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Sample records for exhaust particle aerosols

  1. Single particle mass spectral signatures from vehicle exhaust particles and the source apportionment of on-line PM2.5 by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Ma, Shexia; Gao, Bo; Li, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yanjun; Cai, Jing; Li, Mei; Yao, Ling'ai; Huang, Bo; Zheng, Mei

    2017-09-01

    In order to accurately apportion the many distinct types of individual particles observed, it is necessary to characterize fingerprints of individual particles emitted directly from known sources. In this study, single particle mass spectral signatures from vehicle exhaust particles in a tunnel were performed. These data were used to evaluate particle signatures in a real-world PM2.5 apportionment study. The dominant chemical type originating from average positive and negative mass spectra for vehicle exhaust particles are EC species. Four distinct particle types describe the majority of particles emitted by vehicle exhaust particles in this tunnel. Each particle class is labeled according to the most significant chemical features in both average positive and negative mass spectral signatures, including ECOC, NaK, Metal and PAHs species. A single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was also employed during the winter of 2013 in Guangzhou to determine both the size and chemical composition of individual atmospheric particles, with vacuum aerodynamic diameter (dva) in the size range of 0.2-2μm. A total of 487,570 particles were chemically analyzed with positive and negative ion mass spectra and a large set of single particle mass spectra was collected and analyzed in order to identify the speciation. According to the typical tracer ions from different source types and classification by the ART-2a algorithm which uses source fingerprints for apportioning ambient particles, the major sources of single particles were simulated. Coal combustion, vehicle exhaust, and secondary ion were the most abundant particle sources, contributing 28.5%, 17.8%, and 18.2%, respectively. The fraction with vehicle exhaust species particles decreased slightly with particle size in the condensation mode particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Aircraft exhaust aerosol formation and growth

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    Brown, R.C.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

    1997-12-31

    Aerosol formation and growth in the exhaust plume of the ATTAS aircraft at an altitude of approximately 9 km, burning fuels with 2 ppmm sulfur (`low`) and 266 ppmm (`high`) sulfur has been modeled using an aerosol dynamics model for nucleation, vapor condensation and coagulation, coupled to a 2-dimensional, axisymmetric flow code to treat plume dilution and turbulent mixing. For both the `low` and `high` sulfur fuels, approximately 60% of the available water had condensed within the first 200 m downstream of the exhaust exit. The contrail particle diameters ranged between 0.4 to 1.6 {mu}m. However, the size distributions as a function of radial position for the `low` sulfur plume were broader than the corresponding distributions for the `high` sulfur plume. The model results indicate for a fuel sulfur mass loading of 2 ppmm, sulfuric acid remains a viable activating agent and that the differences in the contrail particle size distributions for sulfur mass loadings between 2 ppmm and 260 ppmm would be difficult to detect. (author) 12 refs.

  3. Sampling and measurement methods for diesel exhaust aerosol

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    Ristimaeki, J.

    2006-07-01

    Awareness of adverse health effects of urban aerosols has increased general interest in aerosol sources. As diesel engines are one significant urban anthropogenic particle source, diesel aerosols have been under intense research during the last decades. This thesis discusses the measurement issues related to the diesel exhaust particles, focusing on the effective density measurement with Elpi-Sumps and Tda-Elpi methods and presents some additional performance issues not discussed in the papers. As the emergence of volatile nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust is sensitive to prevailing circumstances there is a need to properly control the dilution parameters in laboratory measurements in order to obtain repeatable and reproducible results. In addition to the dilution parameters, the effect of ambient temperature on the light duty vehicle exhaust particulate emission was studied. It was found that turbo charged diesel engines were relatively insensitive to changes in ambient temperature whereas particle emissions from naturally aspirated gasoline vehicles were significantly increased at low temperatures. The measurement of effective density and mass of aerosol particles with Dma and impactor was studied and applied to characterisation of diesel exhaust particles. The Tda-Elpi method was used for determination of the volatile mass of diesel exhaust particles as a function of particle size. Based on the measurement results, condensation was suggested to be the main phenomena driving volatile mass transfer to the exhaust particles. Identification of the process and the separation of volatile and solid mass may become important as some health effect studies suggest the volatile fraction to be a key component causing the biological effects of diesel exhaust particles. (orig.)

  4. Health effects of exhaust particles

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    Pihlava, T.; Uuppo, M.; Niemi, S.

    2013-11-01

    This report introduces general information about diesel particles and their health effects. The purpose of this report is to introduce particulate matter pollution and present some recent studies made regarding the health effects of particulate matter. The aim is not to go very deeply into the science, but instead to keep the text understandable for the average layman. Particulate matter is a complex mixture of extremely small particles and liquid droplets. These small particles are made up of a number of components that include for example acids, such as nitrates and sulphates, as well as organic chemicals, metals and dust particles from the soil. Particulate matter comes from several sources, such as transportation emissions, industrial emissions, forest fires, cigarette smoke, volcanic ash and climate variations. Particles are divided into coarse particles with diameters less than 10 ..m, fine particles with diameters smaller than 2.5 ..m and ultra-fine particles with diameters less than 0.1 ..m. The particulate matter in diesel exhaust gas is a highly complex mixture of organic, inorganic, solid, volatile and partly volatile compounds. Many of these particles do not form until they reach the air. Many carcinogenic compounds have been found in diesel exhaust gas and it is considered carcinogenic to humans. Particulate matter can cause several health effects, such as premature death in persons with heart or lung disease, cancer, nonfatal heart attacks, irregular heartbeat, aggravated asthma, decreased lung function and an increase in respiratory symptoms, such as irritation of the airways, coughing or difficulty breathing. It is estimated that in Finland about 1300 people die prematurely due to particles and the economic loss in the EU due to the health effects of particles can be calculated in the billions. Ultra-fine particles are considered to be the most harmful to human health. Ultrafine particles usually make the most of their quantity and surface area

  5. In-situ studies on volatile jet exhaust particle emissions - impacts of fuel sulfur content and environmental conditions on nuclei-mode aerosols

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    Schroeder, F.; Baumann, R.; Petzold, A.; Busen, R.; Schulte, P.; Fiebig, M. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Brock, C.A. [Denver Univ., CO (United States). Dept. of Engineering

    2000-02-01

    In-situ measurements of ultrafine aerosol particle emissions were performed at cruise altitudes behind the DLR ATTAS research jet (RR M45H M501 engines) and a B737-300 aircraft (CFM56-3B1 engines). Measurements were made 0.15-20 seconds after emission as the source aircraft burned fuel with sulfur contents (FSC) of 2.6, 56 or 118 mg kg{sup -1}. Particle size distributions of from 3 to 60 nm diameter were determined using CN-counters with varying lower size detection limits. Volatile particle concentrations in the aircraft plumes strongly increased as diameter decreased toward the sizes of large molecular clusters, illustrating that apparent particle emissions are extremely sensitive to the smallest particle size detectable by the instrument used. Environmental conditions and plume age alone could influence the number of detected ultrafine (volatile) aerosols within an order of magnitude, as well. The observed volatile particle emissions decreased nonlinearly as FSC decreased to 60 mg kg{sup -1}, reaching minimum values of about 2 x 10{sup 17} kg{sup -1} and 2 x 10{sup 16} kg{sup -1} for particles >3 nm and >5 nm, respectively. Volatile particle emissions did not change significantly as FSCs were further reduced below 60 mg kg{sup -1}. Volatile particle emissions did not differ significantly between the two studied engine types. In contrast, soot particle emissions from the modern CFM56-3B1 engines were 4-5 times less (4 x 10{sup 14} kg{sup -1}) than from the older RR M45H M501 engines (1.8 x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1}). Contrail processing has been identified as an efficient sink/quenching parameter for ultrafine particles and reduces the remaining interstitial aerosol by factors 2-10 depending on particle size.

  6. Modelling aerosol number distributions from a vehicle exhaust with an aerosol CFD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albriet, B.; Sartelet, K. N.; Lacour, S.; Carissimo, B.; Seigneur, C.

    2010-03-01

    Vehicular traffic contributes significantly to the aerosol number concentrations at the local scale by emitting primary soot particles and forming secondary nucleated nanoparticles. Because of their potential health effects, more attention is paid to the traffic induced aerosol number distributions. The aim of this work is to explain the phenomenology leading to the formation and the evolution of the aerosol number distributions in the vicinity of a vehicle exhaust using numerical modelling. The emissions are representative of those of a light-duty diesel truck without a diesel particle filter. The atmospheric flow is modelled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to describe the dispersion of pollutants at the local scale. The CFD code, coupled to a modal aerosol model (MAM) describing the aerosol dynamics, is used to model the tailpipe plume of a vehicle with emissions corresponding to urban driving conditions. On the basis of available measurements in Schauer et al. (1999), three surrogate species are chosen to treat the semi-volatile organic compounds in the emissions. The model simulates the formation of the aerosol distribution in the exhaust plume of a vehicle as follows. After emission to the atmosphere, particles are formed by nucleation of sulphuric acid and water vapour depending strongly on the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and on the dilution conditions. The semi-volatile organic compounds are critical for the rapid growth of nanoparticles through condensation. The semi-volatile organic compounds are also important for the evolution of primary soot particles and can contribute substantially to their chemical composition. The most influential parameters for particle formation are the sulphur fuel content, the semi-volatile organic emissions and also the mass and initial diameter of the soot particles emitted. The model is able to take into account the complex competition between nucleation, condensation and dilution, as well as the

  7. GASOLINE VEHICLE EXHAUST PARTICLE SAMPLING STUDY

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    Kittelson, D; Watts, W; Johnson, J; Zarling, D Schauer,J Kasper, K; Baltensperger, U; Burtscher, H

    2003-08-24

    The University of Minnesota collaborated with the Paul Scherrer Institute, the University of Wisconsin (UWI) and Ricardo, Inc to physically and chemically characterize the exhaust plume from recruited gasoline spark ignition (SI) vehicles. The project objectives were: (1) Measure representative particle size distributions from a set of on-road SI vehicles and compare these data to similar data collected on a small subset of light-duty gasoline vehicles tested on a chassis dynamometer with a dilution tunnel using the Unified Drive Cycle, at both room temperature (cold start) and 0 C (cold-cold start). (2) Compare data collected from SI vehicles to similar data collected from Diesel engines during the Coordinating Research Council E-43 project. (3) Characterize on-road aerosol during mixed midweek traffic and Sunday midday periods and determine fleet-specific emission rates. (4) Characterize bulk- and size-segregated chemical composition of the particulate matter (PM) emitted in the exhaust from the gasoline vehicles. Particle number concentrations and size distributions are strongly influenced by dilution and sampling conditions. Laboratory methods were evaluated to dilute SI exhaust in a way that would produce size distributions that were similar to those measured during laboratory experiments. Size fractionated samples were collected for chemical analysis using a nano-microorifice uniform deposit impactor (nano-MOUDI). In addition, bulk samples were collected and analyzed. A mixture of low, mid and high mileage vehicles were recruited for testing during the study. Under steady highway cruise conditions a significant particle signature above background was not measured, but during hard accelerations number size distributions for the test fleet were similar to modern heavy-duty Diesel vehicles. Number emissions were much higher at high speed and during cold-cold starts. Fuel specific number emissions range from 1012 to 3 x 1016 particles/kg fuel. A simple

  8. Filter-based Aerosol Measurement Experiments using Spherical Aerosol Particles under High Temperature and High Pressure

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    Lee, Jong Chan; Jung, Woo Young; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Doo Young [FNC TECH., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Optical Particle Counter (OPC) is used to provide real-time measurement of aerosol concentration and size distribution. Glass fiber membrane filter also be used to measure average mass concentration. Three tests (MTA-1, 2 and 3) have been conducted to study thermal-hydraulic effect, a filtering tendency at given SiO{sub 2} particles. Based on the experimental results, the experiment will be carried out further with a main carrier gas of steam and different aerosol size. The test results will provide representative behavior of the aerosols under various conditions. The aim of the tests, MTA 1, 2 and 3, are to be able to 1) establish the test manuals for aerosol generation, mixing, sampling and measurement system, which defines aerosol preparation, calibration, operating and evaluation method under high pressure and high temperature 2) develop commercial aerosol test modules applicable to the thermal power plant, environmental industry, automobile exhaust gas, chemical plant, HVAC system including nuclear power plant. Based on the test results, sampled aerosol particles in the filter indicate that important parameters affecting aerosol behavior aerosols are 1) system temperature to keep above a evaporation temperature of ethanol and 2) aerosol losses due to the settling by ethanol liquid droplet.

  9. Biogeochemical Recycling on Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, R.; Stewart, B.; Khaing, H.; Tatro, D. P.

    2006-12-01

    Trace elements are recycled on sea-salt particles that are produced and later re-deposited in the surface ocean. This recycling process involves aluminum, iron, and other elements commonly associated with mineral dust. Non-crustal Al can amount to as much as ~ 30% of the total aerosol Al at Bermuda, but this occurs only during a few months of the year when the dust concentrations and deposition rates are low. Simple model calculations suggest that ~15 to 20% of the total Al dry deposition during December and January can be attributed to recycled sea salt, but when dust concentrations are higher, recycling accounts for only ~ 1% of the Al dry deposition. Non-crustal/non-sea salt (NC/NSS) sources account for > 70% of the aerosol Sb, Se, V, and Zn, but differences in the dry deposition velocities for particles of different sizes are such that the amount of Sb and Se recycled on sea spray approaches or exceeds their new inputs to the open ocean from dust and the NC/NSS sources. More recently, recycling on aerosol particles has been found to occur in other environments, including the deserts in the southwestern USA. In this case, the recycling of radionuclides released during nuclear weapons tests many years ago occurs via the resuspension of contaminated soil particles. Studies conducted near Carlsbad, NM have shown that the temporal variability in ^{239,240}Pu and ^{241}Am activities tracks that of Al, a mineral dust indictor, in aerosol samples. Analyses of soil samples from various sites have shown that plutonium is released from the particles by chemical procedures developed for removing iron oxides from mineral particles; this implies that the dust/plutonium relationship is mediated by iron oxides.

  10. AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY

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    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

  11. An overview of aerosol particle sensors for size distribution measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panich Intra

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Fine aerosols are generally referred to airborne particles of diameter in submicron or nanometer size range. Measurement capabilities are required to gain understanding of these particle dynamics. One of the most important physical and chemical parameters is the particle size distribution. The aim of this article is to give an overview of recent development of already existing sensors for particle size distribution measurement based on electrical mobility determination. Available instruments for particle size measurement include a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, an electrical aerosol spectrometer (EAS, an engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS, a bipolar charge aerosol classifier (BCAC, a fast aerosol spectrometer (FAS a differential mobility spectrometer (DMS, and a CMU electrical mobility spectrometer (EMS. The operating principles, as well as detailed physical characteristics of these instruments and their main components consisting of a particle charger, a mobility classifier, and a signal detector, are described. Typical measurements of aerosol from various sources by these instruments compared with an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI are also presented.

  12. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S H; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-06-29

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies.

