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  1. Augmentation cystoplasty and simultaneous ureteral reimplantation reduce high-grade vesicoureteral reflux in children with neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Bin Wang

    2011-07-01

    Conclusion: Simultaneous ureteral reimplantation reduces postop HVUR significantly. We recommend augmentation and simultaneous ureteral reimplantation in children with HVUR and neurogenic bladder if technically feasible.

  2. Neurogenic Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These include choral reading, singing, adaptation (repeated oral reading of the same passage) or speaking while under auditory ... in conjunction with the clients’ physicians. Some therapy techniques that help reduce the symptoms of developmental stuttering may also be effective with neurogenic ...

  3. Neurogenic Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T. Dorsher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented.

  4. Neurogenic Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individuals speech Apraxia of speech—irregularities in the timing and inaccuracies in the movement of the muscles ... edited book with a chapter on neurogenic stuttering.) Market, K. E., Montague, J. C., Buffalo, J. C., & ...

  5. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  6. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    A Look of Hope Islam Mahmoud Sweity From 19 to 30 June 2017 CERN Meyrin, Main Building Islam Mahmoud Sweity Islam Mahmoud Sweity was born in 1997 at Beit Awwa, Palestine. She is currently following a course to get an Art diploma of Painting at the college of Fine Arts at An-Najah National University under the supervision of Esmat Al As'aad. Her portraits, landscapes and still life paintings are full of life and shining colours. Charged of emotional empathy they catch the attention of the viewer and are reminding us that life is beautiful and worth living in spite of all difficulties we have to go through. She participated in many exhibitions and has exposed her drawings in 2015 at CERN and in France in the framework of the exhibition "The Origin“, and in 2017 in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Palestina and Jordan. In this exhibition the oil paintings made in the past year will be presented. For more information : staff.association@cern.ch | T&eacu...

  7. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Encounters Hanne Blitz From February 1st to 12th 2016 CERN Meyrin, Main Building What is our reaction to a first encounter with a tourist attraction? Contemporary Dutch painter Hanne Blitz captures visitors' responses to art and architecture, sweeping vistas and symbolic memorials. Encounters, a series of oil paintings curated specially for this CERN exhibition, depicts tourists visiting cultural highlights around the world. A thought-provoking journey not to be missed, and a tip of the hat to CERN's large Hadron Collider.

  8. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Sintropie Flavio Pellegrini From 13 to 24 March 2017 CERN Meyrin, Main Building Energia imprigionata - Flavio Pellegrini. The exhibition is composed by eleven wood artworks with the expression of movement as theme. The artworks are the result of harmonics math applied to sculpture. The powerful black colour is dominated by the light source, generating reflexes and modulations. The result is a continuous variation of perspective visions. The works generate, at a first approach, an emotion of mystery and incomprehension, only a deeper contemplation lets one discover entangling and mutative details, evidencing the elegance of the lines and letting the meaning emerge. For more information : staff.association@cern.ch | Tél: 022 766 37 38

  9. Intra-articular injection of Botulinum toxin A reduces neurogenic inflammation in CFA-induced arthritic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Kaile; Chu, Xiao; Li, Tieshan; Shen, Nana; Fan, Chenglei; Niu, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Xiaochen; Hu, Luoman

    2017-02-01

    Currently, administration of Botulinum toxin Type A (BoNT/A) to treat arthritic pain has promising efficacy in clinical research. However, the mechanisms underlying anti-neurogenic inflammation mediated by BoNT/A remains unclear. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness in macro and micro levels and to explore the causal mechanism of BoNT/A. Wistar rats (n = 60) were injected with 50ul complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the left ankle joint capsule to establish a model of chronic monoarthritis. Pain behaviour (Evoked pain assessment) and infrared thermal imaging testing were performed at the macroscopic level to assess the effectiveness of analgesia and anti-inflammation. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were used at the microscopic level in an attempt to determine the mechanisms of anti-nociceptive or anti-inflammatory effects of BoNT/A. Additionally, hematoxylin-eosin staining was also used to visualise the cartilage and the synovial degenerative conditions of arthritis. By comparing the outcome of the evoked pain test and immunofluorescence staining, there was a significant improvement in BoNT/A compared with the normal saline (NS) injected control group. In addition, thermal variations showed that the temperature of ipsilateral ankle joint increased between 1 and 2 weeks following injection of CFA, but decreased after 3 weeks (still above the contralateral side). However, the temperature showed no difference between the BoNT/A group and NS group after treatment. The expression of IL-1β or TNF-α in the ankle synovial tissue was significantly decreased in the BoNT/A group compared to the NS group (p < 0.05). Based on the HE assessment, cartilage degeneration and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the BoNT/A group was alleviated compared to the NS group after treatment. In conclusion, we proposed the hypothesis that intra-articular BoNT/A administration does play an important role in anti-neurogenic inflammation. The

  10. Drude conductivity exhibited by chemically synthesized reduced graphene oxide

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    Younas, Daniyal; Javed, Qurat-ul-Ain; Fatima, Sabeen; Kalsoom, Riffat; Abbas, Hussain; Khan, Yaqoob

    2017-09-01

    Electrical conductance in graphene layers having Drude like response due to massless Dirac fermions have been well explained theoretically as well as experimentally. In this paper Drude like electrical conductivity response of reduced graphene oxide synthesized by chemical route is presented. A method slightly different from conventional methods is used to synthesize graphene oxide which is then converted to reduced graphene oxide. Various analytic techniques were employed to verify the successful oxidation and reductions in the process and were also used to measure various parameters like thickness of layers and conductivity. Obtained reduced graphene oxide has very thin layers of thickness around 13 nm on average and reduced graphene oxide has average thickness below 20 nm. Conductivity of the reduced graphene was observed to have Drude like response which is explained on basis of Drude model for conductors.

  11. The Role of High-Density Lipoproteins in Reducing the Risk of Vascular Diseases, Neurogenerative Disorders, and Cancer

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    Donovan McGrowder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High-density lipoprotein (HDL is one of the major carriers of cholesterol in the blood. It attracts particular attention because, in contrast with other lipoproteins, as many physiological functions of HDL influence the cardiovascular system in favourable ways unless HDL is modified pathologically. The functions of HDL that have recently attracted attention include anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities. High anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of HDL are associated with protection from cardiovascular disease. Atheroprotective activities, as well as a functional deficiency of HDL, ultimately depend on the protein and lipid composition of HDL. Further, numerous epidemiological studies have shown a protective association between HDL-cholesterol and cognitive impairment. Oxidative stress, including lipid peroxidation, has been shown to be the mediator of the pathologic effects of numerous risk factors of Alzheimer's disease. Lifestyle interventions proven to increase HDL- cholesterol levels including “healthy” diet, regular exercise, weight control, and smoking cessation have also been shown to provide neuro-protective effects. This review will focus on current knowledge of the beneficial effects of HDL-cholesterol as it relates to cardiovascular diseases, breast and lung cancers, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as well as its neuroprotective potential in reducing the risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

  12. Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema (A Case Report

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    Funda Gümüş

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a life threatening complication of severe central nervous system injury. The most common cause of neurogenic pulmonary edema is subarachnoid hemorrhage followed by head trauma and epilepsy. The rare causes are cervical spine trauma, multiplesclerosis, cerebellar hemorrhage and intracranial tumors. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is characterized by an increase in extravascular lung water in patients who have sustained a sudden change in neurologic condition. The exact pathophysiology is unclear but it probably involves an adrenergic response to the central nervous system injury which leads to increased catecholamine, pulmonary hydrostatic pressure and increased lung capillary permeability. The presenting symptoms are nonspecific and often include dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, hypoxemia, pinkfroty secretion, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and crackles. These symptoms start within minutes or hours and resolves 48-72 hours that typically for neurogenic pulmonary edema. Basic principles of treatment, surgical decompression, reduce intracranial pressure, controlled ventilation with suplemental oxygen, positive end expiratory pressure and diuresis. We report a case with neurogenic pulmonary edema that occured after head trauma. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 59-62

  13. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: neurogenic etiology and manifestation.

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    Sebastian, Swapna; Nair, Prem G; Thomas, Philip; Tyagi, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    To determine the type, severity and manifestation of dysphagia in patients with neurogenic etiology. Clinical documentation was done on the different etiologies, its manifestation, assessment findings and management strategies taken for patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia who were referred for assessment and management of dysphagia over a period of three months in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Flexible endoscopic examination was done in all the patients. The severity of dysphagia in these patients were graded based on Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). A total of 53 patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia were evaluated by an otolaryngologist and a speech language pathologist over a period of three months. The grading of severity based on GUSS for these patients were done. There were 30 patients with recurrent laryngeal nerve injury due to various etiologies, one patient with Neurofibroma-vestibular schwanoma who underwent surgical excision, 16 patients with stroke, two patients with traumatic brain injury, two patients with Parkinsonism and two patients with myasthenia gravis. The manifestation of dysphagia was mainly in the form of prolonged masticatory time, oral transit time, and increased number of swallows required for each bolus, cricopharyngeal spasms and aspiration. Among the dysphagia patients with neurogenic etiology, dysphagia is manifested with a gradual onset and is found to have a progressive course in degenerative disorders. Morbidity and mortality may be reduced with early identification and management of neurogenic dysphagia.

  14. Men without a sense of smell exhibit a strongly reduced number of sexual relationships, women exhibit reduced partnership security - a reanalysis of previously published data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Ilona; Bojanowski, Viola; Hummel, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Olfactory function influences social behavior. For instance, olfaction seems to play a key role in mate choice and helps detecting emotions in other people. In a previous study, we showed that people who were born without a sense of smell exhibit enhanced social insecurity. Based on the comments to this article we decided to have a closer look to whether the absence of the sense of smell affects men and women differently. Under this focus questionnaire data of 32 patients, diagnosed with isolated congenital anosmia (10 men, 22 women) and 36 age-matched healthy controls (15 men, 21 women) was reanalyzed. In result, men and women without a sense of smell reported enhanced social insecurity, but with different consequences: Men who were born without a sense of smell exhibit a strongly reduced number of sexual relationships and women are affected such that they feel less secure about their partner. This emphasizes the importance of the sense of smell for intimate relationships. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sarcopenia, a Neurogenic Syndrome?

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    Ping Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is an aging-associated condition, which is currently characterized by the loss of muscle mass and muscle strength. However, there is no consensus regarding its characterization hitherto. As the world older adult population is on the rise, the impact of sarcopenia becomes greater. Due to the lack of effective treatments, sarcopenia is still a persisting problem among the global older adults and should not be overlooked. As a result, it is vital to investigate deeper into the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of sarcopenia in order to develop more effective therapeutic interventions and to inscribe a more uniform characterization. The etiology of sarcopenia is currently found to be multifactorial, and most of the pharmacological researches are focused on the muscular factors in aging. Although the complete mechanism underlying the development of sarcopenia is still waiting to be elucidated, we propose in this article that the primary trigger of sarcopenia may be neurogenic in origin based on the intimate relationship between the nervous and muscular system, namely, the motor neuron and its underlying muscle fibers. Both of them are affected by the cellular environment and their physiological activity.

  16. Neurostimulation for Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction

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    J. Worsøe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Loss of normal bowel function caused by nerve injury, neurological disease or congenital defects of the nervous system is termed neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD. It usually includes combinations of fecal incontinence, constipation, abdominal pain and bloating. When standard treatment of NBD fails surgical procedures are often needed. Neurostimulation has also been investigated, but no consensus exists about efficacy or clinical use. Methods. A systematic literature search of NBD treated by sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS, sacral nerve stimulation (SNS, peripheral nerve stimulation, magnetic stimulation, and nerve re-routing was made in Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library. Results. SARS improves bowel function in some patients with complete spinal cord injury (SCI. Nerve re-routing is claimed to facilitate defecation through mechanical stimulation of dermatomes in patients with complete or incomplete SCI or myelomeningocele. SNS can reduce NBD in selected patients with a variety of incomplete neurological lesions. Peripheral stimulation using electrical stimulation or magnetic stimulation may represent non-invasive alternatives. Conclusion. Numerous methods of neurostimulation to treat NBD have been investigated in pilot studies or retrospective studies. Therefore, larger controlled trials with well-defined inclusion criteria and endpoints are recommended before widespread clinical use of neurostimulation against NBD.

  17. Chloramphenicol- and tetracycline-resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) exhibit reduced virulence potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcic Erjavec, Marjanca; Rijavec, Matija; Krizan-Hergouth, Veronika; Fruth, Angelika; Zgur-Bertok, Darja

    2007-11-01

    It is well documented that uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates resistant to nalidixic acid have reduced virulence potential. Our goal was to assess whether UPEC isolates resistant to chloramphenicol, tetracycline and streptomycin also exhibit reduced virulence potential. Among 110 human UPEC isolates, the prevalences of the virulence factors fimH, papC, papGII, papGIII, sfa/focDE, afa, hlyA, cnf1, usp, ibeA, fyuA, iroN, iucD, ireA, and K1 and K5 capsules as well as of pathotypes, phylogenetic groups, O antigens and a pathogenicity island (PAI) marker were compared between chloramphenicol-, tetracycline-, streptomycin- and, as a control, nalidixic acid-resistant and -susceptible strains. Our findings show that among human UPEC isolates, not only nalidixic acid-resistant but also chloramphenicol- and tetracycline-resistant isolates have reduced virulence potential compared with susceptible strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a statistically significant reduction in virulence traits among chloramphenicol- and tetracycline-resistant isolates.

  18. Neurogenic and non neurogenic functions of endogenous neural stem cells.

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    Erica eButti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is a lifelong process that occurs in two main neurogenic niches of the brain, namely in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles and in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG in the hippocampus. In the 1960s, studies on adult neurogenesis have been hampered by the lack of established phenotypic markers. The precise tracing of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs was therefore, not properly feasible. After the (partial identification of those markers, it was the lack of specific tools that hindered a proper experimental elimination and tracing of those cells to demonstrate their terminal fate and commitment. Nowadays, irradia-tion, cytotoxic drugs as well as genetic tracing/ablation procedures have moved the field forward and increased our understanding of neurogenesis processes in both physiological and pathological conditions. Newly formed NPC progeny from the SVZ can replace granule cells in the olfactory bulbs of rodents, thus contributing to orchestrate sophisticated odour behaviour. SGZ-derived new granule cells, instead, integrate within the DG where they play an essential role in memory functions. Furthermore, converging evidence claim that endogenous NPCs not only exert neurogenic functions, but might also have non-neurogenic homeostatic functions by the release of different types of neuroprotective molecules. Remarkably, these non-neurogenic homeostatic functions seem to be necessary, both in healthy and diseased conditions, for example for preventing or limiting tissue damage. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic and the non-neurogenic functions of adult NPCs both in physiological and pathological conditions.

  19. Neurogenic inflammation in human and rodent skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmelz, M; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2001-01-01

    The combination of vasodilation and protein extravasation following activation of nociceptors has been termed "neurogenic inflammation." In contrast to rodents, no neurogenic protein extravasation can be elicited in healthy human skin. Dermal microdialysis has considerably increased our knowledge...... about neurogenic inflammation in human skin, including the involvement of mast cells....

  20. Dynamic Pax6 expression during the neurogenic cell cycle influences proliferation and cell fate choices of retinal progenitors

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    Yang Xian-Jie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The paired homeobox protein Pax6 is essential for proliferation and pluripotency of retinal progenitors. However, temporal changes in Pax6 protein expression associated with the generation of various retinal neurons have not been characterized with regard to the cell cycle. Here, we examine the dynamic changes of Pax6 expression among chicken retinal progenitors as they progress through the neurogenic cell cycle, and determine the effects of altered Pax6 levels on retinogenesis. Results We provide evidence that during the preneurogenic to neurogenic transition, Pax6 protein levels in proliferating progenitor cells are down-regulated. Neurogenic retinal progenitors retain a relatively low level of Pax6 protein, whereas postmitotic neurons either elevate or extinguish Pax6 expression in a cell type-specific manner. Cell imaging and cell cycle analyses show that neurogenic progenitors in the S phase of the cell cycle contain low levels of Pax6 protein, whereas a subset of progenitors exhibits divergent levels of Pax6 protein upon entering the G2 phase of the cell cycle. We also show that M phase cells contain varied levels of Pax6, and some correlate with the onset of early neuronal marker expression, forecasting cell cycle exit and cell fate commitment. Furthermore, either elevating or knocking down Pax6 attenuates cell proliferation and results in increased cell death. Reducing Pax6 decreases retinal ganglion cell genesis and enhances cone photoreceptor and amacrine interneuron production, whereas elevating Pax6 suppresses cone photoreceptor and amacrine cell fates. Conclusion These studies demonstrate for the first time quantitative changes in Pax6 protein expression during the preneurogenic to neurogenic transition and during the neurogenic cell cycle. The results indicate that Pax6 protein levels are stringently controlled in proliferating progenitors. Maintaining a relatively low Pax6 protein level is necessary for S phase

  1. Droxidopa for Symptomatic Neurogenic Hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson-Myrthil, Nadia

    Droxidopa is a first-in-class, orally available, synthetic amino acid precursor of norepinephrine that received accelerated Food and Drug Administration approval in February 2014 after Orphan Drug status for a debilitating condition known as symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension. Neurogenic disorders often lead to postural hypotension as a result of poor norepinephrine release from its storage sites. Clinical data suggest increases in standing systolic blood pressure and improvements in many other markers for subjective relief in patients with symptomatic neurogenic hypotension who received droxidopa therapy over 1-2 weeks. Studies evaluating the sustained effects of droxidopa are ongoing. With minimal drug interactions (even with carbidopa use) or adverse effects, droxidopa therapy can be used safely in patients with a variety of neurologic conditions; however, more data are needed to determine its appropriate pharmacotherapeutic role. In all, droxidopa is a safe and effective medication for the treatment of orthostatic dizziness/lightheadedness, or the "feeling that you are about to black out" in adult patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension secondary to primary autonomic failure (Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and pure autonomic failure), dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency, and nondiabetic autonomic neuropathy.

  2. Plasmodium falciparum Nucleosomes Exhibit Reduced Stability and Lost Sequence Dependent Nucleosome Positioning.

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    Elisabeth Silberhorn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The packaging and organization of genomic DNA into chromatin represents an additional regulatory layer of gene expression, with specific nucleosome positions that restrict the accessibility of regulatory DNA elements. The mechanisms that position nucleosomes in vivo are thought to depend on the biophysical properties of the histones, sequence patterns, like phased di-nucleotide repeats and the architecture of the histone octamer that folds DNA in 1.65 tight turns. Comparative studies of human and P. falciparum histones reveal that the latter have a strongly reduced ability to recognize internal sequence dependent nucleosome positioning signals. In contrast, the nucleosomes are positioned by AT-repeat sequences flanking nucleosomes in vivo and in vitro. Further, the strong sequence variations in the plasmodium histones, compared to other mammalian histones, do not present adaptations to its AT-rich genome. Human and parasite histones bind with higher affinity to GC-rich DNA and with lower affinity to AT-rich DNA. However, the plasmodium nucleosomes are overall less stable, with increased temperature induced mobility, decreased salt stability of the histones H2A and H2B and considerable reduced binding affinity to GC-rich DNA, as compared with the human nucleosomes. In addition, we show that plasmodium histone octamers form the shortest known nucleosome repeat length (155bp in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the biochemical properties of the parasite histones are distinct from the typical characteristics of other eukaryotic histones and these properties reflect the increased accessibility of the P. falciparum genome.

  3. Plasmodium falciparum Nucleosomes Exhibit Reduced Stability and Lost Sequence Dependent Nucleosome Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberhorn, Elisabeth; Schwartz, Uwe; Symelka, Anne; de Koning-Ward, Tania; Längst, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    The packaging and organization of genomic DNA into chromatin represents an additional regulatory layer of gene expression, with specific nucleosome positions that restrict the accessibility of regulatory DNA elements. The mechanisms that position nucleosomes in vivo are thought to depend on the biophysical properties of the histones, sequence patterns, like phased di-nucleotide repeats and the architecture of the histone octamer that folds DNA in 1.65 tight turns. Comparative studies of human and P. falciparum histones reveal that the latter have a strongly reduced ability to recognize internal sequence dependent nucleosome positioning signals. In contrast, the nucleosomes are positioned by AT-repeat sequences flanking nucleosomes in vivo and in vitro. Further, the strong sequence variations in the plasmodium histones, compared to other mammalian histones, do not present adaptations to its AT-rich genome. Human and parasite histones bind with higher affinity to GC-rich DNA and with lower affinity to AT-rich DNA. However, the plasmodium nucleosomes are overall less stable, with increased temperature induced mobility, decreased salt stability of the histones H2A and H2B and considerable reduced binding affinity to GC-rich DNA, as compared with the human nucleosomes. In addition, we show that plasmodium histone octamers form the shortest known nucleosome repeat length (155bp) in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the biochemical properties of the parasite histones are distinct from the typical characteristics of other eukaryotic histones and these properties reflect the increased accessibility of the P. falciparum genome. PMID:28033404

  4. Treatment of neurogenic diabetes insipidus.

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    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie

    2011-12-01

    Central or neurogenic diabetes insipidus results from a deficiency in antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or arginine-vasopressin (AVP). Treatment is based on replacement therapy with the hormone analog desmopressin (d-DAVP). d-DAVP can be administered subcutaneously to infants or patients with postoperative or posttraumatic brain injury being monitored for transient diabetes insipidus. Intranasal and oral forms are also available. The recently introduced lyophilisate, which melts under the tongue, has replaced the tablet form (recently withdrawn from the market in France) and provides better bioavailability. Irrespective of the mode of administration, it is usually the patient who finds the effective minimal dose necessary for a normal life, i.e. without excessive polyuria, particularly at night. Patient education is necessary to avoid the risk of water intoxication and hyponatremia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Multilingualism and acquired neurogenic speech disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired neurogenic communication disorders can affect language, speech, or both. Although neurogenic speech disorders have been researched for a considerable time, much of this work has been restricted to a few languages (mainly English, with German, French, Japanese and Chinese also represented). Further, the work has concentrated on monolingual speakers. In this account, I aim to outline the main acquired speech disorders, and give examples of research into multilingual aspects of this top...

  6. TRH-receptor-type-2-deficient mice are euthyroid and exhibit increased depression and reduced anxiety phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuhua; Zupan, Bojana; Raaka, Bruce M; Toth, Miklos; Gershengorn, Marvin C

    2009-05-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is a neuropeptide that initiates its effects in mice by interacting with two G-protein-coupled receptors, TRH receptor type 1 (TRH-R1) and TRH receptor type 2 (TRH-R2). Two previous reports described the effects of deleting TRH-R1 in mice. TRH-R1 knockout mice exhibit hypothyroidism, hyperglycemia, and increased depression and anxiety-like behavior. Here we report the generation of TRH-R2 knockout mice. The phenotype of these mice was characterized using gross and histological analyses along with blood hematological assays and chemistries. Standard metabolic tests to assess glucose and insulin tolerance were performed. Behavioral testing included elevated plus maze, open field, tail suspension, forced swim, and novelty-induced hypophagia tests. TRH-R2 knockout mice are euthyroid with normal basal and TRH-stimulated serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (thyrotropin), are normoglycemic, and exhibit normal development and growth. Female, but not male, TRH-R2 knockout mice exhibit moderately increased depression-like and reduced anxiety-like phenotypes. Because the behavioral changes in TRH-R1 knockout mice may have been caused secondarily by their hypothyroidism whereas TRH-R2 knockout mice are euthyroid, these data provide the first evidence for the involvement of the TRH/TRH-R system, specifically extrahypothalamic TRH/TRH-R2, in regulating mood and affect.

  7. Plant-produced anti-dengue virus monoclonal antibodies exhibit reduced antibody-dependent enhancement of infection activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Matthew; Hurtado, Jonathan; Paul, Amber M; Sun, Haiyan; Lai, Huafang; Yang, Ming; Esqueda, Adrian; Bai, Fengwei; Steinkellner, Herta; Chen, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    The mAb E60 has the potential to be a desirable therapeutic molecule since it efficiently neutralizes all four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV). However, mammalian-cell-produced E60 exhibits antibody-dependent enhancement of infection (ADE) activity, rendering it inefficacious in vivo, and treated animals more susceptible to developing more severe diseases during secondary infection. In this study, we evaluated a plant-based expression system for the production of therapeutically suitable E60. The mAb was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamianaWT and a ∆XFT line, a glycosylation mutant lacking plant-specific N-glycan residues. The mAb was efficiently expressed and assembled in leaves and exhibited highly homogenous N-glycosylation profiles, i.e. GnGnXF3 or GnGn structures, depending on the expression host. Both E60 glycovariants demonstrated equivalent antigen-binding specificity and in vitro neutralization potency against DENV serotypes 2 and 4 compared with their mammalian-cell-produced counterpart. By contrast, plant-produced E60 exhibited reduced ADE activity in Fc gamma receptor expressing human cells. Our results suggest the ability of plant-produced antibodies to minimize ADE, which may lead to the development of safe and highly efficacious antibody-based therapeutics against DENV and other ADE-prone viral diseases. Our study provides so far unknown insight into the relationship between mAb N-glycosylation and ADE, which contributes to our understanding of how sugar moieties of antibodies modulate Fc-mediated functions and viral pathogenesis.

  8. Sacral Nerve Stimulation for Neurogenic Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lai-Fung; Ka-Kit Leung, Gilberto; Lui, Wai-Man

    2016-06-01

    Neurogenic bladder refers to dysfunction of the urinary bladder secondary to diseases of the nervous system that result in problems with urine storage, micturition, or both. The most common causes are multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Patients commonly present with recurrent UTIs, obstructive uropathies, and urinary retention. Without proper treatment, neurogenic bladder may result in nephropathy and renal failure, both of which have a significant negative impact on the health and life expectancy of patients. Restoration of lost neural function using artificial stimulators is a feasible therapeutic strategy. This article reviews the pathophysiology of neurogenic bladder and the 2 most commonly employed sacral nerve stimulation methods-the Brindley procedure and sacral neuromodulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Central neurogenic hyperventilation: a case report and discussion of pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarulli, Andrew W; Lim, Chun; Bui, Jonathan D; Saper, Clifford B; Alexander, Michael P

    2005-10-01

    Central neurogenic hyperventilation is a rare condition with poorly understood pathophysiology. To describe a patient with central neurogenic hyperventilation caused by an infiltrative brainstem lymphoma. Based on analysis of this patient and other case reports, we propose that central neurogenic hyperventilation is uniquely the result of infiltrative tumors that stimulate pontine respiratory centers and central chemoreceptors.

  10. Neurogenic Stuttering and Lateralized Motor Deficits Induced by Tranylcypromine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Duffy

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of neurogenic stuttering induced by the monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine is described. The association of neurogenic stuttering with acquired lateralized motor deficits in the patient described is discussed with reference to current theories regarding the pathogenesis of neurogenic stuttering.

  11. Candida species from oral cavity of HIV-infected children exhibit reduced virulence factors in the HAART era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Lima de Amorim, Elaine; Santos, Adrielle Mangabeira; Alexandre da Rocha Curvelo, José; de Oliveira Martins, Karol; Capillé, Cauli Lima; Maria de Araújo Soares, Rosangela; Barbosa de Araújo Castro, Gloria Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess, in vitro, the biofilm viability and the phospholipase and protease production of Candida spp. from the saliva of HIV infected children and healthy controls, and to correlate the results with the use of medical data. A total of 79 isolates were analyzed: 48 Candida albicans isolates (33/15) and 20 Candida parapsilosis sensu lato complex isolates (12/8) (from HIV/control patients, respectively), and 8 Candida krusei, 1 Candida tropicalis, 1 Candida dubliniensis and 1 Candida guilliermondii from HIV patients. The XTT (2, 3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-Carboxanilide) reduction assay analyzed the biofilm viability. Phospholipase and protease assays were performed using the egg yolk and Bovine Serum Albumin agar plate methods, respectively. All isolates were able to form biofilm with cell viability. Quantitatively, Candida isolates from both groups presented a similar ability to form biofilm (p > 0.05). The biofilm viability activity was higher in C. albicans isolates than in non-albicans Candida isolates (p Candida spp. isolates from HIV-positive children presented higher phospholipase production, in vitro they exhibited reduced virulence factors compared to isolates from healthy individuals. This finding may enlighten the role played by immunosuppression in the modulation of Candida virulence attributes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impressive nonlinear optical response exhibited by Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabira, K.; Saheeda, P.; Divyasree, M. C.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, the nonlinear optical properties of free-standing films of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposite are investigated to assess their suitability as efficient optical limiters. The PVDF/RGO nanocomposite films are generated by mixing different concentrations of RGO as the filler, with PVDF, using solution casting method. The XRD and FTIR data of these nanocomposite films confirm the enhancement in the β phase of PVDF when RGO is added to PVDF, which is one of the prime factors, enhancing the nonlinear response of the nanocomposite. The open aperture and closed aperture Z-scan technique under nanosecond excitation (532 nm, 7 ns) is used to investigate the nonlinear optical characteristics of the PVDF/RGO nanocomposite films. These films are found to exhibit two photon absorption assisted optical non linearity in the nanosecond regime. The highlight of the present work is the observation of quite low values of the normalized transmittance and low optical limiting threshold power in free standing films of PVDF/RGO nanocomposite. These flexible, free-standing and stable nanocomposite films offer high application prospects in the design of efficient optical limiting devices of any desired size or shape.

  13. Carotid body overactivity induces respiratory neurone channelopathy contributing to neurogenic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-07-15

    Why sympathetic activity rises in neurogenic hypertension remains unknown. It has been postulated that changes in the electrical excitability of medullary pre-sympathetic neurones are the main causal mechanism for the development of sympathetic overactivity in experimental hypertension. Here we review recent data suggesting that enhanced sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension is, at least in part, dependent on alterations in the electrical excitability of medullary respiratory neurones and their central modulation of sympatho-excitatory networks. We also present results showing a critical role for carotid body tonicity in the aetiology of enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension. We propose a novel hypothesis of respiratory neurone channelopathy induced by carotid body overactivity in neurogenic hypertension that may contribute to sympathetic excess. Moreover, our data support the notion of targeting the carotid body as a potential novel therapeutic approach for reducing sympathetic vasomotor tone in neurogenic hypertension. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  14. Sacral neuromodulation in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllner, J; Krebs, J; Pannek, J

    2016-02-01

    This is a retrospective chart analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). This study was conducted in a spinal cord injury rehabilitation center in Switzerland. The charts of all patients who underwent SNM (testing and/or permanent implantation) because of NLUTD at our institution between 2007 and 2013 were evaluated. Treatment outcomes and complications were recorded. A total of 50 patients, 30 women and 20 men, with a mean age of 46 (±14) years, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The most frequent cause for SNM was spinal cord injury in 35 patients (70%). Median duration of the underlying disease was 9.5 (±9.3) years. In all, 35 patients (70%) received a permanent implant. The complication rate was 16% (8/50). At the last follow-up, SNM was in use in 32 patients. In 26 patients with SNM because of detrusor overactivity, voiding frequency per 24 h was significantly reduced from 9 to 6, and daily pad use rate was significantly improved (2.6 versus 0.6 pads per 24h). On comparing urodynamic assessment of detrusor function before and under SNM, no significant suppression of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) was detected. In nine patients with chronic neurogenic urinary retention, median postvoid residual urine was significantly reduced from 370 to 59 ml. In all, 94% of the patients were either very satisfied or satisfied with SNM. SNM might be an additional therapy option in carefully selected patients with NLUTD. On the basis of our results, urodynamic evaluation before SNM is mandatory, as the procedure does not seem to be suited to significantly alleviate NDO.

  15. Chromosomal regions associated with prostate cancer risk localize to lamin B-deficient microdomains and exhibit reduced gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, Brian T; Wang, Yuanyuan; Pfleghaar, Katrin; Shimi, Takeshi; Taimen, Pekka; Shumaker, Dale K

    2012-04-01

    The lamins are major determinants of nuclear shape and chromatin organization and these features are frequently altered in prostate cancer (CaP). Human CaP cell lines frequently have nuclear lobulations, which are enriched in A-type lamins but lack B-type lamins and have been defined as lamin B-deficient microdomains (LDMDs). LDMD frequency is correlated with CaP cell line aggressiveness and increased cell motility. In addition, LNCaP cells grown in the presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) show an increased frequency of LDMDs. The LDMDs are enriched in activated RNA polymerase II (Pol IIo) and androgen receptor (AR) and A-type lamins form an enlarged meshwork that appears to co-align with chromatin fibres and AR. Furthermore, fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization demonstrated that chromosomal regions associated with CaP susceptibility are preferentially localized to LDMDs. Surprisingly, these regions lack histone marks for transcript elongation and exhibit reduced BrU incorporation, suggesting that Pol II is stalled within LDMDs. Real-time PCR of genes near androgen response elements (AREs) was used to compare transcription between cells containing LDMDs and controls. Genes preferentially localized to LDMDs showed significantly decreased expression, while genes in the main nuclear body were largely unaffected. Furthermore, LDMDs were observed in human CaP tissue and the frequency was correlated with increased Gleason grade. These results imply that lamins are involved in chromatin organization and Pol II transcription, and provide insights into the development and progression of CaP. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Museum Exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A TSP from NASA Tech Briefs provided the solution to an electrical problem at a Florida museum. When a model train would not start without a jerk, a Marshall Space Flight Center development called pulse width control was adapted. The new circuit enables the train to start smoothly and reduces construction and maintenance costs. The same technology is also used in another hands-on exhibit. Applications of other TSPs are anticipated.

  17. Microglia from neurogenic and non-neurogenic regions display differential proliferative potential and neuroblast support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Paul Marshall

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microglia isolated from the neurogenic subependymal zone (SEZ and hippocampus (HC are capable of massive in vitro population expansion that is not possible with microglia isolated from non-neurogenic regions. We asked if this regional heterogeneity in microglial proliferative capacity is cell intrinsic, or is conferred by interaction with respective neurogenic or non-neurogenic niches. By combining SEZ and cerebral cortex (CTX primary tissue dissociates to generate heterospatial cultures, we find that exposure to the SEZ environment does not enhance CTX microglia expansion; however, the CTX environment exerts a suppressive effect on SEZ microglia expansion. Furthermore, addition of purified donor SEZ microglia to either CTX- or SEZ-derived cultures suppresses the expansion of host microglia, while the addition of donor CTX microglia enhances the over-all microglia yield. These data suggest that SEZ and CTX microglia possess intrinsic, spatially restricted characteristics that are independent of their in vitro environment, and that they represent unique and functionally distinct populations. Finally, we determined that the repeated supplementation of neurogenic SEZ cultures with expanded SEZ microglia allows for sustained levels of inducible neurogenesis, provided that the ratio of microglia to total cells remains within a fairly narrow range.

  18. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    OpenAIRE

    Al Taweel W; Seyam R

    2015-01-01

    Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete...

  19. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  20. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Jeremy B.; Mayer, Erik N.; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from ...

  1. Understanding the Economic Impact of Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Zamora, Isaac D; Atiemo, Humphrey O

    2017-08-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a chronic and disabling condition associated with multiple comorbidities and a widespread economic impact. Literature on cost of care and resource utilization is sparse and heterogeneous. Nonstandardized approaches, impact perspectives, and types of costs are used to describe the economic implications of neurogenic bladder. The financial toll is difficult to ascertain due to indirect and intangible costs exacerbated by the underlying disability. Health resource utilization based on clinical manifestations of neurogenic bladder may serve as an alternative measure. Understanding the multifold economic implications and health resource utilization patterns of neurogenic bladder may guide improvement of treatment strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Infantile amnesia: a neurogenic hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josselyn, Sheena A; Frankland, Paul W

    2012-08-16

    In the late 19th Century, Sigmund Freud described the phenomenon in which people are unable to recall events from early childhood as infantile amnesia. Although universally observed, infantile amnesia is a paradox; adults have surprisingly few memories of early childhood despite the seemingly exuberant learning capacity of young children. How can these findings be reconciled? The mechanisms underlying this form of amnesia are the subject of much debate. Psychological/cognitive theories assert that the ability to maintain detailed, declarative-like memories in the long term correlates with the development of language, theory of mind, and/or sense of "self." However, the finding that experimental animals also show infantile amnesia suggests that this phenomenon cannot be explained fully in purely human terms. Biological explanations of infantile amnesia suggest that protracted postnatal development of key brain regions important for memory interferes with stable long-term memory storage, yet they do not clearly specify which particular aspects of brain maturation are causally related to infantile amnesia. Here, we propose a hypothesis of infantile amnesia that focuses on one specific aspect of postnatal brain development--the continued addition of new neurons to the hippocampus. Infants (humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents) exhibit high levels of hippocampal neurogenesis and an inability to form lasting memories. Interestingly, the decline of postnatal neurogenesis levels corresponds to the emergence of the ability to form stable long-term memory. We propose that high neurogenesis levels negatively regulate the ability to form enduring memories, most likely by replacing synaptic connections in preexisting hippocampal memory circuits.

  3. Immersive Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The immersive exhibition is a specialized exhibition genre in museums, which creates the illusion of time and place by representing key characteristics of a reference world and by integrating the visitor in this three-dimensionally reconstructed world (Mortensen 2010). A successful representation...... of the reference world depends on three criteria: whether the exhibition is staged as a coherent whole with all the displayed objects supporting the representation, whether the visitor is integrated as a component of the exhibition, and whether the content and message of the exhibition become dramatized...... as a result of the visitor’s interaction with the exhibit....

  4. Monomelic neurogenic syndromes: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Mamede; Swash, Michael

    2007-12-15

    Monomelic neurogenic syndromes are rare. Their classification and prognostic features have not been addressed in the European population. A prospective study of 17 patients with monomelic neurogenic amyotrophy, of upper or lower limb onset, with progression limited to one limb for three or more years. Clinical and neurophysiological studies were performed in the subsequent 3 or more years. Fifteen patients were of European origin and two were Asian. Those presenting with proximal monomelic weakness or with involvement of the posterior compartment of the lower leg showed no further progression after the initial period of development of the syndrome. Brisk reflexes in wasted muscles did not predict progression. Electromyographic signs of denervation in the opposite limb at presentation did not predict later progression. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) features of corticospinal dysfunction were a useful predictor of subsequent progression (p=0.01). One patient with lower limb onset developed conduction block with weakness in an upper limb nine years after presentation, and this upper limb weakness responded to IVIg therapy. This adult-onset European group of patients is different as compared with juvenile-onset Asian cases. The clinical syndromes appear heterogeneous, but neurophysiological investigations, in particular TMS, can be helpful in determining prognosis. Multifocal motor neuropathy should be considered when there is progression, even years after onset.

  5. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  6. Female mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA mice exhibit hyperactivity and a reduced sense of danger in the open field test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Langford-Smith

    Full Text Available Reliable behavioural tests in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases allow us to study the natural history of disease and evaluate the efficacy of novel therapies. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA (MPS IIIA or Sanfilippo A, is a severe, neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency in the heparan sulphate catabolising enzyme, sulfamidase. Undegraded heparan sulphate accumulates, resulting in lysosomal enlargement and cellular dysfunction. Patients suffer a progressive loss of motor and cognitive function with severe behavioural manifestations and premature death. There is currently no treatment. A spontaneously occurring mouse model of the disease has been described, that has approximately 3% of normal enzyme activity levels. Behavioural phenotyping of the MPS IIIA mouse has been previously reported, but the results are conflicting and variable, even after full backcrossing to the C57BL/6 background. Therefore we have independently backcrossed the MPS IIIA model onto the C57BL/6J background and evaluated the behaviour of male and female MPS IIIA mice at 4, 6 and 8 months of age using the open field test, elevated plus maze, inverted screen and horizontal bar crossing at the same circadian time point. Using a 60 minute open field, we have demonstrated that female MPS IIIA mice are hyperactive, have a longer path length, display rapid exploratory behaviour and spend less time immobile than WT mice. Female MPS IIIA mice also display a reduced sense of danger and spend more time in the centre of the open field. There were no significant differences found between male WT and MPS IIIA mice and no differences in neuromuscular strength were seen with either sex. The altered natural history of behaviour that we observe in the MPS IIIA mouse will allow more accurate evaluation of novel therapeutics for MPS IIIA and potentially other neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Human Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Rikke

    From 1870s to 1910s, more than 50 exhibitions of so-called exotic people took place in Denmark. Here large numbers of people of Asian and African origin were exhibited for the entertainment and ‘education’ of a mass audience. Several of these exhibitions took place in Copenhagen Zoo. Here differe...

  8. Presentation of neurogenic shock within the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Matthew Pritam; Wrenn, Paul; O'Donnell, Andrew David

    2017-03-01

    Injury to the spinal cord can result in loss of sympathetic innervation causing a drop in BP and HR, this condition is known as neurogenic shock. There is debate among the literature on how and when neurogenic shock presents and what values of HR and BP should be used to define it. Previous studies do not take into account multiple prehospital and emergency department recordings. To improve understanding of how neurogenic shock presents in humans, allowing better identification and treatment. The Trauma Audit and Research Network database for an adult major trauma centre was used to isolate patients with a spinal cord injury. Qualifying patients had all available BPs and HRs collated into a database. Patients with neurogenic shock were isolated, allowing data analysis. Out of 3069 trauma patients, 33 met the inclusion criteria, of which 15 experienced neurogenic shock. 87% of the patients who had neurogenic shock experienced it within 2 hours of injury. Neurogenic shock below the T6 level was less common (p=0.009); however, there were still four cases in the cohort. More patients with complete spinal cord injury had neurogenic shock (p=0.039). Neurogenic shock is variable and unpredictable. It can present in the prehospital environment and without warning in a patient with previously normal vital signs. The medical team should be aware of it in all patients with spinal cord injury regardless of injury level. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required.

  10. Control of dynamic foot-ground interactions in male and female soccer athletes: females exhibit reduced dexterity and higher limb stiffness during landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Mark A; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J; Gregor, Robert J; Powers, Christopher M

    2014-01-22

    Controlling dynamic interactions between the lower limb and ground is important for skilled locomotion and may influence injury risk in athletes. It is well known that female athletes sustain anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears at higher rates than male athletes, and exhibit lower extremity biomechanics thought to increase injury risk during sport maneuvers. The purpose of this study was to examine whether lower extremity dexterity (LED)--the ability to dynamically control endpoint force magnitude and direction as quantified by compressing an unstable spring with the lower limb at submaximal forces--is a potential contributing factor to the "at-risk" movement behavior exhibited by female athletes. We tested this hypothesis by comparing LED-test performance and single-limb drop jump biomechanics between 14 female and 14 male high school soccer players. We found that female athletes exhibited reduced LED-test performance (p=0.001) and higher limb stiffness during landing (p=0.008) calculated on average within 51 ms of foot contact. Females also exhibited higher coactivation at the ankle (p=0.001) and knee (p=0.02) before landing. No sex differences in sagittal plane joint angles and center of mass velocity at foot contact were observed. Collectively, our results raise the possibility that the higher leg stiffness observed in females during landing is an anticipatory behavior due in part to reduced lower extremity dexterity. The reduced lower extremity dexterity and compensatory stiffening strategy may contribute to the heightened risk of ACL injury in this population. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Exhibit Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Marianne Foss

    ) a synthesis of the findings from the first two studies with findings from the literature to generate two types of results: a coherent series of suggestions for a design iteration of the studied exhibit as well as a more general normative model for exhibit engineering. Finally, another perspective...

  12. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jeremy B; Mayer, Erik N; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder.

  13. Management of detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia in neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, W; Corcos, J

    2011-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects 11.5 to 53.4 individuals per million of the population in developed countries each year. SCI is caused by trauma, although it can also result from myelopathy, myelitis, vascular disease or arteriovenous malformations and multiple sclerosis. Patients with complete lesions of the spinal cord between spinal cord level T6 and S2, after they recover from spinal shock, generally exhibit involuntary bladder contractions without sensation, smooth sphincter synergy, but with detrusor striated sphincter dyssynergia (DESD). Those with lesions above spinal cord level T6 may experience, in addition, smooth sphincter dyssynergia and autonomic hyperreflexia. DESD is a debilitating problem in patients with SCI. It carries a high risk of complications, and even life expectancy can be affected. Nearly half of the patients with untreated DESD will develop deleterious urologic complications, due to high intravesical pressures, resulting in urolithiasis, urinary tract infection (UTI), vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), hydronephrosis, obstructive uropathy, and renal failure. The mainstay of treatment is the use of antimuscarinics and catheterization, but in those for whom this is not possible external sphincterotomy has been a last resort option. External sphincterotomy is associated with significant risks, including haemorrhage; erectile dysfunction and the possibility of redo procedures. Over the last decade alternatives have been investigated, such as urethral stents and intrasphincteric botulinum toxin injection. In this review, we will cover neurogenic DESD, with emphasis on definition, classifications, diagnosis and different therapeutic options available.

  14. [Giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum: a case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Quan, Chang-Yi; Li, Gang; Cai, Qi-Liang; Hu, Bin; Wang, Jiu-Wei; Niu, Yuan-Jie

    2013-02-01

    To study the etiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of a case of giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum and reviewed the relevant literature. The patient was a 37-year-old man, with urinary incontinence for 22 years and intermittent dysuria with frequent micturition for 9 years, aggravated in the past 3 months. He had received surgery for spina bifida and giant vesico-prostatic calculus. The results of preoperative routine urinary examination were as follows: WBC 17 -20/HPF, RBC 12 - 15/HPF. KUB, IVU and pelvic CT revealed spina bifida occulta, neurogenic bladder and giant prostatic calculus. The patient underwent TURP and transurethral lithotripsy with holmium-YAG laser. The prostatic calculus was carbonate apatite in composition. Urinary dynamic images at 2 weeks after surgery exhibited significant improvement in the highest urine flow rate and residual urine volume. Seventeen months of postoperative follow-up showed dramatically improved urinary incontinence and thicker urine stream. Prostate diverticulum with prostatic giant calculus is very rare, and neurogenic bladder may play a role in its etiology. Cystoscopy is an accurate screening method for its diagnosis. For the young patients and those who wish to retain sexual function, TURP combined with holmium laser lithotripsy can be employed, and intraoperative rectal examination should be taken to ensure complete removal of calculi.

  15. Enhanced Dentate Neurogenesis after Brain Injury Undermines Long-Term Neurogenic Potential and Promotes Seizure Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Neuberger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal dentate gyrus is a focus of enhanced neurogenesis and excitability after traumatic brain injury. Increased neurogenesis has been proposed to aid repair of the injured network. Our data show that an early increase in neurogenesis after fluid percussion concussive brain injury is transient and is followed by a persistent decrease compared with age-matched controls. Post-injury changes in neurogenesis paralleled changes in neural precursor cell proliferation and resulted in a long-term decline in neurogenic capacity. Targeted pharmacology to restore post-injury neurogenesis to control levels reversed the long-term decline in neurogenic capacity. Limiting post-injury neurogenesis reduced early increases in dentate excitability and seizure susceptibility. Our results challenge the assumption that increased neurogenesis after brain injury is beneficial and show that early post-traumatic increases in neurogenesis adversely affect long-term outcomes by exhausting neurogenic potential and enhancing epileptogenesis. Treatments aimed at limiting excessive neurogenesis can potentially restore neuroproliferative capacity and limit epilepsy after brain injury.

  16. Exhibiting design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2017-01-01

    This article explores how co-curatorial strategies and partnerships can work as driving forces for representing design, and how they can vitalize the exhibition as a media between enlightenment and experience. Focusing on Design Museum DK, drawing on historical as well as recent cases, it identif......This article explores how co-curatorial strategies and partnerships can work as driving forces for representing design, and how they can vitalize the exhibition as a media between enlightenment and experience. Focusing on Design Museum DK, drawing on historical as well as recent cases...

  17. A role for endothelin in bicuculline-induced neurogenic pulmonary oedema in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, C; Tippler, B; Shams, H; Simmet, T

    1995-07-01

    1. The possible contribution of endogenous endothelin (ET) to the pathogenesis of seizure-associated pulmonary oedema was examined in mechanically ventilated rats after intravenous bolus injection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, bicuculline (1.2 mg kg-1). 2. Recurrent seizure activity elicited by bicuculline injection led to rapidly developing pulmonary oedema. Within 4 min after bicuculline application (1.2 mg kg-1), arterial O2 partial pressure (PaO2) significantly dropped from 17.49 +/- 1.20 kPa to 7.51 +/- 2.21 kPa (P 0.05) after phosphoramidon pretreatment. In contrast, vehicle-treated animals that received bicuculline showed both significant hypercapnia as well as profound hypoxia. Phosphoramidon significantly diminished the maximum increase in Paw by 76.7 +/- 12.4% (P 0.05) in BQ-123-treated animals. In contrast, vehicle-treated animals that received bicuculline exhibited significant hypercapnia as well as profound hypoxia. BQ-123 significantly reduced the increase in Paw by 51.3 +/- 12.8% (P < 0.01). It affected MABP only slightly and had no effect on the acidosis.6. These results suggest that ET peptides play a significant role in this model of neurogenic pulmonary oedema and may act as mediators of respiratory distress. The deleterious effects of endogenous ET in this model are primarily mediated via the ETA receptor, for they were inhibited by the ETA receptor antagonist, BQ-123. ETA receptor antagonists may therefore be of potential therapeutic value in respiratory distress.

  18. Preventing kidney injury in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Javadi Larijani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NBD in newborn infants is myelomeningocele. The pathophysiology almost always involves the bladder detrusor sphincter dyssynergy (DSD, which if untreated can cause severe and irreversible damage to the upper and lower urinary tracts. Early diagnosis and adequate management of NBD is critical to prevent both renal damage and bladder dysfunction and to reduce chances for the future surgeries. Initial investigation of the affected newborn infant includes a renal and bladder ultrasound, measurement of urine residual, determination of serum creatinine level, and urodynamics study. Voiding cystogram is indicated when either hydronephrosis or DSD is present. The main goal of treatment is prevention of urinary tract deterioration and achievement of continuance at an appropriate age. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC in combination with anticholinergic (oxybutynin and antibiotics are instituted in those with high filling and voiding pressures, DSD and/or high grade reflux immediately after the myelomeningocele is repaired. Botulium toxin-A injection into detrusor is a safe alternative in patients with insufficient response or significant side effects to anticholinergic (oral or intravesical instillation therapy. Surgery is an effective alternative in patients with persistent detrusor hyperactivity and/or dyssynergic detrusor sphincter despites of the CIC and maximum dosage of anticholinergic therapy. Children with NBD require care from a multidisciplinary team approach consisting of pediatricians, neurosurgeon, urologist, nephrologists, orthopedic surgeon, and other allied medical specialists.

  19. Alzheimer’s Disease Mutant Mice Exhibit Reduced Brain Tissue Stiffness Compared to Wild-type Mice in both Normoxia and following Intermittent Hypoxia Mimicking Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Menal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEvidence from patients and animal models suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA may increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD and that AD is associated with reduced brain tissue stiffness.AimTo investigate whether intermittent hypoxia (IH alters brain cortex tissue stiffness in AD mutant mice exposed to IH mimicking OSA.MethodsSix-eight month old (B6C3-Tg(APPswe,PSEN1dE985Dbo/J AD mutant mice and wild-type (WT littermates were subjected to IH (21% O2 40 s to 5% O2 20 s; 6 h/day or normoxia for 8 weeks. After euthanasia, the stiffness (E of 200-μm brain cortex slices was measured by atomic force microscopy.ResultsTwo-way ANOVA indicated significant cortical softening and weight increase in AD mice compared to WT littermates, but no significant effects of IH on cortical stiffness and weight were detected. In addition, reduced myelin was apparent in AD (vs. WT, but no significant differences emerged in the cortex extracellular matrix components laminin and glycosaminoglycans when comparing baseline AD and WT mice.ConclusionAD mutant mice exhibit reduced brain tissue stiffness following both normoxia and IH mimicking sleep apnea, and such differences are commensurate with increased edema and demyelination in AD.

  20. Human Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Rikke

    of displayed people, connecting the attitudes and science of the past with both our (continued) modern fascination with ‘the exotic’, and contemporary language and popular culture. As such, it will be of interest to scholars of sociology, anthropology and history working in the areas of gender and sexuality...... light on the staging of exhibitions, the daily life of the exhibitees, the wider connections between shows across Europe and the thinking of the time on matters of race, science, gender and sexuality. A window onto contemporary racial understandings, the book presents interviews with the descendants...

  1. Human Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Rikke

    , this book draws on unique archival material, including photographs, documentary evidence and newspaper articles, newly discovered in Copenhagen. This opens for new insights and perspectives on these European exhibitions. The book employs post-colonial and feminist approaches to the material to shed fresh...... of displayed people, connecting the attitudes and science of the past with both our (continued) modern fascination with ‘the exotic’, and contemporary language and popular culture. As such, it will be of interest to scholars of sociology, anthropology and history working in the areas of gender and sexuality...

  2. Noninvasive Evaluation of Cellular Proliferative Activity in Brain Neurogenic Regions in Rats under Depression and Treatment by Enhanced [18F]FLT-PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Kayo; Takata, Kumi; Eguchi, Asami; Yamato, Masanori; Kume, Satoshi; Nakano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2016-08-03

    Neural stem cells in two neurogenic regions, the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus, can divide and produce new neurons throughout life. Hippocampal neurogenesis is related to emotions, including depression/anxiety, and the therapeutic effects of antidepressants, as well as learning and memory. The establishment of in vivo imaging for proliferative activity of neural stem cells in the SGZ might be used to diagnose depression and to monitor the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]fluoro-l-thymidine ([(18)F]FLT) has been studied to allow visualization of proliferative activity in two neurogenic regions of adult mammals; however, the PET imaging has not been widely used because of lower accumulation of [(18)F]FLT, which does not allow quantitative assessment of the decline in cellular proliferative activity in the SGZ under the condition of depression. We report the establishment of an enhanced PET imaging method with [(18)F]FLT combined with probenecid, an inhibitor of drug transporters at the blood-brain barrier, which can allow the quantitative visualization of neurogenic activity in rats. Enhanced PET imaging allowed us to evaluate reduced cell proliferation in the SGZ of rats with corticosterone-induced depression, and further the recovery of proliferative activity in rats under treatment with antidepressants. This enhanced [(18)F]FLT-PET imaging technique with probenecid can be used to assess the dynamic alteration of neurogenic activity in the adult mammalian brain and may also provide a means for objective diagnosis of depression and monitoring of the therapeutic effect of antidepressant treatment. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis may play a role in major depression and antidepressant therapy. Establishment of in vivo imaging for hippocampal neurogenic activity may be useful to diagnose depression and monitor the therapeutic efficacy of

  3. Neuropeptides, neurogenic inflammation and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birklein, Frank; Schmelz, Martin

    2008-06-06

    This review explains symptoms and nature of neuropeptide signaling and its importance for clinical symptoms of CRPS. Neurogenic inflammation regularly accompanies excitation of primary afferent nociceptors. It has two major components-plasma extravasation and vasodilatation. The most important mediators are the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). After peripheral trauma immune reaction (e.g. cytokines) and the attempts of the tissue to regenerate (e.g. growth factors) sensitize nociceptors and amplify neurogenic inflammation. This cascade of events has been demonstrated in rat models of CRPS. Clinical findings in these animals strongly resemble clinical findings in CRPS, and can be prevented by anti-cytokine and anti-neuropeptide treatment. In CRPS patients, there is meanwhile also plenty of evidence that neurogenic inflammation contributes to clinical presentation. Increased cytokine production was demonstrated, as well as facilitated neurogenic inflammation. Very recently even "non-inflammatory" signs of CRPS (hyperhidrosis, cold skin) have been linked to neuropeptide signaling. Surprisingly, there was even moderately increased neurogenic inflammation in unaffected body regions. This favors the possibility that CRPS patients share genetic similarities. The future search for genetic commonalities will help us to further unravel the "mystery" CRPS.

  4. CD4+ T cells from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis exhibit reduced apoptosis and down-regulation of proapoptotic Bim in peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoknecht, Tanja; Schwinge, Dorothee; Stein, Stephanie; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Sebode, Marcial; Mucha, Sören; Otto, Benjamin; Ellinghaus, Eva; Stahl, Felix; Franke, Andre; Lohse, Ansgar W; Herkel, Johannes; Schramm, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    The pathogenesis of the progressive liver disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), remains largely elusive. The strong genetic association with HLA loci suggests that T cell-dependent, adaptive immune reactions could contribute to disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have indicated that PSC is also associated with polymorphisms in the locus encoding for proapoptotic Bim (BCL2L11). Bim is crucial for the maintenance of immunologic tolerance through induction of apoptosis in activated T cells. Of interest with regard to PSC is the finding that BCL2L11-deficient mice develop periductular infiltrates. We, therefore, investigated, whether defective apoptosis of T cells might contribute to the phenotype of PSC. Thus, we induced apoptosis of T cells from patients with PSC and controls by repeated T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation or cytokine withdrawal. We found that CD4+ T cells, but not CD8+ T cells, from patients with PSC exhibited significantly reduced apoptosis in response to both, TCR restimulation or cytokine withdrawal. This increased apoptosis resistance was associated with significantly reduced up-regulation of proapoptotic Bim in T cells from patients with PSC. However, T cell apoptosis did not seem to be influenced by the previously described BCL2L11 polymorphisms. Reduced CD4+ T cell apoptosis in patients with PSC was not due to reduced cell activation, as indicated by a similar surface expression of the activation markers CD69, CD25, and CD28 in T cells from patients and controls. Thus, decreased apoptosis of activated CD4+ T cells may be part of the immune dysregulation observed in patients with PSC. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  5. Capsaicin-induced neurogenic inflammation in the skin in patients with symptoms induced by odorous chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mosbech, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Intradermal injection of capsaicin induces the axonal release of neuropeptides, vasodilatation and flare, e.g. neurogenic inflammation. The spatial profile of neurogenic inflammation in the skin has been studied in various experimental models. Polarization spectroscopy imaging introduced recently...

  6. Uncoupling neurogenic gene networks in the Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, William A; Goyal, Yogesh; Yamaya, Kei; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Levine, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    The EGF signaling pathway specifies neuronal identities in the Drosophila embryo by regulating developmental patterning genes such as intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind). EGFR is activated in the ventral midline and neurogenic ectoderm by the Spitz ligand, which is processed by the Rhomboid protease. CRISPR/Cas9 was used to delete defined rhomboid enhancers mediating expression at each site of Spitz processing. Surprisingly, the neurogenic ectoderm, not the ventral midline, was found to be the dominant source of EGF patterning activity. We suggest that Drosophila is undergoing an evolutionary transition in central nervous system (CNS)-organizing activity from the ventral midline to the neurogenic ectoderm. © 2017 Rogers et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. A Modified Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Vaccine with Reduced Activity of Antioxidants and Glutamine Synthetase Exhibits Enhanced Protection of Mice despite Diminished in Vivo Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoen, Carolyn M.; DeStefano, Michelle S.; Hager, Cynthia C.; Tham, Kyi-Toe; Braunstein, Miriam; Allen, Alexandria D.; Gates, Hiriam O.; Cynamon, Michael H.; Kernodle, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    Early attempts to improve BCG have focused on increasing the expression of prominent antigens and adding recombinant toxins or cytokines to influence antigen presentation. One such modified BCG vaccine candidate has been withdrawn from human clinical trials due to adverse effects. BCG was derived from virulent Mycobacterium bovis and retains much of its capacity for suppressing host immune responses. Accordingly, we have used a different strategy for improving BCG based on reducing its immune suppressive capacity. We made four modifications to BCG Tice to produce 4dBCG and compared it to the parent vaccine in C57Bl/6 mice. The modifications included elimination of the oxidative stress sigma factor SigH, elimination of the SecA2 secretion channel, and reductions in the activity of iron co-factored superoxide dismutase and glutamine synthetase. After IV inoculation of 4dBCG, 95% of vaccine bacilli were eradicated from the spleens of mice within 60 days whereas the titer of BCG Tice was not significantly reduced. Subcutaneous vaccination with 4dBCG produced greater protection than vaccination with BCG against dissemination of an aerosolized challenge of M. tuberculosis to the spleen at 8 weeks post-challenge. At this time, 4dBCG-vaccinated mice also exhibited altered lung histopathology compared to BCG-vaccinated mice and control mice with less well-developed lymphohistiocytic nodules in the lung parenchyma. At 26 weeks post-challenge, 4dBCG-vaccinated mice but not BCG-vaccinated mice had significantly fewer challenge bacilli in the lungs than control mice. In conclusion, despite reduced persistence in mice a modified BCG vaccine with diminished antioxidants and glutamine synthetase is superior to the parent vaccine in conferring protection against M. tuberculosis. The targeting of multiple immune suppressive factors produced by BCG is a promising strategy for simultaneously improving vaccine safety and effectiveness. PMID:26343849

  8. Discerning neurogenic vs. non-neurogenic postnatal lateral ventricular astrocytes via activity-dependent input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena W. Adlaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Throughout development, neural stem cells (NSCs give rise to differentiated neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes which together modulate perception, memory, and behavior in the adult nervous system. To understand how NSCs contribute to postnatal/adult brain remodeling and repair after injury, the lateral ventricular (LV neurogenic niche in the rodent postnatal brain serves as an excellent model system. It is a specialized area containing self-renewing GFAP+ astrocytes functioning as NSCs generating new neurons throughout life. In addition to this now well-studied regenerative process, the LV niche also generates astrocytes, playing an important role for glial scar formation after cortical injury. While LV NSCs can be clearly distinguished from their neuroblast and oligodendrocyte progeny via molecular markers, the astrocytic identity of NSCs has complicated their distinction from terminally-differentiated astrocytes in the niche. Our current models of postnatal/adult LV neurogenesis do not take into account local astrogenesis, or the possibility that cellular markers may be similar between non-dividing GFAP+ NSCs and their differentiated astrocyte daughters. Postnatal LV neurogenesis is regulated by NSC-intrinsic mechanisms interacting with extracellular/niche-driven cues. It is generally believed that these local effects are responsible for sustaining neurogenesis, though behavioral paradigms and disease states have suggested possibilities for neural circuit-level modulation. With recent experimental findings that neuronal stimulation can directly evoke responses in LV NSCs, it is possible that this exciting property will add a new dimension to identifying postnatal/adult NSCs. Here, we put forth a notion that neural circuit-level input can be a distinct characteristic defining postnatal/adult NSCs from non-neurogenic astroglia.

  9. Screening for depression and anxiety in childhood neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabra, Aashish T; Feustel, Paul J; Kogan, Barry A

    2015-04-01

    %). The median CES-D scores were 8 (IQR: 3-19). In this preliminary screening study, we found considerable anxiety in adolescents with NB and both A/D in caregivers. When screening by two validated surveys, adolescents with NB had median scores for A/D that were normal; yet 27% of these patients exhibited scores for anxiety that outwit the normal range. For the caregivers, the median scores were also normal; yet 49% and 32% had scores for A/D, respectively, that were abnormal. SB among pediatric patients has been shown to result in alterations in daily functioning and to increase the dependency on adult care, factors that are associated with altered self-concept, psychological distress, including A/D. Our findings underscore such results from previous studies. In caregivers, we observed a higher prevalence of anxiety than adolescents; similar findings have been reported for caregivers of other chronic conditions. Surprisingly, in caregivers, a lower percentage of scores for depression was observed. Although we have no data on the cause of this finding this may be related to a caregiver's ability to adapt to the demands of the situation in chronic illness or perhaps, lower expectations. The cross-sectional nature of our study limited us to draw any causal relationships for anxiety or depression between neurogenic patients and their caregivers. Despite our study limitations, the prevalence of anxiety in adolescents and in the caregivers is striking. Our data highlight that clinicians should screen for A/D more aggressively in pediatric patients with NB dysfunction and in their caregivers. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Caudal Regression Syndrome/neurogenic bladder presented as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burhan M. Edrees

    Caudal Regression Syndrome/neurogenic bladder presented as recurrent urinary tract infection. Burhan M. Edrees. Department of Pediatrics, Medical College, Umm Al-Qura University, Saudi .... The pulse rate was 129 per minute, respiratory rate was 40 per ... strated abnormalities in the structures and functions of the renal.

