as innovators in the prevention, treatment and management of disease. Not only will this make their own jobs easier, it has the potential to significantly impact patient outcomes.

  1. [Differences and similarities of primary care in the German and Spanish health care systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador Comino, María Rosa; Krane, Sibylla; Schelling, Jörg; Regife García, Víctor

    2016-02-01

    An efficient primary care is of particular importance for any countries' health care system. Many differences exist on how distinctive countries try to obtain the goal of an efficient, cost-effective primary care for its population. In this article we conducted a selective literature review, which includes both scientific and socio-political publications. The findings are complemented with the experience of a Spanish physician from Seville in her last year of training in family medicine, who completed a four months long rotation in the German health care system. We highlighted different features by comparing both countries, including their health care expenditure, the relation between primary and secondary care, the organization in the academic field and the training of future primary care physicians. It is clear that primary care in both countries plays a central role, have to deal with shortcomings, and in some points one system can learn from the other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring patient safety culture in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbakel, Natasha J; Van Melle, Marije; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2014-12-01

    To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Cross-sectional survey. Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Professional staff from primary care practices. Nine professions participated: dental care, dietetics, exercise therapy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, midwifery, anticoagulation clinics, skin therapy and speech therapy. Perceptions of seven patient safety culture dimensions were measured: 'open communication and learning from error', 'handover and teamwork', 'adequate procedures and working conditions', 'patient safety management', 'support and fellowship', 'intention to report events' and 'organizational learning'. Dimension means per profession were presented, and multilevel analyses were used to assess differences between professions. Also the so-called patient safety grade was self-reported. Five hundred and nineteen practices responded (response rate: 24%) of which 313 (625 individual questionnaires) were included for analysis. Overall, patient safety culture was perceived as being positive. Occupational therapy and anticoagulation therapy deviated most from other professions in a negative way, whereas physiotherapy deviated the most in a positive way. In addition, most professions graded their patient safety as positive (mean = 4.03 on a five-point scale). This study showed that patient safety culture in Dutch primary care professions on average is perceived positively. Also, it revealed variety between professions, indicating that a customized approach per profession group might contribute to successful implementation of safety strategies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  3. Advanced nurse roles in UK primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Bonnie; Laurant, Miranda G; Reeves, David

    2006-07-03

    Nurses increasingly work as substitutes for, or to complement, general practitioners in the care of minor illness and the management of chronic diseases. Available research suggests that nurses can provide as high quality care as GPs in the provision of first contact and ongoing care for unselected patients. Reductions in cost are context dependent and rarely achieved. This is because savings on nurses' salaries are often offset by their lower productivity (due to longer consultations, higher patient recall rates, and increased use of tests and investigations). Gains in efficiency are not achieved when GPs continue to provide the services that have been delegated to nurses, instead of focusing on the services that only doctors can provide. Unintended consequences of extending nursing roles include loss of personal continuity of care for patients and increased difficulties with coordination of care as the multidisciplinary team size increases. Rapid access to care is, however, improved. There is a high capital cost involved in moving to multidisciplinary teams because of the need to train staff in new ways of working; revise legislation governing scope of practice; address concerns about legal liability; and manage professional resistance to change. Despite the unintended consequences and the high costs, extending nursing roles in primary care is a plausible strategy for improving service capacity without compromising quality of care or health outcomes for patients.

  4. Is Training in a Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Associated with a Career in Primary Care Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Marion; O'Brien, Bridget; Julian, Katherine; Jain, Sharad; Cornett, Patricia; Hollander, Harry; Baron, Robert B; Kohlwes, R Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Professional and governmental organizations recommend an ideal US physician workforce composed of at least 40 % primary care physicians. They also support primary care residencies to promote careers in primary care. Our study examines the relationship between graduation from a primary care or categorical internal medicine residency program and subsequent career choice. We conducted a cross-sectional electronic survey of a cohort of internal medicine residency alumni who graduated between 2001 and 2010 from a large academic center. Our primary predictor was graduation from a primary care versus a categorical internal medicine program and our primary outcome is current career role. We performed chi-square analysis comparing responses of primary care and categorical residents. We contacted 481 out of 513 alumni, of whom 322 responded (67 %). We compared 106 responses from primary care alumni to 169 responses from categorical alumni. Fifty-four percent of primary care alumni agreed that the majority of their current clinical work is in outpatient primary care vs. 20 % of categorical alumni (p career prior to residency, only 63 % remained interested after residency. Thirty of the 34 primary care alumni (88 %) who lost interest in a primary care career during residency agreed that their ambulatory experience during residency influenced their subsequent career choice. A higher percentage of primary care alumni practice outpatient primary care as compared to categorical alumni. Some alumni lost interest in primary care during residency. The outpatient clinic experience may impact interest in primary care.

  5. Organization of primary care practice for providing energy balance care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, Carrie N; Clauser, Steven B; Liu, Benmei; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Huang, Terry T-K; Smith, Ashley Wilder

    2014-01-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) may not adequately counsel or monitor patients regarding diet, physical activity, and weight control (i.e., provide energy balance care). We assessed the organization of PCPs' practices for providing this care. The study design was a nationally representative survey conducted in 2008. The study setting was U.S. primary care practices. A total of 1740 PCPs completed two sequential questionnaires (response rate, 55.5%). The study measured PCPs' reports of practice resources, and the frequency of body mass index assessment, counseling, referral for further evaluation/management, and monitoring of patients for energy balance care. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression modeling were used. More than 80% of PCPs reported having information resources on diet, physical activity, or weight control available in waiting/exam rooms, but fewer billed (45%), used reminder systems (energy balance care. A total of 26% reported regularly assessing body mass index and always/often providing counseling as well as tracking patients for progress related to energy balance. In multivariate analyses, PCPs in practices with full electronic health records or those that bill for energy balance care provided this care more often and more comprehensively. There were strong specialty differences, with pediatricians more likely (odds ratio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-2.51) and obstetrician/gynecologists less likely (odds ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.44) than others to provide energy balance care. PCPs' practices are not well organized for providing energy balance care. Further research is needed to understand PCP care-related specialty differences.

  6. Communication between primary and secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, Laura Mk; Tyrrell-Price, Jonathan

    2017-08-02

    Background Up to date patient data is a cornerstone of optimal safety and care, so admission to hospital requires transfer of data held in the community to secondary care. Despite the advent of electronic medical record systems such as Connecting Care and EMIS, the telephone remains the mainstay of communication. Methods A prospective cross-sectional quality improvement project was conducted to assess the time taken in telephone communication between primary and secondary care doctors and determine if access to the electronic shared system, Connecting Care, would improve efficiency. As part of normal junior doctor activity, fifty GPs were contacted between September 2015 and February 2016 to obtain medical data on patients admitted to UH Bristol. Time taken to contact each GP and the duration of the conversation was recorded. One hundred patient records were accessed using Connecting Care between October 2015 and February 2016 and the length of time taken to access information documented. Results Out of 50 phone calls 27 resulted in direct transfer to a GP with time to transfer ranging from 12 seconds to 19 minutes 51 seconds (mean 8 minutes 10 seconds, median 7 minutes 16 seconds). A total of 28 messages were left with the receptionist with 16/28 phone calls being returned and time taken for the call to be returned ranged from 34 minutes to 21 hours 3 minutes (mean 5 hours 50 minutes 4 seconds, median 4 hours). Information was available for 88/100 patient records accessed using Connecting Care with a mean duration to access information required of 1 minute 47 seconds. This was significantly shorter than the mean duration of conversation with GPs (4 minutes 22 seconds), mean total duration of telephone call and mean total duration of time to achieve aim of call with GP practices of 13 minutes 18 seconds and 2 hours 14 minutes 11 seconds respectively. Conclusions This study identifies areas of potential improvement in current methods of communication between primary

  7. Taking computerized CBT beyond primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learmonth, Despina; Rai, Sadik

    2008-03-01

    This study seeks to determine whether the effectiveness of Beating the Blues (BtB), an established computer-based CBT (CCBT) programme, can extend beyond primary care. BtB was delivered and evaluated in an NHS specialist CBT care centre as part of routine care. A sample of 104 service users, typically displaying chronic levels of depression and/or anxiety received CCBT. Completers' scores on the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), as well as on single-item rating scales for anxiety and depression, improved significantly following the intervention. Statistically significant differences held during intention-to-treat analyses. Almost half of the completer sample achieved reliable and clinically significant change. The results were benchmarked against national data sets. These preliminary findings suggest a potential role for CCBT within secondary care as a first step, self-help treatment tool for anxiety and depression.

  8. VA Health Care: Actions Needed to Improve Newly Enrolled Veterans Access to Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    specialty care—such as cardiology or gastroenterology—they are typically referred to a specialist by their primary care provider, and each veteran’s...2015, added it to GAO’s High Risk List.5 To help improve timely access to health care, Congress passed the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability...The Government Accountability Office, the audit, evaluation, and investigative arm of Congress , exists to support Congress in meeting its

  9. Integrating primary care with occupational health services: a success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Karen; Strasser, Patricia B

    2010-12-01

    This article describes the process used by a large U.S. manufacturing company to successfully integrate full-service primary care centers at two locations. The company believed that by providing employees with health promotion and disease prevention services, including screening, early diagnosis, and uncomplicated illness treatment, its health care costs could be significantly reduced while saving employees money. To accurately demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of adding primary care to existing occupational health services, a thorough financial analysis projected the return on investment (ROI) of the program. Decisions were made about center size, the scope of services, and staffing. A critical part of the ROI analysis involved evaluating employee health claim data to identify the actual cost of health care services for each center and the projected costs if the services were provided on-site. The pilot initiative included constructing two on-site health center facilities staffed with primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, physical therapists, and other health care professionals. Key outcome metrics from the pilot clinics exceeded goals in three of four categories. In addition, clinic use after 12 months far exceeded benchmarks for similar clinics. Most importantly, the pilot clinics were operating with a positive cash flow within the first year and demonstrated an increasingly positive ROI. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Primary health care services for effective health care development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is an empirical study of 7 communities among the O-kun Yoruba of Ijumu, Kogi State, Nigeria. The general objective of the study was to investigate the prioritizing pattern of the various Primary Health Care services (PHC) in the study area. Data for the study were generated mainly through multi-stage sampling ...

  11. Provider Perspectives on Safety in Primary Care in Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrani, Jonila Cyco; Knibb, Wendy; Petrela, Elizana; Hoxha, Adrian; Gabrani, Adriatik

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety attitudes of specialist physicians (SPs), general physicians (GPs), and nurses in primary care in Albania. The study was cross-sectional. It involved the SPs, GPs, and nurses from five districts in Albania. A demographic questionnaire and the adapted Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ)-Long Ambulatory Version A was used to gather critical information regarding the participant's profile, perception of management, working conditions, job satisfaction, stress recognition, safety climate, and perceived teamwork. The onsite data collectors distributed questionnaires at the primary care clinics and then collected them. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the responses. The significance of mean difference among SPs, GPs, and nurses was tested using analysis of variance. Five hundred twenty-three questionnaires were completed. The concept of patient safety in relation to job satisfaction received the highest ratings. Stress recognition had low ratings. There was a high level of teamwork in SPs, GPs, and nurses. Healthcare staff agreed that it was difficult to discuss errors in their primary healthcare center. Physicians in contrast to nurses were most likely to affirm that they do not make errors in hostile situations. Errors are difficult to discuss. It was clear that primary care staff, such as physicians, never considered the likelihood of errors occurring during tense situations. Staff at primary healthcare centers are used to adverse events and errors. Despite the demand for safety improvement and the existing evidence on the epidemiology of outpatient medical errors, most research has only been conducted in hospital settings. Many patients are put at risk and some are harmed as a result of adverse events in primary care. Adequate communication and technical skills should be utilized by primary care providers (PCPs) for improvement of patient safety. The patient safety measures should include assessment

  12. Collaborative HIV care in primary health care: nurses' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngunyulu, R N; Peu, M D; Mulaudzi, F M; Mataboge, M L S; Phiri, S S

    2017-12-01

    Collaborative HIV care between the nurses and traditional health practitioners is an important strategy to improve health care of people living with HIV. To explore and describe the views of nurses regarding collaborative HIV care in primary healthcare services in the City of Tshwane, South Africa. A qualitative, descriptive design was used to explore and describe the views of nurses who met the study's inclusion criteria. In-depth individual interviews were conducted to collect data from purposively selected nurses. Content analysis was used to analyse data. Two main categories were developed during the data analysis stage. The views of nurses and health system challenges regarding collaborative HIV care. The study findings revealed that there was inadequate collaborative HIV care between the nurses and the traditional health practitioners. It is evident that there is inadequate policy implementation, monitoring and evaluation regarding collaboration in HIV care. The study findings might influence policymakers to consider the importance of collaborative HIV care, and improve the quality of care by strengthening the referral system and follow-up of people living with HIV and AIDS, as a result the health outcomes as implied in the Sustainable Development Goals 2030 might be improved. Training and involvement of traditional health practitioners in the nursing and health policy should be considered to enhance and build a trustworthy working relationship between the nurses and the traditional health practitioners in HIV care. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  13. Cancer Survivorship for Primary Care Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Matthew Y; Overholser, Linda; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M

    2015-06-01

    Long-term cancer survivorship care is a relatively new and rapidly advancing field of research. Increasing cancer survivorship rates have created a huge population of long-term cancer survivors whose cancer-specific needs challenge healthcare infrastructure and highlight a significant deficit of knowledge and guidelines in transitional care from treatment to normalcy/prolonged survivorship. As the paradigm of cancer care has changed from a fixation on the curative to the maintenance on long-term overall quality of life, so to, has the delineation of responsibility between oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). As more patients enjoy long-term survival, PCPs play a more comprehensive role in cancer care following acute treatment. To this end, this annotated bibliography was written to provide PCPs and other readers with an up-to-date and robust base of knowledge on long-term cancer survivorship, including definitions and epidemiological information as well as specific considerations and recommendations on physical, psychosocial, sexual, and comorbidity needs of survivors. Additionally, significant information is included on survivorship care, specifically Survivorship Care Plans (SPCs) and their evolution, utilization by oncologists and PCPs, and current gaps, as well as an introduction to patient navigation programs. Given rapid advancements in cancer research, this bibliography is meant to serve as current baseline reference outlining the state of the science.

  14. Online medical care: the current state of "eVisits" in acute primary care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Ryan; Talbert, Jeffery; Thornbury, William C; Perin, Nathan R; Goodin, Amie J

    2015-02-01

    Online technologies offer the promise of an efficient, improved healthcare system. Patients benefit from increased access to care, physicians are afforded greater flexibility in care delivery, and the health system itself benefits from lower costs to provide such care. One method of incorporating online care into clinical practice, called electronic office visits or "eVisits," allows physicians to provide a consultation with patients online. We performed an analysis of the current published literature on eVisits as well as present emerging research describing the use of mobile platforms as the delivery model. We focused on the role of eVisits in acute primary care practice. A literature review was conducted using electronic databases with a variety of search terms related to the use of eVisits in primary care. Several advantages to eVisit utilization in the primary care setting were identified, namely, improvements in efficiency, continuity of care, quality of care, and access to care. Barriers to eVisit implementation were also identified, including challenges with incorporation into workflow, reimbursement, physician technological literacy, patient health literacy, overuse, security, confidentiality, and integration with existing medical technologies. Only one study of patient satisfaction with eVisit acute primary care services was identified, and this suggests that previous analyses of eVisit utilization are lacking this key component of healthcare service delivery evaluations. The delivery of primary care via eVisits on mobile platforms is still in adolescence, with few methodologically rigorous analyses of outcomes of efficiency, patient health, and satisfaction.

  15. The entrepreneurial role in primary care dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, S

    2012-03-09

    This paper explores the entrepreneurial role of dentists in primary care dentistry. It reviews the changing context of dentistry, not least the reforms being introduced by the health and social care bill. It suggests that this new context will reinforce the need to consider the business side of dental practice, in particular, the importance of quality, creativity and innovation, alongside the importance of meeting the needs of patients. An entrepreneurial approach will be required in order to sustain dental practice in an increasingly competitive environment.

  16. Naturopathy and the Primary Care Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Sara A.; Gutknecht, Nancy C.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Naturopathy is a distinct type of primary care medicine that blends age-old healing traditions with scientific advances and current research. It is guided by a unique set of principles that recognize the body's innate healing capacity, emphasize disease prevention, and encourage individual responsibility to obtain optimal health. Naturopathic treatment modalities include diet and clinical nutrition, behavioral change, hydrotherapy, homeopathy, botanical medicine, physical medicine, pharmaceuticals, and minor surgery. Naturopathic physicians (NDs) are trained as primary care physicians in four-year, accredited doctoral-level naturopathic medical schools. Currently, there are 15 U.S. states, 2 U.S. territories, and a number of provinces in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand that recognize licensure for NDs. PMID:20189002

  17. Human factors and ergonomics for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Paul; Jeffcott, Shelly

    2016-03-01

    In the second paper of this series, we provide a brief overview of the scientific discipline of human factors and ergonomics (HFE). Traditionally the HFE focus in healthcare has been in acute hospital settings which are perceived to exhibit characteristics more similar to other high-risk industries already applying related principles and methods. This paper argues that primary care is an area which could benefit extensively from an HFE approach, specifically in improving the performance and well-being of people and organisations. To this end, we define the purpose of HFE, outline its three specialist sub-domains (physical, cognitive and organisational HFE) and provide examples of guiding HFE principles and practices. Additionally, we describe HFE issues of significance to primary care education, improvement and research and outline early plans for building capacity and capability in this setting.

  18. Reversing Frailty Levels in Primary Care Using the CARES Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theou, Olga; Park, Grace H; Garm, Antonina; Song, Xiaowei; Clarke, Barry; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this manuscript was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Community Actions and Resources Empowering Seniors (CARES) model in measuring and mitigating frailty among community-dwelling older adults. The CARES model is based on a goal-oriented multidisciplinary primary care plan which combines a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) with health coaching. A total of 51 older adults (82 ± 7 years; 33 females) participated in the pilot phase of this initiative. Frailty was measured using the Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) and the Frailty Index (FI-CGA) at baseline and at six-month follow-up. The FI-CGA at follow-up (0.21 ± 0.08) was significantly lower than the FI-CGA at baseline (0.24 ± 0.08), suggesting an average reduction of 1.8 deficits. Sixty-one per cent of participants improved their FI-CGA and 38% improved CFS categories. Participants classified as vulnerable/frail at baseline were more responsive to the intervention compared to non-frail participants. Pilot data showed that it is feasible to assess frailty in primary care and that the CARES intervention might have a positive effect on frailty, a promising finding that requires further investigations. General practitioners who participate in the CARES model can now access their patients' FI-CGA scores at point of service through their electronic medical records.

  19. Treatment of Obesity in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Adam G; Remmert, Jocelyn E; Butryn, Meghan L; Wadden, Thomas A

    2018-01-01

    This article outlines some of the behavioral, pharmacologic, and surgical interventions available to primary care physicians (PCPs) to help their patients with weight management. Studies on lifestyle modification, commercial weight loss programs, and medical and surgical options are reviewed. Several clinical suggestions on obesity management that PCPs can take back and use immediately in office practice are offered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary medical care in Irish prisons

    OpenAIRE

    Allwright Shane PA; Thomas David E; Darker Catherine D; Barry Joe M; O'Dowd Tom

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background An industrial dispute between prison doctors and the Irish Prison Service (IPS) took place in 2004. Part of the resolution of that dispute was that an independent review of prison medical and support services be carried out by a University Department of Primary Care. The review took place in 2008 and we report here on the principal findings of that review. Methods This study utilised a mixed methods approach. An independent expert medical evaluator (one of the authors, DT)...

  1. Primary medical care in Irish prisons

    OpenAIRE

    DARKER, CATHERINE; O'DOWD, THOMAS; ALLWRIGHT, SHANE PATRICIA ANN; BARRY, JOSEPH

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Background: An industrial dispute between prison doctors and the Irish Prison Service (IPS) took place in 2004. Part of the resolution of that dispute was that an independent review of prison medical and support services be carried out by a University Department of Primary Care. The review took place in 2008 and we report here on the principal findings of that review. Methods: This study utilised a mixed methods approach. An independent expert medical evaluator (one of ...

  2. Adolescent suicide: implications for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, B; Geis, H

    1995-12-01

    A number of factors associated with teen suicide have been elucidated in recent years. Relevant clinical and research issues are reviewed: victim characteristics including psychopathology and warning signs; social influences including the effects of music and the media, the role of imitation and access to firearms; prevention programs; and implications for practice including professional education, primary care interventions, response to threats, commitment, and post-intervention.

  3. Interventions for prevention of childhood obesity in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Nicole; Brauer, Paula; Simpson, Janis Randall; Kim, Susie; Haines, Jess

    2016-01-01

    Preventing childhood obesity is a public health priority, and primary care is an important setting for early intervention. Authors of a recent national guideline have identified a need for effective primary care interventions for obesity prevention and that parent perspectives on interventions are notably absent from the literature. Our objective was to determine the perspectives of primary care clinicians and parents of children 2-5 years of age on the implementation of an obesity prevention intervention within team-based primary care to inform intervention implementation. We conducted focus groups with interprofessional primary care clinicians (n = 40) and interviews with parents (n = 26). Participants were asked about facilitators and barriers to, and recommendations for implementing a prevention program in primary care. Data were recorded and transcribed, and we used directed content analysis to identify major themes. Barriers existed to addressing obesity-related behaviours in this age group and included a gap in well-child primary care between ages 18 months and 4-5 years, lack of time and sensitivity of the topic. Trust and existing relationships with primary care clinicians were facilitators to program implementation. Offering separate programs for parents and children, and addressing both general parenting topics and obesity-related behaviours were identified as desirable. Despite barriers to addressing obesity-related behaviours within well-child primary care, both clinicians and parents expressed interest in interventions in primary care settings. Next steps should include pilot studies to identify feasible strategies for intervention implementation.

  4. Primary care for opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannelli P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Mannelli,1 Li-Tzy Wu1–41Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, 3Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, 4Center for Child and Family Policy, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USARecent reports on prescription opioid misuse and abuse have described unprecedented peaks of a national crisis and the only answer is to expand prevention and treatment, including different levels of care.1 Nonetheless, concerns remain about the ability of busy primary care settings to manage problem opioid users along with other patients. In particular, proposed extensions of buprenorphine treatment, a critically effective intervention for opioid use disorder (OUD, are cautiously considered due to the potential risk of misuse or abuse.2 General practitioners are already facing this burden daily in the treatment of chronic pain, and expert supervision and treatment model adjustment are needed to help improve outcomes. Approximately 20% of patients in primary care have noncancer pain symptoms, with most of them receiving opioid prescriptions by their physicians, and their number is increasing.3 Pain diagnoses are comparable in severity to those of tertiary centers and are complicated by significant psychiatric comorbidity, with a measurable lifetime risk of developing OUD.4,5 Some primary care physicians report frustration about opioid abuse and diversion by their patients; support from pain specialists would improve their competence, the quality f their performance, and the ability to identify patients at risk of opioid misuse.6 Thus, buprenorphine treatment should not be adding to a complex clinical scenario. To this end, the promising models of care emphasize the integration of medical with psychological and pharmacological expertise for the management of OUD. 

  5. New demands for primary health care in Brazil: palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Regina de Paula Paz

    Full Text Available Objective.Assess the need for incorporation of palliative care in primary health care (PHC through the characterization of users eligible for this type of care, enrolled in a program for devices dispensing. Methods. Descriptive study of case series conducted in 14 health units in São Paulo (Brazil in 2012. It was included medical records of those enrolled in a program for users with urinary and fecal incontinence, and it was applied Karnofsky Performance Scale Index (KPS to identify the indication of palliative care. Results. 141 of the 160 selected medical records had KPS information. Most cases (98.3%, 138/141 had performance below 70% and, therefore, patients were eligible for palliative care. The most frequent pathologies was related to chronic degenerative diseases (46.3%, followed by disorders related to quality of care during pregnancy and childbirth (24.38%. Conclusion. It is necessary to include palliative care in PHC in order to provide comprehensive, shared and humanized care to patients who need this.

  6. New demands for primary health care in Brazil: palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Paz, Cássia Regina; Reis Pessalacia, Juliana Dias; Campos Pavone Zoboli, Elma Lourdes; Ludugério de Souza, Hieda; Ferreira Granja, Gabriela; Cabral Schveitzer, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Assess the need for incorporation of palliative care in primary health care (PHC) through the characterization of users eligible for this type of care, enrolled in a program for devices dispensing. Descriptive study of case series conducted in 14 health units in São Paulo (Brazil) in 2012. It was included medical records of those enrolled in a program for users with urinary and fecal incontinence, and it was applied Karnofsky Performance Scale Index (KPS) to identify the indication of palliative care. 141 of the 160 selected medical records had KPS information. Most cases (98.3%, 138/141) had performance below 70% and, therefore, patients were eligible for palliative care. The most frequent pathologies was related to chronic degenerative diseases (46.3%), followed by disorders related to quality of care during pregnancy and childbirth (24.38%). It is necessary to include palliative care in PHC in order to provide comprehensive, shared and humanized care to patients who need this.

  7. Congenital Giant Melanocytic Nevus with Malignant Melanoma of the Pleura: Do Primary Pleural Melanomas Exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Sharma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cases of primary pleural and bronchial melanoma have been described in the literature in the absence of melanocytic cells in the pleura and bronchi. We described a case of congenital giant melanocytic nevus that had a presentation suggestive of primary pleural melanoma. However, biopsy of a chest wall lesion confirmed the presence of another melanoma deposit in a subcutaneous swelling concealed within the congenital giant melanocytic nevus. Histopathology with immunohistochemistry results showed that the pleural and chest wall swelling were similar. The difficult clinical detection of the primary tumor contributes to the fact that 24% of cases of congenital giant melanocytic nevus receive a diagnosis of metastatic melanoma without identification of the primary site. We propose that it is probable that the entity “primary pleural melanoma” may, in fact, not exist. Instead, all such reported tumors in the pleura may actually be metastatic from an unknown, regressed, or missed primary site.

  8. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary option...

  9. Ophthalmic Skills Assessment of Primary Health Care Workers at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary eye care is at the frontline in the elimina on of the avoidable causes of blindness. Proficiency in the basic ophthalmic skills is a cri cal factor in the effec ve delivery of eye care services at the primary level of care. The aim of the study was to assess the ability of the primary health care workers to provide basic.

  10. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dianne; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez; Valderas, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. Objective: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance that should be assessed when investigating the relationship between safety culture and performance in primary care. Methods: Two consensus-based studies were carried out, in which subject matter experts and primary healthcare professionals from several EU states rated (a) the applicability to their healthcare system of several existing safety culture assessment tools and (b) the appropriateness and usefulness of a range of potential indicators of a positive patient safety culture to primary care settings. The safety culture tools were field-tested in four countries to ascertain any challenges and issues arising when used in primary care. Results: The two existing tools that received the most favourable ratings were the Manchester patient safety framework (MaPsAF primary care version) and the Agency for healthcare research and quality survey (medical office version). Several potential safety culture process indicators were identified. The one that emerged as offering the best combination of appropriateness and usefulness related to the collection of data on adverse patient events. Conclusion: Two tools, one quantitative and one qualitative, were identified as applicable and useful in assessing patient safety culture in primary care settings in Europe. Safety culture indicators in primary care should focus on the processes rather than the outcomes of care. PMID:26339832

  11. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dianne; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez; Valderas, Jose M

    2015-09-01

    There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance that should be assessed when investigating the relationship between safety culture and performance in primary care. Two consensus-based studies were carried out, in which subject matter experts and primary healthcare professionals from several EU states rated (a) the applicability to their healthcare system of several existing safety culture assessment tools and (b) the appropriateness and usefulness of a range of potential indicators of a positive patient safety culture to primary care settings. The safety culture tools were field-tested in four countries to ascertain any challenges and issues arising when used in primary care. The two existing tools that received the most favourable ratings were the Manchester patient safety framework (MaPsAF primary care version) and the Agency for healthcare research and quality survey (medical office version). Several potential safety culture process indicators were identified. The one that emerged as offering the best combination of appropriateness and usefulness related to the collection of data on adverse patient events. Two tools, one quantitative and one qualitative, were identified as applicable and useful in assessing patient safety culture in primary care settings in Europe. Safety culture indicators in primary care should focus on the processes rather than the outcomes of care.

  12. Preventing violence through primary care intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C; Quillian, J

    1992-08-01

    Homicide was the United States' second leading cause of death among people aged 15 to 24 in 1988; non-fatal assaults occur 100 times more frequently. Yet as a society, we have ignored the problem. Risk factors for violent injuries comprise sociological, developmental/psychological and neurophysiological elements. Providers of primary care for children, young adults and their families can help parents develop healthy parenting techniques in child-rearing, help the grade-school-aged child develop non-violent conflict-resolution skills, and help young people learn to avoid violence and potentially violent activities and situations. Health care providers are able to reduce the incidence of violent injuries by addressing the issue of violence in periodic examination visits with both parents and children. Familiarity with risk indicators enables the health care provider to intervene early when needed. An anticipatory guidance outline and a violence-induced injury-visit form are included.

  13. [Palliative care in Primary Care: presentation of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Gonzalez-Losada, J; Chávez-Díaz, B

    2013-10-01

    We present a case of a patient diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme refractory to treatment. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary brain tumour and unfortunately the most aggressive, with an estimated mortality of about 90% in the first year after diagnosis. In our case the patient had reached a stage of life where quality of life was importsnt, with palliative care being the only recourse. The family is the mainstay in the provision of care of terminally ill patients, and without their active participation it would be difficult to achieve the objectives in patient care. We must also consider the family of the terminally ill in our care aim, as its members will experience a series of changes that will affect multiple areas where we should take action. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary Care Physicians’ Prevention Counseling With Patients With Multiple Morbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Shoshana H.; Schoenberg, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of multiple health conditions or multiple morbidity (MM) is increasing. Providing medical care for adults with MM presents challenges, including balancing disease management with prevention. We conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews with 12 primary care physicians to explore their perspectives on prevention counseling among patients with MM. Participants described the complex relationship between disease management and prevention, highlighted the importance of patient motivation, and discussed various strategies to promote receptivity to prevention recommendations. The perceived potential benefits of prevention recommendations encouraged physicians to persist with such counseling, despite challenges presented by visit time constraints and reimbursement procedures and concerns over futility. Physicians recommended the development of alternate care delivery and reimbursement models to overcome challenges of the existing health care system and meet the prevention needs of patients with MM. We explore implications of these findings for maximizing the health and quality of life of adults with MM. PMID:22927702

  15. Primary care physicians' prevention counseling with patients with multiple morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Shoshana H; Schoenberg, Nancy E

    2012-12-01

    The prevalence of multiple health conditions, or multiple morbidity (MM), is increasing. Providing medical care for adults with MM presents challenges, including balancing disease management with prevention. We conducted in-depth semistructured interviews with 12 primary care physicians to explore their perspectives on prevention counseling among patients with MM. Participants described the complex relationship between disease management and prevention, highlighted the importance of patient motivation, and discussed various strategies to promote receptivity to prevention recommendations. The perceived potential benefits of prevention recommendations encouraged physicians to persist with such counseling, despite challenges presented by visit time constraints, reimbursement procedures, and concerns over futility. Physicians recommended the development of alternate care delivery and reimbursement models to overcome challenges of the existing health care system and to meet the prevention needs of patients with MM. We explore the implications of these findings for maximizing the health and quality of life of adults with MM.

  16. Management of LBP at primary care level in South Africa: up to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Primary Health Care (PHC) is well suited for management of low back pain (LBP). Prevalence of (chronic) LBP is suspected to be high among visitors of the South African primary care centers, but currently no information exists on prevalence or guideline adherence. Objectives: To establish if treatment received ...

  17. Management of heart failure in primary care (the IMPROVEMENT of Heart Failure Programme) : an international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleland, JGF; Cohen-Solal, A; Aguilar, JC; Dietz, R; Eastaugh, J; Follath, F; Freemantle, N; Gavazzi, A; van Gilst, WH; Hobbs, FDR; Korewicki, J; Madeira, HC; Preda, [No Value; Swedberg, K; Widimsky, J

    2002-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a prevalent condition that is generally treated in primary care. The aim of this study was to assess how primary-care physicians think that heart failure should be managed, how they implement their knowledge, and whether differences exist in practice between countries.

  18. Parents’ role in adolescent depression care: primary care provider perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovic, Ana; Reynolds, Kerry; McCauley, Heather L.; Sucato, Gina S.; Stein, Bradley D.; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand how primary care providers (PCPs) perceive barriers to adolescent depression care to inform strategies to increase treatment engagement. Study design We conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 PCPs recruited from community pediatric offices with access to integrated behavioral health services (i.e., low system-level barriers to care) who participated in a larger study on treating adolescent depression. Interviews addressed PCP perceptions of barriers to adolescents’ uptake of care for depression. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for key themes. Results Although PCPs mentioned several adolescent barriers to care, they thought parents played a critical role in assisting adolescents in accessing mental health services. Important aspects of the parental role in accessing treatment included transportation, financial support, and social support. PCP’s perceived that parental unwillingness to accept the depression diagnosis, family dysfunction and trauma were common barriers. PCPs contrasted this with examples of good family support they believed would enable adolescents to attend follow-up appointments and have a “life coach” at home to help monitor for side effects and watch for increased suicidality when starting antidepressants. Conclusions In this PCP population, which had enhanced access to mental health specialists, PCPs primarily reported attitudinal barriers to adolescent depression treatment, focusing mainly on perceived parent barriers. The results of these qualitative interviews provide a framework for understanding PCP perceptions of parental barriers to care, identifying that addressing complex parental barriers to care may be important for future interventions. PMID:26143382

  19. Parents' Role in Adolescent Depression Care: Primary Care Provider Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovic, Ana; Reynolds, Kerry; McCauley, Heather L; Sucato, Gina S; Stein, Bradley D; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    To understand how primary care providers (PCPs) perceive barriers to adolescent depression care to inform strategies to increase treatment engagement. We conducted semistructured interviews with 15 PCPs recruited from community pediatric offices with access to integrated behavioral health services (ie, low system-level barriers to care) who participated in a larger study on treating adolescent depression. Interviews addressed PCP perceptions of barriers to adolescents' uptake of care for depression. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed, and coded for key themes. Although PCPs mentioned several adolescent barriers to care, they thought parents played a critical role in assisting adolescents in accessing mental health services. Important aspects of the parental role in accessing treatment included transportation, financial support, and social support. PCPs perceived that parental unwillingness to accept the depression diagnosis, family dysfunction, and trauma were common barriers. PCPs contrasted this with examples of good family support they believed would enable adolescents to attend follow-up appointments and have a "life coach" at home to help monitor for side effects and watch for increased suicidality when starting antidepressants. In this PCP population, which had enhanced access to mental health specialists, PCPs primarily reported attitudinal barriers to adolescent depression treatment, focusing mainly on perceived parent barriers. The results of these qualitative interviews provide a framework for understanding PCP perceptions of parental barriers to care, identifying that addressing complex parental barriers to care may be important for future interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Strengthening weak primary care systems: steps towards stronger primary care in selected Western and Eastern European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Dourgnon, P.; Greß, S.; Jurgutis, A.; Willems, S.

    2013-01-01

    European health care systems are facing diverse challenges. In health policy, strong primary care is seen as key to deal with these challenges. European countries differ in how strong their primary care systems are. Two groups of traditionally weak primary care systems are distinguished. First a

  1. Practice-based research networks: building the infrastructure of primary care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutting, P A

    1996-02-01

    Family practice and primary care are rapidly achieving prominence as the foundation of a rapidly changing health care system, driven not by systematic reform but by the rapid advance of managed care. The knowledge base to support primary care practice, however, lags far behind after decades of neglect in the headlong rush toward overspecialization. The success of biomedical research in the United States in the last 50 years is due in large part to the network of tertiary care hospitals, where the specialized care of highly selected patients supports broad programs of teaching and research. There are no comparable laboratories, however, for research on the important content areas of primary care. The emergence and success of practice-based research networks over the past decade provide an important infrastructure for careful study of the health and health care phenomena that comprise primary care. Practice-based research networks have made a great deal of progress in methods development and have begun to contribute important information to the primary care knowledge base. They continue, however, to be underfunded and underdeveloped, existing on large infusions of volunteerism by the participating physicians. The study recently completed by the Institute of Medicine's Committee on the Future of Primary Care will play a critical role in promoting widespread appreciation of the gap in the scientific base necessary to support primary care practice, the need for research in primary care, and the complementary relationship of this body of research and the more traditional biomedical research that has been so well funded.