  13. [Polar neutral organic compounds (POCN) in city aerosols. 2. Measuring of emissions from domestic fuel and vehicle exhaust and from immission particles in Berlin (West)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriske, H J; Freise, R; Schneider, C; Rüden, H

    1987-10-01

    During April and May 1985, some emission samples from private coal firing (domestic fuel) were taken and were fired with two different kind of coal (bituminous and brown coal). Also, measurements were done under different combustion conditions (low and high concentrations of oxygenium during the combustion process). In June and November 1985, some emission samples from heavy diesel-engines were taken in a special tunnel equipment, at different engine conditions. During September 1985, also suspended particulates in a highway traffic tunnel were taken. All these samples were taken using high volume cascade impactors which give a fractionation of the suspended particulates into different particle sizes, according to their retention behaviour in the human respiratory system. The results of these emission samples and samples in the highway tunnel were compared with prior immission measurements of urban suspended particulates in Berlin-West, during January 1984. The etherextractable organic matter (= EEOM) of the total suspended particulate matter (= TPM) was determined using ultrasonic extraction method. The EEOM was separated into an acidic (= AF), a basic (= BF) and a neutral fraction (= NF) by dissolution in acidic and basic agents. Of the neutral fraction (NF), further separation was done into aliphatic compounds (= AIP), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (= PAH) and polar neutral organic compounds (POCN) by using thin layer chromatography. From the PAH and POCN, single compounds were identified by gas chromatographic analysis with dual capillary collumns and internal standard method. All organic fractions were tested to their mutagenic activity in the Salmonella typhimurium mammalian microsome bioassay by Ames. The following results were gained: the neutral fraction (NF) made the highest part of the EEOM (greater than or equal to 60%) whereas the part of the AF amounted to 10-25% and of the basic fraction (BF) to approximatively 5-20%. Making further separation of

  14. Computational Studies of Aerosol Growth, Formation and Measurement in Diesel Exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmetty, M.

    2008-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a correlation between exposure to diesel exhaust aerosols and health problems. As diesel vehicles are widely used in traffic, and they are the most important contributor to the traffic aerosol emissions, the diesel aerosols from on-road engines constitute an important subject for aerosol research. The diesel aerosol from an on-road vehicle engine consists of two externally mixed modes with clearly different chemical compositions. The soot mode consists of carbonaceous, fractal-like particles with a diameter of 30-200 nm, while the nucleation mode is mostly volatile, and has a geometric median diameter of 5-30 nm. The emissions from mobile or stationary diesel power plants using medium or heavy fuel oil, which may have a considerable coarse mode and significantly different chemical charcteristics, are outside the scope of this study. In recent years, the interest into the nucleation mode has been steadily growing, as it seems that the appearance of this particle mode is promoted by some modern vehicle technologies. Unlike soot mode, which is formed mainly during combustion, the nucleation mode experiences significant changes or is even formed during the dilution of the exhaust after the exit from the tailpipe. In this thesis, computational methods are developed for the study of the nucleation mode in diesel exhaust. To improve the possibilities of the real-time measurement of the diesel exhaust, data reduction methodology of the Electrical Low-Pressure Impactor (ELPI) is developed, and a Bayesian algorithm is proposed for this purpose. The other objective of this thesis is the study of the growth and formation of the diesel exhaust nucleation mode during sampling and dilution. Tampere University of Technology Exhaust Aerosol Model (TUTEAM) and a simple, semi-empirical flow model are introduced to further this objective. In addition, we study the nucleation processes in diesel exhaust using classical nucleation theory for H{sub 2}SO

  15. The role of sulfur emission in volatile particle formation in jet aircraft exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärcher, B.; Fahey, D. W.

    Recent in-situ emission measurements of the Concorde in the lower stratosphere point to a surprisingly efficient conversion of fuel sulfur to H2SO4 in the exhaust plume. By means of a comprehensive model, the formation and evolution of aerosol particles and precursors are calculated in the diluting aircraft wake. The results provide strong evidence that high levels of SO3 present in the nascent plume are required to explain the observations of large numbers of nanometer-sized aerosols. Limiting particle formation at emission to keep potential chemical effects on stratospheric ozone small will require control of the sulfur oxidation kinetics during fuel combustion. The similarities between super- and subsonic exhaust plumes suggest that the presence of SO3 in the latter will also be a key limiting factor in new aerosol production.

  16. Optical manipulation of aerosol particle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J. P.; Haddrell, A. E.; Walker, J. S.; Power, R.; Bones, D. L.; Davies, J. F.

    2011-10-01

    Aerosols play a crucial role in many areas of science, ranging from atmospheric chemistry and physics, to drug delivery to the lungs, combustion science and spray drying. The development of new methods to characterise the properties and dynamics of aerosol particles is of crucial importance if the complex role that particles play is to be more fully understood. Optical tweezers provide a valuable new tool to address fundamental questions in aerosol science. Single or multiple particles 1-15 μm in diameter can be manipulated over indefinite timescales using optical tweezing. Linear and non-linear Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies can be used to probe a particle's composition and size. In this paper we will report on the latest developments in the use of holographic optical trapping (HOT) to study aerosols. Although widely used to trap and manipulate arrays of particles in the condensed phase, the application of HOT to aerosols is still in its infancy. We will explore the opportunities provided by the formation of complex optical landscapes for controlling aerosol flow, for comparing the properties of multiple particles, for performing the first ever digital microfluidic operations in the aerosol phase and for examining interparticle interactions that can lead to coalescence/coagulation. Although aerosol coagulation is the primary process driving the evolution of particle size distributions, it remains very poorly understood. Using HOT, we can resolve the time-dependent motion of trapped particles and the light scattering from particles during the coalescence process.

  17. Effect of Pellet Boiler Exhaust on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from α-Pinene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Eetu; Hao, Liqing; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Leskinen, Ari; Kortelainen, Miika; Grigonyte, Julija; Worsnop, Douglas R; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Sippula, Olli; Faiola, Celia L; Virtanen, Annele

    2017-02-07

    Interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and implications for aerosol production, have raised particular scientific interest. Despite active research in this area, real anthropogenic emission sources have not been exploited for anthropogenic-biogenic interaction studies until now. This work examines these interactions using α-pinene and pellet boiler emissions as a model test system. The impact of pellet boiler emissions on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from α-pinene photo-oxidation was studied under atmospherically relevant conditions in an environmental chamber. The aim of this study was to identify which of the major pellet exhaust components (including high nitrogen oxide (NOx), primary particles, or a combination of the two) affected SOA formation from α-pinene. Results demonstrated that high NOx concentrations emitted by the pellet boiler reduced SOA yields from α-pinene, whereas the chemical properties of the primary particles emitted by the pellet boiler had no effect on observed SOA yields. The maximum SOA yield of α-pinene in the presence of pellet boiler exhaust (under high-NOx conditions) was 18.7% and in the absence of pellet boiler exhaust (under low-NOx conditions) was 34.1%. The reduced SOA yield under high-NOx conditions was caused by changes in gas-phase chemistry that led to the formation of organonitrate compounds.

  18. Model studies of volatile diesel exhaust particle formation: organic vapours involved in nucleation and growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, L.; Karl, M.; Rönkkö, T.; Arnold, F.

    2015-02-01

    High concentration of volatile nucleation mode particles (NUP) formed in the atmosphere during exhaust cools and dilutes have hazardous health effects and impair visibility in urban areas. Nucleation mechanisms in diesel exhaust are only poorly understood. We performed model studies using two sectional aerosol dynamics process models AEROFOR and MAFOR on the formation of particles in the exhaust of a diesel engine, equipped with an oxidative after-treatment system and running with low fuel sulphur content (FSC), under laboratory sampling conditions where the dilution system mimics real-world conditions. Different nucleation mechanisms were tested; based on the measured gaseous sulphuric acid (GSA) and non-volatile core and soot particle number concentrations of the raw exhaust, the model simulations showed that the best agreement between model predictions and measurements in terms of particle number size distribution was obtained by barrierless heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation between GSA and semi-volatile organic vapour (for example adipic acid) combined with the homogeneous nucleation of GSA alone. Major growth of the particles was predicted to occur by the same organic vapour at concentrations of (1-2) ×1012cm-3. The pre-existing core and soot mode concentrations had opposite trend on the NUP formation, and maximum NUP formation was predicted if a diesel particle filter (DPF) was used. On the other hand, NUP formation was ceased if the GSA concentration was less than 1010cm-3 which suggests, based on the measurements, the usage of biofuel to prevent volatile particles in diesel exhaust.

  19. Bronchoalveolar inflammation after exposure to diesel exhaust: comparison between unfiltered and particle trap filtered exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudell, B; Blomberg, A; Helleday, R; Ledin, M C; Lundbäck, B; Stjernberg, N; Hörstedt, P; Sandström, T

    1999-08-01

    Air pollution particulates have been identified as having adverse effects on respiratory health. The present study was undertaken to further clarify the effects of diesel exhaust on bronchoalveolar cells and soluble components in normal healthy subjects. The study was also designed to evaluate whether a ceramic particle trap at the end of the tail pipe, from an idling engine, would reduce indices of airway inflammation. The study comprised three exposures in all 10 healthy never smoking subjects; air, diluted diesel exhaust, and diluted diesel exhaust filtered with a ceramic particle trap. The exposures were given for 1 hour in randomised order about 3 weeks apart. The diesel exhaust exposure apperatus has previously been carefully developed and evaluated. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed 24 hours after exposures and the lavage fluids from the bronchial and bronchoalveolar region were analysed for cells and soluble components. The particle trap reduced the mean steady state number of particles by 50%, but the concentrations of the other measured compounds were almost unchanged. It was found that diesel exhaust caused an increase in neutrophils in airway lavage, together with an adverse influence on the phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages in vitro. Furthermore, the diesel exhaust was found to be able to induce a migration of alveolar macrophages into the airspaces, together with reduction in CD3+CD25+ cells. (CD = cluster of differentiation) The use of the specific ceramic particle trap at the end of the tail pipe was not sufficient to completely abolish these effects when interacting with the exhaust from an idling vehicle. The current study showed that exposure to diesel exhaust may induce neutrophil and alveolar macrophage recruitment into the airways and suppress alveolar macrophage function. The particle trap did not cause significant reduction of effects induced by diesel exhaust compared with unfiltered diesel exhaust. Further studies are warranted to

  20. Numerical modelling of the internal mixing by coagulation of black carbon particles in aircraft exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlsson, S.; Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1997-12-31

    When exhaust gases from an aircraft engine mix with ambient air the humidity may reach water saturation and water droplets will form on the available cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). It is still not resolved if the CCN, on which the cloud droplets form, are mainly particles present in the ambient air or particles emitted by the aircraft. It the exhaust from a jet engine the particles are believed to consist mainly of black carbon (BC) and sulfate. The aim is to study, with the help of a numerical model, how a two-component aerosol (i.e. BC and sulfate) in an exhaust trail may be transformed in terms of hygroscopicity by coagulation mixing and how this may depend on the sulfur content in the fuel. (R.P.) 15 refs.

  1. Carbonaceous aerosol in jet engine exhaust: emission characteristics and implications for heterogeneous chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, A.; Schroeder, F.P.; Kaercher, B. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Wessling (Germany). Institut fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Stroem, J. [Stockholm University (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1999-08-01

    Characteristic parameters of black carbon aerosol (BC) emitted from jet engine were measured during ground tests and in-flight behind the same aircraft. Size distribution features were a primary BC mode at a model diameter D {approx} 0.045 {mu}m, and a BC agglomeration mode at D < 0.2 {mu}m. The total BC number concentration at the engine exit was 2.9 x 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} with good agreement between model results and in-flight measured number concentrations of non-volatile particles with D {>=} 0.014 {mu}m. A comparison between total number concentration of BC particles and the non-volatile fraction of the total aerosol at the exit plane suggests that the non-volatile fraction of jet engine exhaust aerosol consists almost completely of BC. In-flight BC mass emission indices ranged from 0.11 to 0.15 g BC (kg fuel){sup -1}. The measured in-flight particle emission value was 1.75 {+-} 0.15 x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1} with corresponding ground test values of 1.0-8.7 x 10{sup 14} kg{sup -1}. Both size distribution properties and mass emission indices can be scaled from ground test to in-flight conditions. Implications for atmosphere BC loading, BC and cirrus interaction and the potential of BC for perturbation of atmospheric chemistry are briefly outlined. (author)

  2. Simulation of the evolution of particle size distributions in a vehicle exhaust plume with unconfined dilution by ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pengzhi; Lignell, David O; Kelly, Kerry E; Lighty, JoAnn S; Sarofim, Adel F; Montgomery, Christopher J

    2005-04-01

    Over the past several years, numerous studies have linked ambient concentrations of particulate matter (PM) to adverse health effects, and more recent studies have identified PM size and surface area as important factors in determining the health effects of PM. This study contributes to a better understanding of the evolution of particle size distributions in exhaust plumes with unconfined dilution by ambient air. It combines computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with an aerosol dynamics model to examine the effects of different streamlines in an exhaust plume, ambient particle size distributions, and vehicle and wind speed on the particle size distribution in an exhaust plume. CFD was used to calculate the flow field and gas mixing for unconfined dilution of a vehicle exhaust plume, and the calculated dilution ratios were then used as input to the aerosol dynamics simulation. The results of the study show that vehicle speed affected the particle size distribution of an exhaust plume because increasing vehicle speed caused more rapid dilution and inhibited coagulation. Ambient particle size distributions had an effect on the smaller sized particles (approximately 10 nm range under some conditions) and larger sized particles (>2 microm) of the particle size distribution. The ambient air particle size distribution affects the larger sizes of the exhaust plume because vehicle exhaust typically contains few particles larger than 2 microm. Finally, the location of a streamline in the exhaust plume had little effect on the particle size distribution; the particle size distribution along any streamline at a distance x differed by less than 5% from the particle size distributions along any other streamline at distance x.

  3. Comparison of primary and secondary particle formation from natural gas engine exhaust and of their volatility characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanen, Jenni; Simonen, Pauli; Saarikoski, Sanna; Timonen, Hilkka; Kangasniemi, Oskari; Saukko, Erkka; Hillamo, Risto; Lehtoranta, Kati; Murtonen, Timo; Vesala, Hannu; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2017-07-01

    Natural gas usage in the traffic and energy production sectors is a growing trend worldwide; thus, an assessment of its effects on air quality, human health and climate is required. Engine exhaust is a source of primary particulate emissions and secondary aerosol precursors, which both contribute to air quality and can cause adverse health effects. Technologies, such as cleaner engines or fuels, that produce less primary and secondary aerosols could potentially significantly decrease atmospheric particle concentrations and their adverse effects. In this study, we used a potential aerosol mass (PAM) chamber to investigate the secondary aerosol formation potential of natural gas engine exhaust. The PAM chamber was used with a constant UV-light voltage, which resulted in relatively long equivalent atmospheric ages of 11 days at most. The studied retro-fitted natural gas engine exhaust was observed to form secondary aerosol. The mass of the total aged particles, i.e., particle mass measured downstream of the PAM chamber, was 6-268 times as high as the mass of the emitted primary exhaust particles. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation potential was measured to be 9-20 mg kgfuel-1. The total aged particles mainly consisted of organic matter, nitrate, sulfate and ammonium, with the fractions depending on exhaust after-treatment and the engine parameters used. Also, the volatility, composition and concentration of the total aged particles were found to depend on the engine operating mode, catalyst temperature and catalyst type. For example, a high catalyst temperature promoted the formation of sulfate particles, whereas a low catalyst temperature promoted nitrate formation. However, in particular, the concentration of nitrate needed a long time to stabilize - more than half an hour - which complicated the conclusions but also indicates the sensitivity of nitrate measurements on experimental parameters such as emission source and system temperatures. Sulfate was