  11. Mapping of potential neurogenic niche in the human temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Barreto Nogueira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ are known neurogenic niches in adult mammals. Nonetheless, the existence of neurogenic niches in adult humans is controversial. We hypothesized that mapping neurogenic niches in the human temporal lobe could clarify this issue. Neurogenic niches and neurogenesis were investigated in 28 temporal lobes via immunostaining for nestin and doublecortin (DCX, respectively. Nestin was observed in a continuous layer formed by the SVZ, the subpial zone of the medial temporal lobe and the SGZ, terminating in the subiculum. In the subiculum, remarkable DCX expression was observed through the principal efferent pathway of the hippocampus to the fimbria. A possible explanation for the results is that the SVZ, the subpial zone of the medial temporal lobe and the SGZ form a unit containing neural stem cells that differentiate into neurons in the subiculum. Curiously, the area previously identified as the human rostral migratory stream may in truth be the fornix, which contains axons that originate in the subiculum. This study suggests that neurogenesis may occur in an orchestrated manner in a broad area of the human temporal lobe.

  12. Neurogenic inflammation and allergy | Mostafa | Egyptian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The). Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 2 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Neurogenic inflammation and ...

  13. Caudal Regression Syndrome/neurogenic bladder presented as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burhan M. Edrees

    mities within the spinal cord, brain, or nervous supply. A number of nerves and muscles mostly work together for the attainment of specified function. A very common example regarding the blad- der is, urinary incontenince. In this condition, the brain is unable to control the functions of bladder, which results in neurogenic ...

  14. Onabotulinumtoxin A (Botox) in treatment of neurogenic bladder overactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrsted, Malene; Nordsten, Cecilie Bagi; Bagi, Per

    2012-01-01

    on a systematic search of the PubMed database, a review of the current literature on the use of onabotulinum toxin A (Botox®) in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity is presented. Onabotulinum toxin A proved to be highly effective in the majority of studies, even though a wide range of injection...

  15. Outer membrane vesicles harboring modified lipid A moiety augment the efficacy of an influenza vaccine exhibiting reduced endotoxicity in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Young; Kim, Chang-Ung; Bae, Eun-Hye; Seo, Sang-Hwan; Jeong, Dae Gwin; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Young Sang; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Doo-Jin

    2017-01-23

    Influenza is an acute respiratory disease and a major health problem worldwide. Since mucosal immunity plays a critical role in protection against influenza virus infection, mucosal immunization is considered a promising vaccination route. However, except for live-attenuated vaccines, there are no effective killed or recombinant mucosal influenza vaccines to date. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are nano-sized vesicles produced by gram-negative bacteria, and contain various bacterial components capable of stimulating the immune system of the host. We generated an OMV with low endotoxicity (fmOMV) by modifying the structure of the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide and investigated its effect as an intranasal vaccine adjuvant in an influenza vaccine model. In this model, fmOMV exhibited reduced toll-like receptor 4-stimulating activity and attenuated endotoxicity compared to that of native OMV. Intranasal injection of the vaccine antigen with fmOMV significantly increased systemic antibody and T cell responses, mucosal IgA levels, and the frequency of lung-resident influenza-specific T cells. In addition, the number of antigen-bearing CD103+ dendritic cells in the mediastinal lymph nodes was significantly increased after fmOMV co-administration. Notably, the mice co-immunized with fmOMV showed a significantly higher protection rate against challenge with a lethal dose of homologous or heterologous influenza viruses without adverse effects. These results show the potential of fmOMV as an effective mucosal adjuvant for intranasal vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Corticotropin-releasing factor-overexpressing mice exhibit reduced neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus and food intake in response to fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Million, Mulugeta; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Kobelt, Peter; Mönnikes, Hubert; Taché, Yvette; Wang, Lixin

    2009-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) overexpressing (OE) mice are a genetic model that exhibits features of chronic stress. We investigated whether the adaptive feeding response to a hypocaloric challenge induced by food deprivation is impaired under conditions of chronic CRF overproduction. Food intake response to a 16-h overnight fast and ip injection of gut hormones regulating food intake were compared in CRF-OE and wild type (WT) littermate mice along with brain Fos expression, circulating ghrelin levels, and gastric emptying of a nonnutrient meal. CRF-OE mice injected ip with saline showed a 47 and 44% reduction of 30-min and 4-h cumulative food intake response to an overnight fast, respectively, compared with WT. However, the 30-min food intake decrease induced by ip cholecystokinin (3 microg/kg) and increase by ghrelin (300 microg/kg) were similar in CRF-OE and WT mice. Overnight fasting increased the plasma total ghrelin to similar levels in CRF-OE and WT mice, although CRF-OE mice had a 2-fold reduction of nonfasting ghrelin levels. The number of Fos-immunoreactive cells induced by fasting in the arcuate nucleus was reduced by 5.9-fold in CRF-OE compared with WT mice whereas no significant changes were observed in other hypothalamic nuclei. In contrast, fasted CRF-OE mice displayed a 5.6-fold increase in Fos-immunoreactive cell number in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and a 34% increase in 20-min gastric emptying. These findings indicate that sustained overproduction of hypothalamic CRF in mice interferes with fasting-induced activation of arcuate nucleus neurons and the related hyperphagic response.

  17. Double-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover trial of pregabalin for neurogenic claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, John D; Frazer, Maria E; Rast, Shirley A; McDermott, Michael P; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Chowdhry, Amit K; Czerniecka, Kate; Pilcher, Webster H; Simon, Lee S; Dworkin, Robert H

    2015-01-20

    To test the effects of pregabalin on the induction of neurogenic claudication. This study was a randomized, double-blind, active placebo-controlled, 2-period, crossover trial. Twenty-nine subjects were randomized to receive pregabalin followed by active placebo (i.e., diphenhydramine) or active placebo followed by pregabalin. Each treatment period lasted 10 days, including a 2-step titration. Periods were separated by a 10-day washout period, including a 3-day taper phase after the first period. The primary outcome variable was the time to first moderate pain symptom (Numeric Rating Scale score ≥4) during a 15-minute treadmill test (Tfirst). Secondary outcome measures included pain intensity at rest, pain intensity at the end of the treadmill test, distance walked, and validated self-report measures of pain and functional limitation including the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, modified Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, Oswestry Disability Index, and Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire. No significant difference was found between pregabalin and active placebo for the time to first moderate pain symptom (difference in median Tfirst = -1.08 [95% confidence interval -2.25 to 0.08], p = 0.61). In addition, none of the secondary outcome measures of pain or functional limitation were significantly improved by pregabalin compared with active placebo. Pregabalin was not more effective than active placebo in reducing painful symptoms or functional limitations in patients with neurogenic claudication associated with lumbar spinal stenosis. This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with neurogenic claudication, compared with diphenhydramine, pregabalin does not increase the time to moderate pain during a treadmill test. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Effects of sangre de drago in an in vitro model of cutaneous neurogenic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ulysse; Garcia-Le Gal, Caridad; Le Gal, Grégoire; Boulais, Nicholas; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Dorange, Germaine; Lefeuvre, Luc; Gougerot, Agnés; Misery, Laurent

    2010-09-01

    Sangre de drago (SD) is a viscous bright red resin collected from Croton lechleri trees that grow in the South American jungle. This sap is used extensively in the native pharmacopoeia to treat skin disorders. Its effectiveness as an inhibitor of neurogenic inflammation has been recently demonstrated. To understand the underlying mechanisms of these effects, we examined the ability of SD to reduce substance P (SP) release in an in vitro model of cutaneous neurogenic inflammation (CNI). This model is based on an enzyme immunoassay of SP (an inducer of CNI) in a porcine co-culture of dorsal root ganglion neurons and keratinocytes. After incubation with different concentrations of SD, we noted an immediate and significant dose-dependent decrease in basal SP release, with average values of 32% at 1% SD (v/v) and 26% at 0.1% (v/v). On the other hand, pretreatment (72 or 1 h) of the co-culture with 1% SD (v/v) was sufficient to induce a 111% (72 h) or 65% (1 h) inhibition of capsaicin-induced SP release, while 0.1% SD (v/v) triggered a 109% (72 h) or 30% (1 h) inhibition. We conclude that sangre de drago is a potent inhibitor of CNI through direct inhibition of neuropeptide release by sensory afferent nerves.

  19. Cocaine and MDMA Induce Cellular and Molecular Changes in Adult Neurogenic Systems: Functional Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Capilla-Gonzalez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of the brain to generate new adult neurons is a recent discovery that challenges the old theory of an immutable adult brain. A new and fascinating field of research now focuses on this regenerative process. The two brain systems that constantly produce new adult neurons, known as the adult neurogenic systems, are the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the lateral ventricules/olfactory bulb system. Both systems are involved in memory and learning processes. Different drugs of abuse, such as cocaine and MDMA, have been shown to produce cellular and molecular changes that affect adult neurogenesis. This review summarizes the effects that these drugs have on the adult neurogenic systems. The functional relevance of adult neurogenesis is obscured by the functions of the systems that integrate adult neurons. Therefore, we explore the effects that cocaine and MDMA produce not only on adult neurogenesis, but also on the DG and olfactory bulbs. Finally, we discuss the possible role of new adult neurons in cocaine- and MDMA-induced impairments. We conclude that, although harmful drug effects are produced at multiple physiological and anatomical levels, the specific consequences of reduced hippocampus neurogenesis are unclear and require further exploration.

  20. Non-Traditional Management of the Neurogenic Bladder: Tissue Engineering and Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M. Lewis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with spina bifida and a neurogenic bladder have traditionally been managed with clean intermittent catheterization and pharmacotherapy in order to treat abnormal bladder wall dynamics, protect the upper urinary tract from damage, and achieve urinary continence. However, some patients will fail this therapy and require surgical reconstruction in the form of bladder augmentation surgery using reconfigured intestine or stomach to increase the bladder capacity while reducing the internal storage pressure. Despite functional success of bladder augmentation in achieving a low pressure reservoir, there are several associated complications of this operation and patients do not have the ability to volitionally void. For these reasons, alternative treatments have been sought. Two exciting alternative approaches that are currently being investigated are tissue engineering and neuromodulation. Tissue engineering aims to create new bladder tissue for replacement purposes with both “seeded” and “unseeded” technology. Advances in the fields of nanotechnology and stem cell biology have further enhanced these tissue engineering technologies. Neuromodulation therapies directly address the root of the problem in patients with spina bifida and a neurogenic bladder, namely the abnormal relationship between the nerves and the bladder wall. These therapies include transurethral bladder electrostimulation, sacral neuromodulation, and neurosurgical techniques such as selective sacral rhizotomy and artificial somatic-autonomic reflex pathway construction. This review will discuss both tissue engineering techniques and neuromodulation therapies in more detail including rationale, experimental data, current status of clinical application, and future direction.

  1. The treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with neurogenic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, William O.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) related to compromise of the nervous system is an increasingly common occurrence. This may be due to the multifactorial nature of ED, the myriad of disorders affecting the neurotransmission of erectogenic signals, and improved awareness and diagnosis of ED. Nevertheless, neurogenic ED remains poorly understood and characterized. Disease related factors such as depression, decreased physical and mental function, the burden of chronic illness, and loss of independence may preclude sexual intimacy and lead to ED as well. The amount of data regarding treatment options in subpopulations of differing neurologic disorders remains scarce except for men with spinal cord injury. The treatment options including phosphodiesterase inhibitors, intracavernosal or intraurethral vasoactive agents, vacuum erection devices (VED) and penile prosthetic implantation remain constant. This review discusses the options in specific neurologic conditions, and briefly provides insight into new and future developments that may reshape the management of neurogenic ED. PMID:26904415

  2. Effects of Radiation Therapy on Established Neurogenic Heterotopic Ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan Ho; Shim, Su Jung; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Hyuna; Kang, Youn Joo

    2016-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is frequently seen on rehabilitation units after spinal cord injuries, fractures, brain injuries, and limb amputations. Currently, there is no effective treatment for HO other than prophylaxis with anti-inflammatory medications, irradiation, and bisphosphonate administration. These prophylactic treatments are not effective for managing ectopic bone once it has formed. Here we describe three cases of established neurogenic HO treated with radiation therapy (RT). All patients had decreased serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone-specific ALP levels with decreased pain but increased range of motion immediately after RT. Post-treatment X-rays revealed no further growth of the HO. All patients maintained clinical and laboratory improvements 4 or 6 months after the RT. Our results suggest that RT is safe and effective in decreasing pain and activity of neurogenic HO.

  3. Surgical management of the neurogenic bladder and bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingin Gerald C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Spina bifida and myelodysplasia are associated with neurogenic abnormalities of the bladder and bowel function. All children with myelodysplasia require an evaluation of their urinary tract with ultrasound and urodynamics to confirm normal bladder and kidney function. Patients with anatomical and functional abnormalities require treatment, the mainstay being intermittent catheterization and anticholinergic medication. The treatment goals for patients with a neurogenic bladder are the preservation of the upper urinary tract, bladder and bowel continence, independence, autonomy, and facilitation of self-esteem. A minority of children will not respond to conservative therapy and will ultimately require surgical intervention. This review will discuss the surgical options for bladder augmentation, bladder neck reconstruction and closure, as well as the methods for the creation of continent catheterizable stomas. The timing, indications, and description for each procedure will be addressed. Finally, the antegrade continence enema procedure will be described for the management of refractory fecal incontinence.

  4. Spontaneous Bladder Perforation in an Infant Neurogenic Bladder: Laparoscopic Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cabezalí Barbancho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bladder perforation is an uncommon event in childhood. It is usually associated with bladder augmentation. We are presenting a case of bladder rupture in an infant with neurogenic bladder without prior bladder surgery. Three days after lipomyelomeningocele excision the patient showed signs and symptoms of acute abdomen. The ultrasound exploration revealed significant amount of intraperitoneal free fluid and therefore a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A posterior bladder rupture was diagnosed and repaired laparoscopically. Currently, being 3 years old, she keeps successfully dry with clean intermittent catheterization. Neurogenic bladder voiding function can change at any time of its evolution and lead to complications. Early diagnosis of spontaneous bladder rupture is of paramount importance, so it is essential to think about it in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen.

  5. Neurogenic contraction and relaxation of human penile deep dorsal vein

    OpenAIRE

    Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Domenech, Cristina; Martínez León, Juan B; Vila, José M.; Aldasoro, Martin; Lluch, Salvador

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize neurogenic and pharmacological responses of human penile deep dorsal vein and to determine whether the responses are mediated by nitric oxide from neural or endothelial origin.Ring segments of human penile deep dorsal vein were obtained from 22 multiorgan donors during procurement of organs for transplantation. The rings were suspended in organ bath chambers for isometric recording of tension. We then studied the contractile and relaxant respon...

  6. Sacral Fracture Causing Neurogenic Bladder: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaji, Tatsuro; Yamada, Noboru; Iwai, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    A 76-year-old man presented with a Denis Zone III sacral fracture after a traffic accident. He also developed urinary retention and perineal numbness. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by the sacral fracture. A computed tomogram (CT) revealed that third sacral lamina was fractured and displaced into the spinal canal, but vertebral body did not displace. The fracture lines began at the center of lamina and extended bilateraly. The fracture pattern was unique....

  7. [Autonomic provocative tests in the differential diagnostics of neurogenic syncope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bort, A A; Lar'kin, V I

    2014-01-01

    To study the autonomic provision of orthostatic test in patients with neurogenic syncope. We examined 70 patients, aged from 18 to 56 years. Autonomic response was recorded by means of the autonomic index - minute volume of blood. The most informative indices were the minute volume of blood in the translation in orthostasis, minute the maximum volume of blood in the first half of orthostasis, the average minute volume of blood in the first half of the orthostasis.

  8. Peripheral tumor and tumor-like neurogenic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Evandro [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Aubert, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.aubert@chru-lille.fr [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie-Pathologie, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Wavreille, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.wavreille@chru-lille.fr [Service d’Orthopédie B, Hôpital R Salengro, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Gheno, Ramon; Canella, Clarissa [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Cotten, Anne, E-mail: anne.cotten@chru-lille.fr [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neoplasms of neurogenic origin account for about 12% of all benign and 8% of all malignant soft tissue neoplasms. Traumatic neuroma, Morton neuroma, lipomatosis of a nerve, nerve sheath ganglion, perineurioma, benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) are included in this group of pathologies. Clinical and radiologic evaluation of patients with neurogenic tumors and pseudotumors often reveals distinctive features. In this context, advanced imaging techniques, especially ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) play an important role in the characterization of these lesions. Imaging findings such as location of a soft tissue mass in the region of a major nerve, nerve entering or exiting the mass, fusiform shape, abnormalities of the muscle supplied by the nerve, split-fat sign, target sign and fascicular appearance should always evoke a peripheric nerve sheath neoplasm. Although no single imaging finding or combination of findings allows definitive differentiation between benign from malign peripheric neurogenic tumors, both US and MR imaging may show useful features that can lead us to a correct diagnosis and improve patient treatment. Traumatic neuromas and Morton neuromas are commonly associated to an amputation stump or are located in the intermetatarsal space. Lipomatosis of a nerve usually appears as a nerve enlargement, with thickened nerve fascicles, embedded in evenly distributed fat. Nerve sheath ganglion has a cystic appearance and commonly occurs at the level of the knee. Intraneural perineuroma usually affects young people and manifests as a focal and fusiform nerve enlargement. In this article, we review clinical characteristics and radiologic appearances of these neurogenic lesions, observing pathologic correlation, when possible.

  9. In silico Therapeutics for Neurogenic Hypertension and Vasovagal Syncope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojić, Tijana; Perović, Vladimir R.; Glišić, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Neurocardiovascular diseases (NCVD) are the leading cause of death in the developed world and will remain so till 2020. In these diseases the pathologically changed nervous control of cardiovascular system has the central role. The actual NCV syndromes are neurogenic hypertension, representing the sympathetically mediated disorder, and vasovagal syncope, which is the vagally mediated disorders. Vasovagal syncope, the disease far from its etiological treatment, could benefit from recruiting and application of antimuscarinic drugs used in other parasympathetic disorders. The informational spectrum method (ISM), a method widely applied for the characterization of protein-protein interactions in the field of immunology, endocrinology and anti HIV drug discovery, was applied for the first time in the analysis of neurogenic hypertension and vasovagal syncope therapeutic targets. In silico analysis revealed the potential involvement of apelin in neurogenic hypertension. Applying the EIIP/ISM bioinformatics concept in investigation of drugs for treatment of vasovagal syncope suggests that 78% of tested antimuscarinic drugs could have anti vasovagal syncope effect. The presented results confirm that ISM is a promissing method for investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying pathophysiological proceses of NCV syndromes and discovery of therapeutics targets for their treatment. PMID:26834545

  10. Long-term functional outcome in patients with neurogenic dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, G; Prosiegel, M; Yassouridis, A

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective cohort study was: (1) to document and investigate long-term post-treatment outcome focusing on swallowing disability; and (2) to reveal variables predicting successful functional follow-up results in 63 patients with neurogenic dysphagia. All patients were admitted to an inpatient neurologic rehabilitation unit. Information was gathered through chart review and questionnaires. Functional outcome was categorized according to the degree of feeding status: (1) total tube feeding; (2) oral and tube feeding combined; (3) oral feeding with compensation; and (4) total oral feeding. 'Improvement' was determined as a positive shift in the type of feeding, 'deterioration' as a negative shift and 'no change' was defined as remaining at the same nutritional level. The safety of feeding was assessed by tracking the occurrence of pneumonia. Seventy percent of the patients achieved an improved immediate outcome after therapy. During long-term follow-up examinations, 43% of all patients showed further improvement, 57% did not show any change in their feeding ability and no deterioration was reported for any patient. Comparisons of the relative frequencies of the feeding modalities before and after therapy revealed a significant reduction in tube feeders and a significant increase in oral feeders with compensation during inpatient-treatment. The outpatient-interval showed a significant shift in total oral feeders without compensations but no significant improvement within the tube feeders and within the partial oral feeders. The improvement in nutritional status was not associated with an increased risk of pneumonia. Additional comparisons of the relative frequencies of the compensatory strategies indicated a significant reduction in all treatment techniques at final follow-up. Using logistic regression, predictors of successful post-discharge outcome involved a decreasing pre-treatment interval and unexpectedly low Barthel-ADL mobility scores. As a

  11. Survey of spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder studies using the Web of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Benjing; Zhang, Yongli; Li, Yucheng; Wang, Zantao; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiyin; Wang, Bingdong; Long, Zhixin; Wang, Feng; Song, Guo; Wang, Yan

    2012-08-15

    To identify global trends in research on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder, through a bibliometric analysis using the Web of Science. We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder using the Web of Science. Data retrieval was performed using key words "spinal cord injury", "spinal injury", "neurogenic bladder", "neuropathic bladder", "neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction", "neurogenic voiding dysfunction", "neurogenic urination disorder" and "neurogenic vesicourethral dysfunction". (a) published peer-reviewed articles on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: no limitation. (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers and book chapters. (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to journals; (3) distribution according to subject areas; (4) distribution according to country; (5) distribution according to institution; and (6) top cited publications. There were 646 research articles addressing spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder in the Web of Science. Research on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder was found in the Science Citation Index-Expanded as of 1946. The United States, Ireland and Switzerland were the three major countries contributing to studies in spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder in the 1970s. However, in the 1990s, the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Germany and Japan published more papers on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder than Switzerland, and Ireland fell off the top ten countries list. In this century, the United States ranks first in spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder studies, followed by France, the United Kingdom, Germany, Switzerland and Japan. Subject categories including urology, nephrology and clinical neurology, as well as

  12. Curative effect assessment of bandage contact lens in neurogenic keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Zhao Sun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the curative effect of bandage contact lens in neurogenic keratitis.METHODS:Twenty cases of neurogenic keratitis were studied attheDepartment of Ophthalmology, the first Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, between October 2012 and June 2013. These included 13 males and 7 females, aged from 35 to 88y. Patients were voluntarily divided into an experimental group (lens wearing group, n=10 and control group (drug therapy, n=10. In experimental group patients wore silicone hydrogel bandage soft contact lens. Both groups used the following eyedrops:0.5% levofloxacin TID; 0.5% Sodium carboxymethyl cellulose QID; fibroblast growth factor BID; ganciclovir BID [cases complicated with herpes simplex virus (HSV]; compound tropicamide BID (cases concurrent hypopyon. The healing time of corneal ulcer and complication rates were observed in the two groups.RESULTS: The healing time of corneal ulcer in the experimental group was 10.80±4.44d versus 46.70±13.88d in the control group (P<0.05. No complications occurred in the experimental group, except for the lens falling off twice in one case, the patient recovered eight days after rewearing the lens. While in the control group, all cases vascularized, 2 cases were complicated with descemetocele that recovered with amniotic membrane transplantation and 1 case was complicated with corneal perforation that recovered by autologous conjunctival flap covering.CONCLUSION: Bandage contact lens is a safe and effective method of treating neurogenic keratitis and significantly shortened the healing time of corneal ulcer.

  13. Clinical and Treatment Features of Orbital Neurogenic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Bingöl Kızıltunç

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and treatment features of orbital neurogenic tumors. Material and Method: The records of 35 patients with orbital neurogenic tumors who were diagnosed and treated at Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, between 1998 and 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Orbitotomy via a cutaneous approach was performed in 21 (60% cases and orbitotomy via a transconjunctival approach was performed in 7 (20% cases. Three (8% cases had been operated at different centers. Four (12% cases were diagnosed clinically. Total excisional biopsy was performed in 11 (31.4% cases, subtotal excisional biopsy was performed in 7 (20%, and incisional biopsy was performed in 10 (28.6% cases. 14 (40% 35 cases were diagnosed as meningioma, 12 (34% as peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and 9 (26% cases were diagnosed as optic nerve glioma. Six (43% meningioma cases were optic nerve sheath meningioma, 5 (36% were sphenoid wing meningioma, 2 (14% were ectopic meningioma, and 1 (7% was perisellar meningioma. Six (50% of peripheral nerve sheath tumors were schwannoma, 2 (16% were solitary neurofibroma, 4 (34% were plexiform neurofibroma. External beam radiotherapy was performed in 15 (42.8% cases, cyberknife radiosurgery in 1 (2.8% , chemotherapy in 1 (2.8%, and enucleation ( because of neovascular glaucoma and vitreous hemorrhage was performed in 1 (2.8% case. Discussion: The most common orbital neurogenic tumors are meningioma, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and optic nerve glioma. For meningioma and glioma, external beam radiotherapy is required; for schwannoma and solitary neurofibroma, total excisional biopsy is the preferred treatment. The success of visual and anatomic results are high after treatment. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 335-9

  14. Neurogenic mucosal bicarbonate secretion in guinea pig duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, G; Fang, X; Wang, G D; Liu, S; Wang, X Y; Xia, Y; Wood, J D

    2013-02-01

    To test a hypothesis that: (i) duodenal pH and osmolarity are individually controlled at constant set points by negative feedback control centred in the enteric nervous system (ENS); (ii) the purinergic P2Y(1) receptor subtype is expressed by non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons, which represent the final common excitatory pathway from the ENS to the bicarbonate secretory glands. Ussing chamber and pH-stat methods investigated involvement of the P2Y(1) receptor in neurogenic stimulation of mucosal bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) secretion in guinea pig duodenum. ATP increased HCO(3)(-) secretion with an EC(50) of 160 nM. MRS2179, a selective P2Y(1) purinergic receptor antagonist, suppressed ATP-evoked HCO(3)(-) secretion by 47% and Cl(-) secretion by 63%. Enteric neuronal blockade by tetrodotoxin or exposure to a selective vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, VPAC(1)) receptor antagonist suppressed ATP-evoked HCO(3)(-) secretion by 61 and 41%, respectively, and Cl- by 97 and 70% respectively. Pretreatment with the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine did not alter ATP-evoked HCO3(-) or Cl(-) secretion. Whereas acid directly stimulates the mucosa to release ATP and stimulate HCO(3)(-) secretion in a cytoprotective manner, neurogenically evoked HCO(3)(-) secretion accounts for feedback control of optimal luminal pH for digestion. ATP stimulates duodenal HCO(3)(-) secretion through an excitatory action at purinergic P2Y(1) receptors on neurons in the submucosal division of the ENS. Stimulation of the VIPergic non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons, which are one of three classes of secretomotor neurons, accounts for most, if not all, of the neurogenic secretory response evoked by ATP. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. A One Year Prospective Study of Neurogenic Stuttering Following Stroke: Incidence and Co-Occurring Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theys, C.; van Wieringen, A.; Sunaert, S.; Thijs, V.; De Nil, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study, data on incidence, stuttering characteristics, co-occurring speech disorders, and recovery of neurogenic stuttering in a large sample of stroke participants were assessed. Following stroke onset, 17 of 319 participants (5.3%; 95% CI, 3.2-8.3) met the criteria for neurogenic stuttering. Stuttering persisted in at least…

  16. Programmed hyperphagia in offspring of obese dams: Altered expression of hypothalamic nutrient sensors, neurogenic factors and epigenetic modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mina; Han, Guang; Ross, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Maternal overnutrition results in programmed offspring obesity, mediated in part, by hyperphagia. This is remarkably similar to the effects of maternal undernutrition on offspring hyperphagia and obesity. In view of the marked differences in the energy environment of the over and under-nutrition exposures, we studied the expression of select epigenetic modifiers associated with energy imbalance including neurogenic factors and appetite/satiety neuropeptides which are indicative of neurogenic differentiation. HF offspring were exposed to maternal overnutrition (high fat diet; HF) during pregnancy and lactation. We determined the protein expression of energy sensors (mTOR, pAMPK), epigenetic factors (DNA methylase, DNMT1; histone deacetylase, SIRT1/HDAC1), neurogenic factors (Hes1, Mash1, Ngn3) and appetite/satiety neuropeptides (AgRP/POMC) in newborn hypothalamus and adult arcuate nucleus (ARC). Despite maternal obesity, male offspring born to obese dams had similar body weight at birth as Controls. However, when nursed by the same dams, male offspring of obese dams exhibited marked adiposity. At 1 day of age, HF newborn males had significantly decreased energy sensors, DNMT1 including Hes1 and Mash1, which may impact neuroprogenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. This is consistent with increased AgRP in HF newborns. At 6 months of age, HF adult males had significantly increased energy sensors and decreased histone deactylases. In addition, the persistent decreased Hes1, Mash1 as well as Ngn3 are consistent with increased AgRP and decreased POMC. Thus, altered energy sensors and epigenetic responses which modulate gene expression and adult neuronal differentiation may contribute to hyperphagia and obesity in HF male offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neurogenic muscle hypertrophy in a 12-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutelija Fattorini, Matija; Gagro, Alenka; Dapic, Tomislav; Krakar, Goran; Marjanovic, Josip

    2017-01-01

    Muscular hypertrophy secondary to denervation is very rare, but well-documented phenomena in adults. This is the first report of a child with neurogenic unilateral hypertrophy due to S1 radiculopathy. A 12-year-old girl presented with left calf hypertrophy and negative history of low back pain or trauma. The serum creatinine kinase level and inflammatory markers were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging showed muscle hypertrophy of the left gastrocnemius and revealed a protruded lumbar disc at the L5-S1 level. The protruded disc abuts the S1 root on the left side. Electromyography showed mild left S1 radiculopathy. Passive stretching and work load might clarify the origin of neurogenic hypertrophy but there is still a need for further evidence. Clinical, laboratory, magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography findings showed that S1 radiculopathy could be a cause of unilateral calf swelling in youth even in the absence of a history of back or leg pain. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-Neurogenic Language Disorders: A Preliminary Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Mario F

    Few publications deal with non-neurogenic language disorders (NNLDs), distinct from psychogenic speech disorders such as psychogenic dysphonia or stuttering. NNLDs are alterations in language owing to psychosomatic preoccupations, conversion disorder, psychiatric disorders, or other psychological reasons. To identify and classify the range of NNLDs and their characteristics. This review summarizes the literature on disturbances in language, broadly defined as the use of symbols for communication, which may have a psychogenic or psychiatric etiology. The literature suggests a classification for NNLDs that includes psychogenic aphasia with dysgrammatism; psychogenic "lalias" including oxylalia and agitolalia, palilalia and echolalia, xenolalia, glossolalia, and coprolalia; psychologically-mediated word usage; psychotic language; and psychogenic forms of the foreign accent syndrome. Clinicians and researchers have insufficiently emphasized the presence of NNLDs, their characteristics, and their identification. Yet, these disorders may be the first or predominant manifestation of a psychologically-mediated illness. There are 2 steps to recognition. The first is to know how to distinguish NNLDs from the manifestations of neurogenic language impairments after a neurological evaluation. The second step is awareness of specific associated and examination features that suggest the presence of a NNLD. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurogenic gene regulatory pathways in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng; Angerer, Lynne M; Angerer, Robert C

    2016-01-15

    During embryogenesis the sea urchin early pluteus larva differentiates 40-50 neurons marked by expression of the pan-neural marker synaptotagmin B (SynB) that are distributed along the ciliary band, in the apical plate and pharyngeal endoderm, and 4-6 serotonergic neurons that are confined to the apical plate. Development of all neurons has been shown to depend on the function of Six3. Using a combination of molecular screens and tests of gene function by morpholino-mediated knockdown, we identified SoxC and Brn1/2/4, which function sequentially in the neurogenic regulatory pathway and are also required for the differentiation of all neurons. Misexpression of Brn1/2/4 at low dose caused an increase in the number of serotonin-expressing cells and at higher dose converted most of the embryo to a neurogenic epithelial sphere expressing the Hnf6 ciliary band marker. A third factor, Z167, was shown to work downstream of the Six3 and SoxC core factors and to define a branch specific for the differentiation of serotonergic neurons. These results provide a framework for building a gene regulatory network for neurogenesis in the sea urchin embryo. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Frozen-thawed rhesus sperm retain normal morphology and highly progressive motility but exhibit sharply reduced efficiency in penetrating cervical mucus and hyaluronic acid gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollner, Theodore L; Dong, Qiaoxiang; VandeVoort, Catherine A

    2011-02-01

    The preservation of the genetic diversity of captive populations of rhesus monkeys is critical to the future of biomedical research. Cryopreservation of rhesus macaque sperm is relatively simple to perform, yields high post-thaw motility, and theoretically, provides via artificial insemination (AI) a way to easily transfer genetics among colonies of animals. In the interest of optimizing semen cryopreservation methods for use with vaginal AI, we evaluated the ability of frozen-thawed rhesus sperm to penetrate periovulatory cervical mucus (CM). Motile sperm concentration of pre-freeze ("fresh") and post-thawed ("thawed") samples from five different males were normalized for both computer assisted sperm motion analysis and CM penetration experiments. Sperm samples were deposited into slide chambers containing CM or gel composed of hyaluronic acid (HA) as a surrogate for CM and numbers of sperm were recorded as they entered a video field a preset distance from the sperm suspension-CM (or HA) interface. Fresh and thawed sperm were dried on glass slides, "Pap"-stained, and assessed for changes in head dimensions and head and flagellar shape. While retaining better than 80% of fresh sperm progressive motility, thawed sperm from the same ejaculate retained on average only 18.6% of the CM penetration ability. Experiments using HA gel yielded similar results only with reduced experimental error and thus improved detection of treatment differences. Neither the percentage of abnormal forms nor head dimensions differed between fresh and thawed sperm. While findings suggests that sperm-CM interaction is a prominent factor in previous failures of vaginal AI with cryopreserved macaque sperm, neither sperm motility nor morphology appears to account for changes in the ability of cryopreserved sperm to penetrate CM. Our data points to a previously unidentified manifestation of cryodamage which may have implications for assessment of sperm function beyond the cervix and across

  1. Formulation and validation of a reduced order model of 2D materials exhibiting a two-phase microstructure as applied to graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Ivano; Nguyen, Hoang; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A.; Gao, Wei; Mao, Lily; Ghasemi, Arman; Wen, Jianguo; Nguyen, SonBinh; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2018-03-01

    Novel 2D materials, e.g., graphene oxide (GO), are attractive building blocks in the design of advanced materials due to their reactive chemistry, which can enhance interfacial interactions while providing good in-plane mechanical properties. Recent studies have hypothesized that the randomly distributed two-phase microstructure of GO, which arises due to its oxidized chemistry, leads to differences in nano- vs meso‑scale mechanical responses. However, this effect has not been carefully studied using molecular dynamics due to computational limitations. Herein, a continuum mechanics model, formulated based on density functional based tight binding (DFTB) constitutive results for GO nano-flakes, is establish for capturing the effect of oxidation patterns on the material mechanical properties. GO is idealized as a continuum heterogeneous two-phase material, where the mechanical response of each phase, graphitic and oxidized, is informed from DFTB simulations. A finite element implementation of the model is validated via MD simulations and then used to investigate the existence of GO representative volume elements (RVE). We find that for the studied GO, an RVE behavior arises for monolayer sizes in excess to 40 nm. Moreover, we reveal that the response of monolayers with two main different functional chemistries, epoxide-rich and hydroxyl‑rich, present distinct differences in mechanical behavior. In addition, we explored the role of defect density in GO, and validate the applicability of the model to larger length scales by predicting membrane deflection behavior, in close agreement with previous experimental and theoretical observations. As such the work presents a reduced order modeling framework applicable in the study of mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms in 2D multiphase materials.

  2. Holstein-Friesian calves selected for divergence in residual feed intake during growth exhibited significant but reduced residual feed intake divergence in their first lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, K A; Pryce, J E; Spelman, R J; Davis, S R; Wales, W J; Waghorn, G C; Williams, Y J; Marett, L C; Hayes, B J

    2014-03-01

    Residual feed intake (RFI), as a measure of feed conversion during growth, was estimated for around 2,000 growing Holstein-Friesian heifer calves aged 6 to 9 mo in New Zealand and Australia, and individuals from the most and least efficient deciles (low and high RFI phenotypes) were retained. These animals (78 New Zealand cows, 105 Australian cows) were reevaluated during their first lactation to determine if divergence for RFI observed during growth was maintained during lactation. Mean daily body weight (BW) gain during assessment as calves had been 0.86 and 1.15 kg for the respective countries, and the divergence in RFI between most and least efficient deciles for growth was 21% (1.39 and 1.42 kg of dry matter, for New Zealand and Australia, respectively). At the commencement of evaluation during lactation, the cows were aged 26 to 29 mo. All were fed alfalfa and grass cubes; it was the sole diet in New Zealand, whereas 6 kg of crushed wheat/d was also fed in Australia. Measurements of RFI during lactation occurred for 34 to 37 d with measurements of milk production (daily), milk composition (2 to 3 times per week), BW and BW change (1 to 3 times per week), as well as body condition score (BCS). Daily milk production averaged 13.8 kg for New Zealand cows and 20.0 kg in Australia. No statistically significant differences were observed between calf RFI decile groups for dry matter intake, milk production, BW change, or BCS; however a significant difference was noted between groups for lactating RFI. Residual feed intake was about 3% lower for lactating cows identified as most efficient as growing calves, and no negative effects on production were observed. These results support the hypothesis that calves divergent for RFI during growth are also divergent for RFI when lactating. The causes for this reduced divergence need to be investigated to ensure that genetic selection programs based on low RFI (better efficiency) are robust. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy

  3. Neurogenic claudication secondary to degenerative spondylolisthesis: is fusion always necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, W J; Mohamed, Mohamed; Bhojak, Manesh; Wilby, Martin

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the efficacy and long-term safety of a midline sparing decompression for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). We specifically looked at the rate of re-operation with a lumbar fusion. Of the patients that did require a secondary fusion procedure, we examined retrospectively any risk factors (both clinical and radiological) that could have been identified pre-operatively to predict the necessity of a primary fusion procedure. Data was collected prospectively within a single surgeon practice at our institution. All patients had a diagnosis of neurogenic claudication secondary to DS. Radiological and clinical risk factors that could have predicted the requirement of a fusion procedure were retrospectively analysed. This is a study of 70 patients (46F:24M). The median age at surgery was 68 years. All patients had a diagnosis of neurogenic claudication and were treated with a mid-line sparing decompression. Following the primary procedure, patients' VAS and ODI scores for both leg and back pain improved significantly both at short-term follow-up (mean seven months) and sustained at long-term follow-up (range 16-57 months, mean 33 months; p < 0.0001 Wilcoxon matched pair ranks). Eight (11%) patients had symptom progression and required a further fusion procedure. We found that if on the pre-operative MRI, the patient had a facet joint angle of greater than 60°, and a preserved disc height (greater than 7 mm) this would increase the likelihood of the requirement for fusion. Of the patients that required a secondary fusion procedure, 6/8 patients (75%) had sagittal facets, hyperlordosis and a preserved disc height pre-operatively. A primary decompression using a midline sparing osteotomy is an effective procedure for the treatment of neurogenic claudication caused by DS. The second message is that on inspection of the pre-operative imaging, sagittally placed facet joints, a hyperlordosis and a preserved disc height then a fusion

  4. Bibliometric profile of neurogenic bladder in the literature: a 20-year bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Qu, Bo; Shen, Yan; Su, Xiao-Jing; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Xue-Mei; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Pi, Hong-Ying

    2015-05-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a dysfunction of the lower urinary tract caused by nervous system disorder. We investigated the trends in publication of articles under the topic "neurogenic bladder" using bibliometric analysis. Articles on neurogenic bladder, published between 1995 and 2014, were retrieved from the ISI Web of Science citation database. We analyzed the search results for authors, countries, institutions, journals, and top-cited papers. A total of 1,904 articles were retrieved. There was a small increase in the number of articles on neurogenic bladder from 1995 (n = 43) to 2014 (n = 117). The USA was the leading country in the total number of articles (n = 598). However, the number of publications from China has rapidly increased, and China was ranked second in 2014. Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler (n = 65) was the most productive author, and University of Paris VI (Paris 6) (n = 61) was the most productive institution. The Journal of Urology published the greatest number of articles on this topic (n = 285). Articles on neurogenic bladder were often published in a professional journal under the category Urology & Nephrology, Neurosciences & Neurology, or Rehabilitation. Visualization analysis based on co-citation networks was conducted using CiteSpace III. Visualization analysis revealed that the hot spots in neurogenic bladder were botulinum toxin-A, prazosin, bethanechol, and afferent pathways. These findings provide new insight into the publication trends and hot spots in neurogenic bladder.

  5. Bibliometric profile of neurogenic bladder in the literature: a 20-year bibliometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic bladder is a dysfunction of the lower urinary tract caused by nervous system disorder. We investigated the trends in publication of articles under the topic "neurogenic bladder" using bibliometric analysis. Articles on neurogenic bladder, published between 1995 and 2014, were retrieved from the ISI Web of Science citation database. We analyzed the search results for authors, countries, institutions, journals, and top-cited papers. A total of 1,904 articles were retrieved. There was a small increase in the number of articles on neurogenic bladder from 1995 (n = 43 to 2014 (n = 117. The USA was the leading country in the total number of articles (n = 598. However, the number of publications from China has rapidly increased, and China was ranked second in 2014. Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler (n = 65 was the most productive author, and University of Paris VI (Paris 6 (n = 61 was the most productive institution. The Journal of Urology published the greatest number of articles on this topic (n = 285. Articles on neurogenic bladder were often published in a professional journal under the category Urology & Nephrology, Neurosciences & Neurology, or Rehabilitation. Visualization analysis based on co-citation networks was conducted using CiteSpace III. Visualization analysis revealed that the hot spots in neurogenic bladder were botulinum toxin-A, prazosin, bethanechol, and afferent pathways. These findings provide new insight into the publication trends and hot spots in neurogenic bladder.

  6. Long-term effects of repeated intradetrusor botulinum neurotoxin A injections on detrusor function in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Jürgen; Göcking, Konrad; Bersch, Ulf

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of repeated botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) treatments on detrusor function in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (DOA) due to spinal cord lesions. In a retrospective study, urodynamic evaluations of 27 consecutive patients with neurogenic DOA due to spinal cord lesions who received at least five BoNT-A treatments were analysed. After the first BoNT-A treatment, bladder capacity, reflex volume, continence status and detrusor compliance were significantly improved and maximum detrusor pressure (P(detmax)) was significantly reduced. The mean number of BoNT-A treatments was 7.1. Compared with the results of the first treatment, the incontinence rate (seven patients) and the number of patients with an elevated P(detmax) (five patients) were slightly increased after the final BoNT-A treatment. The long-term success rate was 74%. Every fourth patient needed a major surgical intervention. There was a significant decrease in P(detmax) before BoNT-A treatments, indicating that detrusor contraction strength did not completely recover after treatment. Our study confirmed the long-term efficacy of repeated BoNT-A treatments in patients with neurogenic DOA. However, in long-term follow-up, every fourth patient required surgical interventions. Moreover, our data give the first hint that BoNT-A may lead to impaired detrusor contraction strength, which could influence future treatment options. Prospective studies are necessary to elucidate the impact of repeated BoNT-A treatments on detrusor function and the interactions with future treatment options.

  7. Endobronchial neurogenic tumor: A combination of traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Tandon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic neuromas are uncommon and benign lesions arising from a peripheral nerve injury during surgery. Here we describe a case with histopathologic features of both a traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma in a patient without integumentary physical exam findings nor prior surgical history. A 54 year old male was admitted for surgical debridement of a foot ulcer. During pre-operative evaluation and review of imaging multiple CT scans revealed a stable, 4 mm endobronchial lesion in the left lower lobe. Given history of nicotine abuse, bronchoscopy was performed. Bronchoscopy showed a pearly, polypoid lesion. Histopathological results showed strong positivity for S-100 protein and spindle cell proliferation. Repeat CT chest showed no new lesions in the bronchial tree. The rarity of this case is noted not only by the limited number of bronchial neurogenic tumors, but the combined features in this case of a traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma which has not been described.

  8. Sacral Fracture Causing Neurogenic Bladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Sasaji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old man presented with a Denis Zone III sacral fracture after a traffic accident. He also developed urinary retention and perineal numbness. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by the sacral fracture. A computed tomogram (CT revealed that third sacral lamina was fractured and displaced into the spinal canal, but vertebral body did not displace. The fracture lines began at the center of lamina and extended bilateraly. The fracture pattern was unique. The sacrum was osteoporosis, and this fracture may be based on osteoporosis. We performed laminectomy to decompress sacral nerve roots. One month after surgery, the patient was able to urinate. Three months after surgery, his bladder function recovered normally. One year after surgery, he returned to a normal daily life and had no complaints regarding urination. One-year postoperative CT showed the decompressed third sacrum without displacement.

  9. Neurogenic cardiomyopathy in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesdangsakonwut, S; Sunden, Y; Yamada, K; Nishizono, A; Sawa, H; Umemura, T

    2015-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies have been rarely described in rabbits. Here we report myocardial necrosis of the ventricular wall in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies. Myocardial lesions were found only in rabbits with brain lesions, and the severity of the cardiac lesions was proportional to that of the brain lesions. Neither the frequency nor the cumulative dose of anesthesia was related to the incidence or the severity of the myocardial lesions. The myocardial lesions were characterized by degeneration and/or necrosis of myocardial cells and were accompanied by contraction band necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The brain lesions due to rabies virus infection were most prominent in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, brainstem, and medulla. Rabies virus antigen was not found in the hearts of any rabbits. Based on these findings, the myocardial lesions were classified as neurogenic cardiomyopathy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K N Stamatiou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination.

  11. Britain exhibition at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin; CERN PhotoLab

    1969-01-01

    The United Kingdom inaugurated the Industrial Exhibitions in 1968, and it wasn't till 1971 that other countries staged exhibitions at CERN. This photo was taken in 1969, at the second British exhibition, where 16 companies were present.

  12. Selective Deletion of the Brain-Specific Isoform of Renin Causes Neurogenic Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Keisuke; Liu, Xuebo; Morgan, Donald A; Davis, Deborah R; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Cassell, Martin D; Grobe, Justin L; Rahmouni, Kamal; Sigmund, Curt D

    2016-12-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is a critical determinant of blood pressure, but the mechanisms regulating RAS activity in the brain remain unclear. Expression of brain renin (renin-b) occurs from an alternative promoter-first exon. The predicted translation product is a nonsecreted enzymatically active renin whose function is unknown. We generated a unique mouse model by selectively ablating the brain-specific isoform of renin (renin-b) while preserving the expression and function of the classical isoform expressed in the kidney (renin-a). Preservation of renal renin was confirmed by measurements of renin gene expression and immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, renin-b-deficient mice exhibited hypertension, increased sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney and heart, and impaired baroreflex sensitivity. Whereas these mice displayed decreased circulating RAS activity, there was a paradoxical increase in brain RAS activity. Physiologically, renin-b-deficient mice exhibited an exaggerated depressor response to intracerebroventricular administration of losartan, captopril, or aliskiren. At the molecular level, renin-b-deficient mice exhibited increased expression of angiotensin-II type 1 receptor in the paraventricular nucleus, which correlated with an increased renal sympathetic nerve response to leptin, which was dependent on angiotensin-II type 1 receptor activity. Interestingly, despite an ablation of renin-b expression, expression of renin-a was significantly increased in rostral ventrolateral medulla. These data support a new paradigm for the genetic control of RAS activity in the brain by a coordinated regulation of the renin isoforms, with expression of renin-b tonically inhibiting expression of renin-a under baseline conditions. Impairment of this control mechanism causes neurogenic hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Early treatment improves urodynamic prognosis in neurogenic voiding dysfunction: 20 years of experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia M. Costa Monteiro

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Treatment onset within the first year of life improves urodynamic prognosis in patients with neurogenic bladder and triplicates the probability of urodynamic improvement in two years. The role of neonatologists and pediatricians in early referral is extremely important.

  14. [Comparative analysis of the potentiative effect of noradrenaline on the neurogenic vasoconstriction diminished by various factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iartsev, V N; Karachentsev, O V; Dvoretskiĭ, D P

    2015-01-01

    The effect of 0.03-1.0 μM noradrenaline on the neurogenic response to electrical field stimulation of the juvenile rat tail artery segment in control conditions, after cooling from 36 to 25 degrees C, and after solution pH decrease from 7.4 to 6.6 was studied. Noradrenaline was shown to potentiate neurogenic vasoconstriction diminished by low temperature or low pH. Decrease in neurogenic vasoconstriction being equal, low dose noradrenaline was most effective at low temperature and high dose noradrenaline was most effective at low pH. 1.0 μM noradrenaline was equally effective in both cases. Increase in the neurogenic tone of the rat tail artery evoked by noradrenaline at low temperature and acidosis may contribute to decrease in heat emission at low ambient temperature in vivo.

  15. Surgical treatment of neurogenic stress urinary incontinence: A systematic review of quality assessment and surgical outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farag, F.; Koens, M.J.; Sievert, K.D.; Ridder, D. de; Feitz, W.; Heesakkers, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are many opinions but little firm knowledge about the optimal treatment of neurogenic stress urinary incontinence (NSUI). OBJECTIVE: To scrutinize the quality and surgical outcomes of the available treatment modalities in the published literature. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A systematic

  16. Usefulness of classical homoeopathy for the prevention of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Pannek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to Spinal Cord Injury (SCI, recurrent Urinary Tract Infections (UTI, is a frequently encountered clinical problem. Often, conventional preventive measures are not successful. Aims: To treat the patients of SCI suffering from recurrent UTI with classical homoeopathy as add-on to standard urologic care. Materials and Methods: After exclusion of morphological abnormalities and initiation of a standard regime for prophylaxis, all patients with a neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to SCI, with more than three symptomatic UTI/year, were offered additional homoeopathic care. Symptoms were fever, incontinence, increased spasticity, decreased bladder capacity or pain/decreased general health combined with significant bacteriuria. Descriptive statistics was used for analysis. Results: Eight patients were followed up for a median period of 15 months. Five patients remained free of UTI, whereas UTI frequency was reduced in three patients. Conclusion: Our initial experience with homoeopathic prevention of UTI as add on to standard urologic prophylactic measures is encouraging. For an evidence-based evaluation of this concept, prospective studies are required. Keys for the positive outcome of this case series are co-operation of well-qualified partners, mutual respect and the motivation to co-operate closely.

  17. Event driven electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve for management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjorback, Morten Voss; Rijkhoff, Nico; Petersen, Thor; Nohr, Mads; Sinkjaer, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of automatic event driven electrical stimulation on the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve for management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients suffering from Multiple Sclerosis. A total of 10 patients participated in the study. Detrusor pressure was recorded during physiological filling of the bladder and electrical stimulation was applied with surface electrodes whenever the detrusor pressure exceeded 10 cm H(2)O. In seven of the eight patients, where neurogenic detrusor overactivity was observed an average of 12 detrusor contractions could be inhibited by stimulation. In one patient, however, stimulation failed to inhibit the detrusor contractions. The average increase in bladder volume from first suppressed detrusor contraction until leakage was 94% (range: 22-366%). On average, the time from first suppressed contraction until leakage was 15 min and 50 sec (range: 4 min 58 sec-32 min 5 sec) with an average physiological filling rate of 8 ml/min. Urgency was effectively suppressed at the onset of stimulation. The results indicate that involuntary detrusor contractions in patients with multiple sclerosis can effectively be inhibited with event driven stimulation, hereby improving bladder capacity and reducing the number of incontinence episodes. However, the used method for detecting detrusor contractions is not suitable in a chronic setting and alternative techniques needs to be investigated if stimulation should be applied automatically.

  18. Effects of electrotherapy in treatment of neurogenic bladder in children with occult spinal dysraphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirović Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neurogenic bladder can develop as a result of various degrees of neurogenic lesion in spina bifida. The degree of bladder dysfunction depends on the level and type of spina bifida. Due to results upon complete diagnostic protocols, treatment options are applied. Objective Comparison of therapy results of patients with occult spinal dysraphism with neurogenic bladder that under-went medicamentous therapy and medicamentous with electrotherapy treatment. Methods We had 49 patients with neurogenic bladder that were treated at the University Children's Hospital in Belgrade in the period 2003-2008. The first group of children received medicamentous therapy and the second group received medicamentous therapy with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation. In both groups we evaluated 4 symptoms: daily enuresis, enuresis nocturna, urgency and frequency and 4 urodynamic parameters: lower bladder capacity, unstable contractions and residual urine and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia. Follow-up urodynamic evaluation was done after 3, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results Our findings pointed out a high statistical significance of improvement in all evaluated urodynamic parameters of neurogenic bladder (predominantly in bladder capacity in the group of children with combined therapy as well in resolution of symptoms (predominantly enuresis nocturna, urgency and frequency. Conclusion Combined therapy is more efficient in treatment of children with neurogenic bladder. Electrotherapy is non-invasive, easily applicable and has had a significant place in treatment of children with dysfunctional voiding.

  19. Neurogenic contraction and relaxation of human penile deep dorsal vein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Domenech, Cristina; Martínez León, Juan B; Vila, José M; Aldasoro, Martin; Lluch, Salvador

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize neurogenic and pharmacological responses of human penile deep dorsal vein and to determine whether the responses are mediated by nitric oxide from neural or endothelial origin.Ring segments of human penile deep dorsal vein were obtained from 22 multiorgan donors during procurement of organs for transplantation. The rings were suspended in organ bath chambers for isometric recording of tension. We then studied the contractile and relaxant responses to electrical field stimulation and to vasoactive agents.Electrical field stimulation (0.5–2 Hz) and noradrenaline (3×10−10–3×10−5 M) caused frequency- and concentration-dependent contractions that were of greater magnitude in veins denuded of endothelium. The inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, 10−4 M) increased the adrenergic responses only in rings with endothelium.In preparations contracted with noradrenaline in the presence of guanethidine (10−6 M) and atropine (10−6 M), electrical stimulation induced frequency-dependent relaxations. This neurogenic relaxation was prevented by L-NAME, methylene blue (3×10−5 M) and tetrodotoxin (10−6 M), but was unaffected by removal of endothelium.Acetylcholine (10−8–3×10−5 M) and substance P (3×10−11–3×10−7 M) induced endothelium-dependent relaxations. In contrast, sodium nitroprusside (10−9–3×10−5 M) and papaverine (10−8–3×10−5 M) caused endothelium-independent relaxations.The results provide functional evidence that the human penile deep dorsal vein is an active component of the penile vascular resistance through the release of nitric oxide from both neural and endothelial origin. Dysfunction in any of these sources of nitric oxide should be considered in some forms of impotence. PMID:9690872

  20. Synostosis Between Pubic Bones due to Neurogenic, Heterotopic Ossification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic, heterotopic ossification is characterised by the formation of new, extraosseous (ectopic bone in soft tissue in patients with neurological disorders. A 33-year-old female, who was born with spina bifida, paraplegia, and diastasis of symphysis pubis, had indwelling urethral catheter drainage and was using oxybutynin bladder instillations. She was prescribed diuretic for swelling of feet, which aggravated bypassing of catheter. Hence, suprapubic cystostomy was performed. Despite anticholinergic therapy, there was chronic urine leak around the suprapubic catheter and per urethra. Therefore, the urethra was mobilised and closed. After closure of the urethra, there was no urine leak from the urethra, but urine leak persisted around the suprapubic catheter. Cystogram confirmed the presence of a Foley balloon inside the bladder; there was no urinary fistula. The Foley balloon ruptured frequently, leading to extrusion of the Foley catheter. X-ray of abdomen showed heterotopic bone formation bridging the gap across diastasis of symphysis pubis. CT of pelvis revealed heterotopic bone lying in close proximity to the balloon of the Foley catheter; the sharp edge of heterotopic bone probably acted like a saw and led to frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter. Unique features of this case are: (1 temporal relationship of heterotopic bone formation to suprapubic cystostomy and chronic urine leak; (2 occurrence of heterotopic ossification in pubic region; (3 complications of heterotopic bone formation viz. frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter by the irregular margin of heterotopic bone and difficulty in insertion of suprapubic catheter because the heterotopic bone encroached on the suprapubic track; (4 synostosis between pubic bones as a result of heterotopic ossification..Common aetiological factors for neurogenic, heterotopic ossification, such as forceful manipulation, trauma, or spasticity, were absent in this

  1. Prospective evaluation of Peristeen® transanal irrigation system with the validated neurogenic bowel dysfunction score sheet in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Maryellen S; Dorgalli, Crystal; McLorie, Gordon; Khoury, Antoine E

    2017-03-01

    To determine the ability of Peristeen® transanal irrigation system to reduce symptoms of neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD) in patients using the validated neurogenic bowel dysfunction scoring system for the pediatric population. Patients 3-21 years with NBD whose current bowel program was unsuccessful were given the Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction (NBoDS) score sheet before initiating Peristeen®, and at 2 weeks, 2 months, and 6 months after. All patients were started on Peristeen® with tap water (20 ml/kg) per daily irrigation. Mean and paired t-tests were completed. 24 patients were enrolled and had follow-up. Mean age was 10.5 years (range 3-21 years), 25%, 50%, 25% had thoracic, lumbar and sacral level lesions respectively. Mean NBoDS score at initiation of Peristeen® was 20.21 (±5.56), n = 24. The mean score after two weeks of use was 12.75 (±4.40), n = 24. There was a statistically significant decrease of 7.46 (95%CI, 5.07-9.84) points, t(23) = 6.47, P irrigation system provides a significant reduction in NBoDS scores in pediatric patients with NBD. Peristeen® should be considered when other conservative bowel management options have been unsuccessful. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:632-635, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Digital collections and exhibits

    CERN Document Server

    Denzer, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Today's libraries are taking advantage of cutting-edge technologies such as flat panel displays using touch, sound, and hands-free motions to design amazing exhibits using everything from simple computer hardware to advanced technologies such as the Microsoft Kinect. Libraries of all types are striving to add new interactive experiences for their patrons through exciting digital exhibits, both online and off. Digital Collections and Exhibits takes away the mystery of designing stunning digital exhibits to spotlight library trea

  3. Myopathy in CRPS-I: disuse or neurogenic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsman, Natalie M; Geertzen, Jan H B; Dijkstra, Pieter U; van den Dungen, Jan J A M; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A

    2009-08-01

    The diagnosis Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is based on clinical symptoms, including motor symptoms. Histological changes in muscle tissue may be present in the chronic phase of CRPS-I. Aim of this study was to analyze skeletal muscle tissue from amputated limbs of patients with CRPS-I, in order to gain more insight in factors that may play a role in changes in muscles in CRPS-I. These changes may be helpful in clarifying the pathophysiology of CRPS-I. Fourteen patients with therapy resistant and longstanding CRPS-I, underwent an amputation of the affected limb. In all patients histological analysis showed extensive changes in muscle tissue, such as fatty degeneration, fibre atrophy and nuclear clumping, which was not related to duration of CRPS-I prior to amputation. In all muscles affected, both type 1 and type 2 fibre atrophy was found, without selective type 2 fibre atrophy. In four patients, type grouping was observed, indicating a sequence of denervation and reinnervation of muscle tissue. In two patients even large group atrophy was present, suggesting new denervation after reinnervation. Comparison between subgroups in arms and legs showed no difference in the number of changes in muscle tissue. Intrinsic and extrinsic muscles were affected equally. Our findings show that in the chronic phase of CRPS-I extensive changes can be seen in muscle tissue, not related to duration of CRPS-I symptoms. Signs of neurogenic myopathy were present in five patients.

  4. Bedside lung ultrasound: a case of neurogenic pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenkov, Vladimir V; Kovalev, Alexey N; Gorbunov, Vyacheslav V

    2013-06-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is an acute life-threatening complication associated with many forms of central nervous system injury. NPE usually appears within minutes to hours after injury and has a high mortality rate if not recognized and treated appropriately. Lung ultrasound quickly provides at the bedside relevant information on the state of aeration and ventilation of the lung. We describe a case report of acute respiratory insufficiency after posterior cranial fossa surgery. The patient underwent a subtotal meningiomectomy. Postoperative course was complicated by respiratory failure with unstable hemodynamic parameters. The pulmonary edema was suspected, and sonography examination was performed. Lung ultrasound showed typical signs for non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Transthoracic echocardiography showed preserved left ventricle systolic function, but signs of the severe hypovolemia were found. We corrected for the preload and ventilator support settings. Within 24 h, her respiratory status improved with a resolution of the pulmonary edema. Lung ultrasound at the bedside can provide accurate information on lung status in neurocritically ill patients with acute respiratory failure. The addition of transthoracic echocardiography to lung sonography provides an additive insight on the eventual pulmonary involvement. Lung ultrasound has the potential to become a reference tool for bedside dynamic respiratory monitoring in the Neuro ICU.

  5. Neurogenic vestibular evoked potentials using a tone pip auditory stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, E S; Zamba-Papanicolaou, E; Pantziaris, M; Kleopas, K; Kyriakides, T; Papacostas, S; Pattichis, C; Iliopoulos, I; Piperidou, C

    2004-01-01

    To obtain neurogenic vestibular evoked potentials (NVESTEPs) with surface scalp recording using a tone pip auditory stimulus. Fourteen neurologically normal volunteers (Age range 26-45 years, 10 females and 4 males), and two patients with sensorineural hearing loss and possible multiple sclerosis respectively, were examined. Two channel recordings were obtained, the first channel being P3 referred to Fpz, and the second channel being P4 referred to Fpz. A 1 kHz tone pip stimulus with two cycles was delivered via headphones monoaurally with contralateral masking noise. A consistent negative wave with a mean absolute latency of 4.72 msec was obtained, which we have named N5. 25% of the ears tested had better responses at the ipsilateral parietal electrode. In the patient with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, NVESTEPs was present, suggesting that the NVESTEP is not a cochlear response. In the patient with possible multiple sclerosis, an abnormal NVESTEP response and a normal BAEP response were found. Use of a tone-pip rather than a click auditory stimulus allows a lower click intensity to be used in the production of NVESTEP responses, leads to a shorter testing time, and is therefore more comfortable for the patient. This study adds to our impression that the NVESTEP may be a physiological response that can be used to assess the vestibular system and is different from the BAEP response. Further testing in patients with symptoms of dizziness and with disorders specific for the vestibular nerve is required.

  6. Ethics on Exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethical questions raised by an exhibition of work by an artist with a history of mental illness and the exhibition's relevance to art therapy and “outsider art” discourse on the subject. Considerations for how such an exhibit could be handled had the circumstances included an art therapist and art therapy client are…

  7. Neurogenic bladder and bowel in pediatric spinal cord injury patients/Pediyatrik medulla spinalis yaralanmalarinda norojen mesane ve norojen barsak

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ersoz, Murat

    2008-01-01

    .... In this review clinical practice, dissimilarities with adult patients and clinical experience about neurogenic bladder and bowel in paediatric spinal cord injury patients are presented. Anahtar Kelimeler...

  8. Premature aging of the hippocampal neurogenic niche in adult Bmal1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amira A H; Schwarz-Herzke, Beryl; Stahr, Anna; Prozorovski, Timour; Aktas, Orhan; von Gall, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis undergoes dramatic age-related changes. Mice with targeted deletion of the clock geneBmal1 (Bmal1(-/-)) show disrupted regulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis, accelerated aging, neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits. As proliferation of neuronal progenitor/precursor cells (NPCs) is enhanced in young Bmal1(-/-) mice, we tested the hypothesis that this results in premature aging of hippocampal neurogenic niche in adult Bmal1(-/-) mice as compared to wildtype littermates. We found significantly reduced pool of hippocampal NPCs, scattered distribution, enhanced survival of NPCs and an increased differentiation of NPCs into the astroglial lineage at the expense of the neuronal lineage. Immunoreaction of the redox sensitive histone deacetylase Sirtuine 1, peroxisomal membrane protein at 70 kDa and expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Waf1/CIP1) were increased in adult Bmal1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, genetic disruption of the molecular clockwork leads to accelerated age-dependent decline in adult neurogenesis presumably as a consequence of oxidative stress.