  2. Clinical research in primary dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasman, P A; Macpherson, L E; Haining, S A; Breckons, M

    2015-08-28

    Many commissioning bodies for research expect that researchers will actively involve the public and patients in their projects. The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), for example, involves members of the public in reviewing funding applications and making recommendations about research funding. The NIHR's portfolio is currently operating in 97% of NHS Trusts and this now includes research sited in primary dental care. This paper presents some case studies of these and other projects which are designed specifically for patient benefit in dental services in the community. This means there is no necessity to translate the outcomes of such research from a university or hospital base to the general population as the projects are undertaken in dental practices that provide primary dental care to (predominantly) NHS patients. The relevance of the outcomes to dental care is, therefore, likely to be of direct interest and importance to commissioners of healthcare funding in the UK who have a duty to use evidence bases for commissioning decisions.

  3. Creating collaborative learning environments for transforming primary care practices now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William L; Cohen-Katz, Joanne

    2010-12-01

    The renewal of primary care waits just ahead. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) movement and a refreshing breeze of collaboration signal its arrival with demonstration projects and pilots appearing across the country. An early message from this work suggests that the development of collaborative, cross-disciplinary teams may be essential for the success of the PCMH. Our focus in this article is on training existing health care professionals toward being thriving members of this transformed clinical care team in a relationship-centered PCMH. Our description of the optimal conditions for collaborative training begins with delineating three types of teams and how they relate to levels of collaboration. We then describe how to create a supportive, safe learning environment for this type of training, using a different model of professional socialization, and tools for building culture. Critical skills related to practice development and the cross-disciplinary collaborative processes are also included. Despite significant obstacles in readying current clinicians to be members of thriving collaborative teams, a few next steps toward implementing collaborative training programs for existing professionals are possible using competency-based and adult learning approaches. Grasping the long awaited arrival of collaborative primary health care will also require delivery system and payment reform. Until that happens, there is an abundance of work to be done envisioning new collaborative training programs and initiating a nation-wide effort to motivate and reeducate our colleagues. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. [Reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Molina Sáez, Celia; Urbieta Sanz, Elena; Madrigal de Torres, Manuel; Piñera Salmerón, Pascual; Pérez Cárceles, María D

    2016-03-01

    To quantify and to evaluate the reliability of Primary Care (PC) computerised medication records of as an information source of patient chronic medications, and to identify associated factors with the presence of discrepancies. A descriptive cross-sectional study. General Referral Hospital in Murcia. Patients admitted to the cardiology-chest diseases unit, during the months of February to April 2013, on home treatment, who agreed to participate in the study. Evaluation of the reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records by analysing the concordance, by identifying discrepancies, between the active medication in these records and that recorded in pharmacist interview with the patient/caregiver. Identification of associated factors with the presence of discrepancies was analysed using a multivariate logistic regression. The study included a total of 308 patients with a mean of 70.9 years (13.0 SD). The concordance of active ingredients was 83.7%, and this decreased to 34.7% when taking the dosage into account. Discrepancies were found in 97.1% of patients. The most frequent discrepancy was omission of frequency (35.6%), commission (drug added unjustifiably) (14.6%), and drug omission (12.7%). Age older than 65 years (1.98 [1.08 to 3.64]), multiple chronic diseases (1.89 [1.04 to 3.42]), and have a narcotic or psychotropic drug prescribed (2.22 [1.16 to 4.24]), were the factors associated with the presence of discrepancies. Primary Care computerised medication records, although of undoubted interest, are not be reliable enough to be used as the sole source of information on patient chronic medications when admitted to hospital. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Estimating impacts on safety caused by the introduction of electronic medical records in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit Singh

    2004-12-01

    Conclusions This FMEA-like approach identified changes in practice hazards apparently related to EMR implementation. This in turn can help in targeting pre-existing and new vulnerabilities in primary care practices.

  6. African primary care research: reviewing the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Andrew; Mash, Bob

    2014-02-25

    This is the second article in the series on African primary care research. The article focuses on how to search for relevant evidence in the published literature that can be used in the development of a research proposal. The article addresses the style of writing required and the nature of the arguments for the social and scientific value of the proposed study, as well as the use of literature in conceptual frameworks and in the methods. Finally, the article looks at how to keep track of the literature used and to reference it appropriately.

  7. [Experience in treating mucoceles in Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabando Carranza, J A; Cortés Martinez, M; Calvo Carrasco, D

    2016-03-01

    Several cases of mucocele have been treated in our Primary Health Care centre. These are benign lesions, relatively frequent (2.5/1000), which is caused by a retention of mucous from the minor salivary glands into the oral cavity, mainly at the level of the lower lip. The experience in their treatment in this centre is presented, along with a review of the literature to see if our treatment was correct. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterizing Primary Care Visit Activities at Veterans Health Administration Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Jennifer C; Terwiesch, Christian; Pelak, Mary; Pettit, Amy R; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Medical home models seek to increase efficiency and maximize the use of resources by ensuring that all care team members work at the top of their licenses. We sought to break down primary care office visits into measurable activities to better under stand how primary care providers (PCPs) currently spend visit time and to provide insight into potential opportunities for revision or redistribution of healthcare tasks. We videotaped 27 PCPs during office visits with 121 patients at four Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Based on patterns emerging from the data, we identified a taxonomy of 12 provider activity categories that enabled us to quantify the frequency and duration of activities occurring during routine primary care visits. We conducted descriptive and multivariate analyses to examine associations between visit characteristics and provider and clinic characteristics. We found that PCPs spent the greatest percentage of their visit time discussing existing conditions (20%), discussing new conditions (18%), record keeping (13%), and examining patients (13%). Providers spent the smallest percentage of time on preventive care and coordination of care. Mean visit length was 22.9 minutes (range 7.9-58.0 minutes). Site-level ratings of medical home implementation were not associated with differences in how visit time was spent. These data provide a window into how PCPs are spending face-to-face time with patients. The methodology and taxonomy presented here may prove useful for future quality improvement and research endeavors, particularly those focused on opportunities to increase nonappointment care and to ensure that team members work at the top of their skill level.

  9. Optimizing the Primary Prevention of Type-2 Diabetes in Primary Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Interprofessional Relations; Primary Health Care/Organization & Administration; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/Prevention & Control; Primary Prevention/Methods; Risk Reduction Behavior; Randomized Controlled Trial; Life Style

  10. Depression in elderly primary health care clinic attendees in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Depression in the elderly presenting at primary care settings is usually under- detected by primary care physicians. This study assessed the prevalence of depression and the utility of the Geriatric Depression Scale (Short Form) in detecting depression in elderly patients in primary care populations in Ilorin, Nigeria. This was ...

  11. Transition from specialist to primary diabetes care: A qualitative study of perspectives of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liddy Clare

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing prevalence of diabetes and heightened awareness of the benefits of early and intensive disease management have increased service demands and expectations not only of primary care physicians but also of diabetes specialists. While research has addressed issues related to referral into specialist care, much less has been published about the transition from diabetes specialists back to primary care. Understanding the concerns of family physicians related to discharge of diabetes care from specialist centers can support the development of strategies that facilitate this transition and result in broader access to limited specialist services. This study was undertaken to explore primary care physician (PCP perspectives and concerns related to reassuming responsibility for diabetes care after referral to a specialized diabetes center. Methods Qualitative data were collected through three focus groups. Sessions were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and sorted with themes identified using a constant comparison method. The study was undertaken through the regional academic referral center for adult diabetes care in Ottawa, Canada. Participants included 22 primary care physicians representing a variety of referral frequencies, practice types and settings. Results Participants described facilitators and barriers to successful transition of diabetes care at the provider, patient and systems level. Major facilitators included clear communication of a detailed, structured plan of care, ongoing access to specialist services for advice or re-referral, continuing education and mentoring for PCPs. Identified provider barriers were gaps in PCP knowledge and confidence related to diabetes treatment, excessive workload and competing time demands. Systems deterrents included reimbursement policies for health professionals and inadequate funding for diabetes medications and supplies. At the PCP-patient interface

  12. Recommendations from primary care providers for integrating mental health in a primary care system in rural Nepal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Acharya, Bibhav; Tenpa, Jasmine; Thapa, Poshan; Gauchan, Bikash; Citrin, David; Ekstrand, Maria

    2016-01-01

    .... Primary care provider perspectives are important for successful program implementation. We conducted three focus groups with all 24 primary care providers at a district-level hospital in rural Nepal...

  13. The healthy migrant effect in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno-Feliu, Luis A; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Diaz, Esperanza; Poblador-Plou, Beatriz; Macipe-Costa, Rosa; Prados-Torres, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    To compare the morbidity burden of immigrants and natives residing in Aragón, Spain, based on patient registries in primary care, which represents individuals' first contact with the health system. A retrospective observational study was carried out, based on linking electronic primary care medical records to patients' health insurance cards. The study population consisted of the entire population assigned to general practices in Aragón, Spain (1,251,540 individuals, of whom 12% were immigrants). We studied the morbidity profiles of both the immigrant and native populations using the Adjusted Clinical Group System. Logistic regressions were conducted to compare the morbidity burden of immigrants and natives after adjustment for age and gender. Our study confirmed the "healthy immigrant effect", particularly for immigrant men. Relative to the native population, the prevalence rates of the most frequent diseases were lower among immigrants. The percentage of the population showing a moderate to very high morbidity burden was higher among natives (52%) than among Latin Americans (33%), Africans (29%), western Europeans (27%), eastern Europeans and North Americans (26%) and/or Asians (20%). Differences were smaller for immigrants who had lived in the country for 5 years or longer. Length of stay in the host country had a decisive influence on the morbidity burden represented by immigrants, although the health status of both men and women worsened with longer stay in the host country. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. [Medication reconciliation: From admission to primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, E; Mendizabal, A; Ariz, C; Mitxelena, I; Pérez, A; Igea, V

    2016-06-01

    To implement a medication reconciliation circuit of inter-level, comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach in an integrated health organization. To measure the discrepancies detected in each of the steps studied. A prospective intervention study of one-year duration. The medication is reconciled at admission to the hospital, at discharge and when the patient goes to his Primary Care physician. The number and type of discrepancies detected each time the medication is reconciled are collected and resolved, as well as the total number of drugs before and after each reconciliation process quantified. Between November 1, 2013 and October 31, 2014 the medication had been reconciled to 77 patients, 63% male, mean age 69,5 years. Mean admission discrepancy per patient was 7,85, 3,67 at discharge and 2,19 at Primary Care. This program of medication reconciliation, in addition to detect and resolve discrepancies, has been a starting point for establishing new channels of communication between the different health professionals who have participated in the program and disseminate the safety culture within the organization. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. [Urine incontinence referral criteria for primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Esteban Fuertes, M; Fernández-Pro Ledesma, A; Molero García, J M

    2013-05-01

    Despite the high incidence of urinary incontinence (UI), health professional awareness of this disease is low, which in itself is not serious but significantly limits the lives of the patients. The Primary Care associations, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN], Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG], Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [semFYC]) along with the Asociación Española de Urología (EAU) have developed this consensus with the proposal of making GPs aware, and to help them in the diagnosis, treatment and referral to Urologists. The first goal in primary care must be the detection of UI, thus an opportunistic screening at least once in the lifetime of asymptomatic women > 40 years old and asymptomatic men > 55 years old. The diagnosis, based on medical history and physical examination, must determine the type and severity of the UI in order to refer severe cases to the Urologist. Except for overactive bladder (OAB), non-pharmacological conservative treatment is the first approach to uncomplicated UI in females and males. Antimuscarinics are the only drugs that have demonstrated efficacy and safety in urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and OAB. In men with mixed symptoms, excluding severe obstruction cases, a combination therapy of alpha-blockers and antimuscarinics should be chosen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Primary health care in the Southern Mediterranean region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weide, M.G.; Fakiri, F. el; Kulu Glasgow, I.; Grielen, S.J.; Zee, J. van der

    1998-01-01

    This book gives an overview of primary health care in the Southern Mediterranean region. For twelve countries detailed information is provided on the structure and financing of health care, the organisation of primary care (including mother and child health care and immunisation programmes), health

  17. A training course for experts in diabetology in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hart, Huberta E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/147217016; Rutten, Guy E H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074622781

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands so-called Diabetes Care Groups organize the primary diabetes care centrally with delegation to different health care providers. A training course for general practitioners who would like to become experts in diabetology in the primary care setting meets the need to guide the

  18. Primary care as a means of decreasing health care costs | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... weight management, sufficient exercise, discontinuing smoking habits, stress management, and secondary prevention which involves annual medicals, and a focussed approach of specific screening protocols. Keywords: Primary health care; primary care; managed health care; medical scheme; cardiovascular disease,

  19. Assessing the quality of primary care in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Anna D; Leslie, Hannah H; Bitton, Asaf; Jerome, J Gregory; Thermidor, Roody; Joseph, Jean Paul; Kruk, Margaret E

    2017-03-01

    To develop a composite measure of primary care quality and apply it to Haiti's primary care system. Using the Primary Health Care Performance Initiative's framework, we defined four domains of primary care service delivery: (i) accessible care; (ii) effective service delivery; (iii) management and organization; and (iv) primary care functions. We gave each primary care facility in Haiti a quality score for each domain and overall, with poor, fair and good quality indicated by scores of 0.00-0.49, 0.50-0.74 and 0.75-1.00, respectively. We quantified access and effective access to primary care as the proportions of the population within 5 km of any primary care facility and a good facility, respectively. Of the 786 primary care facilities in Haiti in 2013, only 332 (43%) facilities were classified as good for accessible care. Fewer facilities were classified as good in the domains of effective service delivery (30; 4%), management and organization (91; 12%) and primary care functions (43; 5%). Although about 91% of the population lived within 5 km of a primary care facility, only an estimated 23% of the entire population - including just 5% of the rural population - had access to primary care of good quality. Despite an extensive network of health facilities, a minority of Haitians had access to a primary care facility of good quality. Such facilities were especially scarce in rural areas. Similar systematic analyses of the quality of primary care could inform national efforts to strengthen health systems.

  20. Incorporating a primary care practicum in midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Julia Lange; Phillippi, Julia C

    2015-01-01

    There is a shortage of primary care providers in the United States. As more individuals obtain health insurance coverage with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the number seeking care will increase dramatically. Both the Institute of Medicine and the American College of Nurse-Midwives state that certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives should function at their full scope of practice, which includes primary care services as delineated by the Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice. Nonetheless, the percentage of midwives who self-identify as primary care providers is decreasing. Dedicated primary care educational experiences may increase student confidence and encourage the incorporation of primary care into midwifery practice after graduation. Midwifery students in 2 cohorts completed questionnaires before and after a dedicated primary care practicum to study changes in the perceived level of confidence in primary care provision. The students in cohort A participated in 45 hours of primary care clinical time, whereas the students in cohort B participated in 88 hours of primary care clinical time. Postclinical focus groups provided qualitative data on student perceptions and attitudes about the clinical experience. Student responses were coded by cohort and analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis. Seventeen midwifery students from 2 cohorts completed questionnaires. Students in both cohorts reported increased perceived confidence in almost all primary care domains. Participation in a dedicated primary care clinical rotation increased student-perceived confidence in primary care practice. The inclusion of designated primary care clinical education in nurse-midwifery education may contribute to meeting the national need for primary care providers. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health

  1. Migrant children's health problems, care needs, and inequalities: European primary care paediatricians' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Sanz, A; Leiva-Gea, I; Martin-Alvarez, L; Del Torso, S; van Esso, D; Hadjipanayis, A; Kadir, A; Ruiz-Canela, J; Perez-Gonzalez, O; Grossman, Z

    2018-03-01

    Primary care paediatricians' perception of migrant children's health in Europe has not been explored before. Our aim was to examine European paediatricians' knowledge on migrant children's health problems, needs, inequalities, and barriers to access health care. European primary care paediatricians were invited by the European Academy of Paediatrics Research in Ambulatory Setting Network country coordinators to complete a web-based survey concerning health care of migrant children. A descriptive analysis of all variables was performed. The survey was completed by 492 paediatricians. Sixty-three per cent of the respondents reported that the general health of migrant children is worse than that of nonmigrants, chronic diseases cited by 66% of the respondents as the most frequent health problem. Sixty-six per cent of the paediatricians reported that migrant children have different health needs compared to nonmigrant children, proper oral health care mentioned by 86% of the respondents. Cultural/linguistic factors have been reported as the most frequent barrier (90%).to access health care. However, only 37% of providers have access to professional interpreters and cultural mediators. Fifty-two per cent and 32% do not know whether one or more of the family members are undocumented and whether they are refugees/asylum seekers, respectively. Updated guidelines for care of migrant children are available for only 35% of respondents, and 80% of them have not received specific training on migrant children's care. European primary care paediatricians recognize migrant children as a population at risk with more frequent and specific health problems and needs, but they are often unaware of their legal state. Lack of interpreters augments the existing language barriers to access proper care and should be solved. Widespread lack of guidelines and specific providers' training should be addressed to optimize health care delivery to migrant children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Between-Visit Workload in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galpin, Kevin; Jones-Taylor, Cedrella; Anander, Steven; Demosthenes, Charles; Platt, Susan; Ponkshe, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background The time spent and complexity of work done by primary internal medicine physicians between office visits has not been well studied. Objective To measure the time and complexity of this care. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting General internists practicing on primary care teams with electronic medical records at a tertiary Veterans Health Administration Medical Center. Participants Ten physicians. Main Measures The project was designed to measure physician work between office visits. The electronic record was used to record the number and complexity of work events by physicians for 1 month. Complexity of work was measured on five levels ranging from Level I with no change in management, Level II with change in management of one disease, Level III of two diseases, Level IV of three diseases, and Level V of four or more diseases. Time sampling was done over 5 days to determine the time spent by level of complexity. Total time per physician was calculated by multiplying the number of events each physician captured by the average time for that physician for that level of complexity. Key Results Physicians worked a median of 7.9 h per week between office visits. Work was apportioned among Level I (18.3%), Level II (38.3%), Level III (36.5%), Level IV (4.6%), and Level V (2.3%). Limitations Single VA population and self-reported data. Findings may not be generalizable to other practice settings. Conclusion Primary internists spent a median of 7.9 h per week in work between office visits with 82% of the time involved in changes in management. PMID:20700665

  3. Primary health care supervision in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Capblanch, Xavier; Garner, Paul

    2008-03-01

    To (a) summarise opinion about what supervision of primary health care is by those advocating it; (b) compare these features with reports describing supervision in practice; and (c) to appraise the evidence of the effects of sector performance. Systematic review. Reports were classified into three groups and summarised using appropriate methods: policy and opinion papers (narrative summary), descriptive studies (systematically summarised) and experimental or quasi-experimental studies (design and outcomes systematically summarised). Data presented as narrative summaries and tables. 74 reports were included. In eight policy and opinion papers, supervision was conceptualised as the link between the district and the peripheral health staff; it is important in performance and staff motivation; it often includes problem solving, reviewing records, and observing clinical practice; and is usually undertaken by visiting the supervisees place of work. In 54 descriptive studies, the setting was the primary health care (PHC) or specific services and programmes. Supervisor-supervisee dyads were generally district personnel supervising health facilities or lay health workers. Supervision mostly meant visiting supervisees, but also included meetings in the centre; it appeared to focus on administration and checking, sometimes with checklists. Problem solving, feedback and clinical supervision, training and consultation with the community were less commonly described in the descriptive studies. Supervision appears expensive from studies that have reported costs. In 12 quasi-experimental trials, supervision interventions generally showed small positive effects in some of the outcomes assessed. However, trial quality was mixed, and outcomes varied greatly between studies. Supervision is widely recommended, but is a complex intervention and implemented in different ways. There is some evidence of benefit on health care performance, but the studies are generally limited in the rigor

  4. Primary medical care in Irish prisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background An industrial dispute between prison doctors and the Irish Prison Service (IPS) took place in 2004. Part of the resolution of that dispute was that an independent review of prison medical and support services be carried out by a University Department of Primary Care. The review took place in 2008 and we report here on the principal findings of that review. Methods This study utilised a mixed methods approach. An independent expert medical evaluator (one of the authors, DT) inspected the medical facilities, equipment and relevant custodial areas in eleven of the fourteen prisons within the IPS. Semistructured interviews took place with personnel who had operational responsibility for delivery of prison medical care. Prison doctors completed a questionnaire to elicit issues such as allocation of clinician's time, nurse and administrative support and resources available. Results There was wide variation in the standard of medical facilities and infrastructure provided across the IPS. The range of medical equipment available was generally below that of the equivalent general practice scheme in the community. There is inequality within the system with regard to the ratio of doctor-contracted time relative to the size of the prison population. There is limited administrative support, with the majority of prisons not having a medical secretary. There are few psychiatric or counselling sessions available. Conclusions People in prison have a wide range of medical care needs and there is evidence to suggest that these needs are being met inconsistently in Irish prisons. PMID:20307311

  5. Primary medical care in Irish prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Joe M; Darker, Catherine D; Thomas, David E; Allwright, Shane P A; O'Dowd, Tom

    2010-03-22

    An industrial dispute between prison doctors and the Irish Prison Service (IPS) took place in 2004. Part of the resolution of that dispute was that an independent review of prison medical and support services be carried out by a University Department of Primary Care. The review took place in 2008 and we report here on the principal findings of that review. This study utilised a mixed methods approach. An independent expert medical evaluator (one of the authors, DT) inspected the medical facilities, equipment and relevant custodial areas in eleven of the fourteen prisons within the IPS. Semistructured interviews took place with personnel who had operational responsibility for delivery of prison medical care. Prison doctors completed a questionnaire to elicit issues such as allocation of clinician's time, nurse and administrative support and resources available. There was wide variation in the standard of medical facilities and infrastructure provided across the IPS. The range of medical equipment available was generally below that of the equivalent general practice scheme in the community. There is inequality within the system with regard to the ratio of doctor-contracted time relative to the size of the prison population. There is limited administrative support, with the majority of prisons not having a medical secretary. There are few psychiatric or counselling sessions available. People in prison have a wide range of medical care needs and there is evidence to suggest that these needs are being met inconsistently in Irish prisons.

  6. Primary medical care in Irish prisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allwright Shane PA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An industrial dispute between prison doctors and the Irish Prison Service (IPS took place in 2004. Part of the resolution of that dispute was that an independent review of prison medical and support services be carried out by a University Department of Primary Care. The review took place in 2008 and we report here on the principal findings of that review. Methods This study utilised a mixed methods approach. An independent expert medical evaluator (one of the authors, DT inspected the medical facilities, equipment and relevant custodial areas in eleven of the fourteen prisons within the IPS. Semistructured interviews took place with personnel who had operational responsibility for delivery of prison medical care. Prison doctors completed a questionnaire to elicit issues such as allocation of clinician's time, nurse and administrative support and resources available. Results There was wide variation in the standard of medical facilities and infrastructure provided across the IPS. The range of medical equipment available was generally below that of the equivalent general practice scheme in the community. There is inequality within the system with regard to the ratio of doctor-contracted time relative to the size of the prison population. There is limited administrative support, with the majority of prisons not having a medical secretary. There are few psychiatric or counselling sessions available. Conclusions People in prison have a wide range of medical care needs and there is evidence to suggest that these needs are being met inconsistently in Irish prisons.

  7. Civilian primary care prescribing psychologist in an army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David S

    2012-12-01

    The present article discusses the integration of a civilian prescribing psychologist into a primary care clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center. A description of the role of the prescribing psychologist in this setting is provided. The author asserts that integrating prescribing psychology into primary care can improve patient access to skilled behavioral health services including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment. Potential benefits to the primary care providers (PCPs) working in primary care clinics are discussed. The importance of collaboration between the prescribing psychologist and PCP is emphasized. Initial feedback indicates that integration of a prescribing psychologist into primary care has been well received in this setting.

  8. Primary Health Care: care coordinator in regionalized networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Patty Fidelis de; Santos, Adriano Maia Dos

    2016-12-22

    To analyze the breadth of care coordination by Primary Health Care in three health regions. This is a quantitative and qualitative case study. Thirty-one semi-structured interviews with municipal, regional and state managers were carried out, besides a cross-sectional survey with the administration of questionnaires to physicians (74), nurses (127), and a representative sample of users (1,590) of Estratégia Saúde da Família (Family Health Strategy) in three municipal centers of health regions in the state of Bahia. Primary Health Care as first contact of preference faced strong competition from hospital outpatient and emergency services outside the network. Issues related to access to and provision of specialized care were aggravated by dependence on the private sector in the regions, despite progress observed in institutionalizing flows starting out from Primary Health Care. The counter-referral system was deficient and interprofessional communication was scarce, especially concerning services provided by the contracted network. Coordination capacity is affected both by the fragmentation of the regional network and intrinsic problems in Primary Health Care, which poorly supported in its essential attributes. Although the health regions have common problems, Primary Health Care remains a subject confined to municipal boundaries. Analisar o alcance da coordenação do cuidado pela Atenção Primária à Saúde em três regiões de saúde. Trata-se de estudo de caso, com abordagem quantitativa e qualitativa. Foram realizadas 31 entrevistas semiestruturadas com gestores municipais, regionais e estaduais e estudo transversal com aplicação de questionários para médicos (74), enfermeiros (127) e amostra representativa de usuários (1.590) da Estratégia Saúde da Família em três municípios-sede de regiões de saúde do estado da Bahia. A função de porta de entrada preferencial pela Atenção Primária à Saúde deparava-se com forte concorrência de servi

  9. Usual and unusual care: existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Mohr, David C; Davidson, Karina W; Schwartz, Joseph E

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the use of existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions and the role of extrinsic health care services in the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Selective qualitative review. Extrinsic health care services, also known as nonstudy care, have important but under-recognized effects on the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Usual care, treatment-as-usual, standard of care, and other existing practice control groups pose a variety of methodological and ethical challenges, but they play a vital role in behavioral intervention research. This review highlights the need for a scientific consensus statement on control groups in behavioral trials.

  10. PAs in primary care: Current status and workforce implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, Bettie; Smith, Noel; Cawley, James F

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the PA primary care workforce is an initial step toward greater use of primary care PAs in new healthcare delivery models. This study sought to describe primary care PA practice as it compares with PA practice in other specialties. Data from two 2015 national American Academy of Physician Assistants surveys were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Statistically significant differences between primary care and specialty PAs were assessed using tests of column proportions and tests of column means. Compared with PAs in specialties, primary care PAs were older, saw more patients per week, and spent less time consulting with physicians. In addition, higher percentages were Hispanic, had a record of military service, and had plans to leave their specialty or retire. Primary care PAs appear to possess unique strengths; however, challenges to maintaining a primary care PA workforce are substantial.

  11. Health promotion and primary health care: examining the discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Rachelle

    2015-01-01

    The health promotion discourse is comprised of assumptions about health and health care that are compatible with primary health care. An examination of the health promotion discourse illustrates how assumptions of health can help to inform primary health care. Despite health promotion being a good fit for primary health care, this analysis demonstrates that the scope in which it is being implemented in primary health care settings is limited. The health promotion discourse appears largely compatible with primary health care-in theory and in the health care practices that follow. The aim of this article is to contribute to the advancement of theoretical understanding of the health promotion discourse, and the relevance of health promotion to primary health care.

  12. Optimising management of hypertension in primary care: the Valsartan Intensified Primary Care Reduction of Blood Pressure (Viper-Bp) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Simon; Carrington, Melinda J; Swemmer, Carla; Kurstjens, Nicol; Jennings, Garry L

    2011-12-15

    The Valstartan Intensified Primary CarE Reduction of Blood Pressure Study (VIPER-BP) Study is an open-label, randomised controlled trial comparing usual primary care management with an intensive BP management strategy using three forms of valsartan-based therapy (mono-therapy, thiazide diuretic or calcium channel blocker combinations) to achieve individualised BP control. To identify the features of General Practitioner (GP) management of hypertension in Australia, we analyse the response to a case scenario-based survey of 500 GPs. We subsequently recruited a national cohort of GP Investigators to enrol up to 2500 patients into the VIPER-BP Study. GP responses clearly demonstrated that, compared to the VIPER-BP intervention, a heterogeneous approach to the primary care management of hypertension persists in Australia. By November 2010, 2157 hypertensive patients from 272 actively recruiting GP Investigators were enrolled into the study. Of these, 1965 (91%) patients were entered into a standardised "run-in" phase of 28 days of valsartan 80 mg/day. Subsequently, 1285 patients were randomised to usual care (n=435) or the VIPER-BP intervention (n=850). There was a predominance of males (62%), whilst 55% had pre-existing diabetes or cardiovascular disease and 63% had been previously treated for hypertension. Mean systolic and diastolic BP on randomisation for men and women, respectively, was 148 ± 15/88 ± 11 and 148 ± 18/87 ± 10 mm Hg. In contrast to typical primary care management of hypertension, VIPER-BP combines more intensive and aggressive therapies with structured management to more rapidly attain and sustain individualised BP targets in hypertensive patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Serious mental illness and the role of primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planner, Claire; Gask, Linda; Reilly, Siobhan

    2014-08-01

    Policies and guidelines from across the international community are attempting to galvanise action to address the unacceptably high morbidity and mortality rates amongst people with a serious mental illness (SMI). Primary care has a pivotal role to play in translating policy into evidence based practice in conjunction with other providers of health care services. This paper explores the current and potential of role of primary care providers in delivering health care to people with SMI. A review of research in the following key areas of primary health care provision is provided: access, screening and preventative care, routine monitoring and follow-up, diagnosis and delivery of treatments in accordance with guidelines and delivery of interventions. There is undoubtedly a need for further research to establish the effectiveness of primary care interventions and the organisation of services. Equally, understanding how primary care services can deliver high quality care and promoting effective working at the interface with other services must be priorities.

  14. Managing diagnostic uncertainty in primary care: a systematic critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rahul; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Panagioti, Maria; Esmail, Aneez; Campbell, Stephen; Panagopoulou, Efharis

    2017-08-07

    Diagnostic uncertainty is one of the largest contributory factors to the occurrence of diagnostic errors across most specialties in medicine and arguably uncertainty is greatest in primary care due to the undifferentiated symptoms primary care physicians are often presented with. Physicians can respond to diagnostic uncertainty in various ways through the interplay of a series of cognitive, emotional and ethical reactions. The consequences of such uncertainty however can impact negatively upon the primary care practitioner, their patients and the wider healthcare system. Understanding the nature of the existing empirical literature in relation to managing diagnostic uncertainty in primary medical care is a logical and necessary first step in order to understand what solutions are already available and/or to aid the development of any training or feedback aimed at better managing this uncertainty. This review is the first to characterize the existing empirical literature on managing diagnostic uncertainty in primary care. Sixteen databases were systematically searched from inception to present with no restrictions. Hand searches of relevant websites and reference lists of included studies were also conducted. Two authors conducted abstract/article screening and data extraction. PRISMA guidelines were adhered to. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria. A narrative and conceptual synthesis was undertaken under the premises of critical reviews. Results suggest that studies have focused on internal factors (traits, skills and strategies) associated with managing diagnostic uncertainty with only one external intervention identified. Cognitive factors ranged from the influences of epistemological viewpoints to practical approaches such as greater knowledge of the patient, utilizing resources to hand and using appropriate safety netting techniques. Emotional aspects of uncertainty management included clinicians embracing uncertainty and working with provisional diagnoses

  15. Paediatric primary care quality and accessibility: Parents' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Marie-Hélène; Lemoine, Claude; Cyr, Claude

    2006-01-01

    To measure parents' satisfaction with paediatric primary care quality and accessibility. High-quality paediatric primary care is a cornerstone of efforts to improve health outcomes and access to care, as well as to control health care spending. A strong primary care infrastructure is related to improved health outcomes, including an improved mortality rate. A cross-sectional survey using the Parents' Perception of Primary Care questionnaire and evidence-based items from the Rourke Baby Record were used to measure parents' satisfaction. Of 200 questionnaires sent, 130 were returned. The mean number of children per family was 1.7+/-0.8 (mean +/- SD). Sixty-six per cent of children received their primary care from general practitioners, 19% received their primary care from paediatricians, and 15% had no regular physician and identified other professionals (community nurses, midwives or chiropractors) as their primary care providers. Parents were questioned about their child's hearing in 66% of cases. Only 41% of parents received guidance about breastfeeding, 37% about adequate sleeping position, 17% about the dangers of second-hand smoke and 16% about car safety seats. The level of satisfaction with communication, contextual knowledge and coordination of care was higher for families followed by general practitioners and paediatricians than for families followed by nonphysicians. According to the Parents' Perception of Primary Care scores, the overall satisfaction with primary care was higher for care given by general practitioners and paediatricians than for care given by midwives or chiropractors, and intermediate when given by nurses. In this survey, the majority of children received their primary care from physicians, most commonly general practitioners. Parents' overall satisfaction regarding their infant's primary health care was higher when it was delivered by physicians than by alternative health care providers. Evidence-based guidance recommendations were

  16. [Update of hidradenitis suppurativa in Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, F J; Pascual, J C; López-Martín, I; Pereyra-Rodríguez, J J; Martorell Calatayud, A; Salgado-Boquete, L; Labandeira-García, J

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a prevalent disease that is noted for its clinical variability and by its severe impact on quality of life. A meticulous scientific literature review is presented in this article in order to give an update on what is known on this condition. Primary Care physicians obviously play an important role in the early diagnosis and management of hidradenitis suppurativa. This review aims to provide a current and practical overview about this disease in order to optimise the healthcare for these patients by making the best use of available resources. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Management of neonatal jaundice in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Asl; Mat Daud, S; Teh, S H; Choo, Y M; Kutty, F M

    2016-01-01

    The Clinical Practice Guidelines on Management of Neonatal Jaundice 2003 was updated by a multidisciplinary development group and approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia in 2014. A systematic review of 13 clinical questions was conducted using evidence retrieved mainly from Medline and Cochrane databases. Critical appraisal was done using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklist. Recommendations were formulated based on the accepted 103 evidences and tailored to local setting as stated below. Neonatal jaundice (NNJ) is a common condition seen in primary care. Multiple risk factors contribute to severe NNJ, which if untreated can lead to adverse neurological outcomes. Visual assessment, transcutaneous bilirubinometer (TcB) and total serum bilirubin (TSB) are the methods used for the detection of NNJ. Phototherapy remains the mainstay of the treatment. Babies with severe NNJ should be followed-up to detect and manage sequelae. Strategies to prevent severe NNJ include health education, identification of risk factors, proper assessment and early referral.