  4. Comparison of primary and secondary particle formation from natural gas engine exhaust and of their volatility characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Alanen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas usage in the traffic and energy production sectors is a growing trend worldwide; thus, an assessment of its effects on air quality, human health and climate is required. Engine exhaust is a source of primary particulate emissions and secondary aerosol precursors, which both contribute to air quality and can cause adverse health effects. Technologies, such as cleaner engines or fuels, that produce less primary and secondary aerosols could potentially significantly decrease atmospheric particle concentrations and their adverse effects. In this study, we used a potential aerosol mass (PAM chamber to investigate the secondary aerosol formation potential of natural gas engine exhaust. The PAM chamber was used with a constant UV-light voltage, which resulted in relatively long equivalent atmospheric ages of 11 days at most. The studied retro-fitted natural gas engine exhaust was observed to form secondary aerosol. The mass of the total aged particles, i.e., particle mass measured downstream of the PAM chamber, was 6–268 times as high as the mass of the emitted primary exhaust particles. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation potential was measured to be 9–20 mg kgfuel−1. The total aged particles mainly consisted of organic matter, nitrate, sulfate and ammonium, with the fractions depending on exhaust after-treatment and the engine parameters used. Also, the volatility, composition and concentration of the total aged particles were found to depend on the engine operating mode, catalyst temperature and catalyst type. For example, a high catalyst temperature promoted the formation of sulfate particles, whereas a low catalyst temperature promoted nitrate formation. However, in particular, the concentration of nitrate needed a long time to stabilize – more than half an hour – which complicated the conclusions but also indicates the sensitivity of nitrate measurements on experimental parameters such as emission

  5. Primary particulate emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from idling diesel vehicle exhaust in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Hu, Qihou; Liu, Tengyu; Wang, Xinming; Zhang, Yanli; Song, Wei; Sun, Yele; Bi, Xinhui; Yu, Jianzhen; Yang, Weiqiang; Huang, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhou; Huang, Zhonghui; He, Quanfu; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; George, Christian

    2017-09-01

    In China diesel vehicles dominate the primary emission of particulate matters from on-road vehicles, and they might also contribute substantially to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). In this study tailpipe exhaust of three typical in-use diesel vehicles under warm idling conditions was introduced directly into an indoor smog chamber with a 30m 3 Teflon reactor to characterize primary emissions and SOA formation during photo-oxidation. The emission factors of primary organic aerosol (POA) and black carbon (BC) for the three types of Chinese diesel vehicles ranged 0.18-0.91 and 0.15-0.51gkg-fuel -1 , respectively; and the SOA production factors ranged 0.50-1.8gkg-fuel -1 and SOA/POA ratios ranged 0.7-3.7 with an average of 2.2. The fuel-based POA emission factors and SOA production factors from this study for idling diesel vehicle exhaust were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than those reported in previous studies for idling gasoline vehicle exhaust. The emission factors for total particle numbers were 0.65-4.0×10 15 particleskg-fuel -1 , and particles with diameters less than 50nm dominated in total particle numbers. Traditional C 2 -C 12 precursor non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) could only explain less than 3% of the SOA formed during aging and contribution from other precursors including intermediate volatile organic compounds (IVOC) needs further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Formation of secondary aerosols from gasoline vehicle exhaust when mixing with SO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur dioxide (SO2 can enhance the formation of secondary aerosols from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs, but its influence on secondary aerosol formation from anthropogenic VOCs, particularly complex mixtures like vehicle exhaust, remains uncertain. Gasoline vehicle exhaust (GVE and SO2, a typical pollutant from coal burning, are directly co-introduced into a smog chamber, in this study, to investigate the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA and sulfate aerosols through photooxidation. New particle formation was enhanced, while substantial sulfate was formed through the oxidation of SO2 in the presence of high concentration of SO2. Homogenous oxidation by OH radicals contributed a negligible fraction to the conversion of SO2 to sulfate, and instead the oxidation by stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs, formed from alkenes in the exhaust reacting with ozone, dominated the conversion of SO2. After 5 h of photochemical aging, GVE's SOA production factor revealed an increase by 60–200 % in the presence of high concentration of SO2. The increase could principally be attributed to acid-catalyzed SOA formation as evidenced by the strong positive linear correlation (R2 = 0.97 between the SOA production factor and in situ particle acidity calculated by the AIM-II model. A high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS resolved OA's relatively lower oxygen-to-carbon (O : C (0.44 ± 0.02 and higher hydrogen-to-carbon (H : C (1.40 ± 0.03 molar ratios for the GVE / SO2 mixture, with a significantly lower estimated average carbon oxidation state (OSc of −0.51 ± 0.06 than −0.19 ± 0.08 for GVE alone. The relative higher mass loading of OA in the experiments with SO2 might be a significant explanation for the lower SOA oxidation degree.

  7. Model studies of volatile diesel exhaust particle formation: are organic vapours involved in nucleation and growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, L.; Karl, M.; Rönkkö, T.; Arnold, F.

    2015-09-01

    A high concentration of volatile nucleation mode particles (NUP) formed in the atmosphere when the exhaust cools and dilutes has hazardous health effects and it impairs the visibility in urban areas. Nucleation mechanisms in diesel exhaust are only poorly understood. We performed model studies using two sectional aerosol dynamics process models AEROFOR and MAFOR on the formation of particles in the exhaust of a diesel engine, equipped with an oxidative after-treatment system and running with low fuel sulfur content (FSC) fuel, under laboratory sampling conditions where the dilution system mimics real-world conditions. Different nucleation mechanisms were tested. Based on the measured gaseous sulfuric acid (GSA) and non-volatile core and soot particle number concentrations of the raw exhaust, the model simulations showed that the best agreement between model predictions and measurements in terms of particle number size distribution was obtained by barrier-free heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation between the GSA and a semi-volatile organic vapour combined with the homogeneous nucleation of GSA alone. Major growth of the particles was predicted to occur due to the similar organic vapour at concentrations of (1-2) × 1012 cm-3. The pre-existing core and soot mode concentrations had an opposite trend on the NUP formation, and the maximum NUP formation was predicted if a diesel particle filter (DPF) was used. On the other hand, the model predicted that the NUP formation ceased if the GSA concentration in the raw exhaust was less than 1010 cm-3, which was the case when biofuel was used.

  8. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution.

  9. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  10. Space Shuttle exhausted aluminum oxide - A measured particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Purgold, G. C.; Edahl, R. A.; Winstead, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminum oxide (A2O3) particles were collected from the Space Shuttle exhaust plume immediately following the launch of STS-34 on October 18, 1989. A2O3 samples were obtained at 2.4, 3.0, 3.2, and 7.4 km in altitude. The samples were analyzed using SEM to develope particle size distributions. There were no indications that the particle size distribution changed as a function of altitude. The particle number concentrations per cubic meter of air sampled for the four collections was found to fit an exponential expression.

  11. Mutagenicity of Diesel and Soy Biodiesel Exhaust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagenicity Of Diesel And Soy Biodiesel Exhaust Particles E Mutlua,b' SH Warrenb, PP Matthewsb, CJ Kingb, B Prestonc, MD Haysb, DG Nashb,ct, WP Linakb, MI Gilmourb, and DM DeMarinib aUniversity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC bU.S. Environmental Agency, Research Triangle Pa...

  12. In situ exhaust cloud measurements. [particle size distribution and cloud physics of rocket exhaust clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wornom, D.

    1980-01-01

    Airborne in situ exhaust cloud measurements were conducted to obtain definitions of cloud particle size range, Cl2 content, and HCl partitioning. Particle size distribution data and Cl2 measurements were made during the May, August, and September 1977 Titan launches. The measurements of three basic effluents - HCl, NO sub X, and particles - against minutes after launch are plotted. The maximum observed HCl concentration to the maximum Cl2 concentration are compared and the ratios of the Cl2 to the HCl is calculated.

  13. Dilution and aerosol dynamics within a diesel car exhaust plume—CFD simulations of on-road measurement conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrner, U.; von Löwis, S.; Vehkamäki, H.; Wehner, B.; Bräsel, S.; Hermann, M.; Stratmann, F.; Kulmala, M.; Wiedensohler, A.

    Vehicle particle emissions are studied extensively because of their health effects, contribution to ambient PM levels and possible impact on climate. The aim of this work was to obtain a better understanding of secondary particle formation and growth in a diluting vehicle exhaust plume using 3-d information of simulations together with measurements. Detailed coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and aerosol dynamics simulations have been conducted for H 2SO 4-H 2O and soot particles based on measurements within a vehicle exhaust plume under real conditions on public roads. Turbulent diffusion of soot and nucleation particles is responsible for the measured decrease of number concentrations within the diesel car exhaust plume and decreases coagulation rates. Particle size distribution measurements at 0.45 and 0.9 m distance to the tailpipe indicate a consistent soot mode (particle diameter Dp˜50 nm) at variable operating conditions. Soot mode number concentrations reached up to 10 13 m -3 depending on operating conditions and mixing. For nucleation particles the simulations showed a strong sensitivity to the spatial dilution pattern, related cooling and exhaust H 2SO 4(g). The highest simulated nucleation rates were about 0.05-0.1 m from the axis of the plume. The simulated particle number concentration pattern is in approximate accordance with measured concentrations, along the jet centreline and 0.45 and 0.9 m from the tailpipe. Although the test car was run with ultralow sulphur fuel, high nucleation particle ( Dp⩽15 nm) concentrations (>10 13 m -3) were measured under driving conditions of strong acceleration or the combination of high vehicle speed (>140 km h -1) and high engine rotational speed (>3800 revolutions per minute (rpm)). Strong mixing and cooling caused rapid nucleation immediately behind the tailpipe, so that the highest particle number concentrations were recorded at a distance, x=0.45 m behind the tailpipe. The simulated growth of H 2SO 4

  14. Nuclear track radiography of 'hot' aerosol particles

    CERN Document Server

    Boulyga, S F; Kievets, M K; Lomonosova, E M; Zhuk, I V; Yaroshevich, O I; Perelygin, V P; Petrova, R I; Brandt, R; Vater, P

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear track radiography was applied to identify aerosol 'hot' particles which contain elements of nuclear fuel and fallout after Chernobyl NPP accident. For the determination of the content of transuranium elements in radioactive aerosols the measurement of the alpha-activity of 'hot' particles by SSNTD was used in this work, as well as radiography of fission fragments formed as a result of the reactions (n,f) and (gamma,f) in the irradiation of aerosol filters by thermal neutrons and high energy gamma quanta. The technique allowed the sizes and alpha-activity of 'hot' particles to be determined without extracting them from the filter, as well as the determination of the uranium content and its enrichment by sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Pu isotopes. Sensitivity of determination of alpha activity by fission method is 5x10 sup - sup 6 Bq per particle. The software for the system of image analysis was created. It ensured the identification of track clusters on an optical imag...

  15. Hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous hydrogen chloride partitioning in a cloud contaminated by solid rocket exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Partitioning of hydrogen chloride between hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous HCl in the lower atmosphere was experimentally investigated in a solid rocket exhaust cloud diluted with humid ambient air. Airborne measurements were obtained of gaseous HCl, total HCl, relative humidity and temperature to evaluate the conditions under which aerosol formation occurs in the troposphere in the presence of hygroscopic HCl vapor. Equilibrium predictions of HCl aerosol formation accurately predict the measured HCl partitioning over a range of total HCl concentrations from 0.6 to 16 ppm.

  16. Formation of secondary inorganic aerosols by power plant emissions exhausted through cooling towers in Saxony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinneburg, Detlef; Renner, Eberhard; Wolke, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The fraction of ambient PM10 that is due to the formation of secondary inorganic particulate sulfate and nitrate from the emissions of two large, brown-coal-fired power stations in Saxony (East Germany) is examined. The power stations are equipped with natural-draft cooling towers. The flue gases are directly piped into the cooling towers, thereby receiving an additionally intensified uplift. The exhausted gas-steam mixture contains the gases CO, CO2, NO, NO2, and SO2, the directly emitted primary particles, and additionally, an excess of 'free' sulfate ions in water solution, which, after the desulfurization steps, remain non-neutralized by cations. The precursor gases NO2 and SO2 are capable of forming nitric and sulfuric acid by several pathways. The acids can be neutralized by ammonia and generate secondary particulate matter by heterogeneous condensation on preexisting particles. The simulations are performed by a nested and multi-scale application of the online-coupled model system LM-MUSCAT. The Local Model (LM; recently renamed as COSMO) of the German Weather Service performs the meteorological processes, while the Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport Model (MUSCAT) includes the transport, the gas phase chemistry, as well as the aerosol chemistry (thermodynamic ammonium-sulfate-nitrate-water system). The highest horizontal resolution in the inner region of Saxony is 0.7 km. One summer and one winter episode, each realizing 5 weeks of the year 2002, are simulated twice, with the cooling tower emissions switched on and off, respectively. This procedure serves to identify the direct and indirect influences of the single plumes on the formation and distribution of the secondary inorganic aerosols. Surface traces of the individual tower plumes can be located and distinguished, especially in the well-mixed boundary layer in daytime. At night, the plumes are decoupled from the surface. In no case does the resulting contribution of the cooling tower emissions to PM10

  17. Buildup of aerosol precursor gases and sulfur-induced activation of soot in nascent jet aircraft exhaust plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Hirschberg, M.M.; Fabian, P. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung; Gerz, T. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    Research issues concerning the chemical transformation of exhaust trace gases are summarized. The photochemical evolution of NO{sub x} early in the plume is strongly coupled to plume mixing. Substantial amounts of HNO{sub 3} are generated in nascent plumes even if no NO{sub 2} is emitted. The production of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} becomes very efficient if part of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. Each emitted soot particle can acquire 1-10% by mass fully oxidized sulfur molecules prior to binary homogeneous nucleation, if a few percent of the exhaust SO{sub x} are emitted as SO{sub 3}, indicating an important activation pathway for soot, and leading to a marked enhancement of new aerosol formation and growth rates. (author) 11 refs.

  18. Effect of aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions on near field plume aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

    1997-12-31

    Based on estimated exit plane sulfur speciation, a two dimensional, axisymmetric flow field model with coupled gas phase oxidation kinetics and aerosol nucleation and growth dynamics is used to evaluate the effect of fuel sulfur oxidation in the engine on the formation and growth of volatile H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O aerosols in the near field plume. The conversion of fuel sulfur to sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid in the engine is predicted to significantly increase the number density and surface area density of volatile H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O aerosols and the chemical activation of exhaust soot particulates. This analysis indicates the need for experimental measurements of exhaust SO{sub x} emissions to fully assess the atmospheric impact of aircraft emissions. (author) 18 refs.; Submitted to Geophysical Research Letters

  19. Effect of measurement protocol on organic aerosol measurements of exhaust emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngseob; Sartelet, Karine; Seigneur, Christian; Charron, Aurélie; Besombes, Jean-Luc; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc; Marchand, Nicolas; Polo, Lucie

    2016-09-01

    Exhaust emissions of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) from passenger vehicles are usually estimated only for the particle phase via the total particulate matter measurements. However, they also need to be estimated for the gas phase, as they are semi-volatile. To better estimate SVOC emission factors of passenger vehicles, a measurement campaign using a chassis dynamometer was conducted with different instruments: (1) a constant volume sampling (CVS) system in which emissions were diluted with filtered air and sampling was performed on filters and polyurethane foams (PUF) and (2) a Dekati Fine Particle Sampler (FPS) in which emissions were diluted with purified air and sampled with on-line instruments (PTR-ToF-MS, HR-ToF-AMS, MAAP, CPC). Significant differences in the concentrations of organic carbon (OC) measured by the instruments are observed. The differences can be explained by sampling artefacts, differences between (1) the time elapsed during sampling (in the case of filter and PUF sampling) and (2) the time elapsed from emission to measurement (in the case of on-line instruments), which vary from a few seconds to 15 min, and by the different dilution factors. To relate elapsed times and measured concentrations of OC, the condensation of SVOC between the gas and particle phases is simulated with a dynamic aerosol model. The simulation results allow us to understand the relation between elapsed times and concentrations in the gas and particle phases. They indicate that the characteristic times to reach thermodynamic equilibrium between gas and particle phases may be as long as 8 min. Therefore, if the elapsed time is less than this characteristic time to reach equilibrium, gas-phase SVOC are not at equilibrium with the particle phase and a larger fraction of emitted SVOC will be in the gas phase than estimated by equilibrium theory, leading to an underestimation of emitted OC if only the particle phase is considered or if the gas-phase SVOC are estimated

  20. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  1. CAMEX-3 CLOUD AND AEROSOL PARTICLE CHARACTERIZATION VIDEO V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud and aerosol particles are exposed to laser light to measure particle size from 0.3 micrometer to 6.4 millimeter, and both size and shape between 40 micrometer...