  9. Feline dry eye syndrome of presumed neurogenic origin: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbag, Lionel; Pesavento, Patricia A; Carrasco, Sebastian E; Reilly, Christopher M; Maggs, David J

    2018-01-01

    A 14-year-old female spayed Abyssinian cat, which about 1 year previously underwent thoracic limb amputation, radiotherapy and chemotherapy for an incompletely excised vaccine-related fibrosarcoma, was presented for evaluation of corneal opacity in the left eye (OS). The ocular surface of both eyes (OU) had a lackluster appearance and there was a stromal corneal ulcer OS. Results of corneal aesthesiometry, Schirmer tear test-1 (STT-1) and tear film breakup time revealed corneal hypoesthesia, and quantitative and qualitative tear film deficiency OU. Noxious olfactory stimulation caused increased lacrimation relative to standard STT-1 values suggesting an intact nasolacrimal reflex. Various lacrimostimulants were administered in succession; namely, 1% pilocarpine administered topically (15 days) or orally (19 days), and topically applied 0.03% tacrolimus (47 days). Pilocarpine, especially when given orally, was associated with notable increases in STT-1 values, but corneal ulceration remained/recurred regardless of administration route, and oral pilocarpine resulted in gastrointestinal upset. Tacrolimus was not effective. After 93 days, the cat became weak and lame and a low thyroxine concentration was detected in serum. The cat was euthanized and a necropsy performed. Both lacrimal glands were histologically normal, but chronic neutrophilic keratitis and reduced conjunctival goblet cell density were noted OU. The final diagnosis was dry eye syndrome (DES) of presumed neurogenic origin, associated with corneal hypoesthesia. This report reinforces the importance of conducting tearfilm testing in cats with ocular surface disease, as clinical signs of DES were different from those described in dogs.

  10. Genetic Evaluation of E. coli Strains Isolated from Asymptomatic Children with Neurogenic Bladders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kryger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to describe the genetic profiles of E. coli that colonize asymptomatic pediatric neurogenic bladders. E. coli was isolated from 25 of 80 urine samples. Patients were excluded if they presented with symptomatic urinary tract infection or received treatment with antibiotics in the preceding three months. Multiplex PCR was performed to determine E. coli phylotype (A, B1, B2, and D and the presence of seven pathogenicity islands (PAIs and 10 virulence factors (VFs. E. coli strains were predominantly of the B1 and B2 phylotype, with few strains in the A or D phylotype. The PAIs IV536, ICFT073, and IICFT073 had the highest prevalence: 76%, 64%, and 48%, respectively. The PAIs II536, IJ96, and IIJ96 were less prevalent: 28%, 20%, and 24%, respectively. The most prevalent VF was vat (40%, while the least prevalent VFs were sfa (8% and iha (12%. None of the strains carried the VF fyuA, which is very common in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. The genetic profiles of E. coli in this cohort seem to be more similar to UPEC than to commensal E. coli. However, they appear to have reduced virulence potential that allows them to colonize asymptomatically.

  11. Paediatric Crohn disease patients with stricturing behaviour exhibit ileal granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibody production and reduced neutrophil bacterial killing and GM-CSF bioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurickova, I; Collins, M H; Chalk, C; Seese, A; Bezold, R; Lake, K; Allmen, D; Frischer, J S; Falcone, R A; Trapnell, B C; Denson, L A

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibodies are associated with stricturing behaviour in Crohn disease (CD). We hypothesized that CD ileal lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) would produce GM-CSF autoantibodies and peripheral blood (PB) samples would contain GM-CSF neutralizing capacity (NC). Paediatric CD and control PBMC and ileal biopsies or LPMC were isolated and cultured and GM-CSF, immunoglobulin (Ig)G and GM-CSF autoantibodies production were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Basal and GM-CSF-primed neutrophil bacterial killing and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) tyrosine phosphorylation (pSTAT5) were measured by flow cytometry. GM-CSF autoantibodies were enriched within total IgG for LPMC isolated from CD ileal strictures and proximal margins compared to control ileum. Neutrophil bacterial killing was reduced in CD patients compared to controls. Within CD, neutrophil GM-CSF-dependent STAT5 activation and bacterial killing were reduced as GM-CSF autoantibodies increased. GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 did not vary between controls and CD patients in washed PB granulocytes in which serum was removed. However, GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 was reduced in whole PB samples from CD patients. These data were used to calculate the GM-CSF NC. CD patients with GM-CSF NC greater than 25% exhibited a fourfold higher rate of stricturing behaviour and surgery. The likelihood ratio (95% confidence interval) for stricturing behaviour for patients with elevation in both GM-CSF autoantibodies and GM-CSF NC was equal to 5 (2, 11). GM-CSF autoantibodies are produced by LPMC isolated from CD ileal resection specimens and are associated with reduced neutrophil bacterial killing. CD peripheral blood contains GM-CSF NC, which is associated with increased rates of stricturing behaviour. PMID:23600834

  12. Inosine Improves Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity following Spinal Cord Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeun Goo Chung

    Full Text Available Neurogenic detrusor overactivity and the associated loss of bladder control are among the most challenging complications of spinal cord injury (SCI. Anticholinergic agents are the mainstay for medical treatment of detrusor overactivity. However, their use is limited by significant side effects such that a search for new treatments is warranted. Inosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside with neuroprotective, neurotrophic and antioxidant effects that is known to improve motor function in preclinical models of SCI. However, its effect on lower urinary tract function has not been determined. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of systemic administration of inosine on voiding function following SCI and to delineate potential mechanisms of action. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent complete spinal cord transection, or cord compression by application of an aneurysm clip at T8 for 30 sec. Inosine (225 mg/kg or vehicle was administered daily via intraperitoneal injection either immediately after injury or after a delay of 8 wk. At the end of treatment, voiding behavior was assessed by cystometry. Levels of synaptophysin (SYP, neurofilament 200 (NF200 and TRPV1 in bladder tissues were measured by immunofluorescence imaging. Inosine administration decreased overactivity in both SCI models, with a significant decrease in the frequency of spontaneous non-voiding contractions during filling, compared to vehicle-treated SCI rats (p<0.05, including under conditions of delayed treatment. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated increased levels of the pan-neuronal marker SYP and the Adelta fiber marker NF200, but decreased staining for the C-fiber marker, TRPV1 in bladder tissues from inosine-treated rats compared to those from vehicle-treated animals, including after delayed treatment. These findings demonstrate that inosine prevents the development of detrusor overactivity and attenuates existing overactivity following SCI, and may

  13. Non-neurogenic SVZ-like niche in dolphins, mammals devoid of olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolisi, Roberta; Cozzi, Bruno; Bonfanti, Luca

    2017-08-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been implicated in brain plasticity and brain repair. In mammals, it is mostly restricted to specific brain regions and specific physiological functions. The function and evolutionary history of mammalian adult neurogenesis has been elusive so far. The largest neurogenic site in mammals (subventricular zone, SVZ) generates neurons destined to populate the olfactory bulb. The SVZ neurogenic activity appears to be related to the dependence of the species on olfaction since it occurs at high rates throughout life in animals strongly dependent on this function for their survival. Indeed, it dramatically decreases in humans, who do not depend so much on it. This study investigates whether the SVZ neurogenic site exists in mammals devoid of olfaction and olfactory brain structures, such as dolphins. Our results demonstate that a small SVZ-like region persists in these aquatic mammals. However, this region seems to have lost its neurogenic capabilities since neonatal stages. In addition, instead of the typical newly generated neuroblasts, some mature neurons were observed in the dolphin SVZ. Since cetaceans evolved from terrestrial ancestors, non-neurogenic SVZ may indicate extinction of adult neurogenesis in the absence of olfactory function, with the retention of an SVZ-like anatomical region either vestigial or of still unknown role.

  14. Characterization of the spectrum of hemodynamic profiles in trauma patients with acute neurogenic shock☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard L.; Baker, Stephen D.; Sterling, Sarah A.; Porter, John M; Jones, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neurogenic shock considered a distributive type of shock secondary to loss of sympathetic outflow to the peripheral vasculature. In this study, we examine the hemodynamic profiles of a series of trauma patients with a diagnosis of neurogenic shock. Methods Hemodynamic data were collected on a series of trauma patients determined to have spinal cord injuries with neurogenic shock. A well-established integrated computer model of human physiology was used to analyze and categorize the hemodynamic profiles from a system analysis perspective. A differentiation between these categories was presented as the percent of total patients. Results Of the 9 patients with traumatic neurogenic shock, the etiology of shock was decrease in peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) in 3 (33%; 95% confidence interval, 12%–65%), loss of vascular capacitance in 2 (22%; 6%–55%) and mixed peripheral resistance and capacitance responsible in 3 (33%; 12%–65%), and purely cardiac in 1 (11%; 3%–48%). The markers of sympathetic outflow had no correlation to any of the elements in the patients' hemodynamic profiles. Conclusions Results from this study suggest that hypotension of neurogenic shock can have multiple mechanistic etiologies and represents a spectrum of hemodynamic profiles. This understanding is important for the treatment decisions in managing these patients. PMID:23566731

  15. Characterization of the spectrum of hemodynamic profiles in trauma patients with acute neurogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard L; Baker, Stephen D; Sterling, Sarah A; Porter, John M; Jones, Alan E

    2013-08-01

    Neurogenic shock considered a distributive type of shock secondary to loss of sympathetic outflow to the peripheral vasculature. In this study, we examine the hemodynamic profiles of a series of trauma patients with a diagnosis of neurogenic shock. Hemodynamic data were collected on a series of trauma patients determined to have spinal cord injuries with neurogenic shock. A well-established integrated computer model of human physiology was used to analyze and categorize the hemodynamic profiles from a system analysis perspective. A differentiation between these categories was presented as the percent of total patients. Of the 9 patients with traumatic neurogenic shock, the etiology of shock was decrease in peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) in 3 (33%; 95% confidence interval, 12%-65%), loss of vascular capacitance in 2 (22%; 6%-55%) and mixed peripheral resistance and capacitance responsible in 3 (33%; 12%-65%), and purely cardiac in 1 (11%; 3%-48%). The markers of sympathetic outflow had no correlation to any of the elements in the patients' hemodynamic profiles. Results from this study suggest that hypotension of neurogenic shock can have multiple mechanistic etiologies and represents a spectrum of hemodynamic profiles. This understanding is important for the treatment decisions in managing these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Visitors Center Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A child enjoys building his own LEGO model at a play table which was included in the exhibit 'Travel in Space' World Show. The exhibit consisted of 21 displays designed to teach children about flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles.

  17. Sonnesgade 11 - Exhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Claudia; Toft, Anne Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    This exhibition consists of site specific installations; a collection of work by students from Studio Constructing an Archive at the Aarhus School of Architecture, and SLETH Architects. The exhibition showcases the culmination of a common project which began in February 2013. The project has been...

  18. Exhibition in Sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Burton

    1977-01-01

    The traveling exhibition titled "The Wild Beasts: Fauvism and its Affinities" opened first at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City and was then moved to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 1976. Discusses the exhibition's historic value, how Fauvism passed through three fairly distinct stylistic phases, and the social…

  19. Space physics exhibits underway

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVito, M. Catherine

    AGU is planning a new space science exhibit for the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington that will help visitors come to an understanding of space science as a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and exciting field. The title of the exhibit is “Electric Space: Our Earth-Sun Environment.” The exhibit's five modules will include demonstrations of the effects of particle and field radiation on humans and satellites in space and on human technology on the ground. The project also includes a larger traveling version that will visit science and technology centers throughout the United States. The first exhibit is planned to open at the Air and Space Museum in late summer or early fall 1992, in time for International Space Year activities; the traveling exhibit will begin touring in early 1993.

  20. Molecular analyses of neurogenic defects in a human pluripotent stem cell model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Michael J; Nazor, Kristopher L; Tran, Ha T; Szücs, Attila; Lynch, Candace L; Paredes, Ryder; Tassone, Flora; Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Hagerman, Randi J; Loring, Jeanne F

    2017-03-01

    New research suggests that common pathways are altered in many neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder; however, little is known about early molecular events that contribute to the pathology of these diseases. The study of monogenic, neurodevelopmental disorders with a high incidence of autistic behaviours, such as fragile X syndrome, has the potential to identify genes and pathways that are dysregulated in autism spectrum disorder as well as fragile X syndrome. In vitro generation of human disease-relevant cell types provides the ability to investigate aspects of disease that are impossible to study in patients or animal models. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells recapitulates development of the neocortex, an area affected in both fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. We have generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from several individuals clinically diagnosed with fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. When differentiated to dorsal forebrain cell fates, our fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cell lines exhibited reproducible aberrant neurogenic phenotypes. Using global gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, we have analysed the early stages of neurogenesis in fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cells. We discovered aberrant DNA methylation patterns at specific genomic regions in fragile X syndrome cells, and identified dysregulated gene- and network-level correlates of fragile X syndrome that are associated with developmental signalling, cell migration, and neuronal maturation. Integration of our gene expression and epigenetic analysis identified altered epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation of a distinct set of genes in fragile X syndrome. These fragile X syndrome-aberrant networks are significantly enriched for genes associated with autism spectrum disorder, giving support to the idea that underlying similarities exist among these neurodevelopmental diseases. © The

  1. A nitric oxide-like factor mediates nonadrenergic-noncholinergic neurogenic relaxation of penile corpus cavernosum smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, N; Azadzoi, K M; Goldstein, I; Saenz de Tejada, I

    1991-01-01

    This study was initiated to characterize nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) inhibitory neurotransmission in penile corpus cavernosum. Using organ baths, isometric tension measurements were made in strips of human and rabbit corpus cavernosum. In examining endothelium-mediated responses, cumulative additions of exogenous acetylcholine elicited dose-dependent relaxations which were significantly reduced or completely inhibited in tissues treated with NG-monomethyl L-arginine (L-NMMA; an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis), oxyhemoglobin (a nitric oxide scavenger), or methylene blue (a guanylate cyclase blocker). Tissues exposed to hypoxic conditions (PO2 = 5-10 mmHg) also did not respond to exogenous acetylcholine. Mechanical removal of the endothelium in human corporal strips or in situ treatment of rabbit corpora with detergent blocked the relaxation to acetylcholine. Transmural electrical stimulation of corporal tissue strips denuded of functional endothelium, in the presence of adrenergic blockade with bretylium and muscarinic receptor blockade with atropine, caused frequency-dependent relaxation. This neurogenic relaxation was reduced or prevented by L-NMMA, oxyhemoglobin, methylene blue, and hypoxia. The effects of L-NMMA were reversed by L-arginine and the effects of hypoxia were readily reversed by normoxic conditions. Authentic, exogenous nitric oxide relaxed corporal strips which were contracted with adrenergic agonists and this effect was significantly inhibited by oxyhemoglobin. It is concluded that (a) endothelium-mediated responses of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle are mediated by a diffusible nitric oxide-like substance; (b) NANC neurogenic inhibitory responses do not require functional endothelium, and (c) nitric oxide, or a closely related substance, may act as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in penile corpus cavernosum smooth muscle. Images PMID:1647413

  2. [Potentiative effects of noradrenaline on the neurogenic vasoreactivity diminished by cooling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iartsev, V N; Karachentseva, O V; Dvoretskiĭ, D P

    2013-08-01

    The effect of 0.03--1.0 μM noradrenaline on the response to electrical field stimulation of the juvenile rat tail artery segment at 36 degrees C and after cooling to 25 degrees C was studied. At 25 degrees C, the neurogenic vasoconstriction was inhibited, but low dose noradrenaline potentiate the constriction. This potentiation was greater at 25 degrees C than at 36 degrees C, following spontaneous decline in the constriction counteracted by noradrenaline. At low temperature, the potentiative effects of noradrenaline were greater at high frequency of electrical field stimulation. The phenomenon of increase in the noradrenaline-evoked potentiation of neurogenic vasoconstriction inhibited by cold may be of importance for thermoregulation. It could provide restoration of diminished effectiveness of the neurogenic contractile signal thus leading to low heat emission at low temperature.

  3. Detrusor Arreflexia as an End Stage of Neurogenic Bladder in HAM/TSP?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Tannus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The HTLV-1 virus is a known agent involved in the development of HAM/TSP. Past studies have typically observed patients with autonomic dysfunction consisting of detrusor overactivity and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia, with the occasional observation of underactive detrusor or detrusor arreflexia. However, studies have not yet evaluated the progression of neurogenic bladder over time. In this paper, we describe a HAM/TSP patient with the initial development of overactive detrusor, and subsequent development of detrusor arreflexia. Given a paucity of studies characterizing the effects of HTLV-1 on the autonomic nervous system, particularly aspects controlling continence, this patient's clinical course may represent one type of end point for patients with HAM/TSP and neurogenic bladder. Further cohort or case-series studies, with particular emphasis on the progression of neurogenic bladder, are needed to evaluate the significance of this described case in relation to typical disease progression patterns.

  4. The effect of penile vibratory stimulation on male fertility potential, spasticity and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Læssøe, Line; Sønksen, J

    2005-01-01

    Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS).......Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS)....

  5. Intravesical prostatic protrusion correlates well with storage symptoms in elderly male patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yen Lu

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: In elderly male patients with non-neurogenic OAB, more severe storage symptoms are associated with a lower maximum flow rate and a more prominent IPP, indicating that a significant cause of male non-neurogenic OAB is prostate associated.

  6. Neurogenic differentiation from adipose-derived stem cells and application for autologous transplantation in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Xin-wei; Chen, Jian-Ting; Xiang, Liang-Bi; Zhou, Da-Peng

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue have the capacity to differentiate into endodermal, mesoderm and ectodermal cell lineages in vitro, which are an ideal engraft in tissue-engineered repair. In this study, mouse adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were isolated from subcutaneous fat. The markers of ADSCs, CD13, CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD166, Nestin, GFAP and MAP-2 were detected by immunofluorescence assays. The ADSCs were cultured in cocktail factors (including ATRA, GGF-2, bFGF, PDGF and forskolin) for neurogenic differentiation. The neurogenic cells markers, Nestin, GFAP and MAP-2 were analyzed using immunofluorescence and real-time PCR after dramatic changes in morphology. Neurogenic cells from ADSCs were autologous transplanted into the mouse of spinal cord injury for observation neurogenic cells colonization in spinal cord. The result demonstrated that the mouse ADSCs were positive for the CD13, CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105 and CD166 but negative for neurogenic cell markers, MAP-2, GFAP and Nestin. After neurogenic differentiation, the neurogenic cells were positive for neurogenic cell special markers, gene expression level showed a time-lapse increase, and the cells were successful colonized into spinal cord. In conclusion, our research shows that a population of neuronal cells can be specifically generated from ADSCs and that induced cells may allow for participation in tissue-repair.

  7. Measurement of lower limb blood flow in patients with neurogenic claudication using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, G F; Ashcroft, G P; Roditi, G H; Hutchison, J D; Evans, N T; Mikecz, P; Chaloner, F; Dodd, M; Leonard, C; Porter, R W

    1995-02-15

    Ten subjects (seven with neurogenic claudication and three control subjects) underwent examination of lower limb muscle blood flow before and after exercise using positron emission tomography. To investigate the hypothesis that lower limb muscle ischemia was the origin of symptoms in neurogenic claudication. Patients with neurogenic claudication secondary to spinal stenosis experience lower limb discomfort after exercise similar to that of ischemic claudication. However, they do not have clinical evidence of peripheral vascular disease. The authors postulated that the lower limb discomfort in patients with neurogenic claudication may arise from muscle ischemia due to inadequate dilatation of arterioles in response to exercise, this itself arising secondary to sympathetic dysfunction due to spinal stenosis. Using O15-labeled water and positron emission tomography measured thigh and leg muscle blood flow response to exercise bilaterally in seven patients with unilateral neurogenic claudication and three control subjects were measured. The average values obtained for mid-thigh and mid-calf muscle perfusion at rest were 2.57 ml/min/100 g tissue (2.23-3.90) and 2.39 ml/min/100 g tissue (2.03-3.46), respectively. The average values obtained from mid-thigh and mid-calf perfusion after exercise were 4.41 ml/min/100 g tissue (2.8-6.0) and 4.87 ml/min/100 g (2.2-11.7). We found no difference in muscle perfusion between symptomatic and asymptomatic limbs in this group of patients. These studies suggest that muscle ischemia is not the origin of symptoms in most patients with neurogenic claudication.

  8. The conceptualization and development of a patient-reported neurogenic bladder symptom score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welk B

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Blayne Welk,1 Sarah A Morrow,2 Wendy Madarasz,3 Patrick Potter,4 Keith Sequeira41Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Western University, London, ON, Canada; 3St Joseph's Health Care, London Ontario, Canada; 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Western University, London, ON, CanadaBackground: There is no single patient-reported instrument that was developed specifically to assess symptoms and bladder-related consequences for neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to identify and consolidate items for a novel measurement tool for this population.Methods: Item generation was based on a literature review of existing instruments, open-ended semistructured interviews with patients, and expert opinion. Judgment-based item reduction was performed by a multidisciplinary expert group. The proposed questionnaire was sent to external experts for review.Results: Eight neurogenic quality of life measures and 29 urinary symptom-specific instruments were identified. From these, 266 relevant items were extracted and used in the creation of the new neurogenic symptom score. Qualitative interviews with 16 adult patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction as a result of spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, or spina bifida were completed. Dominant themes included urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, urgency, and bladder spasms. Using the literature review and interview data, 25 proposed items were reviewed by 12 external experts, and the questions evaluated based on importance on a scale of 1 (not important to 5 (very important. Retained question domains had high mean importance ratings of 3.1 to 4.3 and good agreement with answer hierarchy.Conclusion: The proposed neurogenic bladder symptom score is a novel patient-reported outcome measure. Further work is underway to perform a data-based item reduction and to assess the validity and reliability of this instrument

  9. Long-Term Cost-Effectiveness of Transanal Irrigation in Patients with Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Emmanuel

    Full Text Available People suffering from neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD and an ineffective bowel regimen often suffer from fecal incontinence (FI and related symptoms, which have a huge impact on their quality of life. In these situations, transanal irrigation (TAI has been shown to reduce these symptoms and improve quality of life.To investigate the long-term cost-effectiveness of initiating TAI in patients with NBD who have failed standard bowel care (SBC.A deterministic Markov decision model was developed to project the lifetime health economic outcomes, including quality-adjusted life years (QALYs, episodes of FI, urinary tract infections (UTIs, and stoma surgery when initiating TAI relative to continuing SBC. A data set consisting of 227 patients with NBD due to spinal cord injury (SCI, multiple sclerosis, spina bifida and cauda equina syndrome was used in the analysis. In the model a 30-year old individual with SCI was used as a base-case. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was applied to evaluate the robustness of the model.The model predicts that a 30-year old SCI patient with a life expectancy of 37 years initiating TAI will experience a 36% reduction in FI episodes, a 29% reduction in UTIs, a 35% reduction in likelihood of stoma surgery and a 0.4 improvement in QALYs, compared with patients continuing SBC. A lifetime cost-saving of £21,768 per patient was estimated for TAI versus continuing SBC alone.TAI is a cost-saving treatment strategy reducing risk of stoma surgery, UTIs, episodes of FI and improving QALYs for NBD patients who have failed SBC.

  10. A Case of Neuro-Behcet's Disease Presenting with Central Neurogenic Hyperventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhachroum, Ayham M; Saeed, Saba; Kaur, Jaspreet; Shams, Tanzila; DeGeorgia, Michael A

    2016-03-11

    Behcet's disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder usually characterized by the triad of oral ulcers, genital ulcers, and uveitis. Central to the pathogenesis of Behcet's disease is an autoimmune vasculitis. Neurological involvement, so called "Neuro-Behcet's disease", occurs in 10-20% of patients, usually from a meningoencephalitis or venous thrombosis. We report the case of a 46-year-old patient with Neuro-Behcet's disease who presented with central neurogenic hyperventilation as a result of brainstem involvement from venulitis. To the best of our knowledge, central neurogenic hyperventilation has not previously been described in a patient with Neuro-Behcet's disease.

  11. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, Paul

    2005-04-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. Science exhibitions also provide a marvelous opportunity for scientists to become engaged in the exhibit development process. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on two of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (on tour for four years) and Alien Earths (its tour began early in 2005). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, Planet Quest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous potential for informal education and inquiry-based investigations. This talk will focus on the role informal science projects play in effectively communicating science to a broad, public audience.

  12. Interspinous process implantation for the treatment of neurogenic intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyrani, Nasser; Picinic Norheim, Elizabeth; Elaine Ku, Yeelan; Nick Shamie, Arya

    2012-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a disabling medical condition in which narrowing of the spinal canal compresses the spinal cord and nerves causing a condition called neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC). Decompressive spine surgery is the standard of care for patients who fail to improve with conservative management. However, oftentimes, patients who suffer from LSS are elderly individuals with multiple co-morbidities who cannot withstand the risks of decompressive surgery. X-Stop, a novel and minimally invasive FDA approved interspinous process implant, has come into the scene as an alternative to decompressive surgery, and can be inserted under local anesthetic with minimal blood loss. Despite its growing support in medical literature as an effective and conservative treatment of NIC, X-Stop remains a fairly new form of treatment. The aim of this study is to assess the clinical efficacy of its use. Fifty consecutive patients with at least two-year follow-up had a confirmed diagnosis of NIC secondary to LSS by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and subsequently received an X-Stop implant. Subjects' ages ranged from 64 to 95 with a mean age of 79, while the gender distribution comprised of 23 males and 27 females. Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) was used to assess patient outcome measures in three domains: physical function (PF), patient satisfaction (PS), and symptom severity (SS). The visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess trends in pain with a scale from 0-10, with 0 defined as "pain-free" and 10 designated as "the worst pain imaginable". Compared to pre-op scores, PF, SS, and VAS scores for back, buttock and leg pain had a significant mean decrease at 6, 12, 24 months post-op (P 38) and 74% (17.23) were achieved at six months, 12 months, and 24 months respectively. X-Stop is a safe and effective treatment for NIC that provides marked relief of symptoms with sustained beneficial outcomes at up to two years of follow

  13. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  14. EXHIBITION: Accelerated Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An exhibition of plastic arts and two evenings of performances by sound and visual artists as part of CERN's 50th anniversary celebrations. Fifty candles for CERN, an international laboratory renowned for fundamental research, is a cause for celebration. Since March this year, Geneva and neighbouring parts of France have been the venues for a wealth of small and large-scale events, which will continue until November. Given CERN's location in the commune of Meyrin, the ForuMeyrin is hosting exhibitions of plastic arts and performances entitled: Accelerated Particles. Several works will be exhibited and performed in two 'salons'. Salon des matières: An exhibition of plastic arts From Tues 12 October to Wed 3 November 2004 Tuesdays to Fridays: 16:00 to 19:00 Saturdays: 14:00 to 18:00 Exhibition open late on performance nights, entrance free Salon des particules: Musical and visual performances Tues 12 and Mon 25 October from 20:00 to 23:00 Preview evening for both events: Tues 12 October from 18:...

  15. Feline dry eye syndrome of presumed neurogenic origin: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Sebbag

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 14-year-old female spayed Abyssinian cat, which about 1 year previously underwent thoracic limb amputation, radiotherapy and chemotherapy for an incompletely excised vaccine-related fibrosarcoma, was presented for evaluation of corneal opacity in the left eye (OS. The ocular surface of both eyes (OU had a lackluster appearance and there was a stromal corneal ulcer OS. Results of corneal aesthesiometry, Schirmer tear test-1 (STT-1 and tear film breakup time revealed corneal hypoesthesia, and quantitative and qualitative tear film deficiency OU. Noxious olfactory stimulation caused increased lacrimation relative to standard STT-1 values suggesting an intact nasolacrimal reflex. Various lacrimostimulants were administered in succession; namely, 1% pilocarpine administered topically (15 days or orally (19 days, and topically applied 0.03% tacrolimus (47 days. Pilocarpine, especially when given orally, was associated with notable increases in STT-1 values, but corneal ulceration remained/recurred regardless of administration route, and oral pilocarpine resulted in gastrointestinal upset. Tacrolimus was not effective. After 93 days, the cat became weak and lame and a low thyroxine concentration was detected in serum. The cat was euthanized and a necropsy performed. Both lacrimal glands were histologically normal, but chronic neutrophilic keratitis and reduced conjunctival goblet cell density were noted OU. Relevance and novel information The final diagnosis was dry eye syndrome (DES of presumed neurogenic origin, associated with corneal hypoesthesia. This report reinforces the importance of conducting tearfilm testing in cats with ocular surface disease, as clinical signs of DES were different from those described in dogs.

  16. Botulinum toxin A for the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Deffontaines-Rufin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO is common in patients who suffer from multiple sclerosis (MS. When the usual pharmacological treatment fails, botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injections can be proposed. The safety and efficacy of this treatment are already well known, but only a few studies focus on its use in patients with MS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-one patients with MS underwent their first BTX-A injection for refractory NDO. They had clinical and urodynamic cystometry assessment before and three months after injection. The patients were divided in three groups according to treatment efficacy: full success (total urinary continence, no overactive detrusor, improvement, or total failure (urge incontinence and overactive detrusor. RESULTS: 77% of the patients had clinical improvement or full success of the treatment with a reduction of their urgency and incontinence. Significant urodynamic improvement after treatment was shown on different parameters: volume at first involuntary bladder contraction (p = 0.0000001, maximum cystometric capacity (p = 0.0035, maximum detrusor pressure (p = 0.0000001. 46% of the patients were in the "full success" group. 31% of the patients had a partial improvement. 23% of the patients had no efficacy of the treatment. Duration of MS was a predictive factor of treatment failure (p = 0.015. CONCLUSIONS: Despite that a full success was obtained in 46% of the cases, BTX-A injection therapy failed to treat refractory NDO in 23% of patients suffering from MS. Duration of the disease was a predictive factor for an inefficient treatment. The injection therapy should be considered as soon as oral anticholinergic drugs fail to reduce NDO.

  17. Sensory and other neurogenic effects of exposures to airborne office dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølhave, L.; Kjærgaard, S. K.; Attermann, J.

    This Danish Office Dust Experiment investigated the response of 24 healthy non-sensitive adult subjects to exposure to normal office dust in the air (7 μg m -3 clean air, 136 and 390 μg m -3 TSP). The dust had no major identifiable specific reactive components. The exposure duration was 5 1/4 h and was arranged in a climate chamber in controlled atmospheric conditions. Measurements were made acutely at exposure onset, subacutely at exposure end and next day (late). As secondary aims the time course and threshold of any observed effect of the exposures, and the characteristics of any hyperresponding subgroup were investigated. In a questionnaire with 36 questions the dust exposures caused increased acute, subacute and late perceptions of reduced air quality, acute and subacute increased odor intensity, acute eye irritation, acute and late heavy head, subacute feeling of perspiration, and subacute general irritation. Cough increased subacutely during exposures. In addition, a performance test showed effects of dust exposures which also affected "Mood Scale" ratings. No effect was seen on an addition test for distraction, and objective measurements of skin humidity. The overall conclusion of the study is that healthy subjects without hypersensitivity reactions seem to respond to airborne house dust. The responses are both subjective sensory reactions and other neurogenic effects even at exposure levels within the range found in normal buildings. Some of the effects appeared acutely and decreased through adaptation while others increased during prolonged exposure and remained for more than 17 h after the exposure ended. The findings may indicate for this type of dust a threshold level for the dose-response relationships below 140 μg m -3.

  18. Minocycline treatment ameliorates interferon-alpha-induced neurogenic defects and depression-like behaviors in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Shun eZheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-alpha (IFN-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that is widely used for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis and malignancy, because of its immune-activating, antiviral, and antiproliferative properties. However, long-term IFN-α treatment frequently causes depression, which limits its clinical utility. The precise molecular and cellular mechanisms of IFN-α-induced depression are not currently understood. Neural stem cells (NSCs in the hippocampus continuously generate new neurons, and some evidence suggests that decreased neurogenesis plays a role in the neuropathology of depression. We previously reported that IFN-α treatment suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis and induced depression-like behaviors via its receptors in the brain in adult mice. However, it is unclear how systemic IFN-α administration induces IFN-α signaling in the hippocampus. In this study, we analyzed the role of microglia, immune cells in the brain, in mediating the IFN-α-induced neurogenic defects and depressive behaviors. In vitro studies demonstrated that IFN-α treatment induced the secretion of endogenous IFN-α from microglia, which suppressed NSC proliferation. In vivo treatment of adult mice with IFN-α for five weeks increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines, including IFN-α, and reduced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Both effects were prevented by simultaneous treatment with minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation. Furthermore, minocycline treatment significantly suppressed IFN-α-induced depressive behaviors in mice. These results suggest that microglial activation plays a critical role in the development of IFN-α-induced depression, and that minocycline is a promising drug for the treatment of IFN-α-induced depression in patients, especially those who are low responders to conventional antidepressant treatments.

  19. Electrical stimulation of sacral dermatomes in multiple sclerosis patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fjorback, M.V.; Rey, F. van; Rijkhoff, N.J.M.; Nohr, M.; Petersen, T.; Heesakkers, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve (DPN) has been shown to suppress detrusor contractions in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). However, the long-term use of surface electrodes in the genital region may not be well tolerated and may

  20. [A swollen, painless calf caused by neurogenic muscle (pseudo)-hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Zwarts, M.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Neurogenic muscle (pseudo) hypertrophy of the calf was diagnosed in a 60-year-old man, who presented with chronic, painless and unilateral calf enlargement caused by a chronic S1 radiculopathy due to a lumbar disc hernia in the L5-S1 interspace. The differential diagnosis of a swelling of the calf

  1. Directly reprogramming fibroblasts into adipogenic, neurogenic and hepatogenic differentiation lineages by defined factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Jin, Yu-Qing; Gao, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    The reprogramming of adult cells into pluripotent cells or directly into alternative adult cell types represents a great potential technology for regenerative medicine. In the present study, the potential of key developmental adipogenic, neurogenic and hepatogenic regulators to reprogram human fibroblasts into adipocytes, neurocytes and hepatocytes was investigated. The results demonstrated that direct reprogramming of octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)β activated C/EBPα and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ expression, inducing the conversion of fibroblasts into adipocytes. Similarly, direct reprogramming of the transcription factors sex determining region-box 2, trans-acting T-cell specific transcription factor (GATA-3) and neurogenic differentiation 1 in fibroblasts may induce neurogenic differentiation through hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) transfection. Moreover, hepatogenic differentiation was induced by combining the direct reprogramming of Oct4, GATA-3, hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox α and forkhead box protein A2 in fibroblasts. These results demonstrate that specific transcription factors and reprogramming factors are able to directly reprogram fibroblasts into adipogenic, neurogenic and hepatogenic differentiation lineages by HVJ-E transfection. PMID:28587331

  2. Neurogenic pulmonary edema due to ventriculo-atrial shunt dysfunction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ana Sofia; Menezes, Sónia; Silva, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary edema is caused by the accumulation of fluid within the air spaces and the interstitium of the lung. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of pulmonary edema following a significant central nervous system insult. It may be a less-recognized consequence of raised intracranial pressure due to obstructive hydrocephalus by blocked ventricular shunts. It usually appears within minutes to hours after the injury and has a high mortality rate if not recognized and treated appropriately. We report a patient with acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to ventriculo-atrial shunt dysfunction, proposed to urgent surgery for placement of external ventricular drainage, who presented with neurogenic pulmonary edema preoperatively. She was anesthetized and supportive treatment was instituted. At the end of the procedure the patient showed no clinical signs of respiratory distress, as prompt reduction in intracranial pressure facilitated the regression of the pulmonary edema. This report addresses the importance of recognition of neurogenic pulmonary edema as a possible perioperative complication resulting from an increase in intracranial pressure. If not recognized and treated appropriately, neurogenic pulmonary edema can lead to acute cardiopulmonary failure with global hypoperfusion and hypoxia. Therefore, awareness of and knowledge about the occurrence, clinical presentation and treatment are essential. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurogenic claudication by epidural lipomatosis: A case report and review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Kurt (Erkan); S.H. Bakker-Niezen (S.)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractEpidural lipomatosis is most frequently seen in patients on chronic steroid treatment. Only twelve cases of idiopathic spinal epidural lipomatosis have been described. In this report we present an additional case of this condition in a middle-aged male presenting with neurogenic

  4. A step-wise approach to sperm retrieval in men with neurogenic anejaculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Normal fertility is dependent on intravaginal delivery of semen through ejaculation. This process is highly dependent on an intact ejaculatory reflex arc, which can be disrupted through any type of trauma or disease causing damage to the CNS and/or peripheral nerves. Neurogenic anejaculation...

  5. Neurogenic Language Disorders in Children. International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Franco, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Language disorders in children are one of the most frequent causes of difficulties in communication, social interaction, learning and academic achievement. It has been estimated that over 5% of children present with some kind of language disorder. This volume illustrates the state of the art in neurogenic language disorders in children. The most…

  6. Exhibition in Sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Ludwig Mies van der Rohe is known primarily as an architect. However, he also designed chairs and tables. Discusses an exhibit held in New York City a few months ago which showed how well the famous architect achieved his goals in the area of furniture design. (Author/RK)

  7. EXHIBITION: Accelerated Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ An exhibition of plastic arts and two evenings of performances by sound and visual artists as part of CERN's fiftieth anniversary celebrations. The fiftieth anniversary of a world famous organization like CERN, an international laboratory specializing in fundamental research, is a cause for celebration. Since March this year, Geneva and neighbouring parts of France have been the venues for a wealth of small and large-scale events, which will continue until November. Given CERN's location in the commune of Meyrin, the ForuMeyrin is hosting two "salons" consisting of an exhibition of plastic arts and evenings of music and visual arts performances with the collective title of "Accelerated Particles". Several works will be exhibited and performed. Salon des matières: An exhibition of plastic arts Until Wednesday 3 November 2004. Tuesdays to Fridays: 4.00 p.m. to 7.00 p.m. Saturdays: 2.00 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. Doors open late on the evening of the performances. Salon des ...

  8. Neurogenética en el Perú, ejemplo de investigación traslacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mazzetti

    Full Text Available La neurogenética es una disciplina emergente en el Perú que vincula la investigación básica con la práctica clínica. El Centro de Investigación Básica en Neurogenética, es el único centro en el Perú dedicado a la atención especializada de enfermedades neurogenéticas. La investigación en esta área está estrechamente ligada a la enfermedad de Huntington, desde la genotipificación del gen HTT por PCR, hasta los actuales estudios de haplogrupos en esta enfermedad. La investigación en otras enfermedades monogénicas permitió la implementación de metodologías alternativas para la genotipificación del síndrome X frágil y distrofia miotónica tipo 1. Esfuerzos colaborativos nacionales e internacionales han permitido conocer nuevas variantes genéticas en enfermedades complejas, como la enfermedad de Parkinson y Alzheimer. El entrenamiento multidisciplinario y la mentoría fomentan la formación de nuevos especialistas en neurogenética, permitiendo el crecimiento sostenido de esta disciplina en el país. El impulso de la investigación en el Perú ha impulsado el crecimiento de la investigación en neurogenética; sin embargo, las limitaciones en infraestructura, tecnología y capacitación aún son un reto para el crecimiento de investigación en esta disciplina

  9. Levodropropizine reduces capsaicin- and substance P-induced plasma extravasation in the rat trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamawaki, I; Geppetti, P; Bertrand, C; Huber, O; Daffonchio, L; Omini, C; Nadel, J A

    1993-10-12

    We investigated the effect of the non-opioid, peripherally acting antitussive agent levodropropizine to reduce neurogenic plasma extravasation in the rat trachea. Levodropropizine (10, 50 and 200 mg/kg) reduced in a dose-dependent manner the extravasation of Evans blue dye evoked by capsaicin. Levodropropizine inhibited also substance P-evoked extravasation, whereas it did not affect the extravasation evoked by platelet activating factor. Levodropropizine (10 and 100 microM) did not affect the contraction produced by [Sar9,Met(O2)11]substance P, a selective agonist for tachykinin NK1 receptors, in the rat urinary bladder in vitro. These data indicate that levodropropizine inhibits capsaicin-induced plasma extravasation: (a) acting at a postjunctional level; (b) exhibiting neuropeptide selectivity and; (c) via a mechanism independent of tachykinin NK1 receptor blockade. Irrespective of the mechanism, this novel antiinflammatory action of levodropropizine underlines its potential role in inflammatory airway diseases such as bronchial asthma.

  10. CERN permanent exhibitions

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Explore by yourself the issues CERN's physicists are trying to solve: given that the entire universe is made of particles, where do they come from? Why do they behave in the way they do? Discover the massive apparatus used by physicists at CERN, like the LHC, and see how each part works. And if you have more time on site, follow the LHC circuit at ground level to understand in situ this giant machine. Enter our exhibitions. Welcome!

  11. Effect of α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy on urodynamics and oxidative damage of nerve in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Bao Ye

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy on urodynamics and oxidative damage of nerve in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder. Methods: A total of 78 patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=39, control group received conventional therapy and observation group received conventional therapy + α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy. Before treatment and after one course of treatment, urodynamic indexes, peripheral nerve conduction latency time and serum indexes of two groups were detected respectively. Results: After one course of treatment, RUV, Pdet, FS, T and C value as well as ROS, MDA, SP, NPY and ChAT content of both groups were significantly lower than those before treatment, MFR value as well as GSH, SOD, BDNF and CNTF content was significantly higher than those before treatment, and the sensory conduction latency time of median nerve and ulnar nerve as well as motor conduction latency time of median nerve and peroneal nerve were shorter than those before treatment (P<0.05; RUV, Pdet, FS, T and C value as well as ROS, MDA, SP, NPY and ChAT content of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group, MFR value as well as GSH, SOD, BDNF and CNTF content was significantly higher than those of control group, and the sensory conduction latency time of median nerve and ulnar nerve as well as motor conduction latency time of median nerve and peroneal nerve were significantly shorter than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy can optimize the urodynamics in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder and also reduce the oxidative damage of nerve, and it is an effective solution for treatment of such disease.

  12. Upcycling CERN Exhibitions

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Summer is coming - and with it, a new Microcosm exhibition showcasing CERN (see here). But while the new exhibit is preparing to enchant visitors, many have been asking about the site's former content. Will it simply be out with the old and in with the new? Not as such!   The plasma ball from Microcosm is now on display at the LHCb site. As Microcosm's new content is moving in, its old content is moving up. From LHCb to IdeaSquare, former Microcosm displays and objects are being installed across the CERN site. "Microcosm featured many elements that were well suited to life outside of the exhibition," says Emma Sanders, Microcosm project leader in the EDU group. "We didn't want this popular content to go to waste, and so set out to find them new homes across CERN." The LHCb experiment has received a number of Microcosm favourites, including the Rutherford experiment, the cosmic ray display and the Thomson experiment. "We&...

  13. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting the complexity of geosciences to the public via the Internet poses a number of challenges. For example, utilizing various - and sometimes redundant - Web 2.0 tools can quickly devour limited time. Do you tweet? Do you write press releases? Do you create an exhibit or concept map? The presentation will provide participants with a context for utilizing Web 2.0 tools by briefly highlighting methods of online scientific communication across several dimensions. It will address issues of: * breadth and depth (e.g. from narrow topics to well-rounded views), * presentation methods (e.g. from text to multimedia, from momentary to enduring), * sources and audiences (e.g. for experts or for the public, content developed by producers to that developed by users), * content display (e.g. from linear to non-linear, from instructive to entertaining), * barriers to entry (e.g. from an incumbent advantage to neophyte accessible, from amateur to professional), * cost and reach (e.g. from cheap to expensive), and * impact (e.g. the amount learned, from anonymity to brand awareness). Against this backdrop, the presentation will provide an overview of two methods of online information dissemination, exhibits and concept maps, using the WebExhibits online museum (www.webexhibits.org) and SpicyNodes information visualization tool (www.spicynodes.org) as examples, with tips on how geoscientists can use either to communicate their science. Richly interactive online exhibits can serve to engage a large audience, appeal to visitors with multiple learning styles, prompt exploration and discovery, and present a topic’s breadth and depth. WebExhibits, which was among the first online museums, delivers interactive information, virtual experiments, and hands-on activities to the public. While large, multidisciplinary exhibits on topics like “Color Vision and Art” or “Calendars Through the Ages” require teams of scholars, user interface experts, professional writers and editors

  14. Smithsonian climate change exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2006-05-01

    Two new museum exhibits, ``Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely'' and ``Atmosphere: Change is in the Air'' opened 15 April at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., in partnership with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA, and the U.S. National Science Foundation. In ``Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely,'' anecdotes from indigenous polar people reveal how climate changes have affected life within the last 50 years. For example, as permafrost melts and sea ice shrinks, plant distributions and animal migration patterns are changing, severely affecting culture.

  15. Anniversary Exhibition. Nechvolodov.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - -

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available On the 10th of August, 2005 in Tartu (the second biggest educational and cultural city in Estonia Stanislav Nechvolodov's exhibition was opened to show the 5-year cycle of his work, traditional for the author and his admirers. At the opening ceremony Nechvolodov said that the exhibition was the last one and appointed on his 70th anniversary.The architectural and building society in Irkutsk remembers Stanislav Nechvolodov as an architect working on dwelling and civil buildings in 1960-70s. Below are some extracts from the Estonian press.«Postimees» newspaper, December 1993. The interview «Expressionistic naturalist, conservative Nechvolodov» by journalist Eric Linnumyagi. He asks about all the details and describes the troubles experienced by Nechvolodov during the perestroika period in Estonia, for example: the Tartu University refused to install the sculpture of Socrat, the art school refused to engage him as an instructor, the sculpture of Socrat moved to Vrotzlav, Poland, and Nechvolodov moved to Poland to read lectures there.«Tartu» newspaper, November 2000. Mats Oun, artist, says in the article «Nechvolodov: a man of Renaissance»: «Nechvolodov works in Estonia, his works are placed in many local and foreign museums. Regardless some insignificant faults, he deserves a high estimation, and his manysided open exhibition can be an example for other artists. He is a man of Renaissance».

  16. Effects of ethanol treatment on the neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle in the mouse

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aydinoglu, Fatma; Yilmaz, Sakir N; Coskun, Banu; Daglioglu, Nebile; Ogulener, Nuran

    2008-01-01

    .... The neurogenic- and endothelium-dependent relaxation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle and the degenerative effect of subacute ethanol treatment on the endothelial cells of corpus cavernosum was investigated in mice...

  17. Long-term results of bulking agent injection for persistent incontinence in cases of neurogenic bladder dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vocht, T. F.; Chrzan, R.; Dik, P.; Klijn, A. J.; de Jong, T. P. V. M.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated the effectiveness of bladder neck injection as a supplementary treatment for persistent low pressure incontinence after unsatisfactory fascial sling procedures in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 89 patients with

  18. The effect of spinal cord-injury level on the outcome of neurogenic bladder treatment using OnabotulinumtoxinA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Al Taweel

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections are an effective and well-tolerated treatment for neurogenic overactive bladder that will increase patient satisfaction and improve QOL with persisted clinical efficacy for more than 8 months.

  19. Semiconditional Electrical Stimulation of Pudendal Nerve Afferents Stimulation to Manage Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young-Hee; Kim, Jung Moon; Im, Hyung Tae; Lee, Kye-Wook; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hur, Dong Min

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of semiconditional electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve afferents for the neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury. Forty patients (36 males, 4 males) with spinal cord injury who had urinary incontinence and frequency, as well as felt bladder contraction with bladder filling sense or autonomic dysreflexic symptom participated in this study. Method Patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity were subdivided into complete i...

  20. [NORADRENALINE-EVOKED RESTORATION OF THE NEUROGENIC VASOREACTIVITY DIMINISHED BY ACIDOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartsev, V N; Karachentseva, O V

    2015-09-01

    The effect of 0.03-1.0 μM noradrenaline on the neurogenic contractile response to electrical field stimulation of the juvenile rat tail artery segment in control conditions and after the solution pH decrease from 7.4 to 6.6 was studied. Acidosis were shown to inhibit this response significantly at all frequencies of stimulation used (3, 5, 10, and 40 Hz). Noradrenaline potentiated neurogenic vasoconstriction diminished spontaneously or by low pH. The potentiative effect of noradrenaline in acidic solution was more pronounced at higher frequencies of stimulation and noradrenaline concentrations. This phenomenon can, at least in part, account for blood flow redistribution from less important organs to vital ones during exercise which is characterized by acidosis, augmented sympathetic nerve activity and increased levels of noradrenaline.

  1. Early revealing of neurogenic disorders of urination in patients with anorectal anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makedonsky I.O.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available 148 patients with anorectal malformations (ARM were examined. Using clinical, X-ray, ultrasound and urodynamical methods of detections, factors which can cause bladder dysfunction in anorectal malformations are revealed. It was noted that patients with high and low forms of this defect have significant percentage of neurogenec disorders of urination. Absence of anomalies of spinal column development does not exclude these children from the group of scheduled profound urologic investigation. We propose ultrasound measurement of bladder wall thickness and 4-hour monitoring of voiding, urodynamic examination as early diagnostic methods of neurogenic bladder dysfunctions. For timely revealing and treatment of neurogenic disorders of urination we recommend urologic inves¬tigation to all ARM patients. Improvement of diagnostic methods and development of algorithm of revealing mentioned pathologies against ARM with the aim to prevent com¬plications in the urinary system, being perspective in decreasing lethality and disability.

  2. A Case of Neuro-Behcet’s Disease Presenting with Central Neurogenic Hyperventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhachroum, Ayham M.; Saeed, Saba; Kaur, Jaspreet; Shams, Tanzila; De Georgia, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 46 Final Diagnosis: Central hyperventilation Symptoms: Hyperventilation Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Behcet’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder usually characterized by the triad of oral ulcers, genital ulcers, and uveitis. Central to the pathogenesis of Behcet’s disease is an autoimmune vasculitis. Neurological involvement, so called “Neuro-Behcet’s disease”, occurs in 10–20% of patients, usually from a meningoencephalitis or venous thrombosis. Case Report: We report the case of a 46-year-old patient with Neuro-Behcet’s disease who presented with central neurogenic hyperventilation as a result of brainstem involvement from venulitis. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, central neurogenic hyperventilation has not previously been described in a patient with Neuro-Behcet’s disease. PMID:26965646

  3. The vascular and neurogenic factors associated with erectile dysfunction in patients after pelvic fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Guan; Sun Wendong; Shengtian Zhao; Tongyan Liu; Yuqiang Liu; Xiulin Zhang; Mingzhen Yuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of pelvic fractures. To identify the vascular and neurogenic factors associated with ED, 120 patients admitted with ED after traumatic pelvic fracture between January 2009 and June 2013 were enrolled in this study. All patients answered the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire. Nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) testing confirmed the occurrence of ED in 96 (80%) patients on whom penile duplex ultrasound and ...

  4. Buccally Administered Intranasal Desmopressin Acetate for the Treatment of Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus in Infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smego, Allison R; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2016-05-01

    The treatment of neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) in infancy is challenging and complicated by fluid overload and dehydration. Therapy with subcutaneous (SC), intranasal (IN), or oral tablet desmopressin acetate (1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin [DDAVP]) remains difficult to titrate in infants. Assess the efficacy and safety of buccally administered IN DDAVP for the management of infants with neurogenic DI. Retrospective review of clinical and laboratory data of 15 infants (mean age, 4.5 mo) with neurogenic DI treated at a tertiary care center. Treatment was with diluted IN DDAVP formulation (10 mcg/mL) administered buccally via a tuberculin syringe to the buccal mucosa. After initial DDAVP titration of 2-3 days, IN DDAVP doses ranged from 1 to 5 mcg twice daily given buccally. Mean serum sodium concentration at DI diagnosis was 159 ± 6.6 mmol/L (range, 151-178) and improved to 142 ± 3.5 mmol/L (range, 137-147) with the buccally administered IN DDAVP. Normal sodium concentrations were established without major fluctuations. Serum sodium was then maintained in the outpatient setting at a mean of 145.7 ± 4.8 mmol/L (mean duration of follow-up, 11 mo). Buccally administered IN formulation of DDAVP provides a practical and safe treatment alternative for neurogenic DI in infancy. Our approach avoided severe hypo- and hypernatremia during DDAVP titration and ongoing outpatient management of DI. The possibility for smaller dosage increments and ease of administration make IN DDAVP administered buccally preferable over other DDAVP treatment options in infants.

  5. Notch receptor expression in neurogenic regions of the adult zebrafish brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Oliveira-Carlos

    Full Text Available The adult zebrash brain has a remarkable constitutive neurogenic capacity. The regulation and maintenance of its adult neurogenic niches are poorly understood. In mammals, Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance both in embryonic and adult CNS. To better understand how Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance during adult neurogenesis in zebrafish we analysed Notch receptor expression in five neurogenic zones of the adult zebrafish brain. Combining proliferation and glial markers we identified several subsets of Notch receptor expressing cells. We found that 90 [Formula: see text] of proliferating radial glia express notch1a, notch1b and notch3. In contrast, the proliferating non-glial populations of the dorsal telencephalon and hypothalamus rarely express notch3 and about half express notch1a/1b. In the non-proliferating radial glia notch3 is the predominant receptor throughout the brain. In the ventral telencephalon and in the mitotic area of the optic tectum, where cells have neuroepithelial properties, notch1a/1b/3 are expressed in most proliferating cells. However, in the cerebellar niche, although progenitors also have neuroepithelial properties, only notch1a/1b are expressed in a high number of PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. In this region notch3 expression is mostly in Bergmann glia and at low levels in few PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. Additionally, we found that in the proliferation zone of the ventral telencephalon, Notch receptors display an apical high to basal low gradient of expression. Notch receptors are also expressed in subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells. We suggest that the partial regional heterogeneity observed for Notch expression in progenitor cells might be related to the cellular diversity present in each of these neurogenic niches.

  6. Bladder augmentation in three patients with contracted bladder caused by neurogenic bladder

    OpenAIRE

    末盛, 毅; 高橋, 省二; 夏目, 修; 山本, 雅司; 山田, 薫; 百瀬, 均; 塩見, 努

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with contracted bladder caused by neurogenic bladder underwent ileocystoplasty. The primary diagnosis was meningomyelocele for all of them. The operative procedure adopted was Goodwin's Cup-patch method. All cases have obtained increased bladder capacity with improvement of bladder compliance and have been free from urinary incontinence. They were followed up by using clean intermittent self catheterization. Ileocystoplasty combined with clean intermittent self catheterization ...

  7. Early treatment improves urodynamic prognosis in neurogenic voiding dysfunction: 20 years of experience,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia M. Costa Monteiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the association between early treatment and urodynamic improvement in pediatric and adolescent patients with neurogenic bladder. Methodology: Retrospective longitudinal and observational study (between 1990 and 2013 including patients with neurogenic bladder and myelomeningocele treated based on urodynamic results. The authors evaluated the urodynamic follow-up (bladder compliance and maximum bladder capacity and pressure considering the first urodynamic improvement in two years as the outcome variable and early referral as the exposure variable, using a descriptive and multivariate analysis with logistic regression model. Results: Among 230 patients included, 52% had an early referral. The majority were diagnosed as overactive bladder with high bladder pressure (≥40 cm H2O and low bladder compliance (3 mL/cmH2O and were treated with oxybutynin and intermittent catheterization. Urodynamic follow-up results showed 68% of improvement at the second urodynamic examination decreasing bladder pressure and increasing bladder capacity and compliance. The percentage of incontinence and urinary tract infections decreased over treatment. Early referral (one-year old or less increased by 3.5 the probability of urodynamic improvement in two years (95% CI: 1.81-6.77. Conclusion: Treatment onset within the first year of life improves urodynamic prognosis in patients with neurogenic bladder and triplicates the probability of urodynamic improvement in two years. The role of neonatologists and pediatricians in early referral is extremely important.

  8. Neurogenic heterotopic ossification: epidemiology and morphology on conventional radiographs in an early neurological rehabilitation population

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    Seipel, R.; Langner, S.; Lippa, M.; Kuehn, J.P.; Hosten, N. [Ernst Moritz Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Greifswald (Germany); Platz, T. [An-Institut der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, BDH-Klinik Greifswald GmbH, Neurologisches Rehabilitationszentrum und Querschnittgelaehmtenzentrum, Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    To retrospectively evaluate neurogenic heterotopic ossification in an early neurological rehabilitation population (phases B and C) with respect to epidemiology and morphology on conventional radiographs. Over a 4-year period, 1,463 patients treated at a clinic for early neurological rehabilitation were evaluated for clinical symptoms of neurogenic heterotopic ossification. In case of clinical suspicion, plain radiographs of the expected sites were obtained. If heterotopic ossification was detected, the initial and subsequent radiographs were retrospectively analyzed for sites, size, and morphology. Immature lesions were categorized as small (<10 mm) or large (10-100 mm). The prevalence rate of neurogenic heterotopic ossification was 2.05%. The condition was most common in young male adults. The hip was the most common site accounting for more than half of the cases. Two or more ossifications were seen in 56.7% of the affected patients with approximately two-thirds showing bilateral symmetric involvement of corresponding joint regions. The size of ossifications strongly varied interindividually. Small immature lesions demonstrated less progression in size than large lesions during maturation (P < 0.05). Standard radiographs, as a fast and inexpensive technique, allow the expected size progression of heterotopic ossifications during maturation to be estimated, which is relevant in terms of therapeutic decisions, patient mobilization, and neurological rehabilitation. (orig.)

  9. The sea urchin animal pole domain is a Six3-dependent neurogenic patterning center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng; Yaguchi, Junko; Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Angerer, Robert C; Angerer, Lynne M

    2009-04-01

    Two major signaling centers have been shown to control patterning of sea urchin embryos. Canonical Wnt signaling in vegetal blastomeres and Nodal signaling in presumptive oral ectoderm are necessary and sufficient to initiate patterning along the primary and secondary axes, respectively. Here we define and characterize a third patterning center, the animal pole domain (APD), which contains neurogenic ectoderm, and can oppose Wnt and Nodal signaling. The regulatory influence of the APD is normally restricted to the animal pole region, but can operate in most cells of the embryo because, in the absence of Wnt and Nodal, the APD expands throughout the embryo. We have identified many constituent APD regulatory genes expressed in the early blastula and have shown that expression of most of them requires Six3 function. Furthermore, Six3 is necessary for the differentiation of diverse cell types in the APD, including the neurogenic animal plate and immediately flanking ectoderm, indicating that it functions at or near the top of several APD gene regulatory networks. Remarkably, it is also sufficient to respecify the fates of cells in the rest of the embryo, generating an embryo consisting of a greatly expanded, but correctly patterned, APD. A fraction of the large group of Six3-dependent regulatory proteins are orthologous to those expressed in the vertebrate forebrain, suggesting that they controlled formation of the early neurogenic domain in the common deuterostome ancestor of echinoderms and vertebrates.

  10. Congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy in megaconial myopathy due to a mutation in CHKB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gago, Manuel; Dacruz-Alvarez, David; Pintos-Martínez, Elena; Beiras-Iglesias, Andrés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta gene (CHKB) mutations have been identified in Megaconial Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (MDCMC) patients, a very rare inborn error of metabolism with 21 cases reported worldwide. We report the case of a Spanish boy of Caucasian origin who presented a generalized congenital muscular hypotonia, more intense at lower limb muscles, mildly elevated creatine kinase (CK), serum aspartate transaminase (AST) and lactate. Electromyography (EMG) showed neurogenic potentials in the proximal muscles. Histological studies of a muscle biopsy showed neurogenic atrophy with enlarged mitochondria in the periphery of the fibers, and complex I deficiency. Finally, genetic analysis showed the presence of a homozygous mutation in the gene for choline kinase beta (CHKB: NM_005198.4:c.810T>A, p.Tyr270(∗)). We describe here the second Spanish patient whit mutation in CHKB gene, who despite having the same mutation, presented an atypical aspect: congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy progressing to a combined neuropathic and myopathic phenotype (mixed pattern). Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Experience with glycerin for antegrade continence enema in patients with neurogenic bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, David I; Balsara, Zarine R; Routh, Jonathan C; Ross, Sherry S; Wiener, John S

    2013-02-01

    Malone antegrade continence enemas are used in the management of neurogenic bowel to attain fecal continence. Several different irrigation solutions have been described but glycerin, an osmotic laxative that promotes peristalsis, has rarely been mentioned or studied. We assessed clinical outcomes in our patients with a Malone antegrade continence enema using glycerin based irrigation. We retrospectively reviewed patients with neurogenic bowel who underwent a Malone antegrade continence enema procedure between 1997 and 2011. Glycerin diluted with tap water followed by a tap water flush is our preferred irrigation protocol. Bowel regimen outcomes examined included fecal continence, emptying time, leakage from stoma, enema volume, frequency and independence. Of the 23 patients with followup greater than 6 months 19 used glycerin based irrigation. Average age at surgery was 8.8 years. Patients using glycerin instilled a median of 30 ml (mean 29) glycerin and 50 ml (131) tap water. Fecal continence rate was 95% and stoma leakage rate was 16%, and only 16% of patients required daily irrigation. Glycerin is a viable and effective alternative irrigant for antegrade enemas of neurogenic bowel, with an excellent fecal continence rate. The volume of irrigant needed is typically less than 90 ml, which is much less than in published reports using tap water alone. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SPOT14-Positive Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells in the Hippocampus Respond Dynamically to Neurogenic Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlen Knobloch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs in the adult brain is tightly controlled to prevent exhaustion and to ensure proper neurogenesis. Several extrinsic stimuli affect NSPC regulation. However, the lack of unique markers led to controversial results regarding the in vivo behavior of NSPCs to different stimuli. We recently identified SPOT14, which controls NSPC proliferation through regulation of de novo lipogenesis, selectively in low-proliferating NSPCs. Whether SPOT14-expressing (SPOT14+ NSPCs react in vivo to neurogenic regulators is not known. We show that aging is accompanied by a marked disappearance of SPOT14+ NSPCs, whereas running, a positive neurogenic stimulus, increases proliferation of SPOT14+ NSPCs. Furthermore, transient depletion of highly proliferative cells recruits SPOT14+ NSPCs into the proliferative pool. Additionally, we have established endogenous SPOT14 protein staining, reflecting transgenic SPOT14-GFP expression. Thus, our data identify SPOT14 as a potent marker for adult NSPCs that react dynamically to positive and negative neurogenic regulators.

  13. Lumbosacral dysraphism as cause of neurogenic bladder: Magnetic Resonance Imaging based study from SIUT Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Saima; Faiq, Syed Muhammmad; Idrees, Muhammad Khalid

    2015-05-01

    To find the frequency and types of spinal dysraphism in patients presenting with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The cross-sectional study was conducted at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi, from February to September 2011, and comprised patients of either gender 5-15 years of age with neurogenic bladder suspected to be due to lumbosacral dysraphism. They all had magnetic resonance imaging of lumbosacral spine. All images were reviewed by an experienced radiologist and patients were diagnosed as having spinal dysraphism and were categorised according to the radiological features. Data was analysed using SPSS 10. Of the 175 patients in the study, 96(55%) were males and 79(45%) were females with an overall mean age of 7.3±2.15 years (range: 5-15 years). Spinal bony defects were found in 110(62.8%) patients, and of these, 96(87%) had spinal dysraphism. Myelomeningocele, meningocele and sacral agenesis was found in 58(60.4%) of the 96 patient with spinal dysraphism. Spinal dysraphism is the most common cause of neurogenic bladder in children up to 15 years of age and myelomeningocele, meningocele and sacral agenesis comprised more than 60% of such cases.