  18. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsima BM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Billy M Tsima,1 Vincent Setlhare,1 Oathokwa Nkomazana2 1Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana Background: Botswana’s health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An integrated symptom-based guideline was developed so as to translate the Botswana national guidelines to those applicable in primary care. The Botswana Primary Care Guideline (BPCG integrates the care of communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases, by frontline primary health care workers.Methods: The Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, together with guideline developers from the Knowledge Translation Unit (University of Cape Town collaborated with the Ministry of Health to develop the guideline. Stakeholder groups were set up to review specific content of the guideline to ensure compliance with Botswana government policy and the essential drug list.Results: Participants included clinicians, academics, patient advocacy groups, and policymakers from different disciplines, both private and public. Drug-related issues were identified as necessary for implementing recommendations of the guideline. There was consensus by working groups for updating the essential drug list for primary care and expansion of prescribing rights of trained nurse prescribers in primary care within their scope of practice. An integrated guideline incorporating common symptoms of diseases seen in the Botswana primary care setting was developed.Conclusion: The development of the BPCG took a broad consultative approach with buy in from relevant stakeholders. It is anticipated that implementation of the BPCG will translate into better

  19. Operational integration in primary health care: patient encounters and workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Chatzea, Vasiliki-Eirini; Markaki, Adelais; Kritikos, Kyriakos; Petelos, Elena; Lionis, Christos

    2017-11-29

    Despite several countrywide attempts to strengthen and standardise the primary healthcare (PHC) system, Greece is still lacking a sustainable, policy-based model of integrated services. The aim of our study was to identify operational integration levels through existing patient care pathways and to recommend an alternative PHC model for optimum integration. The study was part of a large state-funded project, which included 22 randomly selected PHC units located across two health regions of Greece. Dimensions of operational integration in PHC were selected based on the work of Kringos and colleagues. A five-point Likert-type scale, coupled with an algorithm, was used to capture and transform theoretical framework features into measurable attributes. PHC services were grouped under the main categories of chronic care, urgent/acute care, preventive care, and home care. A web-based platform was used to assess patient pathways, evaluate integration levels and propose improvement actions. Analysis relied on a comparison of actual pathways versus optimal, the latter ones having been identified through literature review. Overall integration varied among units. The majority (57%) of units corresponded to a basic level. Integration by type of PHC service ranged as follows: basic (86%) or poor (14%) for chronic care units, poor (78%) or basic (22%) for urgent/acute care units, basic (50%) for preventive care units, and partial or basic (50%) for home care units. The actual pathways across all four categories of PHC services differed from those captured in the optimum integration model. Certain similarities were observed in the operational flows between chronic care management and urgent/acute care management. Such similarities were present at the highest level of abstraction, but also in common steps along the operational flows. Existing patient care pathways were mapped and analysed, and recommendations for an optimum integration PHC model were made. The developed web

  20. Assessment of primary health care from the perspective of patients hospitalized for ambulatory care sensitive conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos de Sá, Francisco; Di Lorenzo Oliveira, Cláudia; de Moura Fernandino, Débora; Menezes de Pádua, Cristiane A; Cardoso, Clareci Silva

    2016-06-01

    The hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC) has been used to assess the effectiveness of primary health care (PHC). Due to the existence of different models of organization of PHC in Brazil, it is important to develop indicators and tools for their assessment. Assessment PHC from the perspective of patients hospitalized for ACSC. A cross-sectional study was carried out. The patients were interviewed for assessment of PHC quality using the primary care assessment tool and a questionnaire. Descriptive analyses were performed and the Primary Health Care Index (PHCI) was calculated according to the health service modality, either the traditional primary health care (TPHC) or the Family Health Program (FHP). The PHCI of the two health care models were compared. A total of 314 ACSC patients were interviewed 26.4% from the FHP and 73.6% from the TPHC. In general, the PHCI dimension with the lowest score was health service access. There was no significant difference in the general PHCI for the two modalities of services (P = 0.16); however, comprehensiveness was better assessed in the TPHC, while longitudinality, family focus and community orientation were better evaluated by FHP users (P ≤ 0.05). The FHP was found to be better qualified to establish longitudinality in the community, an important dimension for continued care. However, promoting access to and consolidating a proactive care model focussed on family shows to be a great challenge for the implementation of a quality and resolutive PHC in large urban centres. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Psoriasis for the primary care practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Melodie; Aldredge, Lakshi; Parker, Patti

    2017-03-01

    Primary care practitioners (PCPs) are playing an increasingly important role in the management and care of psoriasis. Thus, it is important for PCPs to be knowledgeable about the disease and to be able to differentiate between common myths and facts related to diagnosis and treatment. By building relationships with their patients and working collaboratively with dermatology health professionals and other specialists, PCPs can facilitate communication about the patient's treatment preferences and expectations for symptom relief, and they may be better able to work with the patient to optimize treatment adherence. This review aims to provide PCPs with a primer on psoriasis, its associated comorbidities, and its impact on patients' quality of life. Discussion topics include psoriasis epidemiology, triggering factors, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, comorbidities, and approaches to treatment. This review also highlights the importance of staying abreast of advances in the understanding of psoriasis pathogenesis as well as emerging therapeutic treatment options, because these advances may change the treatment landscape and increase patients' expectations for skin clearance. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Women with pre-existing diabetes and their experiences of maternity care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhouse, Elizabeth; Letherby, Gayle; Stephen, Nicole

    2013-02-01

    the aims of the study were to explore the experience of maternity care services used by women whose pregnancy is complicated by pre-existing diabetes, to gain a deeper understanding of service use and to identify aspects of services that women with pre-existing diabetes would like improved. for women with pre-existing diabetes; pregnancy, birth and the transition to motherhood can be complex and even chaotic. The aim of specialist diabetes care given during pregnancy and delivered by a specialist team of health-care professionals is to optimise pregnancy outcome. However, how health-care professionals within maternity services provide care and support women with pre-existing diabetes during pregnancy and early motherhood has received limited attention. an exploratory study utilising a grounded theory approach was conducted. Data were collected via in-depth interviews with 20 respondents; one-to-one, dyad and group interviews were undertaken to fully explore issues. Analysis was undertaken by sub-groups of the research team with at least two members working on each of them. three themes were identified from interviews: empathic care with care more focused on diabetes not pregnancy; feeling judged by health-care professionals (with nearly all respondents reporting negative encounters of consultation with the specialist team); and the notion of expertise (with respondents reporting feeling frustrated when it seemed health-care professionals did not value their expertise). the study emphasised the importance of the health-care relationship for pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes. For outcomes to be optimised women need to be able to form open and trusting relationships with the health-care team. this study highlights the need for the health-care team not only to provide physical care to optimise outcome but also supportive care to assist women with pregnancies complicated by diabetes to achieve the best possible physical and emotional health and well

  3. Primary Care Practice Development: A Relationship-Centered Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, William L.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Nutting, Paul A.; Stange, Kurt C.; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Numerous primary care practice development efforts, many related to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), are emerging across the United States with few guides available to inform them. This article presents a relationship-centered practice development approach to understand practice and to aid in fostering practice development to advance key attributes of primary care that include access to first-contact care, comprehensive care, coordination of care, and a personal relationship ...

  4. Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care: one journal, two audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care (OMPC) enters its fourth year of operation in 2010 under the umbrella of BioMed Central. Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care strives to promote and advance research and scholarly work within the fields of osteopathic medicine and primary care. In so doing, OMPC welcomes submissions from clinicians within both the osteopathic and allopathic medical professions, and from other professionals having interests in primary care, including health care delivery, public health, and evidence-based medicine. Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care offers fair and expeditious peer review (mean time from submission to publication, 118 days), retention of copyright for authors, unlimited online distribution and access without charge to readers, indexing in PubMed, and archiving in PubMed Central. In 2010, there will be an increased availability of waivers or discounts of article processing charges via several mechanisms for eligible authors who submit qualified manuscripts, especially in the field of primary care. PMID:20145732

  5. A Mixed Methods Examination of Communication between Oncologists and Primary Care Providers among Primary Care Physicians in Underserved Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Shen, Megan; Binz-Scharf, Maria; D’Agostino, Tom; Blakeney, Natasha; Weiss, Elisa; Michaels, Margo; Patel, Shilpa; McKee, M. Diane; Bylund, Carma L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Research has demonstrated that communication and care coordination improve cancer patient outcomes. To improve communication and care coordination, it is important to understand Primary Care Providers’ (PCPs’) perceptions of communication with oncologists as well as PCPs’ communication needs. Methods A mixed methods approach was utilized in the present study. In the qualitative phase of the study, 18 PCPs practicing in underserved, minority communities were interviewed about their experiences communicating with oncologists. In the quantitative phase of the study, 128 PCPs completed an online survey about their preferences, experiences, and satisfaction with communication with oncologists. Results Results indicated a PCP-oncologist gap in communication occurred between diagnosis and treatment. PCPs wanted more communication with oncologists, updates on their patients’ prognosis throughout treatment, to be contacted via telephone or email, and saw their role as crucial in providing supportive care for their patients. Conclusions Although PCPs recognize that they play a critical, pro-active role in supporting patients throughout the continuum of their cancer care experience, existing norms regarding post-referral engagement and oncologist-PCP communication often hinder activation of this role among PCPs. Expected standards regarding the method, frequency, and quality of post-referral communication should be jointly articulated and made accountable between PCPs and oncologists to help improve cancer patients’ quality of care, particularly in minority communities. PMID:25377382

  6. Effectiveness of oral health education among primary health care workers at the primary health center in Nellore district, Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthyala Pavana Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary dental care can be a way of achieving good oral health for the community. This can be achieved by integration of oral health care with the existing primary health care activities through training of primary health care workers on aspects of oral health. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of oral health education among primary health care workers at the primary health center (PHC in Nellore district, Andhra Pradesh. Materials and Methods: Descriptive longitudinal study was conducted from June 2010 to August 2010 at a PHC. Knowledge about oral health among primary health care workers was pretested using a self-administered questionnaire prepared in local language (Telugu. Later after a month health education was provided to the health workers, and pamphlets with information on oral health were distributed. Posttest assessment was done 1-month after providing health education using the same questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 12.0 software, Student′s t-test was used to compare knowledge scores between pre and posttests. Results: A total of 118 Primary Health Care Workers with the majority in the 20-30 years age group participated in the study. Posttest assessment showed a change in knowledge level with an overall increase in knowledge level of primary health care workers with a mean difference of 12.56 ± 3.23, which was highly significant (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The knowledge about oral health was poor, and it improved after providing health education to primary health care workers. Change in knowledge was appreciable and may play a key role in oral health promotion of the vast majority of the rural population.

  7. Documenting coordination of cancer care between primary care providers and oncology specialists in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, Melissa C; Vukmirovic, Marija; Tomasone, Jennifer R; Grunfeld, Eva; Urquhart, Robin; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Walker, Melanie; Webster, Fiona; Fitch, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    To report on the findings of the CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum) Casebook project, which systematically documented Canadian initiatives (ie, programs and projects) designed to improve or support coordination and continuity of cancer care between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncology specialists. Pan-Canadian environmental scan. Canada. Individuals representing the various initiatives provided data for the analysis. Initiatives included in the Casebook met the following criteria: they supported coordination and collaboration between PCPs and oncology specialists; they were related to diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, or personalized medicine; and they included breast or colorectal cancer or both. Data were collected on forms that were compiled into summaries (ie, profiles) for each initiative. Casebook initiatives were organized based on the targeted stage of the cancer care continuum, jurisdiction, and strategy (ie, model of care or type of intervention) employed. Thematic analysis identified similarities and differences among employed strategies, the level of primary care engagement, implementation barriers and facilitators, and initiative evaluation. The CanIMPACT Casebook profiles 24 initiatives. Eleven initiatives targeted the survivorship stage of the cancer care continuum and 15 focused specifically on breast or colorectal cancer or both. Initiative teams implemented the following strategies: nurse patient navigation, multidisciplinary care teams, electronic communication or information systems, PCP education, and multicomponent initiatives. Initiatives engaged PCPs at various levels. Implementation barriers included lack of care standardization across jurisdictions and incompatibility among electronic communication systems. Implementation facilitators included having clinical and program leaders publicly support the initiative, repurposing existing resources, receiving financial support, and

  8. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians...... is conducted. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one such chronic disease. Despite specialist care being essential, much IBD care could and probably should be delivered in primary care with continued collaboration between all stakeholders. Whilst most primary care physicians only have few patients currently...... affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD...

  9. Primary care in Minnesota: an academic health center's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kathleen D; Cieslak, Jennifer E; Radcliffe, Peter M; Sjogren, Kaia

    2008-05-01

    Although Minnesota's overall supply of primary care physicians is as good as or better than that of many other states, Minnesotans in some rural and urban communities do not have ready access to primary care. Simply training more doctors using the current model is not a viable solution to this problem. In order to increase the supply of primary care physicians, the state, its educational institutions, and its health care provider organizations will need to develop new educational opportunities, explore new models of care, and create viable systems for health care delivery for all Minnesotans. This article describes the current status of primary care in the state and ideas for addressing anticipated workforce shortages and enhancin the vitality of primary care.

  10. Project DULCE: Strengthening Families through Enhanced Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sege, Robert; Kaplan-Sanof, Margot; Morton, Samantha J.; Velasco-Hodgson, M. Carolina; Preer, Genevieve; Morakinyo, Grace; DeVos, Ed; Krathen, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Project DULCE (Developmental understanding and legal Collaboration for everyone) integrated the Strengthening families approach to building family protective factors into routine health care visits for infants in a primary health care setting. The core collaborators--Boston medical Center pediatric primary care, the medical-legal partnership |…

  11. Patient Satisfaction and Factor of Importance in Primary Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Patient Satisfaction and Factor of Importance in Primary. Health Care Services in Botswana. Abdullahi R. Bamidele, Muhammad E. Hoque, and Hendry Van der Heever. Department of Public Health, School of Health Care Sciences. University of Limpopo (Medunsa Campus), South Africa. ABSTRACT: Primary health care ...

  12. Primary palliative care clinic pilot project demonstrates benefits of a nurse practitioner-directed clinic providing primary and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Darrell; Eby, Kerry; Burson, Sean; Green, Meghan; McGoodwin, Wendy; Isaac, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Primary Palliative Care Pilot Project was to determine if patients with a life-limiting illness who receive their primary care and palliative care from a consistent provider via a nurse practitioner (NP)-founded and-directed Primary Palliative Care Clinic at a public hospital would have improved symptom management and decreased emergency department utilization over time. All patients followed in the Harborview Primary Palliative Care Clinic from January to March 2010. The results of this project demonstrate that patients with a life-limiting illness who receive their primary care and palliative care in an NP-founded and -directed Primary Palliative Care Clinic have decreased utilization of the emergency department, and some experience improvement in symptom assessment scores. Palliative care providers and administrators should explore opportunities to expand outpatient palliative care clinics with an emphasis on primary care and continuity of care. NPs by experience and education are ideally suited to manage both primary and palliative care needs for people at the end of life. ©2011 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. Understanding integrated care: a comprehensive conceptual framework based on the integrative functions of primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, P.P.; Schepman, S.M.; Opheij, W.; Bruijnzeels, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Primary care has a central role in integrating care within a health system. However, conceptual ambiguity regarding integrated care hampers a systematic understanding. This paper proposes a conceptual framework that combines the concepts of primary care and integrated care, in order to

  14. Primary health care in Canada: systems in motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Brian; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Strumpf, Erin; Coyle, Natalie

    2011-06-01

    During the 1980s and 1990s, innovations in the organization, funding, and delivery of primary health care in Canada were at the periphery of the system rather than at its core. In the early 2000s, a new policy environment emerged. This policy analysis examines primary health care reform efforts in Canada during the last decade, drawing on descriptive information from published and gray literature and from a series of semistructured interviews with informed observers of primary health care in Canada. Primary health care in Canada has entered a period of potentially transformative change. Key initiatives include support for interprofessional primary health care teams, group practices and networks, patient enrollment with a primary care provider, financial incentives and blended-payment schemes, development of primary health care governance mechanisms, expansion of the primary health care provider pool, implementation of electronic medical records, and quality improvement training and support. Canada's experience suggests that primary health care transformation can be achieved voluntarily in a pluralistic system of private health care delivery, given strong government and professional leadership working in concert. © 2011 Milbank Memorial Fund. Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  15. Characterization of care for patients with wounds in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Ramos Vieira Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the treatment of patients with wounds in the Primary Health Care. A descriptive research with quantitative approach. Ninety-three Family Health Units of the city of Recife-PE, Brazil, were selected, and 112 nurses were interviewed from July to December 2011. The record book of bandages and procedures and the dressing form were used as an additional source of data. Frequencies, measures of central tendency and dispersion, prevalence and, for continuous variables, the analysis of variance were estimated. The prevalence of patients with wounds was 1.9% of the estimated covered population. Vascular ulcers accounted for 74.1% of the treated wounds. The dressing was predominantly performed by Nursing technicians, and the products available for this procedure did not match the current technological development.

  16. Usual and unusual care: existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Mohr, David C; Davidson, Karina W; Schwartz, Joseph E

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the use of existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions and the role of extrinsic health care services in the design and conduct of behavioral trials...

  17. Health information technology workforce needs of rural primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Susan M; Andrilla, C Holly A; Patterson, Davis G; Fenton, Susan H; Ostergard, Stefanie J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed electronic health record (EHR) and health information technology (HIT) workforce resources needed by rural primary care practices, and their workforce-related barriers to implementing and using EHRs and HIT. Rural primary care practices (1,772) in 13 states (34.2% response) were surveyed in 2012 using mailed and Web-based questionnaires. EHRs or HIT were used by 70% of respondents. Among practices using or intending to use the technology, most did not plan to hire new employees to obtain EHR/HIT skills and even fewer planned to hire consultants or vendors to fill gaps. Many practices had staff with some basic/entry, intermediate and/or advanced-level skills, but nearly two-thirds (61.4%) needed more staff training. Affordable access to vendors/consultants who understand their needs and availability of community college and baccalaureate-level training were the workforce-related barriers cited by the highest percentages of respondents. Accessing the Web/Internet challenged nearly a quarter of practices in isolated rural areas, and nearly a fifth in small rural areas. Finding relevant vendors/consultants and qualified staff were greater barriers in small and isolated rural areas than in large rural areas. Rural primary care practices mainly will rely on existing staff for continued implementation and use of EHR/HIT systems. Infrastructure and workforce-related barriers remain and must be overcome before practices can fully manage patient populations and exchange patient information among care system partners. Efforts to monitor adoption of these skills and ongoing support for continuing education will likely benefit rural populations. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  18. How primary care networks can help integrate academic and service initiatives in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul; Graffy, Jonathan; Wallace, Paul; Kirby, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Theory of effective network operation in primary care is underdeveloped. This study aimed to identify how primary care networks can best integrate academic and service initiatives. We performed a comparative case study of 4 primary care research networks in North London, England, for the years 1998-2002. Indicators were selected to assess changes in (1) research capacity, (2) multidisciplinary collaboration, and (3) research productivity. We compared the profiles of network outcome with descriptions of their contexts and organizational types from a previous evaluation. Together, the networks supported 133 viable projects and 30 others; 399 practitioners, managers, and academics participated in the research teams. How the networks organized themselves was influenced by the circumstances in which they were formed. Different ways of organizing were associated with different outcome profiles. Shared projects and learning spaces helped participants to develop trusted relationships. A top-down, hierarchical approach based on institutional alliances and academic expertise attracted more funding and appeared to be stable. The bottom-up, individualistic network with research practices was good at reflecting on practical primary care concerns. Whole-system methods brought together stakeholder contributions from all parts of the system. Networks can help integrate academic research and service development initiatives by facilitating interorganizational interactions and in shared leadership of projects. Researchers and practitioners stand to gain considerably from an integrated approach in both the short and the long term. Success requires agreement about a set of pathways, learning spaces, and feedback mechanisms to harness the insights and efforts of stakeholders throughout the whole system.

  19. [Evolution of burnout and associated factors in primary care physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matía Cubillo, Angel Carlos; Cordero Guevara, José; Mediavilla Bravo, José Javier; Pereda Riguera, Maria José; González Castro, Maria Luisa; González Sanz, Ana

    2012-09-01

    To analyse the course of burnout and develop an explanatory model. Prospective cohort dynamics. SITE: All primary health care centres in Burgos. All physicians except medical emergencies, paediatrics and residents. Anonymous self-report questionnaire: Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and related variables. An analysis was performed using the Student-t, X(2) test and logistic regression. The response rate was 47.76% in 2007, which was lower than that of 2005. There were significant differences between 2005 and 2007, for increases in the percentage of physicians who smoked, postgraduate training, residency, and those who believe that coordination with nursing and specialist care and institutional communication is appropriate. There was an increase in the prevalence of burnout by almost one point compared with 2005, a decrease in maximum burnout and emotional exhaustion (EC), and an increase in depersonalisation (DP) and personal accomplishment (RP). The incidence density of burnout was 1/113. 5 primary care physicians per year. The existence of burnout is associated with the use of chronic medication and inadequate coordination between nursing and EC, and also with the high workload. The increase in the prevalence found is consistent with the idea of burnout as a dynamic development and the theoretical model described. Stable and quality employment is one way to indirectly mitigate (by encouraging internal communication) professional burnout. In the multivariate analysis, the most critical variable in the onset of burnout is the inadequate coordination with nursing. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. [Identification of sentinel events in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera Cañadas, G; Cañada Dorado, A; Drake Canela, M; Fernández-Martínez, B; Ordóñez León, G; Cimas Ballesteros, M

    To identify and describe a list of sentinel events (SEs) for Primary Care (PC). A structured experts' consensus was obtained by using two online questionnaires. The participants were selected because of their expertise in PC and patient safety. The first questionnaire assessed the suitability of the hospital SEs established in the National Quality Forum 2006 for use in PC via responses of "yes", "no", or "yes but with modification". In the latter case, a re-wording of the SE was requested. Additionally, inclusion of new SEs was also allowed. The second questionnaire included those SEs with positive responses ("yes", "yes with modification"), so that the experts could choose between the original and alternative drafts, and evaluate the newly described SEs. The questionnaires were completed by 44 out of a total of the 47 experts asked to participate, and a total of 17 SEs were identified as suitable for PC. For the first questionnaire, 12 of the 28 hospital SEs were considered adaptable to PC, of which 11 were re-drafts. Thirty-seven experts proposed new SEs. These mainly concerned problems with medication and vaccines, delay, or lack of assistance, diagnostic delays, and problems with diagnostic tests, and were finally summarised in 5 SEs. In the second questionnaire, ≥65% of the experts chose the alternative wording against the original cases for the 11 SEs suitable for PC. The 5 newly included SEs were considered adequate with a positive response of 70-85%. Having a list of SEs available in PC will help to improve the management of health care risks. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Endoscopy training in primary care: innovative training program to increase access to endoscopy in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tarik; Deutchman, Mark; Ingram, Beth; Walker, Ely; Westfall, John M

    2012-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Colonoscopy can be an extension of the care provided by a family physician to help substantially reduce CRC morbidity and mortality. Family physicians trained in colonoscopy can provide access to care in rural and medically underserved areas. The Department of Family Medicine and the Colorado Area Health Education Center (AHEC) developed the Endoscopy Training for Primary Care (ETPC) program to teach primary care physicians to perform colonoscopy. The program included online didactic education, a formal endoscopy simulator experience, and proctoring by a current endoscopist. Participants completed a baseline and follow-up survey assessing CRC screening knowledge and the effectiveness of the endoscopy training for ongoing screening activities. To date, 94 practitioners and health professional students have participated in the study. Ninety-one (97%) completed the online didactic portion of the training. Sixty-five participants (77%) were physicians or medical students, and the majority (64%) was in the field of family medicine. The year 4 (2011) follow-up cohort was comprised of 62% respondents working in an urban background and 26% in rural communities. Many participants remain in a queue for proctoring by a trained endoscopist. Several participants are successfully performing a significant number of colonoscopies. ETPC program showed success in recruiting a large number of physicians and students to participate in training. The program enhanced perceptions about the value of colon cancer screening and providing screening endoscopy in primary care practice. Providing sites for simulation training throughout Colorado provided opportunity for providers in rural regions to participate. As a result of this training, thousands of patients underwent testing to prevent colon cancer. Future research relating to colonoscopy training by family physicians should focus on quality

  2. [The Articulator of Primary Health Care Program: an innovative proposal for qualification of Primary Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doricci, Giovanna Cabral; Guanaes-Lorenzi, Carla; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa

    2017-06-01

    In 2009, the Secretary of State for Health of Sao Paulo created a Program with a view to qualify the primary care in the state. This proposal includes a new job function, namely the articulator of primary care. Due to the scarcity of information about the practice of these new professionals in the scientific literature, this article seeks to analyze how articulators interpret their function and how they describe their daily routines. Thirteen articulators were interviewed. The interviews were duly analyzed by qualitative delineation. The results describe three themes: 1)Roles of the articulator: technical communicator and political advisor; 2) Activities performed to comply with the expected roles, examples being diagnosis of the municipalities, negotiation of proposals, participation in meetings, visits to municipalities; and 3) Challenges of the role, which are configured as challenges to the health reform process, examples being the lack of physical and human resources, activities of professionals in the medical-centered model, among others. The conclusion drawn is that the Program has great potential to provide input for the development and enhancement of Primary Care. Nevertheless, there are a series of challenges to be overcome, namely challenges to the context per se.

  3. Patient safety in primary care has many aspects: an interview study in primary care doctors and nurses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaal, S.; Laarhoven, E. van; Wolters, R.J.; Wetzels, R.; Verstappen, W.H.J.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Scientific definitions of patient safety may be difficult to apply in routine health care delivery. It is unknown what primary care workers consider patient safety. This study aimed to clarify the concept of patient safety in primary care. METHODS: We held 29

  4. Approach to Red Eye for Primary Care Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Anne L; Wells, Jill Razor

    2015-09-01

    A red eye is a common presenting complaint in the primary care setting. Redness of the eye indicates the presence of ocular inflammation, and most commonly represents benign conditions that can be readily treated by the primary care provider. However, there are emergent conditions that can present as a red eye. Primary care providers must readily recognize the danger signs that indicate these more serious ophthalmologic conditions that warrant immediate referral to an ophthalmologist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsima, Billy M; Setlhare, Vincent; Nkomazana, Oathokwa

    2016-01-01

    Botswana's health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An integrated symptom-based guideline was developed so as to translate the Botswana national guidelines to those applicable in primary care. The Botswana Primary Care Guideline (BPCG) integrates the care of communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases, by frontline primary health care workers. The Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, together with guideline developers from the Knowledge Translation Unit (University of Cape Town) collaborated with the Ministry of Health to develop the guideline. Stakeholder groups were set up to review specific content of the guideline to ensure compliance with Botswana government policy and the essential drug list. Participants included clinicians, academics, patient advocacy groups, and policymakers from different disciplines, both private and public. Drug-related issues were identified as necessary for implementing recommendations of the guideline. There was consensus by working groups for updating the essential drug list for primary care and expansion of prescribing rights of trained nurse prescribers in primary care within their scope of practice. An integrated guideline incorporating common symptoms of diseases seen in the Botswana primary care setting was developed. The development of the BPCG took a broad consultative approach with buy in from relevant stakeholders. It is anticipated that implementation of the BPCG will translate into better patient outcomes as similar projects elsewhere have done.

  6. Pediatric Primary Care Involvement in End-of-Life Care for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Lisa C; Nageswaran, Savithri

    2017-03-01

    To examine the relationship between pediatric primary care involvement and hospice and home health care use at end of life. California Medicaid data were used to estimate the relationship between pediatric primary care involvement and use of hospice and home health care using generalized estimating equations. Of the 2037 children who died between 2007 and 2010, 11% used hospice and 23% used home health. Among all children, primary care was not related to hospice use and was associated with home health use, usual source of care (OR = 1.83, P care (OR = 1.60, P care (low: OR = 1.49, P Primary care for children aged 15 to 20 years was related to hospice use, usual source of care (OR = 4.06, P care (low: OR = 4.92, P Primary care for children under 5 years was associated with home health use, usual source of care (OR = 2.59, P care (OR = 2.49, P care (low: OR = 2.22, P care (moderate: OR = 2.38, P care (moderate: OR = 2.32, P Primary care involvement affected hospice use among older age-groups and home health use among younger age-groups. These findings underscore the need for clinical knowledge about end-of-life care for children of all ages among primary care providers.

  7. Agreement among dentists' restorative treatment planning thresholds for primary occlusal caries, primary proximal caries, and existing restorations: findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaven, Tim J; Gordan, Valeria V; Litaker, Mark S; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Brad Rindal, D; Firestone, Allen R; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the agreement among individual National Dental Practice-Based Research Network dentists' self-reported treatment decisions for primary occlusal caries, primary proximal caries, and existing restorations. Five hypothetical clinical scenarios were presented: primary occlusal caries; primary proximal caries; and whether three existing restorations should be repaired or replaced. We quantified the probability that dentists who recommended later restorative intervention for primary caries were the same ones who recommended that existing restorations be repaired instead of replaced. Dentists who recommended later restorative treatment of primary occlusal caries and proximal caries at a more-advanced stage were significantly more likely to recommend repair instead of replacement. Agreement among dentists on a threshold stage for the treatment of primary caries ranged from 40 to 68%, while that for repair or replacement of existing restorations was 36 to 43%. Dentists who recommended repair rather than replacement of existing restorations were significantly more likely to recommend later treatment of primary caries. Conversely, dentists who recommended treatment of primary caries at an earlier stage were significantly more likely to recommend replacement of the entire restoration. Between-dentist agreement for primary caries treatment was better than between-dentist agreement for repair or replacement of existing restorations. These findings suggest consistency in how individual dentists approach the treatment of primary caries and existing restorations. However, substantial variation was found between dentists in their treatment decisions about the same teeth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Agreement among dentists’ restorative treatment planning thresholds for primary occlusal caries, primary proximal caries, and existing restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaven, Tim J.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Litaker, Mark S.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Firestone, Allen R.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to quantify the agreement among individual National Dental Practice-Based Research Network dentists’ self-reported treatment decisions for primary occlusal caries, primary proximal caries, and existing restorations. Methods Five hypothetical clinical scenarios were presented: primary occlusal caries; primary proximal caries; and whether three existing restorations should be repaired or replaced. We quantified the probability that dentists who recommended later restorative intervention for primary caries were the same ones who recommended that existing restorations be repaired instead of replaced. Results Dentists who recommended later restorative treatment of primary occlusal caries and proximal caries at a more-advanced stage were significantly more likely to recommend repair instead of replacement. Agreement among dentists on a threshold stage for the treatment of primary caries ranged from 40 to 68%, while that for repair or replacement of existing restorations was 36 to 43%. Conclusions Dentists who recommended repair rather than replacement of existing restorations were significantly more likely to recommend later treatment of primary caries. Conversely, dentists who recommended treatment of primary caries at an earlier stage were significantly more likely to recommend replacement of the entire restoration. Between-dentist agreement for primary caries treatment was better than between-dentist agreement for repair or replacement of existing restorations. Clinical implications These findings suggest consistency in how individual dentists approach the treatment of primary caries and existing restorations. However, substantial variation was found between dentists in their treatment decisions about the same teeth. PMID:23743181

  9. [Comprehensive primary care and segmented health systems in South America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanella, Ligia; Almeida, Patty Fidelis de

    2017-10-02

    The article analyzes recent reforms in primary health care in the South American countries, discussing the scope and challenges for establishing comprehensive primary health care in the region's health systems. The data sources were case studies conducted in 12 countries, and the analytical lines were the strategic components in the design and implementation of primary health care: national policy approaches, characteristics of financing, organization and provision, and the workforce in primary health care. The crosscutting analysis from a comparative perspective provides an overview of primary health care in the region's countries and highlights convergences and asymmetries. A common trait is the recovery of the expanded definition of primary health care with family and community components, a territorial base, multidisciplinary team, incorporation of community health workers, and social participation. Implementation revealed heterogeneities in the advances and contradictions in the models. Insufficient supply of physicians, difficulties in provision and physician retention in remote and peripheral areas, as well as in primary health care itself, precarious employment relations, and absence of career plans are common problems, and there have been recent initiatives in government intervention to direct the workforce to the public system. Segmentation of the supply of primary health care converges with the segmentation of social protection in the various countries, through maintenance of social insurance or selective and targeted insurance or coverage by private health insurance, and persistent exclusion of populations from the right to health. The article argues that implementation of comprehensive primary health care is conditioned by the prevailing modalities of social protection in health.

  10. Development and Validation of the Tibetan Primary Care Assessment Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhua Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a primary care assessment tool in Tibetan area and assess the primary care quality among different healthcare settings. Methods. Primary care assessment tool-Tibetan version (PCAT-T was developed to measure seven primary care domains. Data from a cross-sectional survey of 1386 patients was used to conduct validity and reliability analysis of PCAT-T. Analysis of variance was used to conduct comparison of primary care quality among different healthcare settings. Results. A 28-item PCAT-T was constructed which included seven multi-item scales and two single-item scales. All of multi-item scales achieved good internal consistency and item-total correlations. Scaling assumptions tests were well satisfied. The full range of possible scores was observed for all scales, except first contact and continuity. Compared with prefecture hospital (77.42 and county hospital (82.01, township health center achieved highest primary care quality total score (86.64. Conclusions. PCAT-T is a valid and reliable tool to measure patients' experience of primary care in the Tibet Autonomous Region. Township health center has the best primary care performance compared with other healthcare settings, and township health center should play a key role in providing primary care in Tibet.

  11. Human Papillomavirus Infections in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunmodede, Folashade; Yale, Steven H.; Krawisz, Bruce; Tyler, Gregory C.; Evans, Anthony C.

    2007-01-01

    Cervical cancer continues to be a leading cause of mortality worldwide. The incidence and mortality associated with invasive cervical cancer have declined significantly in developed countries due to widespread availability of screening with the Papanicolaou (Pap) test. However, the incidence and prevalence of non-invasive cervical intraepithelial neoplasms and genital warts related to oncogenic and nononcogenic strains of human papilloma viruses (HPV) have remained relatively stable. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have resulted in improved characterization of various HPV types and have led to changes in terminology of Pap test findings. Changes in nomenclature may lead to confusion among primary care providers regarding how best to further evaluate abnormal cytological results. This article provides a concise overview of the approach to the treatment of genital warts and management of abnormal cervical cytology based on guidelines from the American Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology. It also reviews advances in HPV vaccine development and the new recombinant vaccine recently approved for use in the United States. PMID:18086908

  12. Leadership for primary health care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, David

    2012-10-01

    Over the last decade, I have put together a new theory of leadership. This paper describes its four propositions, which are consistent with the research literature but which lead to conclusions that are not commonly held and seldom put into practice. The first proposition is a model describing the territory of leadership that is different from either the Leadership Qualities Framework, 2006 or the Medical Leadership Competency Framework, 2010, both of which have been devised specifically for the NHS (National Health Service). The second proposition concerns the ill-advised attempt of individuals to become expert in all aspects of leadership: complete in themselves. The third suggests how personality and capability are related. The fourth embraces and recommends the notion of complementary differences among leaders. As the NHS seeks increasing leadership effectiveness, these propositions may need to be considered and their implications woven into the fabric of NHS leader selection and development. Primary Health Care research, like all fields of collective human endeavour, is eminently in need of sound leadership and the same principles that facilitate sound leadership in other fields is likely to be relevant to research teams.

  13. Spatial analysis of elderly access to primary care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano-Gracia Nancy

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Admissions for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs are considered preventable admissions, because they are unlikely to occur when good preventive health care is received. Thus, high rates of admissions for ACSCs among the elderly (persons aged 65 or above who qualify for Medicare health insurance are signals of poor preventive care utilization. The relevant geographic market to use in studying these admission rates is the primary care physician market. Our conceptual model assumes that local market conditions serving as interventions along the pathways to preventive care services utilization can impact ACSC admission rates. Results We examine the relationships between market-level supply and demand factors on market-level rates of ACSC admissions among the elderly residing in the U.S. in the late 1990s. Using 6,475 natural markets in the mainland U.S. defined by The Health Resources and Services Administration's Primary Care Service Area Project, spatial regression is used to estimate the model, controlling for disease severity using detailed information from Medicare claims files. Our evidence suggests that elderly living in impoverished rural areas or in sprawling suburban places are about equally more likely to be admitted for ACSCs. Greater availability of physicians does not seem to matter, but greater prevalence of non-physician clinicians and international medical graduates, relative to U.S. medical graduates, does seem to reduce ACSC admissions, especially in poor rural areas. Conclusion The relative importance of non-physician clinicians and international medical graduates in providing primary care to the elderly in geographic areas of greatest need can inform the ongoing debate regarding whether there is an impending shortage of physicians in the United States. These findings support other authors who claim that the existing supply of physicians is perhaps adequate, however the distribution of them across

  14. Primary care cardiology for patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, Jeffrey R

    2011-12-01

    Primary care cardiology is also known as ambulatory cardiology and outpatient cardiology. Primary care cardiology for the longitudinal management of patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome is both poorly described and has limited evidence to justify its basis. This article briefly discusses the various complications that these patients can develop, reviews the medical literature, and describes a framework for the care of these complex patients from infancy to transition to care by specialists in adults with congenital cardiac disease.

  15. Quality improvement research on late life depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, C M

    2001-08-01

    Two million older Americans suffer from depression annually. Depression causes more functional impairment than many other common medical conditions and older adults have the highest rate of suicide in the United States. Although many of these patients fail to seek or fail to receive care for depression, the majority will be seen in primary care for the treatment of other conditions. To review the health services research on quality improvement for late life depression. Qualitative literature review. During the past 30 years, multiple educational and quality improvement interventions have been designed and tested to improve the recognition and treatment of depression in primary care settings. The findings from this large body of health services research suggest that: (1) the outcome of major depression in the usual care of primary care is typically poor; this is particularly true of late life depression; (2) informational support provided to primary care physicians is necessary but insufficient to improve the outcomes of late life depression in primary care; achieving guideline-level therapy requires the substantial participation of an informed and motivated patient working in concert with a health care team and health care system designed to care for chronic conditions; (3) up to 30% of older primary care patients will fail to respond to excellent guideline-level therapy provided in primary care; and (4) the latest quality improvement efforts focus not only on the clinical skills of primary care physicians, but also on patient's self-care and on innovative strategies to improve the system of care. Late life depression is often a chronic disease and outcomes research demonstrates that quality improvement efforts that focus resources on improving systems of care and the active participation of patients offer the best evidence of improved patient outcomes.

  16. People-Centred Quality Indicators for Primary Care Centres

    OpenAIRE

    Krczal, Eva; Mock, Tina

    2016-01-01

    In Austria, the recent evolution of primary healthcare centres offers a new alternative to the people. In order to become attractive to the people the service quality dimension offers various opportunities for Primary Care Centres. Incorporating the principle of Integrated Care they offer more convenient opening times and a better continuity of care than practices working on an individual basis. Considering the fact that people have a free choice of visiting care providers the service dimensi...