  2. CAMEX-3 CLOUD AND AEROSOL PARTICLE CHARACTERIZATION (CAPAC) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud and aerosol particles are exposed to laser light to measure particle size from 0.3 micrometer to 6.4 millimeter, and both size and shape between 40 micrometer...

  3. Physical properties of the arctic summer aerosol particles in relation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The sea-salt particles of marine origin generated within the Arctic circle are identified as the main source of the Arctic summer aerosols. Total number concentration of aerosol particles increases with increase in wind speed, the increase being more when winds from open leads over the oceanic sector are reaching the ...

  4. The Formation of Hydrochloric Acid Aerosol from the Interaction of the Space Shuttle Rocket Exhaust with the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of conditions of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity under which hydrochloric acid aerosol is expected upon interaction of the proposed space shuttle rocket exhaust products with the atmosphere.

  5. Effect of aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions on near field plume aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Anderson, M. R.; Kolb, C. E.

    A two dimensional, axisymmetric flowfield model with coupled gas phase oxidation kinetics and aerosol nucleation and growth dynamics is used to evaluate the effect of fuel sulfur oxidation in the Concorde engine on the formation and growth of volatile H2SO4/H2O aerosols in the near field plume. Rased on estimated exit plane sulfur speciation, results are shown for between 2% and 20% conversion of the fuel sulfur to S(VI) (SO3 and H2SO4) in engine. The primary motivation is to provide estimates for the changes in the number density and surface area density of sulfuric acid aerosols due to sulfur oxidation in the engine. This analysis indicates the need for experimental measurements of sulfur emissions at the exhaust exit, in addition to soot properties, to fully assess the atmospheric impact of aircraft emissions.

  6. Spectral characterization of biological aerosol particles using two-wavelength excited laser-induced fluorescence and elastic scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Lin, Horn-Bond; Huston, Alan L; Eversole, Jay D

    2011-03-28

    A two-wavelength laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument has been developed and used to characterize individual biological aerosol particles, including biological warfare (BW) agent surrogates. Fluorescence in discrete spectral bands from widely different species, and also from similar species under different growth conditions were measured and compared. The two-wavelength excitation approach was found to increase discrimination among several biological materials, and especially with respect to diesel exhaust particles, a common interferent for LIF BW detection systems. The spectral characteristics of a variety of biological materials and ambient air components have been studied as a function of aerosol particle size and incident fluence.

  7. Particle size distributions of several commonly used seeding aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosswy, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the course of experimentation, no solid particle powder could be found which produced an aerosol with a narrow particle size distribution when fluidization was the only flow process used in producing the aerosol. The complication of adding particle size fractionation processes to the aerosol generation effort appears to be avoidable. In this regard, a simple sonic orifice is found to be effective in reducing the percentage of agglomerates in the several metal oxide powders tested. Marginally beneficial results are obtained for a 0.5/99.5 percent by weight mixture of the flow agent and metal oxide powder. However, agglomeration is observed to be enhanced when the flow agent percentage is increased to 5 percent. Liquid atomization using the Collison nebulizer as well as a version of the Laskin nozzle resulted in polydispersed aerosols with particle size distributions heavily weighted by the small particle end of the size spectrum. The aerosol particle size distributions produced by the vaporization/condensation seeder are closer to the ideal monodispersed aerosol than any of the other aerosols tested. In addition, this seeding approach affords a measure of control over particle size and particle production rate.

  8. Secondary aerosol formation from photochemical aging of aircraft exhaust in a smog chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Miracolo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were performed to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on fine particle emissions from an in-use CFM56-2B gas turbine engine mounted on a KC-135 Stratotanker airframe. Emissions were sampled into a portable smog chamber from a rake inlet installed one-meter downstream of the engine exit plane of a parked and chocked aircraft. The chamber was then exposed to sunlight and/or UV lights to initiate photo-oxidation. Separate tests were performed at different engine loads (4, 7, 30, 85 %. Photo-oxidation created substantial secondary particulate matter (PM, greatly exceeding the direct PM emissions at each engine load after an hour or less of aging at typical summertime conditions. After several hours of photo-oxidation, the ratio of secondary-to-primary PM mass was on average 35 ± 4.1, 17 ± 2.5, 60 ± 2.2, and 2.7 ± 1.1 for the 4, 7, 30, and 85 % load experiments, respectively. The composition of secondary PM formed strongly depended on load. At 4 % load, secondary PM was dominated by secondary organic aerosol (SOA. At higher loads, the secondary PM was mainly secondary sulfate. A traditional SOA model that accounts for SOA formation from single-ring aromatics and other volatile organic compounds underpredicts the measured SOA formation by ~60 % at 4 % load and ~40 % at 85 % load. Large amounts of lower-volatiliy organic vapors were measured in the exhaust; they represent a significant pool of SOA precursors that are not included in traditional SOA models. These results underscore the importance of accounting for atmospheric processing when assessing the influence of aircraft emissions on ambient PM levels. Models that do not account for this processing will likely underpredict the contribution of aircraft emissions to local and regional air pollution.

  9. Electrospray ionizer for mass spectrometry of aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Siqin; Hogan, Chris; Li, Lin; Liu, Benjamin Y. H.; Naqwi, Amir; Romay, Francisco

    2017-09-19

    A device and method are disclosed to apply ESI-based mass spectroscopy to submicrometer and nanometer scale aerosol particles. Unipolar ionization is utilized to charge the particles in order to collect them electrostatically on the tip of a tungsten rod. Subsequently, the species composing the collected particles are dissolved by making a liquid flow over the tungsten rod. This liquid with dissolved aerosol contents is formed into highly charged droplets, which release unfragmented ions for mass spectroscopy, such as time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. The device is configured to operate in a switching mode, wherein aerosol deposition occurs while solvent delivery is turned off and vice versa.

  10. Sources of optically active aerosol particles over the Amazon forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, Pascal; Graham, Bim; Roberts, Gregory C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Maenhaut, Willy; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    Size-fractionated ambient aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site and a primary rainforest site in the Brazilian Amazon Basin during two field campaigns (April-May and September-October 1999), as part of the European contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA-EUSTACH). The samples were analyzed for up to 19 trace elements by particle-induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE), for equivalent black carbon (BC e) by a light reflectance technique and for mass concentration by gravimetric analysis. Additionally, we made continuous measurements of absorption and light scattering by aerosol particles. The vertical chemical composition gradients at the forest site have been discussed in a companion article (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres 108 (D18), 4591 (doi:4510.1029/2003JD003465)). In this article, we present the results of a source identification and quantitative apportionment study of the wet and dry season aerosols, including an apportionment of the measured scattering and absorption properties of the total aerosol in terms of the identified aerosol sources. Source apportionments (obtained from absolute principal component analysis) revealed that the wet and dry season aerosols contained the same three main components, but in different (absolute and relative) amounts: the wet season aerosol consisted mainly of a natural biogenic component, whereas pyrogenic aerosols dominated the dry season aerosol mass. The third component identified was soil dust, which was often internally mixed with the biomass-burning aerosol. All three components contributed significantly to light extinction during both seasons. At the pasture site, up to 47% of the light absorption was attributed to biogenic particles during the wet season, and up to 35% at the tower site during the wet-to-dry transition period. The results from the present study suggest that, in addition to pyrogenic particles, biogenic and soil dust aerosols must be

  11. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pousse-Nottelmann

    2015-08-01

    aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO. The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen (WBF process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases the cloud droplet number concentration with possible implications for the ice crystal number

  12. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidovits, Paul [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Aerosols containing black carbon (and some specific types of organic particulate matter) directly absorb incoming light, heating the atmosphere. In addition, all aerosol particles backscatter solar light, leading to a net-cooling effect. Indirect effects involve hydrophilic aerosols, which serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud cover and cloud stability, impacting both atmospheric radiation balance and precipitation patterns. At night, all clouds produce local warming, but overall clouds exert a net-cooling effect on the Earth. The effect of aerosol radiative forcing on climate may be as large as that of the greenhouse gases, but predominantly opposite in sign and much more uncertain. The uncertainties in the representation of aerosol interactions in climate models makes it problematic to use model projections to guide energy policy. The objective of our program is to reduce the uncertainties in the aerosol radiative forcing in the two areas highlighted in the ASR Science and Program Plan. That is, (1) addressing the direct effect by correlating particle chemistry and morphology with particle optical properties (i.e. absorption, scattering, extinction), and (2) addressing the indirect effect by correlating particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity with particle size, chemistry, and morphology. In this connection we are systematically studying particle formation, oxidation, and the effects of particle coating. The work is specifically focused on carbonaceous particles where the uncertainties in the climate relevant properties are the highest. The ongoing work consists of laboratory experiments and related instrument inter-comparison studies both coordinated with field and modeling studies, with the aim of providing reliable data to represent aerosol processes in climate models. The work is performed in the aerosol laboratory at Boston College. At the center of our laboratory setup are two main sources for the production of aerosol particles: (a

  13. The optical manipulation and characterisation of aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jonathan P.

    2008-08-01

    Aerosols play a crucial role in many areas of science, ranging from atmospheric chemistry and physics, to pharmaceutical aerosols and drug delivery to the lungs, to combustion science and spray drying. The development of new methods for characterising the properties and dynamics of aerosol particles is of crucial importance if the complex role that particles play is to be more fully understood. Optical tweezers provide a valuable new tool to address fundamental questions in aerosol science. Single or multiple particles 1-15 μm in diameter can be manipulated for indefinite timescales. Linear and non-linear Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies can be used to probe particle composition, phase, component mixing state, and size. In particular, size can be determined with nanometre accuracy, allowing accurate measurements of the thermodynamic properties of aerosols, the kinetics of particle transformation and of light absorption. Further, the simultaneous manipulation of multiple particles in parallel optical traps provides a method for performing comparative measurements on particles of different composition. We will present some latest work in which optical tweezers are used to characterise aerosol dynamics, demonstrating that optical tweezers can find application in studies of hygroscopicity, the mixing state of different chemical components, including the phase separation of immiscible phases, and the kinetics of chemical transformation.

  14. Combined particle emission reduction and heat recovery from combustion exhaust - A novel approach for small wood-fired appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerer, A.; Poeschl, U.; Niessner, R. [Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany). Institute of Hydrochemistry; Schmatloch, V. [EMPA, Swiss Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    Replacing fossil fuels by renewable sources of energy is one approach to address the problem of global warming due to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Wood combustion can help to replace fuel oil or gas. It is advisable, however, to use modern technology for combustion and exhaust gas after-treatment in order to achieve best efficiency and avoid air quality problems due to high emission levels often related to small scale wood combustion. In this study, simultaneous combustion particle deposition and heat recovery from the exhaust of two commercially available wood-fired appliances has been investigated. The experiments were performed with a miniature pipe bundle heat exchanger operating in the exhaust gas lines of a fully automated pellet burner or a closed fireplace. The system has been characterised for a wide range of aerosol inlet temperatures (135-295 {sup circle} C) and flow velocities (0.13-1.0ms{sup -1}), and particle deposition efficiencies up to 95% have been achieved. Deposition was dominated by thermophoresis and diffusion and increased with the average temperature difference and retention time in the heat exchanger. The aerosols from the two different appliances exhibited different deposition characteristics, which can be attributed to enhanced deposition of the nucleation mode particles generated in the closed fire place. The measured deposition efficiencies can be described by simple linear parameterisations derived from laboratory studies. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of thermophoretic particle removal from biomass burning flue gas and support the development of modified heat exchanger systems with enhanced capability for simultaneous heat recovery and particle deposition. (author)

  15. Aerosol vertical distribution, new particle formation, and jet aircraft particle emissions in the free troposhere and tropopause region; Vertikalverteilung und Neubildungsprozesse des Aerosols und partikelfoermige Flugzeugemissionen in der freien Troposphaere und Tropopausenregion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F.P.

    2000-07-01

    A contribution to the understanding of natural and anthropogenously induced particle formation as well as aerosol physical transformation processes within the free troposphere (FT) is introduced. Documentation and interpretation of empirical data relevant with respect to possible climatologic impact of anthropogenous aerosol emissions into the atmosphere is presented. The first section describes new technique for high spatial resolution measurements of ultrafine aerosol particles by condensation nucleus counters (CNCs), a necessary prerequisite for the observation of natural particle formation and jet aircraft emissions. The second section illustrates vertical distribution and variability ranges of the aerosol in the FT and the tropopause region (TP). Typical microphysical states of the atmospheric aerosol within the Northern Hemisphere are documented by means of systematic measurements during more than 60 flight missions. Simple mathematical parameterizations of the aerosol vertical distribution and aerosol size distributions are developed. Important aerosol sources within the FT are localized and possible aerosol formation processes are discussed. The third section is focussed on jet-engine particle emissions within the FT and TP. A unique inflight experiment for detection of extremely high concentrations (>10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}) of extremely small (donw to <3 nm) aerosols inside the exhaust plumes of several jet aircraft is described. Particle emission indices and emission-controlling parameters are deduced. Most important topic is the impact of fuel sulfur content of kerosine on number, size and chemical composition of jet particle emissions. Generalized results are parameterized in form of lognormal aerosol particle size distributions. (orig.) [German] Ein Beitrag zum Verstaendnis natuerlicher und anthropogen induzierter Aerosolneubildung sowie physikalischer Aerosolumwandlung in der freien Troposphaere wird vorgestellt. Empirisch gewonnenes Datenmaterial wird

  16. Toxicity of Exhaust Gases and Particles from IC-Engines -- International Activities Survey (EngToxIn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, J. [University for Applied Sciences, Biel-Bienne (Switzerland)

    2011-09-15

    Exhaust gases from engines, as well as from other combustion -- and industrial processes contain different gaseous, semi volatile and solid compounds which are toxic. Some of these compounds are not regarded by the respective legislations; some new substances may appear, due to the progressing technical developments and new systems of exhaust gas aftertreatment. The toxical effects of exhaust gases as whole aerosols (i.e. all gaseous components together with particle matter and nanoparticles) can be investigated in a global way, by exposing the living cells, or cell cultures to the aerosol, which means a simultaneous superposition of all toxic effects from all active components. On several places researchers showed, that this method offers more objective results of validation of toxicity, than other methods used up to date. It also enables a relatively quick insight in the toxic effects with consideration of all superimposed influences of the aerosol. This new methodology can be applied for all kinds of emission sources. It bears potentials of giving new contributions to the present state of knowledge in this domain and can in some cases lead to a change of paradigma. The present report gives short information about the activities concerning the research on toxicity of exhaust gases from IC-engines in different countries. It also gives some ideas about research of information sources. It can be stated that there are worldwide a lot of activities concerning health effects. They have different objectives, different approaches and methodologies and rarely the results can be directly compared to each other. Nevertheless there also are some common lines and with appropriate efforts there are possible ways to establish the harmonised biological test procedures.

  17. Secondary organic aerosol formation from photochemical aging of light-duty gasoline vehicle exhausts in a smog chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Wang, X.; Deng, W.; Hu, Q.; Ding, X.; Zhang, Y.; He, Q.; Zhang, Z.; Lü, S.; Bi, X.; Chen, J.; Yu, J.