  14. Changes in the neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxant responses of rabbit corpus cavernosum smooth muscle after cavernous nerve neurotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkan, T; Sarioglu, Y; Yazir, Y

    2010-04-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the reactivity of the corpus cavernosum smooth muscle after unilateral cavernous nerve neurotomy in rabbits. Rabbits (18) were randomly divided into two groups: sham-operated (n = 9) and those subjected to unilateral neurotomy of a 5-mm segment of the cavernous nerve (n = 9). The reactivity of the corpus cavernosum tissue from the neurotomized and sham groups was studied in organ chambers at 4 weeks postoperation. In the neurotomized group, endothelium-dependent relaxation of the corpus cavernosum smooth muscle to carbachol was significantly increased when compared to the sham group. In addition, the sensitivity (i.e., pD(2)) of neurotomized strips to carbachol was also increased when compared to controls. Electrical field stimulation-induced neurogenic relaxation was significantly reduced in the neurotomized group. Relaxation to the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside and to papaverine was similar in the cavernosal tissue of both groups. There was no change in agonist potency. Furthermore, neurotomy had no effect on KCl-induced contractile responses. When tissue contraction was induced with phenylephrine to study relaxation to various stimuli, the tension induced was similar in the neurotomized and the sham control groups. We conclude that unilateral, chronic cavernous nerve neurotomy causes significant functional changes to the penile erectile tissue of rabbits, which may contribute to the development of impotence. Copyright 2010 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  15. A crucial role for the cortico-striato-cortical loop in the pathogenesis of stroke-related neurogenic stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theys, Catherine; De Nil, Luc; Thijs, Vincent; van Wieringen, Astrid; Sunaert, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Neurogenic stuttering is an acquired speech disorder characterized by the occurrence of stuttering-like dysfluencies following brain damage. Because the onset of stuttering in these patients is associated with brain lesions, this condition provides a unique opportunity to study the neural processes underlying speech dysfluencies. Lesion localizations of 20 stroke subjects with neurogenic stuttering and 17 control subjects were compared using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping. The results showed nine left-hemisphere areas associated with the presence of neurogenic stuttering. These areas were largely overlapping with the cortico-basal ganglia-cortical network comprising the inferior frontal cortex, superior temporal cortex, intraparietal cortex, basal ganglia, and their white matter interconnections through the superior longitudinal fasciculus and internal capsule. These results indicated that stroke-induced neurogenic stuttering is not associated with neural dysfunction in one specific brain area but can occur following one or more lesion throughout the cortico-basal ganglia-cortical network. It is suggested that the onset of neurogenic stuttering in stroke subjects results from a disintegration of neural functions necessary for fluent speech. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  16. Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Outcomes following a Conservative Management Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Robert A; Pisansky, Andrew; Fleck, Joseph; Hoversten, Patrick; Cotter, Katherine J; Katorski, Jenna; Liberman, Daniel; Elliott, Sean P

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy is characterized by motor impairment following injury to the developing brain. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction is estimated to affect at least a third of children with cerebral palsy. However there are limited data as patients transition to adulthood. We sought to describe the symptoms, sequelae and management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction in adults with cerebral palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of adult patients with cerebral palsy between 2011 and 2014. Patients with prior bladder reconstruction or catheterization based bladder drainage were excluded from study. Cerebral palsy severity was determined using GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System). A conservative evaluation and treatment paradigm was used. Noninvasive treatments were encouraged. Specifically clean intermittent catheterization, which is often not feasible, is avoided unless urinary retention, hydronephrosis or refractory lower urinary tract symptoms develop. There were 121 patients included in final analysis. Median age was 25 and 61 patients (50%) had GMFCS level V. Noninvasive management failed in 28 of 121 patients (23%) as defined by hydronephrosis in 9, persistent urinary retention in 10 and refractory lower urinary tract symptoms/incontinence in 9. Urethral clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated. Of all patients 25% showed evidence of urolithiasis during the study period. Surgical intervention was rare and associated with significant morbidity. Adults with cerebral palsy may present with variable signs and symptoms of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. Conservative treatment was successful in more than 75% of patients. Clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated in patients in whom conservative treatment failed. Surgical intervention was rarely indicated and it should be reserved for select individuals. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  17. Environmental Enrichment, Age, and PPARα Interact to Regulate Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Lorefice, Clara; Decara, Juan; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands have been shown to modulate recovery after brain insults such as ischemia and irradiation by enhancing neurogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of PPARα receptors on the proliferative rate of neural precursor cells (NPC) in the adult brain. The study was performed in aged Pparα−/− mice exposed to nutritional (treats) and environmental (games) enrichments for 20 days. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of cells containing the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) and the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (Dcx+) in the main neurogenic zones of the adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ), and/or hypothalamus. Results indicated a reduction in the number of BrdU+ cells in the neurogenic zones analyzed as well as Dcx+ cells in the SGZ during aging (2, 6, and 18 months). Pparα deficiency alleviated the age-related reduction of NPC proliferation (BrdU+ cells) in the SVZ of the 18-months-old mice. While no genotype effect on NPC proliferation was detected in the SGZ during aging, an accentuated reduction in the number of Dcx+ cells was observed in the SGZ of the 6-months-old Pparα−/− mice. Exposing the 18-months-old mice to nutritional and environmental enrichments reversed the Pparα−/−-induced impairment of NPC proliferation in the neurogenic zones analyzed. The enriched environment did not modify the number of SGZ Dcx+ cells in the 18 months old Pparα−/− mice. These results identify PPARα receptors as a potential target to counteract the naturally observed decline in adult NPC proliferation associated with aging and impoverished environments. PMID:27013951

  18. [Urodynamic changes after bladder augmentation surgery in paediatric patients with myelomeningocele due to neurogenic bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza Torres, Raúl Ignacio; Galarza-Flores, Mario Eduardo; Gómez-Castellanos, Julio Cesar; Barrera-de León, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Augmentation cystoplasty is a successful surgical procedure for the management of neurogenic bladder in children in order to improve urodynamic parameters. The aim of this article is to describe urodynamic changes after augmentation cystoplasty in children with myelomeningocele. A descriptive cross-sectional study including children aged 8-16 years with a myelomeningocele operated on for augmentation cystoplasty surgery with sigmoid colon segments due to a neurogenic bladder from the years 2003-2013. A urodynamic study was conducted before and after the surgical procedure. Non-probabilistic sample of consecutive cases. Descriptive statistics with frequencies and percentages, medians, and ranges. Inferential intra-group comparison with the Wilcoxon test and inter-group with Mann-Whitney U. SPSS 20.0 statistical package. The study included 50 patients, of whom 25 were male and 25 were female, with a median age of 12 years (range, 6-15 years). Bladder capacity improved from 52.8% to 95.9% (p<0.001), uninhibited contractions 1.4-1.8, contraction intensity 47-8.5 (p<0.001), mean pre-surgical and post-surgical filling pressure 40.8cm H2O and 11.0cm H2O, respectively (p<0.001), mean emptying pressure 48.5 vs. 3.6cm H2O (p<0.001), and bladder accommodation 4.6 vs. 41.3cm H2O (p<0.001). Augmentation cystoplasty with sigmoid colon significantly improved urodynamic parameters, such as bladder accommodation and filling pressure in children with myelomeningocele-associated neurogenic bladder. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental enrichment, age and PPARα interact to regulate proliferation in neurogenic niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita ePerez-Martin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα ligands have been shown to modulate recovery after brain insults such as ischemia and irradiation by enhancing neurogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of PPARα receptors on the proliferative rate of neural precursor cells (NPC in the adult brain. The study was performed in aged Pparα-/- mice exposed to nutritional (treats and environmental (games enrichments for 20 days. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of cells containing the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU+ and the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (Dcx+ in the main neurogenic zones of the adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ, subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ and/or hypothalamus. Results indicated a reduction in the number of BrdU+ cells in the neurogenic zones analyzed as well as Dcx+ cells in the SGZ during aging (2, 6, 18 months. Pparα deficiency alleviated the age-related reduction of NPC proliferation (BrdU+ cells in the SVZ of the 18-months-old mice. While no genotype effect on NPC proliferation was detected in the SGZ during aging, an accentuated reduction in the number of Dcx+ cells was observed in the SGZ of the 6-months-old Pparα-/- mice. Exposing the 18-months-old mice to nutritional and environmental enrichments reversed the Pparα-/--induced impairment of NPC proliferation in the neurogenic zones analyzed. The enriched environment did not modify the number of SGZ Dcx+ cells in the 18 months old Pparα-/- mice. These results identify PPARα receptors as a potential target to counteract the naturally observed decline in adult NPC proliferation associated with aging and impoverished environments.

  20. Neurogenic vasodilatation in isolated bovine and canine penile arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, A; Gillespie, J S

    1983-01-01

    Field stimulation of isolated, perfused bovine or canine penile arteries produced dilatation, after the adrenergic motor component of the response had been blocked with guanethidine and the vessels had developed a background tone. The vasodilatation was blocked by tetrodotoxin but not by atropine. The vasodilator responses to field stimulation were compared with those produced by ATP, by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and by the inhibitory factor extracted from the bovine retractor penis muscle. Of the three putative transmitters, the inhibitory factor produced responses that most closely resembled those to field stimulation. Haemoglobin, which blocks non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic inhibitory transmission in the bovine and canine retractor penis muscles, did not impair the vasodilatations produced by ATP or VIP, but slowly reduced or abolished those produced by field stimulation or by the inhibitory factor. Haemoglobin itself produced a powerful constriction of the isolated penile arteries. The results are compatable with the possibility that the inhibitory factor from the bovine retractor penis muscle (which may be the inhibitory transmitter in that muscle) is, or closely resembles, the transmitter of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic vasodilator fibres in the penile arteries of dog and ox. PMID:6684686

  1. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Against the Odds Exhibition Opens Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents / ... April 17, Dr. Donald Lindberg officially opened the exhibition, "Against the Odds: Making a Difference in Global ...

  2. New Frontiers of Basic Science Research in Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazato, Minoru; Kadekawa, Katsumi; Kitta, Takeya; Wada, Naoki; Shimizu, Nobutaka; de Groat, William C; Birder, Lori A; Kanai, Anthony J; Saito, Seiichi; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    The lower urinary tract's main functions are storage and elimination. The micturition reflex pathway is modulated by the spinobulbospinal reflex pathway as well as higher brain centers involved in the voluntary micturition control. Micturition is sensitive to numerous injuries, resulting in various types of dysfunction. Animal studies indicate that lower urinary tract dysfunction partly depends on plasticity of the neural pathways. Reflex plasticity is associated with changes in ion channels, receptors, and numerous mediators. Animal models may aid in understanding the mechanisms leading to pathologic conditions and the plasticity in reflex pathways to the lower urinary tract after neurogenic lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Treating Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Tobias; Schneider, Marc P; Bachmann, Lucas M; Blok, Bertil F M; Groen, Jan; Hoen, Lisette A 't; Castro-Diaz, David; Padilla Fernández, Bárbara; Del Popolo, Giulio; Musco, Stefania; Hamid, Rizwan; Ecclestone, Hazel; Karsenty, Gilles; Phé, Véronique; Pannek, Jürgen; Kessler, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a promising therapy for non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and might also be a valuable option in patients with an underlying neurological disorder. We systematically reviewed all available evidence on the efficacy and safety of TENS for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. The review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. After screening 1943 articles, 22 studies (two randomised controlled trials, 14 prospective cohort studies, five retrospective case series, and one case report) enrolling 450 patients were included. Eleven studies reported on acute TENS and 11 on chronic TENS. In acute TENS and chronic TENS, the mean increase of maximum cystometric capacity ranged from 69ml to 163ml and from 4ml to 156ml, the mean change of bladder volume at first detrusor overactivity from a decrease of 13ml to an increase of 175ml and from an increase of 10ml to 120ml, a mean decrease of maximum detrusor pressure at first detrusor overactivity from 18 cmH20 to 72 cmH20 and 8 cmH20, and a mean decrease of maximum storage detrusor pressure from 20 cmH20 to 58 cmH2O and from 3 cmH20 to 8 cmH2O, respectively. In chronic TENS, a mean decrease in the number of voids and leakages per 24h ranged from 1 to 3 and from 0 to 4, a mean increase of maximum flow rate from 2ml/s to 7ml/s, and a mean change of postvoid residual from an increase of 26ml to a decrease of 85ml. No TENS-related serious adverse events have been reported. Risk of bias and confounding was high in most studies. Although preliminary data suggest TENS might be effective and safe for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, the evidence base is poor and more reliable data from well-designed randomised controlled trials are needed to make definitive conclusions. Early data suggest that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation might be effective and safe for

  4. Back Pain, Neurogenic Symptoms, and Physical Function in Relation to Spondylolisthesis among Elderly Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denard, Patrick J.; Holton, Kathleen F.; Miller, Jessica; Fink, Howard A.; Kado, Deborah M.; Marshall, Lynn M.; Yoo, Jung U.

    2010-01-01

    Background Context Degenerative spondylolisthesis is a presumed cause of back pain. Previous studies of spondylolisthesis and back pain included only women or combined results for men and women. Comparisons of the frequency of back pain, neurogenic symptoms, and functional limitations specifically among elderly men with and without spondylolisthesis are needed. Purpose To determine associations of prevalent spondylolisthesis with back pain symptoms, neurogenic symptoms, and functional limitations among elderly men. Study Design/ Setting: Cross-sectional epidemiologic study conducted within the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) cohort. The MrOS cohort is comprised of 5,995 community dwelling men ages ≥65 years who were recruited at 6 US academic medical centers. Extensive self-reported data and lumbar spine radiographs were obtained for all MrOS participants at baseline. Patient Sample For this study, 300 men were selected at random specifically for the evaluation of spondylolisthesis on the baseline spine radiographs. Outcome Measures Standardized questionnaires were used to assess self-reported back pain, leg pain (radiculopathy), lower extremity numbness (paresthesias) and lower extremity weakness occurring in the past 12 months, and to ascertain current difficulty with activities of daily living. Methods In the present study, radiographic spondylolisthesis was classified as forward slip of ≥5%. Prevalence of back pain, neurogenic symptoms and difficulty with activities of daily living were compared between men with and without spondylolisthesis using chisquare or Fisher’s exact tests. Results Spondylolisthesis was present among 92 (31%) men. Among men with and without spondylolisthesis, back pain (63% vs. 67%, p=0.46) and moderate/severe back pain (41% vs. 38%, p=0.76) were reported with similar frequency. Men with spondylolisthesis more often reported radiculopathy (33% vs. 22%, p=0.06), paresthesias (18% vs. 11%, p= 0.10) and weakness (18% vs. 9%, p=0

  5. Edema pulmonar neurogênico: relato de dois casos Neurogenic pulmonary edema: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desanka Dragosavac

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available O edema pulmonar neurogênico é rara e grave complicação de pacientes com traumatismo craniencefálico (TCE. Pode ocorrer também em outras patologias do sistema nervoso central, tais como acidentes vasculares cerebrais (AVC, tumores ou após crises epilépticas, entre outras. Foram avaliados 36 casos com TCE grave e quatro pacientes com AVC, internados na UTI geral, no período de janeiro a setembro 1995. Nesse intervalo de tempo foram diagnosticados dois casos de edema pulmonar neurogênico, um ocorrendo em paciente com TCE grave e outro em paciente com AVC hemorrágico. O diagnóstico foi estabelecido pelo rápido desenvolvimento de edema pulmonar, com hipoxemia grave, queda da complacência pulmonar e infiltrados difusos bilaterais sem história prévia de aspiração traqueal ou outro fator de risco para o desenvolvimento de síndrome de angústia respiratória aguda. No primeiro paciente com trauma craniencefálico, o edema neurogênico foi diagnosticado na internação, uma hora após o trauma, com concomitante reação inflamatória grave e boa evolução em três dias. O outro caso, com AVC hemorrágico, desenvolveu edema neurogênico no quarto dia após drenagem de hematoma intraparenquimatoso, evoluindo para o óbito.Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a rare and serious complication in patients with head injury. It also may develop after a variety of cerebral insults such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumors and after epileptic seizures. Thirty six patients with severe head injury and four patients with cerebrovascular insults treated in Intensive Care Unit of HC-UNICAMP from January to September 1995 were evaluated. In this period there were two patients with neurogenic pulmonary edema, one with head injury and other with intracerebral hemorrhage. Diagnosis was made by rapid onset of pulmonary edema, severe hypoxemia, decrease of pulmonary complacence and diffuse pulmonary infiltrations, without previous history of tracheal

  6. Imaging of spinal stenosis: neurogenic intermittent claudication and cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Timothy P

    2012-07-01

    Spinal stenosis in either the cervical or lumbar spinal segments is one of the most common indications for spine imaging and intervention, particularly among the elderly. This article examines the pathophysiology and imaging of the corresponding clinical syndromes, cervical spondylotic myelopathy or neurogenic intermittent claudication. The specificity fault of spine imaging is readily evident in evaluation of spinal stenosis, as many patients with anatomic cervical or lumbar central canal narrowing are asymptomatic. Imaging also may be insensitive to dynamic lesions. Those imaging features that identify symptomatic patients, or predict response to interventions, are emphasized. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bioimpedance based monitoring system for people with neurogenic dysfunction of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Alessandro; Rossi, Stefano; Fanucci, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with impaired bladder volume sensation have the necessity to monitor bladder level in order to avoid urinary tract infections and urinary reflux that can lead to renal failure. In this paper the the effectiveness of an embedded and wearable solution for bladder volume monitoring using the bioimpedance measurement is tested. Data are streamed real-time using Bluetooth wireless technology. The bioimpedance measurements on a healthy subject prove the effectiveness of the proposed solution. In the future the system will be evaluated in real world scenarios with patients affected by spinal paralysis and bladder neurogenic dysfunction.

  8. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Energie sombre, matière noire J.-J. Dalmais - J. Maréchal Du 11 au 27 novembre 2014, CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal A l’image des particules atomiques qui ont tissé des liens pour créer la matière, deux artistes haut bugistes croisent leurs regards et conjuguent leurs expressions singulières pour faire naître une vision commune de l’univers, produit des forces primordiales. Les sculptures de Jean-Jacques Dalmais et les peintures de Jacki Maréchal se rencontrent pour la première fois et se racontent par un enrichissement mutuel la belle histoire de la Vie. Dialogue magique des œuvres en mouvement qui questionnent en écho l’énergie sombre et la matière noire. Cette harmonieuse confluence de jeux de miroir et de résonnance illumine de poésie et de sobriété l’espace expos&...

  9. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The Elementary Particles of Painting Alfonso Fratteggiani Bianchi and Ermanno Imbergamo From September 26 to October 7, 2016 CERN Meyrin, Main Building With intentions similar to those of CERN physicists, the artist Alfonso Fratteggiani Bianchi investigates the color pigment, studying its interaction with light and with the support on which it is deposited. He creates monochrome paintings by spreading the color pigment in the pure state on stones, without using glue or any other type of adhesive. With intentions similar to artists, the physicist Ermanno Imbergamo investigates the use of luminescent wavelength shifters, materials commonly used in Particle Physics, for art. He creates other monochrome artworks, which disclose further aspects of interaction among light, color pigments and support. For more information: staff.association@cern.ch | Tel: 022 767 28 19

  10. Exhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    Cosmos KOLI Du 15 au 26 janvier 2018 CERN Meyrin, Main Building (Nébuleuse d'Orion- KOLI) KOLI, Artiste confirmé, diplômé de l’Académie de Beaux Arts de Tirana, depuis 26 ans en Suisse, où il a participé à maintes expositions collectives et organisé 10 expositions privées avec  beaucoup de succès, s’exprime actuellement dans un bonheur de couleur et de matières qui côtoient des hautes sphères… le cosmos ! Gagnant d’un premier prix lors d’une exposition collective organisée par le consulat Italien, il s’est installé au bord du lac dans le canton de Vaud où il vit depuis maintenant déjà 13 ans. www.kolicreation.com Pour plus d’informations et demandes d’accès : staff.association@cern.ch | T&eacut...

  11. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    La couleur des jours oriSio Du 2 au 12 mai 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal oriSio - Motus Suite à un fort intérêt pour la Chine et une curiosité pour un médium très ancien, la laque ! Je réinterprète cet art à travers un style abstrait. Je présente ici des laques sur aluminium, travaillés au plasma et ensuite colorés à l’aide de pigments pour l’essentiel. Mes œuvres je les veux brutes, déchirées, évanescentes, gondolées, voire trouées mais avec une belle approche de profondeur de la couleur.   Pour plus d’informations : staff.association@cern.ch | Tél: 022 766 37 38

  12. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Still Life Jérémy Bajulaz Du 25 septembre au 6 octobre 2017 CERN Meyrin, Main Building (Aubergine - Jérémy Bajulaz) Né en 1991 en Haute-Savoie, France. Diplômé de l'Ecole Emile Cohl à Lyon, Jérémy Bajulaz intègre en 2014 le programme d'artiste en résidence au Centre Genevois de Gravure Contemporaine. C'est là que son travail prendra corps, autour de la lumière et de ses vibrations aux travers de sujets comme le portrait et la nature morte, dans le souci de l'observation; le regard prenant une place importante dans le processus créatif. Lauréat 2017 du VII Premio AAAC, son travail a été présenté dans de nombreuses expositions collectives, en 2015 au Bâtiment d’Art Contemporain de Genève, en 2016 au 89e Salon de Lyon et du ...

  13. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    La mosaïque ou quand détruire permet de construire Lauren Decamps Du 28 novembre au 9 décembre 2016 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal Paysage d'Amsterdam - Lauren Decamps On ne doit jamais rien détruire qu'on ne soit sûr de pouvoir remplacer aussi avantageusement " écrivait Plutarque dans ses Œuvres morales du 1er siècle après JC. L'artiste mosaïste Lauren Decamps adhère à cette idée et tente à sa manière de donner une nouvelle vie à ses matériaux en les taillant puis les réassemblant, créant ainsi des œuvres abstraites et figuratives.

  14. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Firmament des toiles Joëlle Lalagüe Du 6 au 16 juin 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal Phylaë Voyage - Joëlle Lalagüe. Each picture is an invitation for a cosmic trip. This is a whispering of soul, which comes from origins. A symphony of the world, some notes of love, a harmony for us to fly to infinity. Pour plus d’informations et demandes d'accès : staff.association@cern.ch | Tél: 022 766 37 38

  15. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    COLORATION Sandra Duchêne From September 5 to 16, 2016 CERN Meyrin, Main Building La recherche de l’Universel. Après tout ! C’est de l’Amour ! What else to say ? …La couleur, l’ENERGIE de la vie…

  16. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Le Point Isabelle Gailland Du 20 février au 3 mars 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal La Diagonale - Isabelle Gailland. Au départ, un toujours même point minuscule posé au centre de ce que la toile est un espace. Une réplique d'autres points, condensés, alignés, isolés, disséminés construiront dans leur extension, la ligne. Ces lignes, croisées, courbées, déviées, prolongées, seront la structure contenant et séparant la matière des couleurs. La rotation de chaque toile en cours d'exécution va offrir un accès illimité à la non-forme et à la forme. Le point final sera l'ouverture sur différents points de vue de ce que le point et la ligne sont devenus une représentation pour l'œil et l'im...

  17. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Harmonie Nathalie Lenoir Du 4 au 15 septembre 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal Peindre est un langage. Le tracé du pinceau sur le lin en est l'expression. A qui appartient un tableau en définitive ? A celui qui l'a peint ? A celui qui le regarde ? A celui qui l'emporte ? La peinture est une émotion partagée... Laissez-vous projeter de l'autre côté de la toile, prenez un moment pour rêver, en harmonie avec les éléments, parce-que la peinture parle à votre âme… Pour plus d’informations et demandes d’accès : staff.association@cern.ch | Tél : 022 766 37 38

  18. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Œuvres recentes Fabienne Wyler Du 6 au 17 février 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal L'escalier du diable B - aquarelle, encre de Chine XLV - Fabienne Wyler. En relation avec certains procédés d’écriture contemporaine (par ex. Webern ou certaines musiques conçues par ordinateur), les compositions picturales de Fabienne Wyler s’élaborent à partir de « modules » (groupes de quadrangles) qu’elle reproduit en leur faisant subir toutes sortes de transformations et de déplacements : étirements, renversements, rotations, effet miroir, transpositions, déphasages, superpositions, etc., et ceci à toutes les échelles. Au fil des œuvres sont apparues des séries intitulées, Bifurcations, Intermittences, Attracteurs étranges, Polyrythmies. Ces titres ont un lien &e...

  19. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Gaïa Manuella Cany Du 10 au 28 avril 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal Oiseau - Manuella Cany. Tableaux abstraits inspirés de vues satellites ou photos prises du ciel. Certains sont à la frontière du figuratif alors que d'autres permettent de laisser libre cours à son imagination. Aux détails infinis, ces tableaux sont faits pour être vus de loin et de près grâce à une attention toute particulière apportée aux effets de matières et aux couleurs le long de volutes tantôt nuancées tantôt contrastées.   Pour plus d’informations : staff.association@cern.ch | Tél: 022 766 37 38

  20. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Parallels vision Astronomical subjects which evoke extrasensory kinetic visions Alberto Di Fabio From 8 to 10 October, CERN Meyrin, Main Building In the framework of Italy@cern, the Staff Association presents Alberto Di Fabio. Di Fabio’s work is inspired by the fundamental laws of the physical world, as well as organic elements and their interrelation. His paintings and works on paper merge the worlds of art and science, depicting natural forms and biological structures in vivid colour and imaginative detail. For all additional information: staff.association@cern.ch | Tel: 022 767 28 19

  1. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Les vibrantes Patrick Robbe-Grillet Du 30 octobre au 10 novembre 2017 CERN Meyrin, Main Building Patrick Robbe-Grillet - Feux d'artifices Qui est Patrick Robbe-Grillet ? Artiste Franco-Suisse, né en 1968 à Genève. En recherche du sentiment de paix, autodidacte, après un séjour en Chine en 2000, puis au Japon en 2002, suivi d’un long questionnement, il trouve sa voie dans la peinture, élément libérateur de sa créativité et expression de sa sensibilité à fleur de peau. « La Chine m’a enseigné les courbes, les nuances. Le Japon, la ligne droite, la rigueur. » Vous avez su rendre visible l'invisible ! - commentaire de Monsieur Fawaz Gruosi Pour plus d’informations et demandes d’accès : staff.association@cern.ch | Tél : 022 766 37 38

  2. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Jan Hladky, physicien de l'Institut de Physique de l'Académie des Sciences de la République tchèque, et membre de la collaboration Alice, expose ses œuvres au Bâtiment principal du 20 avril au 6 mai. Son exposition est dédiée aux victimes du séisme de Sendai. Des copies de ses œuvres seront mises en vente et les sommes récoltées seront versées au profit des victimes.

  3. Human tau expression reduces adult neurogenesis in a mouse model of tauopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komuro, Yutaro; Xu, Guixiang; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lamb, Bruce T

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is a central feature of a class of neurodegenerative diseases termed tauopathies. Notably, there is increasing evidence that tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease, are also characterized by a reduction in neurogenesis, the birth of adult neurons. However, the exact relationship between hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of MAPT and neurogenic deficits remains unclear, including whether this is an early- or late-stage disease marker. In the present study, we used the genomic-based hTau mouse model of tauopathy to examine the temporal and spatial regulation of adult neurogenesis during the course of the disease. Surprisingly, hTau mice exhibited reductions in adult neurogenesis in 2 different brain regions by as early as 2 months of age, before the development of robust MAPT pathology in this model. This reduction was found to be due to reduced proliferation and not because of enhanced apoptosis in the hippocampus. At these same time points, hTau mice also exhibited altered MAPT phosphorylation with neurogenic precursors. To examine whether the effects of MAPT on neurogenesis were cell autonomous, neurospheres prepared from hTau animals were examined in vitro, revealing a growth deficit when compared with non-transgenic neurosphere cultures. Taken together, these studies provide evidence that altered adult neurogenesis is a robust and early marker of altered, cell-autonomous function of MAPT in the hTau mouse mode of tauopathy and that altered adult neurogenesis should be examined as a potential marker and therapeutic target for human tauopathies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Highly efficient iodide/triiodide dye-sensitized solar cells with gel-coated reduce graphene oxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites as the counter electrode exhibiting an open-circuit voltage of 0.90 V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huiqin; Neo, Chin Yong; Ouyang, Jianyong

    2013-07-24

    To increase the open-circuit voltage (Voc) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), it is crucial to enhance the photovoltaic efficiency of DSCs. Here, we report an effective method to significantly improve the Voc and photovoltaic efficiency of DSCs by using gel-coated composites of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the counter electrode. Gel-coated rGO-SWCNT composites outperform Pt, rGO and SWCNTs in catalyzing the reduction of I3(-) and functioning as the counter electrode of DSCs. The Voc and power conversion efficiency (PCE) are 0.86 V and 8.37% for fresh DSCs with the composite of 80 wt % rGO and 20 wt % SWCNTs, significantly higher than those (Voc = 0.77 V, PCE = 7.79%) of control DSCs with Pt fabricated by pyrolysis as the counter electrode. The Voc value of DSCs with rGO-SWCNT composites as the counter electrode further increases to 0.90 V after one week. The high Voc and PCE are ascribed to the synergetic effects of rGO and SWCNTs in reducing the overpotential of the I3(-) reduction. RGO with high specific surface area can have high electrocatalytic activity, whereas SWCNTs give rise to high conductivity for the composites and facilitate the penetration of the redox species into rGO sheets by preventing the agglomeration of the rGO sheets. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to report iodide/triiodide DSCs with both high Voc and PCE.

  5. Heparan sulfate alterations in extracellular matrix structures and fibroblast growth factor-2 signaling impairment in the aged neurogenic niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Taihei; Kerever, Aurelien; Yoshimura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Yuji; Nonaka, Risa; Higashi, Kyohei; Toida, Toshihiko; Mercier, Frederic; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri

    2017-08-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle decreases with age. In the subventricular zone, the specialized extracellular matrix structures, known as fractones, contact neural stem cells and regulate neurogenesis. Fractones are composed of extracellular matrix components, such as heparan sulfate proteoglycans. We previously found that fractones capture and store fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) via heparan sulfate binding, and may deliver FGF-2 to neural stem cells in a timely manner. The heparan sulfate (HS) chains in the fractones of the aged subventricular zone are modified based on immunohistochemistry. However, how aging affects fractone composition and subsequent FGF-2 signaling and neurogenesis remains unknown. The formation of the FGF-fibroblast growth factor receptor-HS complex is necessary to activate FGF-2 signaling and induce the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk1/2). In this study, we observed a reduction in HS 6-O-sulfation, which is critical for FGF-2 signal transduction, and failure of the FGF-2-induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 in the aged subventricular zone. In addition, we observed increased HS 6-O-endo-sulfatase, an enzyme that may be responsible for the HS modifications in aged fractones. In conclusion, the data revealed that heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfation is reduced and FGF-2-dependent Erk1/2 signaling is impaired in the aged subventricular zone. HS modifications in fractones might play a role in the reduced neurogenic activity in aging brains. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Neurogenic polyps of the gastrointestinal tract: a clinicopathologic review with emphasis on differential diagnosis and syndromic associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Harpaz, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Primary neurogenic gastrointestinal polyps are encountered relatively frequently in routine pathology practice. They encompass a variety of neoplastic entities with clinical, morphologic, and molecular features that reflect the diversity of neural elements within the gastrointestinal system. Although most are benign and encountered incidentally, accurate diagnosis may have important clinical implications because of the associations of certain neurogenic polyps with familial syndromes or other conditions. We review the pathology of these polyps with an emphasis on the diagnostic challenges that they pose and on newly described subtypes.

  7. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel localized to non-neuronal airway cells promotes non-neurogenic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassini, Romina; Pedretti, Pamela; Moretto, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel, localized to airway sensory nerves, has been proposed to mediate airway inflammation evoked by allergen and cigarette smoke (CS) in rodents, via a neurogenic mechanism. However the limited clinical evidence for the role of neurogenic...... inflammation in asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease raises an alternative possibility that airway inflammation is promoted by non-neuronal TRPA1.By using Real-Time PCR and calcium imaging, we found that cultured human airway cells, including fibroblasts, epithelial and smooth muscle cells express...

  8. Investigation of the mechanisms underlying the high acetylene-reducing activity exhibited by the soil bacterial community from BC2 horizon in the permafrost zone of the East Siberian larch forest bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, S; Desyatkin, R V; Hashidoko, Y

    2014-04-01

    This study addressed a microbial composition of East Siberian larch forest bed soil and focused on major nitrogen-fixing bacterial consortia showing the highest capacity to induce acetylene reduction. The ability of a soil microbial consortium to effectively reduce acetylene was investigated using gellan gum medium. In parallel, each microbial component in the medium was analysed by a 16S rRNA gene-targeting denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), together with an attempt to isolate pure culture of the culturable eubacteria. Six strains of the isolated bacteria were characterized as diazotrophs, and Burkholderia xenovorans was found to be one of the major nitrogen fixer in the bacterial community cultured from the BC2 horizon soil microbiota. Co-culturing of either a diazotrophic Pseudomonas sp. with a nondiazotrophic Luteibacter sp. or a diazotrophic Luteibacter sp. with a nondiazotrophic bacterium B. xenovorans resulted in a marked elevation in acetylene reduction over that observed in the pure culture of each diazotroph. A promotion of acetylene reduction in mixed bacterial cultures, particularly when the cultures included Luteibacter, was clearly observed due to an increase in the bacterial cell population. Our study, which showed that some unculturable bacteria including anaerobic Clostridium sp. that can provide major contribution to nitrogen fixation, may provide key information useful in identifying the 'missing link' in the nitrogen cycle in the cryogenic soil ecosystem of boreal forests. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Effects and Safety of Aqueous Extract of Poncirus fructus in Spinal Cord Injury with Neurogenic Bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hee Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects and safety of the aqueous extract of the dried, immature fruit of Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf., known as Poncirus fructus (PF, in spinal cord injury (SCI patients with neurogenic bowel. Methods. Thirty-one SCI patients with neurogenic bowel were recruited. Patients were evaluated based on clinical information, constipation score, Bristol Stool Form Scale, stool retention score using plain abdominal radiograph, and colon transit time. PF was administered in dosages of 800 mg each prior to breakfast and lunch for 14 days. Results. The morphological feature of the stool before and after administration indicated a statistically significant difference from 3.52 ± 1.33 to 4.32 ± 1.44 points (p<0.05. Stool retention score before and after administration of PF was represented with low significance (7.25 ± 1.60 to 6.46 ± 1.53 points in the whole colon (p<0.05, and the colon transit time was significantly shortened (57.41 ± 20.7 to 41.2 ± 25.5 hours in terms of the whole transit time (p<0.05. Side effects were observed in 7 people (28.0% consisting of 2 people with soft stools and 5 people with diarrhea. Conclusion. For SCI patients, PF administration significantly improved defecation patterns, defecation retention, and colon transit time. PF could be an effective aid to improve colonic motility and constipation.

  10. The vascular and neurogenic factors associated with erectile dysfunction in patients after pelvic fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yong; Wendong, Sun; Zhao, Shengtian; Liu, Tongyan; Liu, Yuqiang; Zhang, Xiulin; Yuan, Mingzhen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of pelvic fractures. To identify the vascular and neurogenic factors associated with ED, 120 patients admitted with ED after traumatic pelvic fracture between January 2009 and June 2013 were enrolled in this study. All patients answered the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire. Nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) testing confirmed the occurrence of ED in 96 (80%) patients on whom penile duplex ultrasound and neurophysiological testing were further performed. Of these ED patients 29 (30%) were demonstrated only with vascular abnormality, 41 (42.7%) were detected only with neural abnormality, 26 (27.1%) revealed mixed abnormalities. Of the 55 patients (29+26) with vascular problems, 7 patients (12.7%) with abnormal arterial response to intracavernous injection of Bimix (15mg papaverine and 1mg phentolamine), 31 (56.4%) with corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction and 17 (30.9%) had both problems. Of the 67 (41+26) patients with abnormal neurophysiological outcomes, 51 (76.1%) with abnormal bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR), 20 (29.9%) with pathological pudendal nerve evoked potentials (PDEPs) and 25 (37.3%) with abnormal posterior tibial somatosensory nerve evoked potentials (PTSSEPs). Our observation indicated that neurogenic factors are important for the generation of ED in patients with pelvic fracture; venous impotence is more common than arteriogenic ED. PMID:26689522

  11. Recent Advances in Neurogenic Small Molecules as Innovative Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Herrera-Arozamena

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system of adult mammals has long been considered as a complex static structure unable to undergo any regenerative process to refurbish its dead nodes. This dogma was challenged by Altman in the 1960s and neuron self-renewal has been demonstrated ever since in many species, including humans. Aging, neurodegenerative, and some mental diseases are associated with an exponential decrease in brain neurogenesis. Therefore, the controlled pharmacological stimulation of the endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs niches might counteract the neuronal loss in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and other pathologies, opening an exciting new therapeutic avenue. In the last years, druggable molecular targets and signalling pathways involved in neurogenic processes have been identified, and as a consequence, different drug types have been developed and tested in neuronal plasticity. This review focuses on recent advances in neurogenic agents acting at serotonin and/or melatonin systems, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, sigma receptors, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2.

  12. Novel Surgical Approach for Decompression of the Scalene Triangle in Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Robert R; Ricci, Joseph A; Eberlin, Kyle R

    2018-02-02

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a cause of upper extremity and shoulder dysfunction. TOS can present with a wide range of symptoms due to compression of the brachial plexus or its branches during their passage through the cervicothoracobrachial region or scalene triangle. There are three types of TOS: arterial, venous, and neurogenic. Neurogenic TOS (nTOS) is by far the most frequent type and represents more than 95% of all cases. Historically, surgical intervention for all types of TOS has evolved based on the treatment for a vascular etiology and has typically included a first rib resection. Despite nTOS being by far the more common type, most previous interventions have not considered treatment via peripheral nerve decompression.We describe surgical treatment of nTOS, performed on an outpatient basis, which focuses on the surgical decompression of the structures associated with the scalene triangle in conjunction with release of the pectoralis minor insertion through limited incisions. The procedure avoids the morbidity associated with first rib resection and is successful in ameliorating nTOS symptoms. Further, we propose a nomenclature shift to scalene triangle syndrome (STS) to reflect the nerve and arterial compressions needing to be addressed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile eCoste

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs. Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  14. Boundary Caps Give Rise to Neurogenic Stem Cells and Terminal Glia in the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Gresset

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available While neurogenic stem cells have been identified in rodent and human skin, their manipulation and further characterization are hampered by a lack of specific markers. Here, we perform genetic tracing of the progeny of boundary cap (BC cells, a neural-crest-derived cell population localized at peripheral nerve entry/exit points. We show that BC derivatives migrate along peripheral nerves to reach the skin, where they give rise to terminal glia associated with dermal nerve endings. Dermal BC derivatives also include cells that self-renew in sphere culture and have broad in vitro differentiation potential. Upon transplantation into adult mouse dorsal root ganglia, skin BC derivatives efficiently differentiate into various types of mature sensory neurons. Together, this work establishes the embryonic origin, pathway of migration, and in vivo neurogenic potential of a major component of skin stem-like cells. It provides genetic tools to study and manipulate this population of high interest for medical applications.

  15. The vascular and neurogenic factors associated with erectile dysfunction in patients after pelvic fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Guan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Erectile dysfunction (ED is a common complication of pelvic fractures. To identify the vascular and neurogenic factors associated with ED, 120 patients admitted with ED after traumatic pelvic fracture between January 2009 and June 2013 were enrolled in this study. All patients answered the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5 questionnaire. Nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT testing confirmed the occurrence of ED in 96 (80% patients on whom penile duplex ultrasound and neurophysiological testing were further performed. Of these ED patients 29 (30% were demonstrated only with vascular abnormality, 41 (42.7% were detected only with neural abnormality, 26 (27.1% revealed mixed abnormalities. Of the 55 patients (29+26 with vascular problems, 7 patients (12.7% with abnormal arterial response to intracavernous injection of Bimix (15mg papaverine and 1mg phentolamine, 31 (56.4% with corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction and 17 (30.9% had both problems. Of the 67 (41+26 patients with abnormal neurophysiological outcomes, 51 (76.1% with abnormal bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR, 20 (29.9% with pathological pudendal nerve evoked potentials (PDEPs and 25 (37.3% with abnormal posterior tibial somatosensory nerve evoked potentials (PTSSEPs. Our observation indicated that neurogenic factors are important for the generation of ED in patients with pelvic fracture; venous impotence is more common than arteriogenic ED.

  16. Creating a neurogenic environment: the role of BDNF and FGF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin; Henry, Rebecca A; Hughes, Stephanie M; Connor, Bronwen

    2007-09-01

    Regional environmental cues present in the adult brain determine the fate of adult neural progenitor cells. To determine whether the growth factors BDNF or FGF2 can create a neurogenic environment outside the SVZ, we used AAV(1/2)-mediated gene transfer to produce ectopic BDNF or FGF2 expression in the normal adult rat striatum and transplanted SVZ-derived progenitor cells into this region. We observed that ectopic expression of BDNF in the striatum promoted neuronal differentiation of transplanted adult neural progenitor cells, while FGF2 expression supported the survival and proliferation of transplanted progenitor cells in the adult striatum. However, region-specific neuronal differentiation of transplanted progenitor cells was not observed in the adult striatum, suggesting ectopic BDNF or FGF2 expression was insufficient for the generation of mature neuronal phenotypes. This study provides direct in vivo evidence that ectopic striatal expression of either BDNF or FGF2 can induce neurogenesis in non-neurogenic regions of the adult brain.

  17. Oral mucosa stem cells alleviates spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder symptoms in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Sam; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Lee, Sung-Min; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jin, Jun-Jang; Kim, Khae-Hawn

    2014-05-13

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) deteriorates various physical functions, in particular, bladder problems occur as a result of damage to the spinal cord. Stem cell therapy for SCI has been focused as the new strategy to treat the injuries and to restore the lost functions. The oral mucosa cells are considered as the stem cells-like progenitor cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of oral mucosa stem cells on the SCI-induced neurogenic bladder in relation with apoptotic neuronal cell death and cell proliferation. The contraction pressure and the contraction time in the urinary bladder were increased after induction of SCI, in contrast, transplantation of the oral mucosa stem cells decreased the contraction pressure and the contraction time in the SCI-induced rats. Induction of SCI initiated apoptosis in the spinal cord tissues, whereas treatment with the oral mucosa stem cells suppressed the SCI-induced apoptosis. Disrupted spinal cord by SCI was improved by transplantation of the oral mucosa stem cells, and new tissues were increased around the damaged tissues. In addition, transplantation of the oral mucosa stem cells suppressed SCI-induced neuronal activation in the voiding centers. Transplantation of oral mucosa stem cells ameliorates the SCI-induced neurogenic bladder symptoms by inhibiting apoptosis and by enhancing cell proliferation. As the results, SCI-induced neuronal activation in the neuronal voiding centers was suppressed, showing the normalization of voiding function.

  18. Patient controlled versus automatic stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opisso, E; Borau, A; Rodríguez, A; Hansen, J; Rijkhoff, N J M

    2008-10-01

    We investigated whether patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity can sense the onset of bladder contraction and in turn suppress the contraction by electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile-clitoral nerve. A total of 67 patients with different neurological disorders were recruited to undergo 3 filling cystometries. The first cystometry was done without stimulation. The second cystometry was performed with automatic controlled stimulation based on detrusor pressure. The third cystometry was done with patient controlled stimulation using a push button. Four females and 13 males underwent all 3 fillings. Compared to cystometry 1 average bladder capacity for cystometries 2 and 3 was 60% higher. Compared to peak pressure for cystometry 1 average peak pressure during suppressed contractions for cystometries 2 and 3 was 49% and 26% lower, respectively. The average delay of the onset of stimulation during cystometry 3 with respect to cystometry 2 was 5.7 seconds. The study shows that patient controlled genital nerve stimulation is as effective as automatic controlled stimulation to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Thus, patient controlled stimulation is feasible in select patients, although patients must be trained in the technique.

  19. Neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the cause. They often include symptoms of urinary incontinence . Symptoms of overactive bladder may include: Having to ... urinary diversion) Support Groups If you are having urinary incontinence, organizations are available for further information and support. ...

  20. The World of Virtual Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Eiselt

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACTSpecial collections of the National and University Library (NUK hide a lot of items of precious value. The Slovenian cultural heritage is stored on paper or on other media as a part of the library’s Manuscripts, Incunabula and Rare Books Collection, Old Prints Collection, Maps and Pictorial Collection, Music Collection, Ephemera Collection, Serials Collection, and Slovenian Diaspora Publications Collection. Only a small part of the treasures is temporary revealed to the public on special exhibitions. The idea of virtual exhibitions of library treasures was born in 2005. The library aimed to exhibit precious items of special collections of high historical or artistic value. In 2008 the first two virtual exhibitions were created in-house offering access to the rich collections of old postcards of Ljubljana at the beginning of 20th century kept in the Maps and Pictorial Collection of NUK. They were soon followed by other virtual exhibitions. At the beginning they were organised in the same way as physical exhibitions, afterwards different programs were used for creation of special effects (for ex. 3D wall. About two years ago it was decided that the creation of virtual exhibitions will be simplified. Files of digitised and borndigital library materials in jpg format are imported to MS PowerPoint 2010. Each jpg file is now formatted by adding a frame, a description … to the slides which are saved as jpg files. The last step is the import of jpg files into Cooliris application used for NUK web exhibitions. In the paper the virtual exhibition design and creation, the technical point of view and criteria for the selection of exhibition content are explained following the example of the virtual exhibitions the Old Postcards of Ljubljana, Photo Ateliers in Slovenia, a collection of photographs Four Seasons by Fran Krašovec and photos of Post-Earthquake Ljubljana in 1895.

  1. Exhibitions: Facing Outward, Pointing Inward

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    The Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) Exhibitions Project of the early 1990s produced a range of work that continues to inform the practice of using exhibitions as a "360 degree" method of transforming teaching and learning, community connections, school design, and assessment. Among that work was this paper coupling the origins of exhibitions…

  2. A qualitative study of older people's experience of living with neurogenic claudication to inform the development of a physiotherapy intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Samantha; Williamson, Esther; Darton, Frances; Griffiths, Frances; Lamb, Sarah E

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore older people's experiences of living with neurogenic claudication (NC), their preferences for physiotherapy treatment provision and associated outcomes in order to inform an intervention to be tested in a clinical trial. Patients with a diagnosis of NC and/or lumbar spinal stenosis were recruited through a UK NHS tertiary care center. Semi-structured interviews and self-report questionnaires were used to obtain data. A thematic analysis was conducted. 15 participants were recruited; half were classed as frail older adults. Pain and the threat of pain was a prominent feature of participants' experience of NC. This led to a loss of engagement in meaningful activities and sense of self. Discourses of ageing influenced experiences as well as treatment preferences, particularly the acceptability of walking aids. A combination of one-to-one and group setting for treatment was preferred. Outcome preferences related to re-engagement in meaningful activities and pain reduction. Limitations relate to generalisability of the findings for NC patients not under physiotherapy treatment. We have obtained important findings about older people's experiences of living with NC and preferences for physiotherapy treatment and outcomes. These will be incorporated into an evidence-based intervention and evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. Implications for rehabilitation Older people living with NC want to get back to meaningful activities and learn how to live with the threat of pain. Allied health professionals (AHPs) should be sensitive to the complex and ambiguous ways in which older people live with ageing and age-related decline. AHPs are in a position to support patients' successful transition to the use of walking aids thereby reducing stigmatizing effects and increasing activity. AHPs should consider a mixture of one-to-one and group classes to enable rehabilitation for older NC patients.

  3. Effectiveness of interspinous implant surgery in patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moojen, Wouter A.; Arts, Mark P.; Bartels, Ronald H. M. A.; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite an increasing implantation rate of interspinous process distraction (IPD) devices in the treatment of intermittent neurogenic claudication (INC), definitive evidence on the clinical effectiveness of implants is lacking. The main objective of this review was to perform a meta-analysis of all

  4. Tibial Nerve Stimulation for Treating Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marc P; Gross, Tobias; Bachmann, Lucas M; Blok, Bertil F M; Castro-Diaz, David; Del Popolo, Giulio; Groen, Jan; Hamid, Rizwan; Karsenty, Gilles; Pannek, Jürgen; Hoen, Lisette 't; Kessler, Thomas M

    2015-11-01

    Tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) is a promising therapy for non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and might also be a valuable option for patients with an underlying neurological disorder. We systematically reviewed all available evidence on the efficacy and safety of TNS for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). The review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. After screening 1943 articles, 16 studies (4 randomized controlled trials [RCTs], 9 prospective cohort studies, 2 retrospective case series, and 1 case report) enrolling 469 patients (283 women and 186 men) were included. Five studies reported on acute TNS and 11 on chronic TNS. In acute and chronic TNS, the mean increase of maximum cystometric capacity ranged from 56 to 132mL and from 49 to 150mL, and the mean increase of bladder volume at first detrusor overactivity ranged from 44 to 92mL and from 93 to 121mL, respectively. In acute and chronic TNS, the mean decrease of maximum detrusor pressure during the storage phase ranged from 5 to 15cm H2O and from 4 to 21cm H2O, respectively. In chronic TNS, the mean decrease in number of voids per 24h, in number of leakages per 24h, and in postvoid residual ranged from 3 to 7, from 1 to 4, and from 15 to 55mL, respectively. No TNS-related adverse events have been reported. Risk of bias and confounding was high in most studies. Although preliminary data of RCTs and non-RCTs suggest TNS might be effective and safe for treating NLUTD, the evidence base is poor, derived from small, mostly noncomparative studies with a high risk of bias and confounding. More reliable data from well-designed RCTs are needed to reach definitive conclusions. Early data suggest tibial nerve stimulation might be effective and safe for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, but more reliable evidence is required. Copyright © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by

  5. Transcription Factors Exhibit Differential Conservation in Bacteria with Reduced Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Galán-Vásquez

    Full Text Available The description of transcriptional regulatory networks has been pivotal in the understanding of operating principles under which organisms respond and adapt to varying conditions. While the study of the topology and dynamics of these networks has been the subject of considerable work, the investigation of the evolution of their topology, as a result of the adaptation of organisms to different environmental conditions, has received little attention. In this work, we study the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria from a genome reduction perspective, which manifests itself as the loss of genes at different degrees. We used the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli as a reference to compare 113 smaller, phylogenetically-related γ-proteobacteria, including 19 genomes of symbionts. We found that the type of regulatory action exerted by transcription factors, as genomes get progressively smaller, correlates well with their degree of conservation, with dual regulators being more conserved than repressors and activators in conditions of extreme reduction. In addition, we found that the preponderant conservation of dual regulators might be due to their role as both global regulators and nucleoid-associated proteins. We summarize our results in a conceptual model of how each TF type is gradually lost as genomes become smaller and give a rationale for the order in which this phenomenon occurs.

  6. Semiconditional electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents stimulation to manage neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Kim, Jung Moon; Im, Hyung Tae; Lee, Kye-Wook; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hur, Dong Min

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of semiconditional electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve afferents for the neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury. Forty patients (36 males, 4 males) with spinal cord injury who had urinary incontinence and frequency, as well as felt bladder contraction with bladder filling sense or autonomic dysreflexic symptom participated in this study. Patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity were subdivided into complete injury and incomplete injury groups by ASIA classification and subdivided into tetraplegia and paraplegia groups by neurologic level of injury. Bladder function, such as bladder volumes infused to the bladder until the first occurrence of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (V(ini)) and the last contraction suppressed by electrical stimulation (V(max)) was measured by water cystometry (CMG) and compared with the results of each subgroup. Among the 40 subjects, 35 patients showed neurogenic detrusor overactivity in the CMG study. Among these 35 patients, detrusor overactivity was suppressed effectively by pudendal nerve afferent electrical stimulation in 32 patients. The infusion volume until the occurrence of the first reflex contraction (V(ini)) was 99.4±80.3 ml. The volume of saline infused to the bladder until the last contraction suppressed by semiconditional pudendal nerve stimulation (V(max)) was 274.3±93.2 ml, which was significantly greater than V(ini). In patients with good response to the pudendal nerve afferent stimulation, the bladder volume significantly increased by stimulation in all the patients. In this study, semiconditional electrical stimulation on the dorsal penile afferent nerve could effectively inhibit neurogenic detrusor overactivity and increase bladder volume in patients with spinal cord injury.

  7. Photowalk Exhibition opens at Microcosm

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The winning photographs from the 2010 Global Particle Physics Photowalk competition will go on display at Microcosm from 11 February to 2 April. The exhibition is part of a global photography event taking place over three continents, with Photowalk exhibitions opening simultaneously at Fermilab in the US, KEK in Japan and here at CERN.   DESY wire chamber - First place people's choice; second place global jury competition. Photographer: Hans-Peter Hildebrandt  If you were one of the 1,300 photography lovers who voted in last year’s Photowalk competition, this exhibition is your chance to see the winning entries in print. The exhibition will take place in the downstairs gallery of Microcosm, overlooking the garden. 15 photographs will be on display, with each of the laboratories that participated in Photowalk represented by their 3 winning entries. Among them will be the “people’s choice” sunburst photo of a particle detector at DESY (Photo 1), and...

  8. Rapid but not slow spinal cord compression elicits neurogenic pulmonary edema in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2009), s. 269-277 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GA309/06/1246 Grant - others:EC FP6 projekt RESCUE(FR) LSHB-CT-2005-518233; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697; GA MZd(CZ) NR8339; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Program:1M; 1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : neurogenic pulmonary edema * rat * spinal cord injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  9. Giant Congenital Pelvic AVM Causing Cardiac Failure, Diplegia, and Neurogenic Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekci, Tumay; Yucel, Serap; Turgut, Eser; Soylu, Aysegul Idil

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are uncommon lesions and only a rare number of male cases have been reported. Their clinical presentations are variable and imaging modalities have an important place in diagnosis and treatment planning. We present the imaging findings of a giant congenital pelvic AVM that was diagnosed in a 30-year-old male patient eight years ago and which progressed despite follow-up and treatment, causing cardiac failure, diplegia, and neurogenic bladder. Pelvic AVMs are uncommon lesions and they can present with various symptoms based on their locations and sizes. Delays in the diagnosis and treatment can cause local and systemic complications. Imaging is very important in the diagnosis of pelvic AVM.

  10. NEUREX: a tutorial expert system for the diagnosis of neurogenic diseases of the lower limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starita, A; Majidi, D; Giordano, A; Battaglia, M; Cioni, R

    1995-02-01

    Specialist tutors have to transfer two types of knowledge to doctors who are specialising in a particular clinic: public declarative knowledge, including facts, notions, principles in that particular field; and their own private procedural knowledge acquired in years of direct experience. Embodying this knowledge into an expert system means that this information can be shared more rapidly, and tutoring is easier. This paper presents a tutorial expert system for neurological clinics which can emulate the diagnostic process of an expert neurologist for neurogenic diseases of the lower limbs, assist users in planning the optimal sequence of NG and EMG tests, interpret the results of these tests, and help users to achieve the most suitable diagnosis.

  11. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  12. Globe exhibit wins international acclaim

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The Globe’s “Universe of Particles” exhibition has recently received four prestigious awards for its avant-garde design. This external praise is great encouragement for the CERN exhibitions currently on the drawing board.   The Universe of Particles exhibition has won 4 awards for its avant-garde design. Back in 2008, the design company Atelier Brückner was presented with a challenge: to design the layout of a new permanent exhibition for CERN, one that would epitomize both the Organization and its research. The brief was concise but complex: the exhibit had to be symbolic of the Organization, use modern technology, engage and immerse visitors, and, preferably, use touch-screen technology. With the help of IArt, an interactive technology firm, and based on the content provided by CERN’s Education Group, Atelier Brückner developed the “Universe of Particles” exhibit as it is today. Its principal concept centred on the s...

  13. Urethral sphincter EMG-controlled dorsal penile/clitoral nerve stimulation to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opisso, E.; Borau, A.; Rijkhoff, N. J. M.

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether real-time external urethral sphincter (EUS) EMG-controlled dorsal genital nerve (DGN) stimulation can suppress undesired detrusor bladder contractions in patients with both neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD). Detrusor pressure (Pdet) and EUS EMG were recorded in 12 neurogenic patients who underwent two filling cystometries. The first one was without stimulation and was intended to confirm the NDO and DSD and to set the EMG detection threshold. The second one was with real-time EMG-controlled stimulation of DGNs. Two detection methods were analyzed to detect bladder contractions. The first method was a Kurtosis-scaled root mean square (RMS) detector and was used on-line. The second was a simple RMS detector and was used off-line. Of 12 patients included, 10 patients showed both NDO and DSD. In nine of these ten patients relevant EMG concomitant to detrusor activity was detected and stimulation could suppress at least one detrusor contraction. The second filling compared to the first one showed an increase of 84% in bladder capacity (p = 0.002) and a decrease of 106% in Pdet (p = 0.002). Nine false-positive detections occurred during the ten fillings with electrical stimulation. The mean increases of both time and Pdet between stimulation and bladder contraction onsets for method 1 were 1.8 s and 4 cmH2O and for method 2 were 0.9 s and 2 cmH2O, respectively. This study shows that EUS EMG can be used in real time to detect the onset of a bladder contraction. In combination with DGN stimulation has been shown to be feasible to suppress undesired bladder contractions and in turn to increase bladder capacity in subjects with both NDO and DSD.

  14. [Pregnancy and delivery for women with congenital spinal cord defects and neurogenic bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manach, Q; Dommergues, M; Denys, P; Loiseau, K; Idiard-Chamois, B; Chartier-Kastler, E; Phé, V

    2017-10-01

    Data are scarce regarding pregnancy and delivery among women with a neurogenic bladder due to congenital spinal cord defects. To report the obstetrical and urological outcomes of women with congenital spinal cord defects and vesico-sphincteric disorders. A retrospective multicentric study included all consecutive women with a neurogenic bladder due to congenital spinal defects, who delivered between January 2005 and December 2014. The following data were collected: demographics, neuro-urological disease characteristics, urological and obstetrical history, complications during pregnancy, neonatal outcomes, and changes in urological symptoms. Overall, sixteen women, median age 29,4 years old (IQR 22-36), had a total of 20 pregnancies and 21 births (15 caesareans, 5 vaginal deliveries). Prior to the beginning of their first pregnancy, 12 patients were under intermittent self-catheterization. Symptomatic urinary tract infections during pregnancy occurred in 11 pregnancies, including 4 pyelonephritis. In 4 women, stress urinary incontinence had worsened but recovered post-partum. In 3 women, de novo clean intermittent catheterization became necessary and had to be continued post-partum. During 3 pregnancies, anticholinergic treatment had been started or increased because of urge urinary incontinence worsened. These changes were maintained after delivery. The median gestational age at birth was 39.0 weeks (IQR 37.8-39.5). There were 15 caesarean sections, of which 9 were indicated to prevent a potential aggravation of vesico-sphincteric disorders. Among the 5 pregnancies with vaginal delivery, there was no post-partum alteration of the sphincter function. Successful pregnancy outcome is possible in women with congenital spinal cord defects and vesico-sphincteric disorders but it requires managing an increased risk of urinary tract infections, caesarean section, and occasionally worsened urinary incontinence. 5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  15. Neurogenic vision loss: Causes and outcome. An experience from a tertiary center in Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vision loss can be a consequence of numerous disorders of eye and neural pathway conveying visual input to brain. A variety of conditions can affect visual pathway producing neurogenic vision loss. The presentation and course of vision loss depends on the site of involvement and underlying etiology. We conducted this unprecedented study to evaluate the characteristics and outcome of various diseases of the visual pathway. Materials and Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we evaluated 64 patients with neurogenic visual impairment. Ophthalmological causes were excluded in all of them. Their presentation, ophthalmological characteristics and investigation findings were recorded. These patients were followed up till 6 months. Results: Out of 69 patients evaluated, 5 were excluded as they had ophthalmological abnormalities. The remaining 64 cases (113 eyes were enrolled. 54 cases were due to diseases of anterior visual pathway and rest 10 had cortical vision loss. The etiologic distribution is as follows: Isolated optic neuritis- 12 (19%, multiple sclerosis- 4 (6.3%, neuromyelitis optica- 5 (7.9%, tubercular meningitis- 15 (23.8%, non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy, ischemic optic neuropathy complicating cavernous sinus thrombosis, cryptococcal meningitis, malignant infiltration of optic nerve, Crouzon′s syndrome, calvarial thickening and traumatic occipital gliosis- 1 (1.6% case each, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, pituitary adenoma, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy- 3 (4.8% cases each, cortical venous thrombosis 5 (7.9%, subacute scleroing panencephalitis- 4 (6.3% cases. Conclusions: The diseases of anterior visual pathway were much more common than cortical vision loss. A majority of our patients had severe impairment of vision at presentation.

  16. Kinin B1 Receptor Promotes Neurogenic Hypertension Through Activation of Centrally Mediated Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramula, Srinivas; Lazartigues, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Hypertension is associated with increased activity of the kallikrein-kinin system. Kinin B1 receptor (B1R) activation leads to vasoconstriction and inflammation. Despite evidence supporting a role for the B1R in blood pressure regulation, the mechanisms by which B1R could alter autonomic function and participate in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain unidentified. We sought to explore whether B1R-mediated inflammation contributes to hypertension and investigate the molecular mechanisms involved. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that activation of B1R in the brain is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension, using the deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt model of neurogenic hypertension in wild-type and B1R knockout mice. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt treatment in wild-type mice led to significant increases in B1R mRNA and protein levels and bradykinin levels, enhanced gene expression of carboxypeptidase N supporting an increase in the B1R ligand, associated with enhanced blood pressure, inflammation, sympathoexcitation, autonomic dysfunction, and impaired baroreflex sensitivity, whereas these changes were blunted or prevented in B1R knockout mice. B1R stimulation was further shown to involve activation of the ASK1-JNK-ERK1/2 and NF-κB pathways in the brain. To dismiss potential developmental alterations in knockout mice, we further used B1R blockade selectively in the brain of wild-type mice. Supporting the central origin of this mechanism, intracerebroventricular infusion of a specific B1R antagonist, attenuated the deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced increase in blood pressure in wild-type mice. Our data provide the first evidence of a central role for B1R-mediated inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension and offer novel insights into possible B1R-targeted therapies for the treatment of neurogenic hypertension. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. A randomized trial of clitoral vacuum suction versus vibratory stimulation in neurogenic female orgasmic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Marcalee; Bashir, Khurram; Alexander, Craig; Marson, Lesley; Rosen, Raymond

    2017-09-09

    To examine safety and efficacy of use of a clitoral vacuum suction device (CVSD) versus vibratory stimulation (V) to treat orgasmic dysfunction in women with MS or SCI. Randomized clinical trial. Two academic medical centers. Thirty-one women including 20 with MS and 11 with SCI. A 12-week trial of the use of a CVSD versus V MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Female Sexual Function Inventory (FSFI) and Female Sexual Distress Scale (FSDS). 23 women (18 MS; 5 SCI) completed the study including 13/16 randomized to CVSD and 10/15 randomized to V. There was a statistically significant increase in total FSFI score (p=.011), desire (p=. 009), arousal (p=.009), lubrication (p=.008), orgasm (p=.012), and satisfaction (p=.049) and a significant decrease in distress as measured by FSDS (p=.020) in subjects using the CVSD. In subjects who used V, there was a statistically significant increase in the orgasm subscale of the FSFI (p=.028). Subjects using the CVSD maintained improvements 4 weeks after treatment. CVSD is safe and overall efficacious to treat female neurogenic sexual dysfunction related to MS and SCI. V is also safe and efficacious to female neurogenic orgasmic dysfunction; however, results were limited to the active treatment period. Due to ease of access and cost, clinicians can consider use of V for women with MS or SCI with orgasmic dysfunction. CVSD is recommended for women with multiple sexual dysfunctions or for whom V is ineffective. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reconstitution of experimental neurogenic bladder dysfunction using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Masahiro; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Masuda, Maki; Akatsuka, Akira; Hoshi, Akio; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Postoperative neurogenic bladder dysfunction is a major complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer and is mainly caused by unavoidable damage to the bladder branch of the pelvic plexus (BBPP) associated with colateral blood vessels. Thus, we attempted to reconstitute disrupted BBPP and blood vessels using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells that show synchronized reconstitution capacity of vascular, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems. METHODS.: Under pentobarbital anesthesia, intravesical pressure by electrical stimulation of BBPP was measured as bladder function. The distal portion of BBPP with blood vessels was then cut unilaterally (experimental neurogenic bladder model). Measurements were performed before, immediately after, and at 4 weeks after transplantation as functional recovery. Stem cells were obtained from the right soleus and gastrocnemius muscles after enzymatic digestion and cell sorting as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN). Suspended cells were autografted around the damaged region, whereas medium alone and CD45 cells were transplanted as control groups. To determine the morphological contribution of the transplanted cells, stem cells obtained from green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse muscles were transplanted into a nude rat model and were examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. RESULTS.: At 4 weeks after surgery, the transplantation group showed significantly higher functional recovery ( approximately 80%) than the two controls ( approximately 28% and 24%). The transplanted cells showed an incorporation into the damaged peripheral nerves and blood vessels after differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and fibroblasts around the bladder. CONCLUSION.: Transplantation of multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of damaged BBPP.