  17. The Chief Primary Care Medical Officer: Restoring Continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doohan, Noemi; DeVoe, Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    The year 2016 marked the 20th anniversary of the hospitalist profession, with more than 50,000 physicians identifying as hospitalists. The Achilles heel of hospitalist medicine, however, is discontinuity. Despite many current payment and delivery systems rewarding this discontinuity and severing long-term relationships between patient and primary care teams at the hospital door, primary care does not stop being important when a person is admitted to the hospital. The notion of a broken primary care continuum is not an academic construct, it causes real harm to patients. As a step toward fixing the discontinuity in our health care systems, we propose that every hospital needs a Chief Primary Care Medical Officer (CPCMO), an expert in practice across the spectrum of care. The CPCMO can lead hospital efforts to create systems that ensure primary care's continuum is complete, while strengthening physician collaboration across specialties, and moving toward achieving the Quadruple Aim of enhancing patient experience, improving population health, reducing costs, and improving the work life of health care providers. For hospitals operating on value-based payment structures, anticipated improvement in measurable outcomes such as decreased length of stay, decreased readmission rates, improved transitions of care, improved patient satisfaction, improved access to primary care, and improved patient health, will enhance the rate of return on the hospital's investment. The speciality of family medicine should reevaluate our purpose, and reembrace our mission as personal physicians by championing the creation of Chief Primary Care Medical Officers. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  18. Models for Primary Eye Care Services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhra Misra

    2015-01-01

    In the current situation, an integrated health care system with primary eye care promoted by government of India is apparently the best answer. This model is both cost effective and practical for the prevention and control of blindness among the underprivileged population. Other models functioning with the newer technology of tele-ophthalmology or mobile clinics also add to the positive outcome in providing primary eye care services. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of various models presently functioning in the country with the idea of providing useful inputs for eye care providers and enabling them to identify and adopt an appropriate model for primary eye care services.

  19. 78 FR 38718 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care... geographic areas, population groups, and facilities designated as primary medical care, mental health, and... (primary medical care, dental, psychiatric, vision care, podiatric, pharmacy, and veterinary care). The...

  20. Addressing the Primary Care Shortage on a Shoestring: A Successful Track in an Internal Medicine Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brislen, Heather; Dunn, Angela; Parada, Alisha; Rendon, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Nationally, shortages of primary care providers are of major concern. Internal medicine programs, once the major supplier of primary care physicians, are no longer producing large numbers of primary care providers to help meet the needs of the growing patient population. In 2009, residents at the University of New Mexico created a resident-driven Primary Care Track (PCT) within the internal medicine residency, and after six years this track is thriving. The PCT allows residents to designate blocks of time specifically devoted to primary care training. Residents opt in to the track at the end of intern year and arrange their own schedules over large blocks of time in the last two years of training to allow for an individualized curriculum that prepares them for independent practice in primary care. Approximately 85% (11/13) of residents who have graduated from the track have gone on to practice in primary care after graduation, and the internal medicine residency program as a whole has also seen an increase in the fraction of residents pursuing primary care since the inception of this track. The PCT is currently at maximum capacity and may be forced to turn away applicants. To expand while still maintaining the core principles of the track, the PCT will strive to find additional ways to use New Mexico's existing resources and to develop a more robust mentoring structure and didactic programs. Formalized financial, faculty, and administrative support of the program also will be needed.

  1. Developing cancer services strategy in primary care in England: primary care trust managers' views of the primary care cancer leads initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, Brenda; Heywood, Phil; Allgar, Victoria; Walker, Reg; Darr, Aamra; Din, Ikhlaq

    2006-01-01

    Primary care cancer lead clinicians (PCCLs) act strategically in primary care trusts (PCTs) in England to improve communication and understanding of cancer across primary and secondary care and provide a link between Cancer Networks and primary care. The aim is to evaluate the first three years of the initiative. A postal questionnaire was sent to all PCT chief executives in all PCTs in England and some were passed on to other PCT managers for completion. The response rate was 61 per cent. PCT directors of public health were the largest group of respondents (29 per cent). Most (74 per cent) PCCLs were GPs and 22 per cent were nurses. PCCLs were most likely to focus on palliative care and preventive services. Key achievements were identified as raising awareness of cancer, developing relationships and promoting primary care. The personal skills of the PCCLs were important as was support of colleagues at all levels. Lack of time was a major barrier to achievement, as was a lack of understanding of the role from others. Links with the Cancer Networks were being developed. About 85 per cent of managers wanted the role to continue. The paper illustrates that PCCLs are at the forefront of improving cancer services in primary care. They are particularly important in view of the priority of reducing premature deaths and promotion of healthy lifestyles.

  2. Integrated primary care, the collaboration imperative inter-organizational cooperation in the integrated primary care field: a theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, Pim P; Bruijnzeels, Marc A; de Leeuw, Rob J; Schrijvers, Guus J.P

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Capacity problems and political pressures have led to a rapid change in the organization of primary care from mono disciplinary small business to complex inter-organizational relationships. It is assumed that inter-organizational collaboration is the driving force to achieve integrated (primary) care. Despite the importance of collaboration and integration of services in primary care, there is no unambiguous definition for both concepts. The purpose of this study is to examine and link the conceptualisation and validation of the terms inter-organizational collaboration and integrated primary care using a theoretical framework. Theory The theoretical framework is based on the complex collaboration process of negotiation among multiple stakeholder groups in primary care. Methods A literature review of health sciences and business databases, and targeted grey literature sources. Based on the literature review we operationalized the constructs of inter-organizational collaboration and integrated primary care in a theoretical framework. The framework is being validated in an explorative study of 80 primary care projects in the Netherlands. Results and conclusions Integrated primary care is considered as a multidimensional construct based on a continuum of integration, extending from segregation to integration. The synthesis of the current theories and concepts of inter-organizational collaboration is insufficient to deal with the complexity of collaborative issues in primary care. One coherent and integrated theoretical framework was found that could make the complex collaboration process in primary care transparent. This study presented theoretical framework is a first step to understand the patterns of successful collaboration and integration in primary care services. These patterns can give insights in the organization forms needed to create a good working integrated (primary) care system that fits the local needs of a population. Preliminary data of the

  3. Primary care research conducted in networks: getting down to business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, James W

    2012-01-01

    This seventh annual practice-based research theme issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine highlights primary care research conducted in practice-based research networks (PBRNs). The issue includes discussion of (1) theoretical and methodological research, (2) health care research (studies addressing primary care processes), (3) clinical research (studies addressing the impact of primary care on patients), and (4) health systems research (studies of health system issues impacting primary care including the quality improvement process). We had a noticeable increase in submissions from PBRN collaborations, that is, studies that involved multiple networks. As PBRNs cooperate to recruit larger and more diverse patient samples, greater generalizability and applicability of findings lead to improved primary care processes.

  4. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furler, John; Cleland, Jennifer; Del Mar, Chris; Hanratty, Barbara; Kadam, Umesh; Lasserson, Daniel; McCowan, Colin; Magin, Parker; Mitchell, Caroline; Qureshi, Nadeem; Rait, Greta; Steel, Nick; van Driel, Mieke; Ward, Alison

    2008-09-29

    A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some countries. Emerging from this has been innovation in research design and focus, although less is known of the effect on research output. Primary care research is now well placed to lead a broad re-vitalisation of academic medicine, answering questions of relevance to practitioners, patients, communities and Government. Key areas for future primary care research leaders to focus on include exposing undergraduates early to primary care research, integrating this early exposure with doctoral and postdoctoral research career support, further expanding cross disciplinary approaches, and developing useful measures of output for future primary care research investment.

  5. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Nadeem

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Methods Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Results Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some countries. Emerging from this has been innovation in research design and focus, although less is known of the effect on research output. Conclusion Primary care research is now well placed to lead a broad re-vitalisation of academic medicine, answering questions of relevance to practitioners, patients, communities and Government. Key areas for future primary care research leaders to focus on include exposing undergraduates early to primary care research, integrating this early exposure with doctoral and postdoctoral research career support, further expanding cross disciplinary approaches, and developing useful measures of output for future primary care research investment.

  6. [INTEGRATION OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE WITH PRIMARY HEALTH CARE IN CROATIA – OPINIONS OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE PHYSICIANS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovčić, Z; Nola, I A

    2015-01-01

    respondents still did not differentiate these two concepts. Accordingly, it is concluded that as many as 21.4% of general practitioners and family physicians lack even basic knowledge about CAM and thus are not qualified for even initial communication with their patients on the subject of CAM. These physicians show no interest in CAM since they could have learned about this difference independently of their formal education through numerous articles published daily in popular media. Furthermore, the results showed that 79.8% of respondents received queries from their patients with regards to CAM, and this indicator clearly shows that there is strong market demand for this service. In order to meet this demand, it is necessary to urgently organize or expand the existing formal education with regards to CAM with the aim of encompassing as many primary health care physicians as possible, which is also considered necessary by physicians themselves (76.2%). These data indicate the need for urgent organization of teaching and training programs on the subject of CAM, as well as expansion and increased scope of the existing programs. Unresolved legislation and lack of appropriate registered academic state and private institutions and programs for education in CAM certainly contribute to the current situation in which the position of CAM in Croatia is not regulated. Acts and declarations do not automatically make CAM services safer, but will start the new age of CAM integration in the health care system, thus empowering patient rights.

  7. Understanding integrated care: a comprehensive conceptual framework based on the integrative functions of primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, Pim P.; Schepman, Sanneke M.; Opheij, Wilfrid; Bruijnzeels, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Primary care has a central role in integrating care within a health system. However, conceptual ambiguity regarding integrated care hampers a systematic understanding. This paper proposes a conceptual framework that combines the concepts of primary care and integrated care, in order to understand the complexity of integrated care. Methods The search method involved a combination of electronic database searches, hand searches of reference lists (snowball method) and contacting researchers in the field. The process of synthesizing the literature was iterative, to relate the concepts of primary care and integrated care. First, we identified the general principles of primary care and integrated care. Second, we connected the dimensions of integrated care and the principles of primary care. Finally, to improve content validity we held several meetings with researchers in the field to develop and refine our conceptual framework. Results The conceptual framework combines the functions of primary care with the dimensions of integrated care. Person-focused and population-based care serve as guiding principles for achieving integration across the care continuum. Integration plays complementary roles on the micro (clinical integration), meso (professional and organisational integration) and macro (system integration) level. Functional and normative integration ensure connectivity between the levels. Discussion The presented conceptual framework is a first step to achieve a better understanding of the inter-relationships among the dimensions of integrated care from a primary care perspective. PMID:23687482

  8. Understanding integrated care: a comprehensive conceptual framework based on the integrative functions of primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, Pim P; Schepman, Sanneke M; Opheij, Wilfrid; Bruijnzeels, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Primary care has a central role in integrating care within a health system. However, conceptual ambiguity regarding integrated care hampers a systematic understanding. This paper proposes a conceptual framework that combines the concepts of primary care and integrated care, in order to understand the complexity of integrated care. The search method involved a combination of electronic database searches, hand searches of reference lists (snowball method) and contacting researchers in the field. The process of synthesizing the literature was iterative, to relate the concepts of primary care and integrated care. First, we identified the general principles of primary care and integrated care. Second, we connected the dimensions of integrated care and the principles of primary care. Finally, to improve content validity we held several meetings with researchers in the field to develop and refine our conceptual framework. The conceptual framework combines the functions of primary care with the dimensions of integrated care. Person-focused and population-based care serve as guiding principles for achieving integration across the care continuum. Integration plays complementary roles on the micro (clinical integration), meso (professional and organisational integration) and macro (system integration) level. Functional and normative integration ensure connectivity between the levels. The presented conceptual framework is a first step to achieve a better understanding of the inter-relationships among the dimensions of integrated care from a primary care perspective.

  9. Promoting palliative care in the community: production of the primary palliative care toolkit by the European Association of Palliative Care Taskforce in primary palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Scott A; Firth, Adam; Schneider, Nils; Van den Eynden, Bart; Gomez-Batiste, Xavier; Brogaard, Trine; Villanueva, Tiago; Abela, Jurgen; Eychmuller, Steffen; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Downing, Julia; Sallnow, Libby; van Rijswijk, Erik; Barnard, Alan; Lynch, Marie; Fogen, Frederic; Moine, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    A multidisciplinary European Association of Palliative Care Taskforce was established to scope the extent of and learn what facilitates and hinders the development of palliative care in the community across Europe. To document the barriers and facilitators for palliative care in the community and to produce a resource toolkit that palliative care specialists, primary care health professionals or policymakers, service developers, educationalists and national groups more generally could use to facilitate the development of palliative care in their own country. (1) A survey instrument was sent to general practitioners with knowledge of palliative care services in the community in a diverse sample of European countries. We also conducted an international systematic review of tools used to identify people for palliative care in the community. (2) A draft toolkit was then constructed suggesting how individual countries might best address these issues, and an online survey was then set up for general practitioners and specialists to make comments. Iterations of the toolkit were then presented at international palliative care and primary care conferences. Being unable to identify appropriate patients for palliative care in the community was a major barrier internationally. The systematic review identified tools that might be used to help address this. Various facilitators such as national strategies were identified. A primary palliative care toolkit has been produced and refined, together with associated guidance. Many barriers and facilitators were identified. The primary palliative care toolkit can help community-based palliative care services to be established nationally. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Feasibility of Implementing Chronic Care Model in the Malaysian Public Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, F; Ramli, A S; Daud, M H; Haniff, J; Abdul-Razak, S; Selvarajah, S; Lee, V K; Tong, S F; Bujang, M A

    2017-04-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) is a global health threat. the Chronic Care Model (CCM) was proven effective in improving NCD management and outcomes in developed countries. Evidence from developing countries including Malaysia is limited and feasibility of CCM implementation has not been assessed. this study intends to assess the feasibility of public primary health care clinics (PHC) in providing care according to the CCM. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess the public PHC ability to implement the components of CCM. All public PHC with Family Medicine Specialist in Selangor and Kuala Lumpur were invited to participate. A site feasibility questionnaire was distributed to collect site investigator and clinic information as well as delivery of care for diabetes and hypertension. there were a total of 34 public PHC invited to participate with a response rate of 100%. there were 20 urban and 14 suburban clinics. the average number of patients seen per day ranged between 250-1000 patients. the clinic has a good mix of multidisciplinary team members. All clinics had a diabetic registry and 73.5% had a hypertensive registry. 23.5% had a dedicated diabetes and 26.5% had a dedicated hypertension clinic with most clinic implementing integrated care of acute and NCD cases. the implementation of the essential components of CCM is feasible in public PHCs, despite various constraints. Although variations in delivery of care exists, majority of the clinics have adequate staff that were willing to be trained and are committed to improving patient care.

  11. Is Team-Based Primary Care Associated with Less Access Problems and Self-Reported Unmet Need in Canada?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmunt, Austin; Asada, Yukiko; Burge, Frederick

    2017-10-01

    As in many jurisdictions, the delivery of primary care in Canada is being transformed from solo practice to team-based care. In Canada, team-based primary care involves general practitioners working with nurses or other health care providers, and it is expected to improve equity in access to care. This study examined whether team-based care is associated with fewer access problems and less unmet need and whether socioeconomic gradients in access problems and unmet need are smaller in team-based care than in non-team-based care. Data came from the 2008 Canadian Survey of Experiences with Primary Health Care (sample size: 10,858). We measured primary care type as team-based or non-team-based and socioeconomic status by income and education. We created four access problem variables and four unmet need variables (overall and three specific components). For each, we ran separate logistic regression models to examine their associations with primary care type. We examined socioeconomic gradients in access problems and unmet need stratified by primary care type. Primary care type had no statistically significant, independent associations with access problems or unmet need. Among those with non-team-based care, a statistically significant education gradient for overall access problems existed, whereas among those with team-based care, no statistically significant socioeconomic gradients existed.

  12. SGA Children in Pediatric Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Patrizia; Cioffi, Luigi; Limauro, Raffaele; Farris, Evelina; Bianco, Vincenzo; Sassi, Roberto; De Giovanni, Maria; Gallo, Valeria; D’Onofrio, Antonietta; Di Maio, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic evidences suggest a strong association between low birth weight and some diseases in adult life ( hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases).Aim of this study was to evaluate the obesity/overweight prevalence in a population of children born small for gestation age, SGA children 400, 208 males and 192 females compared to a population of children born appropriate for gestational age 6818 AGA children, 3502 males and 3316 females, during childhood. Our intention was also to build the natural history of weight gain during prepubertal age in children born SGA and AGA. Design and Methods: Observational prospective longitudinal study. We followed our patients from January2001 up to December 2010; weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were evaluated in all the SGA and AGA children. BMI z-score range for defining overweight and obesity was, respectively, 1.13 to 1.7 and >1.7 according to CDC growth charts. Results: In transversal evaluation, we prove that 10-year-old SGA females are twice obese and more overweight compared to equal age AGA females. In longitudinal evaluation, we highlight different observations: SGA children obese at 2 years are still obese at 10 years; the number of obese SGA children increases gradually until the age of 10; AGA children, appear to be less obese than SGA children at 10 years. Conclusion: SGA males and females are more obese at 5 and 10 years compared to the AGA population. Primary care pediatricians, through early detection of the children at risk, can carry out an effective obesity prevention project in SGA children. PMID:27583297

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of spirometry in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinant Geert-Jan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of spirometry for the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma in patients suspected of suffering from an obstructive airway disease (OAD in primary care. Methods Cross sectional diagnostic study of 219 adult patients attending 10 general practices for the first time with complaints suspicious for OAD. All patients underwent spirometry and structured medical histories were documented. All patients received whole-body plethysmography (WBP in a lung function laboratory. The reference standard was the Tiffeneau ratio (FEV1/VC received by the spirometric maneuver during examination with WBP. In the event of inconclusive results, bronchial provocation was performed to determine bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR. Asthma was defined as a PC20 fall after inhaling methacholine concentration ≤ 16 mg/ml. Results 90 (41.1% patients suffered from asthma, 50 (22.8% suffered from COPD, 79 (36.1% had no OAD. The sensitivity for diagnosing airway obstruction in COPD was 92% (95%CI 80–97; specificity was 84% (95%CI 77–89. The positive predictive value (PPV was 63% (95%CI 51–73; negative predictive value (NPV was 97% (95%CI 93–99. The sensitivity for diagnosing airway obstruction in asthma was 29% (95%CI 21–39; specificity was 90% (95%CI 81–95. PPV was 77% (95%CI 60–88; NPV was 53% (95%CI 45–61. Conclusion COPD can be estimated with high diagnostic accuracy using spirometry. It is also possible to rule in asthma with spirometry. However, asthma can not be ruled out only using spirometry. This diagnostic uncertainty leads to an overestimation of asthma presence. Patients with inconclusive spirometric results should be referred for nitric oxide (NO – measurement and/or bronchial provocation if possible to guarantee accurate diagnosis.

  14. SGA Children in Pediatric Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Gallo MD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidemiologic evidences suggest a strong association between low birth weight and some diseases in adult life ( hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases.Aim of this study was to evaluate the obesity/overweight prevalence in a population of children born small for gestation age, SGA children 400, 208 males and 192 females compared to a population of children born appropriate for gestational age 6818 AGA children, 3502 males and 3316 females, during childhood. Our intention was also to build the natural history of weight gain during prepubertal age in children born SGA and AGA. Design and Methods: Observational prospective longitudinal study. We followed our patients from January2001 up to December 2010; weight, height and body mass index (BMI were evaluated in all the SGA and AGA children. BMI z-score range for defining overweight and obesity was, respectively, 1.13 to 1.7 and >1.7 according to CDC growth charts. Results: In transversal evaluation, we prove that 10-year-old SGA females are twice obese and more overweight compared to equal age AGA females. In longitudinal evaluation, we highlight different observations: SGA children obese at 2 years are still obese at 10 years; the number of obese SGA children increases gradually until the age of 10; AGA children, appear to be less obese than SGA children at 10 years. Conclusion: SGA males and females are more obese at 5 and 10 years compared to the AGA population. Primary care pediatricians, through early detection of the children at risk, can carry out an effective obesity prevention project in SGA children.

  15. Advanced nurse roles in UK primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sibbald, B.; Laurant, M.G.H.; Reeves, D.

    2006-01-01

    Nurses increasingly work as substitutes for, or to complement, general practitioners in the care of minor illness and the management of chronic diseases. Available research suggests that nurses can provide as high quality care as GPs in the provision of first contact and ongoing care for unselected

  16. Do family physicians need more payment for working better? Financial incentives in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolozsvári, László Róbert; Orozco-Beltran, Domingo; Rurik, Imre

    2014-05-01

    Financial incentives are widely used in health services to improve the quality of care or to reach some specific targets. Pay for performance systems were also introduced in the primary health care systems of many European countries. Our study aims to describe and compare recent existing primary care indicators and related financing in European countries. Literature search was performed and questionnaires were sent to primary care experts of different countries within the European General Practice Research Network. Ten countries have published primary care quality indicators (QI) associated with financial incentives. The number of QI varies from 1 to 134 and can modify the finances of physicians with up to 25% of their total income. The implementations of these schemes should be critically evaluated with continuous monitoring at national or regional level; comparison is required between targets and their achievements, health gains and use of resources as well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Patients' experiences of diabetes education teams integrated into primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohmann, Barbara; Espin, Sherry; Gucciardi, Enza

    2017-02-01

    To explore patients' perspectives on care received from diabetes education teams (a registered nurse and a registered dietitian) integrated into primary care. Qualitative study using semistructured, one-on-one interviews. Three diabetes education programs operating in 11 primary care sites in one region of Ontario. Twenty-three patients with diabetes. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit participants from each site for interviews. Educator teams invited patients with whom they had met at least once to participate in semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis with NVivo 11 software. The diabetes education teams integrated into primary care exhibited many of the principles of person-centred care, as evidenced by the 2 overarching themes. The first is personalized care, with the subthemes care environment, shared decision making, and patient preference for one-on-one care. Participants described feeling included in partnerships with their health care providers, as they collaborated with physicians and diabetes educators to develop knowledge and set goals in the convenience and comfort of their usual primary care settings. Many participants also expressed a preference for one-on-one sessions. The second theme is patient-provider relationship, with the subthemes respect, supportive interaction, and facilitating patient engagement. Supportive environments created by the educators built trusting relationships, where patients expressed enhanced motivation to improve their self-care. Diabetes educators integrated into primary care can serve to enrich the experience of patients, provide key education to improve patient understanding, and support primary care physicians in providing timely and comprehensive clinical care. Diabetes patients appear to benefit from convenient access to interprofessional teams of educators in primary care to support diabetes self-management. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  18. Primary Care Practice Transformation and the Rise of Consumerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrank, William H

    2017-04-01

    Americans are increasingly demanding the same level of service in healthcare that they receive in other services and products that they buy. This rise in consumerism poses challenges for primary care physicians as they attempt to transform their practices to succeed in a value-based reimbursement landscape, where they are rewarded for managing costs and improving the health of populations. In this paper, three examples of consumer-riven trends are described: retail healthcare, direct and concierge care, and home-based diagnostics and care. For each, the intersection of consumer-driven care and the goals of value-based primary care are explored. If the correct payment and connectivity enablers are in place, some examples of consumer-driven care are well-positioned to support primary care physicians in their mission to deliver high-quality, efficient care for the populations they serve. However, concerns about access and equity make other trends less consistent with that mission.

  19. Primary health eye care knowledge among general practitioners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-05-10

    May 10, 2010 ... Original Research: Primary health eye care knowledge among general practitioners. 52. Vol 53 No 1. S Afr Fam Pract ... Conclusion: GPs appear to lack sufficient knowledge to manage primary health eye care problems, presumably due to a ... hours after welding, with no visible foreign body on the cornea.

  20. Consulting Psychiatry within an Integrated Primary Care Model

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiter, Elizabeth A. Zeidler; Pandhi, Nancy; Fondow, Meghan D. M.; Thomas, Chantelle; Vonk, Jantina; Reardon, Claudia L.; Serrano, Neftali

    2013-01-01

    After implementation of an integrated consulting psychiatry model and psychology services within primary care at a federally qualified health center, patients have increased access to needed mental health services, and primary care clinicians receive the support and collaboration needed to meet the psychiatric needs of the population.

  1. Consulting psychiatry within an integrated primary care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler Schreiter, Elizabeth A; Pandhi, Nancy; Fondow, Meghan D; Thomas, Chantelle; Vonk, Jantina; Reardon, Claudia L; Serrano, Neftali

    2013-11-01

    After implementation of an integrated consulting psychiatry model and psychology services within primary care at a federally qualified health center, patients have increased access to needed mental health services, and primary care clinicians receive the support and collaboration needed to meet the psychiatric needs of the population.

  2. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  3. Occurrence, recognition, and outcome of psychological disorders in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemens, B.G.; Ormel, J.; Simon, G.E.

    Objective: The authors' goal was to cross-validate the earlier finding of the Groningen Primary Care Study that recognition of psychological disorders was associated with better patient outcomes. Method: The 12-item General Health Questionnaire was used to screen 1,271 consecutive primary care

  4. Knowledge of Primary Care Physicians Regarding Domestic Violence.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... gender-based violence. Since primary care physicians frequently are the first in the community to encounter the battered woman, they must be equipped with the necessary knowledge, training and experience. Objective: The aim of this work was to study the knowledge and perception of primary care physicians about DV.

  5. Exploring patient safety culture in Dutch primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.; Melle, M. van; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Design Cross-sectional survey: Setting: Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Participants:

  6. College Students' Reasons for Depression Nondisclosure in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William J.; Morrison, Patrick; Lombardero, Anayansi; Swingle, Kelsey; Campbell, Duncan G.

    2016-01-01

    Unwillingness to share depression experiences with primary care physicians contributes to the undertreatment of depression. This project examined college students' reasons for depression nondisclosure to primary care providers (PCPs). Undergraduate participants read a vignette describing someone with depression and completed measures of disclosure…

  7. Abstract: Promotion of Primary Health Care Philosophy in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background Community-based education (CBE) serves as a primordial instrument in the implementation of Primary Health Care (PHC). Learning experiences in community-based settings provide the students with opportunities to learn by means of being actively engaged in primary health care associated ...

  8. Designing A Mixed Methods Study In Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Creswell, John W.; Fetters, Michael D.; Ivankova, Nataliya V.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mixed methods or multimethod research holds potential for rigorous, methodologically sound investigations in primary care. The objective of this study was to use criteria from the literature to evaluate 5 mixed methods studies in primary care and to advance 3 models useful for designing such investigations.

  9. Depressive symptoms and marital adjustment among primary care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between erectile dysfunction (ED), marital adjustment and depression. Methods: The survey was conducted among primary care patients at Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia. Subjects were 678 married, male primary care patients; aged 20–70 years (mean ...

  10. Primary care in the Netherlands: current situation and trends.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D.H. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Primary care in the Netherlands has a strong international reputation. However, this picture may be qualified in two respects. First of all, the Dutch primary care system is less cohesive than is sometimes suggested. Secondly, there are major challenges in the Dutch system (as is the

  11. A sustainable primary care system: lessons from the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, M.J.; Burgers, J.S.; Westert, G.P.

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch primary care system has drawn international attention, because of its high performance at low cost. Primary care practices are easily accessible during office hours and collaborate in a unique out-of-hours system. After the reforms in 2006, there are no copayments for patients receiving

  12. [Primary care: A definition of the field to develop research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verga-Gérard, A

    2017-12-02

    Research in the field of primary care has dramatically increased in France in recent years, especially since 2013 with the introduction of primary care as a thematic priority for research proposals launched by the Ministry of Health (Direction générale de l'offre de soins). The RECaP (Research in Clinical Epidemiology and Public Health) network is a French research network supported by Inserm, which recently implemented a specific working group focusing on research in primary care, based on a multidisciplinary approach. Researchers from different specialties participate in this group. The first aim of the group was to reach a common definition of the perimeter and of the panel of healthcare professionals and structures potentially involved in the field of primary care. For this purpose, a selection of different data sets of sources defining primary care was analyzed by the group, each participant collecting a set of sources, from which a synthesis was made and discussed. A definition of primary care at different levels (international, European and French) was summarized. A special attention was given to the French context in order to adapt the perimeter to the characteristics of the French healthcare system, notably by illustrating the different key elements of the definition with the inclusion of primary care actors and the type of practice premises. In conclusion, this work illustrates the diversity of primary care in France and the potential offered for research purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary care for asylum seekers in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, M. van; Devillé, W.; Bakker, D. de

    2004-01-01

    In 2000 policymakers decided that primary care for asylum seekers should be organized as it is for Dutch residents. Nurses of the Community Health Services organize selection and referral to primary care. General practitioners have practice in the different Centres of Asylum Seekers or in their own

  14. Implementation of primary health care - package or process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After establishing the commitment of the government to comprehensive primary health care (PHC), the Department of Health and provinces are now faced with the challenge of implementation. An important response has come with the recent proposed'core package of primary health care services'.' After consultation with ...

  15. Enhancing Primary Health Care Services for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, C. A.; Finlayson, J.; Cooper, S.-A.; Allan, L.; Robinson, N.; Burns, E.; Martin, G.; Morrison, J.

    2005-01-01

    Primary health care teams have an important part to play in addressing the health inequalities and high levels of unmet health needs experienced by people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Practice nurses have an expanding role within primary health care teams. However, no previous studies have measured their attitudes, knowledge, training…

  16. Primary care morbidity in Eastern Cape Province | Brueton | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary care morbidity in Eastern Cape Province. V Brueton, P Yogeswaran, J Chandia, K Mfenyana, B Modell, M Modell, I Nazareth. Abstract. Background. Primary health care in rural South Africa is predominantly provided by remote clinics and health centres. In 1994, health centres were upgraded and new health centres ...

  17. Pain distribution in primary care patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Overgaard, Søren; Vestergaard, Jacob T

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common diagnosis in primary care adult patients presenting with hip pain but pain location and pain distribution in primary care patients with hip OA have been reported inadequately. OBJECTIVE: To describe pain location and pain distribution...

  18. Assessing breast cancer risk in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Deirdre; Schwartz, Shira

    2014-10-15

    Individuals who are given a preventive exam by a primary care provider are more likely to agree to cancer screening. The provider recommendation has been identified as the strongest factor associated with screening utilization. This article provides a framework for breast cancer risk assessment for an advanced practice registered nurse working in primary care practice.

  19. The European primary care monitor: structure, process and outcome indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kringos, Dionne S.; Boerma, Wienke G. W.; Bourgueil, Yann; Cartier, Thomas; Hasvold, Toralf; Hutchinson, Allen; Lember, Margus; Oleszczyk, Marek; Pavlic, Danica Rotar; Svab, Igor; Tedeschi, Paolo; Wilson, Andrew; Windak, Adam; Dedeu, Toni; Wilm, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Scientific research has provided evidence on benefits of well developed primary care systems. The relevance of some of this research for the European situation is limited.There is currently a lack of up to date comprehensive and comparable information on variation in development of primary care, and

  20. Career Choice and Primary Care in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiess, Nicoline; Ibrahim, Halah; Shaban, Sami; Perez, Maria Nichole; Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar

    2015-12-01

    The low number of medical trainees entering primary care is contributing to the lack of access to primary care services in many countries. Despite the need for primary care physicians in the Middle East, there is limited information regarding trainees' career choices, a critical determinant in the supply of primary care physicians. We analyzed the career choices of medical students in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), with a larger goal of reforming postgraduate training in the region and enhancing the focus on primary care. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of applicants to a large established internal medicine residency program in the UAE. We calculated data for demographics, subspecialty choice, and factors affecting subspecialty choice, and we also reported descriptive statistics. Our response rate was 86% (183 of 212). Only 25% of applicants (n = 46) were interested in general internal medicine. The majority of respondents (n = 126, 69%) indicated a desire to pursue subspecialty training, and the remainder chose careers in research or administration. A majority of respondents (73%) were women, unmarried, and childless. Educational debt or lifestyle were not indicated as important factors in career choice. Low interest in primary care was similar to that in many Western countries, despite a much higher percentage of female applicants and a reduced emphasis on lifestyle or income factors in career decisions. Reasons for the reduced interest in primary care deserve further exploration, as do tests of interventions to increase interest, such as improving the primary care clerkship experience.

  1. Suicidality in primary care patients with somatoform disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiborg, J.F.; Gieseler, D.; Fabisch, A.B.; Voigt, K.; Lautenbach, A.; Lowe, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine rates of suicidality in primary care patients with somatoform disorders and to identify factors that might help to understand and manage active suicidal ideation in these patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study screening 1645 primary care patients. In total, 142

  2. Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Planning Template for Primary Care Offices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Plan Template for Primary Care Provider Offices is intended to assist primary care providers and office managers with preparing their offices for quickly putting a plan in place to handle an increase in patient calls and visits, whether during the 2009-2010 influenza season or future influenza seasons.

  3. Obstetric emergencies in primary midwifery care In The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Marrit

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, the primary aim was to gain insight into management of obstetric emergencies occurring in primary midwifery care in the Netherlands. Secondly, we aimed to develop preventative strategies and tools to optimise care in case of an obstetric emergency. From 2008-2010, a unique dataset of

  4. Autism-Specific Primary Care Medical Home Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Allison; Scal, Peter; Wey, Andrew; Gaillard, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Forty-six subjects received primary medical care within an autism-specific medical home intervention (www.autismmedicalhome.com) and 157 controls received standard primary medical care. Subjects and controls had autism spectrum disorder diagnoses. Thirty-four subjects (74%) and 62 controls (40%) completed pre and post surveys. Controlling for…

  5. Factors affecting the referral of primary health care doctors toward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hend Al-Namash

    2011-06-08

    Jun 8, 2011 ... Abstract Background: Few eligible candidates are referred from primary care for bariatric surgery in spite of improvement in its safety and efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify factors affecting primary care physicians' (PCPs) referral to bariatric surgery in morbid obesity. Methods: This ...

  6. Factors affecting the referral of primary health care doctors toward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Few eligible candidates are referred from primary care for bariatric surgery in spite of improvement in its safety and efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify factors affecting primary care physicians' (PCPs) referral to bariatric surgery in morbid obesity. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional ...

  7. Utilization of primary health care facilities: Lessons from a rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of primary health care facilities: Lessons from a rural community in southwest Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Medicine ... Background: This study assessed service/organisational factors and clients' perceptions that influenced utilisation of Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities in a rural community in Nigeria.

  8. Medication error in mental health: implications for primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Maidment, Ian D; Parmentier, Henk

    2009-01-01

    Medication errors are associated with significant morbidity and people with mental health problems may be particularly susceptible to medication errors due to various factors. Primary care has a key role in improving medication safety in this vulnerable population. The complexity of services, involving primary and secondary care and social services, and potential training issues may increase ...

  9. In Defence of Care: Gilligan's Relevance for Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the main, writing about care seems to contrast the ethics of justice with the ethics of care. Whilst the former deploys objectivity, the latter holds that individuals are connected. Problematically, contemporary primary education seemingly holds a-personal, justice conceptions as its basis and rationale. In turn, primary education, in parts,…

  10. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Primary Care Screener for Affective Disorder (PC-SAD) in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Angelo; Adler, D A; Rogers, W H; Lega, I; Zerella, M P; Matteucci, G; Tarsitani, L; Caredda, M; Gigantesco, A; Biondi, M

    2013-01-01

    Depression goes often unrecognised and untreated in non-psychiatric medical settings. Screening has recently gained acceptance as a first step towards improving depression recognition and management. The Primary Care Screener for Affective Disorders (PC-SAD) is a self-administered questionnaire to screen for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Dysthymic Disorder (Dys) which has a sophisticated scoring algorithm that confers several advantages. This study tested its performance against a 'gold standard' diagnostic interview in primary care. A total of 416 adults attending 13 urban general internal medicine primary care practices completed the PC-SAD. Of 409 who returned a valid PC-SAD, all those scoring positive (N=151) and a random sample (N=106) of those scoring negative were selected for a 3-month telephone follow-up assessment including the administration of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) by a psychiatrist who was masked to PC-SAD results. Most selected patients (N=212) took part in the follow-up assessment. After adjustment for partial verification bias the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value for MDD were 90%, 83%, 51%, and 98%. For Dys, the corresponding figures were 78%, 79%, 8%, and 88%. While some study limitations suggest caution in interpreting our results, this study corroborated the diagnostic validity of the PC-SAD, although the low PPV may limit its usefulness with regard to Dys. Given its good psychometric properties and the short average administration time, the PC-SAD might be the screening instrument of choice in settings where the technology for computer automated scoring is available.

  11. Customer-centered strategic diversification: specialty health care provider moves towards primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clugston, M M

    1997-01-01

    A logistic regression model is used to analyze an OB/GYN'S move towards primary care. Current clients' use/no use response of the clinic as a primary care provider is the criterion variable. Predictor variables include new primary care services, expanded OB/GYN services, overall system utilization, and current insurance and physician status. Overall, only 37% of the clinic's current clients indicated they would utilize the clinic for primary care. Having a personal physician is a significant predictor of a client's decision to utilize the clinic's new primary care services. Other significant predictor variables are discussed.