    2015-08-01

    In China, a rapid increase in passenger vehicles has led to the growing concern of vehicle exhaust as an important source of anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in megacities hard hit by haze. In this study, the SOA formation of emissions from two idling light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) (Euro 1 and Euro 4) operated in China was investigated in a 30 m3 smog chamber. Five photo-oxidation experiments were carried out at 25 °C with relative humidity at around 50 %. After aging at an OH exposure of 5 × 106 molecules cm-3 h, the formed SOA was 12-259 times as high as primary organic aerosol (POA). The SOA production factors (PF) were 0.001-0.044 g kg-1 fuel, comparable with those from the previous studies at comparable OH exposure. This quite lower OH exposure than that in typical atmospheric conditions might however lead to the underestimation of the SOA formation potential from LDGVs. Effective SOA yields in this study were well fit by a one-product gas-particle partitioning model but quite lower than those of a previous study investigating SOA formation from three idling passenger vehicles (Euro 2-4). Traditional single-ring aromatic precursors and naphthalene could explain 51-90 % of the formed SOA. Unspeciated species such as branched and cyclic alkanes might be the possible precursors for the unexplained SOA. A high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer was used to characterize the chemical composition of SOA. The relationship between f43 (ratio of m/z 43, mostly C2H3O+, to the total signal in mass spectrum) and f44 (mostly CO2+) of the gasoline vehicle exhaust SOA is similar to the ambient semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). We plot the O : C and H : C molar ratios of SOA in a Van Krevelen diagram. The slopes of ΔH : C / ΔO : C ranged from -0.59 to -0.36, suggesting that the oxidation chemistry in these experiments was a combination of carboxylic acid and alcohol/peroxide formation.

  18. Aerosol Sampling Bias from Differential Electrostatic Charge and Particle Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayjock, Michael Anthony

    Lack of reliable epidemiological data on long term health effects of aerosols is due in part to inadequacy of sampling procedures and the attendant doubt regarding the validity of the concentrations measured. Differential particle size has been widely accepted and studied as a major potential biasing effect in the sampling of such aerosols. However, relatively little has been done to study the effect of electrostatic particle charge on aerosol sampling. The objective of this research was to investigate the possible biasing effects of differential electrostatic charge, particle size and their interaction on the sampling accuracy of standard aerosol measuring methodologies. Field studies were first conducted to determine the levels and variability of aerosol particle size and charge at two manufacturing facilities making acrylic powder. The field work showed that the particle mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) varied by almost an order of magnitude (4-34 microns) while the aerosol surface charge was relatively stable (0.6-0.9 micro coulombs/m('2)). The second part of this work was a series of laboratory experiments in which aerosol charge and MMAD were manipulated in a 2('n) factorial design with the percentage of sampling bias for various standard methodologies as the dependent variable. The experiments used the same friable acrylic powder studied in the field work plus two size populations of ground quartz as a nonfriable control. Despite some ill conditioning of the independent variables due to experimental difficulties, statistical analysis has shown aerosol charge (at levels comparable to those measured in workroom air) is capable of having a significant biasing effect. Physical models consistent with the sampling data indicate that the level and bipolarity of the aerosol charge are determining factors in the extent and direction of the bias.

  19. Bounce behavior of freshly nucleated biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, A.; Kannosto, J.; Kuuluvainen, H.; Arffman, A.; Joutsensaari, J.; Saukko, E.; Hao, L.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Tiitta, P.; Holopainen, J. K.; Keskinen, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Smith, J. N.; Laaksonen, A.

    2011-08-01

    The assessment of the climatic impacts and adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosol particles requires detailed information on particle properties. However, very limited information is available on the morphology and phase state of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. The physical state of particles greatly affects particulate-phase chemical reactions, and thus the growth rates of newly formed atmospheric aerosol. Thus verifying the physical phase state of SOA particles gives new and important insight into their formation, subsequent growth, and consequently potential atmospheric impacts. According to our recent study, biogenic SOA particles produced in laboratory chambers from the oxidation of real plant emissions as well as in ambient boreal forest atmospheres can exist in a solid phase in size range >30 nm. In this paper, we extend previously published results to diameters in the range of 17-30 nm. The physical phase of the particles is studied by investigating particle bounce properties utilizing electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI). We also investigate the effect of estimates of particle density on the interpretation of our bounce observations. According to the results presented in this paper, particle bounce clearly decreases with decreasing particle size in sub 30 nm size range. The comparison measurements by ammonium sulphate and investigation of the particle impaction velocities strongly suggest that the decreasing bounce is caused by the differences in composition and phase of large (diameters greater than 30 nm) and smaller (diameters between 17 and 30 nm) particles.

  20. Bounce behavior of freshly nucleated biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Virtanen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the climatic impacts and adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosol particles requires detailed information on particle properties. However, very limited information is available on the morphology and phase state of secondary organic aerosol (SOA particles. The physical state of particles greatly affects particulate-phase chemical reactions, and thus the growth rates of newly formed atmospheric aerosol. Thus verifying the physical phase state of SOA particles gives new and important insight into their formation, subsequent growth, and consequently potential atmospheric impacts. According to our recent study, biogenic SOA particles produced in laboratory chambers from the oxidation of real plant emissions as well as in ambient boreal forest atmospheres can exist in a solid phase in size range >30 nm. In this paper, we extend previously published results to diameters in the range of 17–30 nm. The physical phase of the particles is studied by investigating particle bounce properties utilizing electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI. We also investigate the effect of estimates of particle density on the interpretation of our bounce observations. According to the results presented in this paper, particle bounce clearly decreases with decreasing particle size in sub 30 nm size range. The comparison measurements by ammonium sulphate and investigation of the particle impaction velocities strongly suggest that the decreasing bounce is caused by the differences in composition and phase of large (diameters greater than 30 nm and smaller (diameters between 17 and 30 nm particles.

  1. Development and characterization of a single particle laser ablation mass spectrometer (SPLAM for organic aerosol studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gaie-Levrel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A single particle instrument was developed for real-time analysis of organic aerosol. This instrument, named Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry (SPLAM, samples particles using an aerodynamic lens system for which the theoretical performances were calculated. At the outlet of this system, particle detection and sizing are realized by using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Polystyrene Latex (PSL, sodium chloride (NaCl and dioctylphtalate (DOP particles were used to characterize and calibrate optical detection of SPLAM. The optical detection limit (DL and detection efficiency (DE were determined using size-selected DOP particles. The DE ranges from 0.1 to 90% for 100 and 350 nm DOP particles respectively and the SPLAM instrument is able to detect and size-resolve particles as small as 110–120 nm. During optical detection, particle scattered light from the two diode lasers, is detected by two photomultipliers and the detected signals are used to trigger UV excimer laser (λ = 248 nm used for one-step laser desorption ionization (LDI of individual aerosol particles. The formed ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles. The TOF-MS detection limit for gaseous aromatic compounds was determined to be 0.85 × 10−15 kg (∼4 × 103 molecules. DOP particles were also used to test the overall operation of the instrument. The analysis of a secondary organic aerosol, formed in a smog chamber by the ozonolysis of indene, is presented as a first application of the instrument. Single particle mass spectra were obtained with an effective hit rate of 8%. Some of these mass spectra were found to be very different from one particle to another possibly reflecting chemical differences within the investigated indene SOA particles. Our study shows that an exhaustive statistical analysis, over hundreds of particles

  2. Fuel composition and secondary organic aerosol formation: gas-turbine exhaust and alternative aviation fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miracolo, Marissa A; Drozd, Greg T; Jathar, Shantanu H; Presto, Albert A; Lipsky, Eric M; Corporan, Edwin; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-08-07

    A series of smog chamber experiments were performed to investigate the effects of fuel composition on secondary particulate matter (PM) formation from dilute exhaust from a T63 gas-turbine engine. Tests were performed at idle and cruise loads with the engine fueled on conventional military jet fuel (JP-8), Fischer-Tropsch synthetic jet fuel (FT), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. Emissions were sampled into a portable smog chamber and exposed to sunlight or artificial UV light to initiate photo-oxidation. Similar to previous studies, neat FT fuel and a 50/50 FT/JP-8 blend reduced the primary particulate matter emissions compared to neat JP-8. After only one hour of photo-oxidation at typical atmospheric OH levels, the secondary PM production in dilute exhaust exceeded primary PM emissions, except when operating the engine at high load on FT fuel. Therefore, accounting for secondary PM production should be considered when assessing the contribution of gas-turbine engine emissions to ambient PM levels. FT fuel substantially reduced secondary PM formation in dilute exhaust compared to neat JP-8 at both idle and cruise loads. At idle load, the secondary PM formation was reduced by a factor of 20 with the use of neat FT fuel, and a factor of 2 with the use of the blend fuel. At cruise load, the use of FT fuel resulted in no measured formation of secondary PM. In every experiment, the secondary PM was dominated by organics with minor contributions from sulfate when the engine was operated on JP-8 fuel. At both loads, FT fuel produces less secondary organic aerosol than JP-8 because of differences in the composition of the fuels and the resultant emissions. This work indicates that fuel reformulation may be a viable strategy to reduce the contribution of emissions from combustion systems to secondary organic aerosol production and ultimately ambient PM levels.

  3. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2011-01-01

    -effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions that resemble the Earth's atmosphere. By comparison with ionization using a gamma source we further show that the nature of the ionizing particles is not important for the ion-induced component of the nucleation. This implies that inexpensive...

  4. Identification of sources of aerosol particles in three locations in eastern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimidza, S.; Moloi, K.

    2000-07-01

    Airborne particles have been collected using a dichotomous virtual impactor at three different locations in the eastern part of Botswana: Serowe, Selibe-Phikwe, and Francistown. The particles were separated into two fractions (fine and coarse). Sampling at the three locations was done consecutively during the months of July and August, which are usually dry and stable. The sampling time for each sample was 12 hours during the day. For elemental composition, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence technique was used. Correlations and principal component analysis with varimax rotation were used to identify major sources of aerosol particles. In all the three places, soil was found to be the main source of aerosol particles. A copper-nickel mine and smelter at Selibe-Phikwe was found to be not only a source of copper and nickel particles in Selibe-Phikwe but also a source of these particles in far places like Serowe. In Selibe-Phikwe and Francistown, car exhaust was found to be the major source of fine particles of lead and bromine.

  5. Prenatal exposure to diesel exhaust particles and effect on the male reproductive system in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Talsness, Chris

    2009-01-01

    In utero exposure to diesel exhaust particles may reduce sperm production in adulthood. We investigated the effect of prenatal exposure to diesel exhaust particles on the male reproductive system and assessed endocrine disruption and regulation of aquaporin expression as possible mechanisms...... of action. Dams inhaled 20 mg/m(3) of diesel exhaust particle standard reference material 2975 (SRM2975) or clean air for 1h/day on day 7-19 during pregnancy. Male offspring were killed on day 170 after birth. The dams that had inhaled SRM2975 delivered offspring, which in adulthood had reduced daily sperm...

  6. AN ASSESSMENT OF SEVERITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL AEROSOL PARTICLES DURING PRECIPITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Verma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Africa is one of the sources of biomass burning emissions. It is estimated that about 6 million tons of fuel per day is consumed in the southern hemisphere. Biomass burning has an important contribution on aerosol particle concentrations in the atmosphere. Efforts have been made to conduct research in Gaborone to monitor the concentration of atmospheric aerosols in atmosphere. These studies were mainly confined to measurement of concentration of aerosols and establishing a relation with determinants such as carbon dioxide concentration, biomass burning, and precipitation among others. However, very little seems to have been done in relating the empirical data to a mathematical model or to study quantitatively the impact of precipitation on the concentration of aerosols larger than 0.3?m in the atmosphere. In this paper we provide an objective criterion for classifying measurements on concentration of atmospheric aerosol particles and build a mathematical model that helps us to understand variations in weekly aerosol concentrations in terms of their severity. We also construct an index of severity which when applied to different seasons under the study period indicates that precipitation significantly scavenges atmospheric aerosols.International Journal of Environment Volume-4, Issue-3, June-August 2015Page: 81-95

  7. Physicochemical characterisation of combustion particles from vehicle exhaust and residential wood smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarze Per E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to ambient particulate matter has been associated with a number of adverse health effects. Particle characteristics such as size, surface area and chemistry seem to influence the negative effects of particles. In this study, combustion particles from vehicle exhaust and wood smoke, currently used in biological experiments, were analysed with respect to microstructure and chemistry. Methods Vehicle exhaust particles were collected in a road tunnel during two seasons, with and without use of studded tires, whereas wood smoke was collected from a stove with single-stage combustion. Additionally, a reference diesel sample (SRM 2975 was analysed. The samples were characterised using transmission electron microscopy techniques (TEM/HRTEM, EELS and SAED. Furthermore, the elemental and organic carbon fractions were quantified using thermal optical transmission analysis and the content of selected PAHs was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results Carbon aggregates, consisting of tens to thousands of spherical primary particles, were the only combustion particles identified in all samples using TEM. The tunnel samples also contained mineral particles originating from road abrasion. The geometric diameters of primary carbon particles from vehicle exhaust were found to be significantly smaller (24 ± 6 nm than for wood smoke (31 ± 7 nm. Furthermore, HRTEM showed that primary particles from both sources exhibited a turbostratic microstructure, consisting of concentric carbon layers surrounding several nuclei in vehicle exhaust or a single nucleus in wood smoke. However, no differences were detected in the graphitic character of primary particles from the two sources using SAED and EELS. The total PAH content was higher for combustion particles from wood smoke as compared to vehicle exhaust, whereas no source difference was found for the ratio of organic to total carbon. Conclusion Combustion particles from

  8. Influence of water uptake on the aerosol particle light scattering coefficients of the Central European aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Zieger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of aerosol water uptake on the aerosol particle light scattering was examined at the regional continental research site Melpitz, Germany. The scattering enhancement factor f(RH, defined as the aerosol particle scattering coefficient at a certain relative humidity (RH divided by its dry value, was measured using a humidified nephelometer. The chemical composition and other microphysical properties were measured in parallel. f(RH showed a strong variation, e.g. with values between 1.2 and 3.6 at RH=85% and λ=550 nm. The chemical composition was found to be the main factor determining the magnitude of f(RH, since the magnitude of f(RH clearly correlated with the inorganic mass fraction measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS. Hysteresis within the recorded humidograms was observed and explained by long-range transported sea salt. A closure study using Mie theory showed the consistency of the measured parameters.

  9. Hygroscopic behaviour of aerosol particles emitted from biomass fired grate boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rissler, Jenny; Swietlicki, Erik [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Physics; Pagels, Joakim; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Bohgard, Mats [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology; Strand, Michael; Lillieblad, Lena; Sanati, Mehri [Vaexjoe Univ. (Sweden). Bioenergy Technology

    2005-02-01

    This study focuses on the hygroscopic properties of sub-micrometer aerosol particles emitted from two small-scale district heating combustion plants (1 and 1.5 MW) burning two types of biomass fuels (moist forest residue and pellets). The hygroscopic particle diameter growth was measured when taken from a dehydrated to a humidified state for particle diameters between 30-350 nm (dry size) using a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA). Particles of a certain dry size all showed similar hygroscopic growth and the average diameter growth at RH=90% for 110/100 nm particles was 1.68 in the 1 MW boiler, and 1.52 in the 1.5 MW boiler. These growth factors are considerably higher in comparison to other combustion aerosol particles such as diesel exhaust, and are the result of the efficient combustion and the high concentration of alkali species in the fuel. The observed water uptake could be explained using the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule and a chemical composition of only potassium salts, taken from an Ion Chromatography analysis of filter sample (KCl, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). Agglomerated particles collapsed and became more spherical when initially exposed to a moderately high relative humidity. When diluting with hot particle-free air, the fractal-like structures remained intact until humidified in the HTDMA. A method is presented to by which to estimate the fractal dimension of the agglomerated combustion aerosol and correct the measured mobility diameter hygroscopic growth to the more useful property volume growth. The fractal dimension was estimated to be {approx}2.5.