  19. Influence of rat progenitor neurogenic cells supernatant on glioma 101.8 cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubich L. D.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the influence of the rat progenitor neurogenic cells supernatant (RPNS on the transplantable rat malignant brain glioma cells (strain 101.8 under conditions of cultivation. Methods. Primary cultures were obtained from glioma 101.8 fragments (n = 12 and intact brain of newborn rats (n = 9. RPNS was received from neurogenic cell suspensions of fetal rat brain on 8–11th (E8-11 and 12–16th (E12-16 days of gestation. Results: RPNS (E8-11 as well as RPNS (E12-16 showed a cytotoxic effect on the glioma 101.8 cells in short-term cultures, the level of which was dose-dependent and intensified with increasing duration of incubation. RPNS (E12-16 had a more pronounced cytotoxic action on the cells of glioma 101.8 compared with RPNS (E8-11. The cytotoxic index (CI of RPNS (E12-16 on the glioma 101.8 cells was significantly higher than CI determined in cell suspensions of normal rat brain (CI was (91.99 ± 2.37 % and (22.9 ± 4.97 % respectively over 48 h incubation with RPNS. After RPNS (E8-11 influence on the glioma 101.8 primary cultures the signs of dose-dependent cytotoxic effects were observed: the thinning of growth areas, appearance of dystrophic and necrobiotic changes in tumor cells and decreasing of a mitotic index. These features were strengthened under the RPNS (E12-16 influence. Conclusions. Fetal RPNS showed dose-dependent cytotoxic and antiproliferative effects on the cultivated glioma 101.8 cells, which were intensified with the increasing of rat brain gestational age and lengthening of the incubation duration. A prerequisite for such effects is likely the NPC ability to produce the substances with antitumor activity.

  20. Management of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pannek J

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jürgen Pannek, Jens Wöllner Neuro-Urology, Swiss Paraplegic Center, Nottwil, Switzerland Introduction: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are one of the most common morbidities in persons with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD. They are associated with a significant morbidity and mortality, and they affect the quality of life of the affected patients. Diagnosis and treatment of UTI in this group of patients are challenging. In this review, the current strategies regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are summarized. Diagnostics: it is important to correctly diagnose a UTI, as treatment of bacteriuria should strictly be avoided. A UTI is defined as a combination of laboratory findings (leukocyturia and bacteriuria and symptoms. Laboratory findings without symptoms are classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria. Routine urine screening is not advised. Treatment: Only UTI should be treated; treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is not indicated. Prior to treatment, urine for a urine culture should be obtained. Antibiotic treatment for ~7 days is advised. Prevention: In recurrent UTI, bladder management should be optimized and morphologic causes for UTI should be excluded. If UTIs persist, medical prophylaxis should be considered. Currently, no prophylactic measure with evidence-based efficacy exists. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis should be used merely as an ultimate measure. Among the various mentioned innovative approaches for UTI prevention, bacteriophages, intravesical instillations, complementary and alternative medicine techniques, and probiotics seem to be most promising. Conclusion: Recently, several promising innovative options for UTI prophylaxis have been developed which may help overcome the current therapeutic dilemma. However, further well designed studies are necessary to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these approaches. Keywords: neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, spinal cord injury, prophylaxis

  1. Augmentation enterocystoplasty without reimplantation for patients with neurogenic bladder and vesicoureteral reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chao Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR after augmentation cystoplasty alone in patients with a hypocompliant neurogenic bladder. Between January 2009 and December 2014, 29 patients with a hypocompliant bladder associated with VUR confirmed by videourodynamics (VUD preoperatively were recruited in this study. All patients had undergone bladder augmentation with a generous detubularized segment of bowel at our institution. No effort had been made to correct the existing reflux. Preoperative assessment included urinalysis, kidney function tests, ultrasonography, and videourodynamic evaluation. All patients had various degrees of VUR. The status of VUR and bladder function were studied by VUD. The mean follow-up period was 2.2 years (range 0.5–5.5 years. The VUD manifested a significant improvement of bladder capacity, diminution of intravesical pressure, and resolution of reflux after bladder augmentation. After the surgery, 24/29 (83% no longer had reflux, 3/29 (10% showed improvement in reflux, and 2/29 (7% demonstrated no change in reflux. In addition, 16/21 (76% patients had reflux Grades I-III; 100% patients with reflux Grades IV and V had complete cessation of reflux. Only one patient had symptomatic urinary infection after the surgery. Augmentation enterocystoplasty without ureteral reimplantation is thus effective and adequate for patients with high-pressure and hypocompliant neurogenic bladder. Therefore, ureteral reimplantation is not necessary when augmentation enterocystoplasty is recommended for patients with high-pressure, low-compliant bladder and VUR.

  2. Intravenous adenosine protects the myocardium primarily by activation of a neurogenic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manintveld, Olivier C; te Lintel Hekkert, Maaike; Keijzer, Elisabeth; Verdouw, Pieter D; Duncker, Dirk J

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous adenosine is a trigger for ischemic myocardial preconditioning (IPC). Although intravascular administration of adenosine has been used to further unravel the mechanism of protection by IPC, it is questionable whether adenosine and IPC employ the same signaling pathways to exert cardioprotection. We therefore investigated whether the active metabolic barrier of the endothelium prevents an increase in myocardial interstitial adenosine concentrations by intravenous adenosine, using microdialysis, and also the role of NO and activation of a neurogenic pathway in the cardioprotection by adenosine. In pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, area at risk and infarct size (IS) were determined 120 min after a 60-min coronary artery occlusion (CAO), using trypan blue and nitro-blue-tetrazolium staining, respectively. IPC with a single 15-min CAO and a 15-min adenosine infusion (ADO, 200 μg min−1 i.v.) limited IS to the same extent (IS=41±6% and IS=40±4%, respectively) compared to control rats (IS=63±3%, both P<0.05). However, IPC increased myocardial interstitial adenosine levels seven-fold from 4.3±0.7 to 27.1±10.0 μM (P<0.05), while ADO had no effect on interstitial adenosine (4.1±1.2 μM), or any of the other purines. The NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine (LNNA), which did not affect IS (IS=62±3%), attenuated the protection by ADO (IS=56±3%; P<0.05 vs ADO, P=NS vs LNNA). The ganglion blocker hexamethonium, which had also no effect on IS (IS=66±3%), blunted the protection by ADO (IS=55±4%; P<0.05 vs ADO and vs hexamethonium). These observations demonstrate that cardioprotection by ADO is dependent on NO, and is primarily mediated by activation of a neurogenic pathway. PMID:15895104

  3. Laparoscopic resection of paraaortic/paracaval neurogenic tumors: surgical outcomes and technical tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takashige; Sazawa, Ataru; Harabayashi, Toru; Oishi, Yuichiro; Miyajima, Naoto; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Maruyama, Satoru; Okada, Hiromi; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2016-10-01

    Due to variations in location and size, laparoscopic surgery for paraaortic or paracaval neurogenic tumors is challenging. We evaluated the surgical outcomes, as well as surgical tips and tricks. Between 2000 and 2015, 25 procedures were performed in 24 patients. One patient underwent second surgery due to the recurrence of paraganglioma. Data were collected on the tumor diameter, tumor location, perioperative outcomes, pathology, and last-known disease status. Regarding the operative procedures, we reviewed the operative charts or videos to identify surgical tips and tricks. The median tumor diameter was 5.0 cm (range 1.5-10). The tumor location was suprahilar in 10, hilar in 6, and infrahilar in 9 cases. Regarding the approach, a transperitoneal approach was selected in 24 cases and retroperitoneal approach in 1. The median operative time and blood loss were 208 min (range 73-513) and 10 mL (range 0-1020), respectively. No patient required blood transfusion or conversion to open surgery. Pathological examination revealed paraganglioma in 12, ganglioneuroma in 7, and schwannoma in 6 cases. At the last follow-up, 23 patients were free of disease, while one patient developed metastatic multiple recurrence of paraganglioma 54 months after the second laparoscopic surgery. A review of the surgical records revealed several tips and tricks, including taping the vena cava/renal vein (n = 2) being helpful for detaching a retrocaval tumor from these great vessels, or rotating the kidney to provide a favorable operative view of tumors behind the renal hilum (n = 2). In recent cases, 3D-CT was helpful for preoperative planning. Laparoscopic resection of paraaortic or paracaval neurogenic tumors is feasible in experienced hands. Surgeons should be familiar with detaching maneuvers around great vessels and the mobilization of adjacent organs. Careful preoperative planning is mandatory.

  4. Use of botulinum toxin in individuals with neurogenic detrusor overactivity: State of the art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsenmeyer, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injection into the bladder wall has been shown to be an effective alternative to anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) medications and more invasive surgery in those with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and urinary incontinence who are not tolerating anticholinergic medications. In August 2011, Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for this use. Clinically, intradetrusor injection of BoNT has been found to decrease urinary incontinence and improve quality of life. Its impact on urodynamic parameters is an increase in the maximum cystometric (bladder) capacity and decrease in the maximum detrusor pressures. The most common side effects are urinary tract infections and urinary retention. There have been rare reports and a black box warning of distant spread of BoNT. BoNT has gained popularity because of its effectiveness and long duration of action, relative ease of administration, easy learning curve, reproducibility of results on repeated administration, and low incidence of complications. Objective To discuss the structure and function, mechanisms of action, clinical and urodynamic studies, injection technique, potential beneficial and adverse effects, and potential areas of research of BoNT. Methods Literature search focused on botulinum toxin in MEDLINE/PubMed. Search terms included botulinum toxin, neurogenic bladder, NDO, botox bladder, botox spinal cord injury, botox, FDA, botox side effects. All papers identified were English language, full-text papers. In addition, English abstracts of non-English papers were noted. The reference list of identified articles was also searched for further papers. Conclusion Botulinum toxin is an alternative treatment for individuals with NDO who fail to tolerate anticholinergic medications. Its popularity has increased because of the literature, which has supported its effectiveness, safety, easy

  5. Discovery of novel hippocampal neurogenic agents by using an in vivo stable isotope labeling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea; Lee, Jean; Busch, Robert; Wolff, Mary; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2006-12-01

    Neurogenesis occurs in discrete regions of adult mammalian brain, including the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. Hippocampal neurogenesis is enhanced by different classes of antidepressants, but screening for neurogenic actions of novel antidepressants has been inefficient because of limitations of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling techniques. We describe an efficient in vivo method for measuring hippocampal neurogenesis involving incorporation of the stable isotope, (2)H, into genomic DNA during labeling with (2)H(2)O (heavy water). Male rodents received 8 to 10% (2)H(2)O in drinking water; DNA was isolated from hippocampal progenitor cells or neurons. Label incorporation into progenitor cells of Swiss-Webster mice revealed subpopulation kinetics: 16% divided with t(1/2) of 2.7 weeks; the remainder did not divide over 1 year. Progenitor cell proliferation rates in mice were strain-dependent. Chronic antidepressant treatment for 3 weeks, with (2)H(2)O administered during the final week, increased progenitor cell proliferation across all the strains tested. Fluoxetine treatment increased (2)H incorporation into DNA of gradient-enriched neurons or flow-sorted neuronal nuclei 4 weeks after (2)H(2)O labeling, representing the survival and differentiation of newly divided cells into neurons. By screening 11 approved drugs for effects on progenitor cell proliferation, we detected previously unrecognized, dose-dependent enhancement of hippocampal progenitor cell proliferation by two statins and the anticonvulsant topiramate. We also confirmed stimulatory activity of other anticonvulsants and showed inhibition of progenitor cell proliferation by isotretinoin and prednisolone. In conclusion, stable isotope labeling is an efficient, high-throughput in vivo method for measuring hippocampal progenitor cell proliferation that can be used to screen for novel neurogenic drugs.

  6. Exhibition - Mathematics, A Beautiful Elsewhere

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    From 21 October 2011 to 18 March 2012, the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain will present the exhibition Mathematics: A Beautiful Elsewhere, an exhibition developed in association with the Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques (IHÉS) and under the patronage of UNESCO. For this unprecedented event, the foundation invited mathematicians to work with artists with whom it has previously worked to create an exhibition that allows visitors to see, hear, do, interpret and think about mathematics. By bringing mathematics into its premises, the Fondation Cartier is itself undergoing the “sudden change of scenery” described by mathematician Alexandre Grothendieck. More information is available here. Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain 261, boulevard Raspail 75014 Paris http://fondation.cartier.com Private Visit For professors, researchers and all the staff of Mathematics departments...

  7. The Felix-trial. Double-blind randomization of interspinous implant or bony decompression for treatment of spinal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Moojen (Wouter); M.P. Arts (Mark); R. Brand (René); B.W. Koes (Bart); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract. Background. Decompressive laminotomy is the standard surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with canal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication. New techniques, such as interspinous process implants, claim a shorter hospital stay, less post-operative pain

  8. Development of the larval anterior neurogenic domains of Terebratalia transversa (Brachiopoda) provides insights into the diversification of larval apical organs and the spiralian nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagata, Scott; Resh, Carlee; Hejnol, Andreas; Martindale, Mark Q; Passamaneck, Yale J

    2012-01-24

    Larval features such as the apical organ, apical ciliary tuft, and ciliated bands often complicate the evaluation of hypotheses regarding the origin of the adult bilaterian nervous system. Understanding how neurogenic domains form within the bilaterian head and larval apical organ requires expression data from animals that exhibit aspects of both centralized and diffuse nervous systems at different life history stages. Here, we describe the expression of eight neural-related genes during the larval development of the brachiopod, Terebratalia transversa. Radially symmetric gastrulae broadly express Tt-Six3/6 and Tt-hbn in the animal cap ectoderm. Tt-NK2.1 and Tt-otp are restricted to a central subset of these cells, and Tt-fez and Tt-FoxQ2 expression domains are already asymmetric at this stage. As gastrulation proceeds, the spatial expression of these genes is split between two anterior ectodermal domains, a more dorsal region comprised of Tt-Six3/6, Tt-fez, Tt-FoxQ2, and Tt-otp expression domains, and an anterior ventral domain demarcated by Tt-hbn and Tt-NK2.1 expression. More posteriorly, the latter domains are bordered by Tt-FoxG expression in the region of the transverse ciliated band. Tt-synaptotagmin 1 is expressed throughout the anterior neural ectoderm. All genes are expressed late into larval development. The basiepithelial larval nervous system includes three neurogenic domains comprised of the more dorsal apical organ and a ventral cell cluster in the apical lobe as well as a mid-ventral band of neurons in the mantle lobe. Tt-otp is the only gene expressed in numerous flask-shaped cells of the apical organ and in a subset of neurons in the mantle lobe. Our expression data for Tt-Six3/6, Tt-FoxQ2, and Tt-otp confirm some aspects of bilaterian-wide conservation of spatial partitioning within anterior neurogenic domains and also suggest a common origin for central otp-positive cell types within the larval apical organs of spiralians. However, the field of

  9. Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Cynthia A; Day, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome are secondary events that affect patients with traumatic brain injury. All 3 syndromes affect both sodium and water balance; however, they have differences in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Differentiating between hypernatremia (central neurogenic diabetes insipidus) and the 2 hyponatremia syndromes (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome) is critical for preventing worsening neurological outcomes in patients with head injuries.

  10. CT anatomy of the vagus nerve with radiological-pathological correlation of the intrathoracic vagal neurogenic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Hideo [Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Medical School

    2000-11-01

    The correlation in the title was evaluated since vagus nerve in the thoracic cavity had not been assessed by CT hitherto. For the purpose to examine the nerve imaging, subjects were a patient of neurofibromatosis and a normal volunteer. CT was done with Siemens Somato Plus 4 and General Electric-Yokokawa HiSpeed Advantage SG. For the same purpose, 100 cases of thoracic image by the latter apparatus were retrospectively assessed. Finally, the correlation in the title was examined retrospectively with combination of MR imaging in 9 cases who had undergone a surgery treatment of vagal neurogenic tumors (4 malignant and 4 benign cases of schwannoma and 1 neurofibromatosis). The nerve was found to be imaged by the ordinary CT and thus, which was thought to be useful for surgery, prognosis assessment and diagnosis of neurogenic tumors together with MRI. (K.H.)

  11. Spatiotemporal Mapping Techniques Show Clozapine Impairs Neurogenic and Myogenic Patterns of Activity in the Colon of the Rabbit in a Dose-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger G. Lentle

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clozapine, an antipsychotic used in treatment-resistant schizophrenia, has adverse gastrointestinal effects with significant associated morbidity and mortality. However, its effects on defined patterns of colonic contractile activity have not been assessed.Method: We used novel radial and longitudinal spatiotemporal mapping techniques, combined with and monitoring of ambient lumen pressure, in ex vivo preparations of triply and of singly haustrated portions of rabbit colon. We identified the contractile patterns of mass peristalses, fast phasic, and ripple contractions and directly qualified the effects of clozapine, at concentrations of 10 μmol/L, 20 μmol/L, and 30 μmol/L, and of norclozapine, the main metabolite of clozapine, on contractile patterns. The effects of carbachol, serotonin and naloxone on clozapine-exposed preparations were also determined. Tetradotoxin was used to distinguish neurogenic from myogenic contractions.Results: At 10 μmol/L, clozapine temporarily abolished the longitudinal contractile components of mass peristalsis, which on return were significantly reduced in number and amplitude, as was maximal mass peristaltic pressure. These effects were reversed by carbachol (1 μmol/L and to some extent by serotonin (15 μmol/L. At 10 μmol/L, myogenic ripple contractions were not affected. At 20 μmol/L, clozapine had a similar but more marked effect on mass peristalses with both longitudinal and radial components and corresponding maximal pressure greatly reduced. At 30 μmol/L, clozapine suppressed the radial and longitudinal components of mass peristalses for over 30 min, as well as ripple contractions. Similar dose-related effects were observed on addition of clozapine to the mid colon. At 20 μmol/L, norclozapine had opposite effects to those of clozapine, causing an increase in the frequency of mass peristalsis with slight increases in basal tone. These slightly augmented contractions were abolished on

  12. Neurogenic bladder evaluation and management after spinal cord injury: Current practice among urologists working in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Al Taweel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the current trends in the management and surveillance of the NB population secondary to spinal cord injury (SCI or myelomeningocele by certified urologist working in Saudi Arabia and to compare it to the current guidelines. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a 12-points questionnaire distributed to urologists working in Saudi Arabia and registered at the Saudi medical association. The assessment and follow-up of upper and lower urinary tract function in neurogenic bladder patients, their optimal frequency and management of related infections were the topics of inquiry. Results: Of the 272 urologists surveyed, 105 responded, yielding a response rate of 38%. Eighty-nine percent of respondents said that ultrasound was their diagnostic tool of choice for upper tract evaluation. Sixty-one percent of respondents said that they would follow their patients with a multichannel urodynamic study. Forty percent of urologists stated that they would treat asymptomatic bacteriuria. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC was the most common modality chosen for the management of neurogenic bladder in patients with emptying difficulties. Conclusion: This study confirms that most urologists in Saudi Arabia involved with neurogenic bladder management. However, more than one third of the urologists do not have urodynamic machine and only two of the reporting practitioners has a videourodynamic machine. The results emphasize the need for clear guidelines in this field of urology in Saudi Arabia. Highly specialized rehabilitation centers for neurogenic bladder secondary to SCI are required for optimal care and urologist teaching.

  13. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Medić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of their settings. Because technology continues to rapidly change the way we communicate, cultural institutions should adapt to new ways of communication with their visitors. This paper examines mobile technologies that can be used in museums to give visitors a different experience and transfer the knowledge innovatively. In that way it will be presented the modern concept of presentation of museum exhibitions, focusing on usage of mobile devices through mobile applications and QR codes. The paper provides the broad understanding of usage mobile technologies in museum exhibitions with its advantages and limitations. The research results can help the museums management to improve interpretation and communication with visitors and enrich the visitor experience.

  14. "Big Science" exhibition at Balexert

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN is going out to meet those members of the general public who were unable to attend the recent Open Day. The Laboratory will be taking its "Big Science" exhibition from the Globe of Science and Innovation to the Balexert shopping centre from 19 to 31 May 2008. The exhibition, which shows the LHC and its experiments through the eyes of a photographer, features around thirty spectacular photographs measuring 4.5 metres high and 2.5 metres wide. Welcomed and guided around the exhibition by CERN volunteers, shoppers at Balexert will also have the opportunity to discover LHC components on display and watch films. "Fun with Physics" workshops will be held at certain times of the day. Main hall of the Balexert shopping centre, ground floor, from 9.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. Monday to Friday and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the two Saturdays. Call for volunteers All members of the CERN personnel are invited to enrol as volunteers to help welcom...

  15. Harnableitung bei Kindern und Jugendlichen mit neurogener Blasenfunktionsstörung: auch langfristig eine sichere Therapieoption?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Einleitung: Pharmakotherapie, der saubere Einmalkatheterismus (clean intermittent catheterization = CIC und die Infektionsprophylaxe sind die drei Säulen der konservativen Therapie bei Patienten mit neurogener Blasenfunktionsstörung. Während der Pubertät werden die Patienten zunehmend unabhängiger vom Elternhaus. Gleichzeitig nimmt jedoch die Compliance der Medikamenteneinnahme und der Durchführung des regelmäßigen CIC ab. Der orthopädische und/oder neurologische Status kann sich ebenfalls verändern. Dies kann letztlich zum Fehlschlagen der konservativen Therapie (Inkontinenz, Restharn, Verschlechterung der Funktion des oberen Harntraktes führen. In einem multidisziplinären Team wird diese Problematik der Kinder und Jugendlichen unter Berücksichtigung der Wünsche des Patienten als auch der medizinischen Ziele (z. B. Schutz der Nierenfunktion in unserer Klinik diskutiert. Die Harnableitung wurde hierbei in einigen Fällen als notwendige Kompromißlösung angesehen. In der vorliegenden retrospektiven Studie untersuchten wir, ob die Harnableitung auch langfristig ein sicheres Verfahren darstellt. Material und Methode: Zwischen 1967 und 1997 erfolgte bei 149 Kindern und Heranwachsenden die Anlage einer Harnableitung. 129 Patienten konnten durchschnittlich 11,8 Jahre (0,8-28,5 nachbeobachtet werden. Das durchschnittliche Alter bei der Operation betrug 12,1 Jahre (0,8-20. Ein Colon-Conduit wurde bei 59 Patienten (in der Mehrzahl der Fälle vor der Ära des CIC und der kontinenten Harnableitung angelegt, eine orthotope Blasensubstitution erfolgte bei 12, eine kontinente kutane Harnableitung bei 58 Patienten (50 % Rollstuhlfahrer. Ergebnisse: Der obere Harntrakt blieb bei 95-97 % der renoureteralen Einheiten (RUE stabil, bzw. verbesserte sich. Alle Patienten mit einer orthotopen Blasensubstitution sind tagsüber kontinent; eine Patientin benötigt zur Sicherheit zeitweise eine Vorlage während der Nacht. 7 der 12 Patienten führen einen

  16. Clinical usefulness of urine cytology in the detection of bladder tumors in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pannek J

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Jürgen Pannek, Franziska Rademacher, Jens Wöllner Neuro-Urology, Swiss Paraplegic Center, Nottwil, Switzerland Introduction: Screening for bladder cancer in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction is a challenge. Cystoscopy alone is not sufficient to detect bladder tumors in this patient group. We investigated the usefulness of combined cystoscopy and urine cytology.Materials and methods: By a systematic chart review, we identified all patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction who underwent combined cystoscopy and urine cytology testing. In patients with suspicious findings either in cytology or cystoscopy, transurethral resection was performed.Results: Seventy-nine patients (age 54.8±14.3 years, 38 female, 41 male were identified; 44 of these used indwelling catheters. Cystoscopy was suspicious in 25 patients and cytology was suspicious in 17 patients. Histologically, no tumor was found in 15 patients and bladder cancer was found in 6 patients. Sensitivity for both cytology and cystoscopy was 83.3%; specificity was 43.7% for cytology and 31.2% for cystoscopy. One bladder tumor was missed by cytology and three tumors were missed by cystoscopy. If a biopsy was taken only if both findings were suspicious, four patients would have been spared the procedure, and one tumor would not have been diagnosed.Conclusion: A combination of cystoscopy and urine cytology can improve bladder tumor detection rates and lower the number of unnecessary biopsies. Keywords: bladder cancer, neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, urine cytology, cystoscopy

  17. To clamp or not to clamp? Bladder management by suprapubic catheterization in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Jürgen; Göcking, Konrad; Bersch, Ulf

    2010-10-01

    In a small subset of patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, insertion of suprapubic catheters (SPC) cannot be avoided. If SPC has to be utilized, catheter clamping and anticholinergic medication are often recommended, but evidence supporting this view is scarce. We determined the influence of anticholinergic medication and catheter clamping on urodynamic parameters and the status of the urinary tract in patients with chronic suprapubic catheterization. In a retrospective study, the results of urodynamic testing, sonographic evaluations, and urinalyses of 85 patients with chronic (>1 year) suprapubic catheterization due to neurogenic bladder dysfunction were analyzed. The 51 male and 34 female patients (mean age 55 years) were managed with an SPC for 65.3 ± 48.0 months. Forty patients had an SPC for more than 60 months. Comparing the results before SPC insertion with the last follow-up examination, no significant differences in detrusor compliance and maximum detrusor pressure were detected, whereas bladder capacity significantly decreased. In three patients, alterations of the upper urinary tract were found. The results were not significantly different between the patients using anticholinergic medication and/or catheter clamping and those who did not. According to our study, routine use of anticholinergic medication and clamping of catheter does not seem to be necessary to preserve detrusor compliance and renal function in patients with SPC and neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

  18. bicaudal-C is required for the formation of anterior neurogenic ectoderm in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Yaguchi, Junko; Inaba, Kazuo

    2014-10-31

    bicaudal-C (bicC) mRNA encodes a protein containing RNA-binding domains that is reported to be maternally present with deflection in the oocytes/eggs of some species. The translated protein plays a critical role in the regulation of cell fate specification along the body axis during early embryogenesis in flies and frogs. However, it is unclear how it functions in eggs in which bicC mRNA is uniformly distributed, for instance, sea urchin eggs. Here, we show the function of BicC in the formation of neurogenic ectoderm of the sea urchin embryo. Loss-of-function experiments reveal that BicC is required for serotonergic neurogenesis and for expression of ankAT-1 gene, which is essential for the formation of apical tuft cilia in the neurogenic ectoderm of the sea urchin embryo. In contrast, the expression of FoxQ2, the neurogenic ectoderm specification transcription factor, is invariant in BicC morphants. Because FoxQ2 is an upstream factor of serotonergic neurogenesis and ankAT-1 expression, these data indicate that BicC functions in regulating the events that are coordinated by FoxQ2 during sea urchin embryogenesis.

  19. Borneo 2007. Three European Exhibitions

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard Sellato

    2013-01-01

    The year 2007 appears to have been an exceptionally good one for Borneo in Europe. Two exhibitions were held in France, and one in Switzerland, which prominently featured the big island, its forests, its peoples, its cultures, and its arts. Here a brief review of these three events. Bornéo... Dayak et Punan. Peuples de la forêt tropicale humide, Musée d’Art et d’Archéologie, Laon, France, 25 November 2006 – 11 March 2007 The beautiful city of Laon, only a short distance by train or by car fro...

  20. Borneo 2007. Three European Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Sellato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The year 2007 appears to have been an exceptionally good one for Borneo in Europe. Two exhibitions were held in France, and one in Switzerland, which prominently featured the big island, its forests, its peoples, its cultures, and its arts. Here a brief review of these three events. Bornéo... Dayak et Punan. Peuples de la forêt tropicale humide, Musée d’Art et d’Archéologie, Laon, France, 25 November 2006 – 11 March 2007 The beautiful city of Laon, only a short distance by train or by car fro...

  1. CERN Permanent exhibitions short version

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Visits Explore by yourself the issues CERN's physicists are trying to solve: given that the entire universe is made of particles, where do they come from? Why do they behave in the way they do? Discover the massive apparatus used by physicists at CERN, like the LHC, and see how each part works. CERN invites the public to discover the mysteries of the Universe and the work of the world's biggest physics laboratory through free of charge guided tours and permanent exhibitions. As a group, with friends, individually, on foot, on your bike, come and discover CERN or explore it virtually. Welcome!

  2. Factors that influence the urodynamic results of botulinum toxin in the treatment of neurogenic hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Vírseda-Chamorro, M; Salinas Casado, J; Gómez-Rodríguez, A; Esteban-Fuertes, M

    2015-05-01

    To determine the urodynamic efficacy and factors that influence the urodynamic results of treatment of neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity with intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). A retrospective study was conducted with a cohort of 70 patients composed of 40 men and 30 women with stable SCI (mean age, 39 ± 13.3 years) who underwent an intradetrusor injection of 300 IUs of BTX-A. A urodynamic study was conducted prior to the injection and 6 ± 4.3 months after the treatment. New urodynamic studies were subsequently performed up to an interval of 16 ± 12.2 months. The BTX-A significantly increased (p treatment and lesion age showed no influence in terms of the increase in bladder capacity. The indwelling urinary catheter (IUC) was the only statistically significant negative factor. The urodynamic effect of BTX-A is maintained for a considerable time interval. The IUC negatively influences the result of the treatment. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibition of neurogenic inflammation by the Amazonian herbal medicine sangre de grado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M J; Vergnolle, N; McKnight, W; Musah, R A; Davison, C A; Trentacosti, A M; Thompson, J H; Sandoval, M; Wallace, J L

    2001-09-01

    This study was designed to determine if the Amazonian medicinal sangre de grado, confers benefit by suppressing the activation of sensory afferent nerves. (i) vasorelaxation of rat mesenteric arteries in response to calcitonin gene-related peptide; (ii) rat paw edema in response to protease- activating peptide receptor 2-activating peptide; (iii) rat paw hyperalgesia in response to low-dose protease-activating peptide receptor 2-activating peptide or prostaglandin E2; (iv) gastric hyperemia in response luminal capsaicin; (v) a clinical trial of a sangre de grado balm in pest control workers. The parent botanical was fractionated for evaluation of potential active components. In preconstricted rat mesenteric arteries, highly diluted sangre de grado (1:10,000) caused a shift to the right of the calcitonin gene-related peptide dose-response curve (p sangre de grado balm (1% concentration, p sangre de grado balm. A fraction possessing analgesic and capsaicin antagonistic properties was isolated and high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that it was a proanthocyandin oligomer. In pest control workers, sangre de grado balm (Zangrado) was preferred over placebo, for the relief of itching, pain, discomfort, edema, and redness in response to wasps, fire ants, mosquitoes, bees, cuts, abrasions, and plant reactions. Subjects reported relief within minutes. We conclude that sangre de grado is a potent inhibitor of sensory afferent nerve mechanisms and supports its ethnomedical use for disorders characterized by neurogenic inflammation.

  4. Neurogenic effects of β-amyloid in the choroid plexus epithelial cells in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolos, Marta; Spuch, Carlos; Ordoñez-Gutierrez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco; Ferrer, Isidro; Carro, Eva

    2013-08-01

    β-amyloid (Aβ) can promote neurogenesis, both in vitro and in vivo, by inducing neural progenitor cells to differentiate into neurons. The choroid plexus in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is burdened with amyloid deposits and hosts neuronal progenitor cells. However, neurogenesis in this brain tissue is not firmly established. To investigate this issue further, we examined the effect of Aβ on the neuronal differentiation of choroid plexus epithelial cells in several experimental models of AD. Here we show that Aβ regulates neurogenesis in vitro in cultured choroid plexus epithelial cells as well as in vivo in the choroid plexus of APP/Ps1 mice. Treatment with oligomeric Aβ increased proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells in cultured choroid plexus epithelial cells, but decreased survival of newly born neurons. These Aβ-induced neurogenic effects were also observed in choroid plexus of APP/PS1 mice, and detected also in autopsy tissue from AD patients. Analysis of signaling pathways revealed that pre-treating the choroid plexus epithelial cells with specific inhibitors of TyrK or MAPK diminished Aβ-induced neuronal proliferation. Taken together, our results support a role of Aβ in proliferation and differentiation in the choroid plexus epithelial cells in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Novel genetic and neuropathological insights in neurogenic muscle weakness, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Kristl G; Abicht, Angela; Häusler, Martin; Kleinle, Stephanie; Wiesmann, Martin; Schulz, Jörg B; Horvath, Rita; Weis, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Neurogenic muscle weakness, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) is caused by m.8993T>G/C mutations in the mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthase subunit 6 gene (MT-ATP6). Traditionally, heteroplasmy levels between 70% and 90% lead to NARP, and >90% result in Leigh syndrome. In this study we report a 30-year-old man with NARP and m.8993T>G in MT-ATP6. Although the patient carried the mutation in homoplasmic state in blood with similarly high levels in urine (94%) and buccal swab (92%), he presented with NARP and not the expected, more severe Leigh phenotype. The mutation could not be detected in any of the 3 analyzed tissues of the mother, indicating a large genetic shift between mother and offspring. Nerve biopsy revealed peculiar endoneurial Schwann cell nuclear accumulations, clusters of concentrically arranged Schwann cells devoid of myelinated axons, and degenerated mitochondria. We emphasize the phenotypic variability of the m.8993T>G MT-ATP6 mutation and the need for caution in predictive counseling in such patients. Muscle Nerve 54: 328-333, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Fluoxetine treatment ameliorates depression induced by perinatal arsenic exposure via a neurogenic mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Christina R.; Solomon, Benjamin R.; Ulibarri, Adam L.; Allan, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between arsenic exposure and increased rates of psychiatric disorders, including depression, in exposed populations. We have previously demonstrated that developmental exposure to low amounts of arsenic induces depression in adulthood along with several morphological and molecular aberrations, particularly associated with the hippocampus and the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis. The extent and potential reversibility of this toxin-induced damage has not been characterized to date. In this study, we assessed the effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant, on adult animals exposed to arsenic during development. Perinatal arsenic exposure (PAE) induced depressive-like symptoms in a mild learned helplessness task and in the forced swim task after acute exposure to a predator odor (2,4,5-trimethylthiazoline, TMT). Chronic fluoxetine treatment prevented these behaviors in both tasks in arsenic-exposed animals and ameliorated arsenic-induced blunted stress responses, as measured by corticosterone (CORT) levels before and after TMT exposure. Morphologically, chronic fluoxetine treatment reversed deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) after PAE, specifically differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells. Protein expression of BDNF, CREB, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and HDAC2 was significantly increased in the dentate gyrus of arsenic animals after fluoxetine treatment. This study demonstrates that damage induced by perinatal arsenic exposure is reversible with chronic fluoxetine treatment resulting in restored resiliency to depression via a neurogenic mechanism. PMID:24952232

  7. The Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation Approach Applied to Patients With Neurogenic Dysphagia: A Case Series Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Rajappa, Akila; Kantarcigil, Cagla; Wagner, Elise; Ivey, Chandra; Youse, Kathleen

    2016-04-01

    To examine the effects of the Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation approach on physiological and functional swallowing outcomes in adults with neurogenic dysphagia. Intervention study; before-after trial with 4-week follow-up through an online survey. Outpatient university clinics. A consecutive sample of subjects (N=10) recruited from outpatient university clinics. All subjects were diagnosed with adult-onset neurologic injury or disease. Dysphagia diagnosis was confirmed through clinical and endoscopic swallowing evaluations. No subjects withdrew from the study. Participants completed the 4-week Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation protocol, including 2 oropharyngeal exercise regimens, a targeted swallowing routine using salient stimuli, and caregiver participation. Treatment included hourly sessions twice per week and home practice for approximately 45 min/d. Outcome measures assessed pre- and posttreatment included airway safety using an 8-point Penetration Aspiration Scale, lingual isometric pressures, self-reported swallowing-related quality of life (QOL), and level of oral intake. Also, patients were monitored for adverse dysphagia-related effects. QOL and adverse effects were also assessed at the 4-week follow-up (online survey). The Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation approach was effective in improving maximum and mean Penetration Aspiration Scale scores (PDysphagia Rehabilitation approach was safe and improved physiological and some functional swallowing outcomes in our sample; however, further investigation is needed before it can be widely applied. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diazoxide enhances excitotoxicity-induced neurogenesis and attenuates neurodegeneration in the rat non-neurogenic hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, M; Batlle, M; Ortega, F J; Gimeno-Bayón, J; Andrade, C; Mahy, N; Rodríguez, M J

    2016-10-01

    Diazoxide, a well-known mitochondrial KATP channel opener with neuroprotective effects, has been proposed for the effective and safe treatment of neuroinflammation. To test whether diazoxide affects the neurogenesis associated with excitotoxicity in brain injury, we induced lesions by injecting excitotoxic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) into the rat hippocampus and analyzed the effects of a daily oral administration of diazoxide on the induced lesion. Specific glial and neuronal staining showed that NMDA elicited a strong glial reaction associated with progressive neuronal loss in the whole hippocampal formation. Doublecortin immunohistochemistry and bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-NeuN double immunohistochemistry revealed that NMDA also induced cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the lesioned non-neurogenic hippocampus. Furthermore, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells in the injured hippocampus expressed transcription factor Sp8 indicating that the excitotoxic lesion elicited the migration of progenitors from the subventricular zone and/or the reprograming of reactive astrocytes. Diazoxide treatment attenuated the NMDA-induced hippocampal injury in rats, as demonstrated by decreases in the size of the lesion, neuronal loss and microglial reaction. Diazoxide also increased the number of BrdU/NeuN double-stained cells and elevated the number of Sp8-positive cells in the lesioned hippocampus. These results indicate a role for KATP channel activation in regulating excitotoxicity-induced neurogenesis in brain injury. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Compilation of a preliminary checklist for the differential diagnosis of neurogenic stuttering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska Lundie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurogenic stuttering (NS is the most frequently occurring acquired form of stuttering in children and adults. This form of stuttering is primarily caused by neurological incidents. Owing to controversies with regard to similarities between developmental stuttering (DS and NS symptomatology, differential diagnosis is problematic. Differential diagnosis will guide the appropriate management of persons who stutter (PWS.Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and highlight the characteristics of NS in order to compile a preliminary checklist for accurate diagnosis and intervention.Method: An explorative, applied mixed method, multiple case study research design was followed. Purposive sampling was used to select four participants. A comprehensive assessment battery was compiled for data collection.Results: The results revealed a distinct pattern of core stuttering behaviours in NS, although discrepancies existed regarding stuttering severity and frequency. It was also found that DS and NS can co-occur. The case history and the core stuttering pattern are important considerations during differential diagnosis, as these are the only consistent characteristics in people with NS.Conclusion: It is unlikely that all the symptoms of NS are present in an individual. The researchers scrutinised the findings of this study and the findings of previous literature to compile a potentially workable checklist.

  10. Regionally-specified second trimester fetal neural stem cells reveals differential neurogenic programming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping Fan

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC have the potential for treatment of a wide range of neurological diseases such as Parkinson Disease and multiple sclerosis. Currently, NSC have been isolated only from hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult brain. It is not known whether NSC can be found in all parts of the developing mid-trimester central nervous system (CNS when the brain undergoes massive transformation and growth. Multipotent NSC from the mid-trimester cerebra, thalamus, SVZ, hippocampus, thalamus, cerebellum, brain stem and spinal cord can be derived and propagated as clonal neurospheres with increasing frequencies with increasing gestations. These NSC can undergo multi-lineage differentiation both in vitro and in vivo, and engraft in a developmental murine model. Regionally-derived NSC are phenotypically distinct, with hippocampal NSC having a significantly higher neurogenic potential (53.6% over other sources (range of 0%-27.5%, p<0.004. Whole genome expression analysis showed differential gene expression between these regionally-derived NSC, which involved the Notch, epidermal growth factor as well as interleukin pathways. We have shown the presence of phenotypically-distinct regionally-derived NSC from the mid-trimester CNS, which may reflect the ontological differences occurring within the CNS. Aside from informing on the role of such cells during fetal growth, they may be useful for different cellular therapy applications.

  11. Management of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Jürgen; Wöllner, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common morbidities in persons with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). They are associated with a significant morbidity and mortality, and they affect the quality of life of the affected patients. Diagnosis and treatment of UTI in this group of patients are challenging. In this review, the current strategies regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are summarized. it is important to correctly diagnose a UTI, as treatment of bacteriuria should strictly be avoided. A UTI is defined as a combination of laboratory findings (leukocyturia and bacteriuria) and symptoms. Laboratory findings without symptoms are classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria. Routine urine screening is not advised. Only UTI should be treated; treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is not indicated. Prior to treatment, urine for a urine culture should be obtained. Antibiotic treatment for ~7 days is advised. In recurrent UTI, bladder management should be optimized and morphologic causes for UTI should be excluded. If UTIs persist, medical prophylaxis should be considered. Currently, no prophylactic measure with evidence-based efficacy exists. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis should be used merely as an ultimate measure. Among the various mentioned innovative approaches for UTI prevention, bacteriophages, intravesical instillations, complementary and alternative medicine techniques, and probiotics seem to be most promising. Recently, several promising innovative options for UTI prophylaxis have been developed which may help overcome the current therapeutic dilemma. However, further well designed studies are necessary to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these approaches.

  12. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Luarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future.

  13. Compilation of a preliminary checklist for the differential diagnosis of neurogenic stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundie, Mariska; Erasmus, Zandria; Zsilavecz, Ursula; Van der Linde, Jeannie

    2014-06-27

    Neurogenic stuttering (NS) is the most frequently occurring acquired form of stuttering in children and adults. This form of stuttering is primarily caused by neurological incidents. Owing to controversies with regard to similarities between developmental stuttering (DS) and NS symptomatology, differential diagnosis is problematic. Differential diagnosis will guide the appropriate management of persons who stutter (PWS). The aim of this study was to describe and highlight the characteristics of NS in order to compile a preliminary checklist for accurate diagnosis and intervention. An explorative, applied mixed method, multiple case study research design was followed. Purposive sampling was used to select four participants. A comprehensive assessment battery was compiled for data collection. The results revealed a distinct pattern of core stuttering behaviours in NS, although discrepancies existed regarding stuttering severity and frequency. It was also found that DS and NS can co-occur. The case history and the core stuttering pattern are important considerations during differential diagnosis, as these are the only consistent characteristics in people with NS. It is unlikely that all the symptoms of NS are present in an individual. The researchers scrutinised the findings of this study and the findings of previous literature to compile a potentially workable checklist.

  14. Subject-controlled stimulation of dorsal genital nerve to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opisso, Eloy; Borau, Albert; Rijkhoff, Nico J M

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effects of subject controlled dorsal genital nerve (DGN) electrical stimulation on neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in subjects at home. Subjects underwent a 5-day study at home with DGN stimulation. Stimulation was provided with surface electrodes placed either on the dorsal penile shaft in males and on or close to the clitoris in females. The days 1 and 5 were with no stimulation whereas days 2-4 were with stimulation. Two urodynamic studies were performed at the beginning and at the end of the study. A bladder diary was obtained. Eleven subjects with NDO and with urge incontinence were included. One subject stopped the protocol before the end of the 5-day trial and two did not undergo the second urodynamic study. The subjects showed a statistically significant increase in bladder capacities compared to baseline (P = 0.047). Mean volume per day voided significantly increased over the study within the subjects. Differences between day 1 and day 5 were statistically significant (P = 0.028). The feasibility and the globally positive outcomes of the study indicate that the stimulation of the dorsal genital nerve can be an option for the treatment of the NDO. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Electrical stimulation of sacral dermatomes in multiple sclerosis patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjorback, M V; Van Rey, F S; Rijkhoff, N J M; Nøhr, M; Petersen, T; Heesakkers, J P

    2007-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve (DPN) has been shown to suppress detrusor contractions in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). However, the long-term use of surface electrodes in the genital region may not be well tolerated and may introduce hygienic challenges. The aim of this study was to assess whether electrical stimulation of the sacral dermatomes could suppress detrusor contractions in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with NDO, hereby providing an alternative to DPN stimulation. A total of 14 MS patients (8 M, 6 F) with low bladder capacity (stimulation was applied. In the second and third filling electrical stimulation of either the DPN or sacral dermatomes was applied automatically whenever the detrusor pressure exceeded 10 cmH2O. The control filling showed detrusor overactivity in 12 of the 14 patients. In 10 of the 12 patients one or more detrusor contractions could be suppressed with DPN stimulation. Electrical stimulation of the sacral dermatomes failed to suppress detrusor contractions in all patients. Although therapeutic effects may be present from stimulation of the sacral dermatomes, we were unable to demonstrate any acute effects during urodynamics. For this reason stimulation of the sacral dermatomes is not an option in a system that relies on the acute suppression of a detrusor contraction. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord injured patients by conditional electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J; Media, S; Nøhr, M; Biering-Sørensen, F; Sinkjaer, T; Rijkhoff, N J M

    2005-06-01

    The feasibility of automatic event driven electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) was evaluated in individuals with spinal cord injury. The study included 2 women and 14 men older than 18 years with NDO, bladder capacity below 500 ml and complete or incomplete suprasacral spinal cord injury. Detrusor pressure (Pdet) was recorded during ordinary, natural bladder filling. In a similar subsequent recording Pdet was used to trigger electrical stimulation when pressure exceeded 10 cm H2O. Of the 16 patients enrolled in this study 13 had increased bladder capacity together with a storage pressure decrease as a result of automatic, event driven electrical stimulation. In 2 patients stimulation could not inhibit the first undesired contraction, leakage occurred and finally 1 could not tolerate stimulation. During stimulated filling Pdet never exceeded 55 cm H2O. Thus, storage pressure was sufficiently low to prevent kidney damage. An average bladder capacity increase of 53% was achieved. This study demonstrates the feasibility of automatic, event driven electrical stimulation in the treatment of NDO. Although the setup in this experiment is not suitable in a clinical setting, the treatment modality is promising and it warrants further investigation.

  17. Enrico Fermi exhibition at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A touring exhibition celebrating the centenary of Enrico Fermi's birth in 1901 will be on display at CERN (Main Building, Mezzanine) from 12-27 September. You are cordially invited to the opening celebration on Thursday 12 September at 16:00 (Main Building, Council Chamber), which will include speechs from: Luciano Maiani Welcome and Introduction Arnaldo Stefanini Celebrating Fermi's Centenary in Documents and Pictures Antonino Zichichi The New 'Centro Enrico Fermi' at Via Panisperna Ugo Amaldi Fermi at Via Panisperna and the birth of Nuclear Medicine Jack Steinberger Fermi in Chicago Valentin Telegdi A Close-up of Fermi and the screening of a documentary video about Fermi: Scienziati a Pisa: Enrico Fermi (Scientists at Pisa: Enrico Fermi) created by Francesco Andreotti for La Limonaia from early film, photographs and sound recordings (In Italian, with English subtitles - c. 30 mins). This will be followed by an aperitif on the Mezz...

  18. The Neurogenic Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor NeuroD6 Concomitantly Increases Mitochondrial mass and Regulates Cytoskeletal Organization in the Early Stages of Neuronal Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kathleen Baxter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a central role during neurogenesis by providing energy in the form of ATP for cytoskeletal remodelling, outgrowth of neuronal processes, growth cone activity and synaptic activity. However, the fundamental question of how differentiating neurons control mitochondrial biogenesis remains vastly unexplored. Since our previous studies have shown that the neurogenic bHLH (basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor NeuroD6 is sufficient to induce differentiation of the neuronal progenitor-like PC12 cells and that it triggers expression of mitochondrial-related genes, we investigated whether NeuroD6 could modulate the mitochondrial biomass using our PC12-ND6 cellular paradigm. Using a combination of flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and mitochondrial fractionation, we demonstrate that NeuroD6 stimulates maximal mitochondrial mass at the lamellipodia stage, thus preceding axonal growth. NeuroD6 triggers remodelling of the actin and microtubule networks in conjunction with increased expression of the motor protein KIF5B, thus promoting mitochondrial movement in developing neurites with accumulation in growth cones. Maintenance of the NeuroD6-induced mitochondrial mass requires an intact cytoskeletal network, as its disruption severely reduces mitochondrial mass. The present study provides the first evidence that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in co-ordinating increase in mitochondrial mass with cytoskeletal remodelling, suggestive of a role of this transcription factor as a co-regulator of neuronal differentiation and energy metabolism.

  19. A preliminary investigation on the effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy as a treatment for neurogenic heterotopic ossification following traumatic brain injury. Part I: Effects on pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, J E; Biros, E; Lamont, A C; Sacher, Y; Kibrik, O; Milanese, S; Gordon, S; Galea, M P

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) is a complication of a neurological injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may be present around major synovial joints. It is often accompanied by severe pain, which may lead to limitation in activities of daily living. Currently, a common intervention for NHO is surgery, which has been reported to carry many additional risks. This study was designed to assess the effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on pain in patients with TBI with chronic NHO. A series of single-case studies (n = 11) was undertaken with patients who had TBI and chronic NHO at the hip or knee. Each patient received four applications of high-energy EWST delivered to the affected joint over 8 weeks. Two-weekly follow-up assessments were carried out, and final assessments were made 3 and 6 months post-intervention. Pain was measured using the Faces Rating Scale, and X-rays were taken at baseline and 6-months post-intervention to physiologically measure the size of the NHO. The application of high-energy ESWT was associated with significant overall reduction of pain in patients with TBI and NHO (Tau-0.412, 95% confidence interval -0.672 to -0.159, p = 0.002). ESWT is a novel non-invasive intervention for reducing pain resulting from NHO in patients with TBI.

  20. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sciatic nerve compression by neurogenic heterotopic ossification: use of CT to determine surgical indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salga, Marjorie [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Jourdan, Claire [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Handi-Resp, (EA4047), Versailles (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Neurophysiology, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hangard, Chloe; Carlier, Robert-Yves [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Medical Imaging, Garches (France); Denormandie, Philippe [Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Garches (France); Genet, Francois [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Military Medical Service, Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clamart (France)

    2014-09-14

    To describe the characteristics of neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) based on clinical tests, electroneuromyography (ENMG) and CT in a database of patients with lesions of the central nervous system who required sciatic nerve neurolysis along with posterior hip NHO resection, and to determine the respective roles of ENMG and CT in the management of posterior hip NHOs in patients who are unable to communicate or express pain. The consistency of the ENMG results with clinical findings, CT results and macroscopic signs of lesions was retrospectively assessed after sciatic nerve neurolysis and ablation of 55 posterior hip NHOs. Sciatic nerve neurolysis was necessary in 55 cases (47.4 %; 55 out of 116). CT showed contact of the NHO with the nerve in all cases: 5 in contact with no deflection, 3 in contact with deflection, 21 moulded into a gutter and 26 entrapped in the NHO. There were clinical signs of sciatic nerve lesion in 21.8 % of cases (12 out of 55). ENMG showed signs of sciatic nerve lesions in only 55.6 % (10 out of 18), only 4 of whom presented with clinical signs of a nerve lesion. No significant relationship was found between clinical symptoms and ENMG findings of sciatic nerve compression (n = 13, p = 0.77). Nerve compression by NHO is likely an underdiagnosed condition, particularly in patients who are unable to communicate. Diagnosis of sciatic compression by NHO should be based on regular clinical examinations and CT. ENMG is not sufficiently sensitive to be used alone for surgical decision-making. (orig.)

  2. Parents of children with neurogenic bowel dysfunction: their experiences of using transanal irrigation with their child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C; Bray, L; Driver, C; Harris, V

    2014-11-01

    Neurogenic bowel dysfunction in children is a lifelong condition often resulting in the need for active bowel management programmes, such as transanal irrigation. Parents are central in the decision-making process to initiate and carry out treatments until such a time their child becomes independent. Minimal research has focussed on examining parents' experiences of undertaking transanal irrigation with their child. This study aimed to explore parents' experiences of learning about and using irrigation with their child and how parents motivated their children to become independent. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with parents with experience of using transanal irrigation with their child. Interviews were undertaken by a parent researcher. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Eighteen telephone interviews (16 mothers, 1 father and 1 carer) were conducted. Parents shared how they had negotiated getting started and using transanal irrigation with their child. They discussed a sense of success derived from their confidence in using and mastering irrigation, the process of making decisions to continue or stop using irrigation and how they motivated themselves and their child to continue with the irrigation regime. Challenges included minimizing their child's distress during the irrigation procedure and how they negotiated and moved towards their child becoming independent. Despite the emotional difficulty parents experienced as a result of the invasive nature of transanal irrigation most parents reported an improvement in their child's faecal continence which positively impacted on the child and family's lives. The child's physical ability and emotional readiness to develop independent irrigation skills in the future concerned some parents. The experiences shared by parents in this study has the capacity to inform transanal irrigation nursing and medical care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Diagnostic value of "dysphagia limit" for neurogenic dysphagia: 17 years of experience in 1278 adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Kiylioglu, Nefati; Tarlaci, Sultan; Tanriverdi, Zeynep; Alpaydin, Sezin; Acarer, Ahmet; Baysal, Leyla; Arpaci, Esra; Yuceyar, Nur; Secil, Yaprak; Ozdemirkiran, Tolga; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2015-03-01

    Neurogenic dysphagia (ND) is a prevalent condition that accounts for significant mortality and morbidity worldwide. Screening and follow-up are critical for early diagnosis and management which can mitigate its complications and be cost-saving. The aims of this study are to provide a comprehensive investigation of the dysphagia limit (DL) in a large diverse cohort and to provide a longitudinal assessment of dysphagia in a subset of subjects. We developed a quantitative and noninvasive method for objective assessment of dysphagia by using laryngeal sensor and submental electromyography. DL is the volume at which second or more swallows become necessary to swallow the whole amount of bolus. This study represents 17 years experience with the DL approach in assessing ND in a cohort of 1278 adult subjects consisting of 292 healthy controls, 784 patients with dysphagia, and 202 patients without dysphagia. A total of 192 of all patients were also reevaluated longitudinally over a period of 1-19 months. DL has 92% sensitivity, 91% specificity, 94% positive predictive value, and 88% negative predictive value with an accuracy of 0.92. Patients with ALS, stroke, and movement disorders have the highest sensitivity (85-97%) and positive predictive value (90-99%). The clinical severity of dysphagia has significant negative correlation with DL (r=-0.67, pdysphagia and it can be performed in an EMG laboratory. Our study provides specific quantitative features of DL test that can be readily utilized by the neurologic community and nominates DL as an objective and robust method to evaluate dysphagia in a wide range of neurologic conditions. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson's disease: evaluation, management, and emerging role of droxidopa

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    Isaacson SH

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stuart H Isaacson, Julia Skettini Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center of Boca Raton, Boca Raton, FL, USA Abstract: Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH is due to failure of the autonomic nervous system to regulate blood pressure in response to postural changes due to an inadequate release of norepinephrine, leading to orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension. nOH is common in Parkinson's disease (PD. Prevalence varies throughout the course of PD, ranging from 40% to 60%, and resulting in symptomatic nOH in approximately half. Symptomatic nOH, including lightheadedness, can limit daily activities and lead to falls. Symptomatic nOH can also limit therapeutic options for treating PD motor symptoms. Clinical evaluation should routinely include symptom assessment and blood pressure measurement of supine, sitting, and 3-minute standing; 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can also be helpful. Non-pharmacological management of symptomatic nOH involves education, physical maneuvers, and adequate hydration. Current pharmacological treatment of symptomatic nOH includes salt supplement, fludrocortisone, midodrine, pyridostigmine, and other empiric medications. Despite these options, treatment of symptomatic nOH remains suboptimal, often limited by severe increases in supine blood pressure. Droxidopa, an oral prodrug converted by decarboxylation to norepinephrine, is a promising therapeutic option for symptomatic nOH in PD, improving symptoms of nOH, daily activities, falls, and standing systolic blood pressure in several recent trials. These trials demonstrated short-term efficacy and tolerability, with comparable increases in standing and supine blood pressures. Longer-term studies are ongoing to confirm durability of treatment effect. Keywords: (presyncope, norepinephrine, autonomic, lightheadedness, treatment, falls

  5. [Effects of Suspending Moxibustion at "Dazhui" (GV 14) on Neurogenic Inflammation in Asthma Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Jiao, Lin; Xiong, Jun

    2015-10-01

    To observe the effect of suspending-moxibustion stimulation of "Dazhui" (GV 14) with different quantities on the levels of nerve growth factor(NGF) , substance P(SP) , calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neurokinin A (NKA) , neurokinin B (NKB) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (pERK) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of asthma rats, so as to analyze its mechanisms underlying improving asthma. Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into six groups: blank control, model, 15 min-moxibustion (15 min-moxi), 30 min-moxi, 60 min-moxi and 90 min-moxi (n = 10 rats in each group). The asthma model was established by intraperitoneal injection of suspension of egg protein, magaldrate, and inactivated Bacillus pertussis (on day 1 and 8), and inhaling the atomized ovalbumin saline (from day 15 on for 14 days). Mild moxibustion was conducted at "Dazhui" (GV 14) for 15 min, 30 min, 60 min and 90 min, respectively, once daily for 7 days. The levels of NGF, SP, CGRP, NKA, NKB, and pERK in the BALF were detected by ELISA (enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay). The contents of NGF, SP, CGRP, NKA, NKB and pERK in the BALF in the model group were obviously higher than those in the blank control group (P 0.05). Suspending-moxibustion stimulation of GV 14 can down-regulate the contents of NGF, SP, CGRP, NKA, NKB, and pERK levels in the BALF in asthma rats, suggesting a relief of neurogenic inflammation reaction after moxibustion. The effect of moxibustion presents a time-dependant manner and peaks at 60 min.

  6. Experience with different botulinum toxins for the treatment of refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity

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    Cristiano M. Gomes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report our experience with the use of the botulinum toxin-A (BoNT/A formulations Botox® and Prosigne® in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single institution, 45 consecutive patients with refractory urinary incontinence due to NDO received a single intradetrusor (excluding the trigone treatment with botulinum toxin type A 200 or 300 units. Botox was used for the first 22 patients, and Prosigne for the subsequent 23 patients. Evaluations at baseline and week 12 included assessment of continence and urodynamics. Safety evaluations included monitoring of vital signs, hematuria during the procedure, hospital stay, and spontaneous adverse event reports. RESULTS: A total of 42 patients were evaluated (74% male; mean age, 34.8 years. Significant improvements from baseline in maximum cystometric capacity (MCC, maximum detrusor pressure during bladder contraction, and compliance were observed in both groups (P < 0.05. Improvement in MCC was significantly greater with Botox versus Prosigne (+103.3% vs. +42.2%; P = 0.019. Continence was achieved by week 12 in 16 Botox recipients (76.2% and 10 Prosigne recipients (47.6%; P = 0.057. No severe adverse events were observed. Mild adverse events included 2 cases of transient hematuria on the first postoperative day (no specific treatment required, and 3 cases of afebrile urinary tract infection. CONCLUSIONS: Botox and Prosigne produce distinct effects in patients with NDO, with a greater increase in MCC with Botox. Further evaluation will be required to assess differences between these formulations.

  7. Risk factors for symptomatic urinary tract infections in individuals with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, J; Wöllner, J; Pannek, J

    2016-09-01

    Retrospective investigation. To investigate the association of patient and injury characteristics, as well as bladder management, with the occurrence of patient-reported, symptomatic urinary tract infection(s) UTI(s) in patients with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). Tertiary urologic referral center. The patient database was screened for patients with chronic (>12 months) NLUTD who had presented between 2008 and 2012. Patient characteristics, bladder evacuation management, the annual number of patient-reported, symptomatic UTIs and the type of prophylactic treatment to prevent UTIs were collected. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the effects of the investigated risk factors on the occurrence of symptomatic UTI(s) and recurrent symptomatic UTIs (⩾3 annual UTIs). The data of 1104 patients with a mean NLTUD duration of 20.3±11.6 years were investigated. The evacuation method was a significant (P⩽0.004) predictor for the occurrence of symptomatic UTI and recurrent symptomatic UTIs. The greatest annual number of symptomatic UTIs was observed in patients using transurethral indwelling catheters, and the odds of experiencing a UTI and recurrent UTIs were increased more than 10- and 4-fold, respectively. The odds of a UTI or recurrent UTIs were also increased significantly (P⩽0.014) in patients using intermittent catheterization (IC). Botulinum toxin injections into the detrusor increased the odds of a UTI ~10-fold (P=0.03). The bladder evacuation method is the main predictor for symptomatic UTIs in individuals with NLUTD. Transurethral catheters showed the highest odds of symptomatic UTI and should be avoided whenever possible.

  8. Bladder management in individuals with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, J; Wöllner, J; Pannek, J

    2016-08-01

    Retrospective investigation. To investigate the association of patient and injury characteristics with bladder evacuation by indwelling catheterization in patients with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). Tertiary urologic referral center. The patient database was screened for patients with chronic (>12 months) NLUTD. Patient characteristics and bladder management details were collected. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the effects of the investigated factors on bladder evacuation by indwelling catheterization. The data of 1263 patients with a median age of 47 years (range 11-89 years) and a median NLTUD duration of 15.2 years (range 1.0-63.4 years) were investigated. The most common bladder evacuation method was intermittent catheterization (IC; 41.3%) followed by triggered reflex voiding (25.7%), suprapubic catheterization (11.8%), sacral anterior root stimulation (7.3%), spontaneous voiding (7.0%), abdominal straining (5.7%) and transurethral catheterization (1.3%). Female gender, tetraplegia, an age older than 45 years and injury duration were significant (<0.001) predictors of indwelling catheterization. The odds of bladder evacuation by indwelling catheterization were increased ~2.5, 3 and 4 times in women, patients older than 45 years and tetraplegics, respectively. IC is the most common bladder evacuation method. However, the majority of individuals with NLUTD are using other evacuation methods, because factors such as functional deficiencies, mental impairment or the social situation are relevant for choosing a bladder evacuation method. Individuals at risk of indwelling catheterization can be identified based on female gender, age, injury severity and injury duration.

  9. Benign and malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin on FDG PET

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    Yun, M. J.; Go, D. H.; Yoo, Y. H.; Shin, K. H.; Lee, J. D [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The differentiation between benign and malignant nerve sheath tumors is difficult based on conventional radiological imaging. This study was undertaken to investigate the value of FDG PET in distinguishing benign from malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin. We performed a retrospective review of the medical record to select patients with nerve sheath tumors who had underdone FDG PET imaging. Fifteen patients (7F: 8M) with benign or malignant nerve sheath tumors were included in this study. Of the 15 patients, 9 were diagnosed with the known neurofibromatosis type I. A total of 19 nerve sheath tumors were included from the 15 patients. All patients had undergone FDG PET to evaluate for malignant potential of the known lesions. Images of FDG PET were semi-quantitatively analyzed and a region of interest (ROI) was placed over the area of the maximum FDG uptake and an average standardized uptake value was taken for final analysis. There were 5 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 5 schwannomas, and 9 neurofibromas. The mean SUV was 2 (ranged from 1.6 to 3.3) for schwannomas, 1.3 (0.7 to 2.5) for neurofibromas, and 8.4 (4.6 to 12.2) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Of 14 benign tumors, all except one schwannoma showed a SUV less than 3. When a cutoff SUV of 4 was used to differentiate the nerve sheath tumors, all tumors were correctly classified as benign or malignant, respectively. Among the 9 patients diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type I. 4 had malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and FDG PET accurately detected all the 4 lesions with malignant transformation. According to our results, FDG PET seems to have a great potential for accurately characterizing benign versus malignant nerve sheath tumors. It appears to be extremely useful for patients with neurofibromatosis to localize the lesion with malignant transformation.