  12. Integrated primary care in Germany: the road ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Schlette

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Health care delivery in Germany is highly fragmented, resulting in poor vertical and horizontal integration and a system that is focused on curing acute illness or single diseases instead of managing patients with more complex or chronic conditions, or managing the health of determined populations. While it is now widely accepted that a strong primary care system can help improve coordination and responsiveness in health care, primary care has so far not played this role in the German system. Primary care physicians traditionally do not have a gatekeeper function; patients can freely choose and directly access both primary and secondary care providers, making coordination and cooperation within and across sectors difficult. Description of policy development: Since 2000, driven by the political leadership and initiative of the Federal Ministry of Health, the German Bundestag has passed several laws enabling new forms of care aimed to improve care coordination and to strengthen primary care as a key function in the German health care system. These include on the contractual side integrated care contracts, and on the delivery side disease management programmes, medical care centres, gatekeeping and ‘community medicine nurses’. Conclusion and discussion: Recent policy reforms improved framework conditions for new forms of care. There is a clear commitment by the government and the introduction of selective contracting and financial incentives for stronger cooperation constitute major drivers for change. First evaluations, especially of disease management programmes, indicate that the new forms of care improve coordination and outcomes. Yet the process of strengthening primary care as a lever for better care coordination has only just begun. Future reforms need to address other structural barriers for change such as fragmented funding streams, inadequate payment systems, the lack of standardized IT systems and trans

  13. Electronic consultation system demonstrates educational benefit for primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Jonas; Olayiwola, J Nwando; Knox, Margae; Murphy, Elizabeth J; Tuot, Delphine S

    2017-01-01

    Background Electronic consultation systems allow primary care providers to receive timely speciality expertise via iterative electronic communication. The use of such systems is expanding across the USA with well-documented high levels of user satisfaction. We characterise the educational impact for primary care providers of a long-standing integrated electronic consultation and referral system. Methods Primary care providers' perceptions of the educational value inherent to electronic consultation system communication and the impact on their ability to manage common speciality clinical conditions and questions were examined by electronic survey using five-point Likert scales. Differences in primary care providers' perceptions were examined overall and by primary care providers' speciality, provider type and years of experience. Results Among 221 primary care provider participants (35% response rate), 83.9% agreed or strongly agreed that the integrated electronic consultation and referral system provided educational value. There were no significant differences in educational value reported by provider type (attending physician, mid-level provider, or trainee physician), primary care providers' speciality, or years of experience. Perceived benefit of the electronic consultation and referral system in clinical management appeared stronger for laboratory-based conditions (i.e. subclinical hypothyroidism) than more diffuse conditions (i.e. abdominal pain). Nurse practitioners/physician assistants and trainee physicians were more likely to report improved abilities to manage specific clinical conditions when using the electronic consultation and/or referral system than were attending physicians, as were primary care providers with ≤10 years experience, versus those with >20 years of experience. Conclusions Primary care providers report overwhelmingly positive perceptions of the educational value of an integrated electronic consultation and referral system. Nurse

  14. ''Medically unexplained" symptoms and symptom disorders in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Marianne; Hartman, Tim C. Olde; Aamland, Aase

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many patients consult their GP because they experience bodily symptoms. In a substantial proportion of cases, the clinical picture does not meet the existing diagnostic criteria for diseases or disorders. This may be because symptoms are recent and evolving or because symptoms...... that better supports clinical decision-making, creates clearer communication and provides scientific underpinning of research to ensure effective interventions. Discussion: We propose a classification of symptoms that places greater emphasis on prognostic factors. Prognosis-based classification aims...... mental disorders, psychological features and demographic data. We discuss how these characteristics may be used to classify symptoms into three groups: self-limiting symptoms, recurrent and persistent symptoms, and symptom disorders. The middle group is especially relevant in primary care...

  15. Racial Disparities In Geographic Access To Primary Care In Philadelphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elizabeth J; Polsky, Daniel; Barbu, Corentin M; Seymour, Jane W; Grande, David

    2016-08-01

    Primary care is often thought of as the gateway to improved health outcomes and can lead to more efficient use of health care resources. Because of primary care's cardinal importance, adequate access is an important health policy priority. In densely populated urban areas, spatial access to primary care providers across neighborhoods is poorly understood. We examined spatial variation in primary care access in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We calculated ratios of adults per primary care provider for each census tract and included buffer zones based on prespecified drive times around each tract. We found that the average ratio was 1,073; the supply of primary care providers varied widely across census tracts, ranging from 105 to 10,321. We identified six areas of Philadelphia that have much lower spatial accessibility to primary care relative to the rest of the city. After adjustment for sociodemographic and insurance characteristics, the odds of being in a low-access area were twenty-eight times greater for census tracts with a high proportion of African Americans than in tracts with a low proportion of African Americans. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  16. Models for integrating rehabilitation and primary care: a scoping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Mary Ann; Shortt, Samuel; Godwin, Marshall; Smith, Karen; Rowe, Kirby; O'Brien, Patti; Donnelly, Catherine

    2009-09-01

    To describe the scope and breadth of knowledge currently available regarding the integration of rehabilitation and primary care services. Peer-reviewed journals were searched using CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EBM Reviews for the years 1995 through 2007. This process identified 172 items. To be considered for the subsequent review, the article had to describe a service delivery program that offered primary care and rehabilitation, or services specifically designed for people with chronic conditions/disabilities. Further, it had to be available in English or French. No methodological limitations were applied to screen for levels of evidence. Based on these criteria, 38 articles remained that pertained to both primary care and rehabilitation. These were reviewed, sorted, and categorized to discover commonalities and differences among the approaches used to integrating rehabilitation into primary care. In consultation with the team of investigators, it was determined that there were 6 different models for providing primary health care and rehabilitation services in an integrated approach: clinic, outreach, self-management, community-based rehabilitation, shared care, and case management. In addition, a number of themes were identified across models that may act as either supports or impediments to the integration of rehabilitation services into primary care settings: team approach, interprofessional trust, leadership, communication, compensation, accountability, referrals, and population-based approach. Rehabilitation providers interested in working in the primary care sector may be assisted in conceptualizing the benefits that they bring to the setting by considering these models and issues.

  17. Pharmaceutical care in Brazil’s primary health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Patricia Sodré; Costa, Ediná Alves; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Álvares, Juliana; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Leite, Silvana Nair

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To characterize the activities of clinical nature developed by pharmacists in basic health units and their participation in educational activities aiming at health promotion. METHODS This article is part of the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos – Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM – National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines – Services, 2015), a cross-sectional and exploratory study, of evaluative nature, consisting of a survey of information in a representative sample of cities, stratified by the Brazilian regions that constitute domains of study, and a subsample of primary health care services. The interviewed pharmacists (n=285) were responsible for the delivery of medicines and were interviewed in person with the use of a script. The characterization of the activities of clinical nature was based on information from pharmacists who declared to perform them, and on participation in educational activities aiming at health promotion, according to information from all pharmacists. The results are presented in frequency and their 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS From the interviewed subjects, 21.3% said they perform activities of clinical nature. Of these, more than 80% considered them very important; the majority does not dispose of specific places to perform them, which hinders privacy and confidentiality in these activities. The main denominations were “pharmaceutical guidance” and “pharmaceutical care.” The registration of activities is mainly made in the users’ medical records, computerized system, and in a specific document filed at the pharmacy, impairing the circulation of information among professionals. Most pharmacists performed these activities mainly along with physicians and nurses; 24.7% rarely participated in meetings with the health team, and 19.7% have never participated. CONCLUSIONS Activities of clinical nature performed by pharmacists

  18. Occupational Therapy in Primary Care: Determining Receptiveness of Occupational Therapists and Primary Care Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Dahl-Popolizio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary care (PC is an emerging practice setting for occupational therapy; however, few occupational therapists currently practice in this setting due to barriers, including uncertainty about reimbursement and the role of occupational therapists. This pilot study aimed to determine if PC providers and occupational therapists are receptive to occupational therapists as integrated interprofessional PC team members if barriers to inclusion are addressed. Method: After a brief educational paragraph explaining potential occupational therapy contributions to PC teams, the participants accessed a link to survey questions regarding their personal level of receptiveness to occupational therapy in PC. The questions comprised Likert scale and open-ended answers. Results: Of the Likert scale responses, 94%-99% provided by occupational therapists and 82%-97% provided by PC providers indicated possibly or yes to the inclusion of occupational therapists on the PC team. The descriptive responses were primarily supportive. Discussion: The majority of the occupational therapists and PC providers surveyed indicated support for including occupational therapists in primary care. This indicates that when barriers are addressed, occupational therapists and PC providers are receptive to the inclusion of occupational therapists as members of the interprofessional PC team.

  19. Using Quality Experts from Manufacturing to Transform Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Rose M.; Walsworth, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Improving Performance in Practice (IPIP) is an initiative convened by the American Board of Medical Specialties. It investigates the efficacy of coaches in helping primary-care practices improve the care of patients with diabetes and asthma. Most IPIP states use coaches who have a health care background, and are trained in quality…

  20. The impact of nurse practitioners in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biezen, M.G.M. van der

    2017-01-01

    There is a strain on primary health care whose challenges are recognised as increasing demands for care due to an ageing population, and reforms that shift care from hospitals to the community. In the face of these developments, tasks have increasingly been delegated to other staff. This thesis

  1. Primary Care-Mental Health Integration in the VA: Shifting Mental Health Services for Common Mental Illnesses to Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lucinda B; Yoon, Jean; Escarce, José J; Post, Edward P; Wells, Kenneth B; Sugar, Catherine A; Yano, Elizabeth M; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2017-12-15

    Primary care-mental health integration (PC-MHI) aims to increase access to general mental health specialty (MHS) care for primary care patients thereby decreasing referrals to non-primary care-based MHS services. It remains unclear whether new patterns of usage of MHS services reflect good mental health care. This study examined the relationship between primary care clinic engagement in PC-MHI and use of different MHS services. This was a retrospective longitudinal cohort study of 66,638 primary care patients with mental illnesses in 29 Southern California Veterans Affairs clinics (2008-2013). Regression models used clinic PC-MHI engagement (proportion of all primary care clinic patients who received PC-MHI services) to predict relative rates of general MHS visits and more specialized MHS visits (for example, visits for serious mental illness services), after adjustment for year and clinic fixed effects, other clinic interventions, and patient characteristics. Patients were commonly diagnosed as having depression (35%), anxiety (36%), and posttraumatic stress disorder (22%). For every 1 percentage point increase in a clinic's PC-MHI engagement rate, patients at the clinic had 1.2% fewer general MHS visits per year (pPrimary care clinics with greater engagement in PC-MHI showed reduced general MHS use rates, particularly for patients with depression, without accompanying reductions in use of more specialized MHS services.

  2. Demand Management: The Primary Care Role at Ireland Army Community Hospital (IACH)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Bonnie J

    2005-01-01

    .... Several factors contributing to this concern are the variability of primary care managers, deficiencies in the continuity of care, the lack of internal policies governing primary care practices...

  3. [The Primary Health Care Situation in Saxony-Anhalt. Perception, Description and Evaluation of Local Health Care Problems by Mayors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthen, L; Gerlinger, T

    2016-10-01

    Background: The combination of ageing general practitioners and a shortage of young doctors is having a negative effect on primary health care in almost all municipalities in the German state of Saxony-Anhalt. The communities are finding it progressively more difficult to safeguard the provision of primary health care. To solve these problems, they have neither the appropriate skills nor sufficient funding. The aim of this study was to ask mayors in Saxony-Anhalt to describe and evaluate local primary health-care systems from their perspective. Method: In June of 2013, all 124 full-time mayors in Saxony-Anhalt were asked by e-mail to participate in a web-based survey. The questionnaire was broken down into the categories: "socio-demographics", "health-care system in the communities", "causes and measures taken to deal with health-care problems", "development of the primary health-care system" and "cooperation". The data were descriptively analysed using IBM Statistics SPSS. Results: The response rate was 51.6% (n=64). For 87.5% of the respondents the primary health-care system is an important location factor in their community. 45.3% consider it their duty to ensure the provision of local health care. However, 42.6% of the polled mayors believe the infrastructure in their community to be too unattractive to convince young general practitioners to settle down there. In the next 10 years, 75.0% of the respondents expect the provision of primary health care to deteriorate further. Conclusions: In view of local deficits, the polled municipalities are very interested in safeguarding the continued existence of primary health care. As local experts, communities should get more involved in planning and decision-making processes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Telepaediatrics, primary health care and developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appropriate care to be given in PHC facilities without transfer. Currently paediatric ... of practitioners', 'which should benefit future patients'.10. Telemedicine can aid ... Telepaediatrics, which has the potential to improve paediatric care if expert knowledge is not locally available, involves transfer of information between two or ...

  5. Exemplars in the use of technology for management of depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Neftali; Molander, Rachel; Monden, Kimberley; Grosshans, Ashley; Krahn, Dean D

    2012-06-01

    Depression care management as part of larger efforts to integrate behavioral health care into primary care has been shown to be effective in helping patients and primary care clinicians achieve improved outcomes within the primary care environment. Central to care management systems is the use of registries which enable effective clinic population management. The aim of this article is to detail the methods and utility of technology in depression care management processes while also highlighting the real-world variations and barriers that exist in different clinical environments, namely a federally qualified health center and a Veterans Administration clinic. We analyzed descriptive data from the registries of Access Community Health Centers and the William S. Middleton Veterans Administration clinics along with historical reviews of their respective care management processes. Both registry reviews showed trend data indicating improvement in scores of depression and provided baseline data on important system variables, such as the number of patients who are not making progress, the percentage of patients who are unreachable by phone, and the kind of actions needed to ensure evidence-based and efficient care. Both sites also highlighted systemic technical barriers to more complete implementation of care management processes. Care management processes are an effective and efficient part of population-based care for depression in primary care. Implementation depends on available resources including hardware, software, and clinical personnel. Additionally, care management processes and technology have evolved over time based on local needs and are part of an integrated method to support the work of primary care clinicians in providing care for patients with depression.

  6. Exploring levers and barriers to accessing primary care for marginalised groups and identifying their priorities for primary care provision: a participatory learning and action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Patrick; Tierney, Edel; O'Carroll, Austin; Nurse, Diane; MacFarlane, Anne

    2016-12-03

    The involvement of patients and the public in healthcare has grown significantly in recent decades and is documented in health policy documents internationally. Many benefits of involving these groups in primary care planning have been reported. However, these benefits are rarely felt by those considered marginalised in society and they are often excluded from participating in the process of planning primary care. It has been recommended to employ suitable approaches, such as co-operative and participatory initiatives, to enable marginalised groups to highlight their priorities for care. This Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) research study involved 21 members of various marginalised groups who contributed their views about access to primary care. Using a series of PLA techniques for data generation and co-analysis, we explored barriers and facilitators to primary healthcare access from the perspective of migrants, Irish Travellers, homeless people, drug users, sex workers and people living in deprivation, and identified their priorities for action with regard to primary care provision. Four overarching themes were identified: the home environment, the effects of the 'two-tier' healthcare system on engagement, healthcare encounters, and the complex health needs of many in those groups. The study demonstrates that there are many complicated personal and structural barriers to accessing primary healthcare for marginalised groups. There were shared and differential experiences across the groups. Participants also expressed shared priorities for action in the planning and running of primary care services. Members of marginalised groups have shared priorities for action to improve their access to primary care. If steps are taken to address these, there is scope to impact on more than one marginalised group and to address the existing health inequities.

  7. Skin conditions in primary care: an analysis of referral demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Arenas, E; Garrido, V; Serrano-Ortega, S

    2014-04-01

    Skin conditions are among the main reasons for seeking primary health care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) must diagnose skin conditions and determine their impact, and must therefore incorporate the relevant knowledge and skills into their education. The present study analyzes the reasons for primary care referral to dermatology (referral demand) as well as diagnostic agreement between PCPs and dermatologists informed by pathology where appropriate. Data were collected for 755 patients and 882 initial dermatology appointments from February 1, 2012 through April 30, 2012 following primary care referral. Data obtained included age, sex, occupation, reason for referral, primary care diagnosis, and dermatologic diagnosis. Statistical analysis of the data for each diagnosed condition identified frequency, reasons for referral, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and the κ statistic for diagnostic agreement. The most common diagnoses were seborrheic keratosis, melanocytic nevus, actinic keratosis, and acne. The main reason for referral was diagnostic assessment (52.5%). For skin tumors, sensitivity of primary care diagnosis was 22.4%, specificity 94.7%, PPV 40.7%, and NPV 88.3%, with a κ of 0.211. For the more common diagnoses, primary care sensitivity was generally low and specificity high. According to our results, primary care physicians are better qualified to rule out a given skin condition in a patient (high specificity) than to establish an accurate clinical diagnosis (poor sensitivity). This suggests that knowledge and skills training should be organized for primary care physicians to improve management of skin conditions-especially skin cancer, because of its impact. A more responsive system would ensue, with shorter waiting lists and better health care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and Family Medicine: Overlapping But Not Synonymous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    Defines and depicts graphically the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary care functions (from least to most intensified phases of medical care); ambulatory care (care of sick or well people not confined to bed); and family medicine (an emerging medical discipline focusing on complete and longterm care of the family). (JT)

  9. [Survey on the needs expressed by primary care doctors for continuing education in drug therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, D; Llop, R; Barceló, M E; Cucurull, E; Vallés, J A; Diogène, E; García, N; Fernández, E; Sabaté, N; Simó, E; Casadevall, J

    2002-12-01

    To describe the aspects of continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics considered as most relevant by the primary health care physicians. Observational study.Setting. Physicians filled-up the questionnaires during 45 minutes at their primary health care centres. Primary health care physicians involved in the Fundation Institut Català de Farmacologia continuing education activities since 1997 were selected. A specific questionnaire was designed to collect the physicians' opinion on different topics regarding continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics. 180 physicians from 21 primary health care centres answered the questionnaire. 68% of the responding physicians considered that continuing education has to be useful to improve routine clinical practice. Regular seminars and methods stimulating active participation administered by primary health care professionels are preferred. Continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics should be focused to health problems rather than being drug-oriented. They referred being more interested in drug selection issues and in the role of new drug in comparison with the existing alternatives rather than in regulation and drug consumption issues. 66,3% of the responding physicians considered that continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics should be compulsory. Public health authorities and primary health care physicians should share the responsibility in setting-up continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics programs, according to the opinion of almost 70% of the physicians. Primary health care physicians are interested in continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics as far as it is practical and useful to solve problems of their routine clinical practice.

  10. Master of Primary Health Care degree: who wants it and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Abby; Wallis, Katharine A; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity

    2016-06-01

    INTRODUCTION The Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care at the University of Auckland is considering developing a Master of Primary Health Care (MPHC) programme. Masters level study entails considerable investment of both university and student time and money. AIM To explore the views of potential students and possible employers of future graduates to discover whether there is a market for such a programme and to inform the development of the programme. METHODS Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 primary health care stakeholders. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using a general inductive approach to identify themes. FINDINGS Primary care practitioners might embark on MPHC studies to develop health management and leadership skills, to develop and/or enhance clinical skills, to enhance teaching and research skills, or for reasons of personal interest. Barriers to MPHC study were identified as cost and a lack of funding, time constraints and clinical workload. Study participants favoured inter-professional learning and a flexible delivery format. Pre-existing courses may already satisfy the post-graduate educational needs of primary care practitioners. Masters level study may be superfluous to the needs of the primary care workforce. CONCLUSIONS Any successful MPHC programme would need to provide value for PHC practitioner students and be unique. The postgraduate educational needs of New Zealand primary care practitioners may be already catered for. The international market for a MPHC programme is yet to be explored.

  11. Patient complaint cases in primary health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Søren; Christensen, René dePont; Damsbo, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Limited knowledge exists about factors increasing the risk of general practitioners becoming involved in a complaint case or getting disciplined in connection with a complaint case.......Limited knowledge exists about factors increasing the risk of general practitioners becoming involved in a complaint case or getting disciplined in connection with a complaint case....

  12. Primary Health Care That Works: The Costa Rican Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesec, Madeline; Ratcliffe, Hannah L; Karlage, Ami; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Gawande, Atul; Bitton, Asaf

    2017-03-01

    Long considered a paragon among low- and middle-income countries in its provision of primary health care, Costa Rica reformed its primary health care system in 1994 using a model that, despite its success, has been generally understudied: basic integrated health care teams. This case study provides a detailed description of Costa Rica's innovative implementation of four critical service delivery reforms and explains how those reforms supported the provision of the four essential functions of primary health care: first-contact access, coordination, continuity, and comprehensiveness. As countries around the world pursue high-quality universal health coverage to attain the Sustainable Development Goals, Costa Rica's experiences provide valuable lessons about both the types of primary health care reforms needed and potential mechanisms through which these reforms can be successfully implemented. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  13. Community nurses working in piloted primary care teams: Irish Republic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Triona

    2010-08-01

    Primary care health services in the Irish Republic have undergone fundamental transformation with the establishment of multidisciplinary primary care teams nationwide. Primary care teams provide a community-based health service delivered through a range of health professionals in an integrated way. As part of this initiative ten pilot teams were established in 2003. This research was undertaken in order to gain an understanding of nurse\\'s experiences of working in a piloted primary care team. The methodology used was a focus group approach. The findings from this study illustrated how community nurse\\'s roles and responsibilities have expanded within the team. The findings also highlighted the benefits and challenges of working as a team with various other community-based health-care disciplines.

  14. Health Care Accessibility Modeling: Effects of Change in Spatial Representation of Demand for Primary Health Care Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowski Piotr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Health care accessibility can be measured by the number of prospective patients who could reach a medical facility within a prescribed time limit. The representation of health care demand in estimating accessibility is an important consideration since different spatial aggregations of demand have different consequences with regard to accessibility estimates. This article examines the effects of aggregating population demand for primary health care, ranging from census tract to aggregated census block, on estimates of primary health care accessibility. Spatial representations of aggregated demand were incorporated into a location-allocation model in order to determine a measure of accessibility represented by the unmet demand for primary health care services. The model was implemented for the U.S. State of Idaho, based on the allocation of Idaho residents’ demand for primary health care to the state’s existing primary health care facilities. The results confirm a relationship between the level of demand aggregation and the level of potential accessibility. In case of a rural state such as Idaho the relationship is positive; higher levels of aggregation result in higher measures of accessibility.

  15. Brief, Rapid Response, Parenting Interventions Within Primary Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultas, Margaret W; McMillin, Stephen Edward; Broom, Matthew A; Zand, Debra H

    2015-08-20

    Opportunities created by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act along with the increased prevalence of pediatric behavioral and mental health concerns provide new challenges for pediatric health care providers. To address these matters, providers need to change the manner by which they provide health care to families. A novel approach is providing brief, rapid response, evidence-based parenting interventions within the pediatric primary care setting. Family-focused parenting programs support the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations of improving mental health via supports in pediatric primary care to maximize the social and psychological well-being of families. A considerable body of research indicates that parenting interventions reduce the severity and frequency of disruptive behavior disorders in children and provide support to parent by bolstering parental resilience and improving overall family functioning. Providing these services within the pediatric primary care setting addresses the need for fully integrated health services that are family-centered and easily accessible.

  16. Emotional exhaustion in primary care during early implementation of the VA's medical home transformation: Patient-aligned Care Team (PACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Lisa S; Schmidt Hackbarth, Nicole; Darling, Jill; Rodriguez, Hector P; Stockdale, Susan E; Cordasco, Kristina M; Yano, Elizabeth M; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2015-03-01

    Transformation of primary care to new patient-centered models requires major changes in healthcare organizations, including interprofessional expectations and organizational policies. Emotional exhaustion (EE) among workers can accompany major organizational change, threatening its success. Yet little guidance exists about the magnitude of associations with EE during primary care transformation. We assessed EE during the initial phase of national primary care transformation in the Veterans Health Administration. Cross-sectional online surveys of primary care clinicians (PCCs) and staff in 23 primary care clinics within 5 healthcare systems in 1 veterans administration administrative region. We used descriptive, bivariate, and multivariable analyses adjusted for clinic membership and weighted for nonresponse. 515 veterans administration employees (191 PCCs and 324 other primary care staff). Outcome is the EE subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Predictors include clinic characteristics (from administrative data) and self-reported efficacy for change, experiences with transformation, and perspectives about the organization. The overall response rate was 64% (515/811). In total, 53% of PCCs and 43% of staff had high EE. PCCs (vs. other primary care staff), female (vs. male), and non-Latino (vs. Latino) respondents reported higher EE. Respondents reporting higher efficacy for change and participatory decision making had lower EE scores, adjusting for sex and race. Recognition by healthcare organizations of the potential for clinician and staff EE during primary care transformation is critical. Methods for reducing EE by increasing clinician and staff change efficacy and opportunities to participate in decision making should be considered, with attention to PCCs, and women.

  17. Humanization of pediatric care in the world: focus and review of existing models and measurement tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripodi, Marina; Siano, Maria Anna; Mandato, Claudia; De Anseris, Anna Giulia Elena; Quitadamo, Paolo; Guercio Nuzio, Salvatore; Viggiano, Claudia; Fasolino, Francesco; Bellopede, Annalisa; Annunziata, Maria; Massa, Grazia; Pepe, Francesco Maria; De Chiara, Maria; Siani, Paolo; Vajro, Pietro

    2017-08-30

    The term "humanization" indicates the process by which people try to make something more human and civilized, more in line with what is believed to be the human nature. The humanization of care is an important and not yet a well-defined issue which includes a wide range of aspects related to the approach to the patient and care modalities. In pediatrics, the humanization concept is even vaguer due to the dual involvement of both the child and his/her family and by the existence of multiple proposed models. The present study aims to analyze the main existing humanization models regarding pediatric care, and the tools for assessing its grade. The main Humanization care programs have been elaborated and developed both in America (Brazil, USA) and Europe. The North American and European models specifically concern pediatric care, while the model developed in Brazil is part of a broader program aimed at all age groups. The first emphasis is on the importance of the family in child care, the second emphasis is on the child's right to be a leader, to be heard and to be able to express its opinion on the program's own care. Several tools have been created and used to evaluate humanization of care programs and related aspects. None, however, had been mutually compared. The major models of humanization care and the related assessment tools here reviewed highlight the urgent need for a more unifying approach, which may help in realizing health care programs closer to the young patient's and his/her family needs.

  18. HEALTH-CARE COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH DEPRESSIVE AND ANXIETY DISORDERS IN PRIMARY-CARE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIMON, G; ORMEL, J; VONKORFF, M; BARLOW, W

    Objective: The authors examined the overall health care costs associated with depression and anxiety among primary care patients. Method: Of 2,110 consecutive primary care patients in a health maintenance organization, 1,962 were screened with the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. A stratified

  19. Primary care multidisciplinary teams in practice: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Brandi; Morgan, Perri; Strand de Oliveira, Justine; Hull, Sharon; Østbye, Truls; Everett, Christine

    2017-12-29

    Current recommendations for strengthening the US healthcare system consider restructuring primary care into multidisciplinary teams as vital to improving quality and efficiency. Yet, approaches to the selection of team designs remain unclear. This project describes current primary care team designs, primary care professionals' perceptions of ideal team designs, and perceived facilitating factors and barriers to implementing ideal team-based care. Qualitative study of 44 health care professionals at 6 primary care practices in North Carolina using focus group discussions and surveys. Data was analyzed using framework content analysis. Practices used a variety of multidisciplinary team designs with the specific design being influenced by the social and policy context in which practices were embedded. Practices overwhelmingly located barriers to adopting ideal multidisciplinary teams as being outside of their individual practices and outside of their control. Participants viewed internal organizational contexts as the major facilitators of multidisciplinary primary care teams. The majority of practices described their ideal team design as including a social worker to meet the needs of socially complex patients. Primary care multidisciplinary team designs vary across practices, shaped in part by contextual factors perceived as barriers outside of the practices' control. Facilitating factors within practices provide a culture of support to team members, but they are insufficient to overcome the perceived barriers. The common desire to add social workers to care teams reflects practices' struggles to meet the complex demands of patients and external agencies. Government or organizational policies should avoid one-size-fits-all approaches to multidisciplinary care teams, and instead allow primary care practices to adapt to their specific contextual circumstances.

  20. Emergent themes in the sustainability of primary health care innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibthorpe, Beverly M; Glasgow, Nicholas J; Wells, Robert W

    2005-11-21

    A synthesis of the findings of the five studies of sustainability of primary health care innovation across six domains (political, institutional, financial, economic, client and workforce) yielded three main themes. These were: the importance of social relationships, networks and champions; the effect of political, financial and societal forces; and the motivation and capacity of agents within the system. The need for routine assessment of the sustainability of primary health care innovations is discussed. Given the dearth of literature on the sustainability of primary health care innovation, there is potential to develop a program of research directed towards a future synthesis of evidence.

  1. What Can Primary Care Learn From Sports Teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscella, Kevin; Fogarty, Colleen; Salas, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Teams are familiar to sports but relatively new to primary care. In this perspective, we use sports teams to illustrate key principles from team science and extract practical lessons for primary care teams. The most notable lessons include the need for continuous team learning based on presession planning and postsession debriefing, real-world team training focused on identified teamwork needs, and on-site team coaching. Implementation of these principles requires organizational commitment coupled with alignment of continuing medical education and recertification requirements with primary care teamwork competencies.

  2. Criteria and instruments of appropriateness in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pizzini

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization describes three particular features to assess the appropriateness of most medical services provided by clinicians during typical primary care visits: equity, efficacy and effectiveness. But many others aspects are involved and primary care physicians provide a wide range of services, most of which have not been studied sufficiently to develop explicit criteria for appropriateness. This articles describes meaning and characteristics of appropriateness in primary care and underlines the most important difficulties met by general practitioners, from the so called “disease mongering” to the application of the results of trials into the real clinical practice.

  3. Dental students' reflections about long-term care experiences through an existing model of oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Mario; Pattanaporn, Komkham

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore students' reflective thinking about long-term care experiences from the perspective of a model of oral health. A total of 186 reflections from 193 second-year undergraduate dental students enrolled between 2011/12 and 2014/15 at the University of British Columbia were explored qualitatively. Reflections had a word limit of 300, and students were asked to relate an existing model of oral health to their long-term care experiences. We have identified the main ideas via a thematic analysis related to the geriatric dentistry experience in long-term care. The thematic analysis revealed that students attempted to demystify their pre-conceived ideas about older people and long-term care facilities, to think outside the box, for example away from a typical dental office, and to consider caring for elderly people from an interprofessional lens. According to some students, not all domains from the existing model of oral health were directly relevant to their geriatric experience while other domains, including interprofessionalism and cognition, were missing. While some participants had a positive attitude towards caring for this cohort of the population, others did not take this educational activity as a constructive experience. The nature of most students' reflective thinking within a long-term care experience showed to be related to an existing model of oral health. This model can help to give meaning to the dental geriatric experience of an undergraduate curriculum. Such experience has been instrumental in overcoming potential misconceptions about long-term care and geriatric dentistry. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Existence and functionality of emergency obstetric care services at district level in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Echoka, Elizabeth; Kombe, Yeri; Dubourg, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge on emergency obstetric care (EmOC) is limited in Kenya, where only partial data from sub-national studies exist. The EmOC process indicators have also not been integrated into routine health management information system to monitor progress in safe motherhood interventions both...

  5. How to integrate social care services into primary health care? An experience from Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Ali; Riazi-Isfahani, Sahand; Damari, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Social issues have prominent effects on the peoples' physical and mental health and on the health risk factors. In Iran, many organizations provide social care services to their target population. This study aimed to explore the roles and functions of Primary Health Care (PHC) system in providing social care services in Iran. Methods: This was a qualitative study, for which data were collected via three sources: A review of the literature, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with experts and stakeholders. The main objective was to find a way to integrate social care into the Iranian PHC system. A conventional content analysis was performed to explore the data. Results: Overall, 20 experts were interviewed and the acquired data were classified into four major categories including priorities, implementation, requirements and stewardship. The main challenges were the existing controversies in the definition of social care, social service unit disintegration, multiple stewards for social care services, weaknesses of rules and regulations and low financing of the public budget. Social care services can be divided into two categories: Basic and advanced. Urban and rural health centers, as the first level of PHC, could potentially provide basic social care services for their defined population and catchment areas such as detecting social harms in high risk individuals and families and providing counseling for people in need. They can also refer the individuals to receive advanced services. Conclusion: Iran has a successful history of establishing the PHC System especially in rural areas. This network has an invaluable capacity to provide social health services. Establishing these services needs some prerequisites such as a reform PHC structure, macro support and technical intersectoral collaboration. They should also be piloted and evaluated before they could be implemented in the whole country. PMID:27683649

  6. How to integrate social care services into primary health care? An experience from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Ali; Riazi-Isfahani, Sahand; Damari, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Social issues have prominent effects on the peoples' physical and mental health and on the health risk factors. In Iran, many organizations provide social care services to their target population. This study aimed to explore the roles and functions of Primary Health Care (PHC) system in providing social care services in Iran. This was a qualitative study, for which data were collected via three sources: A review of the literature, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with experts and stakeholders. The main objective was to find a way to integrate social care into the Iranian PHC system. A conventional content analysis was performed to explore the data. Overall, 20 experts were interviewed and the acquired data were classified into four major categories including priorities, implementation, requirements and stewardship. The main challenges were the existing controversies in the definition of social care, social service unit disintegration, multiple stewards for social care services, weaknesses of rules and regulations and low financing of the public budget. Social care services can be divided into two categories: Basic and advanced. Urban and rural health centers, as the first level of PHC, could potentially provide basic social care services for their defined population and catchment areas such as detecting social harms in high risk individuals and families and providing counseling for people in need. They can also refer the individuals to receive advanced services. Iran has a successful history of establishing the PHC System especially in rural areas. This network has an invaluable capacity to provide social health services. Establishing these services needs some prerequisites such as a reform PHC structure, macro support and technical intersectoral collaboration. They should also be piloted and evaluated before they could be implemented in the whole country.

  7. Chronic spinal cord injury impairs primary antibody responses, but spares existing humoral immunity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropallo, Michael A.; Held, Katherine S.; Goenka, Radhika; Ahmad, Sifat A.; O’Neill, Patrick J.; Steward, Oswald; Lane, Thomas E.; Cancro, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in immune depression. To better understand how injury inhibits humoral immunity, the effects of chronic thoracic SCI on B cell development and immune responses to thymus-independent (TI) type-2 and thymus-dependent (TD) antigens were determined. Mice received complete crush injury or control laminectomy at either thoracic level 3 (T3), which disrupts descending autonomic control of the spleen, or at T9, which conserves most splenic sympathetic activity. Although mature B cell numbers were only mildly reduced, bone marrow B cell production was transiently but profoundly depressed immediately after injury. Despite the return of normal B cell production four weeks after SCI, mice receiving T3-injury showed a significant reduction in their ability to mount primary TI-2 or TD immune responses. The latter were marked by decreases in germinal center B cells as well as class switched high-affinity antibody secreting cells. Importantly, injury did not affect affinity maturation per se, pre-existing B cell memory, or secondary humoral immune responses. Together, these findings show that chronic high thoracic SCI impairs the ability to mount optimal antibody responses to new antigenic challenges, but spares previously established humoral immunity. PMID:22523388

  8. Utilization of Primary Health Care Services in Jaba Local Government Area of Kaduna State Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otovwe, Agofure; Elizabeth, Sarki

    2017-07-01

    Primary health care was designed to provide accessible health care for all. However, most primary health care facilities are in various states of disrepair, catering for less than 20% of potential patients in the population. This study was designed to investigate the utilisation of primary health care services in Jaba Local Government Area of Kaduna State Nigeria. The study employed a cross-sectional study design conducted among 383 respondents utilising simple random sampling techniques. A pretested semi-structured questionnaire was administered to obtain information from respondents, while descriptive statistics was used to analyse the data. The results show that almost all of the respondents, 333(97.90%), were aware of the existence of primary health care services in their community. Furthermore, the majority of the respondents, 304(89.40%), utilized primary health care services while 293(86.20%) and 212(62.40%) were satisfied with the amount of charges for services and the supply of drugs respectively. According to the respondent, weak services in primary health care includes; personal hygiene and nutritional education, management of chronic diseases and cancer screening. Factors that influence the utilization of primary health care services according to the respondents were availability of trained personnel (AOR=1.828 95% CI=0.410-1.672), attitude of staffs (AOR=1.114 95% CI=0.527-2.355), waiting times (AOR=1.110 95% CI=0.584-2.224) and availability of diagnostic services (AOR=0.951 95% CI=0.472-1.918). The study highlighted the weaknesses in some of the services offered at the various primary health centres and the factors which can hinder the residents from patronizing primary health care services.