  10. Gaseous ion-composition measurements in the young exhaust plume of jet aircraft at cruising altitudes. Implications for aerosols and gaseous sulfuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, F.; Wohlfrom, K.H.; Klemm, M.; Schneider, J.; Gollinger, K. [Max-Planck-Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Schumann, U.; Busen, R. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    Mass spectrometric measurements were made in the young exhaust plume of an Airbus (A310) at cruising altitudes at distances between 400 and 800 m behind the Airbus (averaged plume age: 3.4 sec). The measurements indicate that gaseous sulfuric acid (GSA) number densities were less than 1.3 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} which is smaller than the expected total sulfuric acid. Hence the missing sulfuric acid must have been in the aerosol phase. These measurements also indicate a total aerosol surface area density A{sub T} {<=} 5.4 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} per cm{sup 3} which is consistent with simultaneously measured soot and water contrail particles. However, homogeneous nucleation leading to (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub x}(H{sub 2}O){sub y}-clusters can not be ruled out. (author) 16 refs.

  11. Diesel exhaust particle-induced airway responses are augmented in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kuk-Young; Park, Moo-Kyun; Leikauf, George D; Park, Choon-Sik; Jang, An-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Air pollutants and obesity are important factors that contribute to asthma. The aim of this study was to assess the airway responsiveness and inflammation in Otsuka-Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) obese rats and Long Evans Tokushima-Otsuka (LETO) nonobese rats exposed to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima fatty rats and LETO rats were exposed intranasally to DEP and then challenged with aerosolized DEP on days 6 to 8. Body plethysmography, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and histology were performed. Enhanced pause (Penh) was measured as an indicator of airway resistance on day 9 and samples were collected on day 10. After exposure to DEP, the OLETF group exhibited a greater increase in Penh compared to that in the LETO group. Moreover, the BAL fluid in mice showed an increase in the total and differential cell counts in the DEP-exposed OLETF group compared to that in the DEP-exposed LETO group. Histological assessment of lung tissue from each group revealed that the DEP-exposed OLETF group tended to have increased inflammatory cell infiltrations in the prebronchial area. Increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, coactivator 1β messenger RNA was observed in the lungs of obese rats compared to that in nonobese rats following DEP exposure. These data indicate that the DEP-exposed OLETF group had increased airway responses and inflammation compared to the DEP-exposed LETO group, indicating that diesel particulates and obesity may be co-contributors to asthma.

  12. Diesel exhaust particle exposure in vitro alters monocyte differentiation and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Chaudhuri

    Full Text Available Air pollution by diesel exhaust particles is associated with elevated mortality and increased hospital admissions in individuals with respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. During active inflammation monocytes are recruited to the airways and can replace resident alveolar macrophages. We therefore investigated whether chronic fourteen day exposure to low concentrations of diesel exhaust particles can alter the phenotype and function of monocytes from healthy individuals and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Monocytes were purified from the blood of healthy individuals and people with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in the presence or absence of diesel exhaust particles and their phenotypes studied through investigation of their lifespan, cytokine generation in response to Toll like receptor agonists and heat killed bacteria, and expression of surface markers. Chronic fourteen day exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to concentrations of diesel exhaust particles >10 µg/ml caused mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction, and a gradual loss of cells over time both in healthy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease individuals. Chronic exposure to lower concentrations of diesel exhaust particles impaired CXCL8 cytokine responses to lipopolysaccharide and heat killed E. coli, and this phenotype was associated with a reduction in CD14 and CD11b expression. Chronic diesel exhaust particle exposure may therefore alter both numbers and function of lung macrophages differentiating from locally recruited monocytes in the lungs of healthy people and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  13. Particle Property Data Quality Flags for the MISR Aerosol Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitley, B. J.; Kahn, R. A.; Garay, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    , extending over more than twelve years of MISR data, aid in the assessment. Comparisons with the limited available AERONET aerosol type data are also made and evaluated as appropriate. Seasons and regions that regularly show poorly constrained aerosol type results are identified, as are times and places where particle property information can be used with confidence. This work is performed in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and in part at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  14. Experimental investigation of the effect of inlet particle properties on the capture efficiency in an exhaust particulate filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Sandeep; Rothamer, David; Zelenyuk, Alla; Stewart, Mark; Bell, David

    2017-11-01

    The impact of inlet particle properties on the filtration performance of clean and particulate matter (PM) laden cordierite filter samples was evaluated using PM generated by a spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engine fuelled with tier II EEE certification gasoline. Prior to the filtration experiments, a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) was used to measure the electrical-mobility based particle size distribution (PSD) in the SIDI exhaust from distinct engine operating conditions. An advanced aerosol characterization system that comprised of a centrifugal particle mass analyser (CPMA), a differential mobility analyser (DMA), and a single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) was used to obtain additional information on the SIDI particulate, including particle composition, mass, and dynamic shape factors (DSFs) in the transition () and free-molecular () flow regimes. During the filtration experiments, real-time measurements of PSDs upstream and downstream of the filter sample were used to estimate the filtration performance and the total trapped mass within the filter using an integrated particle size distribution method. The filter loading process was paused multiple times to evaluate the filtration performance in the partially loaded state. The change in vacuum aerodynamic diameter () distribution of mass-selected particles was examined for flow through the filter to identify whether preferential capture of particles of certain shapes occurred in the filter. The filter was also probed using different inlet PSDs to understand their impact on particle capture within the filter sample. Results from the filtration experiment suggest that pausing the filter loading process and subsequently performing the filter probing experiments did not impact the overall evolution of filtration performance. Within the present distribution of particle sizes, filter efficiency was independent of particle shape potentially due to the diffusion-dominant filtration

  15. Selection of quasi-monodisperse super-micron aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, Michael; Pfeifer, Sascha; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Size-segregated quasi monodisperse particles are essential for e.g. fundamental research concerning cloud microphysical processes. Commonly a DMA (Differential Mobility Analyzer) is used to produce quasi-monodisperse submicron particles. Thereto first, polydisperse aerosol particles are bipolarly charged by a neutralizer, and then selected according to their electrical mobility with the DMA [Knutson et al. 1975]. Selecting a certain electrical mobility with a DMA results in a particle size distribution, which contains singly charged particles as well as undesired multiply charged larger particles. Often these larger particles need to either be removed from the generated aerosol or their signals have to be corrected for in the data inversion and interpretation process. This problem becomes even more serious when considering super-micron particles. Here we will present two different techniques for generating quasi-monodisperse super-micron aerosol particles with no or only an insignificant number of larger sized particles being present. First, we use a combination of a cyclone with adjustable aerodynamic cut-off diameter and our custom-built Maxi-DMA [Raddatz et al. 2013]. The cyclone removes particles larger than the desired ones prior to mobility selection with the DMA. This results in a reduction of the number of multiply charged particles of up to 99.8%. Second, we utilize a new combination of cyclone and PCVI (Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor), which is based on purely inertial separation and avoids particle charging. The PCVI instrument was previously described by Boulter et al. (2006) and Kulkarni et al. (2011). With our two setups we are able to produce quasi-monodisperse aerosol particles in the diameter range from 0.5 to 4.4 µm without a significant number of larger undesired particles being present. Acknowledgements: This work was done within the framework of the DFG funded Ice Nucleation research UnIT (INUIT, FOR 1525) under WE 4722/1-1. References

  16. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  17. New Particle Formation and Secondary Organic Aerosol in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, M.; Yue, D.; Guo, S.; Hu, W.; Huang, X.; He, L.; Wiedensohler, A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.

    2011-12-01

    Air pollution in Beijing has been a major concern due to being a mega-city and green Olympic Games requirements. Both long term and intensive field measurements have been conducted at an Urban Air Quality Monitoring Station in the campus of Peking University since 2004. Aerosol characteristics vary seasonally depending on meteorological conditions and source emissions. Secondary compositions of SNA (sum of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium) and SOA (secondary organic aerosol) become major fraction of fine particles, which may enhance aerosol impacts on visibility and climate change. The transformation processes of new particle formation (NPF) and secondary organic aerosol have been focused on. It was found that gaseous sulfuric acid, ammonia, and organic compounds are important precursors to NPF events in Beijing and H2SO4-NH3-H2O ternary nucleation is one of the important mechanisms. The contributions of condensation and neutralization of sulfuric acid, coagulation, and organics to the growth of the new particles are estimated as 45%, 34%, and 21%, respectively. Tracer-based method to estimate biogenic and anthropogenic SOA was established by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Secondary organic tracers derived from biogenic (isoprene, α-pinene, β-caryophyllene) and anthropogenic (toluene) contributed 32% at urban site and 35% at rural site, respectively. Other source apportionment techniques were also used to estimate secondary organic aerosols, including EC tracer method, water soluble organic carbon content, chemical mass balance model, and AMS-PMF method.

  18. Characterization of particulate matter emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Worton, D. R.; Fortner, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Franklin, J. P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured in July 2010 from on-road motor vehicles driving through a highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. A soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was used to measure the chemical composition of PM emitted by gasoline and diesel vehicles at high time resolution. Organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during various time periods that had different levels of diesel influence, as well as directly in the exhaust plumes of individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks. BC emission factor distributions for HD trucks were more skewed than OA distributions (N = 293), with the highest 10% of trucks accounting for 56 and 42% of total measured BC and OA emissions, respectively. OA mass spectra measured for HD truck exhaust plumes show cycloalkanes are predominate in exhaust OA emissions relative to saturated alkanes (i.e., normal and iso-paraffins), suggesting that lubricating oil rather than fuel is the dominant source of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions in diesel vehicle exhaust. This finding is supported by the detection of trace elements such as zinc and phosphorus in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. Trace elements were emitted relative to total OA at levels that are consistent with typical weight fractions of commonly used additives present in lubricating oil. A comparison of measured OA and BC mass spectra across various sampling periods revealed a high degree of similarity in OA and BC emitted by gasoline and diesel engines. This finding indicates a large fraction of OA in gasoline exhaust is lubricant-derived as well. The similarity in OA and BC mass spectra for gasoline and diesel engine exhaust is likely to confound ambient source apportionment efforts to determine contributions to air pollution from these two important sources.

  19. Effects of Diesel Engine Exhaust Origin Secondary Organic Aerosols on Novel Object Recognition Ability and Maternal Behavior in BALB/C Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin-Tin Win-Shwe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have reported an increased risk of cardiopulmonary and lung cancer mortality associated with increasing exposure to air pollution. Ambient particulate matter consists of primary particles emitted directly from diesel engine vehicles and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs are formed by oxidative reaction of the ultrafine particle components of diesel exhaust (DE in the atmosphere. However, little is known about the relationship between exposure to SOA and central nervous system functions. Recently, we have reported that an acute single intranasal instillation of SOA may induce inflammatory response in lung, but not in brain of adult mice. To clarify the whole body exposure effects of SOA on central nervous system functions, we first created inhalation chambers for diesel exhaust origin secondary organic aerosols (DE-SOAs produced by oxidation of diesel exhaust particles caused by adding ozone. Male BALB/c mice were exposed to clean air (control, DE and DE-SOA in inhalation chambers for one or three months (5 h/day, 5 days/week and were examined for memory function using a novel object recognition test and for memory function-related gene expressions in the hippocampus by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, female mice exposed to DE-SOA for one month were mated and maternal behaviors and the related gene expressions in the hypothalamus examined. Novel object recognition ability and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor expression in the hippocampus were affected in male mice exposed to DE-SOA. Furthermore, a tendency to decrease maternal performance and significantly decreased expression levels of estrogen receptor (ER-a, and oxytocin receptor were found in DE-SOA exposed dams compared with the control. This is the first study of this type and our results suggest that the constituents of DE-SOA may be associated with memory function and maternal performance based on the impaired gene expressions in the hippocampus and hypothalamus

  20. Influence of number and size of particles on the health risk from diesel and Otto engine exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, U.; Boehncke, A.; Mangelsdorf, I. (Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Aerosolforschung, Hannover (Germany))

    1999-01-01

    On behalf of the German Umweltbundesamt (Federal Environmental Protection Agency), a comparative risk assessment is being carried out by the Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Aerosol Research, Hannover, in cooperation with the German IFEU, (Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung, Heidelberg), FoBiG (Forschungs- und Beratungsinstitut Gefahrstoffe GmbH, Freiburg) and Prof. Pott and Dr. Roller, Duesseldorf. Passenger cars with either gasoline or diesel engines as well as city busses with either CNG (Compressed Natural Gas) or diesel motor, are compared with regard to relevant exhaust components (including e.g. particulate matter, NO[sub x] and benzene) and current and future European emission standards. This risk assessment is based on emission rates for the individual exhaust components which have been deduced by IFEU from model calculations for the various European emission standards. These are connected mathematically with reference concentrations for the toxic effects of individual components and Unit Risks for their carcinogenic properties, so that a comparison of the toxic and carcinogenic potencies of the individual exhaust components is possible for the different motor types. A reference concentration of 3.5 [mu]g/m[sup 3] for the insoluble particle core and 5 [mu]g/m[sup 3] for the total particles, as derived by the WHO and US EPA, are used for the calculations in the risk assessment. The basis of the Unit Risk for the carcinogenic effects is 1 x 10[sup -4] [mu]g/m[sup 3] for the insoluble particle core and 7 x 10[sup -5] [mu]g/m[sup 3] for the total particles as derived by the German LAI (Laenderausschuss Immissionsschutz). Since the project is currently not yet finished, the main results are given briefly and qualitatively. (orig.)

  1. Influence of number and size of particles on the health risk from diesel and Otto engine exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, U.; Boehncke, A.; Mangelsdorf, I. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Aerosolforschung, Hannover (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    On behalf of the German Umweltbundesamt (Federal Environmental Protection Agency), a comparative risk assessment is being carried out by the Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Aerosol Research, Hannover, in cooperation with the German IFEU, (Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung, Heidelberg), FoBiG (Forschungs- und Beratungsinstitut Gefahrstoffe GmbH, Freiburg) and Prof. Pott and Dr. Roller, Duesseldorf. Passenger cars with either gasoline or diesel engines as well as city busses with either CNG (Compressed Natural Gas) or diesel motor, are compared with regard to relevant exhaust components (including e.g. particulate matter, NO{sub x} and benzene) and current and future European emission standards. This risk assessment is based on emission rates for the individual exhaust components which have been deduced by IFEU from model calculations for the various European emission standards. These are connected mathematically with reference concentrations for the toxic effects of individual components and Unit Risks for their carcinogenic properties, so that a comparison of the toxic and carcinogenic potencies of the individual exhaust components is possible for the different motor types. A reference concentration of 3.5 {mu}g/m{sup 3} for the insoluble particle core and 5 {mu}g/m{sup 3} for the total particles, as derived by the WHO and US EPA, are used for the calculations in the risk assessment. The basis of the Unit Risk for the carcinogenic effects is 1 x 10{sup -4} {mu}g/m{sup 3} for the insoluble particle core and 7 x 10{sup -5} {mu}g/m{sup 3} for the total particles as derived by the German LAI (Laenderausschuss Immissionsschutz). Since the project is currently not yet finished, the main results are given briefly and qualitatively. (orig.)