  10. Surgical management of functional bladder outlet obstruction in adults with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utomo, Elaine; Groen, Jan; Blok, Bertil F M

    2014-05-24

    The most common type of functional bladder outlet obstruction in patients with neurogenic bladder is detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD). The lack of co-ordination between the bladder and the external urethral sphincter muscle (EUS) in DSD can result in poor bladder emptying and high bladder pressures, which may eventually lead to progressive renal damage. To assess the effectiveness of different surgical therapies for the treatment of functional bladder outlet obstruction (i.e. DSD) in adults with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings (searched 20 February 2014), and the reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing a surgical treatment of DSD in adults suffering from neurogenic bladder dysfunction, with no treatment, placebo, non-surgical treatment, or other surgical treatment, alone or in combination. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We included five trials (total of 199 participants, average age of 40 years). The neurological diseases causing DSD were traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS), or congenital malformations.One trial compared placement of sphincteric stent prosthesis with sphincterotomy. For urodynamic measurements, results for postvoid residual urine volume (PVR) and cystometric bladder capacity were inconclusive and consistent with benefit of either sphincteric stent prosthesis or sphincterotomy at three, six, 12, and 24 months. Results for maximum detrusor pressure (Pdet.max) were also inconclusive at three, six, and 12 months; however, after two years, the Pdet.max after sphincterotomy was lower than after stent placement (mean difference (MD) -30 cmH2O, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.99 to

  11. Neurogenic hyperadrenergic orthostatic hypotension: a newly recognized variant of orthostatic hypotension in older adults with elevated norepinephrine (noradrenaline).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Philip L; Shibao, Cyndya A; Garland, Emily M; Black, Bonnie K; Biaggioni, Italo; Diedrich, André; Paranjape, Sachin Y; Robertson, David; Raj, Satish R

    2015-07-01

    Patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (OH) typically have impaired sympathetic nervous system tone and therefore low levels of upright plasma norepinephrine (NE) (noradrenaline). We report a subset of patients who clinically have typical neurogenic OH but who paradoxically have elevated upright levels of plasma NE. We retrospectively studied 83 OH patients evaluated at the Vanderbilt Autonomic Dysfunction Center between August 2007 and May 2013. Based on standing NE, patients were dichotomized into a hyperadrenergic OH group [hyperOH: upright NE ≥ 3.55 nmol/l (600 pg/ml), n=19] or a non-hyperadrenergic OH group [nOH: upright NE < 3.55 nmol/l (600 pg/ml), n=64]. Medical history and data from autonomic testing, including the Valsalva manoeuvre (VM), were analysed. HyperOH patients had profound orthostatic falls in blood pressure (BP), but less severe than in nOH [change in SBP (systolic blood pressure): -53 ± 31 mmHg compared with -68 ± 33 mmHg, P=0.050; change in DBP (diastolic blood pressure): -18 ± 23 mmHg compared with -30 ± 17 mmHg, P=0.01]. The expected compensatory increase in standing heart rate (HR) was similarly blunted in both hyperOH and nOH groups [84 ± 15 beats per minute (bpm) compared with 82 ± 14 bpm; P=0.6]. HyperOH patients had less severe sympathetic failure as evidenced by smaller falls in DBP during phase 2 of VM and a shorter VM phase 4 BP recovery time (16.5 ± 8.9 s compared with 31.6 ± 16.6 s; P<0.001) than nOH patients. Neurogenic hyperOH patients have severe neurogenic OH, but have less severe adrenergic dysfunction than nOH patients. Further work is required to understand whether hyperOH patients will progress to nOH or whether this represents a different disorder.

  12. Effects of isoflurane and desflurane on neurogenic motor- and somatosensory-evoked potential monitoring for scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, J M; Péréon, Y; Fayet, G; Guihéneuc, P

    1996-11-01

    Most techniques used to monitor spinal cord tracts are sensitive to the effects of anesthesia, particularly to volatile anesthetic agents. The aim of this prospective study was to show that evoked potentials recorded from the peripheral nerves after spinal cord stimulation, so-called neurogenic motor evoked potentials, are resistant to clinical concentrations of isoflurane or desflurane, compared with somatosensory-evoked potentials. Twenty-three patients were studied during surgery to correct scoliosis. The background anesthetic consisted of a continuous infusion of propofol. Isoflurane (n = 12) or desflurane (n = 11) were then introduced to achieve 0.5 and 1.0 end-tidal minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC), both in 50% oxygen-nitrous oxide and in 100% oxygen. Somatosensory-evoked potentials were elicited and recorded using a standard method, defining cortical P40 and subcortical P29. Neurogenic motor-evoked potentials were elicited by electric stimulation of the spinal cord via needle electrodes placed by the surgeon in the rostral part of the surgical field. Responses were recorded from needle electrodes inserted in the right and left popliteal spaces close to the sciatic nerve. Stimulus intensity was adjusted to produce a supramaximal response; that is, an unchanged response in amplitude with subsequent increases in stimulus intensity. Measurements were obtained before introducing volatile agents and 20 min after obtaining a stable level of each concentration. Isoflurane and desflurane in both 50% oxygen-nitrous oxide and 100% oxygen were associated with a significant decrease in the amplitude and an increase in the latency of the cortical P40, whereas subcortical P29 latency did not vary significantly. Typical neurogenic motor-evoked potentials were obtained in all patients without volatile anesthetic agents, consisting of a biphasic wave, occurring 15 to 18 ms after stimulation, with an amplitude ranging from 1.3 to 4.1 microV. Latency or peak

  13. Chondrosarcoma of right 1st rib presenting as neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome; A 13th case report in world literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravisagar Patel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic outlet syndrome [TOS] caused by a tumor of the rib is rare and has been reported only 12 times in the literature over the past one and one-half centuries, with the majority of cases due to osteochondroma. We report a case of chondrosarcoma of right 1st rib causing neurogenic TOS that was resected via posterolateral thoracotomy and biopsy confirmed a grade I chondrosarcoma. In the treatment of chondrosarcoma, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are less effective, and appropriate surgery is needed.

  14. The antimigraine drug, sumatriptan (GR43175), selectively blocks neurogenic plasma extravasation from blood vessels in dura mater.

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    Buzzi, M. G.; Moskowitz, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. We describe the actions of GR43175, a 5-hydroxytryptamine1 (5-HT1)-like receptor agonist, on neurogenically-mediated plasma protein extravasation within an important pain-sensitive intracranial tissue, the dura mater. 2. GR43175 markedly attenuated extravasation of 125I-albumin from blood vessels within ipsilateral dura mater when administered to rats (100 micrograms kg-1) fifteen minutes before unilateral electrical trigeminal stimulation (1.2 mA, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 5 min); the ratio (stimulated...

  15. Stem cell recruitment of newly formed host cells via a successful seduction? Filling the gap between neurogenic niche and injured brain site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Yankee, Ernest; McGrogan, Michael; Case, Casey; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report that a unique mechanism of action exerted by stem cells in the repair of the traumatically injured brain involves their ability to harness a biobridge between neurogenic niche and injured brain site. This biobridge, visualized immunohistochemically and laser captured, corresponded to an area between the neurogenic subventricular zone and the injured cortex. That the biobridge expressed high levels of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases characterized initially by a stream of transplanted stem cells, but subsequently contained only few to non-detectable grafts and overgrown by newly formed host cells, implicates a novel property of stem cells. The transplanted stem cells manifest themselves as pathways for trafficking the migration of host neurogenic cells, but once this biobridge is formed between the neurogenic site and the injured brain site, the grafted cells disappear and relinquish their task to the host neurogenic cells. Our findings reveal that long-distance migration of host cells from the neurogenic niche to the injured brain site can be achieved through transplanted stem cells serving as biobridges for initiation of endogenous repair mechanisms. This is the first report of a stem cell-paved "biobridge". Indeed, to date the two major schools of discipline in stem cell repair mechanism primarily support the concept of "cell replacement" and bystander effects of "trophic factor secretion". The present novel observations of a stem cell seducing a host cell to engage in brain repair advances basic science concepts on stem cell biology and extracellular matrix, as well as provokes translational research on propagating this stem cell-paved biobridge beyond cell replacement and trophic factor secretion for the treatment of traumatic brain injury and other neurological disorders.

  16. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain

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    Patricia eRivera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10% or sucrose liquid diets for two weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+ and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU+ in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ, subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3±1.1 g/kg/day after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133 exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence.

  17. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Bindila, Laura; Alen, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Rubio, Leticia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10%) or sucrose liquid diets for 2 weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+) and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ) and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3 ± 1.1 g/kg/day) after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ, and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133) exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence. PMID:26483633

  18. Exhibits Enhanced by Stand-Alone Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rennes, Eve C.

    Both the development and evaluation of one of a set of computer programs designed for use by visitors as adjuncts to museum exhibits are described. Museum displays used were (1) a static, behind-glass exhibit on evolution; (2) a hands-on primitive stone age tools exhibit; and (3) a Foucault pendulum. A computer placed next to each exhibit served…

  19. Minimal effective dose of dysport and botox in a rat model of neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr-Roussel, Delphine; Oger, Stéphanie; Pignol, Bernadette; Pham, Emmanuel; Le Maux, Amélie; Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne; Caisey, Stéphanie; Compagnie, Sandrine; Picaut, Philippe; Bernabé, Jacques; Alexandre, Laurent; Giuliano, François; Denys, Pierre

    2012-05-01

    Two botulinum toxins A have been evaluated for the treatment of refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in humans: Dysport (abobotulinumtoxinA) and Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA). However, these two distinct commercialized products have different potency units and are not interchangeable. Assessment of the dose response and determination of minimal effective dose (MED) for Dysport and Botox in spinal cord-injured (SCI) rats with NDO. Female, adult, Sprague-Dawley rats (n=98) underwent T8-T9 spinal cord transection. Nineteen days after spinal cord injury, rats received intradetrusor injections (25μl injected, eight sites) of vehicle (V); Dysport 2, 5, 7.5, 10, and 12.5 U; and Botox 0.8, 2, 5, 7.5, and 10 U. Two days after injection, continuous cystometry was performed in conscious rats. Voiding contractions (VC) were assessed by duration of VC, intercontraction interval, voided volume, maximal pressure, pressure threshold change, and intravesical baseline pressure (BP), while nonvoiding contractions (NVC) were evaluated by amplitude, frequency, and volume threshold to elicit NVC. MEDs for Dysport and Botox were determined by analysis of variance step-down trend test. MEDs for Dysport and Botox were 10 U and 7.5 U, respectively. Regarding VC, only BP significantly decreased after 10 U Dysport and 7.5 U Botox compared to V (from 3.7±0.6 to 1.5±0.1 and 1.4±0.3mm Hg, respectively; pBotox (7.5 U) significantly inhibited NVC by decreasing their amplitude (from 7.4±1.1 to 5.8±0.5 and 5.4±0.6mm Hg, respectively; pBotox under standardized conditions showing similar inhibiting effects on NDO, albeit at different MEDs. It highlights the importance of distinguishing each preparation for predicted outcomes and doses to be used. Further studies in patients with NDO are warranted to confirm these experimental results. Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chapter 4: Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) and neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Arjun; Lucas, Malcolm

    2014-07-01

    This chapter focuses on the position of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment pathway for overactive bladder (OAB) and neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction associated with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), and the recommendations of the major international guideline groups. Recommendations of different guideline groups may vary, especially when evidence is weak, often because of differences in methodology and panel composition. Relevant guidelines from the European Association of Urology, American Urological Association, and the UK National Institute for Care and Clinical Excellence were reviewed, and the recommendations that form the basis of the treatment algorithms have been discussed. Any differences between guidelines have been highlighted and special emphasis made on the position of botulinum toxin type A in these pathways. In all the reviewed guidelines, botulinum toxin type A is recommended, alongside sacral nerve neuromodulation, to treat OAB and NDO in patients who have failed oral therapy. The evidence base is consistent, but further evidence is required regarding optimal dosing regimens and injection technique. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Preoperative renal scar as a risk factor of postoperative metabolic acidosis following ileocystoplasty in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, T; Moriya, K; Kitta, T; Kon, M; Nonomura, K

    2014-04-01

    We investigated relation of preoperative renal scar to incidence of postoperative metabolic acidosis following ileocystoplasty in patients with neurogenic bladder. Thirty patients with neurogenic bladder, who underwent ileocystoplasty, were enrolled in the present study. Median age at ileocystoplasty was 13.9 years and median follow-up period after ileocystoplasty was 8.2 years. Metabolic acidosis was defined based on the outlined criteria: base excess (BE) is less than 0 mmol l(-1). Preoperative examination revealed that no apparent renal insufficiency was identified in blood analysis, although preoperative (99m)Tc-DMSA scintigraphy indicated abnormalities such as renal scar in 14 patients (47%). Incidence of postoperative metabolic acidosis was compared between patients with and without preoperative renal scar, which may reflect some extent of renal tubular damage. Postoperative metabolic acidosis was identified in 13 patients (43%). Incidence of postoperative metabolic acidosis was significantly higher in patients with renal scar (11/14, 79%) compared with patients without renal scar (2/16, 13%; Pmetabolic acidosis postoperatively. Compared with patients without preoperative renal scar, pH (Pmetabolic acidosis was significantly implicated in preoperative renal scar. If renal abnormalities are preoperatively identified in imaging tests, we need to care patients carefully regarding metabolic acidosis and subsequent comorbidities following ileocystoplasty.

  2. PET-scan shows peripherally increased neurokinin 1 receptor availability in chronic tennis elbow: visualizing neurogenic inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Peterson

    Full Text Available In response to pain, neurokinin 1 (NK1 receptor availability is altered in the central nervous system. The NK1 receptor and its primary agonist, substance P, also play a crucial role in peripheral tissue in response to pain, as part of neurogenic inflammation. However, little is known about alterations in NK1 receptor availability in peripheral tissue in chronic pain conditions and very few studies have been performed on human beings. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow were therefore examined by positron emission tomography (PET with the NK1 specific radioligand [(11C]GR205171 before and after treatment with graded exercise. The radioligand signal intensity was higher in the affected arm as compared with the unaffected arm, measured as differences between the arms in volume of voxels and signal intensity of this volume above a reference threshold set as 2.5 SD above mean signal intensity of the unaffected arm before treatment. In the eight subjects examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in all subjects but signal intensity decreased in five and increased in three. In conclusion, NK1 receptors may be activated, or up-regulated in the peripheral, painful tissue of a chronic pain condition. This up-regulation does, however, have moderate correlation to pain ratings. The increased NK1 receptor availability is interpreted as part of ongoing neurogenic inflammation and may have correlation to the pathogenesis of chronic tennis elbow.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00888225 http://clinicaltrials.gov/

  3. [Assessment of severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction in chronic patients with a simple 1-item questionnaire (PGI-S)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévinaire, J G; Soler, J M; Bordji, H; Fiolet, M C; Navaux, M A; Mortier, P E

    2016-09-01

    Bowel symptoms (constipation and incontinence) are frequent in patients with a neurologic disease, but rarely assessed in rehabilitation centres. To study the prevalence of neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD) in those patients, and to assess its severity with the Patient Global Impression of Severity (PGI-S). Prospective study by questionnaires, with the Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction Score (0-47) and the PGI-S, a 1-item questionnaire (absent, mild, moderate, severe) for the severity of the bowel symptoms, and the Bristol Stool Chart for stool consistency. All patients presenting a chronic (>2months) neurological disease were included. Inclusion of 169 patients, 97 with spinal cord injury, 42 with multiple sclerosis and 30 with hemiplegia. In each population, prevalence of constipation was 67 %, 45 % and 17 %, of pelvic floor dyssynergia 82 %, 45 % and 27 %, and leakages (gas or stools) de 74 %, 48 % and 43 %, respectively. Moderate to severe bowel symptoms were seen in 61 % of spinal cord injury, 43 % of multiple sclerosis and 23 % of hemiplegic patients, with NBD scores of 11.9±6.5, 5.7±4.9 and 3.7±4.2, respectively (Ptools to assess the presence of bowel symptoms in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcutaneous stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve for treating refractory urge incontinence of idiopathic and neurogenic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles-Antuña, C; Pérez-Haro, M L; González-Ruiz de L, C; Quintás-Blanco, A; Tamargo-Diaz, E M; García-Rodríguez, J; San Martín-Blanco, A; Fernandez-Gomez, J M

    2017-09-01

    To assess the efficacy of treatment with transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation (TPTNS) in patients with urge urinary incontinence, of neurogenic or nonneurogenic origin, refractory to first-line therapeutic options. We included 65 patients with urge urinary incontinence refractory to medical treatment. A case history review, a urodynamic study and a somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) study were conducted before the TPTNS, studying the functional urological condition by means of a voiding diary. The treatment consisted of 10 weekly sessions of TPTNS lasting 30minutes. Some 57.7% of the patients showed abnormal tibial SEPs, and 42% showed abnormal pudendal SEPs. A statistically significant symptomatic improvement was observed in all clinical parameters after treatment with TPTNS, and 66% of the patients showed an overall improvement, regardless of sex, the presence of underlying neurological disorders, detrusor hyperactivity in the urodynamic study or SEP disorders. There were no adverse effects during the treatment. TPTNS is an effective and well tolerated treatment in patients with urge incontinence refractory to first-line therapies and should be offered early in the treatment strategy. New studies are needed to identify the optimal parameters of stimulation, the most effective treatment protocols and long-term efficacy, as well as its applicability to patients with a neurogenic substrate. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. The nuclear protein encoded by the Drosophila neurogenic gene mastermind is widely expressed and associates with specific chromosomal regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. 94 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. [Identification of pelvic autonomic nerves during partial and total mesorectal excision--influence parameters and significance for neurogenic bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, W; Heintz, A; Wolf, H K; Junginger, T

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the present prospective study was to determine the frequency of pelvic autonomic nerve preservation (PANP) during total mesorectal excision (TME) for rectal carcinoma, and to identify a possible link between PANP and postoperative micturition disturbances. Between March 1997 and February 2003, 229 patients with adenocarcinoma of the rectum were operated on with sphincter preservation in 178 (78%) cases. In 101 (48%) patients, the tumor did not invade the muscularis propria. To determine influence parameters on the achievement of complete PANP, a multivariate analysis was performed. The number of complete-partial-or nonidentification of the nerves (superior hypogastric plexus up to the neurovascular bundles) was documented and correlated with micturition disturbances. The pelvic autonomic nerves were identified completely in 169 (74%), partially in 25 (11%), and could not be demonstrated in 35 (15%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed multivisceral resection ( p, p<0.001), and tumor site (middle/upper third vs lower third of rectum, p= 0.011) to exert an independent influence on the achievement of complete PANP. Twenty (8.8%) patients needed a long-term urinary catheter. Preservation of the parasympathetic nerves was associated with low bladder dysfunction rates (4.1 vs 22.4%, p<0.001). To minimize the risk of postoperative micturition disturbances due to neurogenic bladder, pelvic autonomic nerves should be identified during TME. Neurogenic bladder after TME is a useful parameter to assess the quality of surgical treatment for rectal carcinoma.

  7. Neurogenic detrusor overactivity is associated with decreased expression and function of the large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+-activated K(+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiril L Hristov

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from a variety of neurological diseases such as spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis often develop neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO, which currently lacks a universally effective therapy. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NDO is associated with changes in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM large conductance Ca(2+-activated K(+ (BK channel expression and function. DSM tissue samples from 33 patients were obtained during open bladder surgeries. NDO patients were clinically characterized preoperatively with pressure-flow urodynamics demonstrating detrusor overactivity, in the setting of a clinically relevant neurological condition. Control patients did not have overactive bladder and did not have a clinically relevant neurological disease. We conducted quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR, perforated patch-clamp electrophysiology on freshly-isolated DSM cells, and functional studies on DSM contractility. qPCR experiments revealed that DSM samples from NDO patients showed decreased BK channel mRNA expression in comparison to controls. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated reduced whole cell and transient BK currents (TBKCs in freshly-isolated DSM cells from NDO patients. Functional studies on DSM contractility showed that spontaneous phasic contractions had a decreased sensitivity to iberiotoxin, a selective BK channel inhibitor, in DSM strips isolated from NDO patients. These results reveal the novel finding that NDO is associated with decreased DSM BK channel expression and function leading to increased DSM excitability and contractility. BK channel openers or BK channel gene transfer could be an alternative strategy to control NDO. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate the value of BK channel opening drugs or gene therapies for NDO treatment and to identify any possible adverse effects.

  8. A critical review of recent clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of non-neurogenic male lower urinary tract symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Michael Erlano; Mendoza, Jonathan; See, Manuel; Esmena, Ednalyn; Aguila, Dean; Silangcruz, Jan Michael; Reyes, Buenaventura Jose; Luna, Saturnino; Morales, Marcelino

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We provide an overview of the quality of recent clinical clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for non-neurogenic male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and summarize the recommendations for their diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Methods: We systematically searched recent (2008–2013) CPGs for non-neurogenic male LUTS. Eligible CPGs were assessed and appraised using Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) tool by a CPG-appraisal group. The appraisal scores for each guideline were summarized according to each domain and in total. A recommendation summary was made across the guidelines for diagnostics, conservative management, medical, minimally invasive therapy, and surgical management. Results: A total of 8 guidelines were considered. According to AGREE II appraisal of guidelines, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) consistently scored high on the guideline domains assessed. Recommendations on diagnostics, conservative management, medical, and surgical management were consistent among the top 3 guidelines. However, we noted a discrepancy in recommending minimally invasive therapy as an alternative management of moderate to severe or bothersome non-neurogenic male LUTS secondary to benign prostatic enlargement (BPE); the NICE guideline, in particular, does not recommend using minimally invasive therapy. Conclusion: The quality of recent CPGs on non-neurogenic male LUTS was appraised and summarized. The guidelines from NICE, AUA and EAU were considered highly compliant to the AGREE II proposition for guideline formation and development. PMID:26279717

  9. Conditioning pain stimulation does not affect itch induced by intra-epidermal histamine pricks but aggravates neurogenic inflammation in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hjalte Holm; Imai, Yosuke; Petersen, Kristian Kjær

    2016-01-01

    forearm by skin prick test punctures. Moreover, neurogenic inflammation and wheal reactions induced by histamine and autonomic nervous system responses (heart rate variability and skin conductance) were monitored. CPM did not modulate the intensity of histamine-induced itch suggesting that pruriceptive...

  10. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: A comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Jongen (Peter); B.F.M. Blok (Bertil); J.P. Heesakkers (John P.); M. Heerings (Marco); W.A. Lemmens (Wim A.); R. Donders (Rogier)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0

  11. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis : a comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Blok, Bertil F.; Heesakkers, John P.; Heerings, Marco; Lemmens, Wim A.; Donders, Rogier

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0 to 24 with

  12. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: a comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, P.J.; Blok, B.F.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Heerings, M.; Lemmens, W.A.J.G.; Donders, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0 to 24 with

  13. Investigating Design Research Landscapes through Exhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Li; Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Mäkelä, Maarit

    2013-01-01

    What characterizes a design research exhibition compared to a traditional design and art exhibition? How do you show the very materialities of the design experiments as a means for communicating knowledge of research and of practice? How do you present, review and utilize such an exhibition? With...

  14. Affordances and distributed cognition in museum exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne; May, Michael; Marandino, Martha

    2014-01-01

    consistent framework. Here, we invoke the notions of affordance and distributed cognition to explain in a coherent way how visitors interact with exhibits and exhibit spaces and make meaning from those interactions, and we exemplify our points using observations of twelve visitors to exhibits at a natural...... history museum. We show how differences in exhibit characteristics give rise to differences in the interpretive strategies used by visitors in their meaning-making process, and conclude by discussing how the notions of affordance and distributed cognition can be used in an exhibit design perspective....

  15. A Heuristic for Improving Transmedia Exhibition Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selvadurai, Vashanth; Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss

    2017-01-01

    The area of interest is transmedia experiences in exhibitions. The research question is: How to involve visitors in a transmedia experience for an existing exhibition, which bridges the pre-, during- and post-experience? Research through design, and action research are the methods used to design...... and reflect on a transmedia experience for an existing exhibition. This is framed with literature about exhibitions and transmedia, and analyzed with quantitative data from a case-study of visitors in the exhibition; this is organizationally contextualized. The contribution covers a significant gap...... in the scientific field of designing transmedia experience in an exhibition context that links the pre- and post-activities to the actual visit (during-activities). The result of this study is a preliminary heuristic for establishing a relation between the platform and content complexity in transmedia exhibitions....

  16. Properties of doublecortin-(DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex compared to the neurogenic dentate gyrus of adult mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Klempin

    Full Text Available The piriform cortex receives input from the olfactory bulb and (via the entorhinal cortex sends efferents to the hippocampus, thereby connecting the two canonical neurogenic regions of the adult rodent brain. Doublecortin (DCX is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that is expressed transiently in the course of adult neurogenesis. Interestingly, the adult piriform cortex, which is usually considered non-neurogenic (even though some reports exist that state otherwise, also contains an abundant population of DCX-positive cells. We asked how similar these cells would be to DCX-positive cells in the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Using BAC-generated transgenic mice that express GFP under the DCX promoter, we studied DCX-expression and electrophysiological properties of DCX-positive cells in the mouse piriform cortex in comparison with the dentate gyrus. While one class of cells in the piriform cortex indeed showed features similar to newly generated immature granule neurons, the majority of DCX cells in the piriform cortex was mature and revealed large Na+ currents and multiple action potentials. Furthermore, when proliferative activity was assessed, we found that all DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex were strictly postmitotic, suggesting that no DCX-positive "neuroblasts" exist here as they do in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that DCX in the piriform cortex marks a unique population of postmitotic neurons with a subpopulation that retains immature characteristics associated with synaptic plasticity. DCX is thus, per se, no marker of neurogenesis but might be associated more broadly with plasticity.

  17. Resection rectopexy--laparoscopic neuromapping reveals neurogenic pathways to the lower segment of the rectum: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, Werner; Kauff, Daniel W; Naumann, Gert; Lang, Hauke

    2013-04-01

    Nerve sparing in functional pelvic floor surgery is strongly recommended as intraoperative damage to the autonomic nerves may predispose to persistent or worsened anorectal and urogenital function. The aim of this study was to investigate the intraoperative neural topography above the pelvic floor in patients undergoing laparoscopic resection rectopexy in combination with electrophysiologic neuromapping. Ten consecutive female patients underwent laparoscopic resection rectopexy for rectal prolapse. Intraoperative identification of pelvic autonomic nerves was carried out with a novel intraoperative neuromonitoring system based on electric stimulation under simultaneous electromyography of the internal anal sphincter and manometry of the bladder. Neuromonitoring results were compared to patients' preoperative anorectal and urogenital function and their functional results at the 3-month follow-up. Laparoscopy in combination with electrophysiologic neuromapping revealed neurogenic pathways to the lower segment of the rectum during surgical mobilization. In all procedures, intraoperative neuromonitoring finally confirmed functional nerve integrity to the internal anal sphincter and the bladder. Patients with preoperatively diagnosed fecal incontinence were continent at the 3-month follow-up. The Wexner score improved in median from preoperative 4 (range 1-18) to 1 (range 0-3) at follow-up (p = 0.012). Cleveland Clinical Constipation Score improved in median from 10 (range 5-17) to 3 (range 1-7; p = 0.005). In none of the investigated patients a new onset of urinary dysfunction did occur. No change in sexual function was observed. Laparoscopy in combination with electrophysiologic neuromapping during nerve-sparing resection rectopexy identified and preserved neurogenic pathways heading to the lower segment of the rectum above the level of the pelvic floor.

  18. Space exhibitions: the science encounters the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coliolo, F.; Menendez, M.

    The widespread dissemination of science has always been one pillar of the development of human knowledge. There are several methods to structure interaction with the public: media, conferences, various written genres, and exhibitions. But: how to attract the public? How to arouse interest among future generation, insatiable for knowledge? In this paper we focus on space exhibitions, whose content combines mystery, discovery and science. The preparation of an exhibition is based on guidelines discussed between an interdisciplinary team and the exhibition project manager, the purpose of which is to find a coherent "strategy" to select information and to choose a concise, efficient, smart and original way to "visualize" the messages. Exhibition visitors are "privileged" because the interactivity is first emotive, then mental and cultural; the audience is universal. The goal of an exhibition is not to explain the content, but to stimulate the audience's curiosity in an attractive environment. We show some photos of ESA exhibitions, and try to understand if the visual impact is the first step towards a "multi-sensory" approach to communication. "A good exhibition can never be replaced by a book, a film or a lecture. A good exhibition creates a thirst for books, film, lectures. A good exhibition changes the visitors"(J. Wagensberg, Modern scientific museology")

  19. Which exhibition attributes create repeat visitation?

    OpenAIRE

    Whitfield, J.; Webber, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    This study identifies exhibition attributes deemed important by attendees’ in determining their attendance at the UK biennial MICROSCIENCE 2008 exhibition using a self-administered internet-based questionnaire. Perceived performance of attributes by attendees is also established. Attendees consider meeting specialists as well as gaining product and technical information to be very important attributes for exhibition selection. Application of an Importance Performance Analysis suggests that re...

  20. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... local authorizations. (i) A copy of any certificate of public convenience and necessity or similar..., showing towns and communities to be served, and (b) gas producing and storage filed, or other sources of.... (8) Exhibit G-II—Flow diagram data. Exhibits G and G-I shall be accompanied by a statement of...

  1. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION FACILITIES § 50.7 Applications: exhibits. Each exhibit must contain a title page..., and substations description including: (i) Conductor size and type; (ii) Type of structures; (iii... existing if applicable) substations or switching stations that will be associated with the proposed new...

  2. Encountering Nanotechnology in an Interactive Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murriello, Sandra E.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This article offers findings from a learning sciences-informed evaluation of a nanoscience and nanotechnology exhibition called Nano-Aventura (NanoAdventure), based on four interactive-collaborative games and two narrated videos. This traveling exhibition was developed in Brazil by the Museu Exploratorio de Ciencias for children and teenagers…

  3. Let's play game exhibitions : A curator's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Jesse; Glas, M.A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330981447; van Vught, J.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413532682

    2017-01-01

    The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision is home to The Experience, a museum exhibiting the history of media in the Netherlands. For ten months in 2016 and 2017, The Experience hosted a temporary exhibition entitled Let’s YouTube . During the Let’s YouTube game month, we programmed a ten-day

  4. Science Fiction Exhibits as STEM Gateways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robie, Samantha

    Women continue to hold less than a quarter of all STEM jobs in the United States, prompting many museums to develop programs and exhibits with the express goal of interesting young girls in scientific fields. At the same time, a number of recent museum exhibits have harnessed the popularity of pop culture and science fiction in order to interest general audiences in STEM subject matter, as well as using the exhibits as springboards to expand or shift mission goals and focus. Because science fiction appears to be successful at raising interest in STEM fields, it may be an effective way to garner the interest of young girls in STEM in particular. This research seeks to describe the ways in which museums are currently using science fiction exhibits to interest young girls in STEM fields and careers. Research focused on four institutions across the country hosting three separate exhibits, and included staff interviews and content analysis of exhibit descriptions, promotional materials, a summative evaluation and supplementary exhibit productions. In some ways, science fiction exhibits do serve young girls, primarily through the inclusion of female role models, staff awareness, and prototype testing to ensure interactives are attractive to girls as well as to boys. However, STEM appears to be underutilized, which may be partly due to a concern within the field that the outcome of targeting a specific gender could be construed as "stereotyping".

  5. A Heuristic for Improving Transmedia Exhibition Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selvadurai, Vashanth; Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss

    2017-01-01

    The area of interest is transmedia experiences in exhibitions. The research question is: How to involve visitors in a transmedia experience for an existing exhibition, which bridges the pre-, during- and post-experience? Research through design, and action research are the methods used to design ...

  6. Artefacts and the performance of an exhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2008-01-01

    The article explores the role of mediating artefacts in children's encounters with a museum of natural history. Using actor network theory it explores how a specific artefact shapes the way users relate to exhibited objects and how the artefact guides users' movements in the exhibition. The media...

  7. Memory and Mourning: An Exhibit History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Scott G.

    2005-01-01

    Mounted by the Strong Museum in Rochester, New York, in 1993, and traveling nationally thereafter, the exhibit Memory and Mourning provided historical and contemporary perspectives to help museum guests explore their own reactions to loss and grief. In the process the exhibit's development team encountered a range of philosophical, historical,…

  8. Paolo Gioli: An Exercise in Exhibition Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Camporesi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The text is thought as a brief museological and museographical journey of Paolo Gioli’s exhibition “Volti” [“Faces”], that allows the reader to go through the exhibition-making process, discussing, among others, the difficulties that I have encountered.

  9. High Quality Virtual Reality for Architectural Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzberg, Anette

    2016-01-01

    This paper will summarise the findings from creating and implementing a visually high quality Virtual Reality (VR) experiment as part of an international architecture exhibition. It was the aim to represent the architectural spatial qualities as well as the atmosphere created from combining natural...... and artificial lighting in a prominent not yet built project. The outcome is twofold: Findings concerning the integration of VR in an exhibition space and findings concerning the experience of the virtual space itself. In the exhibition, an important aspect was the unmanned exhibition space, requiring the VR...... and quantitative methods at two different occasions and setups after the exhibition, both showing a high degree of immersion and experience of reality....

  10. The Culture of Exhibitions and Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Doumas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article reflects on temporary exhibitions from a theoretical as well as practical perspective. Regarded as a particularly effective mass-communication medium, exhibitions have a dual nature: they are scholarly undertakings, bringing off a curator’s vision and, simultaneously, they are projects with economic implications that need to be well managed and administered. The role of conservation in the making of temporary exhibitions, either in-house or touring, is here discussed in relation to how work is planned and prioritized as well as how time is managed and staff is allocated. Reference to weaknesses that lessen the crucial input of conservation in the decision-making process is also made. Much of the debate, which focuses on art exhibitions, concerns practicalities encountered in a private museum that extend from the very early stages of selecting objects for display to the mounting of an exhibition.

  11. Holland at CERN – Industrial exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    Sponsored by EVD, an agency of the Dutch Ministry of the Economy From 8 to 11 November 2010 Industrial Exhibition Administration Building Bldg. 61 9-00 - 17-30 Twenty seven companies will present their latest technology at the industrial exhibition "Holland at CERN". Dutch industry will exhibit products and technologies which are related to the field of particle physics. Individual interviews will take place directly at the stands in the Main Building. The firms will contact relevant users/technicians but any user wishing to make contact with a particular firm is welcome to use the contact details which are available from each departmental secretariat or at the following URL: http://gs-dep.web.cern.ch/gs-dep/groups/sem/ls/Industrial_Exhibitions.htm#Industrial_exhibitions You will find the list of exhibitors below. LIST OF EXHIBITORS: Schelde Exotech Vernooy BV Triumph Group INCAA Computers DeMaCo Holland bv TNO Science & Industry Janssen Precision Engi...

  12. Museum Exhibitions: Optimizing Development Using Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P. B.

    2002-12-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado, has recently developed two museum exhibits called the Space Weather Center and MarsQuest. It is currently planning to develop a third exhibit called InterActive Earth. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The development of these exhibitions included a comprehensive evaluation plan. I will report on the important role evaluation plays in exhibit design and development using MarsQuest and InterActive Earth as models. The centerpiece of SSI's Mars Education Program is the 5,000-square-foot traveling exhibition, MarsQuest: Exploring the Red Planet, which was developed with support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, and several corporate donors. The MarsQuest exhibit is nearing the end of a highly successful, fully-booked three-year tour. The Institute plans to send an enhanced and updated MarsQuest on a second three-year tour and is also developing Destination: Mars, a mini-version of MarsQuest designed for smaller venues. They are designed to inspire and empower participants to extend the excitement and science content of the exhibitions into classrooms and museum-based education programs in an ongoing fashion. The centerpiece of the InterActive Earth project is a traveling exhibit that will cover about 4,000 square feet. The major goal of the proposed exhibit is to introduce students and the public to the complexity of the interconnections in the Earth system, and thereby, to inspire them to better understand planet Earth. Evaluation must be an integral part of the exhibition development process. For MarsQuest, a 3-phase evaluation (front end, formative and summative) was conducted by Randi Korn and Associates in close association with the development team. Sampling procedures for all three evaluation phases ensured the participation of all audiences, including family groups, students, and adults. Each phase of

  13. A mini-exhibition with maximum content

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    The University of Budapest has been hosting a CERN mini-exhibition since 8 May. While smaller than the main travelling exhibition it has a number of major advantages: its compact design alleviates transport difficulties and makes it easier to find suitable venues in the Member States. Its content can be updated almost instantaneously and it will become even more interactive and high-tech as time goes by.   The exhibition on display in Budapest. The purpose of CERN's new mini-exhibition is to be more interactive and easier to install. Due to its size, the main travelling exhibition cannot be moved around quickly, which is why it stays in the same country for 4 to 6 months. But this means a long waiting list for the other Member States. To solve this problem, the Education Group has designed a new exhibition, which is smaller and thus easier to install. Smaller maybe, but no less rich in content, as the new exhibition conveys exactly the same messages as its larger counterpart. However, in the slimm...

  14. Neurogenic compounds comprising melatonin and the eddicacy thereof in in vivo experiments for use in the treatment of diseases of the nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel; Fuente Revenga, Mario de la; Pérez Martín, María Concepción; Pérez Castillo, Ana; Morales-García, José A.; Alonso-Gil, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The invention, which is intended for use in the pharmaceutics and research field, relates to novel chemical entities derived from melatonin and having neurogenic properties, melatonin and/or serotonin receptor-modulating properties, and antioxidant and/or cholinergic properties. Experiments on mice have shown that they can be used for the in vivo regeneration of damaged neuronal populations, without leading to tumours. The invention also relates to methods for producing these novel compo...

  15. Inhibition of Adult Neurogenesis by Inducible and Targeted Deletion of ERK5 MAP Kinase Specifically in Adult Neurogenic Regions Impairs Contextual Fear Memory Extinction and Remote Fear Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Yung-Wei; Chan, Guy C.K.; Kuo, Chay T.; Storm, Daniel R.; Xia, Zhengui

    2012-01-01

    Although there is evidence suggesting that adult neurogenesis may contribute to hippocampus-dependent memory, signaling mechanisms responsible for adult hippocampal neurogenesis are not well characterized. Here we report that ERK5 MAP kinase is specifically expressed in the neurogenic regions of the adult mouse brain. The inducible and conditional knockout (icKO) of erk5 specifically in neural progenitors of the adult mouse brain attenuated adult hippocampal neurogenesis. It also caused defic...

  16. France at CERN – Industrial exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2012-01-01

    Industrial Exhibition Administration Building Bldg 61 – 1st Floor Tuesday 27 March: 9 a.m. – 5.30 p.m. Wednesday 28 March: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.   About thirty French companies are presenting their latest technological advances during the industrial exhibition "France at CERN", featuring products and technologies specifically related to CERN activities. Individual B2B meetings can be organized with the sales and technical representatives of participating firms and will take place at either the companies’ exhibition stands or in conference rooms in the Main Building. Individuals wishing to make contact with one or more companies must use the contact details available from each secretariat of department or by using this link. B2B meetings will be coordinated by UBIFRANCE. You will also find the list of exhibiting and participating companies online here. This event is sponsored by the French subsidiary of RS Components, the most important distri...

  17. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of operating such facilities. Exhibit B. A general or key map on a scale not greater than 20 miles to... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the points...

  18. Communicating Complex Sciences by Means of Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S.

    2011-12-01

    Earth Sciences will have to take over the leading role in global sustainable policy and in discussions about climate change. Efforts to raise attention within the politically responsible communities as well as in the public are getting more and more support by executive and advisory boards all over the world. But how can you successfully communicate complex sciences? For example, to start communication about climate change, the first step is to encourage people to be concerned about climate change. After that, one has to start thinking about how to present data and how to include the presented data into an unprejudiced context. Therefore, the communication toolbox offers various methods to reach diverse audiences. The R&D programme GEOTECHNOLOGIEN conducts roving exhibitions as one of its most successful communication tools. With roving exhibitions GEOTECHNOLOGIEN is able to get in touch with different audiences at once. The main purpose and theme of these exhibitions is to convey the everyday means of climate change to the visitors. It is within the responsibility of science to communicate the effects of a phenomenon like climate change as well as the impact of research results to the everyday life of people. Currently, a GEOTECHNOLOGIEN roving exhibition on remote sensing with satellites deals with various issues of environmental research, including a chapter on climate change. By following the 3M-concept (Meaning - Memorable - Moving), exhibitions allow to connect the visitors daily environment and personal experiences with the presented issues and objects. Therefore, hands-on exhibits, exciting multimedia effects and high-tech artefacts have to be combined with interpretive text elements to highlight the daily significance of the scientific topics and the exhibition theme respectively. To create such an exhibition, strong conceptual planning has to be conducted. This includes the specification of stern financial as well as time wise milestones. In addition

  19. Onabotulinumtoxin A for Treating Overactive/Poor Compliant Bladders in Children and Adolescents with Neurogenic Bladder Secondary to Myelomeningocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study was performed to verify the efficacy and safety of Onabotulinumtoxin A (BTX-A in treating children with neurogenic bladder (NB secondary to myelomeningocele (MMC with detrusor overactivity/low compliance. From January 2002 to June 2011, 47 patients out of 68 with neuropathic bladder were selected (22 females, 25 males, age range 5–17 years; mean age 10.7 years at first injection. They presented overactive/poor compliant neurogenic bladders on clean intermittent catheterization, and were resistant or non compliant to pharmacological therapy. Ten patients presented second to fourth grade concomitant monolateral/bilateral vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. All patients were incontinent despite catheterization. In the majority of patients Botulinum-A toxin was administered under general/local anesthesia by the injection of 200 IU of toxin, without exceeding the dosage of 12IU/kg body weight, diluted in 20 cc of saline solution in 20 sites, except in the periureteral areas. Follow-up included clinical and ultrasound examination, urodynamics performed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks, and annually thereafter. Seven patients remained stable, 21 patients required a second injection after 6–9 months and 19 a third injection. VUR was corrected, when necessary, in the same session after the BT-A injection, by 1–3 cc of subureteral Deflux®. Urodynamic parameters considered were leak point pressure (LPP, leak point volume (LPV and specific volume at 20 cm H2O pressure. The results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. All patients experienced a significant 66.45% average increase of LPV (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 7169 × 10 −10 and a significant 118.57% average increase of SC 20 (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 2.466 × 10 −12. The difference between preoperative and postoperative LPP resulted not significant (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 0.8858 No patient presented severe systemic complications; 38/47 patients presented slight hematuria for

  20. Botulinumtoxin-A in der Behandlung neurogener Blasenfunktionsstörungen bei Kindern: Funktionelle und histomorphologische Langzeitergebnisse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulte-Baukloh H

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Die etablierte Therapie der neurogenen Detrusorhyperaktivität bei Kindern besteht in der Gabe von Anticholinergika und begleitendem intermittierendem Einmalkatheterismus. Eine hohe Nebenwirkungsrate der Anticholinergika oder eine nicht ausreichende Dämpfung der Detrusoraktivität limitiert jedoch die Anwendung und zwingt nicht selten zu einem operativen Vorgehen. Wir untersuchten deshalb die Wirksamkeit von Botulinumtoxin-A (BTX-A auf die neurogene Detrusorhyperaktivität bei Kindern mit neurogener Blasenfunktionsstörung. Hierzu wurden 24 Kinder (11 Mädchen, 13 Jungen; 2,5–20 (Ø 11,9 Jahre mit maximalem Detrusordruck 40 cm H2O trotz anticholinerger Medikation in die Studie eingeschlossen. Nach urodynamischer Evaluierung wurden gewichtsadaptiert 85–300 U BTX-A (Botox(R zystoskopisch an 30–40 Stellen in den M. detrusor injiziert. Urodynamische Kontrollen erfolgten nach 1, 3 und 6 Monaten. Urodynamisch fand sich ein erhöhtes Reflexvolumen nach 1 Monat um +84 %, nach 3 Monaten um +68 % und nach 6 Monaten um +23 %. Entsprechend verhielten sich die Maximalkapazitäten: +35 % (nach 1 Monat, +23 % (nach 3 Monaten und +36 % (nach 6 Monaten. Die Maximaldrücke veränderten sich im o.g. Zeitraum um –41 %, –22 % bzw. +4 %. Die korrespondierenden Veränderungen der Inkontinenzrate betrug –46 %, –15 % bzw. –13 %. Bei 5 Kindern konnte jedoch auch mit dieser Therapie keine zufriedenstellende Drucksituation sichergestellt werden; nach der daraufhin durchgeführten Blasenaugmentation fanden sich in den Blasenresektaten histomorphologisch typische BTX-A bedingte Veränderungen, die jedoch in ihrer Ausprägung keinen signifikanten Gradienten aufwiesen. Zusammenfassend läßt sich festhalten, daß es nach Botulinumtoxin-A-Injektion in den Detrusormuskel bei der Mehrzahl der Patienten zu einer ausgeprägten und therapeutisch relevanten Verbesserung sämtlicher urodynamischer Parameter bei sehr guter Verträglichkeit des Medikamentes kommt

  1. Simultaneous augmentation cystoplasty and cuff only artificial urinary sphincter in children and young adults with neurogenic urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viers, B R; Elliott, D S; Kramer, S A

    2014-04-01

    We review our experience with artificial urinary sphincter and augmentation cystoplasty in patients with neurogenic bladder. This is the largest known series to specifically evaluate cuff only artificial urinary sphincter at augmentation cystoplasty. A total of 18 males underwent simultaneous artificial urinary sphincter and augmentation cystoplasty at our institution between 1982 and 2012, of whom 13 (72%) underwent cuff only artificial urinary sphincter. Outcomes included urinary continence, emptying modality, artificial urinary sphincter status, complications and additional procedures. Of the patients undergoing augmentation cystoplasty and cuff only artificial urinary sphincter 10 (77%) were initially continent. Average time of continence was 52.9 months. Four patients (31%) required no additional procedures and remained continent. Urinary incontinence developed in 3 patients (23%) immediately postoperatively and in 6 (46%) subsequently. Ultimately 9 patients (69%) required conversion to complete artificial urinary sphincter at a mean of 36.9 months postoperatively. Overall 12 patients (92%) were continent at followup. There were no artificial sphincter specific complications in patients undergoing the cuff only procedure with conversion to complete artificial urinary sphincter. After conversion to complete artificial urinary sphincter 3 patients (23%) experienced artificial sphincter specific complications. Reoperation was performed in 10 patients (77%), for 13 total procedures (1.3 per patient). There were no complications with cuff only artificial urinary sphincter and 6 complications with complete artificial urinary sphincter (p = 0.025). Finally, patients undergoing cuff only artificial urinary sphincter requiring revision were younger than those not requiring revision (15.6 vs 30.8 years, p = 0.026). Simultaneous cuff only artificial urinary sphincter and augmentation cystoplasty appears safe and efficacious in patients with neurogenic bladder, with fewer

  2. [All-Russian hygienic exhibitions and museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzybaeva, M P

    2011-01-01

    The material about the popularization of hygiene and health education in Russia in the second half of the 19th century to early 20th century through exhibition and museum activities has been collected for the first time and analyzed in the paper. The role of scientists and scientific medical societies in this process is noted. The significance of museum and exhibition activities in this area for the development of medical science is defined.

  3. Sex differences in science museum exhibit attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arámbula Greenfield, Teresa

    This study examines the relative attraction of hands-on, interactive science museum exhibits for females and males. Studies have demonstrated that such exhibits can be effective learning experiences for children, with both academic and affective benefits. Other studies have shown that girls and boys do not always experience the same science-related educational opportunities and that, even when they do, they do not necessarily receive the same benefits from them. These early differences can lead to more serious educational and professional disparities later in life. As interactive museum exhibits represent a science experience that is-readily available to both girls and boys, the question arose as to whether they were being used similarly by the two groups as well as by adult women and men. It was found that both girls and boys used all types of exhibits, but that girls were more likely than boys to use puzzles and exhibits focusing on the human body; boys were more likely than girls to use computers and exhibits illustrating physical science principles. However, this was less true of children accompanied by adults (parents) than it was of unaccompanied children on school field trips who roamed the museum more freely.Received: 16 February 1994; Revised: 3 February 1995;

  4. Can adult neural stem cells create new brains? Plasticity in the adult mammalian neurogenic niches: realities and expectations in the era of regenerative biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanis, Ilias

    2012-02-01

    Since the first experimental reports showing the persistence of neurogenic activity in the adult mammalian brain, this field of neurosciences has expanded significantly. It is now widely accepted that neural stem and precursor cells survive during adulthood and are able to respond to various endogenous and exogenous cues by altering their proliferation and differentiation activity. Nevertheless, the pathway to therapeutic applications still seems to be long. This review attempts to summarize and revisit the available data regarding the plasticity potential of adult neural stem cells and of their normal microenvironment, the neurogenic niche. Recent data have demonstrated that adult neural stem cells retain a high level of pluripotency and that adult neurogenic systems can switch the balance between neurogenesis and gliogenesis and can generate a range of cell types with an efficiency that was not initially expected. Moreover, adult neural stem and precursor cells seem to be able to self-regulate their interaction with the microenvironment and even to contribute to its synthesis, altogether revealing a high level of plasticity potential. The next important step will be to elucidate the factors that limit this plasticity in vivo, and such a restrictive role for the microenvironment is discussed in more details.

  5. Effects of four antitussives on airway neurogenic inflammation in a guinea pig model of chronic cough induced by cigarette smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu-long; Li, Pei-bo; Zhang, Chen-chen; Zheng, Yan-fang; Wang, Sheng; Nie, Yi-chu; Zhang, Ke-jian; Su, Wei-wei

    2013-12-01

    The effects of four antitussives, including codeine phosphate (CP), moguisteine, levodropropizine (LVDP) and naringin, on airway neurogenic inflammation and enhanced cough were investigated in guinea pig model of chronic cough. Guinea pigs were exposed to CS for 8 weeks. At the 7th and 8th week, the animals were treated with vehicle, CP (4.8 mg/kg), moguisteine (24 mg/kg), LVDP (14 mg/kg) and naringin (18.4 mg/kg) respectively. Then the cough and the time-enhanced pause area under the curve (Penh-AUC) during capsaicin challenge were recorded. The substance P (SP) content, NK-1 receptor expression and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) activity in lung were determined. Chronic CS exposure induced a bi-phase time course of cough responsiveness to capsaicin. Eight weeks of CS exposure significantly enhanced the airway neurogenic inflammation and cough response in guinea pigs. Two weeks of treatment with CP, moguisteine, LVDP or naringin effectively attenuated the chronic CS-exposure enhanced cough. Only naringin exerted significant effect on inhibiting Penh-AUC, SP content and NK-1 receptor expression, as well as preventing the declining of NEP activity in lung. Chronic CS-exposed guinea pig is suitable for studying chronic pathological cough, in which naringin is effective on inhibiting both airway neurogenic inflammation and enhanced cough.

  6. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides 'proof of principle' for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  7. Using Comparative Planetology in Exhibit Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on three of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (currently on tour), Alien Earths (in fabrication), and Giant Planets (in development). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in "habitable zones" around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Giant Planets: Exploring the Outer Solar System will take advantage of the excitement generated by the Cassini mission and bring planetary and origins research and discoveries to students and the public. It will be organized around four thematic areas: Our Solar System; Colossal Worlds; Moons, Rings, and Fields; and Make Space for Kids. Giant Planets will open in 2007. This talk will focus on the importance of making Earth comparisons in the conceptual design of each exhibit and will show several examples of how these comparisons were manifested in

  8. CROATIAN UROLOGISTS' CLINICAL PRACTICE AND COMPLIANCE WITH GUIDELINES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NON-NEUROGENIC MALE LOWER URINARY TRACT SYMPTOMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasković, Igor; Tomić, Miroslav; Nikles, Sven; Neretljak, Ivan; Milicić, Valerija

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Croatian urologists' management of non-neurogenic male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and their compliance with the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines. A cross-sectional survey included 51/179 Croatian urologists. We developed a questionnaire with questions addressing compliance with EAU guidelines. The rate of performing recommended evaluations on the initial assessment of patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)/LUTS varied from 8.0% (serum creatinine and voiding diary) to 100.0% (physical examination, prostate specific antigen and ultrasound). The international prostate symptom score was performed by 31%, analysis of urine sediment by 83%, urine culture by 53%, and serum creatinine by 8% of surveyed urologists. Only 8% of urologists regularly used bladder diary in patients with symptoms of nocturia. Our results indicated that 97% of urologists preferred alpha blockers as the first choice of treatment; 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARI) were mostly prescribed (84%) in combination with an alpha-blocker, preferably as a continuous treatment, whilst 29% of urologists used to discontinue 5ARI after 1-2 years. Half of the Croatian urologists used antimuscarinics in the treatment of BPH/LUTS and recommended phytotherapeutic drugs in their practice. In conclusion, Croatian urologists do not completely comply with the guidelines available.

  9. Nodular osteochondrogenic activity in soft tissue surrounding osteoma in neurogenic para osteo-arthropathy: morphological and immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys P

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenic Para-Osteo-Arthropathy (NPOA occurs as a consequence of central nervous system injuries or some systemic conditions. They are characterized by bone formation around the main joints. Methods In order to define some biological features of NPOAs, histological and immunohistological studies of the soft tissue surrounding osteoma and Ultrasound examination (US of NPOA before the appearance of abnormal ossification on plain radiographs were performed. Results We have observed a great number of ossifying areas scattered in soft tissues. US examination have also shown scattered ossifying areas at the early stage of ossification. A high osteogenic activity was detected in these tissues and all the stages of the endochondral process were observed. Mesenchymal cells undergo chondrocytic differentiation to further terminal maturation with hypertrophy, which sustains mineralization followed by endochondral ossification process. Conclusion We suggest that periosteoma soft tissue reflect early stage of osteoma formation and could be a model to study the mechanism of osteoma formation and we propose a mechanism of the NPOA formation in which sympathetic dystony and altered mechanical loading induce changes which could be responsible for the cascade of cellular events leading to cartilage and bone formation.

  10. Role of the nitric oxide pathway and the endocannabinoid system in neurogenic relaxation of corpus cavernosum from biliary cirrhotic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, M; Sadeghipour, H; Shafaroodi, H; Nezami, B G; Gholipour, T; Hajrasouliha, A R; Tavakoli, S; Nobakht, M; Moore, K P; Mani, A R; Dehpour, A R

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Relaxation of corpus cavernosum, which is mediated by nitric oxide (NO) released from non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) neurotransmission, is critical for inducing penile erection and can be affected by many pathophysiological conditions. However, the peripheral effect of liver cirrhosis on erectile function is as yet unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of biliary cirrhosis on NANC-mediated relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum and the possible roles of endocannabinoid and nitric oxide systems in this model. Experimental approach: Cirrhosis was induced by bile duct ligation. Controls underwent sham operation. Four weeks later, strips of corpus cavernosum were mounted in a standard organ bath and NANC-mediated relaxations were obtained by applying electrical field stimulation. Key results: The NANC-mediated relaxation was enhanced in corporal strips from cirrhotic animals. Anandamide potentiated the relaxations in both groups. Either AM251 (CB1 antagonist) or capsazepine (vanilloid VR1 antagonist), but not AM630 (CB2 antagonist), prevented the enhanced relaxations of cirrhotic strips. Either the non-selective NOS inhibitor L-NAME or the selective neuronal NOS inhibitor L-NPA inhibited relaxations in both groups, but cirrhotic groups were more resistant to the inhibitory effects of these agents. Relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (NO donor) were similar in tissues from the two groups. Conclusions and implications: Cirrhosis potentiates the neurogenic relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum probably via the NO pathway and involving cannabinoid CB1 and vanilloid VR1 receptors. PMID:17486141

  11. Micropatterning Extracellular Matrix Proteins on Electrospun Fibrous Substrate Promote Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation Toward Neurogenic Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaqiong; Wen, Feng; Chen, Huizhi; Pal, Mintu; Lai, Yuekun; Zhao, Allan Zijian; Tan, Lay Poh

    2016-01-13

    In this study, hybrid micropatterned grafts constructed via a combination of microcontact printing and electrospinning techniques process were utilized to investigate the influencing of patterning directions on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiation to desired phenotypes. We found that the stem cells could align and elongate along the direction of the micropattern, where they randomly distributed on nonmicropatterned surfaces. Concomitant with patterning effect of component on stem cell alignment, a commensurate increase on the expression of neural lineage commitment markers, such as microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2), Nestin, NeuroD1, and Class III β-Tubulin, were revealed from mRNA expression by quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR) and MAP2 expression by immunostaining. In addition, the effect of electrospun fiber orientation on cell behaviors was further examined. An angle of 45° between the direction of micropatterning and orientation of aligned fibers was verified to greatly prompt the outgrowth of filopodia and neurogenesis of hMSCs. This study demonstrates that the significance of hybrid components and electrospun fiber alignment in modulating cellular behavior and neurogenic lineage commitment of hMSCs, suggesting promising application of porous scaffolds with smart component and topography engineering in clinical regenerative medicine.

  12. Comparison of different antibiotic protocols for asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with neurogenic bladder treated with botulinum toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Paradella

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNTA injection has been widely used for the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury who do not respond to conventional treatment. There is no consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis for this procedure. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients with spinal cord injury who underwent detrusor BoNTA injection between January of 2007 and December of 2013 in a rehabilitation hospital. Occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI was assessed in 3 groups in accordance with their use of antibiotics (prophylactic dosage, 3 days, more than 3 days for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. All patients were performing self or assisted clean intermittent bladder catheterization and underwent a rigid cystoscopy, under general or regional anesthesia with sedation, and the drug used was Botox®. A total of 616 procedures were performed during the study period. There were 11 identified cases of UTI (1.8% with a trend to a higher rate in the group that used antibiotics for longer time. This report shows that a single dose of antibiotics before the detrusor BoNTA injection is enough to prevent UTI. Randomized clinical trial should be conducted for definitive conclusions.

  13. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the development of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Bárbara; Santos, João; Morgado, Marlene; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Gray, Susannah M Y; McCloskey, Karen D; Allen, Shelley; Cruz, Francisco; Cruz, Célia Duarte

    2015-02-04

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a well known consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), recognizable after spinal shock, during which the bladder is areflexic. NDO emergence and maintenance depend on profound plastic changes of the spinal neuronal pathways regulating bladder function. It is well known that neurotrophins (NTs) are major regulators of such changes. NGF is the best-studied NT in the bladder and its role in NDO has already been established. Another very abundant neurotrophin is BDNF. Despite being shown that, acting at the spinal cord level, BDNF is a key mediator of bladder dysfunction and pain during cystitis, it is presently unclear if it is also important for NDO. This study aimed to clarify this issue. Results obtained pinpoint BDNF as an important regulator of NDO appearance and maintenance. Spinal BDNF expression increased in a time-dependent manner together with NDO emergence. In chronic SCI rats, BDNF sequestration improved bladder function, indicating that, at later stages, BDNF contributes NDO maintenance. During spinal shock, BDNF sequestration resulted in early development of bladder hyperactivity, accompanied by increased axonal growth of calcitonin gene-related peptide-labeled fibers in the dorsal horn. Chronic BDNF administration inhibited the emergence of NDO, together with reduction of axonal growth, suggesting that BDNF may have a crucial role in bladder function after SCI via inhibition of neuronal sprouting. These findings highlight the role of BDNF in NDO and may provide a significant contribution to create more efficient therapies to manage SCI patients. Copyright © 2015 Frias et al.

  14. Effects of walking with a shopping trolley on spinal posture and loading in subjects with neurogenic claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Christine M; White, Derrick; Conaghan, Philip G; Bird, Howard A; Redmond, Anthony C

    2010-10-01

    To explore possible mechanisms underpinning symptom relief and improved walking tolerance in patients with neurogenic claudication (NC) when pushing a shopping trolley by evaluating the effects of a shopping trolley on spinal posture and loading patterns. An exploratory study of kinematic and kinetic changes in walking with and without pushing a shopping trolley in persons with NC symptoms and a comparison with asymptomatic control subjects. A primary care-based musculoskeletal service. Participants (n=8) with NC symptoms who have anecdotally reported symptomatic improvement when walking with a shopping trolley and a control group of asymptomatic persons (n=8). Shopping trolley. Changes in lumbar spinal sagittal posture and ground reaction force. Subjects with NC and asymptomatic controls walked with significantly more flexed spinal posture (increase in flexion, 3.40°; z=3.516; Pshopping trolley. However, at the midstance point of the gait cycle, controls showed minimal reliance on the trolley, whereas, people with NC showed continued offloading. Both posture and loading are affected by pushing a shopping trolley; however, patients with NC were found to offload the spine throughout the stance phase of gait, whereas asymptomatic controls did not. Copyright © 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Loss of neurogenesis in Hydra leads to compensatory regulation of neurogenic and neurotransmission genes in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Y; Buzgariu, W; Galliot, B

    2016-01-05

    Hydra continuously differentiates a sophisticated nervous system made of mechanosensory cells (nematocytes) and sensory-motor and ganglionic neurons from interstitial stem cells. However, this dynamic adult neurogenesis is dispensable for morphogenesis. Indeed animals depleted of their interstitial stem cells and interstitial progenitors lose their active behaviours but maintain their developmental fitness, and regenerate and bud when force-fed. To characterize the impact of the loss of neurogenesis in Hydra, we first performed transcriptomic profiling at five positions along the body axis. We found neurogenic genes predominantly expressed along the central body column, which contains stem cells and progenitors, and neurotransmission genes predominantly expressed at the extremities, where the nervous system is dense. Next, we performed transcriptomics on animals depleted of their interstitial cells by hydroxyurea, colchicine or heat-shock treatment. By crossing these results with cell-type-specific transcriptomics, we identified epithelial genes up-regulated upon loss of neurogenesis: transcription factors (Dlx, Dlx1, DMBX1/Manacle, Ets1, Gli3, KLF11, LMX1A, ZNF436, Shox1), epitheliopeptides (Arminins, PW peptide), neurosignalling components (CAMK1D, DDCl2, Inx1), ligand-ion channel receptors (CHRNA1, NaC7), G-Protein Coupled Receptors and FMRFRL. Hence epitheliomuscular cells seemingly enhance their sensing ability when neurogenesis is compromised. This unsuspected plasticity might reflect the extended multifunctionality of epithelial-like cells in early eumetazoan evolution. © 2015 The Authors.

  16. What do we know about neurogenic bladder prevalence and management in developing countries and emerging regions of the world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przydacz, Mikolaj; Denys, Pierre; Corcos, Jacques

    2017-09-01

    To summarize information on Neurogenic Bladder (NB) epidemiology, management and access to patient treatment in developing countries and emerging regions of the world in order to propose future interventions and help governmental as well as non-governmental organizations design their action plans. Different search methods were used to gather the maximum available data. They included strategic searches; reference checks; grey literature searches (reports, working papers, government documents, civil society information); contacting professional societies, registries, and authors; requesting unpublished data from organizations; and browsing related websites and journals. The incidence and prevalence rates of NB in developing countries are difficult to establish because epidemiological reports are few and far between. The frequency of bladder dysfunction in neurologically impaired populations can be approximately estimated in some of these countries. Similar information paucity affects diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to NB patients living in less-developed regions of the world. The assessment and management of NB seems to vary markedly between countries, and care of patients from emerging regions of the world is often inadequate. Strong concerted efforts are needed on the part of international scientific societies, non-governmental organizations and local governments to work together to change the prognosis for these patients and to improve their quality of life. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Comparison of different antibiotic protocols for asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with neurogenic bladder treated with botulinum toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Paradella

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNTA injection has been widely used for the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury who do not respond to conventional treatment. There is no consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis for this procedure. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients with spinal cord injury who underwent detrusor BoNTA injection between January of 2007 and December of 2013 in a rehabilitation hospital. Occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI was assessed in 3 groups in accordance with their use of antibiotics (prophylactic dosage, 3 days, more than 3 days for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. All patients were performing self or assisted clean intermittent bladder catheterization and underwent a rigid cystoscopy, under general or regional anesthesia with sedation, and the drug used was Botox®. A total of 616 procedures were performed during the study period. There were 11 identified cases of UTI (1.8% with a trend to a higher rate in the group that used antibiotics for longer time. This report shows that a single dose of antibiotics before the detrusor BoNTA injection is enough to prevent UTI. Randomized clinical trial should be conducted for definitive conclusions.