  9. A morbidity survey of South African primary care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Mash

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have described the burden of disease in South Africa. However these studies do not tell us which of these conditions commonly present to primary care providers, how these conditions may present and how providers make sense of them in terms of their diagnoses. Clinical nurse practitioners are the main primary care providers and need to be better prepared for this role. This study aimed to determine the range and prevalence of reasons for encounter and diagnoses found among ambulatory patients attending public sector primary care facilities in South Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was a multi-centre prospective cross-sectional survey of consultations in primary care in four provinces of South Africa: Western Cape, Limpopo, Northern Cape and North West. Consultations were coded prior to analysis by using the International Classification of Primary Care-Version 2 in terms of reasons for encounter (REF and diagnoses. Altogether 18856 consultations were included in the survey and generated 31451 reasons for encounter (RFE and 24561 diagnoses. Women accounted for 12526 (66.6% and men 6288 (33.4%. Nurses saw 16238 (86.1% and doctors 2612 (13.9% of patients. The top 80 RFE and top 25 diagnoses are reported and ongoing care for hypertension was the commonest RFE and diagnosis. The 20 commonest RFE and diagnoses by age group are also reported. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ambulatory primary care is dominated by non-communicable chronic diseases. HIV/AIDS and TB are common, but not to the extent predicted by the burden of disease. Pneumonia and gastroenteritis are commonly seen especially in children. Women's health issues such as family planning and pregnancy related visits are also common. Injuries are not as common as expected from the burden of disease. Primary care providers did not recognise mental health problems. The results should guide the future training and assessment of primary care providers.

  10. Blood pressure status during consultation: a primary care study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Turki, Yousef Abdullah

    2015-03-01

    Blood pressure control needs to be assessed at a primary care level, which is the first contact with patients. To evaluate blood pressure readings among patients visiting a primary care clinic at a teaching university hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a primary care clinic at the King Khalid University Hospital from April to September 2013. Blood pressure readings were measured by trained nurses working in a primary care clinic during patients' visits. The study showed that only 33.6 % of participants had a normal blood pressure reading, and 49.3 % of participants were diagnosed as hypertensive patients. The study showed that 74.7 % do not exercise, and 45 % have high stress levels in their life. Uncontrolled blood pressure was common at this hospital-based primary care clinic, so it is recommended to educate primary care physicians to take care of blood pressure management and to educate and encourage patients about non-pharmacological advice like losing weight and coping with stress.

  11. Work-Related Depression in Primary Care Teams in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Andréa Tenório Correia; Lopes, Claudia de Souza; Susser, Ezra; Menezes, Paulo Rossi

    2016-11-01

    To identify work-related factors associated with depressive symptoms and probable major depression in primary care teams. Cross-sectional study among primary care teams (community health workers, nursing assistants, nurses, and physicians) in the city of São Paulo, Brazil (2011-2012; n = 2940), to assess depressive symptoms and probable major depression and their associations with job strain and other work-related conditions. Community health workers presented higher prevalence of probable major depression (18%) than other primary care workers. Higher odds ratios for depressive symptoms or probable major depression were associated with longer duration of employment in primary care; having a passive, active, or high-strain job; lack of supervisor feedback regarding performance; and low social support from colleagues and supervisors. Observed levels of job-related depression can endanger the sustainability of primary care programs. Public Health implications. Strategies are needed to deliver care to primary care workers with depression, facilitating diagnosis and access to treatment, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Preventive interventions can include training managers to provide feedback and creating strategies to increase job autonomy and social support at work.

  12. Perception of primary care doctors and nurses about care provided to sickle cell disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier Gomes, Ludmila Mourão; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Souza Vieira, Elen Débora; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of primary care physicians and nurses about access to services and routine health care provided to sickle cell disease patients. Methods This descriptive exploratory study took a qualitative approach by surveying thirteen primary care health professionals who participated in a focus group to discuss access to services and assistance provided to sickle cell disease patients. The data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Results Access to primary care services and routine care for sickle cell disease patients were the categories that emerged from the analysis. Interaction between people with sickle cell disease and primary care health clinics was found to be minimal and limited mainly to scheduling appointments. Patients sought care from the primary care health clinics only in some situations, such as for pain episodes and vaccinations. The professionals noted that patients do not recognize primary care as the gateway to the system, and reported that they feel unprepared to assist sickle cell disease patients. Conclusion In the perception of these professionals, there are restrictions to accessing primary care health clinics and the primary care assistance for sickle cell disease patients is affected. PMID:26190428

  13. Managing low back pain in the primary care setting: the know-do gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, N Ann; Moga, Carmen; Harstall, Christa

    2010-01-01

    To ascertain knowledge gaps in the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic low back pain (LBP) in the primary care setting to prepare a scoping survey for identifying knowledge gaps in LBP management among Alberta's primary care practitioners, and to identify potential barriers to implementing a multidisciplinary LBP guideline. English language studies, published from 1996 to 2008, comparing the clinical practice patterns of primary care practitioners with guideline recommendations were identified by systematically searching literature databases, the websites of various health technology assessment agencies and libraries, and the Internet. Data were synthesized qualitatively. The literature search identified 14 relevant studies. Knowledge gaps were reported among various primary care practitioner groups in the assessment of red flags, use of diagnostic imaging, provision of advice regarding sick leave and continuing activity, administration of some medications (muscle relaxants, oral steroids and opioids) and recommendation of particular treatments (acupuncture, physiotherapy, spinal manipulation, traction, ultrasound, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and spinal mobilization). A know-do gap clearly exists among primary care practitioners with respect to the diagnosis and treatment of LBP. The information on know-do gaps will be used to construct a survey tool for unearthing the local knowledge gaps extant among Alberta's primary care practitioners, and to develop a dissemination strategy for a locally produced multidisciplinary LBP guideline, with the aim of ensuring that the know-do gaps inherent within each primary practice discipline are specifically targeted.

  14. Presenting prevalence and management of psychosocial problems in primary care in Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannieuwenborg, Lena; Buntinx, Frank; De Lepeleire, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Psychosocial problems are widespread but reliable data about management are sparse. An overall view is missing and there is a need for a wider framework to include the data available in health care and welfare practice, databases and research output. The question under scope is: how are psychosocial problems presented and handled in primary care in Flanders? A mixed method was used. Using a 'fishbone diagram' (1) we obtained a basic structure to visualize the main (problem) areas and challenges. A literature study (2) and semi-structured interviews with health care and welfare professionals in primary care (3) were performed. Finally, two interdisciplinary focus groups were organized (4). In Flanders, there is no tradition of multidisciplinary psychosocial research in primary care causing a lack of integrated data. Data only exist within disciplines without transdisciplinarity. The data are difficult to interpret due to different labeling and registration processes between disciplines and settings. However, we can find some general trends: assistance to patients with psychosocial problems is based on what can be offered, rather than on patient needs; drug treatment remains popular; referral of patients within primary care or to secondary care does not seem to be obvious. Among all disciplines, there is a great need for more collaboration and considerable advantages are to be expected from the growing emergence of multidisciplinary practices; multiculturalism appears to take an increasingly important place within primary care in Flanders and has implications for the care offered; and treatment effectiveness in psychosocial problems seems to be more related to the person of the caregiver than to a specific discipline, theory or type of treatment. Based on our results, we strongly advise stimulation and organization of integrated (multidisciplinary) research regarding psychosocial problems in primary care and a more consistent registration by the agencies in primary

  15. The roles and training of primary care doctors: China, India, Brazil and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Robert; Almeida, Magda; Wong, William C W; Kumar, Raman; von Pressentin, Klaus B

    2015-12-04

    China, India, Brazil and South Africa contain 40% of the global population and are key emerging economies. All these countries have a policy commitment to universal health coverage with an emphasis on primary health care. The primary care doctor is a key part of the health workforce, and this article, which is based on two workshops at the 2014 Towards Unity For Health Conference in Fortaleza, Brazil, compares and reflects on the roles and training of primary care doctors in these four countries. Key themes to emerge were the need for the primary care doctor to function in support of a primary care team that provides community-orientated and first-contact care. This necessitates task-shifting and an openness to adapt one's role in line with the needs of the team and community. Beyond clinical competence, the primary care doctor may need to be a change agent, critical thinker, capability builder, collaborator and community advocate. Postgraduate training is important as well as up-skilling the existing workforce. There is a tension between training doctors to be community-orientated versus filling the procedural skills gaps at the facility level. In training, there is a need to plan postgraduate education at scale and reform the system to provide suitable incentives for doctors to choose this as a career path. Exposure should start at the undergraduate level. Learning outcomes should be socially accountable to the needs of the country and local communities, and graduates should be person-centred comprehensive generalists.

  16. Anticoagulated patient management in primary care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Out-patients undergoing anticoagulant treatment are attended by nursing staff, working with doctors.To be able to provide adequate medical care, nurses must have the minimum knowledge and skills needed to work with the programme described in this article. These include basic and specific knowledge of anticoagulation. The correct functioning of the service will help provide an optimum control of the INR (International Normalized Ratio and reduce the complications of bleeding, both of which are the main objectives of the nursing care of these patients.

  17. Risk Stratification Methods and Provision of Care Management Services in Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ashok; Sessums, Laura; Gupta, Reshma; Jin, Janel; Day, Tim; Finke, Bruce; Bitton, Asaf

    2017-09-01

    Risk-stratified care management is essential to improving population health in primary care settings, but evidence is limited on the type of risk stratification method and its association with care management services. We describe risk stratification patterns and association with care management services for primary care practices in the Comprehensive Primary Care (CPC) initiative. We undertook a qualitative approach to categorize risk stratification methods being used by CPC practices and tested whether these stratification methods were associated with delivery of care management services. CPC practices reported using 4 primary methods to stratify risk for their patient populations: a practice-developed algorithm (n = 215), the American Academy of Family Physicians' clinical algorithm (n = 155), payer claims and electronic health records (n = 62), and clinical intuition (n = 52). CPC practices using practice-developed algorithm identified the most number of high-risk patients per primary care physician (282 patients, P = .006). CPC practices using clinical intuition had the most high-risk patients in care management and a greater proportion of high-risk patients receiving care management per primary care physician (91 patients and 48%, P =.036 and P =.128, respectively). CPC practices used 4 primary methods to identify high-risk patients. Although practices that developed their own algorithm identified the greatest number of high-risk patients, practices that used clinical intuition connected the greatest proportion of patients to care management services. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  18. Exploring Attributes of High-Value Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Melora; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Frankfort, Jim; Margolius, David; Murphy, Julia; Paita, Luis; Wang, Thomas; Milstein, Arnold

    2017-11-01

    Medicare's merit-based incentive payment system and narrowing of physician networks by health insurers will stoke clinicians' and policy makers' interest in care delivery attributes associated with value as defined by payers. To help define these attributes, we analyzed 2009 to 2011 commercial health insurance claims data for more than 40 million preferred provider organization patients attributed to over 53,000 primary care practice sites. We identified sites ranking favorably on both quality and low total annual per capita health care spending ("high-value") and sites ranking near the median ("average-value"). Sites were selected for qualitative assessment from 64 high-value sites and 102 average-value sites with more than 1 primary care physician who delivered adult primary care and provided services to enough enrollees to permit meaningful spending and quality ranking. Purposeful sampling ensured regional diversity. Physicians experienced in primary care assessment and blinded to site rankings visited 12 high-value sites and 4 average-value sites to identify tangible attributes of care delivery that could plausibly explain a high ranking on value. Thirteen attributes of care delivery distinguished sites in the high-value cohort. Six attributes attained statistical significance: decision support for evidence-based medicine, risk-stratified care management, careful selection of specialists, coordination of care, standing orders and protocols, and balanced physician compensation. Awareness of care delivery attributes that distinguish their high-value peers may help physicians respond successfully to incentives from Medicare and private payers to lower annual health care spending and improve quality of care. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  19. Team Sports: A Place for Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Hancock, Larry

    1985-01-01

    Physicians' role in team sports goes beyond the traditional ‘Doc’ who attends the game for stitching and primary injury management. Injury and illness prevention, ongoing supervision of rehabilitation, education, fitness evaluation, and training prescription are roles which have often fallen, by default, to paramedicals. The author recounts his experience in medical supervision of major junior hockey in the Western Hockey League.

  20. Occupational therapy in primary care: Results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Catherine A; Leclair, Leanne L; Wener, Pamela F; Hand, Carri L; Letts, Lori J

    2016-04-12

    To support integration of occupational therapy in primary care and research in this area, it is critical to document examples of occupational therapy in primary care. This study describes occupational therapy roles and models of practice used in primary care. An electronic survey was sent to occupational therapists across Canada. Participants were identified using purposive and snowball sampling strategies. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Respondents (n = 52) were almost exclusively working on interprofessional teams. Intervention was provided most frequently to individual clients, and services were provided both within the home/community and in the clinic. Occupational therapists offered a range of health promotion and prevention services, predominantly to adults and older adults. A number of supports and barriers to the integration of occupational therapy were identified. A growing number of occupational therapists are working in primary care providing a broad range of services across the life span. © CAOT 2016.

  1. The association between somatization and disability in primary care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leeuw, G.; Gerrits, M.J.G.; Terluin, B.; Numans, M.E.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.; van der Horst, H.E.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient encounters for medically unexplained physical symptoms are common in primary health care. Somatization ('experiencing and reporting unexplained somatic symptoms') may indicate concurrent or future disability but this may also partly be caused by psychiatric disorders. The aim of

  2. Primary health care facility infrastructure and services and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary health care facility infrastructure and services and the nutritional status of children 0 to 71 months old and their caregivers attending these facilities in four rural districts in the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal provinces, South Africa.

  3. The prevalence of personality disorder among UK primary care attenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P; Jenkins, R; Tylee, A; Blizard, R; Mann, A

    2000-07-01

    To determine the prevalence rate of personality disorder among a consecutive sample of UK primary care attenders. Associations between a diagnosis of personality disorder, sociodemographic background and common mental disorder were examined. Three hundred and three consecutive primary care attenders were examined for the presence of ICD-10 and DSM-4 personality disorders using an informant-based interview. Personality disorder was diagnosed in 24% (95% CI: 19-29) of the sample. Personality-disordered subjects were more likely to have psychiatric morbidity as indicated by GHQ-12, to report previous psychological morbidity, to be single and to attend the surgery on an emergency basis. 'Cluster B' personality disorders were particularly associated with psychiatric morbidity. There is a high prevalence rate of personality disorders among primary care attenders. These disorders are associated with the presence of common mental disorder and unplanned surgery attendance. Personality disorders may represent a significant source of burden in primary care.

  4. Knowledge and attitude of primary care doctors towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    menopausal symptoms should be managed. Knowledge and perception of primary care physicians towards management of postmenopausal symptoms are deficient. Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore knowledge and attitude of ...

  5. Consultation letters for medically unexplained physical symptoms in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedeman, Rob; Blankenstein, Annette H.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M.; Krol, Boudien; Stewart, Roy; Groothoff, Johan W.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, CM

    2010-01-01

    Background In primary care between 10% and 35% of all visits concern patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS). MUPS are associated with high medical consumption, significant disabilities and psychiatricmorbidity. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of consultation letters

  6. Health profiles of foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ab Rahman, Norazida; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Mohamad Noh, Kamaliah; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2016-01-01

    .... Little is known about the health profiles of foreign population in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed description of the health problems presented by foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia...

  7. Primary Care Clinician Expectations Regarding Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Melinda M.; Bond, Lynne A.; Howard, Alan; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Expectations regarding aging (ERA) in community-dwelling older adults are associated with personal health behaviors and health resource usage. Clinicians' age expectations likely influence patients' expectations and care delivery patterns; yet, limited research has explored clinicians' age expectations. The Expectations Regarding Aging…

  8. Lack of Needs Assessment in Cancer Survivorship Care and Rehabilitation in Hospitals and Primary Care Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Jensen, Charlotte Maria; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    the aim of this study was to describe specific survivorship care and rehabilitation needs and plans as stated by patients with cancer at hospitals when diagnosed and when primary care survivorship care and rehabilitation begins. Methods: Needs assessment forms from cancer patients at two hospitals and two...... primary care settings were analyzed. The forms included stated needs and survivorship care and rehabilitation plans. All data were categorized using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Results: Eighty-nine patients at hospitals and 99 in primary care, stated...... their needs. Around 50% of the patients completed a survivorship care and rehabilitation plan. In total, 666 (mean 7.5) needs were stated by hospital patients and 836 (mean 8.0) by those in primary care. The needs stated were primarily within the ICF component “body functions and structure”, and the most...

  9. Interprofessional collaboration regarding patients' care plans in primary care : a focus group study into influential factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephanie Anna Lenzen; Trudy van der Weijden; Anna Beurskens; Marloes Amantia van Bokhoven; Ramon Daniëls; Jerôme Jean Jacques van Dongen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The number of people with multiple chronic conditions demanding primary care services is increasing. To deal with the complex health care demands of these people, professionals from different disciplines collaborate. This study aims to explore influential factors regarding

  10. Interprofessional collaboration regarding patients' care plans in primary care: a focus group study into influential factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, J.J. van; Lenzen, S.A.; Bokhoven, M.A. van; Daniels, R.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Beurskens, A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of people with multiple chronic conditions demanding primary care services is increasing. To deal with the complex health care demands of these people, professionals from different disciplines collaborate. This study aims to explore influential factors regarding

  11. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2......, and monitoring delivered by medical assistants with usual care. Measurements: All-cause hospitalizations at 12 months (primary outcome) and quality of life scores (Short Form 12 Health Questionnaire [SF-12] and the Euroqol instrument [EQ-5D]). Results: Included patients had, on average, four co-occurring chronic...

  12. Innovations in primary care: Implications for hypertension detection and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lewanczuk, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The majority of hypertension detection and management in Canada is provided by family physicians. Although various organizations have called attention to the poor rates of hypertension detection and control on a worldwide basis, the tools and infrastructure that allow for better hypertension management have generally been lacking in primary care. Recent advances in the fields of primary care and chronic disease management have led to the development of frameworks wherein chronic diseases such...

  13. The myth of standardized workflow in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, G Talley; Beasley, John W; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Stone, Jamie A; Smith, Paul D; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2016-01-01

    Primary care efficiency and quality are essential for the nation's health. The demands on primary care physicians (PCPs) are increasing as healthcare becomes more complex. A more complete understanding of PCP workflow variation is needed to guide future healthcare redesigns. This analysis evaluates workflow variation in terms of the sequence of tasks performed during patient visits. Two patient visits from 10 PCPs from 10 different United States Midwestern primary care clinics were analyzed to determine physician workflow. Tasks and the progressive sequence of those tasks were observed, documented, and coded by task category using a PCP task list. Variations in the sequence and prevalence of tasks at each stage of the primary care visit were assessed considering the physician, the patient, the visit's progression, and the presence of an electronic health record (EHR) at the clinic. PCP workflow during patient visits varies significantly, even for an individual physician, with no single or even common workflow pattern being present. The prevalence of specific tasks shifts significantly as primary care visits progress to their conclusion but, notably, PCPs collect patient information throughout the visit. PCP workflows were unpredictable during face-to-face patient visits. Workflow emerges as the result of a "dance" between physician and patient as their separate agendas are addressed, a side effect of patient-centered practice. Future healthcare redesigns should support a wide variety of task sequences to deliver high-quality primary care. The development of tools such as electronic health records must be based on the realities of primary care visits if they are to successfully support a PCP's mental and physical work, resulting in effective, safe, and efficient primary care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Telepaediatrics, primary health care and developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    paediatric wards, and an existing paediatric neuro-oncology service in Jordan.8 ... of practitioners', 'which should benefit future patients'.10. Telemedicine can aid ... Telemedicine Platform, Medical Research Council, Cape Town, and School of Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town. Jill Fortuin, MSc.

  15. Supporting primary healthcare professionals to care for people with intellectual disability: a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Nicholas; Van Driel, Mieke L; van Dooren, Kate

    2015-01-01

    The vast health inequities experienced by people with intellectual disability remain indisputable. Persistent and contemporary challenges exist for primary healthcare providers and researchers working to contribute to improvements to the health and well-being of people with intellectual disability. Over two decades after the only review of supports for primary healthcare providers was published, this paper contributes to an evolving research agenda that aims to make meaningful gains in health-related outcomes for this group. The present authors updated the existing review by searching the international literature for developments and evaluations of multinational models of care. Based on our review, we present three strategies to support primary healthcare providers: (i) effectively using what we know, (ii) considering other strategies that offer support to primary healthcare professionals and (iii) researching primary health care at the system level. Strengthening primary care by supporting equitable provision of health-related care for people with intellectual disability is a much needed step towards improving health outcomes among people with intellectual disability. More descriptive quantitative and qualitative research, as well as intervention-based research underpinned by rigorous mixed-methods evaluating these strategies at the primary care level, which is sensitive to the needs of people with intellectual disability will assist primary care providers to provide better care and achieve better health outcomes. Many people with intellectual disability have poor health. The authors reviewed what has been written by other researchers about how to improve the health of people with intellectual disability. In the future, people who support adults with intellectual disability should continue doing what they do well, think of other ways to improve health, and do more research about health. At all times, the needs of people with intellectual disability should be the

  16. Frailty screening in older patients in primary care using routine care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drubbel, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Primary care for frail older people is reported to be suboptimal. A transition toward proactive patient-centred care is needed. We investigated the effectiveness of U-PRIM, a frailty screening intervention based on routine care data, and of U-PRIM followed by U-CARE, a nurse-led

  17. Reinventing your primary care practice: becoming an MDCEO™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conard SE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Scott E Conard,1 Maureen Reni Courtney21ACAP Health, Dallas, 2College of Nursing, University of Texas, Arlington, TX, USAAbstract: Primary care medicine in the United States is undergoing a revolutionary shift. Primary care providers and their staff have an extraordinary chance to create and participate in exciting new approaches to care. New strategies will require courage, flexibility, and openness to change by every member of the practice team, especially the lead clinician who is most often the physician, but can also be the nurse practitioner or physician's assistant. Providers must first recognize their need to alter their fundamental identity to incorporate a new kind of leadership role—that of the MDCEO™ (i.e., the individual clinician who leads the practice to ensure that quality, service, and financial systems are developed and effectively managed. This paper provides a practical vision and rationale for the required transition in primary care, pointing the way for how to achieve new practice effectiveness through new leadership roles. It also provides a model to evaluate the status of a primary care practice. The authors have extensive experience in working with primary care providers to radically evolve their clinical practices to become MDCEOs™. The MDCEO™ will articulate the vision and strategy for the practice, define and foster the practice culture, and create and facilitate team development and overall high level functioning. Each member of the team can then begin to lead their part of the practice: a 21st century population-oriented, purpose-based practice resulting in increased quality of care, improved patient outcomes, greater financial success, and enhanced peace of mind.Keywords: primary health care organization and administration, health care reform, leadership, patient-centered care

  18. Information requested about organ donation in primary health care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, A; Conesa, C; Ramírez, P; Sánchez, J; Sánchez, E; Ramos, F; Parrilla, P

    2006-10-01

    Information provided by primary care workers about organ donation significantly affects the attitude of the general public. The objective of this study was to evaluate information about donation requested by the general public in health centers in an autonomous community (region) of Spain and to find out how many workers provided relevant information. A random sample was taken and stratified by sex, job category, and geographical location (six health areas of our autonomous regional community, 45 municipal councils), among primary care health workers in order to obtain a total of 428 respondents in 34 primary care centers. A study was undertaken of information requested and provided about organ donation and transplantation. The chi square test was applied and differences were considered significant at levels of P organ donation and transplantation. This request for information was much greater from physicians than from the other types of workers (P = .015). Furthermore, 54% of primary care health workers (n=229) reported having provided information about donation, especially physicians (64%), with this being mainly favorable. Information had also been provided by nurses (59%) and ancillary staff (34%). Information requested from primary care health workers by the general public about organ donation and transplantation is increasing when we compare it to data from previous years. Around half of primary care workers have offered information about transplantation. Therefore, it is fundamental that these workers have adequate and correct information to provide patients and families.

  19. Factors shaping intersectoral action in primary health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaf, Julia; Baum, Fran; Freeman, Toby; Labonte, Ron; Javanparast, Sara; Jolley, Gwyn; Lawless, Angela; Bentley, Michael

    2014-12-01

    To examine case studies of good practice in intersectoral action for health as one part of evaluating comprehensive primary health care in six sites in South Australia and the Northern Territory. Interviews with primary health care workers, collaborating agency staff and service users (Total N=33); augmented by relevant documents from the services and collaborating partners. The value of intersectoral action for health and the importance of partner relationships to primary health care services were both strongly endorsed. Factors facilitating intersectoral action included sufficient human and financial resources, diverse backgrounds and skills and the personal rewards that sustain commitment. Key constraining factors were financial and time limitations, and a political and policy context which has become less supportive of intersectoral action; including changes to primary health care. While intersectoral action is an effective way for primary health care services to address social determinants of health, commitment to social justice and to adopting a social view of health are constrained by a broader health service now largely reinforcing a biomedical model. Effective organisational practices and policies are needed to address social determinants of health in primary health care and to provide a supportive context for workers engaging in intersectoral action. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  20. Profile of children hospitalizations by primary care sensitive conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Rosana Gonçalves de Oliveira Toso

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hospitalization for primary care sensitive conditions is a type of hospitalization that may be reduced or avoided if conditions are properly and effectively diagnosed and treated within Primary Health Care. To identify Brazilian rates of morbidity in 0 – 4 year-old children and hospitalization rates for primary care sensitive conditions rates in a pediatric unit of a public hospital in Cascavel, Paraná State, Brazil. Quantitative research whose data were retrieved from the Hospital Information System database - Datasus and from the records of the Medical and Statistical File Service of the hospital, with regard to hospital records of 220 children between January and December 2012, with an instrument specifically developed for research and analysis in descriptive statistics. National hospitalization rates for primary care sensitive conditions were predominant in children under one year and in the northern (657.56 and southern (621.18 regions, underscoring pneumonia. They accounted for 23.30% of hospitalizations, with 15.03% for respiratory diseases in the medical institution under analysis. Respiratory diseases were the main cause of hospitalization for primary care sensitive conditions and in children under one year old. Results suggest an increase in investment for prevention of these diseases in primary health care.

  1. Do primary care physicians coordinate ambulatory care for chronic disease patients in Canada?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alan; Martens, Patricia; Chateau, Dan; Bogdanovic, Bodgan; Koseva, Ina

    2014-08-30

    Adults with chronic disease are the most frequent users of the primary healthcare system. In Manitoba, patients are allowed to seek ambulatory (outpatient) care from the provider of their choosing (primary care physician or specialist), with referrals to specialists preferred but not always required. Some patients receive their routine care from specialists. We conducted this study to determine the patterns by which adults with chronic disease access ambulatory care as a prelude to exploring the impact these patterns may have on the quality of care received. Physician claims for all visits between 2007/8-2009/10 were extracted from the Data Repository at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy. Patients included in the analysis made at least four ambulatory visits to a primary care physician or specialist within the study period, and met the definition criteria for at least one of six chronic diseases: diabetes mellitus; congestive heart failure; mood disorders; ischemic heart disease; total respiratory morbidity; and/or hypertension. Patients were "assigned" to the physician they visited most regularly. Physician visit patterns were assessed by dividing visits into nine visit types based on the type of physician patients visited (assigned primary care physician, other primary care physician, or specialist) and whether or not they received a referral. 347,606 patients with 7,662,411 physician visits were included in the analysis. Most visits were to the patients' assigned primary care physician. About 50% of the visits to specialists were by referral from the assigned primary care physician. However, 26-29% of all visits to a primary care physician were not to the assigned primary care physician, and non-assigned physicians were more likely to refer patients to specialists than assigned primary care physicians. The findings suggest that the current primary care system in Manitoba may not adequately support coordination of ambulatory care. Ambulatory visits to a

  2. [Clinical bioethics for primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-de Paz, L

    2013-01-01

    The clinical decision making process with ethical implications in the area of primary healthcare differs from other healthcare areas. From the ethical perspective it is important to include these issues in the decision making model. This dissertation explains the need for a process of bioethical deliberation for Primary Healthcare, as well as proposing a method for doing so. The decision process method, adapted to this healthcare area, is flexible and requires a more participative Healthcare System. This proposal involves professionals and the patient population equally, is intended to facilitate the acquisition of responsibility for personal and community health. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary Care Provider Perspectives on Reducing Low-Value Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reid, Robert J; Cheadle, Allen; Chang, Eva; Buist, Diana S; Gundersen, Gabrielle; Handley, Matthew R; Pardee, Roy

    2015-01-01

    .... This study explores clinicians’ perceived use of and professional responsibility for reducing low-value care, barriers to decreasing its use, and knowledge and perceived legitimacy of the Choosing Wisely campaign. Methods...

  4. QUALICOPC, a multi-country study evaluating quality, costs and equity in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van den Berg Michael J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The QUALICOPC (Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe study aims to evaluate the performance of primary care systems in Europe in terms of quality, equity and costs. The study will provide an answer to the question what strong primary care systems entail and which effects primary care systems have on the performance of health care systems. QUALICOPC is funded by the European Commission under the "Seventh Framework Programme". In this article the background and design of the QUALICOPC study is described. Methods/design QUALICOPC started in 2010 and will run until 2013. Data will be collected in 31 European countries (27 EU countries, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Turkey and in Australia, Israel and New Zealand. This study uses a three level approach of data collection: the system, practice and patient. Surveys will be held among general practitioners (GPs and their patients, providing evidence at the process and outcome level of primary care. These surveys aim to gain insight in the professional behaviour of GPs and the expectations and actions of their patients. An important aspect of this study is that each patient's questionnaire can be linked to their own GP's questionnaire. To gather data at the structure or national level, the study will use existing data sources such as the System of Health Accounts and the Primary Health Care Activity Monitor Europe (PHAMEU database. Analyses of the data will be performed using multilevel models. Discussion By its design, in which different data sources are combined for comprehensive analyses, QUALICOPC will advance the state of the art in primary care research and contribute to the discussion on the merit of strengthening primary care systems and to evidence based health policy development.

  5. The ethics of complex relationships in primary care behavioral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Jeff; Runyan, Christine

    2013-03-01

    Primary care settings are particularly prone to complex relationships that can be ethically challenging. This is due in part to three of the distinctive attributes of primary care: a whole family orientation; team-based care; and a longitudinal care delivery model. In addition, the high patient volume of primary care means that the likelihood of encountering ethically challenging relationships is probably greater than in a specialty setting. This article argues that one ethical standard of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2010, Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct, www.apa.org/ethics/code) (10.02, Therapy Involving Couples or Families) should be revised to better accommodate the work of psychologists in primary care. The corresponding Principles of Medical Ethics from the American Medical Association (AMA, 2012, Code of medical ethics: Current opinions with annotations, 2012-2013, Washington, DC: Author), most notably the principle regarding a physician's duty to "respect the rights of patients, colleagues, and other health professionals as well as safeguard privacy" are also noted. In addition, the article details how the three attributes of primary care often result in complex relationships, and provides suggestions for handling such relationships ethically. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Ambulatory Assessment of Depression in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-29

    partial blindness that interferes with reading ability, illiteracy , or other deficits that interfere with completion of a practice diary during the...Interpersonal Psychotherapy of Depression. New York, NY: Basic Books . Koike, A. K., Unutzer, J., & Wells, K. B. (2002). Improving the care for depression in...provoking psychotherapy. In P.E.Crits-Christoph & J. P. E. Barber (Eds.), (pp. 45-79). New York: Basic books . Nierenberg, A. A., Alpert, J. E., Pava

  7. Managing Primary Health Care in the South - South Geo Political ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of Primary Health Care (PHC) is one of the main pillars of a health system through Human Resources. Furthermore, the quality of health services depends to a large extent on the people who manage the services. The paper reviews the role of stakeholders in the management of primary health service ...

  8. Toward More Equitable Primary Health Care in Argentina and Latin ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Improving primary health care for everyone requires an effort that extends beyond the formal health sector. This project will examine the value of intersectoral collaborations at the primary healthcare level to generate practical guidance and a theoretical understanding of how these arrangements can influence health equity ...

  9. Burnout syndrome among physicians working in primary health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of the study was to reveal extent of burnout problem among primary care physicians and the socio-demographic factors affecting its occurrence. Methods: The target population included all physicians working in these two health regions in Kuwait. Two hundred physicians working in the primary health ...

  10. Mental Health Collaborative Care and Its Role in Primary Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, David E.; Kilbourne, Amy M.; Nord, Kristina M.; Bauer, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative care models (CCMs) provide a pragmatic strategy to deliver integrated mental health and medical care for persons with mental health conditions served in primary care settings. CCMs are team-based intervention to enact system-level redesign by improving patient care through organizational leadership support, provider decision support, and clinical information systems as well as engaging patients in their care through self-management support and linkages to community resources. The model is also a cost-efficient strategy for primary care practices to improve outcomes for a range of mental health conditions across populations and settings. CCMs can help achieve integrated care aims under healthcare reform yet organizational and financial issues may affect adoption into routine primary care. Notably, successful implementation of CCMs in routine care will require alignment of financial incentives to support systems redesign investments, reimbursements for mental health providers, and adaptation across different practice settings and infrastructure to offer all CCM components. PMID:23881714

  11. RESEARCH Reasons why patients with primary health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    102, No. 10 SAMJ. Reasons why patients with primary health care problems access a secondary hospital emergency centre. Juanita Becker, Angela Dell, Louis Jenkins, Rauf Sayed. Emergency centres (ECs) provide emergency care to people with acute trauma and illness who require the services and expertise available.

  12. Primary care morbidity in Eastern Cape Province | Brueton | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Primary health care in rural South Africa is predominantly provided by remote clinics and health centres. In 1994, health centres were upgraded and new health centres developed to serve as a health care filter between community clinics and district hospitals. Aim. To describe the spectrum of clinical problems ...

  13. Quality of drug prescription in primary health care facilities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Drug therapy can improve a patient's quality of life and health outcomes if only used properly. However, data on prescription quality at primary health care facilities in Tanzania is scanty. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of drug prescriptions in selected health care facilities in two districts of ...

  14. Primary care for young adult cancer survivors: an international perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holge-Hazelton, B.; Blake-Gumbs, L.; Miedema, B.; Rijswijk, E. van

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Internationally, family physicians (FP) are not routinely involved in young adult cancer (YAC) care. In this short report, we would like to make a compelling argument for primary care involvement. METHODS: Comparative descriptions and literature review. RESULTS: Cancer among YAs is rare and

  15. Knowledge of Health Insurance Among Primary Health-Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) was formally launched in Nigeria in 2005 as an option to help bridge the evident gaps in health care financing, with the expectation of it leading to significant improvement in the country's dismal health status indices. Primary Health Care (PHC) is the nation's ...

  16. Determinants of increased primary health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.; Schellevis, F.; Rijken, M.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The number of cancer survivors is increasing, and patients with cancer often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment. Because of the variety of health problems and high prevalence of comorbidity, primary care physicians (PCPs) seem obvious candidates to take care of

  17. Suicidal ideations, plans and attempts in primary care: cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: the aim of the study is to estimate the prevalence of suicidal ideation among Moroccan consultants in primary health care system. Methods: we conducted a cross sectional survey in three health care centers in two cities of Morocco to estimate the prevalence of suicidal ideation, plan and suicide attempts among ...

  18. Integrating mental health into primary health care – Uganda's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    nutrition, attendance of antenatal care, immunisation and discouraging behaviours such as excessive alcohol consumption.5,6,7 In addition this encourages the maximum utilization of the few available health workers thereby improving accessibility. Integrating mental health into primary health care –. Uganda's experience.

  19. Quality of drug prescription in primary health care facilities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Marwa

    Conclusion: Prescribing of higher number of drugs than the WHO recommendations and overuse of antibiotics is still a problem at health care facilities in Mwanza Tanzania. The frequency of occurrence of prescription errors found during the study was considerably high. Keywords: drug prescription, primary health care ...

  20. Screening for diabetic retinopathy in primary care with a mobile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A SWOT analysis of the pilot project was completed and recommendations were made on how to integrate it into the district health system. Conclusion. Screening with a fundal camera improved the quality of care for diabetic patients and is feasible in the South African public sector, primary care setting. A single technician ...

  1. Residents' Perceptions of Primary Care versus Traditional Internal Medicine Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Howard K.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Two internal medicine residency programs at Baylor College of Medicine are discussed. The traditional program emphasizes experience in the care of acute problems within a hospital inpatient environment. The primary care residency program emphasizes training in the outpatient environment and in noninternal medicine disciplines. (MLW)

  2. Pain management in primary care – current perspectives | Meyer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to a 1998 World Health Organization Survey of 26 000 primary care patients on five continents, 22% reported persistent pain over the past year. Part of the problem lies with some health-care providers who have failed to keep up with the advances in pain medicine and continue to follow the biomedical approach, ...