  2. Organic aerosol mixing observed by single-particle mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ellis Shipley; Saleh, Rawad; Donahue, Neil M

    2013-12-27

    We present direct measurements of mixing between separately prepared organic aerosol populations in a smog chamber using single-particle mass spectra from the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Docosane and docosane-d46 (22 carbon linear solid alkane) did not show any signs of mixing, but squalane and squalane-d62 (30 carbon branched liquid alkane) mixed on the time scale expected from a condensational-mixing model. Docosane and docosane-d46 were driven to mix when the chamber temperature was elevated above the melting point for docosane. Docosane vapors were shown to mix into squalane-d62, but not the other way around. These results are consistent with low diffusivity in the solid phase of docosane particles. We performed mixing experiments on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) surrogate systems finding that SOA derived from toluene-d8 (a surrogate for anthropogenic SOA (aSOA)) does not mix into squalane (a surrogate for hydrophobic primary organic aerosol (POA)) but does mix into SOA derived from α-pinene (biogenic SOA (bSOA) surrogate). For the aSOA/POA, the volatility of either aerosol does not limit gas-phase diffusion, indicating that the two particle populations do not mix simply because they are immiscible. In the aSOA/bSOA system, the presence of toluene-d8-derived SOA molecules in the α-pinene-derived SOA provides evidence that the diffusion coefficient in α-pinene-derived SOA is high enough for mixing on the time scale of 1 min. The observations from all of these mixing experiments are generally invisible to bulk aerosol composition measurements but are made possible with single-particle composition data.

  3. Impact of aerosols and atmospheric particles on plant leaf proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xing; Shi, Wen Z.; Zhao, Wen J.; Luo, Na N.

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols and atmospheric particles can diffuse and absorb solar radiation, and directly affect plant photosynthesis and related protein expression. In this study, for the first time, we performed an extensive investigation of the effects of aerosols and atmospheric particles on plant leaf proteins by combining Geographic Information System and proteomic approaches. Data on particles with diameters of 0.1-1.0 μm (PM1) from different locations across the city of Beijing and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the past 6 years (2007-2012) were collected. In order to make the study more reliable, we segregated the influence of soil pollution by measuring the heavy metal content. On the basis of AOD and PM1, two regions corresponding to strong and weak diffuse solar radiations were selected for analyzing the changes in the expression of plant proteins. Our results demonstrated that in areas with strong diffuse solar radiations, plant ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase was expressed at higher levels, but oxygen evolved in enhancer protein and light-harvesting complex II protein were expressed at lower levels. The expression of ATP synthase subunit beta and chlorophyll a-b binding protein were similar in both regions. By analyzing the changes in the expression of these leaf proteins and their functions, we conclude that aerosols and atmospheric particles stimulate plant photosynthesis facilitated by diffuse solar radiations.

  4. Sea-spray aerosol particles generated in the surf zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, A.M.J. van; Kusmierczyk‐Michulec, J.T.; Francius, M.J.; Tedeschi, G.; Piazzola,J.; Merritt, D.L.; Fontana, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the properties of aerosol particles generated over the surf zone, two experiments were held at the pier of Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), La Jolla CA, and at the pier of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (FRF) in Duck NC. On both sites concentrations of

  5. Mode resolved density of atmospheric aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Aalto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the mode resolved density of ultrafine atmospheric particles measured in boreal forest environment. The method used here enables us to find the distinct density information for each mode in atmospheric fine particle population: the density values for nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation mode particles are presented. The experimental data was gained during 2 May 2005–19 May 2005 at the boreal forest measurement station "SMEAR II" in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The density values for accumulation mode varied from 1.1 to 2 g/cm3 (average 1.5 g/cm3 and for Aitken mode from 0.4 to 2 g/cm3 (average 0.97 g/cm3. As an overall trend during the two weeks campaign, the density value of Aitken mode was seen to gradually increase. With the present method, the time dependent behaviour of the particle density can be investigated in the time scale of 10 min. This allows us to follow the density evolution of the nucleation mode particles during the particle growth process following the nucleation burst. The density of nucleation mode particles decreased during the growth process. The density values for 15 nm particles were 1.2–1.5 g/cm3 and for grown 30 nm particles 0.5–1 g/cm3. These values are consistent with the present knowledge that the condensing species are semi-volatile organics, emitted from the boreal forest.

  6. Global distribution of secondary organic aerosol particle phase state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Li, Y., Sr.; Tsimpidi, A.; Karydis, V.; Berkemeier, T.; Pandis, S. N.; Lelieveld, J.; Koop, T.; Poeschl, U.

    2016-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) account for a large fraction of submicron particles in the atmosphere and play a key role in aerosol effects on climate, air quality and public health. The formation and aging of SOA proceed through multiple steps of chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases, which is challenging for the interpretation of field measurements and laboratory experiments as well as accurate representation of SOA evolution in atmospheric aerosol models. SOA particles can adopt liquid, semi-solid and amorphous solid (glassy) phase states depending on chemical composition, relative humidity and temperature. The particle phase state is crucial for various atmospheric gas-particle interactions, including SOA formation, heterogeneous and multiphase reactions and ice nucleation. We found that organic compounds with a wide variety of functional groups fall into molecular corridors, characterized by a tight inverse correlation between molar mass and volatility. Based on the concept of molecular corridors, we develop a method to estimate glass transition temperatures based on the molar mass and molecular O:C ratio of SOA components, which is a key property for determination of particle phase state. We use the global chemistry climate model EMAC with the organic aerosol module ORACLE to predict the atmospheric SOA phase state. For the planetary boundary layer, global simulations indicate that SOA is mostly liquid in tropical and polar air with high relative humidity, semi-solid in the mid-latitudes, and solid over dry lands. We find that in the middle and upper troposphere (>500 hPa) SOA should be mostly in a glassy solid phase state. Thus, slow diffusion of water, oxidants, and organic molecules could kinetically limit gas-particle interactions of SOA in the free and upper troposphere, promote ice nucleation and facilitate long-range transport of reactive and toxic organic pollutants embedded within SOA.

  7. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM), especially fine particles (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 1 m, PM1), has been found to play an important role in global climate change, air quality, and human health. The continuous study of aerosol parameters is therefore imperative for better understanding the environmental effects of the atmospheric particles, as well as their sources, formation and transformation processes. The particle size distribution is particularly important, since this physical parameter determines the mass and number density, lifetime and atmospheric transport, or optical scattering behavior of the particles in the atmosphere (Jaenicke, 1998). Over the years several efforts have been made to improve the knowledge about the chemical composition of atmospheric particles as a function of size (Samara and Voutsa, 2005) and to characterize the relative contribution of different components to the fine particulate matter. It is well established that organic materials constitute a highly variable fraction of the atmospheric aerosol. This fraction is predominantly found in the fine size mode in concentrations ranging from 10 to 70% of the total dry fine particle mass (Middlebrook et al., 1998). Although organic compounds are major components of the fine particles, the composition, formation mechanism of organic aerosols are not well understood. This is because particulate organic matter is part of a complex atmospheric system with hundreds of different compounds, both natural and anthropogenic, covering a wide range of chemical properties. The aim of this study was to characterize the forest PM1, and investigate effects of air mass transport on the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition, estimate and provide insights into the sources and characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols through analysis ^13C/12C isotopic ratio as a function of the aerosol particles size. The measurements were performed at the Rugšteliškis integrated

  8. Bohm criterion and plasma particle/power exhaust to and recycling at the wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Zhu Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The plasma particle and power exhaust to the divertor surface drives both particle and power recycling at the surface, which in return constrains the plasma density and temperature at the target and their profile further upstream. Both particle and power exhaust fluxes are mediated by the plasma sheath next to the divertor surface. In particular, the Bohm criterion constrains the ion exit flow speed, which enters directly into the particle flux and the kinetic flow energy component of the ion power flux, and indirectly into the electron power flux through the sheath potential drop. Here we give an overview on how the Bohm speed is set in a general plasma and how it enters power exhaust and power recycling at the divertor surface, and the implication on the correct implementation of sheath boundary conditions in numerical codes. The cases of ideal and non-ideal Bohm speed are distinguished as a result of the physics discussion.

  9. Micro- and Nanostructural Characteristics of Particles Before and After an Exhaust Gas Recirculation System Scrubber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieke, Kirsten Inga; Rosenørn, Thomas; Pedersen, Jannik

    2013-01-01

    This work provides insight into the morphology and mixing state of submicron particles in diesel exhaust from a ship engine with an exhaust gas recirculation scrubber. Particles from this low-speed ship engine on test bed were collected using a microiner-tial impactor with transmission electron...... microscopy (TEM) grids on two stages. Micro- and nanostructural characteristics of sin-gle particles were studied by TEM. Image analysis was carried out on overview and high-resolution images, revealing influence of the exhaust gas treatment (scrubber) on the particle morphology and mixing state. Soot...... agglomerates were found to be collapsed after scrubber, reflected by their change in fractal dimension (fly) from 1.88 to 2.13. Soot was predominantly found internally mixed with other components, with a higher degree of internal mix-ing observed after scrubber. Soot nanostructural characteristics on the near...

  10. Assessment of exhaust emissions from carbon nanotube production and particle collection by sampling filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Hofmann, Mario; Hallock, Marilyn; Ellenbecker, Michael; Kong, Jing

    2015-11-01

    This study performed a workplace evaluation of emission control using available air sampling filters and characterized the emitted particles captured in filters. Characterized particles were contained in the exhaust gas released from carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Emitted nanoparticles were collected on grids to be analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). CNT clusters in the exhaust gas were collected on filters for investigation. Three types of filters, including Nalgene surfactant-free cellulose acetate (SFCA), Pall A/E glass fiber, and Whatman QMA quartz filters, were evaluated as emission control measures, and particles deposited in the filters were characterized using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to further understand the nature of particles emitted from this CNT production. STEM analysis for collected particles on filters found that particles deposited on filter fibers had a similar morphology on all three filters, that is, hydrophobic agglomerates forming circular beaded clusters on hydrophilic filter fibers on the collecting side of the filter. CNT agglomerates were found trapped underneath the filter surface. The particle agglomerates consisted mostly of elemental carbon regardless of the shapes. Most particles were trapped in filters and no particles were found in the exhaust downstream from A/E and quartz filters, while a few nanometer-sized and submicrometer-sized individual particles and filament agglomerates were found downstream from the SFCA filter. The number concentration of particles with diameters from 5 nm to 20 µm was measured while collecting particles on grids at the exhaust piping. Total number concentration was reduced from an average of 88,500 to 700 particle/cm(3) for the lowest found for all filters used. Overall, the quartz filter showed the most consistent and highest particle reduction control, and exhaust particles containing nanotubes were successfully

  11. Mass spectrometric analysis and aerodynamic properties of various types of combustion-related aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J.; Weimer, S.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Helas, G.; Gwaze, P.; Schmid, O.; Andreae, M. O.; Kirchner, U.

    2006-12-01

    Various types of combustion-related particles in the size range between 100 and 850 nm were analyzed with an aerosol mass spectrometer and a differential mobility analyzer. The measurements were performed with particles originating from biomass burning, diesel engine exhaust, laboratory combustion of diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as from spark soot generation. Physical and morphological parameters like fractal dimension, effective density, bulk density and dynamic shape factor were derived or at least approximated from the measurements of electrical mobility diameter and vacuum aerodynamic diameter. The relative intensities of the mass peaks in the mass spectra obtained from particles generated by a commercial diesel passenger car, by diesel combustion in a laboratory burner, and by evaporating and re-condensing lubrication oil were found to be very similar. The mass spectra from biomass burning particles show signatures identified as organic compounds like levoglucosan but also others which are yet unidentified. The aerodynamic behavior yielded a fractal dimension (Df) of 2.09 +/- 0.06 for biomass burning particles from the combustion of dry beech sticks, but showed values around three, and hence more compact particle morphologies, for particles from combustion of more natural oak. Scanning electron microscope images confirmed the finding that the beech combustion particles were fractal-like aggregates, while the oak combustion particles displayed a much more compact shape. For particles from laboratory combusted diesel fuel, a Df value of 2.35 was found, for spark soot particles, Df [approximate] 2.10. The aerodynamic properties of fractal-like particles from dry beech wood combustion indicate an aerodynamic shape factor [chi] that increases with electrical mobility diameter, and a bulk density of 1.92 g cm-3. An upper limit of [chi] [approximate] 1.2 was inferred for the shape factor of the more compact particles from oak combustion.

  12. Primary Emission and the Potential of Secondary Aerosol Formation from Chinese Gasoline Engine Exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Peng, Jianfei; Qin, Yanhong; Du, Zhuofei; Li, Mengjin; Zheng, Rong; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Lu, Sihua; Wu, Yusheng; Zeng, Limin; Guo, Song; Shao, Min; Wang, Yinhui; Shuai, Shijin

    2017-04-01

    Along with the urbanization and economic growth, vehicle population in China reached 269 million, ranked the second in the world in 2015. Gasoline vehicle is identified to be the main source for urban PM2.5 in China, accounting for 15%-31%. In this study the impact of fuel components on PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from a gasoline port fuel injection (PFI) engine and a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine are discussed. Results show that, higher proportion of aromatics, alkenes or sulfur in gasoline fuel will lead to higher PM emissions. The PM from the PFI engine mainly consists of OC and a small amount of EC and inorganic ions, while the PM discharge from the GDI engine mainly consists of EC, OM and a small amount of inorganic ions. Since the GDI engines can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions, and it would become more and more popular in the near future. The characteristics of POM component, emission factors and source profile were investigated from GDI engine, particularly focused on the effect of engine speed, load and the catalyst, which will be very much helpful for source identification as source indicators. Chamber experiments were conducted to quantify the potential of secondary aerosol formation from exhaust of a PFI gasoline engine and China V gasoline fuel. During 4-5 h simulation, equivalent to10 days of atmospheric photo-oxidation in Beijing, the extreme SOA production was 426 ± 85 mg/kg fuel, with high precursors and OH exposure. 14% of SOA measured in the chamber experiments could be explained through the oxidation of speciated single-ring aromatics. Unspeciated precursors, such as intermediate-volatility organic compounds and semi-volatility organic compounds, might be significant for SOA formation from gasoline VOCs. We concluded that reduction of emissions of aerosol precursor gases from vehicles is essential to mediate pollution in China.

  13. Ice Formation by Soot-Containing Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demott, P. J.; Petters, M. D.; Prenni, A. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Carrico, C. M.; Bennett, M. R.; Stanglmaier, R.; Volckens, J.; Popovicheva, O. B.