  18. Nerve growth factor does not seem to be a biomarker for neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Jörg; Pavlicek, David; Stoyanov, Jivko; Pannek, Jürgen; Wöllner, Jens

    2017-03-01

    To prospectively investigate the association of bladder function with the nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration in the urine of individuals with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) after spinal cord injury (SCI). Individuals with chronic SCI and NLUTD presenting for a routine urologic examination at a tertiary urologic referral center were recruited for the study. Patient characteristics, the current bladder evacuation method and urodynamic parameters were collected. As controls, individuals with normal bladder function were recruited from the staff of a SCI rehabilitation center. The urinary NGF concentration was measured in triplicates by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay with a minimal sensitivity of 10 pg/ml. The data of 10 and 37 individuals with normal bladder function and NLUTD, respectively, were analyzed. The urinary NGF concentration was below 10 pg/ml in all investigated samples. The urinary NGF concentration did not differentiate between individuals with normal bladder function and those with NLUTD. At least in patients with SCI, the urinary NGF concentration does not seem to be a clinically relevant biomarker for NLUTD. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:659-662, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Treatment outcomes and resource use of patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity receiving botulinum toxin A (BOTOX) therapy in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefer, Björn; Ehlken, Birgit; Bremer, Jörn; Burgdörfer, Harald; Domurath, Burkhard; Hampel, Christian; Kutzenberger, Johannes; Seif, Christoph; Sievert, Karl D; Berger, Karin; Pannek, Jürgen

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate treatment outcomes and resource consumption of patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) before and after botulinum toxin A (Botox) therapy in Germany. In a multi-center, cross-sectional, retrospective cohort study, data of patients with NDO 12 months before and after the first Botox therapy were analyzed. 214 patients (mean age 38 +/- 14.8 years, 145 male, 69 female) with NDO due to spinal cord injury (81%); myelomeningocele (14%), or Multiple Sclerosis (5%) from seven hospitals were included. Mean interval between treatments was 8 months. Following treatment, mean maximum detrusor pressure, maximum cystometric capacity and detrusor compliance improved significantly. Prior to Botox therapy, 68% reported urinary tract infections (UTI), 63% had incontinence episodes, and 58% used incontinence aids. These numbers decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after treatment to 28, 33, and 28%, respectively. In patients using incontinence aids, mean costs per patient decreased from 2euro to 1euro per day, whereas the mean cost of drugs to treat UTIs per patient decreased from 163euro to 80euro per year, respectively. This is the first study demonstrating the clinical usefulness of Botox therapy in clinical practice. Successful treatment resulted in lower costs for NDO associated morbidity due to less need for incontinence aids and UTI medication.

  20. Total mesorectal excision with intraoperative assessment of internal anal sphincter innervation provides new insights into neurogenic incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, Werner; Kauff, Daniel W; Gockel, Ines; Huppert, Sabine; Koch, Klaus P; Hoffmann, Klaus P; Lang, Hauke

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess internal anal sphincter (IAS) innervation in patients undergoing total mesorectal excision (TME) by intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM). Fourteen patients underwent TME. IONM was carried out through pelvic splanchnic nerve stimulation under continuous electromyography of the IAS. Anorectal function was assessed with the digital rectal examination scoring system and a standardized questionnaire. Nine of 11 patients who underwent low anterior resection had positive IONM results, with stimulation-induced increased IAS electromyographic amplitudes (median 0.23 μV (interquartile range [IQR] 0.05, 0.56) vs median 0.89 μV (IQR 0.64, 1.88), p < 0.001) after TME. The patients with the positive IONM results were continent after stoma closure. Of 2 patients with negative IONM results, 1 had fecal incontinence after closure of the defunctioning stoma and received a permanent sigmoidostomy. In the other patient the defunctioning stoma was deemed permanent due to decreased anal sphincter function. In 3 patients who underwent abdominoperineal excision, IONM assessed denervation of the IAS after performance of the abdominal part. This study demonstrated that IONM of IAS innervation in rectal cancer patients is feasible and may predict neurogenic fecal incontinence. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Cannabinoids for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo Youssef, Nadim; Schneider, Marc P; Mordasini, Livio; Ineichen, Benjamin V; Bachmann, Lucas M; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Panicker, Jalesh N; Kessler, Thomas M

    2017-04-01

    To review systematically all the available evidence on efficacy and safety of cannabinoids for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Studies were identified by electronic search of the Cochrane register, Embase, Medline, Scopus (last search on 11 November 2016). After screening 8 469 articles, we included two randomized controlled trials and one open-label study, in which a total of 426 patients were enrolled. Cannabinoids relevantly decreased the number of incontinence episodes in all three studies. Pooling data showed the mean difference in incontinence episodes per 24 h to be -0.35 (95% confidence interval -0.46 to -0.24). Mild adverse events were frequent (38-100%), but only two patients (0.7%) reported a serious adverse event. Preliminary data imply that cannabinoids might be an effective and safe treatment option for NLUTD in patients with MS; however, the evidence base is poor and more high-quality, well-designed and adequately powered and sampled studies are urgently needed to reach definitive conclusions. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Influence of the maternal use of labetalol on the neurogenic mechanism for cerebral autoregulation assessed by means of NIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Alexander; Varon, Carolina; Thewissen, Liesbeth; Naulaers, Gunnar; Lemmers, Petra; Van Bel, Frank; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Labetalol is a drug used in the treatment of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP). In a previous study we investigated the influence of the maternal use of labetalol on the cerebral autoregulation (CA) mechanism of neonates. In that study, we found that labetalol induces impaired CA during the first day of life, with CA returning to a normal status by the third day after birth. This effect was hypothesized to be caused by labetalol-induced vasodilation. However, no strong evidence for this claim was found. In this study we aim to find stronger evidence for the vasodilation effect caused by labetalol, by investigating its effect on the neurogenic mechanism (NM) involved in CA. The status of the NM was assessed by means of transfer function analysis between the low frequency content of the autonomic control activity (LFA), obtained by processing of the heart rate (HR), and the regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO₂). We found that neonates from mothers treated with labetalol presented a lower LFA and an impaired NM response during the first day of life, with values returning to normal by the end of the third day. These results reflect a vasodilation effect caused by labetalol, and indicate that the impaired CA observed in the previous study is caused by vasodilation.

  3. Application of data mining techniques to explore predictors of upper urinary tract damage in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H; Lu, B; Wang, X; Zheng, L; Sun, K; Cai, W

    2017-08-17

    This study proposed a decision tree model to screen upper urinary tract damage (UUTD) for patients with neurogenic bladder (NGB). Thirty-four NGB patients with UUTD were recruited in the case group, while 78 without UUTD were included in the control group. A decision tree method, classification and regression tree (CART), was then applied to develop the model in which UUTD was used as a dependent variable and history of urinary tract infections, bladder management, conservative treatment, and urodynamic findings were used as independent variables. The urethra function factor was found to be the primary screening information of patients and treated as the root node of the tree; Pabd max (maximum abdominal pressure, >14 cmH2O), Pves max (maximum intravesical pressure, ≤89 cmH2O), and gender (female) were also variables associated with UUTD. The accuracy of the proposed model was 84.8%, and the area under curve was 0.901 (95%CI=0.844-0.958), suggesting that the decision tree model might provide a new and convenient way to screen UUTD for NGB patients in both undeveloped and developing areas.

  4. CERN exhibition a big hit in Bulgaria

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first CERN exhibition in Bulgaria attracted many visitors. In the first ever CERN exhibition to be held in Bulgaria, over 1,400 visitors, many of them students and young physicists, visited the 10-day event in Sofia. The CERN mini-exhibition took place at the National Earth and Mankind Museum between 8 and 17 November. Permanently staffed by young physicists from Sofia University, there were exhibits on display about research activities at CERN, as well as four additional posters describing Bulgaria's participation. The inauguration took place on the morning of 8 November in the presence of the Vice-Minister for Science and Education, Mrs. Vanya Dobreva, and some 200 guests. A series of short speeches were followed by a visit to the exhibition. CERN's representative at the event, Ray Lewis, was then asked by Professor Matey Mateev, President of the Union of Physicists in Bulgaria, to say a few words on behalf of the Organization. Numerous journalists were also present at the inauguration. A painting enti...

  5. Serum atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) as an objective indicator for the diagnosis of neurogenic shock: animal experiment and human case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min-Zhu; Li, Yong-Guo; Zhang, Peng; Xiong, Jin-Cheng; Zhu, Shi-Sheng; Xiao, Xuan; Li, Jian-Bo

    2017-03-01

    In forensic medicine, the diagnosis of death due to neurogenic shock is considered to be an aporia, as lacking objective indicators and presenting atypical symptoms in autopsy. Medico-legal disputes and complaints occasionally result from this ambiguity. To explore potential objective indicators of neurogenic shock, we set up a model of neurogenic shock by applying an external mechanical force on the carotid sinus baroreceptor in rabbits. The serum atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) level was measured by radioimmunoassay in the control group (n = 8), survival group (n = 15) and death group (n = 5) both before and after the insult. The serum ANP level showed a significant increase after the insult in the death group compared with the serum obtained before the insult (P = 0.006), while the serum ANP level after the insult in the survival group and control group was not statistically significant compared with the serum obtained before the insult (P = 0.332 and P = 0.492, respectively). To verify the repeatability of the model and the postmortem behavior of serum ANP, five healthy adult rabbits underwent the same procedure as the experimental group. The mortality rate was consistent with the former experiment (20 %). There were no significant changes in serum ANP level in vitro and in vivo (within 48 and 24 h, respectively). But there was a significant decrease in serum ANP level at 48 h postmortem in vivo (P = 0.001). A female patient who expired due to neurogenic shock during a hysteroscopy was reported. Neither fatal primary disease nor evidence for mechanical injuries or intoxication was found according to the autopsy. The serum ANP level was assayed as a supplementary indicator and was found to be three-fold higher than the normal maximum limit. Combined with the animal experiment, this case highlights that serum ANP has the potential to be an objective indicator for the diagnosis of death due to neurogenic shock.

  6. The effectiveness of walking stick use for neurogenic claudication: results from a randomized trial and the effects on walking tolerance and posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Christine M; Johnson, Mark I; Marchant, Paul R; Redmond, Anthony C; Bird, Howard A; Conaghan, Philip G

    2010-01-01

    Comer CM, Johnson MI, Marchant PR, Redmond AC, Bird HA, Conaghan PG. The effectiveness of walking stick use for neurogenic claudication: results from a randomized trial and the effects on walking tolerance and posture. To determine the immediate effects of using a stick on walking tolerance and on the potential explanatory variable of posture, and to provide a preliminary evaluation of the effects of daily walking stick use on symptoms and function for people with neurogenic claudication. A 2-phase study of neurogenic claudication patients comprising a randomized trial of 2 weeks of home use of a walking stick and a crossover study comparing walking tolerance and posture with and without a walking stick. A primary care-based musculoskeletal service. Patients aged 50 years or older with neurogenic claudication symptoms (N=46; 24 women, 22 men, mean age=71.26y) were recruited. Walking stick. Phase 1 of the trial used the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire symptom severity and physical function scores to measure outcome. The total walking distance during a shuttle walking test and the mean lumbar spinal posture (measured by using electronic goniometry) were used as the primary outcome measurements in the second phase. Forty of the participants completed phase 1 of the trial, and 40 completed phase 2. No significant differences in symptom severity or physical function were shown in score improvements for walking stick users (stick user scores - control scores) in the 2-week trial (95% confidence interval [CI], -.24 to .28 and -.10 to .26, respectively). In the second phase of the trial, the ratio of the shuttle walking distance with a stick to without a stick showed no significance (95% CI, .959-1.096) between the groups. Furthermore, the use of a walking stick did not systematically promote spinal flexion; no significant difference was shown for mean lumbar spinal flexion for stick use versus no stick (95% CI, .351 degrees -.836 degrees ). The prescription of a walking

  7. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis reduces memory interference in humans: opposing effects of aerobic exercise and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eDéry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the remarkable discovery of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian hippocampus, considerable effort has been devoted to unraveling the functional significance of these new neurons. Our group has proposed that a continual turnover of neurons in the DG could contribute to the development of event-unique memory traces that act to reduce interference between highly similar inputs. To test this theory, we implemented a continuous recognition task containing some objects that were repeated across trials as well as some objects that were highly similar, but not identical, to ones previously observed. The similar objects, termed lures, overlap substantially with previously viewed stimuli, and thus, may require hippocampal neurogenesis in order to avoid catastrophic interference. Lifestyle factors such as aerobic exercise and stress have been shown to impact the local neurogenic microenvironment, leading to enhanced and reduced levels of DG neurogenesis, respectively. Accordingly, we hypothesized that healthy young adults who take part in a long-term aerobic exercise regime would demonstrate enhanced performance on the visual pattern separation task, specifically at correctly categorizing lures as similar. Indeed, those who experienced a proportionally large change in fitness demonstrated a significantly greater improvement in their ability to correctly identify lure stimuli as similar. Conversely, we expected that those who score high on depression scales, an indicator of chronic stress, would exhibit selective deficits at appropriately categorizing lures. As expected, those who scored high on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were significantly worse than those with relatively lower BDI scores at correctly identifying lures as similar, while performance on novel and repeated stimuli was identical. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that adult-born neurons in the DG contribute to the orthogonalization of incoming information.

  8. The exploration of the exhibition informatization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiankang

    2017-06-01

    The construction and management of exhibition informatization is the main task and choke point during the process of Chinese exhibition industry’s transformation and promotion. There are three key points expected to realize a breakthrough during the construction of Chinese exhibition informatization, and the three aspects respectively are adopting service outsourcing to construct and maintain the database, adopting advanced chest card technology to collect various kinds of information, developing statistics analysis to maintain good cutomer relations. The success of Chinese exhibition informatization mainly calls for mature suppliers who can provide construction and maintenance of database, the proven technology, a sense of data security, advanced chest card technology, the ability of data mining and analysis and the ability to improve the exhibition service basing on the commercial information got from the data analysis. Several data security measures are expected to apply during the process of system developing, including the measures of the terminal data security, the internet data security, the media data security, the storage data security and the application data security. The informatization of this process is based on the chest card designing. At present, there are several types of chest card technology: bar code chest card; two-dimension code card; magnetic stripe chest card; smart-chip chest card. The information got from the exhibition data will help the organizers to make relevant service strategies, quantify the accumulated indexes of the customers, and improve the level of the customer’s satisfaction and loyalty, what’s more, the information can also provide more additional services like the commercial trips, VIP ceremonial reception.

  9. Surface Conductive Graphene-Wrapped Micromotors Exhibiting Enhanced Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xing; Katuri, Jaideep; Zeng, Yongfei; Zhao, Yanli; Sanchez, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Surface-conductive Janus spherical motors are fabricated by wrapping silica particles with reduced graphene oxide capped with a thin Pt layer. These motors exhibit a 100% enhanced velocity as compared to standard SiO2 -Pt motors. Furthermore, the versatility of graphene may open up possibilities for a diverse range of applications from active drug delivery systems to water remediation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Exhibits in libraries a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Mary E

    2005-01-01

    "Ccomprehensive...detailed"--Booklist; "thoroughly reseached...highly recommended"--Journal of Access Services. Library exhibits are more than entertainment for patrons. They can inspire and educate, stimulate an interest that can be explored in a book, or attract visitors who otherwise wouldn't stop by. Displays are also an opportunity for a library to put its creative foot forward or help patrons navigate the facility itself. This comprehensive "how-to" includes everything a librarian or staff member needs to know to put on an exhibit, from hatching ideas to evaluating the end result. Illustrations and photographs show practical methods of planning, labeling and displaying.

  11. Comic Strips to Accompany Science Museum Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Beom Sun; Park, Eun-mi; Kim, Sang-Hee; Cho, Sook-kyoung; Chung, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Science museums make the effort to create exhibits with amusing explanations. However, existing explanation signs with lengthy text are not appealing, and as such, visitors do not pay attention to them. In contrast, conspicuous comic strips composed of simple drawings and humors can attract science museum visitors. This study attempted to reveal…

  12. Do cylinders exhibit a cubatic phase?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaak, R.; Frenkel, D.; Mulder, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that freely rotating cylinders with an aspect ratio L/D = 0.9 exhibit a cubatic phase similar to the one found for a system of cut spheres. We present theoretical arguments why a cubatic phase might occur in this particular system. Monte Carlo simulations do not

  13. Synchronization in multicell systems exhibiting dynamic plasticity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using two perturbation analyses, we also show that this emergent synchronized dynamical state is fairly robust under external perturbations. Thus, the inherent plasticity in the oscillatory phenotypes in these model cells may get suppressed to exhibit collective dynamics of a single type in a multicell system, but ...

  14. CERN exhibition wins yet another design prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    The “Universe of Particles” exhibition in CERN’s Globe wins the silver design prize from the German direct business communications association FAMAB.   Not only do tens of thousands of people visit the “Universe of Particles” exhibition each year, but juries for design prizes are crossing its threshold more and more frequently too. In 2011 alone it claimed 8 awards, including winning outright the 2011 Annual Multimedia award, the iF Communication Design for Corporate Architecture award and the Modern Decoration Media award (the Bulletin already reported on some of these in July 2011). The FAMAB award is the latest to join the prestigious list. The jury of FAMAB’s “ADAM 2011” award was particularly impressed by the hands-on nature of the exhibition, which encourages visitors to get interested in science. They also appreciated the way that the space in the Globe is not just a container for the exhibits, but itself ...

  15. 18 CFR 153.8 - Required exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... facilities in the United States and Canada or Mexico; (5) Exhibit E. If the proposal is to import or export..., OR MODIFY FACILITIES USED FOR THE EXPORT OR IMPORT OF NATURAL GAS Application Under Section 3 § 153.8... for the export or the import of natural gas is within the authorized powers of applicant, that...

  16. Assessing the User Resistance to Recommender Systems in Exhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulmo Koo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Under the paradigm shift toward smart tourism, the exhibition industry is making efforts to introduce innovative technologies that can provide more diverse and valuable experiences to attendees. However, various new information technologies have failed in a market in practice due to the user’s resistance against it. Since innovative technology, such as booth recommender systems (BRS, is changing, creating uncertainty among consumers, consumer’s resistance to innovative technology can be considered a normal reaction. Therefore, it is important for a company to understand the psychological aspect of the consumer’s resistance and make measures to overcome the resistance. Accordingly, based on the model of Kim and Kankanhalli (2009, by applying the perceived value, the technology acceptance model, and the status quo bias theory, this study focused on the importance of self-efficacy and technical support in the context of using BRS. To do this purpose, a total of 455 survey data that was collected from “Korea franchise exhibition” attendees were used to analyze the proposed model. Structural equation modeling was applied for data analysis. The result shows that perceived value was affected by relative advantage and switching cost, also switching cost reduced the perceived value. However, self-efficacy reduced the switching cost, thereby decreasing the resistance of exhibition attendees. In addition, technical support increased the relative advantage switching cost and the perceived value. Exhibition attendee’s resistance was significantly negatively affected by perceived value, and positively affected by switching cost. The results will provide balanced viewpoints between the relative advantage and switching cost for exhibition marketers, helping to strengthen the competitiveness in terms of sustainable tourism of exhibition.

  17. Transcription factor Runx1 is pro-neurogenic in adult hippocampal precursor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Fukui

    Full Text Available Transcription factor Runx1 (Runt Related Transcription Factor 1, plays an important role in the differentiation of hematopoetic stem cells, angiogenesis and the development of nociceptive neurons. These known functions have in common that they relate to lineage decisions. We thus asked whether such role might also be found for Runx1 in adult hippocampal neurogenesis as a process, in which such decisions have to be regulated lifelong. Runx1 shows a widespread low expression in the adult mouse brain, not particularly prominent in the hippocampus and the resident neural precursor cells. Isoforms 1 and 2 of Runx1 (but not 3 to 5 driven by the proximal promoter were expressed in hippocampal precursor cells ex vivo, albeit again at very low levels, and were markedly increased after stimulation with TGF-β1. Under differentiation conditions (withdrawal of growth factors Runx1 became down-regulated. Overexpression of Runx1 in vitro reduced proliferation, increased survival of precursor cells by reducing apoptosis, and increased neuronal differentiation, while slightly reducing dendritic morphology and complexity. Transfection with dominant-negative Runx1 in hippocampal precursor cells in vitro did not result in differences in neurogenesis. Hippocampal expression of Runx1 correlated with adult neurogenesis (precursor cell proliferation across BXD recombinant strains of mice and covarying transcripts enriched in the GO categories "neural precursor cell proliferation" and "neuron differentiation". Runx1 is thus a plausible candidate gene to be involved in regulating initial differentiation-related steps of adult neurogenesis. It seems, however, that the relative contribution of Runx1 to such effect is complementary and will explain only small parts of the cell-autonomous pro-differentiation effect.

  18. Effect of exercise on neurogenic inflammation in spinal cord of Type 1 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vikram; Gonzalez, Mayra; Pennington, Kristen; Nargis, Syeda; Chattopadhyay, Munmun

    2016-07-01

    Neuropathy is a long-standing and hard to treat complication of diabetes that interferes almost 25-30% of diabetic patients and impacts the quality of life of the patients. Unforeseen side effects, dependency and addiction made the existing medical treatments comparatively ineffective. A number of studies indicate that moderate physical activity provides health-related advantages. However, existing data do not confirm whether regular physical activity would reduce the amount of inflammation in the nervous system of the subjects with Type 1 diabetes. This study reveals the significance of exercise to alleviate inflammation in the spinal cord of the nervous system and preserve sensory nerve function in animals with Type 1 diabetes after 6 weeks of exercise paradigm. Streptozotocin-diabetic animals were placed in motorized running wheels for sixty minutes per day, for five days a week for 6 weeks starting at one week after diabetes. Emerging evidence suggests that the increases in inflammatory mediators play an important role in the development of sensory neuropathy. This study shows that moderate exercise can reduce the release of a number of proinflammatory cytokines in the dorsal horn (DH) of spinal cord, subsequently delaying the development of neuropathy along with an increase in the anti-inflammatory mediator IL10 in the DH. In general, this study indicates that exercise may provide an alternative to the treatment for sensory neuropathy in Type 1 diabetic subjects via reducing the use of medication and providing an easier way to manage neuropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurogenic mediators contribute to local edema induced by Micrurus lemniscatus venom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Lyra Casais-E-Silva

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Micrurus is one of the four snake genera of medical importance in Brazil. Coral snakes have a broad geographic distribution from the southern United States to Argentina. Micrurine envenomation is characterized by neurotoxic symptoms leading to dyspnea and death. Moreover, various local manifestations, including edema formation, have been described in patients bitten by different species of Micrurus. Thus, we investigated the ability of Micrurus lemniscatus venom (MLV to induce local edema. We also explored mechanisms underlying this effect, focusing on participation of neuropeptides and mast cells.Intraplantar injection of MLV (1-10 μg/paw in rats caused dose- and time-dependent edema with a peak between 15 min and 1 h after injection. MLV also induced degranulation of peritoneal mast cells (MCs. MC depletion by compound 48/80 markedly reduced MLV-induced edema. Pre-treatment (30 min of rats with either promethazine a histamine H1 receptor antagonist or methysergide, a nonselective 5-HT receptor antagonist, reduced MLV-induced edema. However, neither thioperamide, a histamine H3/H4 receptor antagonist, nor co-injection of MLV with HOE-140, a BK2 receptor antagonist, altered the response. Depletion of neuropeptides by capsaicin or treatment of animals with NK1- and NK2-receptor antagonists (SR 140333 and SR 48968, respectively markedly reduced MLV-induced edema.In conclusion, MLV induces paw edema in rats by mechanisms involving activation of mast cells and substance P-releasing sensory C-fibers. Tachykinins NKA and NKB, histamine, and serotonin are major mediators of the MLV-induced edematogenic response. Targeting mast cell- and sensory C-fiber-derived mediators should be considered as potential therapeutic approaches to interrupt development of local edema induced by Micrurus venoms.

  20. LHC INAUGURATION, LHC Fest highlights: exhibition time!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    David Gross, one of the twenty-one Nobel Laureates who have participated in the project.Tuesday 21 October 2008 Accelerating Nobels Colliding Charm, Atomic Cuisine, The Good Anomaly, A Quark Somewhere on the White Paper, Wire Proliferation, A Tale of Two Liquids … these are just some of the titles given to artworks by Physics Nobel Laureates who agreed to make drawings of their prize-winning discoveries (more or less reluctantly) during a special photo session. Science photographer Volker Steger made portraits of Physics Nobel Laureates and before the photo sessions he asked them to make a drawing of their most important discovery. The result is "Accelerating Nobels", an exhibition that combines unusual portraits of and original drawings by twenty-one Nobel laureates in physics whose work is closely related to CERN and the LHC. This exhibition will be one of the highlights of the LHC celebrations on 21 October in the SM18 hall b...

  1. Exhibition: Women and Sciences by Fiami

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    The 19-panel exhibition is on display at CERN's Microcosm from Monday to Saturday from 10.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.   Marie Curie won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry one hundred years ago. She is the only woman ever to win two Nobel Prizes, which is a testament to her remarkable work. But throughout history, women have played a role in science either in their own right or alongside other scientists. In this special exhibition, the comic-strip artist Fiami takes a look back at the relationship between women and science through his portraits of Mileva Einstein, Marie-Anne Lavoisier and, of course, Marie Curie. Fiami has recently published an entire album devoted to Marie Curie. Texts in French All ages - Entrance free Femmes et Sciences is on display at Microcosm: From Wednesday 21 September 2011 to Tuesday 20 December 2011.

  2. The palaeontological exhibition: a venue for dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murriello, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dialogue between museums and their visitors enables museums to subsist, undergo transformations and become consolidated as socially valued cultural venues. The Museo de La Plata (Argentina) was created in the late nineteenth century as a natural history museum, and this study shows that currently the museum is valued socially as a venue for family leisure and education, at which people make sense to the objects exhibited through characteristics conferred upon them by both the institution and the visitor. Nevertheless, such dialogue is somehow affected by the museographic proposal and the public interpretation of the institutional narrative, which could be analysed within the frame of contextual learning. As a consequence, the evolutionary idea that the museum aims to communicate is distorted by the public. This article highlights the importance of considering the visitors' interpretations when planning museum exhibitions, a perspective that has been rather absent in the Argentinian museums. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Blebbishields and mitotic cells exhibit robust macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinesh, Goodwin G; Kamat, Ashish M

    2017-03-01

    Cancer stem cells can survive and undergo transformation after apoptosis by initiating robust endocytosis. Endocytosis in-turn drives formation of serpentine filopodia, which promote construction of blebbishields from apoptotic bodies. However, the status and role of macropinocytosis in blebbishields is not known. Here, we show by scanning electron microscopy and by macropinocytosis assays that blebbishields exhibit robust macropinocytosis. Inhibiting dynamin-mediated endocytosis does not affect macropinocytosis in blebbishields or in mitotic cells. In addition, inhibiting macropinocytosis did not inhibit construction of blebbishields from apoptotic bodies. Thus, although apoptotic cancer stem cells exhibit robust macropinocytosis, macropinocytosis is not essential to generate blebbishields, although it may play other roles in blebbishield biology. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(2):181-186, 2017. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. CERN's new microcosm exhibition is now open

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    After a major revamp in 2015, CERN’s microcosm exhibition is once again open to visitors. The exhibition is free and open to all without reservation and visitors are encouraged to share their #microcosm @CERN experiences on social media. Read more: http://cern.ch/go/7HWC -Producer- CERN Video Productions -Director- Kate Kahle -Camera- indissoluble.com and Julien Ordan -Editor- Julien Ordan -Infography- Daniel Dominguez Noemi Caraban -Music- “Light Years” by Stellardrone http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Ste... You can follow us on: cern.ch youtube.com/cerntv google.com/+CERN facebook.com/cern twitter.com/cern/ linkedin.com/company/cern instagram.com/cern Copyright © 2016 CERN. Terms of use: http://copyright.web.cern.ch/

  5. Craft Generation - Exhibition / Symposium / Workshops / Tour

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    2014 saw a national programme celebrating 25 years of contemporary visual art under the banner of GENERATION.  \\ud \\ud FCA&C (Fife Contemporary Art & Craft) wanted to recognise and celebrate the achievements of Contemporary Scottish Craft practitioners, highlighting creativity, skills, and the career of key individuals as well as and the continuation and renewal of skill and Craftsmanship. \\ud \\ud Established craft artists will exhibited along with artists from the following generation whose ...

  6. PLATE: Product Lifetimes And The Environment Exhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The PLATE (Product Lifetimes And The Environment) Exhibition explored critical themes related to how long products last in contemporary society. The topic of product longevity is examined in innovative ways through prototypes, objects, artefacts, posters, photographs and films produced by designers, social businesses, artists, researchers, lecturers and students.\\ud \\ud Featuring household products, furniture, lighting, fashion, jewellery and artworks, this collection of visual work embraced ...

  7. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit entrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    StenniSphere at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., invites visitors to discover why America comes to Stennis Space Center before going into space. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center.

  8. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  9. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis with neurogenic intermittent claudication and treatment with the Aperius PercLID System: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, Marcelo; Fabrizi, Anthony P; Maina, Raffaella; Gazzeri, Roberto; Martínez-Lage, Juan F

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether clinical improvement is noticeable after a minimally invasive procedure such as that used with the Aperius PercLID System in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) and neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC). The patients were treated with the aforementioned system at 3 different centers. The initial requirement to be included in the study was a minimum follow-up of 12 months. The authors studied 40 cases of DLSS in patients with NIC (age 72.7 +/- 8.08 years). Symptom severity, physical function, quality of life, and self-rated pain were assessed preoperatively and at the 12-month follow-up using the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) and a visual analog scale. The procedure was conducted under spinal (35 patients) or local (5 patients) anesthesia, using biplanar fluoroscopy for visualization. Single-level treatment was performed in 28 patients and 2-level treatment was performed in 12 patients. Based on time recordings in 24 cases, the mean procedural time was 19.9 +/- 5.0 minutes. The mean pain visual analog scale score improved significantly from 8.1 +/- 2.19 at baseline to 3.44 +/- 2.89 at the 1-year follow-up. The ZCQ score for patient satisfaction showed 90% of the patients being satisfied with the procedure. The mean rates of improvement in ZCQ score for symptom severity and physical function at 1 year were 38.7 +/- 33.3% and 33.8 +/- 29.7%, respectively, and both proved to be statistically significant. Most improvement was seen in mobility, pain/discomfort, and ability for self-care. In this preliminary study, the Aperius system provided clinically significant improvement after 1 year of follow-up in patients older than 65 years with DLSS and NIC.

  10. The radiologic relationship of the shoulder girdle to the thorax as an aid in diagnosing neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Jae; Lee, Hyuk Jin; Gong, Hyun Sik; Rhee, Seung Hwan; Park, Sang Jae; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2012-06-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is produced by compression of the brachial plexus in the thoracic outlet. The lower position of the shoulder girdle relative to the upper thorax may be related to NTOS. We investigated this hypothesis using plain cervical radiographs. We conducted this case-control study using plain cervical anteroposterior and lateral radiographs in 63 NTOS patients and 126 carpal tunnel syndrome patients who were matched for age and sex. To estimate the position of the shoulder girdle relative to the upper thorax, we analyzed the level of the clavicle using 2 parameters: the number of vertebrae visible in a lateral radiograph and the number of vertebrae above the line connecting both sternal ends of the clavicles in an anteroposterior radiograph. The number of vertebrae visible in a lateral radiograph was the parameter for the level of the lateral part of the clavicle relative to the upper thorax, whereas we used the number of vertebrae above the line connecting both sternal ends of the clavicles in an anteroposterior radiograph to determine the level of the medial part of the clavicle. Both parameters were greater in the NTOS group than in the control group, which suggests that the level of the shoulder girdle was lower in the NTOS group than in the control group. In addition, the risk of NTOS was increased in patients with lower shoulder girdle position. The lower placement of the shoulder girdle relative to the upper thorax was related to NTOS. Physicians may be able to estimate the position of the shoulder girdle using plain cervical radiographs when NTOS is clinically suspected. Diagnostic IV. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional outcome of supratrigonal cystectomy and augmentation ileocystoplasty in adult patients with refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Jörg; Bartel, Peter; Pannek, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the functional outcome after supratrigonal cystectomy and augmentation ileocystoplasty in adult patients with refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). Retrospective follow-up investigation in a single spinal cord injury rehabilitation center. In 29 patients, urodynamic data before and after supratrigonal cystectomy and augmentation ileocystoplasty, clinical outcome and post-operative complications were evaluated. The median age of the 29 patients at the time of surgery was 31 years, a median 14 years after NLUTD had occurred. At the last follow-up visit (median 2.4, range 0.4-9.0 years post-operatively), 20/29 patients (69%) were continent compared to 2/29 pre-operatively (P = 0.001). Furthermore, 16 patients required no or less detrusor relaxation therapy after augmentation ileocystoplasty. Augmentation cystoplasty resulted in a significant (P = 0.001) increase in the median bladder capacity (from 240 ml to 500 ml) and compliance (from 13 ml/cm H2 O to 50 ml/cm H2 O). The median maximum detrusor pressure had decreased significantly (P = 0.001) from 38 cm H2 O to 15 cm H2 O. Significantly (P = 0.001) fewer patients presented with a risk for renal damage (1 vs. 15 with maximum detrusor pressure >40 cm H2 O and 1 vs. 12 with detrusor compliance <20 ml/cm H2 O) at the last follow-up. The following complications were observed in 11/29 (38%) patients: paralytic and obstructive ileus, impaired bowel function, bladder stones, dehiscence, metabolic acidosis and autonomic dysreflexia. Protection of renal function, adequate bladder capacity and low detrusor pressure can be achieved using supratrigonal cystectomy and augmentation ileocystoplasty in patients suffering from refractory NLUTD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Clinical course of a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence symptoms followed at a tertiary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Lebl

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To characterize a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence followed-up in a tertiary center. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 50 medical records of children who had attained bladder control or minimum age of 5 years, using a structured protocol that included lower urinary tract dysfunction symptoms, comorbidities, associated manifestations, physical examination, voiding diary, complementary tests, therapeutic options, and clinical outcome, in accordance with the 2006 and 2014 International Children's Continence Society standardizations. Results: Female patients represented 86.0% of this sample. Mean age was 7.9 years and mean follow-up was 4.7 years. Urgency (56.0%, urgency incontinence (56.0%, urinary retention (8.0%, nocturnal enuresis (70.0%, urinary tract infections (62.0%, constipation (62.0%, and fecal incontinence (16.0% were the most prevalent symptoms and comorbidities. Ultrasound examinations showed alterations in 53.0% of the cases; the urodynamic study showed alterations in 94.7%. At the last follow-up, 32.0% of patients persisted with urinary incontinence. When assessing the diagnostic methods, 85% concordance was observed between the predictive diagnosis of overactive bladder attained through medical history plus non-invasive exams and the diagnosis of detrusor overactivity achieved through the invasive urodynamic study. Conclusions: This subgroup of patients with clinical characteristics of an overactive bladder, with no history of urinary tract infection, and normal urinary tract ultrasound and uroflowmetry, could start treatment without invasive studies even at a tertiary center. Approximately one-third of the patients treated at the tertiary level remained refractory to treatment.

  13. Molecular Targets of Chromatin Repressive Mark H3K9me3 in Primate Progenitor Cells within Adult Neurogenic Niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Foret

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Histone 3 Lysine 9 (H3K9 methylation is known to be associated with pericentric heterochromatin and important in genomic stability. In this study, we show that trimethylation at H3K9 (H3K9me3 is enriched in an adult neural stem cell niche- the subventricular zone (SVZ on the walls of the lateral ventricle in both rodent and non-human primate baboon brain. Previous studies have shown that there is significant correlation between baboon and human regarding genomic similarity and brain structure, suggesting that findings in baboon are relevant to human. To understand the function of H3K9me3 in this adult neurogenic niche, we performed genome-wide analyses using ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep-sequencing and RNA-Seq for in vivo SVZ cells purified from baboon brain. Through integrated analyses of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq, we found that H3K9me3-enriched genes associated with cellular maintenance, post-transcriptional and translational modifications, signaling pathways, and DNA replication are expressed, while genes involved in axon/neuron, hepatic stellate cell, or immune-response activation are not expressed. As neurogenesis progresses in the adult SVZ, cell fate restriction is essential to direct proper lineage commitment. Our findings highlight that H3K9me3 repression in undifferentiated SVZ cells is engaged in the maintenance of cell type integrity, implicating a role for H3K9me3 as an epigenetic mechanism to control cell fate transition within this adult germinal niche.

  14. Exhibition: Dialogue between Science and religion

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Can the theory of the Big Bang reached by physicists and the concept of creation beloved of religion ever be reconciled? The two approaches have at least one point in common: they do not provide a final answer to the mysteries of the birth of the Universe. And this means that dialogue is alays possible between the two. It is to show the potential of such an exchange that Geneva's Société Evangélique organization is opening an exhibition under the title 'Big Bang and Creation', at the Planète Charmilles shopping centre, to run from 19 to 30 March. View of the 'Big Bang and Creation' exhibition. The exhibition is divided into three sections, showing the views of the scientist and those of the believer without setting them up in opposition to one another. In the first section, under a representation of the vault of heaven, the visitor will discover the different ideas explaining the birth of the Universe: Genesis and the Big Bang, and the different dominant theories ...

  15. Bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Nicholas R. T.; Song, Jeremy; Nieh, James C.

    2009-10-01

    Associative learning is key to how bees recognize and return to rewarding floral resources. It thus plays a major role in pollinator floral constancy and plant gene flow. Honeybees are the primary model for pollinator associative learning, but bumblebees play an important ecological role in a wider range of habitats, and their associative learning abilities are less well understood. We assayed learning with the proboscis extension reflex (PER), using a novel method for restraining bees (capsules) designed to improve bumblebee learning. We present the first results demonstrating that bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect. They improve their associative learning of odor and nectar reward by exhibiting increased memory acquisition, a component of long-term memory formation, when the time interval between rewarding trials is increased. Bombus impatiens forager memory acquisition (average discrimination index values) improved by 129% and 65% at inter-trial intervals (ITI) of 5 and 3 min, respectively, as compared to an ITI of 1 min. Memory acquisition rate also increased with increasing ITI. Encapsulation significantly increases olfactory memory acquisition. Ten times more foragers exhibited at least one PER response during training in capsules as compared to traditional PER harnesses. Thus, a novel conditioning assay, encapsulation, enabled us to improve bumblebee-learning acquisition and demonstrate that spaced learning results in better memory consolidation. Such spaced learning likely plays a role in forming long-term memories of rewarding floral resources.

  16. Exhibition: Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On April 28 the exhibit Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century organised by UNIDIR (United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research) and SGI (Soka Gakkai International) as well as with the contributions of CERN and the University of Geneva, opened at the United Nations Office of Geneva. Linus Pauling is the only person to date to have won two unshared Nobel Prizes: Chemistry in 1954 and Peace in 1962. The first was awarded for his landmark research on the nature of the chemical bond and its application in understanding the structure of complex substances. The second one acknowledged his courageous protest against atmospheric nuclear testing and his championship of international peace. The exhibit, for audience of all ages, traces seven decades of Linus Pauling's life and influence on the 20th century. Before starting its European tour at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the exhibit opened in 1998 in San Francisco and then travelled within the United-States and to Japan with an attendance of more than one...

  17. Exhibition: Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On April 28 the exhibit Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century organised by UNIDIR (United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research) and SGI (Soka Gakkai International) as well as with the contributions of CERN and the University of Geneva, opens at the United Nations Office of Geneva. Linus Pauling is the only person to date to have won two unshared Nobel Prizes: Chemistry in 1954 and Peace in 1962. The first was awarded for his landmark research on the nature of the chemical bond and its application in understanding the structure of complex substances. The second one acknowledged his courageous protest against atmospheric nuclear testing and his championship of international peace. The exhibit, for all ages' audiences, traces seven decades of Linus Pauling's life and influence on the 20th century. Before starting its European tour at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the exhibit opened in 1998 in San Francisco and then travelled within the United-States and to Japan with an attendance of more than one m...

  18. Neurogenesis in sea urchin embryos and the diversity of deuterostome neurogenic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Sarah; Zysk, Ivona; Byrne, Glynis; Kramer, Marabeth; Moller, Daniel; Taylor, Valerie; Burke, Robert D

    2016-01-15

    A single origin to the diverse mechanisms of metazoan neurogenesis is suggested by the involvement of common signaling components and similar classes of transcription factors. However, in many forms we lack details of where neurons arise, patterns of cell division, and specific differentiation pathway components. The sea urchin larval nervous system is composed of an apical organ, which develops from neuroepithelium and functions as a central nervous system, and peripheral neurons, which differentiate in the ciliary band and project axons to the apical organ. To reveal developmental mechanisms of neurogenesis in this basal deuterostome, we developed antibodies to SoxC, SoxB2, ELAV and Brn1/2/4 and used neurons that develop at specific locations to establish a timeline for neurogenesis. Neural progenitors express, in turn, SoxB2, SoxC, and Brn1/2/4, before projecting neurites and expressing ELAV and SynB. Using pulse-chase labeling of cells with a thymidine analog to identify cells in S-phase, we establish that neurons identified by location are in their last mitotic cycle at the time of hatching, and S-phase is coincident with expression of SoxC. The number of cells expressing SoxC and differentiating as neurons is reduced in embryos injected with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to SoxC, SoxB2 or Six3. Injection of RNA encoding SoxC into eggs does not enhance neurogenesis. In addition, inhibition of FGF receptors (SU5402) or a morpholino to FGFR1 reduces expression of SoxC. These data indicate that there are common features of neurogenesis in deuterostomes, and that sea urchins employ developmental mechanisms that are distinct from other ambulacraria. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: a comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Blok, Bertil F; Heesakkers, John P; Heerings, Marco; Lemmens, Wim A; Donders, Rogier

    2015-10-24

    The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0 to 24 with cut-off point 6. A simplified scoring, yielding a total score of 0 to 8 with cut-off point 3, has been developed in urogynaecological patients, but has not been investigated in MS. One-hundred-and-forty-one MS patients completed the Actionable on two occasions. We compared the test performance of the simplified scoring with cut-off point 3 with that of cut-off point 2, using the original scoring with cut-off point 6 as a gold standard. The following measures were calculated: True Positives (TP), True Negatives (TN), False Positives (FP), False Negatives (FN), Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV), Negative Predictive Value (NPV), and Accuracy. The associations between positive test result and urological treatment, and bladder-specific drug treatment were calculated. For cut-off point 3 the outcomes (Test 1, Test 2) were: TP 43.26 %, 40.88 %; TN 29.79 %, 32.85 %; FP 0.00 %, 0.00 %; FN 26.95 %, 26.28 %; Sensitivity 0.62, 0.61; Specificity 1.00, 1.00; PPV 1.00, 1.00; NPV 0.53, 0.55; Accuracy 0.73, 0.74; and for cut-off point 2: TP 59.57 %, 59.85 %; TN 26.95 %, 31.39 %; FP 2.84 %, 1.46 %; FN 10.63 %, 7.30 %; Sensitivity 0.85, 0.89; Specificity 0.90, 0.96; PPV 0.95, 0.98; NPV 0.72, 0.81; Accuracy 0.87, 0.91. Cut-off 3 completely prevented FP outcomes, but wrongly classified 26 % of the patients as negative (FN). Cut-off 2 reduced the FN to 7-10 %, with low FP values (2.84-1.46 %). With cut-off 2, the percentage of patients screened positive was higher in the Progressive group (75.00 %) than in the Relapsing Remitting group (56.25 %) (P = 0.0331), which was not the case with cut-off 3. Only a positive test according to the original scoring was associated with both

  20. RF-EMF exposure at 1800 MHz did not elicit DNA damage or abnormal cellular behaviors in different neurogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liling; Wei, Xiaoxia; Xu, Zhengping; Chen, Guangdi

    2017-04-01

    Despite many years of studies, the debate on genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) continues. To systematically evaluate genotoxicity of RF-EMF, this study examined effects of RF-EMF on DNA damage and cellular behavior in different neurogenic cells. Neurogenic A172, U251, and SH-SY5Y cells were intermittently (5 min on/10 min off) exposed to 1800 MHz RF-EMF at an average specific absorption rate (SAR) of 4.0 W/kg for 1, 6, or 24 h. DNA damage was evaluated by quantification of γH2AX foci, an early marker of DNA double-strand breaks. Cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and cell viability were examined by flow cytometry, hemocytometer, and cell counting kit-8 assay, respectively. Results showed that exposure to RF-EMF at an SAR of 4.0 W/kg neither significantly induced γH2AX foci formation in A172, U251, or SH-SY5Y cells, nor resulted in abnormal cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, or cell viability. Furthermore, prolonged incubation of these cells for up to 48 h after exposure did not significantly affect cellular behavior. Our data suggest that 1800 MHz RF-EMF exposure at 4.0 W/kg is unlikely to elicit DNA damage or abnormal cellular behaviors in neurogenic cells. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:175-185, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A ventral root avulsion injury model for neurogenic underactive bladder studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Huiyi H; Havton, Leif A

    2016-11-01

    Detrusor underactivity (DU) is defined as a contraction of reduced strength and/or duration during bladder emptying and results in incomplete and prolonged bladder emptying. The clinical diagnosis of DU is challenging when present alone or in association with other bladder conditions such as detrusor overactivity, urinary retention, detrusor hyperactivity with impaired contractility, aging, and neurological injuries. Several etiologies may be responsible for DU or the development of an underactive bladder (UAB), but the pathobiology of DU or UAB is not well understood. Therefore, new clinically relevant and interpretable models for studies of UAB are much needed in order to make progress towards new treatments and preventative strategies. Here, we review a neuropathic cause of DU in the form of traumatic injuries to the cauda equina (CE) and conus medullaris (CM) portions of the spinal cord. Lumbosacral ventral root avulsion (VRA) injury models in rats mimic the clinical phenotype of CM/CE injuries. Bilateral VRA injuries result in bladder areflexia, whereas a unilateral lesion results in partial impairment of lower urinary tract and visceromotor reflexes. Surgical re-implantation of avulsed ventral roots into the spinal cord and pharmacological strategies can augment micturition reflexes. The translational research need for the development of a large animal model for UAB studies is also presented, and early studies of lumbosacral VRA injuries in rhesus macaques are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mars in their eyes - a cartoon exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillinger, Pi.

    Recently a collection of 120 cartoons which tell the story of Mars exploration and scientific discovery, past, present and future, was held in London. We discuss the aims of the exhibition, to what extent we believe the original aims were met and report on additional outreach opportunities resulting from the project. The overriding aim was to capitalise on the popular appeal of accessible art - most people admit to enjoying cartoons. This was strengthened by hanging the originals of cartoons which had, mostly, been published in newspapers and magazines in a wide selection of countries. The provenances served to indicate the attraction of Mars to a wide public. We were fortunate to work with the Cartoon Art Trust of the UK who was in the process of relocating to new premises and opening as The Cartoon Museum, in the tourist area of Bloomsbury, central London, very close to the British Museum. "Mars in their Eyes" ran for 10 weeks during April to July 2006; immediately following which a selection of the cartoons was displayed at the week-long Royal Society Summer Exhibition. We explore the differences between the two exhibitions and comment on the various audience responses. We use this comparison to discuss whether a project which is primarily art can be extended to explain science. Does the coupling merely result in dumbing-down of both cultures or is there a true synergy? The experience has led us to coin the phrase "extreme outreach". Projects which are as ambitious as "Mars in their Eyes", without the security of a safe, captive audience, for example at a Science Centre, must be judged by different criteria. Indeed if the project does not meet comparable targets like large visitor numbers, then the honest evaluation of such details can only inform future activities and must not be reflected in the future funding of only "safe" outreach activities.

  3. Dmrt5, a Novel Neurogenic Factor, Reciprocally Regulates Lhx2 to Control the Neuron-Glia Cell-Fate Switch in the Developing Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Bhavana; Keruzore, Marc; Pradhan, Saurabh J; Roy, Basabdatta; Shetty, Ashwin S; Kinare, Veena; D'Souza, Leora; Maheshwari, Upasana; Karmodiya, Krishanpal; Suresh, Agasthya; Galande, Sanjeev; Bellefroid, Eric J; Tole, Shubha

    2017-11-15

    Regulation of the neuron-glia cell-fate switch is a critical step in the development of the CNS. Previously, we demonstrated that Lhx2 is a necessary and sufficient regulator of this process in the mouse hippocampal primordium, such that Lhx2 overexpression promotes neurogenesis and suppresses gliogenesis, whereas loss of Lhx2 has the opposite effect. We tested a series of transcription factors for their ability to mimic Lhx2 overexpression and suppress baseline gliogenesis, and also to compensate for loss of Lhx2 and suppress the resulting enhanced level of gliogenesis in the hippocampus. Here, we demonstrate a novel function of Dmrt5/Dmrta2 as a neurogenic factor in the developing hippocampus. We show that Dmrt5, as well as known neurogenic factors Neurog2 and Pax6, can each not only mimic Lhx2 overexpression, but also can compensate for loss of Lhx2 to different extents. We further uncover a reciprocal regulatory relationship between Dmrt5 and Lhx2, such that each can compensate for loss of the other. Dmrt5 and Lhx2 also have opposing regulatory control on Pax6 and Neurog2, indicating a complex bidirectionally regulated network that controls the neuron-glia cell-fate switch.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We identify Dmrt5 as a novel regulator of the neuron-glia cell-fate switch in the developing hippocampus. We demonstrate Dmrt5 to be neurogenic, and reciprocally regulated by Lhx2: loss of either factor promotes gliogenesis; overexpression of either factor suppresses gliogenesis and promotes neurogenesis; each can substitute for loss of the other. Furthermore, each factor has opposing effects on established neurogenic genes Neurog2 and Pax6 Dmrt5 is known to suppress their expression, and we show that Lhx2 is required to maintain it. Our study reveals a complex regulatory network with bidirectional control of a fundamental feature of CNS development, the control of the production of neurons versus astroglia in the developing hippocampus.Finally, we confirm that Lhx2

  4. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: a comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points

    OpenAIRE

    Jongen, Peter; Blok, Bertil; Heesakkers, John P.; Heerings, Marco; Lemmens, Wim A.; Donders, Rogier

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0 to 24 with cut-off point 6. A simplified scoring, yielding a total score of 0 to 8 with cut-off point 3, has been developed in urogynaecological patients, but has not been investigated in MS. Meth...

  5. Hemorrhagic Onset of Hemangioblastoma Located in the Dorsal Medulla Oblongata Presenting with Tako-Tsubo Cardiomyopathy and Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Gekka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a case of dorsal medulla oblongata hemangioblastoma with fourth ventricular hemorrhage. A 23-year-old female developed sudden consciousness disturbance, and CT revealed hemorrhage in all cerebral ventricles and a hyperdense mass in the cisterna magna. Although the reddish tumor located in the dorsal medulla oblongata was successfully removed, she suffered from severe tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC and neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE because of baroreflex failure and damage to the solitary tract nuclei. After intensive care for 12 weeks following surgery, she was discharged without any neurological or radiological deficits. Pathogenesis of TTC/NPE is discussed in this paper.

  6. Art Therapy Exhibitions: Exploitation or Advocacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Terri

    2017-01-01

    Promoting awareness of human trafficking by sharing trauma survivors' art and summaries of their life stories suggests ethical complexities that have been typically neglected by bioethicists. Although these survivors voluntarily share the objects they created during art therapy sessions, they are still at risk of harm, including further exploitation, due to their vulnerability, high rates of victim sensitivity, and the mental health consequences of their traumatic experiences. While some argue that the benefits of sublimation and art therapy for human trafficking survivors make sharing their art worth the risk, anti-trafficking organizations and supporters of such art exhibitions have responsibilities to be trauma informed. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  7. How do exhibition visitors describe aesthetic qualities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2007-01-01

    In this investigation, visitors to an art and design exhibition have used an interactive computer program to express the qualities they consider important for an art or design object (artefact). They have then used the program with their individually selected qualities to assess the artefacts....... In this article, we present the experiment and its results. They indicate that with such a setting it is relatively easy to reach a degree of consensus about criteria. Such an interactive program can therefore be very useful, for instance when choosing among design proposals or when selecting artefacts...

  8. Applied Gamification in Self-guided Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Peter; Selvadurai, Vashanth; Krishnasamy, Rameshnath Kala

    2018-01-01

    This paper contributes to the current understanding of applied digital gamification by providing insights from two design cases from the Danish aqua zoo, the North Sea Oceanarium, concerned with self-facilitated exhibitions. Grounded in a short review of the current state of art, we provide two...... of applied gamification research. Specifically, the cases provide insights to the challenge of on-boarding visitors into participating and using the designed products during their visit. In both cases, providing certain incentives for using the app or participating in the Instagram challenge, seemed...

  9. Cyclic GMP mediates neurogenic relaxation in the bovine retractor penis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, A.; Drummond, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    Field stimulation of the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic inhibitory nerves to the bovine isolated retractor penis muscle evoked a relaxation that was preceded by a rise in the tissue content of cyclic GMP. There was no change in the content of cyclic AMP. The selective cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 2-o- propoxyphenyl -8- azapurin -6-one (M&B 22948), elevated the tissue's cyclic GMP content, and potentiated both the relaxation and the rise in cyclic GMP produced by inhibitory nerve stimulation. Sodium nitroprusside and an inhibitory factor extracted from the bovine retractor penis muscle mimicked the effects of inhibitory nerve stimulation in that they each produced relaxation associated with a selective rise in cyclic GMP concentration. Haemoglobin (in the form of erythrocyte haemolysate) and N- methylhydroxylamine , which are known to block guanylate cyclase, blocked the relaxation and the rise in cyclic GMP content produced by inhibitory nerve stimulation, inhibitory factor and sodium nitroprusside. Haemoglobin itself caused a rise in muscle tone and at the same time reduced the cyclic GMP content of the tissue. 8-Bromocyclic GMP, a permeant derivative of cyclic GMP, produced a relaxation of the muscle that, as expected, was not blocked by haemoglobin. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, prostaglandin E1 and forskolin each produced relaxation associated with a selective rise in cyclic AMP content. Their effects were not blocked by haemoglobin or N- methylhydroxylamine . It is concluded that inhibitory nerve stimulation in the bovine retractor penis muscle produces a relaxation that is mediated by cyclic GMP, although some substances relax the muscle without affecting cyclic GMP levels. The results are also compatible with the view that the extracts of muscle contain the inhibitory neurotransmitter. PMID:6326922

  10. Children's drawings exhibited in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Elizabeth Roe

    2010-01-01

    "Draw Me A Physicist" has been a success. Members of the public visiting the exhibition in the Globe of Science and Innovation have praised the scientific and creative balance the children of neighbouring France and the Canton of Geneva have obtained through their visit to CERN.   The Draw Me a Physicist exhibition in the Globe For a six-month period 9 to 11-year olds from the Pays de Gex, Meyrin, Satigny and Vernier have been able to enjoy a balance between science and art, through drawing and defining their interpretations of a physicist. In May, eight pairs of drawings from each participating class were selected by the schools to be displayed on the second floor of the Globe. Since the images have been put up, the viewers have enjoyed the contrast between the "before" pictures of vibrant Albert Einsteins to the "after" pictures of casual people sitting in an office. The large room in the Globe has been transformed from a hollow shell int...

  11. A metafluid exhibiting strong optical magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, Sassan N; Alaeian, Hadiseh; Koh, Ai Leen; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2013-09-11

    Advances in the field of metamaterials have enabled unprecedented control of light-matter interactions. Metamaterial constituents support high-frequency electric and magnetic dipoles, which can be used as building blocks for new materials capable of negative refraction, electromagnetic cloaking, strong visible-frequency circular dichroism, and enhancing magnetic or chiral transitions in ions and molecules. While all metamaterials to date have existed in the solid-state, considerable interest has emerged in designing a colloidal metamaterial or "metafluid". Such metafluids would combine the advantages of solution-based processing with facile integration into conventional optical components. Here we demonstrate the colloidal synthesis of an isotropic metafluid that exhibits a strong magnetic response at visible frequencies. Protein-antibody interactions are used to direct the solution-phase self-assembly of discrete metamolecules comprised of silver nanoparticles tightly packed around a single dielectric core. The electric and magnetic response of individual metamolecules and the bulk metamaterial solution are directly probed with optical scattering and spectroscopy. Effective medium calculations indicate that the bulk metamaterial exhibits a negative effective permeability and a negative refractive index at modest fill factors. This metafluid can be synthesized in large-quantity and high-quality and may accelerate development of advanced nanophotonic and metamaterial devices.

  12. Radiation-related information at science exhibitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannai, Tadaaki [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    The aim of the present report was to promote an efficient utilization of science museums providing with educational information concerning radiations. Investigations were made on radiation-related materials exhibited at 38 museums including PR event sites between April 1996 and July 1998 mainly located on Kanto and Tohoku area in Japan. The investigation concerned as to whether the displays on radiation-related material (cosmic rays, X-rays, etc) existed or not, and as to the background of the display as well. As the result, 14 locations had no relevant displays, 10 of them not having things about atomic energy at all. The locations belonging to electricity company mostly had displays related to radiations and atomic energy power generation. A spark chamber was exhibited at 9 locations and a cloud chamber at 3 locations, but only one location among them displayed both. Displays on the actual use of X-radiation were found at 4 locations. Needs to prepare further improved displays exist at the sites visited. (S. Ohno)

  13. CERN Inspires Art in Major New Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Signatures of the Invisible, an exhibition inspired by CERN, opened at the Atlantis Gallery in London on Thursday, 1 March before going on a world tour. The fruit of a close collaboration between CERN and the London Institute, the exhibition brings together works from many leading European contemporary artists. White wooden boxes on a grey floor... the lids opened, unveiling brilliant white light from a bunch of optical fibres carefully stuck together in the shape of a square. Another holds a treasure of lead glass surrounded by enigmatic black mirrors. What's it all about? Signatures of the Invisible, that's what, a joint project organised by the London Institute, one of the world's largest college of art, and our Laboratory. Damien Foresy from the EST workshop putting finishing touches to the spinning tops of French artist Jérôme Basserode. Monica Sand's boxes are just one of the many works based around materials used in particle detection at CERN that was admired at the opening o...

  14. Mies in Brussels 1934. Synthesis of an Unbuilt Exhibition Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Lizondo Sevilla

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article delves into the complex world of exhibition architectures, those whose destiny is reduced to be mounted, exposed and dismantled in a short period of time. A process that allows a quick experience of architecture, bounded in time, and whose experimentation gives rise to the birth of new concepts. The text focuses on the German Pavilion designed by Mies van der Rohe for the Brussels World’s Fair of 1934, his only unbuilt ephemeral architecture due to the political uniqueness of the moment. Now, criticism and the archive allow us to reinterpret its contribution to the history of architecture.

  15. Efficacy and Safety of OnabotulinumtoxinA in Patients with Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Cheng

    Full Text Available Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO affects the quality of life (QoL of millions of individuals worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of onabotulinumtoxinA in patients with NDO using a network meta-analytic approach, which can also quantify and compare the efficacy of onabotulinumtoxinA across different dosages.PubMed, EMBASE, and the Controlled Trials Register were searched to identify randomized controlled trials comparing onabotulinumtoxinA to a control for NDO in adult patients. The primary outcome was the mean number of urinary incontinence (UI episodes per week. Urodynamic parameters included the maximum cystometric capacity (MCC and the maximum detrusor pressure (MDP. The safety of onabotulinumtoxinA was determined by the incidence of various frequent adverse events (AEs. Two authors extracted data independently, and the statistical analyses were performed using RevMan 5.1.0 software.A total of 1,915 patients from six randomized controlled trials were included in this meta-analysis. The onabotulinumtoxinA-treated groups had a significantly decreased mean number of urinary incontinence episodes per week (at week 6 (onabotulinumtoxinA200U: MD: -10.72, 95% CI: -13.4 to -8.04, P<0.00001; 300 U: MD: -11.42, 95% CI: -13.91 to -8.93, P<0.00001, MDP (200 U: MD: -33.46, 95% CI: -39.74 to -27.18, P<0.00001; 300 U: MD: -31.72, 95% CI: -37.69 to -25.75, P<0.00001, and greater increased MCC (200 U: MD: 141.30, 95% CI: 121.28 to 161.32, P<0.00001; 300 U: MD: 151.39, 95% CI: 130.43 to 172.34, P<0.00001 compared to the placebo-treated groups. However, there were no significant differences between the onabotulinumtoxinA-treated groups for the number of weekly UI episodes at 6 weeks (MD: 0.08, 95% CI: -2.57 to 2.73, P = 0.95. Similarly, we also observed that there were no significant differences in MCC (MD: -9.97, 95% CI: -33.15 to 13.20, P = 0.40 and MDP (MD: -1.86, 95% CI: -8.09 to 4.37, P = 0.56. Considering the

  16. Application of an imaging system to a museum exhibition for developing interactive exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kimiyoshi; Inoue, Yuka; Takiguchi, Takahiro; Tsumura, Norimichi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Miyake, Yoichi

    2009-10-01

    In the National Museum of Japanese History, 215,759 artifacts are stored and used for research and exhibitions. In museums, due to the limitation of space in the galleries, a guidance system is required to satisfy visitors' needs and to enhance their understanding of the artifacts. We introduce one exhibition using imaging technology to improve visitors' understanding of a kimono (traditional Japanese clothing) exhibition. In the imaging technology introduced, one data projector, one display with touch panel interface, and magnifiers were used as exhibition tools together with a real kimono. The validity of this exhibition method was confirmed by results from a visitors' interview survey. Second, to further develop the interactive guidance system, an augmented reality system that consisted of cooperation between the projector and a digital video camera was also examined. A white paper board in the observer's hand was used as a projection screen and also as an interface to control the images projected on the board. The basic performance of the proposed system was confirmed; however continuous development was necessary for applying the system to actual exhibitions.

  17. Shape-Memory PVDF Exhibiting Switchable Piezoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeher, Robin; Raidt, Thomas; Novak, Nikola; Katzenberg, Frank; Tiller, Joerg C

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a material is designed which combines the properties of shape-memory and electroactive polymers. This is achieved by covalent cross-linking of polyvinylidene fluoride. The resulting polymer network exhibits excellent shape-memory properties with a storable strain of 200%, and fixity as well as recovery values of 100%. Programming upon rolling induces the transformation from the nonelectroactive α-phase to the piezoelectric β-phase. The highest β-phase content is found to be 83% for a programming strain of 200% affording a d33 value of -30 pm V(-1). This is in good accordance with literature known values for piezoelectric properties. Thermal triggering this material does not only result in a shape change but also renders the material nonelectroactive. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. A Traveling Exhibit of Cassini Image Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Hedman, M. M.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Ebel, D.; Mac Low, M.; Lovett, L. E.; Burns, J. K.; Schaff, N.; Bilson, E. M.

    2007-10-01

    An exhibit of Cassini's images will open at NYC's American Museum of Natural History in March 2008 and then visit the Johnson Art Museum (Cornell) throughout fall 2008, including during next year's DPS. It is under consideration by several other venues in the States and overseas. The exhibit will feature 40-50 images, ranging from letter size to large posters, taken by remote-sensing instruments aboard Cassini and Huygens. Photos will be organized into a half-dozen thematic clusters (e.g., organized by celestial target or by physical process); a panel will introduce each grouping with individual images identified briefly. The Saturn system is a perfect vehicle to educate citizens about planetary science and origins. The images’ beauty should capture the public's attention, allowing us to then engage their curiosity about the relevant science. Among the Saturn system's broad suite of objects are Enceladus and Titan, two satellites of astrobiological interest; moreover, the rings display many processes active in other astrophysical disks. Several auxiliary ideas will be implemented. In Ithaca, we will project images at night against the museum's sand-colored exterior walls. A 10-12 minute musical composition has been commissioned from Roberto Sierra to open the show. We will encourage school children to participate in a human orrery circling the museum and will seek volunteers to participate in several Saturnalia. At Cornell we will involve the university and local communities, by taping their reactions to the images’ exquisite beauty as well as to their scientific content. Cassini will be the E/PO focus of next year's DPS meeting; those materials will be employed throughout the fall at New York schools and be available to travel with the show. We intend to work with NYC partners to offer teacher credits for associated weekend courses. We will produce classroom materials, including a DVD, for teacher use.