  3. lntra-rator variability of primary care physicians

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. Background: Recent studies support the link between hyperlipidaemia and increased prevalence of ... problem following rapid urbanization.The health care system in Saudi Arabia makes the primary care accessible ... The Kappa statistics suggested an excel- lent intra-rator agreement by only four physicians, but ...

  4. Evaluating primary care research networks: a review of currently available tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, M.C.G.; Stalman, W.A.B.; van der Horst, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of primary care research networks (PCRNs) are being developed around the world. Despite the fact that they have existed for a long time in some countries, little is known about what they have actually achieved. There is an ongoing debate in the literature about the

  5. Management of LBP at primary care level in South Africa: up to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LBP is suspected to be high among visitors of the South African primary care centers, but currently no information exists on prevalence or ... Conclusions: Current management of LBP at PHC level appears to be ineffective and not conform guidelines. Further ..... explanation for patients' non-involvement in management of ...

  6. Care guides: an examination of occupational conflict and role relationships in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholey, Douglas R; White, Katie M; Adair, Richard; Christianson, Jon B; Lee, Suhna; Elumba, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Improving the efficiency and effectiveness of primary care treatment of patients with chronic illness is an important goal in reforming the U.S. health care system. Reducing occupational conflicts and creating interdependent primary care teams is crucial for the effective functioning of new models being developed to reorganize chronic care. Occupational conflict, role interdependence, and resistance to change in a proof-of-concept pilot test of one such model that uses a new kind of employee in the primary care office, a "care guide," were analyzed. Care guides are lay individuals who help chronic disease patients and their providers achieve standard health goals. The aim of this study was to examine the development of occupational boundaries, interdependence of care guides and primary care team members, and acceptance by clinic employees of this new kind of health worker. A mixed methods, pilot study was conducted using qualitative analysis; clinic, provider, and patient surveys; administrative data; and multivariate analysis. Qualitative analysis examined the emergence of the care guide role. Administrative data and surveys were used to examine patterns of interdependence between care guides, physicians, team members, and clinic staff; obtain physician evaluations of the care guide role; and evaluate the effect of care guides on patient perceptions of care coordination and follow-up. Evaluation of implementation of the care guide model showed that (a) the care guide scope of practice was clearly defined; (b) interdependent relationships between care guides and providers were formed; (c) relational triads consisting of patient, care guide, and physician were created; (d) patients and providers were supported in managing chronic disease; and (e) resistance to this model among traditional employees was minimized. The feasibility of implementing a new care model for chronic disease management in the primary care setting, identifying factors associated with a positive

  7. Systemic Sclerosis and Perceptions of Quality in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toci, Ashley L; Hyer, J Madison; Silver, Richard M; Nietert, Paul J; Hant, Faye N

    2016-05-01

    Among patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), early recognition of potentially life-threatening organ involvement is critical. Because prompt recognition of early signs of organ involvement can dramatically alter a patient׳s outcome, it is crucial that patients and primary care providers (PCPs) recognize these symptoms. We conducted a survey of patients with SSc regarding their perceptions of the quality of their primary care, and whether or not they perceive the quality of their primary care to be impaired by their scleroderma diagnosis. A mail survey was sent to 525 patients with SSc seen at the Medical University of South Carolina. Questionnaire items addressed demographics and perceptions of their quality of their primary care. Of n = 140 respondents, most (74.5%) did not feel as though their diagnosis of SSc has resulted in barriers to appropriate or satisfactory care, and most (81.3%) answered that they had not ever felt as though their medical concerns were not being addressed because they had SSc. Perceptions of barriers were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with female sex and younger age, along with poorer overall quality of care and satisfaction with their primary care. Most patients with SSc value the quality of their primary care. However, some patients with SSc feel that their PCPs do not adequately monitor their blood pressure, reflux symptoms or shortness of breath. These results highlight the importance of PCPs in the overall care of patients with SSc and the need for continued education regarding close monitoring of signs and symptoms suggestive of possible life-threatening internal organ involvement. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Multidisciplinary care planning and teamwork in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Geoffrey K; Tieman, Jennifer J; Shelby-James, Tania M

    2008-04-21

    To examine policy and implementation issues around multidisciplinary care planning (MDP) as a means of improving outcomes for patients with chronic disease and/or complex care needs. We conducted a series of five systematic reviews of the literature from 1990 to 2006, sampling a spectrum of issues associated with chronic disease and complex health care needs, with a focus on planning and provision of multidisciplinary care. Our review showed that MDP does improve many functional outcomes in the areas studied. Analysis of MDP programs involves examination of two groups of variables - the multidisciplinary components (a range of clinical perspectives and specialist knowledge) and team components (eg, communication and support). Implementing MDP requires changing patterns of interaction between care providers, alignment of roles and work practices, and changes to organisational arrangements. While MDP improves many functional outcomes, widespread implementation of MDP in standard practice will require complex and targeted strategies. Devising and testing such strategies is a prerequisite for widespread, routine use of MPD in chronic disease management.

  9. Measuring safety culture in Dutch primary care: psychometric characteristics of the SCOPE-PC questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbakel, Natasha J; Zwart, Dorien L M; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula

    2013-09-17

    Patient safety has been a priority in primary healthcare in the last years. The prevailing culture is seen as an important condition for patient safety in practice and several tools to measure patient safety culture have therefore been developed. Although Dutch primary care consists of different professions, such as general practice, dental care, dietetics, physiotherapy and midwifery, a safety culture questionnaire was only available for general practices. The purpose of this study was to modify and validate this existing questionnaire to a generic questionnaire for all professions in Dutch primary care. A validated Dutch questionnaire for general practices was modified to make it usable for all Dutch primary care professions. Subsequently, this questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 2400 practices from eleven primary care professions. The instrument's factor structure, reliability and validity were examined using confirmatory and explorative factor analyses. 921 questionnaires were returned. Of these, 615 were eligible for factor analysis. The resulting SCOPE-PC questionnaire consisted of seven dimensions: 'open communication and learning from errors', 'handover and teamwork', 'adequate procedures and working conditions', 'patient safety management', 'support and fellowship', 'intention to report events' and 'organisational learning' with a total of 41 items. All dimensions had good reliability with Cronbach's alphas ranging from 0.70-0.90, and the questionnaire had a good construct validity. The SCOPE-PC questionnaire has sound psychometric characteristics for use by the different professions in Dutch primary care to gain insight in their safety culture.

  10. Primary care perspectives on prostate cancer survivorship: implications for improving quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Northouse, Laurel L; Fagerlin, Angela; Garlinghouse, Carol; Demers, Raymond Y; Rovner, David R; Darwish-Yassine, May; Wei, John T

    2013-08-01

    Primary care providers often care for men with prostate cancer due to its prolonged clinical course and an increasing number of survivors. However, their attitudes and care patterns are inadequately studied. In this context, we surveyed primary care providers regarding the scope of their prostate cancer survivorship care. The 2006 Early Detection and Screening for Prostate Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice Survey conducted by the Michigan Public Health Institute investigated the beliefs and practice patterns of primary care providers in Michigan. We evaluated responses from 902 primary care providers regarding the timing and content of their prostate cancer survivorship care and relationships with specialty care. Two-thirds (67.6%) of providers cared for men during and after prostate cancer treatment. Providers routinely inquired about incontinence, impotence and bowel problems (83.3%), with a few (14.2%) using surveys to measure symptoms. However, only a minority felt 'very comfortable' managing the side effects of prostate cancer treatment. Clear plans (76.1%) and details regarding management of treatment complications (65.2%) from treating specialists were suboptimal. Nearly one-half (45.1%) of providers felt it was equally appropriate for them and treating specialists to provide prostate cancer survivorship care. Primary care providers reported that prostate cancer survivorship care is prevalent in their practice, yet few felt very comfortable managing side effects of prostate cancer treatment. To improve quality of care, implementing prostate cancer survivorship care plans across specialties, or transferring primary responsibility to primary care providers through survivorship guidelines, should be considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Value and the medical home: effects of transformed primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfillan, Richard J; Tomcavage, Janet; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Davis, Duane E; Graham, Jove; Roy, Jason A; Pierdon, Steven B; Bloom, Frederick J; Graf, Thomas R; Goldman, Roy; Weikel, Karena M; Hamory, Bruce H; Paulus, Ronald A; Steele, Glen D

    2010-08-01

    The primary care medical home has been promoted to integrate and improve patient care while reducing healthcare spending, but with little formal study of the model or evidence of its efficacy. ProvenHealth Navigator (PHN), an intensive multidimensional medical home model that addresses care delivery and financing, was introduced into 11 different primary care practices. The goals were to improve the quality, efficiency, and patient experience of care. To evaluate the ability of a medical home model to improve the efficiency of care for Medicare beneficiaries. Observational study using regression modeling based on preintervention and postintervention data and a propensity-selected control cohort. Four years of claims data for Medicare patients at 11 intervention sites and 75 control groups were analyzed to compute hospital admission and readmission rates, and the total cost of care. Regression modeling was used to establish predicted rates and costs in the absence of the intervention. Actual results were compared with predicted results to compute changes attributable to the PHN model. ProvenHealth Navigator was associated with an 18% (P Investing in the capabilities of primary care practices to serve as medical homes may increase healthcare value by improving the efficiency of care. This study demonstrates that the PHN model is capable of significantly reducing admissions and readmissions for Medicare Advantage members.

  12. Implementing primary health care: some problems of creating national programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, J P; Walt, G

    1984-07-01

    While there is a great deal of agreement about the principles underlying Primary Health Care (PHC), there exist many problems, political, planning and management, involved in putting the approach into effect. Some of these difficulties are discussed. It is clear that the PHC approach is essentially political; the way it is implemented in each country will reflect the political priorities and systems of that country. Moreover, ministries of health are not known for their strong position in the ministerial pecking order. Finance and planning ministeries would have to be won over to the importance of the concept of PHC to try to eexpand the health budget and to change the emphasis of existing resource allocation patterns. Costs incurred by a PHC approach ( e.g., expensive transport and communication systems), and resources needed to finance it may be available; however, they may not be channelled to the politically less articulate groups in rural areas. Political implications are not limited to national levels; considerable conflict may exist between different status groups and classes at the village level, thus sabotaging PHC plans. Professional politics will also be played at all levels. It is equally essential to recognize the historical context in which PHC is being introduced. Many countries have inherited colonial infrastructures. Changing the values, perceptions, expectations, administration and organization that accompany such systems is extremely hard, and to put PHC into effect demands radical changes. The planning difficulties which beset PHC are related to the still large private provision of social services like health, and to a flourishing traditional private sector in many developing countries. These may limit the implementation of a national health policy and PHC may thus result in a very patchy service throughout the country. The level of centralized planning will also affect resource allocation and therefore the policy, planning and implementation

  13. [Primary Health Care in Austria - Tu Felix Austria nube - Concept for networking in the primary care of Upper Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Johannes; Rebhandl, Erwin; Hockl, Wolfgang; Stöbich, Anna-Maria

    2017-10-01

    The primary health care in rural areas in Austria is currently determined by challenges such as ageing of the population, the shift towards chronic and age-related illnesses, the specialist medical and hospital-related education and training of physicians' as well growing widespread difficulty of staffing doctor's office. The objective is to realize a general practitioner centered and team-oriented primary health care (PHC) approach by establishing networked primary health care in rural areas of Austria. Using literature research, online survey, expert interviews and expert workshops, we identified different challenges in terms of primary health care in rural areas. Further, current resources and capacities of primary health care in rural areas were identified using the example of the district of Rohrbach. Twelve design dimensions and 51 relevant measurement indicators of a PHC network were delineated and described. Based on this, 12 design approaches of PHC concept for the GP-centered and team-oriented primary health care in rural areas have been developed.

  14. Integration Strategies of Pharmacists in Primary Care-Based Accountable Care Organizations: A Report from the Accountable Care Organization Research Network, Services, and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Tina; Hale, Genevieve M; Eltaki, Sara M; Prados, Yesenia; Jones, Renee; Seamon, Matthew J; Moreau, Cynthia; Gernant, Stephanie A

    2017-05-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) is an innovative health care delivery model centered on value-based care. ACOs consisting of primary care providers are increasingly becoming commonplace in practice; however, medication management remains suboptimal. As experts in medication management, pharmacists perform direct patient care and assist in the transition from one provider to another, which places them in an ideal position to manage multiple aspects of patient care. Pharmacist-provided care has been shown to reduce drug expenditures, hospital readmissions, length of stay, and emergency department visits. Although pharmacists have become key team members of interdisciplinary teams within traditional care settings, their role has often been overlooked in the primary care-based ACO. In 2015, Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy founded the Accountable Care Organization Research Network, Services, and Education (ACORN SEED), a team of pharmacy practice faculty dedicated to using innovative approaches to patient care, while providing unique learning experiences for pharmacy students by partnering with ACOs in the South Florida region. Five opportunities are presented for pharmacists to improve medication use specifically in primary care-based ACOs: medication therapy management, annual wellness visits, chronic disease state management, chronic care management, and transitions of care. Several challenges and barriers that prevent the full integration of pharmacists into primary care-based ACOs include lack of awareness of pharmacist roles in primary care; complex laws and regulations surrounding clinical protocols, such as collaborative practice agreements; provider status that allows compensation for pharmacist services; and limited access to medical records. By understanding and maximizing the role of pharmacists, several opportunities exist to better manage the medication-use process in value-based care settings. As more organizations realize

  15. Ophthalmic emergencies in Primary Care Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary Dubaj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available So far in Poland, the vast majority of patients with ocular problems have been diagnosed and treated immediately by an ophthalmologist, acting in our country as a “GP”. Due to the introduced by the National Health Fund a change in the organization of the home health care system, involving the re-introduction of the need for a referral to an ophthalmologist, family doctors are likely to involve in the diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases. This reform can reduce patient wait time in the ophthalmology office, because family doctors are trained to treat some patients with ocular symptoms. The most serious challenge that can stand in front of them is to distinguish those patients who require urgent ophthalmological consultation and to provide adequate medical care until it was provided by an ophthalmologist. Among these so-called “acute conditions in ophthalmology,” the most important are the central retinal artery blockage, retinal detachment, iritis, a base or acid burns and acute attack of glaucoma. They represent a direct threat to loss of function of the eye, and quick implementation of appropriate prehospital treatment and rapid transport to a specialized center has a significant impact on the future vision of the patient after completion of the treatment process. Therefore, it is important for the family doctor to know right workflow for both initial diagnosis and treatment of patients with eye’s acute condtions.

  16. Health Literacy in Primary Care Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Lauren; Salzman, Brooke; Snyderman, Danielle

    2015-07-15

    Health literacy includes a set of skills needed to make appropriate health decisions and successfully navigate the health care system. These skills include reading, writing, numeracy, communication, and, increasingly, the use of electronic technology. National data indicate that more than one-third of U.S. adults have limited health literacy, which contributes to poor health outcomes and affects patient safety, and health care access and quality. Although there are a number of tools that screen for limited health literacy, they are primarily used for research. Routinely screening patients for health literacy has not been shown to improve outcomes and is not recommended. Instead, multiple professional organizations recommend using universal health literacy precautions to provide understandable and accessible information to all patients, regardless of their literacy or education levels. This includes avoiding medical jargon, breaking down information or instructions into small concrete steps, limiting the focus of a visit to three key points or tasks, and assessing for comprehension. Additionally, printed information should be written at or below a fifth- to sixth-grade reading level. Visual aids, graphs, or pictures can enhance patient understanding, as can more concrete presentation of numerical information.

  17. Primary Care for Refugees: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishori, Ranit; Aleinikoff, Shoshana; Davis, Dawn

    2017-07-15

    Since 1975, more than 3 million refugees have settled in the United States, fleeing unrest, conflict, and persecution. Refugees represent diverse ethnic, cultural, religious, socioeconomic, and educational backgrounds. Despite this heterogeneity, there are commonalities in the refugee experience. Before resettlement, all refugees must undergo an overseas medical screening to detect conditions that pose a potential health threat in the United States. On arrival, they should undergo an examination to detect diseases with high prevalence in their country of origin or departure. Refugees have higher rates of chronic pain compared with the general population, and their mental health and wellbeing are strongly influenced by their migration history. Refugees have higher rates of mood disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and anxiety than the general population. Some refugees have been tortured, which contributes to poorer health. Chronic noncommunicable diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, are also prevalent among refugees. Many refugees may be missing routine immunizations and screenings for cancer and chronic diseases. Attention to reproductive health, oral health, and vision care will help identify and address previously unmet needs. Refugees face barriers to care as a result of cultural, language, and socioeconomic factors.

  18. Weight management: what patients want from their primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, M B; Vu, J D; Croughan-Minihane, M

    2001-06-01

    The researchers wanted to determine the weight management experiences of patients in primary care, and what those patients want from their physicians. Patients completed a survey in a primary care waiting room. Afterward they were measured for body mass index (BMI). A total of 410 consecutive adult patients in 2 primary care practices at the University of California, San Francisco, were approached, and 366 (89%) completed the survey. The primary outcomes were patient attitudes about weight loss, previous weight management experiences with their current physicians, and future preferences for weight management within the primary care relationship. Ninety-seven percent of the obese patients (BMI > 30), 84% of the overweight patients (BMI=25-30), and 39% of the non-overweight patients (BMI obese patients, 24% of the overweight patients, and 12% of the non-overweight patients had discussed weight with their current physicians. The types of weight management assistance that patients most wanted from their physicians were: (1) dietary advice, (2) help with setting realistic weight goals, and (3) exercise recommendations. Although most patients believe they should lose weight, this is often not discussed during office visits. Most patients (especially those who are overweight or obese) want more help with weight management than they are getting from their primary care physicians.

  19. Third sector primary health care in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, P; Dowell, A C; Bowers, S

    2000-03-24

    To describe key organisational characteristics of selected third sector (non-profit and non-government) primary health care organisations. Data were collected, in 1997 and 1998, from 15 third sector primary care organisations that were members of a network of third sector primary care providers, Health Care Aotearoa (HCA). Data were collected by face-to-face interviews of managers and key informants using a semi-structured interview schedule, and from practice computer information systems. Overall the populations served were young: only 4% of patients were aged 65 years or older, and the ethnicity profile was highly atypical, with 21.8% European, 36% Maori, 22.7% Pacific Island, 12% other, and 7.5% not stated. Community services card holding rates were higher than recorded in other studies, and registered patients tended to live in highly deprived areas. HCA organisations had high patient to doctor ratios, in general over 2000:1, and there were significant differences in management structures between HCA practices and more traditional general practice. Third sector organisations provide services for populations that are disadvantaged in many respects. It is likely that New Zealand will continue to develop a diverse range of primary care organisational arrangements. Effort is now required to measure quality and effectiveness of services provided by different primary care organisations serving comparable populations.

  20. 77 FR 65581 - Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit (Sales) Division, East Operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... Employment and Training Administration Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit..., Primary Care Business Unit (Sales) Division, East Operating Unit in Illinois Who Report to East Hanover..., applicable to workers of Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit (Sales) Division...

  1. 78 FR 3030 - Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit (Sales) Division, East Operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit..., NJ and Off-Site Workers of Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit (Sales... Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit (Sales) Division, East Hanover, New Jersey. The Department...

  2. Towards the effective introduction of physical activity interventions in primary health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijg, Johanna Maria

    2014-01-01

    Despite the promising findings related to the efficacy of primary health care-based physical activity interventions and recommendations for primary health care professionals to promote physical activity, the introduction of physical activity interventions in routine daily primary health care

  3. Quality of care offered to children attending primary health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antibiotic was prescribed in almost half (65/141) of the consultations, but antibiotic use was unwarranted in one-third of these cases. Health ... with clearly defined and monitored standard clinical practice routines and norms, is required to change the status quo. Primary .... Although both dosage and frequency of antibiotic ...

  4. Legal limitations for nurse prescribers in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Geyer

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The nurse plays an important role in the delivery of primary health care services in South Africa. The primary purpose is to provide the public with access to safe competent basic health care and to achieve this, the nurse should be empowered to practice within legal and ethical boundaries. This paper explores and describes the limitations imposed by legislation on the nurse’s ability to prescribe treatment in the primary health care field. The focus is mainly on the Nursing Act, the Pharmacy Act and the Medicines and Related Substances Control Act which highlights a number of limitations. It is concluded that empowerment of the nurse should not only include addressing the legal boundaries for practice, but also education and training opportunities to equip them with the expert knowledge and skills that they need to render a quality health care service.

  5. Where does practice nursing fit in primary health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annells, Merilyn

    2007-08-01

    Practice nursing is an integral and growing part of primary health care internationally and increasingly within the Australian health care system. The potential for practice nursing being considered as a specialty of community nursing, boundary issues in community nursing, and defining characteristics of practice nursing as a model of community-based nursing are discussed in this paper. As the author has worked as a practice nurse, personal reflections on the evolving practice nurse role are provided. Practice nursing is a dynamic entity and will continue to evolve in the primary health care setting. In order for practice nursing to meet the primary health care agenda, there is a need to incorporate a social model of health with the medical model of health and to promote research and scholarship to support this goal.

  6. [Sharing experiences: rotation in primary care in Posadas, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Garrido, A B; Caballero, L G; Basiuk, S

    2013-09-01

    Primary care should be the cornerstone of any health system. It is the first contact with the community health system of any country. The Declaration of Alma-Ata, 1978, seeks to provide the basis for the construction of a new health system that will allow the full exercise of the right to health. Carrying out an external rotation in Primary Care in Posadas, Misiones Province, Argentina, during medical training, in family medicine, offers an insight into how other health systems work, provide health care to the community in a Primary Care Center in a country with its similarities and differences like ours, follow the implementation of programs, working with family medicine residents in another country, and living a rewarding personal and professional experience. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding the body-mind in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Reventlow, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    which could readily fit both bodily and mental categories. In this article we discuss theoretical models that have attempted to overcome this challenge: The psychosomatic approach could be called holistic in the sense of taking an anti-dualistic stance. Primary care theorists have formulated integrative......Patients’ experience of symptoms does not follow the body–mind divide that characterizes the classification of disease in the health care system. Therefore, understanding patients in their entirety rather than in parts demands a different theoretical approach. Attempts have been made to formulate...... such approaches but many of these, such as the biopsychosocial model, are still basically dualistic or methodologically reductionist. In primary care, patients often present with diffuse symptoms, making primary care the ideal environment for understanding patients’ undifferentiated symptoms and disease patterns...

  8. Centralized care management support for "high utilizers" in primary care practices at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brent C; Paik, Jamie L; Haley, Laura L; Grammatico, Gina M

    2014-01-01

    Although evidence of effectiveness is limited, care management based outside primary care practices or hospitals is receiving increased attention. The University of Michigan (UM) Complex Care Management Program (CCMP) provides care management for uninsured and underinsured, high-utilizing patients in multiple primary care practices. To inform development of optimal care management models, we describe the CCMP model and characteristics and health care utilization patterns of its patients. Of a consecutive series of 49 patients enrolled at CCMP in 2011, the mean (SD) age was 48 (+/- 14); 23 (47%) were women; and 29 (59%) were White. Twenty-eight (57%) had two or more chronic medical conditions, 39 (80%) had one or more psychiatric condition, 28 (57%) had a substance abuse disorder, and 11 (22%) were homeless. Through phone, e-mail, and face-to-face contact with patients and primary care providers (PCPs), care managers coordinated health and social services and facilitated access to medical and mental health care. Patients had a mean (SD) number of hospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits in 6 months prior to enrollment of2.2 (2.5) and 4.2 (4.3), respectively, with a nonstatistically significant decrease in hospitalizations, hospital days, and emergency room visits in 6 months following enrollment in CCMP. Centralized care management support for primary care practices engages high-utilizing patients with complex medical and behavioral conditions in care management that would be difficult to provide through individual practices and may decrease health care utilization by these patients.

  9. After-hours care and its coordination with primary care in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Samuel, Divya; Bond, Amelia M; Carrier, Emily

    2012-11-01

    Despite expectations that medical homes provide "24 × 7 coverage" there is little to guide primary care practices in developing sustainable models for accessible and coordinated after-hours care. To identify and describe models of after-hours care in the U.S. that are delivered in primary care sites or coordinated with a patient's usual primary care provider. Qualitative analysis of data from in-depth telephone interviews. Primary care practices in 16 states and the organizations they partner with to provide after-hours coverage. Forty-four primary care physicians, practice managers, nurses and health plan representatives from 28 organizations. Analyses examined after-hours care models, facilitators, barriers and lessons learned. Based on 28 organizations interviewed, five broad models of after-hours care were identified, ranging in the extent to which they provide continuity and patient access. Key themes included: 1) The feasibility of a model varies for many reasons, including patient preferences and needs, the local health care market supply, and financial compensation; 2) A shared electronic health record and systematic notification procedures were extremely helpful in maintaining information continuity between providers; and 3) after-hours care is best implemented as part of a larger practice approach to access and continuity. After-hours care coordinated with a patient's usual primary care provider is facilitated by consideration of patient demand, provider capacity, a shared electronic health record, systematic notification procedures and a broader practice approach to improving primary care access and continuity. Payer support is important to increasing patients' access to after-hours care.

  10. Improving service quality in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Denise M; Nordrum, Jon T; Edwards, Frederick D; Caselli, Richard J; Berry, Leonard L

    2015-01-01

    A framework for improving health care service quality was implemented at a 12-provider family medicine practice in 2010. A national patient satisfaction research vendor conducted weekly telephone surveys of 840 patients served by that practice: 280 patients served in 2009, and 560 served during 2010 and 2011. After the framework was implemented, the proportion of "excellent" ratings of provider service (the highest rating on a 5-point scale) increased by 5% to 9%, most notably thoroughness (P = .04), listening (P = .04), and explaining (P = .04). Other improvements included prompt test result notification and telephone staff courtesy (each by 10%, P = .02), as well as teamwork (by 8%, P = .04). Overall quality increased by 10% (P = .01), moving the practice from the 68th to the 91st percentile of medical practices in the research vendor's database. Improvements in patient satisfaction suggest that this framework may be useful in value-based payment models. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  11. Primary health care in Somalian refugee camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, B

    1982-01-01

    The convergence of thousands in Somalia's refugee camps has created an emergency in health care provision. To tackle this problem, the Ministry of Health, in conjunction with UNICEF, recruited a small group of Somali professionals to draw up a plan for the training of community health workers to serve in the camps. A 2nd objective was to make an assessment of the nutritional status of the refugees, and provision of maternal and child health care. At the end of a 2 week workshop a plan was drawn up which emphasized the teaching of preventive medicine, particularly in the control of communicable diseases. It was decided that students in the postbasic training program in administration and teaching in the health service would serve as teachers. Teaching was kept basic and simple, mostly concentrating on topics related to hygiene and food preparation, for example. During program implementation inspection visits were carried out at intervals by a health educator and tutor from the nursing school. At the same time further briefing was given to as many concerned people in the camps as possible. Preliminary feedback suggested that the program was proceeding successfully. After 3 months an evaluation was carried out by teachers in the program. The evaluation showed a great deal to have been accomplished in spite of the disinterest of some parts of the population. The success was attributed to the involvement of Somalis in the camp communities. As of September 1981, the pace of the programs has increased, with the inclusion of health services from expatriate sources within Ministry of Health guidelines.

  12. Evidence for integrating eye health into primary health care in Africa: a health systems strengthening approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Rènée; Faal, Hannah B; Etya'ale, Daniel; Wiafe, Boateng; Mason, Ingrid; Graham, Ronnie; Bush, Simon; Mathenge, Wanjiku; Courtright, Paul

    2013-03-18

    The impact of unmet eye care needs in sub-Saharan Africa is compounded by barriers to accessing eye care, limited engagement with communities, a shortage of appropriately skilled health personnel, and inadequate support from health systems. The renewed focus on primary health care has led to support for greater integration of eye health into national health systems. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate available evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care in sub-Saharan Africa from a health systems strengthening perspective. A scoping review method was used to gather and assess information from published literature, reviews, WHO policy documents and examples of eye and health care interventions in sub-Saharan Africa. Findings were compiled using a health systems strengthening framework. Limited information is available about eye health from a health systems strengthening approach. Particular components of the health systems framework lacking evidence are service delivery, equipment and supplies, financing, leadership and governance. There is some information to support interventions to strengthen human resources at all levels, partnerships and community participation; but little evidence showing their successful application to improve quality of care and access to comprehensive eye health services at the primary health level, and referral to other levels for specialist eye care. Evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care is currently weak, particularly when applying a health systems framework. A realignment of eye health in the primary health care agenda will require context specific planning and a holistic approach, with careful attention to each of the health system components and to the public health system as a whole. Documentation and evaluation of existing projects are required, as are pilot projects of systematic approaches to interventions and application of best practices. Multi-national research may provide

  13. Health system challenges to integration of mental health delivery in primary care in Kenya--perspectives of primary care health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Rachel; Othieno, Caleb; Okeyo, Stephen; Aruwa, Julyan; Kingora, James; Jenkins, Ben

    2013-09-30

    Health system weaknesses in Africa are broadly well known, constraining progress on reducing the burden of both communicable and non-communicable disease (Afr Health Monitor, Special issue, 2011, 14-24), and the key challenges in leadership, governance, health workforce, medical products, vaccines and technologies, information, finance and service delivery have been well described (Int Arch Med, 2008, 1:27). This paper uses focus group methodology to explore health worker perspectives on the challenges posed to integration of mental health into primary care by generic health system weakness. Two ninety minute focus groups were conducted in Nyanza province, a poor agricultural region of Kenya, with 20 health workers drawn from a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a mental health training programme for primary care, 10 from the intervention group clinics where staff had received the training programme, and 10 health workers from the control group where staff had not received the training). These focus group discussions suggested that there are a number of generic health system weaknesses in Kenya which impact on the ability of health workers to care for clients with mental health problems and to implement new skills acquired during a mental health continuing professional development training programmes. These weaknesses include the medicine supply, health management information system, district level supervision to primary care clinics, the lack of attention to mental health in the national health sector targets, and especially its absence in district level targets, which results in the exclusion of mental health from such district level supervision as exists, and the lack of awareness in the district management team about mental health. The lack of mental health coverage included in HIV training courses experienced by the health workers was also striking, as was the intensive focus during district supervision on HIV to the detriment of other

  14. "There's No Big Book on How to Care": Primary Pre-Service Teachers' Experiences of Caring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Hellen R.; Reupert, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated primary, pre-service teachers' experiences regarding their caring role, and the barriers they face when caring for students. Thirteen Australian primary pre-service teachers were individually interviewed. Within a qualitative framework, transcripts were thematically analysed, alongside member checks. While results indicated…

  15. Coordinating Mental Health Care across Primary Care and Schools: ADHD as a Case Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Thomas J.; Blum, Nathan J.; Guevara, James P.; Jones, Heather A.; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2013-01-01

    Although primary care practices and schools are major venues for the delivery of mental health services to children, these systems are disconnected, contributing to fragmentation in service delivery. This paper describes barriers to collaboration across the primary care and school systems, including administrative and fiscal pressures, conceptual…

  16. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  17. Electronic health records and support for primary care teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Kevin; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Cross, Dori A.; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Objective Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Methods Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. Results EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Discussion Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. Conclusions EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. PMID:25627278

  18. Electronic health records and support for primary care teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Draper, Kevin; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Cross, Dori A; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-03-01

    Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  19. Predictors and Outcomes of Burnout in Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabatin, Joseph; Williams, Eric; Baier Manwell, Linda; Schwartz, Mark D; Brown, Roger L; Linzer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    To assess relationships between primary care work conditions, physician burnout, quality of care, and medical errors. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of data from the MEMO (Minimizing Error, Maximizing Outcome) Study. Two surveys of 422 family physicians and general internists, administered 1 year apart, queried physician job satisfaction, stress and burnout, organizational culture, and intent to leave within 2 years. A chart audit of 1795 of their adult patients with diabetes and/or hypertension assessed care quality and medical errors. Women physicians were almost twice as likely as men to report burnout (36% vs 19%, P burnout, care quality, and medical errors. Burnout is highly associated with adverse work conditions and a greater intention to leave the practice, but not with adverse patient outcomes. Care quality thus appears to be preserved at great personal cost to primary care physicians. Efforts focused on workplace redesign and physician self-care are warranted to sustain the primary care workforce. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Humanization policy in primary health care: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Junges, José Roque

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze humanization practices in primary health care in the Brazilian Unified Health System according to the principles of the National Humanization Policy. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was carried out, followed by a meta-synthesis, using the following databases: BDENF (nursing database), BDTD (Brazilian digital library of theses and dissertations), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to nursing and allied health literature), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean health care sciences literature), MedLine (International health care sciences literature), PAHO (Pan-American Health Care Organization Library) and SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online). The following descriptors were used: Humanization; Humanizing Health Care; Reception: Humanized care: Humanization in health care; Bonding; Family Health Care Program; Primary Care; Public Health and Sistema Único de Saúde (the Brazilian public health care system). Research articles, case studies, reports of experiences, dissertations, theses and chapters of books written in Portuguese, English or Spanish, published between 2003 and 2011, were included in the analysis. RESULTS Among the 4,127 publications found on the topic, 40 studies were evaluated and included in the analysis, producing three main categories: the first referring to the infrastructure and organization of the primary care service, made clear the dissatisfaction with the physical structure and equipment of the services and with the flow of attendance, which can facilitate or make difficult the access. The second, referring to the health work process, showed issues about the insufficient number of professionals, fragmentation of the work processes, the professional profile and responsibility. The third category, referring to the relational technologies, indicated the reception, bonding, listening, respect and dialog with the service users. CONCLUSIONS Although many practices were cited as humanizing they do not produce changes

  1. [Humanization policy in primary health care: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Junges, Jose Roque

    2013-12-01

    To analyze humanization practices in primary health care in the Brazilian Unified Health System according to the principles of the National Humanization Policy. A systematic review of the literature was carried out, followed by a meta-synthesis, using the following databases: BDENF (nursing database), BDTD (Brazilian digital library of theses and dissertations), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to nursing and allied health literature), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean health care sciences literature), MedLine (International health care sciences literature), PAHO (Pan-American Health Care Organization Library) and SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online). The following descriptors were used: Humanization; Humanizing Health Care; Reception: Humanized care: Humanization in health care; Bonding; Family Health Care Program; Primary Care; Public Health and Sistema Único de Saúde (the Brazilian public health care system). Research articles, case studies, reports of experiences, dissertations, theses and chapters of books written in Portuguese, English or Spanish, published between 2003 and 2011, were included in the analysis. Among the 4,127 publications found on the topic, 40 studies were evaluated and included in the analysis, producing three main categories: the first referring to the infrastructure and organization of the primary care service, made clear the dissatisfaction with the physical structure and equipment of the services and with the flow of attendance, which can facilitate or make difficult the access. The second, referring to the health work process, showed issues about the insufficient number of professionals, fragmentation of the work processes, the professional profile and responsibility. The third category, referring to the relational technologies, indicated the reception, bonding, listening, respect and dialog with the service users. Although many practices were cited as humanizing they do not produce changes in the health services because of the

  2. Experiences of homosexual patients' access to primary health care services in Umlazi, KwaZulu-Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cele, Nokulunga H; Sibiya, Maureen N; Sokhela, Dudu G

    2015-09-28

    Homosexual patients are affected by social factors in their environment, and as a result may not have easy access to existing health care services. Prejudice against homosexuality and homosexual patients remains a barrier to them seeking appropriate healthcare. The concern is that lesbians and gays might delay or avoid seeking health care when they need it because of past discrimination or perceived homophobia within the health care thereby putting their health at risk. The aim of the study was to explore and describe the experiences of homosexual patients utilising primary health care (PHC) services in Umlazi in the province ofKwaZulu-Natal (KZN). A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive study was conducted which was contextual innature. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 participants. The findings of this study were analysed using content analysis. Two major themes emerged from the data analysis, namely, prejudice against homosexual patients by health care providers and other patients at the primary health care facilities, and, homophobic behaviour from primary health care personnel. Participants experienced prejudice and homophobic behaviour in the course of utilising PHC clinics in Umlazi, which created a barrier to their utilisation of health services located there. Nursing education institutions, in collaboration with the National Department of Health, should introduce homosexuality and anti-homophobia education programmes during the pre-service and in-service education period. Such programmes will help to familiarise health care providers with the health care needs of homosexual patients and may decrease homophobic attitudes.