  19. DYRK1A-mediated Cyclin D1 Degradation in Neural Stem Cells Contributes to the Neurogenic Cortical Defects in Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sònia Najas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in cerebral cortex connectivity lead to intellectual disability and in Down syndrome, this is associated with a deficit in cortical neurons that arises during prenatal development. However, the pathogenic mechanisms that cause this deficit have not yet been defined. Here we show that the human DYRK1A kinase on chromosome 21 tightly regulates the nuclear levels of Cyclin D1 in embryonic cortical stem (radial glia cells, and that a modest increase in DYRK1A protein in transgenic embryos lengthens the G1 phase in these progenitors. These alterations promote asymmetric proliferative divisions at the expense of neurogenic divisions, producing a deficit in cortical projection neurons that persists in postnatal stages. Moreover, radial glial progenitors in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome have less Cyclin D1, and Dyrk1a is the triplicated gene that causes both early cortical neurogenic defects and decreased nuclear Cyclin D1 levels in this model. These data provide insights into the mechanisms that couple cell cycle regulation and neuron production in cortical neural stem cells, emphasizing that the deleterious effect of DYRK1A triplication in the formation of the cerebral cortex begins at the onset of neurogenesis, which is relevant to the search for early therapeutic interventions in Down syndrome.

  20. Identification of a sustained neurogenic zone at the dorsal surface of the adult mouse hippocampus and its regulation by the chemokine SDF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmadani, Abdelhak; Ren, Dongjun; Bhattacharyya, Bula J; Rothwangl, Katharina B; Hope, Thomas J; Perlman, Harris; Miller, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    We identified a previously unknown neurogenic region at the dorsal surface of the hippocampus; (the "subhippocampal zone," SHZ) in the adult brain. Using a reporter mouse in which SHZ cells and their progeny could be traced through the expression of EGFP under the control of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor promoter we observed the presence of a pool of EGFP expressing cells migrating in direction of the dentate gyrus (DG), which is maintained throughout adulthood. This population appeared to originate from the SHZ where cells entered a caudal migratory stream (aCMS) that included the fimbria, the meninges and the DG. Deletion of CXCR4 from neural stem cells (NSCs) or neuroinflammation resulted in the appearance of neurons in the DG, which were the result of migration of NSCs from the SHZ. Some of these neurons were ectopically placed. Our observations indicate that the SHZ is a neurogenic zone in the adult brain through migration of NSCs in the aCMS. Regulation of CXCR4 signaling in these cells may be involved in repair of the DG and may also give rise to ectopic granule cells in the DG in the context of neuropathology. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: Clinical management recommendations of the Neurologic Incontinence committee of the fifth International Consultation on Incontinence 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Marcus John; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Cocci, Andrea; Emmanuel, Anton; Gajewski, Jerzy B; Harrison, Simon C W; Heesakkers, John P F A; Lemack, Gary E; Madersbacher, Helmut; Panicker, Jalesh N; Radziszewski, Piotr; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Wyndaele, Jean Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of neurological disease and lower urinary tract dysfunction have been produced by the International Consultations on Incontinence (ICI). These are comprehensive guidelines, and were developed to have world-wide relevance. To update clinical management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction from the recommendations of the fourth ICI, 2009. A series of evidence reviews and updates were performed by members of the working group. The resulting guidelines were presented at the 2012 meeting of the European Association of Urology for consultation, and consequently amended to deliver evidence-based conclusions and recommendations in 2013. The current review is a synthesis of the conclusions and recommendations, including the algorithms for initial and specialized management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. The pathophysiology is categorized according to the nature of onset of neurological disease and the part(s) of the nervous system affected. Assessment requires clinical evaluation, general investigations, and specialized testing. Treatment primarily focuses on ensuring safety of the patient and optimizing quality of life. Symptom management covers conservative and interventional measures to aid urine storage and bladder emptying, along with containment of incontinence. A multidisciplinary approach to management is essential. The review offers a pragmatic review of management in the context of complex pathophysiology and varied evidence base. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:657-665, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  3. Exhibiting Good Health: Public Health Exhibitions in London, 1948-71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Alex

    2018-01-01

    This article examines the changing nature of public health services and their relationship with the public in post-war Britain by an analysis of the exhibitions mounted by Medical Officers of Health (MOsH) in London. Focusing on the period 1948-71, the article explores a time when public health practice, and the problems it faced, were in flux. A decline in infectious disease and an increase in chronic conditions linked to lifestyle required a new role for public health services. Exhibitions were one of several methods that MOsH used to inform the public about dangers to their health, but also to persuade them to change their behaviour. The exhibition, though, offers a unique insight into the relationship between public health authorities and the public, as exhibitions brought MOsH into direct contact with people. It is suggested that in the MOsH exhibitions we can find signs of a new relationship between public health practitioners and the public. Whilst elements of the pre-war, often moralistic ideology of public health services could still be detected, there is also evidence of a more nuanced, responsive dynamic between practitioners and the people. By the end of the 1960s, 'the public' was increasingly being thought of as a collection of 'publics', including individuals, target groups and vocal respondents.

  4. Exhibiting health and medicine as culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whiteley, Louise; Tybjerg, Karin; Pedersen, Bente Vinge

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This paper discusses the potential role of medical museums in public engagement with health and medicine, based on the work of Medical Museion at the University of Copenhagen. Rather than asking whether cultural venues such as museums can directly improve the well-being of their vis......Introduction: This paper discusses the potential role of medical museums in public engagement with health and medicine, based on the work of Medical Museion at the University of Copenhagen. Rather than asking whether cultural venues such as museums can directly improve the well......-being of their visitors, we instead focus on how museums should communicate about health and medicine. Methods: The paper describes three examples of exhibitions at Medical Museion that attempt to display medicine as culture, and draws out three of the key strategies they employ. Results: The three key strategies are: (1......: There is increasing emphasis on the need for health communication to recognize people’s multiple, lived cultures. We argue that we should also recognize that medical research and practice is itself a form of culture, and as such is multiple and historically shifting. This paper demonstrates that museums are an ideal...

  5. Agitated honeybees exhibit pessimistic cognitive biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Melissa; Desire, Suzanne; Gartside, Sarah E; Wright, Geraldine A

    2011-06-21

    Whether animals experience human-like emotions is controversial and of immense societal concern [1-3]. Because animals cannot provide subjective reports of how they feel, emotional state can only be inferred using physiological, cognitive, and behavioral measures [4-8]. In humans, negative feelings are reliably correlated with pessimistic cognitive biases, defined as the increased expectation of bad outcomes [9-11]. Recently, mammals [12-16] and birds [17-20] with poor welfare have also been found to display pessimistic-like decision making, but cognitive biases have not thus far been explored in invertebrates. Here, we ask whether honeybees display a pessimistic cognitive bias when they are subjected to an anxiety-like state induced by vigorous shaking designed to simulate a predatory attack. We show for the first time that agitated bees are more likely to classify ambiguous stimuli as predicting punishment. Shaken bees also have lower levels of hemolymph dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin. In demonstrating state-dependent modulation of categorization in bees, and thereby a cognitive component of emotion, we show that the bees' response to a negatively valenced event has more in common with that of vertebrates than previously thought. This finding reinforces the use of cognitive bias as a measure of negative emotional states across species and suggests that honeybees could be regarded as exhibiting emotions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Gastric schwannoma exhibiting increased fluorodeoxyglucose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Daisuke; Koide, Naohiko; Hiraga, Risako; Furuya, Naoyuki; Akamatsu, Taiji; Uehara, Takeshi; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    This is the first case of gastric schwannoma that exhibited increased accumulation of [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) on positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The patient was a 60-year-old woman in whom esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a submucosal tumor, about 25 mm in size, in the upper body of the stomach, with ulceration at the top of the tumor. Endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a well-defined hypoechoic mass located in the proper muscle layer of the stomach. The specimen taken from the tumor showed only inflammatory degenerative tissue. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor in the upper body of the stomach. FDG-PET showed FDG uptake (standardized uptake value [SUV] max 5.8) coincident with the tumor. Hence, the tumor was diagnosed initially as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach. Laparoscopic partial gastrectomy was performed. Pathological examination showed that the tumor consisted of spindle cells with large nuclei, and mitosis was absent. The Ki-67 labeling index of the tumor cells was 4%. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells showed a positive reaction for S-100 protein, whereas they were negative for KIT, CD 34, and alpha-smooth muscle actin protein. The tumor was diagnosed as a benign gastric schwannoma. Gastric schwannoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of submucosal tumors of the stomach with FDG uptake.

  7. Fibromyalgi som neurogen smertetilstand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Jespersen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterised by chronic widespread pain and mechanical hyperalgesia. It is associated with a higher pain intensity, fewer pain-free intervals and more pronounced pain-related interference in function than other musculoskeletal pain conditions. Increasing evidence supports...... an underlying augmented central pain processing which includes sensitization of pain-transmitting neurons and dysfunction of pain inhibitory pathways. If this permanent change in the function of the nociceptive system is shown to equal fibromyalgia, the condition may be considered a neuropathic pain condition....

  8. Fibromyalgi som neurogen smertetilstand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Jespersen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    an underlying augmented central pain processing which includes sensitization of pain-transmitting neurons and dysfunction of pain inhibitory pathways. If this permanent change in the function of the nociceptive system is shown to equal fibromyalgia, the condition may be considered a neuropathic pain condition.......Fibromyalgia is characterised by chronic widespread pain and mechanical hyperalgesia. It is associated with a higher pain intensity, fewer pain-free intervals and more pronounced pain-related interference in function than other musculoskeletal pain conditions. Increasing evidence supports...

  9. Fibromyalgi som neurogen smertetilstand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Jespersen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterised by chronic widespread pain and mechanical hyperalgesia. It is associated with a higher pain intensity, fewer pain-free intervals and more pronounced pain-related interference in function than other musculoskeletal pain conditions. Increasing evidence supports...

  10. 77 FR 18295 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective... determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, are of cultural significance. The...

  11. Urodynamic results, clinical efficacy, and complication rates of sacral intradural deafferentation and sacral anterior root stimulation in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction resulting from complete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasmik, D; Krebs, Jörg; van Ophoven, Arndt; Pannek, Jürgen

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the outcome and complications of sacral deafferentation (SDAF) and sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) resulting from complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Retrospective chart analysis of 137 patients who underwent SDAF/SARS at a single institution. Patients were categorized as being at risk of renal damage when the maximum detrusor pressure was >40 cmH2 O or detrusor compliance was <20 ml/cmH2 O. After a mean follow-up time of 14.8 ± 5.3 years, SDAF/SARS treatment significantly (P < 0.001) reduced the number of patients suffering from elevated detrusor pressure from 65 to 2, and from low detrusor compliance from 62 to 13, respectively. Mean bladder capacity significantly (P < 0.001) improved from 272.4 ± 143.0 to 475.0 ± 82.7 ml. The mean number of symptomatic UTI also decreased significantly (P < 0.001) from 6.2 ± 4.5 to 2.5 ± 2.6 per year. The number of patients suffering from incontinence had significantly (P < 0.001) decreased from 70 to 44. At the last follow-up visit, 107 (78.1%) patients were still using the stimulator. A total of 84 complications requiring surgical revision were observed. Defects of the stimulator cables or the receiver plate were the most common events (n = 38). The retrospective design pertains to the limitations of the study. Sacral deafferentation and SARS are an effective treatment option for refractory NLUTD in patients with complete SCI, despite a substantial long-term complication rate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. THE CRM-BASED DIGITAL EXHIBITION SYSTEM FOR CLOTHING INDUSTRY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ming-Kuen Chen; Kuo-Hsuan Chen; Chia-Hon Chen

    2014-01-01

    .... Digital exhibition precludes the restrictions of time, location, space and planning on past physical exhibitions, and can demonstrate characteristics of diversity, interaction and low cost, and break...

  13. Midterm and long-term follow-up in competitive athletes undergoing thoracic outlet decompression for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutze, William; Richardson, Brad; Shutze, Ryan; Tran, Kimberly; Dao, Allen; Ogola, Gerald O; Young, Allan; Pearl, Greg

    2017-12-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) results from compression of the brachial plexus by the clavicle, first rib, and scalene muscles and may develop secondary to repetitive motion of the upper extremity. Athletes routinely perform repetitive motions, and sports requiring significant arm and shoulder use may put the participant at increased risk for NTOS. Competitive athletes who develop NTOS may require first rib resection and scalenectomy (FRRS) for symptomatic relief. However, the effectiveness of FRRS has not previously been studied in this vulnerable population. This is a cross-sectional study of competitive athletes with NTOS who received FRRS by the senior author between 2009 and 2014. Eligible patients were contacted by phone and invited to complete a nine-item survey assessing the long-term effects of FRRS on pain medication use, postoperative physical therapy duration, patient satisfaction, symptom relief, activities of daily living, athletic performance, time to return of athletic performance, and need for other operations. Multivariate analyses of the following risk factors were performed: age, pectoralis minor release, preoperative narcotic use, athletic shutdown, and involvement in a throwing sport. There were 232 competitive athletes who met the inclusion criteria, and 67 of these (age, 14-48 years; 35 male; 99% white) responded to the survey. The average time between surgery and survey completion was 3.9 years (range, 2.2-7.0 years). The most frequent sports conducted by this group were baseball and softball (n = 44 [66%]), volleyball (n = 7 [10%]), and cheerleading and gymnastics (n = 5 [7%]), ranging from high-school to professional levels. The survey results revealed that 96% were improved in pain medication use, 75% would undergo FRRS on the contralateral side if needed, 82% had resolution of symptoms, and 94% were able to perform activities of daily living without limitation; 70% returned to the same or better level of athletic

  14. Green Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles Exhibit Reduced Toxicity to Mammalian Cells and Retain Antimicrobial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interest in silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver nanomaterial stems from their antimicrobial properties. AgNPs are being added to clothing, paint, refrigerators, washing machines and a variety of other commercially available items. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies, howe...

  15. A two-step route to planar perovskite cells exhibiting reduced hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ip, Alexander H.; Adachi, Michael M.; McDowell, Jeffrey J.; Xu, Jixian; Sargent, Edward H., E-mail: ted.sargent@utoronto.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Quan, Li Na; Kim, Dong Ha [Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, 52, Ewhayeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-06

    A simple two-step method was used to produce efficient planar organolead halide perovskite solar cells. Films produced using solely iodine containing precursors resulted in poor morphology and failed devices, whereas addition of chlorine to the process greatly improved morphology and resulted in dense, uniform perovskite films. This process was used to produce perovskite solar cells with a fullerene-based passivation layer. The hysteresis effect, to which planar perovskite devices are otherwise prone, was greatly suppressed through the use of this interface modifier. The combined techniques resulted in perovskite solar cells having a stable efficiency exceeding 11%. This straightforward fabrication procedure holds promise in development of various optoelectronic applications of planar perovskite films.

  16. A home exercise programme is no more beneficial than advice and education for people with neurogenic claudication: results from a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Comer

    Full Text Available To compare the effectiveness of a physiotherapy programme with a control treatment of advice and education in patients with neurogenic claudication symptoms.Pragmatic randomised controlled clinical trial.Primary care-based musculoskeletal service.Adults aged 50 or over with neurogenic claudication symptoms causing limitation of walking.Condition-specific home exercises combined with advice and education, or advice and education alone.The primary outcome was the difference in improvement of symptom severity scores on the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Scale at eight weeks. Secondary outcomes included measures of physical function, pain and general well-being at eight weeks and 12 months.There was no significant difference between groups in the Swiss Spinal Stenosis symptom severity scale at eight weeks (t = 0.47, p = 0.643: mean change (SD control group -0.18 (0.47, treatment group -0.10 (0.66, difference (95% CI 0.08 (-0.19, 0.35; baseline-adjusted difference 0.06 (-0.19, 0.31]. An unplanned subgroup analysis suggested that for patients with the top 25% of baseline symptom severity scores, the physiotherapy exercise programme resulted in an improvement in the primary outcome, and modest but consistently better secondary outcomes at both time-points compared to the control group. The effectiveness in different subgroups requires further direct evaluation.In the treatment of patients with neurogenic claudication symptoms, a physiotherapist-prescribed home exercise programme is no more effective than advice and education.The study was approved by Leeds Central Ethics Committee and informed consent was given by all participating patients.The Corresponding Author has the right to grant on behalf of all authors and does grant on behalf of all authors, a worldwide licence to the Publishers and its licensees in perpetuity, in all forms, formats and media (whether known now or created in the future, to i publish, reproduce, distribute, display and store

  17. A Home Exercise Programme Is No More Beneficial than Advice and Education for People with Neurogenic Claudication: Results from a Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Christine; Redmond, Anthony C.; Bird, Howard A.; Hensor, Elizabeth M. A.; Conaghan, Philip G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of a physiotherapy programme with a control treatment of advice and education in patients with neurogenic claudication symptoms. Design Pragmatic randomised controlled clinical trial. Setting Primary care-based musculoskeletal service. Patients Adults aged 50 or over with neurogenic claudication symptoms causing limitation of walking. Interventions Condition-specific home exercises combined with advice and education, or advice and education alone. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the difference in improvement of symptom severity scores on the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Scale at eight weeks. Secondary outcomes included measures of physical function, pain and general well-being at eight weeks and 12 months. Results There was no significant difference between groups in the Swiss Spinal Stenosis symptom severity scale at eight weeks (t = 0.47, p = 0.643): mean change (SD) control group −0.18 (0.47), treatment group −0.10 (0.66), difference (95% CI) 0.08 (−0.19, 0.35); baseline-adjusted difference 0.06 (−0.19, 0.31)]. An unplanned subgroup analysis suggested that for patients with the top 25% of baseline symptom severity scores, the physiotherapy exercise programme resulted in an improvement in the primary outcome, and modest but consistently better secondary outcomes at both time-points compared to the control group. The effectiveness in different subgroups requires further direct evaluation. Conclusions In the treatment of patients with neurogenic claudication symptoms, a physiotherapist-prescribed home exercise programme is no more effective than advice and education. Ethical approval The study was approved by Leeds Central Ethics Committee and informed consent was given by all participating patients. Copyright The Corresponding Author has the right to grant on behalf of all authors and does grant on behalf of all authors, a worldwide licence to the Publishers and its licensees in perpetuity, in all forms

  18. A home exercise programme is no more beneficial than advice and education for people with neurogenic claudication: results from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Christine; Redmond, Anthony C; Bird, Howard A; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Conaghan, Philip G

    2013-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a physiotherapy programme with a control treatment of advice and education in patients with neurogenic claudication symptoms. Pragmatic randomised controlled clinical trial. Primary care-based musculoskeletal service. Adults aged 50 or over with neurogenic claudication symptoms causing limitation of walking. Condition-specific home exercises combined with advice and education, or advice and education alone. The primary outcome was the difference in improvement of symptom severity scores on the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Scale at eight weeks. Secondary outcomes included measures of physical function, pain and general well-being at eight weeks and 12 months. There was no significant difference between groups in the Swiss Spinal Stenosis symptom severity scale at eight weeks (t = 0.47, p = 0.643): mean change (SD) control group -0.18 (0.47), treatment group -0.10 (0.66), difference (95% CI) 0.08 (-0.19, 0.35); baseline-adjusted difference 0.06 (-0.19, 0.31)]. An unplanned subgroup analysis suggested that for patients with the top 25% of baseline symptom severity scores, the physiotherapy exercise programme resulted in an improvement in the primary outcome, and modest but consistently better secondary outcomes at both time-points compared to the control group. The effectiveness in different subgroups requires further direct evaluation. In the treatment of patients with neurogenic claudication symptoms, a physiotherapist-prescribed home exercise programme is no more effective than advice and education. The study was approved by Leeds Central Ethics Committee and informed consent was given by all participating patients. The Corresponding Author has the right to grant on behalf of all authors and does grant on behalf of all authors, a worldwide licence to the Publishers and its licensees in perpetuity, in all forms, formats and media (whether known now or created in the future), to i) publish, reproduce, distribute, display and store the

  19. Enteromorpha compressa Exhibits Potent Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa M. M. Shanab

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The green macroalgae, Enteromorpha compressa (Linnaeus Nees, Ulva lactuca, and E. linza, were seasonally collected from Abu Qir bay at Alexandria (Mediterranean Sea This work aimed to investigate the seasonal environmental conditions, controlling the green algal growth, predominance, or disappearance and determining antioxidant activity. The freshly collected selected alga (E. compressa was subjected to pigment analysis (chlorophyll and carotenoids essential oil and antioxidant enzyme determination (ascorbate oxidase and catalase. The air-dried ground alga was extracted with ethanol (crude extract then sequentially fractionated by organic solvents of increasing polarity (petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and water. Antioxidant activity of all extracts was assayed using different methods (total antioxidant, DPPH [2, 2 diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl], ABTS [2, 2 azino-bis ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid], and reducing power, and β-carotene linoleic acid bleaching methods. The results indicated that the antioxidant activity was concentration and time dependent. Ethyl acetate fraction demonstrated higher antioxidant activity against DPPH method (82.80% compared to the synthetic standard butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT, 88.5%. However, the crude ethanolic extract, pet ether, chloroform fractions recorded lower to moderate antioxidant activities (49.0, 66.0, and 78.0%, resp.. Using chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses, an active compound was separated and identified from the promising ethyl acetate fraction.

  20. A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Trial of Oxymorphone Hydrochloride and Propoxyphene/Acetaminophen Combination for the Treatment of Neurogenic Claudication Associated With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, John D; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Frazer, Maria E; Murray, Nicole M; Rast, Shirley A; McDermott, Michael P; Chowdhry, Amit K; Tomkinson, Emilie J; Pilcher, Webster H; Walter, Kevin A; Dworkin, Robert H

    2015-05-15

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose crossover study. To test the analgesic efficacy of oxymorphone hydrochloride (OH) and propoxyphene/acetaminophen (PA) for patients with neurogenic claudication associated with lumbar spinal stenosis. Although opioids are often prescribed for neurogenic claudication, no randomized controlled studies support their efficacy for this condition. Patients with neurogenic claudication are generally excluded from clinical trials or included with patients who have nonspecific chronic low back pain, yielding a heterogeneous study population with very different pathophysiologies and clinical presentations. Participants received a single dose of each of the 3 treatments in random order. Treatments were separated by at least 3-day washout periods. The primary outcome variable was the time to first treadmill walking-induced moderate pain (≥4 out of 10 on a Numeric Rating Scale) (Tfirst) assessed 90 minutes after treatment administration. Secondary outcome measures included patient global assessment of low back pain, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Modified Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, Oswestry Disability Index, and Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire. The study was prematurely terminated because of the removal of PA from the US market. Twenty-four patients were randomized; 21 completed all 3 treatment periods. There were no significant differences among the treatment groups with respect to the median Tfirst (OH-placebo: median [98.3% confidence limits]=-0.25 min [-6.54, 5.00]; PA-placebo: 0.02 min [-7.65, 4.90]; OH-PA: -0.27 min [-5.56, 6.66]). This trial failed to demonstrate a benefit of OH or PA in patients experiencing neurogenic claudication. Considering the potential negative side effects of chronic opioid use, additional research is necessary to evaluate the efficacy of sustained opioid treatment specifically for neurogenic claudication. 2.

  1. Designing immersion exhibits as border-crossing environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Marianne Foss

    2010-01-01

    be applied to achieve an understanding of the immersion exhibit form. The argument proceeds by demonstrating how the characteristics of immersion exhibits, and visitors to them, classify them as microcultures, and examining the implications of this for exhibit design using a hypothetical immersion exhibit...

  2. The effects of antimuscarinic treatment on the cognition of spinal cord injured individuals with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: a prospective controlled before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, J; Scheel-Sailer, A; Oertli, R; Pannek, J

    2017-08-08

    Prospective controlled before-and-after study. To investigate the effects of antimuscarinic treatment of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction on the cognition of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) during the early post-acute phase. Single SCI rehabilitation center. Patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted for primary rehabilitation from 2011 to 2015 were screened for study enrollment. Study participants underwent baseline neuropsychological assessments prior to their first urodynamic evaluation (6-8 weeks after SCI). Individuals suffering from neurogenic detrusor overactivity received antimuscarinic treatment, and those not requiring antimuscarinic treatment constituted the control group. The neuropsychological follow-up assessment was carried out 3 months after the baseline assessment. The effects of group and time on the neuropsychological parameters were investigated. The data of 29 individuals were evaluated (control group 19, antimuscarinic group 10). The group had a significant (P≤0.033) effect on immediate recall, attention ability and perseveration. In the control group, individuals performed significantly (P≤0.05) better in immediate recall both at baseline (percentile rank 40, 95% CI 21-86 versus 17, 95% CI 4-74) and follow-up (percentile rank 40, 95% CI 27-74 versus 16, 95% CI 2-74). The time had a significant (P≤0.04) effect on attention ability, processing speed, word fluency and visuospatial performance. The individuals in both groups performed better at the follow-up compared to the baseline assessment. Even though, we did not observe cognitive deterioration in the investigated, cognitively intact SCI individuals during the first 3 treatment months, the concerns regarding deleterious effects of antimuscarinics on cognition remain.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 8 August 2017; doi:10.1038/sc.2017.94.

  3. Initial experience with the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity with a new β-3 agonist (mirabegron) in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllner, J; Pannek, J

    2016-01-01

    It is a retrospective chart analysis. In patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) due to spinal cord injury (SCI), neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) can cause both deterioration of the upper urinary tract and urinary incontinence. Antimuscarinic treatment is frequently discontinued due to side effects or lack of efficacy, whereas injection of onabotulinumtoxin into the detrusor is a minimally invasive procedure with risks of urinary retention, infection and haematuria. Mirabegron, a new β-3 agonist, is a potential new agent for treatment of NDO. Aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of mirabegron in SCI patients with NLUTD. Swiss Paraplegic Center, Nottwil, Switzerland. A retrospective chart analysis of SCI patient treated with mirabegron. Fifteen patients with NDO were treated with mirabegron for a period of at least 6 weeks. Significant reduction of the frequency of bladder evacuation per 24 h (8.1 vs 6.4, P=0.003), and of incontinence episodes per 24 h (2.9 vs 1.3, P=0.027) was observed. Furthermore, we observed improvements in bladder capacity (from 365  to 419 ml), compliance (from 28 to 45 ml cm(-1) H(2)0) and detrusor pressure during storage phase (45.8  vs 30 cm H(2)0). At follow-up, 9/15 patients were satisfied with the therapy, 4/15 reported side effects (3 × aggravation of urinary incontinence, 1 × constipation). Mirabegron may evolve as an alternative in the treatment of NDO. We observed improvements in urodynamic and clinical parameters. Due to the limited number of patients and the retrospective nature of the study, prospective, placebo-controlled studies are necessary.

  4. The Felix-trial. Double-blind randomization of interspinous implant or bony decompression for treatment of spinal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand Ronald

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decompressive laminotomy is the standard surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with canal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication. New techniques, such as interspinous process implants, claim a shorter hospital stay, less post-operative pain and equal long-term functional outcome. A comparative (cost- effectiveness study has not been performed yet. This protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT on (cost- effectiveness of the use of interspinous process implants versus conventional decompression surgery in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods/Design Patients (age 40-85 presenting with intermittent neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis lasting more than 3 months refractory to conservative treatment, are included. Randomization into interspinous implant surgery versus bony decompression surgery will take place in the operating room after induction of anesthesia. The primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient measured by the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ, at 8 weeks and 1 year after surgery. Other outcome parameters include perceived recovery, leg and back pain, incidence of re-operations, complications, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism and costs. The study is a randomized multi-institutional trial, in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses are kept blinded of the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 1 year. Discussion Currently decompressive laminotomy is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Whether surgery with interspinous implants is a reasonable alternative can be determined by this trial. Trial register Dutch Trial register number: NTR1307

  5. The Felix-trial. Double-blind randomization of interspinous implant or bony decompression for treatment of spinal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moojen, Wouter A; Arts, Mark P; Brand, Ronald; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2010-05-27

    Decompressive laminotomy is the standard surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with canal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication. New techniques, such as interspinous process implants, claim a shorter hospital stay, less post-operative pain and equal long-term functional outcome. A comparative (cost-) effectiveness study has not been performed yet. This protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on (cost-) effectiveness of the use of interspinous process implants versus conventional decompression surgery in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Patients (age 40-85) presenting with intermittent neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis lasting more than 3 months refractory to conservative treatment, are included. Randomization into interspinous implant surgery versus bony decompression surgery will take place in the operating room after induction of anesthesia. The primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient measured by the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ), at 8 weeks and 1 year after surgery. Other outcome parameters include perceived recovery, leg and back pain, incidence of re-operations, complications, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism and costs. The study is a randomized multi-institutional trial, in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses are kept blinded of the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 1 year. Currently decompressive laminotomy is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Whether surgery with interspinous implants is a reasonable alternative can be determined by this trial. Dutch Trial register number: NTR1307.

  6. Effectiveness of Short Term Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation for Non-neurogenic Overactive Bladder Syndrome in Adults: A Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elita Wibisono

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate the effectiveness of short-term PTNS for non-neurogenic OAB in adults systematically by comparing with sham procedure and other treatments. Methods: we performed a systematic review of cohort study. Data sources were MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, National Library for Health, Cochrane, and google scholar from 2005 through 2015. Meta-analysis was performed using the random effects model. Heterogeneity of effects was assessed by calculating I2 statistic. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.3 for RCT meta-analysis. Results: we analized 11 randomised controlled trial (RCT and five prospective non-comparative studies with variable success rate. Based on percentage of responders, the results were 37.3% - 81.8% in PTNS group, 0% - 20.9% in sham group, 54.8% in anti-muscarinic group, and 89.7% in multimodal group. The decrease of voiding symptoms episodes per day was found in PTNS (0.7-4.5, sham (0.3-1.5, and anti-muscarinic (0.6-2.9 groups. In meta-analysis of four RCTs, the results favour PTNS over sham procedure with overall risk ratio of 7.32(95% CI of 1.69-32.16, p=0.09, I2=54%. Conclusion: there is an evidence of effectiveness of short term PTNS in treatment of non-neurogenic OAB. PTNS is proven significantly better than sham procedure. Key words: overactive bladder, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation, sham, anti-muscarinic, voiding symptoms.

  7. Creating Virtual Exhibitions for Educational and Cultural Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela DUMITRESCU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents different tools and mechanisms to implement a virtual exhibition in different cultural areas, such as museums and libraries. Quality characteristics of virtual exhibitions are identified and described. The possibility to create native mobile applications for virtual exhibitions presentation is analyzed. The functional flow of creating a virtual exhibition is presented and discussed. The Seals - History Treasure exhibition is presented and significant historical documents are revealed.

  8. SOX9 is an astrocyte-specific nuclear marker in the adult brain outside the neurogenic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Wei; Cornwell, Adam; Li, Jiashu

    2017-01-01

    is also expressed by neural progenitor cells. Transcriptome comparisons of SOX9 cells with GLT1 cells showed that the two populations of cells exhibit largely overlapping gene expression. Expression of SOX9 did not decrease during aging and was instead upregulated by reactive astrocytes in a number...

  9. A content-oriented model for science exhibit engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    : as a means to operationalize the link between exhibit features and visitor activities; and as a template to transform scientists’ practices in the research context into visitors’ activities in the exhibit context. The resulting model of science exhibit engineering is presented and exemplified, and its......Recently, science museums have begun to review their educational purposes and redesign their pedagogies. At the most basic level, this entails accounting for the performance of individual exhibits, and indeed, in some cases, research indicates shortcomings in exhibit design: While often successful...... implications for science exhibit design are discussed at three levels: the design product, the design process, and the design methodology....

  10. The Jellyfish Cassiopea Exhibits a Sleep-like State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Ravi D; Bedbrook, Claire N; Abrams, Michael J; Basinger, Ty; Bois, Justin S; Prober, David A; Sternberg, Paul W; Gradinaru, Viviana; Goentoro, Lea

    2017-10-09

    Do all animals sleep? Sleep has been observed in many vertebrates, and there is a growing body of evidence for sleep-like states in arthropods and nematodes [1-5]. Here we show that sleep is also present in Cnidaria [6-8], an earlier-branching metazoan lineage. Cnidaria and Ctenophora are the first metazoan phyla to evolve tissue-level organization and differentiated cell types, such as neurons and muscle [9-15]. In Cnidaria, neurons are organized into a non-centralized radially symmetric nerve net [11, 13, 15-17] that nevertheless shares fundamental properties with the vertebrate nervous system: action potentials, synaptic transmission, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters [15-20]. It was reported that cnidarian soft corals [21] and box jellyfish [22, 23] exhibit periods of quiescence, a pre-requisite for sleep-like states, prompting us to ask whether sleep is present in Cnidaria. Within Cnidaria, the upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea spp. displays a quantifiable pulsing behavior, allowing us to perform long-term behavioral tracking. Monitoring of Cassiopea pulsing activity for consecutive days and nights revealed behavioral quiescence at night that is rapidly reversible, as well as a delayed response to stimulation in the quiescent state. When deprived of nighttime quiescence, Cassiopea exhibited decreased activity and reduced responsiveness to a sensory stimulus during the subsequent day, consistent with homeostatic regulation of the quiescent state. Together, these results indicate that Cassiopea has a sleep-like state, supporting the hypothesis that sleep arose early in the metazoan lineage, prior to the emergence of a centralized nervous system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastric Schwannoma Mimicking Malignant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Exhibiting Increased Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Sung Jin Oh; Byoung Jo Suh; Jong Kwon Park

    2016-01-01

    A schwannoma is a kind of neurogenic tumor that rarely occurs in the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric schwannomas make up 0.2% of all gastric neoplasms. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors and up to 60?70% of GIST occur in the stomach. Schwannoma and GIST are similar in clinical features, so they are difficult to differentiate preoperatively. Differential diagnosis of these two submucosal tumors is important because of the malignant potential of GIST a...

  12. Weight lifting can facilitate appreciative comprehension for museum exhibits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki eYamada

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Appreciation of exhibits in a museum can be equated to a virtual experience of lives in the contexts originally surrounding the exhibits. Here we focus on the importance of weight information, and hence tested whether experiencing a weight during museum exhibit appreciation affects the beholders’ satisfaction and recognition memory for the exhibits. An experiment was performed at a museum exhibiting skeletal preparations of animals. We used nine preparations and prepared four weight stimuli as weight cues in accordance with the actual weight of four of the preparations: Remaining five preparations was displayed without weight stimuli. In the cued condition, participants were asked to lift up the weight stimuli during their observation of the four exhibits. In the uncued condition, participants observed the exhibits without touching the weight stimuli. After observation of the exhibits, the participants responded to a questionnaire that measured their impressions of the exhibits and the museum, and performed a recognition test on the exhibits. Results showed that memory performance was better and viewing duration was longer with weight lifting instruction than without instruction. A factor analysis on the questionnaires revealed four factors (likeability, contentment, value, and quality. A path analysis showed indirect effects of viewing duration on memory performance and willingness-to-pay for the museum appreciation through the impression factors. Our findings provide insight into a new interactive exhibition that enables long appreciation producing positive effects on visitors’ impression, memory, and value estimation for exhibits.

  13. Weight lifting can facilitate appreciative comprehension for museum exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuki; Harada, Shinya; Choi, Wonje; Fujino, Rika; Tokunaga, Akinobu; Gao, Yueyun; Miura, Kayo

    2014-01-01

    Appreciation of exhibits in a museum can be equated to a virtual experience of lives in the contexts originally surrounding the exhibits. Here we focus on the importance of weight information, and hence tested whether experiencing a weight during museum exhibit appreciation affects the beholders' satisfaction and recognition memory for the exhibits. An experiment was performed at a museum exhibiting skeletal preparations of animals. We used nine preparations and prepared four weight stimuli as weight cues in accordance with the actual weight of four of the preparations: Remaining five preparations was displayed without weight stimuli. In the cued condition, participants were asked to lift up the weight stimuli during their observation of the four exhibits. In the uncued condition, participants observed the exhibits without touching the weight stimuli. After observation of the exhibits, the participants responded to a questionnaire that measured their impressions of the exhibits and the museum, and performed a recognition test on the exhibits. Results showed that memory performance was better and viewing duration was longer with weight lifting instruction than without instruction. A factor analysis on the questionnaires revealed four factors (likeability, contentment, value, and quality). A path analysis showed indirect effects of viewing duration on memory performance and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for the museum appreciation through the impression factors. Our findings provide insight into a new interactive exhibition that enables long appreciation producing positive effects on visitors' impression, memory, and value estimation for exhibits.

  14. 78 FR 7849 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Edwardian Opulence: British Art at... April 15, 2003), I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Edwardian Opulence: British Art at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition...

  15. 76 FR 68808 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... Exhibition Determinations: ``Transition to Christianity: Art of Late Antiquity, 3rd-7th Century AD'' SUMMARY... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Transition to Christianity: Art of Late Antiquity, 3rd-7th Century AD,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, are of cultural...

  16. 76 FR 52378 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``5,000 Years of Chinese Jade..., Smithsonian Institution'' Exhibition ACTION: Notice, correction. SUMMARY: On July 29, 2011, notice was... the Department of State pertaining to the exhibition ``5,000 Years of Chinese Jade Featuring...

  17. 45 CFR 1160.5 - Eligibility for domestic exhibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility for domestic exhibitions. 1160.5... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.5 Eligibility for domestic exhibitions. An indemnity agreement for a domestic exhibition made under these regulations shall cover eligible items from the United States...

  18. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility for international exhibitions. 1160.4... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement for an international exhibition made under these regulations shall cover: (a) Eligible items from...

  19. 75 FR 6079 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Compass and Rule: Architecture as... 15, 2003 , I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Compass and Rule: Architecture as Mathematical Practice in England, 1500-1750,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition...

  20. 33 CFR 20.807 - Exhibits and documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhibits and documents. 20.807 Section 20.807 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL RULES... Evidence § 20.807 Exhibits and documents. (a) Each exhibit must be numbered and marked for identification...

  1. [Review of the pharmaceutical exhibitions in the Meiji Era (Supplement)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, T

    1994-01-01

    The author described (Jpn. J. History Pharm. 16(1), 9-20 (1981) the Review of the Pharmaceutical Exhibitions in the Meiji era. But afterwards the author found there were omissions of three exhibitions. These are the Nagaoka, the Osaka, and the Akita Exhibitions. The Nagaoka Exhibition was organized by the Nagaoka Pharmacists Association in June, 1890. The Osaka Exhibition opened on Jan. 18, 1891 by Osaka Branch of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan. The Akita Pharmaceutical Exhibition was held on Sept. 24-26, 1892, as the chief event of the opening ceremony of the Akita Drug-Trader Association, united pharmacists, druggists, and drug-manufacturers throughout Akita Prefecture. It is the most large-scaled of the three. The exhibits were 1,419, and the visitors were above 8,830. The planning originated with a young pharmacist Masayasu Hanyu.

  2. Digital Natives: Creating Emergent Exhibitions through Digital Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Digital Technology can support the creation of dialogical spaces in the museum, both playful and reflective, that allow audiences to engage in the ongoing construction and reproduction of cultural heritage creating novel connections between self and others and between past, present and future....... In this way, digital technology can contribute to the creation of emergent exhibitions in which the exhibition is created in dialogue between audiences and the museum. We present experiences from a current research project, the Digital Natives exhibition, in which digital technology was designed...... as an integral part of the exhibition to encourage dialogue between audiences and the exhibition materials and thereby investigate how the exhibition emerge as a result of this dialogic co-construction inside the exhibition space. In short, the opportunities offered by digital technologies prompts us to consider...

  3. Estudo multicêntrico sobre escalas para grau de comprometimento em disfagia orofaríngea neurogênica Multicenter study about severity scales of neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Gonçalves da Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a concordância entre distintas escalas para grau de comprometimento em disfagia orofaríngea neurogênica. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado estudo clínico transversal. Participaram 200 indivíduos com disfagia orofaríngea neurogênica, 108 do gênero masculino e 92 do gênero feminino, com idades de 3 meses a 91 anos. Foram aplicadas quatro escalas para classificar o grau de comprometimento da disfagia orofaríngea, sendo duas escalas clínicas e duas videofluoroscópicas. Análises estatísticas foram realizadas para verificar a concordância entre as escalas clínicas e objetivas. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mostraram concordância muito boa entre as escalas clínicas estudadas (Kappa=0,92 e concordância moderada entre as escalas objetivas (Kappa=0,52. CONCLUSÃO: Embora a concordância entre as escalas clínicas tenha sido muito boa e entre as escalas objetivas tenha sido moderada, ainda é necessária ampla discussão e possível revisão dos parâmetros que definem o grau de comprometimento da disfagia orofaríngea em pacientes neurológicos.PURPOSE: To analyze the agreement among different severity scales for neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia. METHODS: A clinical cross-sectional study was conducted. Participants were 200 individuals (108 male, 92 female with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia, aged between three months and 91 years. Four severity scales were applied to classify the oropharyngeal dysphagia: two clinical scales and two videofluoroscopic scales. Statistical analysis were conducted to verify the agreement between clinical and objective scales. RESULTS: Results showed very good agreement between the clinical scales (kappa=0.92 and moderate agreement between the objective scales (kappa=0.52. CONCLUSION: Although the agreement between the clinical scales was very good and between the objective scales was moderate, further discussion and possible revision of the parameters that define the severity of oropharyngeal

  4. Prophylactic Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG) - The Importance of Nutritonal Support in Patients with Head and Neck Cancers (HNCs) or Neurogenic Dysphagia (ND).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristian, D; Poalelungi, A; Anghel, A; Burcoş, T; Grigore, R; Berteşteanu, S; Richiteanu, G; Grama, F

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of prophylactic PEG performed for the enteral nutrition support during the oncological treatment of patients with HNCs and as a part of the management of neurological patients experiencing neurogenic dysphagia. In 2013 we followed up on a group of 23 HNC patients subjected to prophylactic PEG. We assessed the duration of the procedure, intraprocedural incidents and their causes, time to tube-refeeding and discharge after intervention, post interventional analgesia, early and late complications,toleration, costs and postoperative course of these patients after radical surgery maintaining PEG in place. In parallel we followed up on a group of 10 neurological patients who have undergone a PEG placement to improve the nutrional status and to prevent recurrent chest infections due to ND related silent aspiration. The procedures were performed under sedation with Midazolam and the mean duration was about 7 minutes.Postoperative analgesia was minimal. Refeeding through the tube was initiated 2-4h hours later and the patients were discharged 12-24h after the procedure. Early complications were not observed and later we noted 2 cases of peristomal infections, succesfully managed conservatively. After oncologic surgery we noted 2 (8.69%) pharyngocutaneous fistulas.Conservative care obliterated the fistulas at 6 weeks, maintaining the feeding tube in place. We also compared the results with a group of 27 patients fed through the naso-gastric tube and a group of 20 cases with open gastrotomy-tube prophylactically inserted. The 10 neurological patients had varied conditions but degenerative diseases like motor neuron disease (3 cases" 30%) and multiple sclerosis (2 cases -20%) took the lead we encountered one case of peristomal infection and one case of tube blockage resolved by replacement. We evaluated the nutritional status by controling the weight of these patients before and after PEG placement. A mean weight gain of 3.1 kg(range 1

  5. A cost-utility analysis of sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS) compared with medical treatment in patients with complete spinal cord injury with a neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlière, Camille; Verpillot, Elise; Donon, Laurence; Salmi, Louis-Rachid; Joseph, Pierre-Alain; Vignes, Jean-Rodolphe; Bénard, Antoine

    2015-12-01

    Sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS) and posterior sacral rhizotomy restores the ability to urinate on demand with low residual volumes, which is a key for preventing urinary complications that account for 10% of the causes of death in patients with spinal cord injury with a neurogenic bladder. Nevertheless, comparative cost-effectiveness results on a long time horizon are lacking to adequately inform decisions of reimbursement. This study aimed to estimate the long-term cost-utility of SARS using the Finetech-Brindley device compared with medical treatment (anticholinergics+catheterization). The following study design is used for the paper: Markov model elaborated with a 10-year time horizon; with four irreversible states: (1) initial treatment, (2) year 1 of surgery for urinary complication, (3) year >1 of surgery for urinary complication, and (4) death; and reversible states: urinary calculi; Finetech-Brindley device failures. The sample consisted of theoretical cohorts of patients with a complete spinal cord lesion since ≥1 year, and a neurogenic bladder. Effectiveness was expressed as quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Costs were valued in EUR 2013 in the perspective of the French health system. A systematic review and meta-analyses were performed to estimate transition probabilities and QALYs. Costs were estimated from the literature, and through simulations using the 2013 French prospective payment system classification. Probabilistic analyses were conducted to handle parameter uncertainty. In the base case analysis (2.5% discount rate), the cost-utility ratio was 12,710 EUR per QALY gained. At a threshold of 30,000 EUR per QALY the probability of SARS being cost-effective compared with medical treatment was 60%. If the French Healthcare System reimbursed SARS for 80 patients per year during 10 years (anticipated target population), the expected incremental net health benefit would be 174 QALYs, and the expected value of perfect information (EVPI

  6. Senescent intervertebral disc cells exhibit perturbed matrix homeostasis phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Kevin; Patil, Prashanti; McGowan, Sara J; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robbins, Paul D; Kang, James; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Vo, Nam

    2017-09-01

    Aging greatly increases the risk for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) as a result of proteoglycan loss due to reduced synthesis and enhanced degradation of the disc matrix proteoglycan (PG). How disc matrix PG homeostasis becomes perturbed with age is not known. The goal of this study is to determine whether cellular senescence is a source of this perturbation. We demonstrated that disc cellular senescence is dramatically increased in the DNA repair-deficient Ercc1(-/Δ) mouse model of human progeria. In these accelerated aging mice, increased disc cellular senescence is closely associated with the rapid loss of disc PG. We also directly examine PG homeostasis in oxidative damage-induced senescent human cells using an in vitro cell culture model system. Senescence of human disc cells treated with hydrogen peroxide was confirmed by growth arrest, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, γH2AX foci, and acquisition of senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Senescent human disc cells also exhibited perturbed matrix PG homeostasis as evidenced by their decreased capacity to synthesize new matrix PG and enhanced degradation of aggrecan, a major matrix PG. of the disc. Our in vivo and in vitro findings altogether suggest that disc cellular senescence is an important driver of PG matrix homeostatic perturbation and PG loss. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The Eugenides Foundation Interactive Exhibition of Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogiannis, Ioannis

    2010-01-01

    The Interactive Exhibition of Science and Technology is installed in an area of 1200 m2 at the Eugenides Foundation. 65 interactive exhibits, designed by the "Cites des Science et de l' Industrie" are organised in themes, stimulate the visitors' mind and provoke scientific thinking. Parallel activities take place inside the exhibition, such as live science demonstrations, performed by young scientists. Extra material such as news bulletins (short news, science comics and portraits), educational paths and treasure-hunting based games, all available online as well, are prepared on a monthly basis and provided along with the visit to the exhibition. Through these exhibits and activities, scientific facts are made simple and easy to comprehend using modern presentation tools. We present details on how this exhibition acts complementary to the science education provided by schools, making it a highly sophisticated educational tool.

  8. CERN exhibition attracts over 100,000 visitors in Belgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    “This must be an 'all-time record',” says Ray Lewis, CERN travelling exhibition manager. “In all my time with the various permanent and travelling exhibitions that have taken place locally and within our Member States I have never experienced such figures.”   Zarko Obradovic (left), Serbian Minister of Education, Science and Technology, and Rolf Heuer (right), CERN Director-General, at the CERN travelling exhibition in Belgrade. Indeed, in approximately 20 days of exhibition time about 120,000 people, mainly school visiters and the general public, visited the 100 m2 CERN mini-exhibition. It was set up in the centre of Belgrade in October, in association with the meeting of the Restricted European Committee for Future Accelerators (RECFA). After attending the RECFA meeting, CERN's Director-General Rofl Heuer opened the CERN exhibition on the evening of 19 October. Lectures about CERN were held every afternoon, and two public de...

  9. Motion Capture: Drawing and the Moving Image Exhibition, Letterkenny, Donegal.

    OpenAIRE

    Fay, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Motion Capture Drawing & the Moving Image A GLUCKSMAN exhibition, touring to Regional Cultural Centre, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal, 22 January – 9 March 2013 Supported by a Touring and Dissemination award from the Arts Council of Ireland/An Chomhairle Ealaíon. Motion Capture is an exhibition that explores the relationship of movement in two artistic media: drawing and the moving image. Featuring artworks from the mid-twentieth century through to the present day, the exhibition emphasises the ...

  10. 77 FR 31420 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, are of cultural significance. The objects are... Ereli, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Department of...

  11. Variation in eligibility criteria from studies of radiculopathy due to a herniated disc and of neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis: A structured literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevay, S.; Atlas, S.J.; Katz, J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design A structured literature review. Summary of the Background Data Widely recognized classification criteria for rheumatologic disorders have resulted in well-defined patient populations for clinical investigation. Objectives We sought to determine whether similar criteria were needed for back pain disorders by examining variability in eligibility criteria in published studies Methods Studies involving radiculopathy due to lumbar herniated disc (HD) and for neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) were identified. Randomized controlled trials published between January 1, 2006 and October 1, 2008 in select peer reviewed journals were retrieved, their eligibility criteria were identified and categorized. Results Twelve eligible HD studies were identified. Thirteen unique categories of eligibility criteria were identified with a mean of 3.9 (+/−2.0) and a range from 0 to 8 categories per study. More categories were present for studies that included nonsurgical (5.6 +/− 2.5) treatment for studies with only surgical treatment (2.6 +/− 1.7) p= 0.04). Seven LSS studies met eligibility criteria, and 9 unique categories were identified. A mean of 5.0 (+/−2.2) categories with a range from 2 to 7 was used per study. Conclusion Wide variation in the number and type of eligibility criteria from randomized clinical trials of well defined back pain syndromes was identified. These results support the need for developing and disseminating international classification criteria for these clinical conditions. PMID:20228710

  12. TRPV1 and TRPA1 in cutaneous neurogenic and chronic inflammation: pro-inflammatory response induced by their activation and their sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Gouin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cutaneous neurogenic inflammation (CNI is inflammation that is induced (or enhanced in the skin by the release of neuropeptides from sensory nerve endings. Clinical manifestations are mainly sensory and vascular disorders such as pruritus and erythema. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and ankyrin 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1, respectively are non-selective cation channels known to specifically participate in pain and CNI. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 are co-expressed in a large subset of sensory nerves, where they integrate numerous noxious stimuli. It is now clear that the expression of both channels also extends far beyond the sensory nerves in the skin, occuring also in keratinocytes, mast cells, dendritic cells, and endothelial cells. In these non-neuronal cells, TRPV1 and TRPA1 also act as nociceptive sensors and potentiate the inflammatory process. This review discusses the role of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in the modulation of inflammatory genes that leads to or maintains CNI in sensory neurons and non-neuronal skin cells. In addition, this review provides a summary of current research on the intracellular sensitization pathways of both TRP channels by other endogenous inflammatory mediators that promote the self-maintenance of CNI.

  13. Application of transpulmonary thermodilution monitoring (PiCCO in patient with neurogenic pulmonary edema and acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to a central neurocytoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoichi Iwata

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE is an acute life-threatening complication associated with many forms of central nervous system injury. Its pathophysiology is still debated. We report a patient with acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to a central neurocytoma who also had NPE, for which serial transpulmonary thermodilution monitoring (PiCCO was performed. Insertion of the PiCCO, which provides information about the patient's cardiac output, preload status and amount of lung water, revealed a high pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI and low global end-diastolic volume (GEDV without cardiac dysfunction, indicating permeability edema, which led to our changing the therapeutic strategy. Using PiCCO monitoring to balance the preload and extent of pulmonary edema enabled achievement of an optimal cardiac preload for organ perfusion, resulting in normalization of pulmonary edema by day 2. PiCCO facilitates understanding of the mechanism of NPE, guiding the management of fluid balance and the choice of vasopressors in patients with life-threatening NPE.

  14. Clinical usefulness of ultrasound assessment of detrusor wall thickness in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to spinal cord injury: urodynamics made easy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Jürgen; Bartel, Peter; Göcking, Konrad; Frotzler, Angela

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of sonographic measurement of detrusor wall thickness (DWT) for the prediction of risk factors in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) due to spinal cord injury (SCI). In a prospective study, 60 consecutive patients with NLUTD due to SCI presenting for routine urodynamic assessment at a specialized SCI center underwent additional measurement of DWT at varying bladder volumes. Results of urodynamic testing were classified into favorable and unfavorable. DWT at maximum capacity was used to calculate a possible cutoff value for favorable urodynamic results. Urodynamic results were favorable in 48 patients and unfavorable in 12 patients. A DWT of 0.97 mm or less can safely (sensitivity 91.7 %, specificity 63.0 %) be used as a cutoff point for the absence of risk factors for renal damage. According to our results, DWT may be useful as an additional risk assessment for renal damage in patients with NLUTD due to SCI. However, as other parameters required for bladder management, especially detrusor overactivity, cannot be evaluated by this technique, it cannot replace urodynamic testing.

  15. Switch to Abobotulinum toxin A may be useful in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity when intradetrusor injections of Onabotulinum toxin A failed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottet, Florie; Peyronnet, Benoit; Boissier, Romain; Reiss, Bénédicte; Previnaire, Jean G; Manunta, Andrea; Kerdraon, Jacques; Ruffion, Alain; Lenormand, Loïc; Perrouin Verbe, Brigitte; Gaillet, Sarah; Gamé, Xavier; Karsenty, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of switching to a different brand of botulinum toxin A (BTA, from Botox® to Dysport®) in case of failure of intradetrusor injections (IDI) of Botox® in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The charts of all patients who underwent a switch to IDI of Dysport® after failure of an IDI of Botox® at six departments of neurourology were retrospectively reviewed. The main outcomes of interest were the bladder diary data and four urodynamic parameters: maximum cystometric capacity (MCC), maximum detrusor pressure (PDET max), and volume at first uninhibited detrusor contraction (UDC). Fifty-seven patients were included. After the first injection of Dysport®, no adverse events were reported. A significant decrease in number of urinary incontinence episodes per day was observed in 52.63% of patients (P switch from (56.14%). After a median follow up of 21 months, 87% of responders to BTA switch were still treated successfully with BTA. Most patients refractory to Botox® (56.14%) draw benefits from the switch to Dysport®. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A multicenter, prospective, randomized trial evaluating the X STOP interspinous process decompression system for the treatment of neurogenic intermittent claudication: two-year follow-up results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucherman, James F; Hsu, Ken Y; Hartjen, Charles A; Mehalic, Thomas F; Implicito, Dante A; Martin, Michael J; Johnson, Donald R; Skidmore, Grant A; Vessa, Paul P; Dwyer, James W; Puccio, Stephen T; Cauthen, Joseph C; Ozuna, Richard M

    2005-06-15

    A randomized, controlled, prospective multicenter trial comparing the outcomes of neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC) patients treated with the interspinous process decompression system (X STOP) with patients treated nonoperatively. To determine the safety and efficacy of the X STOP interspinous implant. Patients suffering from NIC secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis have been limited to a choice between nonoperative therapies and decompressive surgical procedures, with or without fusion. The X STOP was developed to provide an alternative therapeutic treatment. METHODS.: 191 patients were treated, 100 in the X STOP group and 91 in the control group. The primary outcomes measure was the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire, a patient-completed, validated instrument for NIC. At every follow-up visit, X STOP patients had significantly better outcomes in each domain of the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire. At 2 years, the X STOP patients improved by 45.4% over the mean baseline Symptom Severity score compared with 7.4% in the control group; the mean improvement in the Physical Function domain was 44.3% in the X STOP group and -0.4% in the control group. In the X STOP group, 73.1% patients were satisfied with their treatment compared with 35.9% of control patients. The X STOP provides a conservative yet effective treatment for patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis. In the continuum of treatment options, the X STOP offers an attractive alternative to both conservative care and decompressive surgery.

  17. Life-Long Neurogenic Activity of Individual Neural Stem Cells and Continuous Growth Establish an Outside-In Architecture in the Teleost Pallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Giacomo; Cuccioli, Valentina; Vuillemin, Nelly; Dirian, Lara; Muntasell, Anna Janue; Coolen, Marion; Dray, Nicolas; Bedu, Sébastien; Houart, Corinne; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Foucher, Isabelle; Bally-Cuif, Laure

    2017-11-06

    Spatiotemporal variations of neurogenesis are thought to account for the evolution of brain shape. In the dorsal telencephalon (pallium) of vertebrates, it remains unresolved which ancestral neurogenesis mode prefigures the highly divergent cytoarchitectures that are seen in extant species. To gain insight into this question, we developed genetic tools to generate here the first 4-dimensional (3D + birthdating time) map of pallium construction in the adult teleost zebrafish. Using a Tet-On-based genetic birthdating strategy, we identify a "sequential stacking" construction mode where neurons derived from the zebrafish pallial germinal zone arrange in outside-in, age-related layers from a central core generated during embryogenesis. We obtained no evidence for overt radial or tangential neuronal migrations. Cre-lox-mediated tracing, which included following Brainbow clones, further demonstrates that this process is sustained by the persistent neurogenic activity of individual pallial neural stem cells (NSCs) from embryo to adult. Together, these data demonstrate that the spatiotemporal control of NSC activity is an important driver of the macroarchitecture of the zebrafish adult pallium. This simple mode of pallium construction shares distinct traits with pallial genesis in mammals and non-mammalian amniotes such as birds or reptiles, suggesting that it may exemplify the basal layout from which vertebrate pallial architectures were elaborated. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. A preliminary investigation on the effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy as a treatment for neurogenic heterotopic ossification following traumatic brain injury. Part II: Effects on function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, J E; Biros, E; Sacher, Y; Kibrik, O; Milanese, S; Gordon, S; Galea, M P

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) occurs as a complication of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Management of clinically significant NHO remains variable. Complications of mature NHO include limitation of mobility. The effect of the extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on range of motion at hip and knee, and function in patients with TBI with chronic NHO was investigated. A series of single-case studies applying ESWT to chronic NHO at the hip or knee of 11 patients with TBI were undertaken at a rehabilitation hospital. Participants received four applications of high-energy EWST delivered to the affected hip or knee over a period of 8 weeks. Two-weekly follow- up assessments were carried out; final assessments were made 3 and 6 months post-intervention. Range of motion (ROM) and Functional Reach (FR) or Modified Functional Reach (MFR) were measured. Application of high-energy ESWT was associated with significant improvement in ROM (flexion) of the NHO-affected knee (Tau = 0.833, 95% CI 0.391-1.276, p = 0.002) and significant improvement of FR (Overall Tau 0.486, 95% CI 0.141-0.832, p = 0.006); no significant improvement in hip ROM or MFR. ESWT may improve mobility and balance of patients with TBI who have chronic NHO.

  19. α1A-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonism Improves Erectile and Cavernosal Responses in Rats With Cavernous Nerve Injury and Enhances Neurogenic Responses in Human Corpus Cavernosum From Patients With Erectile Dysfunction Secondary to Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Salamanca, Juan I; La Fuente, José M; Martínez-Salamanca, Eduardo; Fernández, Argentina; Pepe-Cardoso, Augusto J; Louro, Nuno; Carballido, Joaquín; Angulo, Javier

    2016-12-01

    Cavernous nerve injury (CNI) in rats and radical prostatectomy (RP) in men result in loss of nitrergic function and increased adrenergic-neurogenic contractions of cavernosal tissue. To evaluate the modulation of the α-adrenergic system as a strategy to relieve erectile dysfunction (ED) and functional cavernosal alterations induced by CNI. A non-selective α-blocker (phentolamine 1 mg/kg daily), a selective α1A-blocker (silodosin [SILOD] 0.1 mg/kg daily), or vehicle was orally administered for 4 weeks after bilateral crush CNI (BCNI). Erectile and neurogenic responses of the corpus cavernosum (CC) were evaluated. The acute effects of SILOD also were evaluated in vivo (0.03 mg/kg intravenously) and ex vivo (10 nmol/L). The effects of SILOD and tadalafil (TAD) on nitrergic relaxations were determined in human CC from patients with ED with a vascular etiology or ED secondary to RP. Erectile responses in vivo in rats and neurogenic contractions and relaxations of rat and human CC. Long-term treatment with SILOD significantly improved erectile responses and allowed for the potentiation of erectile responses by acute treatment with TAD (0.3 mg/kg intravenously) in rats with BCNI. SILOD partly recovered nitrergic relaxations and normalized neurogenic contractions in CC from rats with BCNI. Long-term treatment with SILOD partly prevented BCNI-induced decreases in neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression. Acute administration of SILOD (0.03 mg/kg intravenously) improved erectile responses in vivo and potentiated nitrergic relaxation and decreased neurogenic contractions ex vivo in CC from rats with BCNI. In human CC from patients with ED with a vascular etiology, TAD (30 nmol/L), SILOD (10 nmol/L), or their combination increased nitrergic relaxations. Potentiation by TAD was lost in human CC from patients with ED after RP but was recovered after co-treatment with SILOD. α-Adrenergic modulation, especially selective α1A-blockade, improves erectile and cavernosal

  20. Biologically active heteroarotinoids exhibiting anticancer activity and decreased toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbrook, D M; Madler, M M; Spruce, L W; Birckbichler, P J; Nelson, E C; Subramanian, S; Weerasekare, G M; Gale, J B; Patterson, M K; Wang, B; Wang, W; Lu, S; Rowland, T C; DiSivestro, P; Lindamood, C; Hill, D L; Berlin, K D

    1997-10-24

    A series of retinoids, containing heteroatoms in a cyclic ring and called heteroarotinoids, were synthesized, and their biological activity was evaluated using tissue culture lines that have measurable responses to trans-retinoic acid (t-RA). Transglutaminase (TGase) was assessed in the human erythroleukemia cell line (GMO6141A) as an indicator of differentiation and apoptosis. Proliferation was evaluated in a human cervical cell line, CC-1, which exhibits dose-dependent alterations in growth rate in response to treatment with trans-retinoic acid. Activation of nuclear retinoic acid receptors was determined in a reporter cell line established from CC-1. The reporter line, called CC-B, contains a reporter gene controlled by a retinoic acid responsive element (RARE) and a thymidine kinase (tk) promoter. Treatment of the CC-B line with the heteroarotinoids resulted in a dose-responsive and retinoid-dependent regulation of reporter gene expression. The heteroarotinoids exhibited activity in all assays and correlated in a statistically significant manner between assays. RARE transactivation activity in CC-B cells correlated with induction of TGase in GMO6141A (R = 0.96) and with a decrease in the growth rate of CC-1 cells (R = -0.90). The ability of the selected heteroarotinoids to induce differentiation, inhibit proliferation, and activate nuclear receptors demonstrates the chemotherapeutic potential of these agents. In view of the biological activity cited, an in vivo toxicity study was conducted on male B6D2F1 mice with three heteroarotinoids, namely 8 [(2E,4E,6E)-3,7-dimethyl-7-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-4,4-dimeth ylthiochroman-6-yl)-2,4,6-heptatrienoic acid], 10 [(2E,4E,6E)-3,7-dimethyl-7-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-4,4-dimeth ylchroman-6-yl)-2, 4,6-heptatrienoic acid], and 13 [(E)-p-[2-(4,4-dimethylchroman-6-yl)propenyl]benzoic acid]. The mice were used with gavage of heteroarotinoids in corn oil [0.1, 0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 mg/kg] and with 0.01 or 0.05 mg/kg of TTNPB (5) [(E)-4