  3. Primary care for young adult cancer survivors: an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Blake-Gumbs, Lyla; Miedema, Baujke

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Internationally, family physicians (FP) are not routinely involved in young adult cancer (YAC) care. In this short report, we would like to make a compelling argument for primary care involvement. METHODS: Comparative descriptions and literature review. RESULTS: Cancer among YAs is rare...... issues the YA cancer patient may present with. The role of the FP in follow-up care seems to be very limited. CONCLUSIONS: YACs in the western world seem to have comparable medical and psychosocial problems. However, the nature of health insurance is such that it impacts differently on the care...

  4. Verbal communication among Alzheimer's disease patients, their caregivers, and primary care physicians during primary care office visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Karen L; Lingler, Jennifer H; Schulz, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Primary care visits of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often involve communication among patients, family caregivers, and primary care physicians (PCPs). The objective of this study was to understand the nature of each individual's verbal participation in these triadic interactions. To define the verbal communication dynamics of AD care triads, we compared verbal participation (percent of total visit speech) by each participant in patient/caregiver/PCP triads. Twenty-three triads were audio taped during a routine primary care visit. Rates of verbal participation were described and effects of patient cognitive status (MMSE score, verbal fluency) on verbal participation were assessed. PCP verbal participation was highest at 53% of total visit speech, followed by caregivers (31%) and patients (16%). Patient cognitive measures were related to patient and caregiver verbal participation, but not to PCP participation. Caregiver satisfaction with interpersonal treatment by PCP was positively related to caregiver's own verbal participation. Caregivers of AD patients and PCPs maintain active, coordinated verbal participation in primary care visits while patients participate less. Encouraging verbal participation by AD patients and their caregivers may increase the AD patient's active role and caregiver satisfaction with primary care visits.

  5. Quality and effectiveness of different approaches to primary care delivery in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trindade Thiago G

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1994, Brazil has developed a primary care system based on multidisciplinary teams which include not only a physician and a nurse, but also 4–6 lay community health workers. This system now consists of 26,650 teams, covering 46% of the Brazilian population. Yet relatively few investigations have examined its effectiveness, especially in contrast with that of the traditional multi-specialty physician team approach it is replacing, or that of other existing family medicine approaches placing less emphasis on lay community health workers. Primary health care can be defined through its domains of access to first contact, continuity, coordination, comprehensiveness, community orientation and family orientation. These attributes can be ascertained via instruments such as the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCATool, and correlated with the effectiveness of care. The objectives of our study are to validate the adult version of this instrument in Portuguese, identify the extent (quality of primary care present in different models of primary care services, and correlate this extent with measures of process and outcomes in patients with diabetes, hypertension and coronary heart disease (CHD. Methods/Design We are conducting a population-based cross-sectional study of primary care in the municipality of Porto Alegre. We will interview a random sample totaling 3000 adults residing in geographic areas covered by four distinct models of primary care of the Brazilian national health system or, alternatively, by one nationally prominent complementary health care service, as well as the physicians and nurses of the health teams of these services. Interviews query perceived quality of care (PCATool-Adult Version, patient satisfaction, and process indicators of management of diabetes, hypertension and known CHD. We are measuring blood pressure, anthropometrics and, in adults with known diabetes, glycated hemoglobin. Discussion We hope to

  6. The impact of improving access to primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David P; Kanter, Michael H; Jacobsen, Steven J; Minardi, Paul M

    2017-10-06

    To measure the size and timing of changes in utilization and costs for employees and dependents who had major access barriers to primary care removed, across an 8-year period (2007 to 2014). Retrospective observational study examining patterns of utilization and costs before and after the implementation of a worksite medical office in 2010. The worksite office offered convenient primary care services with no travel from work, essentially guaranteed same day access, and no co-pay. Trends in visit rates and costs were compared for an intervention fixed cohort group (employees and dependents) at the employer (n = 1211) with a control fixed cohort group (n = 542 162) for 6 types of visits (primary, urgent, emergency, inpatient, specialty, and other outpatient). Difference-in-differences methods assessed the significance of between-group changes in utilization and costs. The worksite medical office intervention group had an increase in primary care visits relative to the control group (+43% vs +4%, P care visits by the intervention group compared with the control group (-43% vs -5%, P access to primary care is significant, but not easily nor automatically achieved. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Epistemology and uncertainty in primary care: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lance; Trotter, David R M

    2009-05-01

    Primary care is an endeavor marked by breadth, complexity, and more clinical uncertainty than all non-primary care specialties except psychiatry. This is significant, as uncertainty is associated with a variety of troublesome economic and clinical indicators. Researchers have identified the three types of cognitive resources needed to combat uncertainty (technical, personal, or conceptual), as well as the affective stress reactions physicians have when confronted with uncertainty. In this study, we explored the relationship between primary care physicians' stress reactions to uncertainty and the conceptual resource of epistemology. Using Likert-type measures of epistemology and stress reactions to uncertainty, we conducted a cross-sectional survey with 78 board-certified and resident physicians in primary care. A simple bivariate regression analysis was performed to identify the relationship between epistemology and stress reactions to uncertainty (Model 1), and a multivariate regression analysis was performed to test for the independent effect of epistemology on stress reactions to uncertainty while controlling for gender, specialty, and professional development status (Model 2). Physician epistemology and stress reactions to uncertainty were significantly related in both models. Among primary care physicians, a biopsychosocial epistemology is associated with less stress reactions to uncertainty, and a biomedical epistemology is associated with more stress reactions to uncertainty.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging use by primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, R A; Quirk, M E; Dohan, D

    1993-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently been introduced in the United States as an imaging technique for clinical use. Initially used by neurologists to view the brain stem, its indications have rapidly expanded to include spine, pelvis, bone marrow, and joints. This has raised concerns over the appropriate, cost-effective use of such an expensive technology. This paper examines MRI scanning patterns that have developed over time in central Massachusetts and surveys primary care knowledge, attitudes, and patterns of utilization. The two MRI centers in central Massachusetts were surveyed for information about the number and types of scans ordered and the specialties of the physicians who ordered the scans. Questionnaires were sent to primary care physicians in Worcester County to assess knowledge and attitudes about MRI and utilization. The data demonstrate changing patterns of MRI utilization over time. Orthopedics has been the specialty with the greatest increase in use, now slightly surpassing neurology in the total number of scans ordered. Primary care physician use has doubled over this same period. Not all primary care physicians utilize MRI, but those who have used the technology have familiarized themselves with its indications and problems and have a better knowledge about its costs. Utilization patterns of MRI have changed considerably in a short time, with primary care physicians requesting use of this new technology much more frequently than when it was first introduced.

  9. Designing a mixed methods study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W; Fetters, Michael D; Ivankova, Nataliya V

    2004-01-01

    Mixed methods or multimethod research holds potential for rigorous, methodologically sound investigations in primary care. The objective of this study was to use criteria from the literature to evaluate 5 mixed methods studies in primary care and to advance 3 models useful for designing such investigations. We first identified criteria from the social and behavioral sciences to analyze mixed methods studies in primary care research. We then used the criteria to evaluate 5 mixed methods investigations published in primary care research journals. Of the 5 studies analyzed, 3 included a rationale for mixing based on the need to develop a quantitative instrument from qualitative data or to converge information to best understand the research topic. Quantitative data collection involved structured interviews, observational checklists, and chart audits that were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical procedures. Qualitative data consisted of semistructured interviews and field observations that were analyzed using coding to develop themes and categories. The studies showed diverse forms of priority: equal priority, qualitative priority, and quantitative priority. Data collection involved quantitative and qualitative data gathered both concurrently and sequentially. The integration of the quantitative and qualitative data in these studies occurred between data analysis from one phase and data collection from a subsequent phase, while analyzing the data, and when reporting the results. We recommend instrument-building, triangulation, and data transformation models for mixed methods designs as useful frameworks to add rigor to investigations in primary care. We also discuss the limitations of our study and the need for future research.

  10. Interventions for increasing chlamydia screening in primary care: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hocking Jane S

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite guidelines recommending opportunistic chlamydia screening of younger women, screening rates in some countries remain low. Our aim was to review the evidence for specific interventions aimed at increasing chlamydia screening rates in primary care. Methods A Medline search was conducted for controlled trials that assessed the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving chlamydia screening rates in primary health care settings. The Medline search was done for studies in English published prior to December 2005 using the following key words: chlamydia, screening, intervention, primary care and GPs. In addition, the references cited in the articles were reviewed. Studies in English published prior to December 2005 were reviewed. Results Four controlled studies met the inclusion criteria – 3 were randomized studies and one was not. Strategies to increase screening rates included the use of educational packages targeting primary care physicians and the correction of barriers to screening within clinic systems. In 3 studies, the intervention was associated with an increase in screening rates of between 100% and 276% (p Conclusion There are only a limited number of randomized or controlled studies that demonstrate improved chlamydia screening of younger women in primary care.

  11. Interventions for increasing chlamydia screening in primary care: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginige, Samitha; Fairley, Christopher K; Hocking, Jane S; Bowden, Francis J; Chen, Marcus Y

    2007-06-04

    Despite guidelines recommending opportunistic chlamydia screening of younger women, screening rates in some countries remain low. Our aim was to review the evidence for specific interventions aimed at increasing chlamydia screening rates in primary care. A Medline search was conducted for controlled trials that assessed the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving chlamydia screening rates in primary health care settings. The Medline search was done for studies in English published prior to December 2005 using the following key words: chlamydia, screening, intervention, primary care and GPs. In addition, the references cited in the articles were reviewed. Studies in English published prior to December 2005 were reviewed. Four controlled studies met the inclusion criteria--3 were randomized studies and one was not. Strategies to increase screening rates included the use of educational packages targeting primary care physicians and the correction of barriers to screening within clinic systems. In 3 studies, the intervention was associated with an increase in screening rates of between 100% and 276% (p < 0.04). In the fourth study, the intervention was associated with a significant attenuation in declining screening rates over time (4% versus 34% decline, p = 0.04). There are only a limited number of randomized or controlled studies that demonstrate improved chlamydia screening of younger women in primary care.

  12. Integrating Primary Care Providers in the Care of Cancer Survivors: Gaps in Evidence and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; O’Malley, Denalee M.; Hudson, Shawna V.

    2017-01-01

    For over a decade since the release of the Institute of Medicine report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition, there has been a focus on providing coordinated, comprehensive care for cancer survivors that emphasized the role of primary care. Several models of care have been described which primarily focused on primary care providers (PCPs) as receivers of cancer survivors and specific types of information (e.g. survivorship care plans) from oncology based care, and not as active members of the cancer survivorship team. In this paper, we reviewed survivorship models that have been described in the literature, and specifically focused on strategies aiming to integrate primary care providers in caring for cancer survivors across different settings. We offer insights differentiating primary care providers’ level of expertise in cancer survivorship and how such expertise may be utilized. We provide recommendations for education, clinical practice, research and policy initiatives that may advance the integration of primary care providers in the care of cancer survivors in diverse clinical settings. PMID:28049575

  13. Collaboration between hospital and primary care nurses: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemetti, T; Stolt, M; Rickard, N; Suhonen, R

    2015-06-01

    Nurses play an important role in the treatment and care of adults in both hospital and primary health care working within complex and fragmented organizational systems. As the nature of health care changes and hospital and primary care sectors become more closely associated, nurses in both sectors have an obligation to increase their collaboration. This study aimed to increase the understanding of collaboration between nurses working with adults in hospital and primary health care, and to facilitate the future measurement of this collaboration. A literature review was undertaken in July and August 2013 using CINAHL and MEDLINE databases from the earliest to August 2013. The searches produced 4951 citations that were reduced to 22 articles for review using a four-step inclusion strategy. Inductive content analysis was used to analyse the data. It is suggested that collaboration is a process that contains (1) collaboration precursors: the opportunity to participate, knowledge and shared objectives; (2) elements of collaboration: competency, awareness and understanding of work roles and interaction; and (3) processes and outcomes: the events or behaviours that are the consequences of the collaboration between hospital and primary healthcare nurses. The results indicate that collaboration between hospital and primary healthcare nurses is an important and integral part of the work of nurses and a process consisting of several predictable issues leading to useful care outcomes. Current healthcare changes make it a requirement for hospital and primary healthcare nurses to collaborate when working with adults to continue to meet the needs of patients. The findings of this study can be used to improve collaboration in practice and to devise research to improve collaboration between hospital and primary healthcare nurses. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  14. Clinical productivity of primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ying; Tuttle, Jane

    Nurse practitioners are increasingly being integrated into primary care delivery to help meet the growing demand for primary care. It is therefore important to understand nurse practitioners' productivity in primary care practice. We examined nurse practitioners' clinical productivity in regard to number of patients seen per week, whether they had a patient panel, and patient panel size. We further investigated practice characteristics associated with their clinical productivity. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of the 2012 National Sample Survey of Nurse Practitioners. The sample included full-time primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings. Multivariable survey regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between practice characteristics and nurse practitioners' clinical productivity. Primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings saw an average of 80 patients per week (95% confidence interval [CI]: 79-82), and 64% of them had their own patient panel. The average patient panel size was 567 (95% CI: 522-612). Nurse practitioners who had their own patient panel spent a similar percent of time on patient care and documentation as those who did not. However, those with a patient panel were more likely to provide a range of clinical services to most patients. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity was associated with several modifiable practice characteristics such as practice autonomy and billing and payment policies. The estimated number of patients seen in a typical week by nurse practitioners is comparable to that by primary care physicians reported in the literature. However, they had a significantly smaller patient panel. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity can be further improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A picture tells 1000 words: learning teamwork in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martina; Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun; Foley, Tony

    2013-04-01

    Teamwork and patient centredness are frequently articulated concepts in medical education, but are not always explicit in the curriculum. In Ireland, recent government policy emphasises the importance of a primary care team approach to health care. We report on an appraisal of a newly introduced community-based student attachment, which focused on teamwork. To review students' experience of teamwork following a community clinical placement by examining student assignments: essays, poetry, music and art. Year-2 graduate-entry students (n = 45) spent 2 weeks with a primary care team. Attachments comprised placements with members of the primary care team, emphasising team dynamics, at the end of which students submitted a representative piece of work, which captured their learning. Essays (n = 22) were analysed using a thematic content analysis. Artwork consisted of painting, collage, photography, poetry and original music (n = 23). These were analysed using Gardner's entry points. Three core themes emerged in both written and visual work: patient centredness; communication; and an improved appreciation of the skills of other health care professionals. Students identified optimal team communication occurring when patient outcomes were prioritised. Metaphors relating to puzzles, hands and inter-connectedness feature strongly. The poems and artwork had a high impact when they were presented to tutors. Primary care team placements focus student attention on teamwork and patient centredness. Student artwork shows potential as a tool to evaluate student learning in medical education. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2013.

  16. The chronic care model and diabetes management in US primary care settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Dipnarine, Krishna; Stopka, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The Chronic Care Model (CCM) uses a systematic approach to restructuring medical care to create partnerships between health systems and communities. The objective of this study was to describe how researchers have applied CCM in US primary care settings to provide care for people who have diabetes and to describe outcomes of CCM implementation. We conducted a literature review by using the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition and the following search terms: "chronic care model" (and) "diabet*." We included articles published between January 1999 and October 2011. We summarized details on CCM application and health outcomes for 16 studies. The 16 studies included various study designs, including 9 randomized controlled trials, and settings, including academic-affiliated primary care practices and private practices. We found evidence that CCM approaches have been effective in managing diabetes in US primary care settings. Organizational leaders in health care systems initiated system-level reorganizations that improved the coordination of diabetes care. Disease registries and electronic medical records were used to establish patient-centered goals, monitor patient progress, and identify lapses in care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) were trained to deliver evidence-based care, and PCP officd-based diabetes self-management education improved patient outcomes. Only 7 studies described strategies for addressing community resources and policies. CCM is being used for diabetes care in US primary care settings, and positive outcomes have been reported. Future research on integration of CCM into primary care settings for diabetes management should measure diabetes process indicators, such as self-efficacy for disease management and clinical decision making.

  17. Key elements of high-quality practice organisation in primary health care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, Lisa; Janamian, Tina; Jackson, Claire L

    2014-08-04

    To identify elements that are integral to high-quality practice and determine considerations relating to high-quality practice organisation in primary care. A narrative systematic review of published and grey literature. Electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Emerald Insight, PsycInfo, the Primary Health Care Research and Information Service website, Google Scholar) were searched in November 2013 and used to identify articles published in English from 2002 to 2013. Reference lists of included articles were searched for relevant unpublished articles and reports. Data were configured at the study level to allow for the inclusion of findings from a broad range of study types. Ten elements were most often included in the existing organisational assessment tools. A further three elements were identified from an inductive thematic analysis of descriptive articles, and were noted as important considerations in effective quality improvement in primary care settings. Although there are some validated tools available to primary care that identify and build quality, most are single-strategy approaches developed outside health care settings. There are currently no validated organisational improvement tools, designed specifically for primary health care, which combine all elements of practice improvement and whose use does not require extensive external facilitation.

  18. PFM Analysis for Pre-Existing Cracks on Alloy 182 Weld in PWR Primary Water Environment using Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Phil; Bahn, Chi Bum [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) analysis was generally used to consider the scatter and uncertainty of parameters in complex phenomenon. Weld defects could be present in weld regions of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), which cannot be considered by the typical fracture mechanics analysis. It is necessary to evaluate the effects of the pre-existing cracks in welds for the integrity of the welds. In this paper, PFM analysis for pre-existing cracks on Alloy 182 weld in PWR primary water environment was carried out using a Monte Carlo simulation. PFM analysis for pre-existing cracks on Alloy 182 weld in PWR primary water environment was carried out. It was shown that inspection decreases the gradient of the failure probability. And failure probability caused by the pre-existing cracks was stabilized after 15 years of operation time in this input condition.

  19. Chemical Intolerance in Primary Care Settings: Prevalence, Comorbidity, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerndahl, David A.; Bell, Iris R.; Palmer, Raymond F.; Miller, Claudia S.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study extends previous community-based studies on the prevalence and clinical characteristics of chemical intolerance in a sample of primary care clinic patients. We evaluated comorbid medical and psychiatric disorders, functional status, and rates of health care use. METHODS A total of 400 patients were recruited from 2 family medicine clinic waiting rooms in San Antonio, Texas. Patients completed the validated Quick Environmental Exposure and Sensitivity Inventory (QEESI) to assess chemical intolerance; the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD) screen for possible psychiatric disorders; the Dartmouth–Northern New England Primary Care Cooperative Information Project (Dartmouth COOP) charts for functional status; and the Healthcare Utilization Questionnaire. RESULTS Overall, 20.3% of the sample met criteria for chemical intolerance. The chemically intolerant group reported significantly higher rates of comorbid allergies and more often met screening criteria for possible major depressive disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and alcohol abuse disorder, as well as somatization disorder. The total number of possible mental disorders was correlated with chemical intolerance scores (P intolerance were significantly more likely to have poorer functional status, with trends toward increased medical service use when compared with non–chemically intolerant patients. After controlling for comorbid psychiatric conditions, the groups differed significantly only regarding limitations of social activities. CONCLUSIONS Chemical intolerance occurs in 1 of 5 primary care patients yet is rarely diagnosed by busy practitioners. Psychiatric comorbidities contribute to functional limitations and increased health care use. Chemical intolerance offers an etiologic explanation. Symptoms may resolve or improve with the avoidance of salient chemical, dietary (including caffeine and alcohol), and drug triggers. Given greater medication

  20. Spatial accessibility of primary care: concepts, methods and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guagliardo Mark F

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary care is recognized as the most important form of healthcare for maintaining population health because it is relatively inexpensive, can be more easily delivered than specialty and inpatient care, and if properly distributed it is most effective in preventing disease progression on a large scale. Recent advances in the field of health geography have greatly improved our understanding of the role played by geographic distribution of health services in population health maintenance. However, most of this knowledge has accrued for hospital and specialty services and services in rural areas. Much less is known about the effect of distance to and supply of primary care on primary care utilization, particularly in the U.S. For several reasons the shortage of information is particularly acute for urban areas, where the majority of people live. First, explicit definitions and conceptualizations of healthcare access have not been widely used to guide research. An additional barrier to progress has been an overwhelming concern about affordability of care, which has garnered the majority of attention and research resources. Also, the most popular measures of spatial accessibility to care – travel impedance to nearest provider and supply level within bordered areas – lose validity in congested urban areas. Better measures are needed. Fortunately, some advances are occurring on the methodological front. These can improve our knowledge of all types of healthcare geography in all settings, including primary care in urban areas. This paper explains basic concepts and measurements of access, provides some historical background, outlines the major questions concerning geographic accessibility of primary care, describes recent developments in GIS and spatial analysis, and presents examples of promising work.

  1. Sustainable Methods of Funding Health Care in Primary and Secondary Care for the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Clinical commissioning is a current health care management model for primary, secondary, and long term health care needs n United Kingdom nowadays. Form on 1 April 2013, Primary care trusts (PCTs) and strategic health authorities (SHAs) have been abolished. Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) work with local authorities to address the wider determinants of health that is used to help people make positive changes to their lifestyle. NHS England (formerly the NHS Commissioning Board) and CCGs ...

  2. Priorities for young adults when accessing UK primary care: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Antoinette; Carter, Mary; Campbell, John L

    2013-10-01

    This literature review focuses on what matters to young adults when they access primary care services in the United Kingdom. Patients' access to and experience of primary care services differs across age groups. Existing research has largely focused on the needs and experiences of children, adolescents, and adults. There is some evidence to suggest the views of young adults (aged 18-25 years) that may differ from the views of other age groups, and research has not previously reported specifically on the views of this group of the population. The literature was reviewed to identify the views and priorities of young UK adults regarding primary healthcare provision, and furthermore, to identify those related topics that would benefit from further research. Relevant academic publications and grey literature published from 2000 onwards was reviewed and synthesised. We identified and reported emerging themes that were of importance to young adults in respect of the UK primary care provision. A total of 19 papers met our inclusion criteria. Young adults access primary care services less frequently than other age groups; this may be because of their experience of primary care throughout childhood and adolescence. Five aspects of primary care provision emerged as being of importance to young adults--the accessibility and availability of services, the confidentiality of health-related information, issues relating to communication with healthcare professionals, continuity of care, and behaviours and attitudes expressed towards young adults by healthcare professionals. There is a lack of focus of current research on the expectations, needs, and primary healthcare experiences of young adults. Young adults may hold views that are distinct from other age groups. Further research is needed to better understand the needs of a young adult population as their needs may impact the future use of services.

  3. Trends and predictors of primary dental care health services for adults in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnick, C; Baron-Epel, O; Zusman, S Paul; Keinan-Boker, L

    2014-12-01

    Guided by the Andersen-Aday Behavioral Model of Health Care Utilization, this study compared primary dental care use trends between 2000 and 2010, and differences in primary dental care use between Israel's two largest ethnic groups, Jews and Arabs. Two waves (years 2000 and 2010) of existing cross-sectional data collected from a nationwide sample on the population's health knowledge, attitudes and practice were used. This study uses the sample of Israeli-Jews (n = 2806) from 2000; and the nationally representative sample of Israeli-Jews (n = 2539) and Israeli-Arabs (n = 1723) from 2010. Primary dental care use increased between 2000 and 2010 in Israel. Israelis who had at least a high school diploma, average or higher income, no dental pain and reported flossing their teeth were more likely to use primary dental care, but this was true of fewer Israeli-Arabs than Israeli-Jews. Other variables, associated with use of primary dental care but differing by ethnic group, were: being older than 65 years, being a native-born Israeli, employment, and health risk factors such as smoking and obesity. As with other western societies and as indicated by the model's three factors (i.e., predisposing, enabling and reinforcing/need), disparities in primary dental care use were found based on income (i.e., enabling); immigrants and ethnic minority status (i.e., predisposing), and health risk such as smoking (i.e., reinforcing/need). It is evident that health promotion activities are needed to target specific population subgroups to reduce disparities in primary dental care utilisation.

  4. Developing a prioritisation framework in an English Primary Care Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fordham Richard J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the English NHS, Primary Care Trusts (PCTs are required to commission health services, to maximise the well-being of the population, subject to the available budget. There are numerous techniques employed to make decisions, some more rational and transparent than others. A weighted benefit score can be used to rank options but this does not take into account value for money from investments. Methods We developed a weighted benefit score framework for use in an English PCT which ranked options in order of 'cost-value' or 'cost per point of benefit'. Our method differs from existing techniques by explicitly combining cost and a composite weighted benefit score into the cost-value ratio. Results The technique proved readily workable, and was able to accommodate a wide variety of data and competing criteria. Participants felt able to assign scores to proposed services, and generate a ranked list, which provides a solid starting point for the PCT Board to discuss and make funding decisions. Limitations included potential for criteria to be neither exhaustive nor mutually exclusive and the lack of an interval property in the benefit score limiting the usefulness of a cost-value ratio. Conclusion A technical approach to decision making is insufficient for making prioritisation decisions, however our technique provides a very valuable, structured and informed starting point for PCT decision making.

  5. Managing antidepressants in primary care: physicians' treatment modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrino, Marijo B; Nagel, Rollin W; Lynch, Denis J

    2011-06-01

    To examine antidepressant management practices in primary care, patients (N = 148) given an antidepressant for at least one month completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and a demographic survey. Participants' mean age was 50.7 yr. and 80% were women. Patients' charts indicated whether physicians had made changes to prescribed antidepressants or dose either 6 wk. before or 6 wk. after study entry. For the 87% of participants whose depression status could be determined, 10% met dysthymic disorder criteria and only 33% had had a medication change in the previous month. Major depressive disorder occurred in 37% but only 18% had had a medication change. Co-existing dysthymic disorder and major depressive disorder were diagnosed in 34%, with 24% receiving a medication change. Participants not receiving a medication change had mean BDI-II scores indicating moderate depression. Lack of antidepressant adjustment suggests physicians may need to monitor depressive symptoms closely using protocols and prompts.

  6. The practice of primary care sports medicine in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, J J; Pirozzolo, J J; Best, T M

    2008-10-01

    To investigate and to characterise the practice patterns, academic rank, and income variables that exist in order to better understand the career of a sports medicine physician in the USA. A cross-sectional survey of family physicians holding a Certificate of Added Qualifications in Sports Medicine through the American Board of Family Medicine as of January 2006. The survey was completed by 325 of 862 physicians (a return rate of 38%). Of all respondents, 212 (65%) reported completing a Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship, 276 (85%) were male and 49 (15%) were female, and 300 (92%) reported having a MD, while 25 (8%) had a DO. Clinical duties represented the largest proportion of the physicians' schedules (7.94 half days/week), and the majority of physicians performed routine athletic event coverage. The average salary for all physicians was $166,000 US. Higher-income groups included: men ($172,000 vs $132 000 for women); regions including Central, South East, and South West; full professors; and non-student health or urgent care clinical work. With control for all other variables, four groups demonstrated significantly higher odds of being high income earners (annual gross salary > $200,000 US). These groups included age over 40, male sex, practice owner, and seeing over 10 patients per half day. Salary can be related to age, gender, number of patients seen, and practice ownership. No statistical difference among salaries was found between MDs and DOs, osteopathic manipulative therapy (OMT) practice, region of the country, or how practices are marketed.

  7. Collaborative care psychiatrists' views on treating bipolar disorder in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerimele, Joseph M; Halperin, Abigail C; Spigner, Clarence; Ratzliff, Anna; Katon, Wayne J

    2014-01-01

    To understand collaborative care psychiatric consultants' views and practices on making the diagnosis of and recommending treatment for bipolar disorder in primary care using collaborative care. We conducted a focus group at the University of Washington in December 2013 with nine psychiatric consultants working in primary-care-based collaborative care in Washington State. A grounded theory approach with open coding and the constant comparative method revealed categories where emergent themes were saturated and validated through member checking, and a conceptual model was developed. Three major themes emerged from the data including the importance of working as a collaborative care team, the strengths of collaborative care for treating bipolar disorder and the need for psychiatric consultants to adapt specialty psychiatric clinical skills to the primary care setting. Other discussion topics included gathering clinical data from multiple sources over time, balancing risks and benefits of treating patients indirectly, tracking patient care outcomes with a registry and effective care. Experienced psychiatric consultants working in collaborative care teams provided their perceptions regarding treating patients with bipolar illness including identifying ways to adapt specialty psychiatric skills, developing techniques for providing team-based care and perceiving the care delivered through collaborative care as high quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Personalized Primary Care for Older People: An evaluation of a multicomponent nurse-led care program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    Providing optimal care for the increasing number of frail older people with complex care needs is a major challenge in primary care. The current approach is reactive and does not meet the needs of older patients, resulting in unnecessary loss of daily functioning, suboptimal quality of life and high

  9. Cost-utility of collaborative care for major depressive disorder in primary care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorden, M.; Huijbregts, K.M.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Beekman, A.T.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; Hakkaart-van Roijen, L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Major depression is a great burden on society, as it is associated with high disability/costs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-utility of Collaborative Care (CC) for major depressive disorder compared to Care As Usual (CAU) in a primary health care setting from a societal

  10. Cost-utility of collaborative care for major depressive disorder in primary care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorden, M.; Huijbregts, K.M.L.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Beekman, A.T.F.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.; Hakkaart-van Roijen, L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Major depression is a great burden on society, as it is associated with high disability/costs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-utility of Collaborative Care (CC) for major depressive disorder compared to Care As Usual (CAU) in a primary health care setting from a societal

  11. Microbiological point of care testing before antibiotic prescribing in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Steffen; Thomsen, Reimar W.; Bro, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Point-of-care testing (POCT) in primary care may improve rational antibiotic prescribing. We examined use of POCT in Denmark, including patient- and general practitioner (GP)-related predictors. METHODS: We linked nationwide health care databases to assess POCT use (C-reactive protein...

  12. Approaches and challenges to optimising primary care teams’ electronic health record usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Pandhi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Although the presence of an electronic health record (EHR alone does not ensure high quality, efficient care, few studies have focused on the work of those charged with optimising use of existing EHR functionality.Objective To examine the approaches used and challenges perceived by analysts supporting the optimisation of primary care teams’ EHR use at a large U.S. academic health care system.Methods A qualitative study was conducted. Optimisation analysts and their supervisor were interviewed and data were analysed for themes.Results Analysts needed to reconcile the tension created by organisational mandates focused on the standardisation of EHR processes with the primary care teams’ demand for EHR customisation. They gained an understanding of health information technology (HIT leadership’s and primary care team’s goals through attending meetings, reading meeting minutes and visiting with clinical teams. Within what was organisationally possible, EHR education could then be tailored to fit team needs. Major challenges were related to organisational attempts to standardise EHR use despite varied clinic contexts, personnel readiness and technical issues with the EHR platform. Forcing standardisation upon clinical needs that current EHR functionality could not satisfy was difficult.Conclusions Dedicated optimisation analysts can add value to health systems through playing a mediating role between HIT leadership and care teams. Our findings imply that EHR optimisation should be performed with an in-depth understanding of the workflow, cognitive and interactional activities in primary care.

  13. Implementation strategy for advanced practice nursing in primary health care in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburger, David; De Bortoli Cassiani, Silvia Helena; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Valaitis, Ruta Kristina; Baumann, Andrea; Pulcini, Joyce; Martin-Misener, Ruth

    2017-06-08

    SYNOPSIS Advanced practice nursing (APN) is a term used to describe a variety of possible nursing roles operating at an advanced level of practice. Historically, APN roles haves evolved informally, out of the need to improve access to health care services for at-risk and disadvantaged populations and for those living in underserved rural and remote communities. To address health needs, especially ones related to primary health care, nurses acquired additional skills through practice experience, and over time they developed an expanded scope of practice. More recently, APN roles have been developed more formally through the establishment of graduate education programs to meet agreed-upon competencies and standards for practice. The introduction of APN roles is expected to advance primary health care throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, where few such roles exist. The purpose of the paper is to outline an implementation strategy to guide and support the introduction of primary health care APN roles in Latin America and the Caribbean. The strategy includes the adaptation of an existing framework, utilization of recent research evidence, and application of knowledge from experts on APN and primary health care. The strategy consists of nine steps. Each step includes a national perspective that focuses on direct country involvement in health workforce planning and development and on implementation. In addition, each step incorporates an international perspective on encouraging countries that have established APN programs and positions to collaborate in health workforce development with nations without advanced practice nursing.

  14. Primary health care staff's perception of childhood tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie; Rose, Michala Vaaben; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnosing tuberculosis in children remains a great challenge in developing countries. Health staff working in the front line of the health service delivery system has a major responsibility for timely identification and referral of suspected cases of childhood tuberculosis. This study...... explored primary health care staff’s perception, challenges and needs pertaining to the identification of children with tuberculosis in Muheza district in Tanzania. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study that included 13 semi-structured interviews and 3 focus group discussions with a total of 29 health...... staff purposively sampled from primary health care facilities. Analysis was performed in accordance with the principles of a phenomenological analysis. Results: Primary health care staff perceived childhood tuberculosis to be uncommon in the society and tuberculosis was rarely considered as a likely...

  15. Overweight and Obesity and the Demand for Primary Physician Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Greve, Jane

    or obese individuals demand more medical care than normal weight individuals by estimating a finite mixture model which splits the population into frequent and non-frequent users of primary physician (GP) services according to the individual's latent health status. Based on a sample of wage-earners aged 25......-60 years drawn from the National Health Interview (NHI) survey 2000 and merged to Danish register data, we compare differences in the impact of being overweight and obese relative to being normal weight on the demand for primary physician care. Estimated bodyweight effects vary across latent classes...... and show that being obese or overweight does not increase the demand for primary physician care among infrequent users but does so among frequent users....

  16. A subtle governance: 'soft' medical leadership in English primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaff, R; Rogers, A; Pickard, S; Marshall, M; Campbell, S; Sibbald, B; Halliwell, S; Roland, M

    2003-07-01

    In many countries governments are recruiting the medical profession into a more active, transparent regulation of clinical practice. Consequently the medical profession adapts the ways it regulates itself and its relationship to health system managers changes. This paper uses empirical research in English Primary Care Groups (PCGs) and Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) to assess the value of Courpasson's concept of soft bureaucracy as a conceptualisation of these changes. Clinical governance in PCGs and PCTs displays important parallels with governance in soft bureaucracies, but the concept of soft bureaucracy requires modification to make it more applicable to general practice. In English primary care, governance over rank-and-file doctors is exercised by local professional leaders rather than general managers, harnessing their colleagues' perception of threats to professional autonomy and self-regulation rather than fears of competition as the means of 'soft coercion'.

  17. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odusola, A.O.; Stronks, K.; Hendriks, M.E.; Schultsz, C.; Akande, T.; Osibogun, A.; van Weert, H.; Haafkens, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care. Objective: We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and

  18. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odusola, Aina O.; Stronks, Karien; Hendriks, Marleen E.; Schultsz, Constance; Akande, Tanimola; Osibogun, Akin; Weert, Henk van; Haafkens, Joke A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care. Objective We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and

  19. Region Emilia Romagna: Primary Health Care Integration/Regione Emilia-Romagna: l’integrazione nel sistema di Cure Primarie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basenghi, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The politics of Region Emilia-Romagna have been meant to improve social and health care integration through an architecture of local services coherent with this purpose, setting up a Department dedicated to Primary Care inside the Social and Health District. The territorial basis of the Local Health Units (LHU), the resident people, the sustained public spending, the employed human resources and the provided services all delineate the organization of the LHU. The purpose is to grant strong integration among local bodies and LHUs through a governance system (planning, management and administration) that makes a distinction between commissioning and supply. The Committenza (commissioning department), which reports to the Strategic Direction and the District, directs the offer in connection with the need analysis, whereas the Primary Care Department arranges activities and provides services by means of integrated networks which ensure continuity to the care. The main hub in the network is known as the Casa della Salute (House of Health), which works through structured practices, protocols and procedures. LHU professionals and freelancers under contract supply primary, in-home and nursing home care, plus specialist outpatient treatment. The Casa della Salute, whose size will depend on the context (large, medium and small), are reliable reference points for citizens, who can address to them in every moment of the day. On behalf of the Regione Emilia-Romagna, it is the Primary Care Observatory which registers the functions existing in the 42 Houses of Health and their organizational and structural characteristics. The analysis of the obtained data will increase enhance the Houses’ implementation.

  20. Process engineering for primary care: Quality improvement and population health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Riley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental paradox of the health care delivery systems in many industrialized nations is that desired population health metrics are often not achieved despite large expenditures in the health care delivery system. For example, the United States commits nearly 18% of its GDP to the health care delivery system, the largest amount of any nation, yet is 37th in achieving health or health care delivery metrics. This article addresses how general practice can be an important driver of population health in the Chinese health care delivery system through the application of quality improvement methods. The article shows examples of how the cause-and-effect diagram, the process map, and the plan, do, study, act (PDSA cycle are important techniques to assist primary care practitioners for improving population health.