    2006-12-01

    A role for soot particles as atmospheric ice forming nuclei remains highly uncertain and poorly quantified. A relatively small amount of data exists and most of this is for laboratory surrogates that may not be well characterized or of assured relevance to the atmosphere. It is important to constrain the role of soot particles as ice nuclei due to their abundance in the atmosphere and the large contribution from anthropogenic activities. Further, global climate models are beginning to be capable of treating the impact of different aerosol types, including soot particles. This paper reports on studies of ice formation by or within surrogates for hydrophobic soot and realistic carbonaceous particles from combustion of fuel in a diesel engine, burning of an assortment biomass materials, and real jet fuel combustor particles. Measurements of primarily monodisperse particles were focused below -30°C to emphasize the transition between temperatures where heterogeneous ice nucleation is required for ice formation and those for which homogeneous freezing processes are also possible. Ice nucleation measurements were made with a continuous flow diffusion chamber. Simultaneous measurements of hygroscopic water uptake and cloud condensation nucleation behavior were also made at 30°C for each aerosol type. Small fractions of hydrophobic soot particles are found capable of initiating heterogeneous ice formation at low temperatures. Results of studies of more realistic particles suggest that any process that increases hygroscopicity tends to limit the conditions for ice formation within soot particles. Most biomass burning particles, showing a range of dry/wet diameter hygroscopic growth factors (1.03 activity as CCN to 102% RH, yet behaved as particles containing solutions in which homogeneous freezing was supported at temperatures below -38°C. This is tentatively attributed to condensation of semi-volatiles during cooling. Ice forming ability as warm as -30°C was limited to

  14. Morphologies of aerosol particles consisting of two liquid phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mijung; Marcolli, Claudia; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) might be a common feature in mixed organic/ammonium sulfate (AS)/H2O particles. Song et al. (2012) observed that in atmospheric relevant organic/AS/H2O mixtures LLPS always occurred for organic aerosol compositions with O:C appeared for O:C > 0.80. The composition of the organic fraction and the mixing state of aerosol particles may influence deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of inorganic salts during RH cycles and also aerosol morphology. In order to determine how the deliquescence and efflorescence of AS in mixed organic/AS/H2O particles is influenced by LLPS and to identify the corresponding morphologies of the particles, we subjected organic/AS/H2O particles deposited on a hydrophobically coated substrate to RH cycles and observed the phase transitions using optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. In this study, we report results from 21 organic/AS/H2O systems with O:C ranging from 0.55 - 0.85 covering aliphatic and aromatic oxidized compounds. Eight systems did not show LLPS for all investigated organic-to-inorganic ratios, nine showed core-shell morphology when present in a two-liquid-phases state and four showed both, core-shell or partially engulfed configurations depending on the organic-to-inorganic ratio. While AS in aerosol particles with complete LLPS showed almost constant values of ERH = 44 ± 4 % and DRH = 77 ± 2 %, a strong reduction or complete inhibition of efflorescence occurred for mixtures that did not exhibit LLPS. To confirm these findings, we performed supplementary experiments on levitated particles in an electrodynamic balance and compared surface and interfacial tensions of the investigated mixtures. Reference Song, M., C. Marcolli, U. K. Krieger, A. Zuend, and T. Peter (2012), Liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles: Dependence on O:C, organic functionalities, and compositional complexity, Geophys. Res. Lett

  15. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust particles from an engine with differing exhaust after treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, X-C; Keane, M J; Ong, T; Li, S-Q; Bugarski, A B

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of engine operating conditions and exhaust aftertreatments on the mutagenicity of diesel particulate matter (DPM) collected directly in an underground mine environment. A number of after-treatment devices are currently used on diesel engines in mines, but it is critical to determine whether reductions in DPM concentrations result in a corresponding decrease in adverse health effects. An eddy-current dynamometer was used to operate naturally aspirated mechanically controlled engine at several steady-state conditions. The samples were collected when the engine was equipped with a standard muffler, a diesel oxidation catalytic converter, two types of uncatalyzed diesel particulate filter systems, and three types of disposable diesel particulate filter elements. Bacterial gene mutation activity of DPM was tested on acetone extracts using the Ames Salmonella assay. The results indicated strong correlation between engine operating conditions and mutagenic activity of DPM. When the engine was fitted with muffler, the mutagenic activity was observed for the samples collected from light-load, but not heavy-load operating conditions. When the engine was equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst, the samples did not exhibit mutagenic activity for any of four engine operating conditions. Mutagenic activity was observed for the samples collected when the engine was retrofitted with three types of disposable filters and sintered metal diesel particulate filter and operated at light load conditions. However, those filtration systems substantially reduced the concentration-normalized mutagenic activity from the levels observed for the muffler.

  16. Effect of lubricant sulfur on the morphology and elemental composition of diesel exhaust particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Piqiang; Li, Yuan; Shen, Hanyan

    2017-05-01

    This work investigates the effects of lubricant sulfur contents on the morphology, nanostructure, size distribution and elemental composition of diesel exhaust particle on a light-duty diesel engine. Three kinds of lubricant (LS-oil, MS-oil and HS-oil, all of which have different sulfur contents: 0.182%, 0.583% and 1.06%, respectively) were used in this study. The morphologies and nanostructures of exhaust particles were analyzed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Size distributions of primary particles were determined through advanced image-processing software. Elemental compositions of exhaust particles were obtained through X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results show that as lubricant sulfur contents increase, the macroscopic structure of diesel exhaust particles turn from chain-like to a more complex agglomerate. The inner cores of the core-shell structure belonging to these primary particles change little; the shell thickness decreases, and the spacing of carbon layer gradually descends, and amorphous materials that attached onto outer carbon layer of primary particles increase. Size distributions of primary particles present a unimodal and normal distribution, and higher sulfur contents lead to larger size primary particles. The sulfur content in lubricants directly affects the chemical composition in the particles. The content of C (carbon) decreases as sulfur increases in the lubricants, while the contents of O (oxygen), S (sulfur) and trace elements (including S, Si (silicon), Fe (ferrum), P (phosphorus), Ca (calcium), Zn (zinc), Mg (magnesium), Cl (chlorine) and Ni (nickel)) all increase in particles. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Measurement of the physical properties of secondary organic aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannosto, J.

    2012-07-01

    The work of this thesis concentrates on applying the Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI, Dekati Ltd.) and scanning/differential mobility particle sizer (SMPS/DMPS) to estimate the particle density and particle solidity of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) d{sub me} < 200 nm. The density estimation method has been extended to smaller particle sizes and the data treatment of the method has been modified to be suitable for large data series and multimodal size distributions. The limitations of the method have been studied using both laboratory tests and simulations. The lowest mode particle diameter for the density method was found to be 10 nm. For multimodal size distributions, the density results varied approximately by 15 %. The density measurements were performed at the SMEAR II station and the density of boreal forest particles was measured. The ELPI was used to study the physical phase of the fresh SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of pure {alpha}-pinene and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of a living Scots pine in a chamber. The phase of SOA particles formed in the boreal forest was analyzed as well. The particles were found to bounce from smooth impaction plates of ELPI towards lower impactor stages. The behavior was interpreted as an indication of a solid physical phase of the particles. The interpretation was corroborated by SEM (Scanning electron microscope) images. In the TEM (Tunneling electron microscope) analysis, the particles were non-crystalline. Based on these results, the particles were inferred to have adopted an amorphous (glassy) physical state. The {alpha}-pinene particles had similar bouncing ability as the Scots pine derived particles indicating similar physical phase behavior. The measured bounce factor did not significantly change during the particle growth for particles larger than 40 nm, indicating no changes in particle solidity. For the smallest particles (below 40 nm), the calculated bounce factor increased as the particles grew

  18. Calibration of aerosol instruments in a wide particle size range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yli-Ojanpera, J.

    2012-07-01

    Aerosol particles have an important role in many scientific and technological issues. Aerosol particle measurements are widely applied for example in clean room technology, in atmospheric measurements and in studying the Particulate Matter (PM) emissions from traffic and industry. This thesis concentrates on developing new aerosol instrumentation both for measurement and calibration purposes. On the measurement side, the driving force has been the urgent need for instruments that have a fast time response and are able to measure nanoparticles with reasonable accuracy. In this respect, the nanoparticle resolution of the Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI, Dekati Ltd.) was improved by designing, manufacturing and implementing a new impactor stage (cutpoint 16.7 nm) to the ELPI cascade impactor. The new impactor stage divides the particle size range measured by the filter stage (7-30 nm) between the new stage and the filter stage. As a result, the nanoparticle resolution of the ELPI was improved. This made the device more suitable, for example, for vehicle engine emission measurements. The new stage is currently being sold as a part of the new ELPI+ instrument, which is an improved version of the original ELPI. On the calibration side, the main driving force behind aerosol instrument development has been the lack of calibration standards available for calibrating the number concentration responses of the instruments in the sub-micrometer size range. In this size range, the most common method to calibrate an instrument is to use a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), for obtaining monodisperse particles for the calibration, and a Faraday cup aerosol electrometer (FCAE), for measuring the reference number concentration. Even though, in principle, the DMA allows size selection up to 1 {mu}m in diameter, the calibrations are usually limited to particles below 100 nm because of the multiple charging of particles. To solve this problem, a new concept for realizing a

  19. A source-independent empirical correction procedure for the fast mobility and engine exhaust particle sizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Naomi; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Wang, Jonathan M.; Ramos, Manuel; Wallace, James S.; Evans, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    The TSI Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS) provide size distributions for 6-560 nm particles with a time resolution suitable for characterizing transient particle sources; however, the accuracy of these instruments can be source dependent, due to influences of particle morphology. The aim of this study was to develop a source-independent correction protocol for the FMPS and EEPS. The correction protocol consists of: (1) broadening the >80 nm size range of the distribution to account for under-sizing by the FMPS and EEPS; (2) applying an existing correction protocol in the 8-93 nm size range; and (3) dividing each size bin by the ratio of total concentration measured by the FMPS or EEPS and a water-based Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) as a surrogate scaling factor to account for particle morphology. Efficacy of the correction protocol was assessed for three sources: urban ambient air, diluted gasoline direct injection engine exhaust, and diluted diesel engine exhaust. Linear regression against a reference instrument, the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), before and after applying the correction protocol demonstrated that the correction ensured agreement within 20%.

  20. Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence from Biological Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    induced fluorescence (LIF) to provide an initial rapid indication of the presence of biological aerosol particles. Examples of recent ultraviolet (UV...pp.4960-4965, 2007. 10. J. W. Lou, M. Currie, V. Sivaprakasam, and J. D. Eversole, “Green and Ultraviolet Pulse Generation with a Compact, Fiber...solutions,” Journal of photochemistry and photobiology 65, 6, 931-936 (1997). 18. S. Dad, R.H. Bisby, I.P. Clark and A.W. Parker, “Identification

  1. Composition and Particle Size Retrievals for Homogeneous Binary Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedziela, R. F.; Argon, P.; Bejcek, L.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosols have widely varying compositions, shapes, and sizes. The ability to measure these physical characteristics, coupled with knowledge about their optical properties, can provide insight as to how these particles might participate in atmospheric processes, including their interaction with light. Over the past several years, our laboratory has been involved in developing methods to determine basic physical properties of laboratory-generated particles based on the analysis of infrared extinction spectra of multi-component aerosols. Here we report the results of a complete study on the applicability of well-known refractive index mixing rules to homogeneous binary liquid organic aerosols in an effort to yield in situ measurements of particle size and composition. In particular, we present results for terpenoid (carvone/nopinone) and long-chain hydrocarbon (squalane/squalene) mixtures. The included image shows model carvone/nopinone extinction spectra that were computed using the Lorentz-Lorenz mixing rule on complex refractive index data for the pure components.

  2. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    atmospheric conditions using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear and significant contribution from ion induced nucleation and consider this to be an unambiguous observation of the ion-effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions not far...... from the Earth's atmosphere. By comparison with ionization using a gamma source we further show that the nature of the ionizing particles is not important for the ion component of the nucleation....

  3. Aerosol Particle Property Comparisons Between MISR and AERONET Retrieved Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitley, B. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOT) data from the Multi-angle ImagingSpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra satellite have already been systematically compared with ground-based data from the AERONET network. As a result of that study, MISR data are now being reprocessed with improved aerosol algorithms and aerosol models. The follow-on study reported here systematically compares MISR and AERONET particle micro-physical properties. This project is currently underway. Our goal is to use the statistical power of numerous AERONET measurements to map the behavior of the MISR property retrievals, identify strength and surprises in the MISR data, and use this information both to refine further the MISR retrieval algorithms and to assess the likely error envelopes in the MISR products. Multi-year data from 36 carefully chosen sites having good long-term measurement records are stratified by broad classes of aerosol air mass types: maritime, biomass burning, desert dust, pollution, and continental aerosols. Available AERONET spectral AOT measurements for two-hour windows around MISR overpass times are interpolated to MISR wavelengths and averaged, and AOT variability over the two-hour window is noted. Sky-scan AERONET data, taken only once an hour, are also were interpolated to MISR wavelengths, and are averaged over a four-hour window provided the variability is smaller than MISR sensitivity to particle properties based on previous work. MISR retrievals over the 17.6 km standard retrieval regions that include the AERONET sites are preferentially used for the comparison. The MISR measurements are averages of over all "successful" aerosol type models in the MISR algorithm climatology, where success is measured by the degree to which multi-angle, multi-spectral top-of-atmosphere radiances match modeled radiances, using several chi-squared tests. Angstrom exponent, single scattering albedo, and size distribution mean values and variance

  4. Representation of aerosol particles and associated transport pathways in regional climate modelling in Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Garland, Rebecca M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural Research Council. Pretoria, South Africa 5Centre for High Performance Computing, CSIR, Pretoria, South Africa School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa Aerosol particles can have... of was to investigate the monthly cycle of aerosol particles from CCAM to understand if that cycle is captured correctly. Multi-year monthly averages of the CCAM modelled and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) were compared...

  5. Automobile diesel exhaust particles induce lipid droplet formation in macrophages in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Gouveia, Ana Cecilia Damiao

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects, which may be related to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and formation of macrophage foam cells. In this study, THP-1 derived macrophages were exposed to an automobile generated DEP (A...... that exposure to A-DEP may induce formation of lipid droplets in macrophages in vitro possibly via lysosomal dysfunction....

  6. SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION OF AUTOMOBILE AND FORKLIFT DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES AND COMPARATIVE PULMONARY TOXICITY IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractTwo samples of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) predominate in DEP health effects research: an automobile-source DEP (A-DEP) sample and the National Institute of Standards Technology (NIST) standard reference material (SRM 2975) generated from a forklift engine...

  7. BIOASSAY-DIRECTED FRACTIONAL AND SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY OF AUTOMOBILE AND FORKLIFT DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Many pulmonary toxicity studies of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) have used anautomobile-generated sample (A-DEP) whose mutagenicity has not been reported. In contrast,rnany inutagenicity studies of DEP have used a forklift-generated sample (SRM ...

  8. Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) During AMAZE-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the AMazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. The presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 μm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as 'viable aerosols' or 'fluorescent bioparticles' (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. First data analyses show a pronounced peak of FBAP at diameters around 2-3 μm. In this size range the biogenic particle fraction was

  9. A numerical determination of the evolution of cloud drop spectra due to condensation on natural aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I. Y.; Haenel, G.; Pruppacher, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    The time variation in size of aerosol particles growing by condensation is studied numerically by means of an air parcel model which allows entrainment of air and aerosol particles. Particles of four types of aerosols typically occurring in atmospheric air masses were considered. The present model circumvents any assumption about the size distribution and chemical composition of the aerosol particles by basing the aerosol particle growth on actually observed size distributions and on observed amounts of water taken up under equilibrium by a deposit of the aerosol particles. Characteristic differences in the drop size distribution, liquid water content and supersaturation were found for the clouds which evolved from the four aerosol types considered.

  10. Diffusivity measurements of volatile organics in levitated viscous aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Field measurements indicating that atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state have spurred numerous studies addressing low diffusivities of water in glassy aerosols. The focus of these studies is on kinetic limitations of hygroscopic growth and the plasticizing effect of water. In contrast, much less is known about diffusion limitations of organic molecules and oxidants in viscous matrices. These may affect atmospheric chemistry and gas-particle partitioning of complex mixtures with constituents of different volatility. In this study, we quantify the diffusivity of a volatile organic in a viscous matrix. Evaporation of single particles generated from an aqueous solution of sucrose and small amounts of volatile tetraethylene glycol (PEG-4) is investigated in an electrodynamic balance at controlled relative humidity (RH) and temperature. The evaporative loss of PEG-4 as determined by Mie resonance spectroscopy is used in conjunction with a radially resolved diffusion model to retrieve translational diffusion coefficients of PEG-4. Comparison of the experimentally derived diffusivities with viscosity estimates for the ternary system reveals a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relationship, which has often been invoked to infer diffusivity from viscosity. The evaporation of PEG-4 shows pronounced RH and temperature dependencies and is severely depressed for RH ≲ 30 %, corresponding to diffusivities pollutant molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

  11. Generation and characterization of large-particle aerosols using a center flow tangential aerosol generator with a non-human-primate, head-only aerosol chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, J Kyle; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Kuhn, Jens H; Wada, Jiro; Bollinger, Laura; Jahrling, Peter B; Johnson, Reed F

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol droplets or particles produced from infected respiratory secretions have the potential to infect another host through inhalation. These respiratory particles can be polydisperse and range from 0.05 to 500 µm in diameter. Animal models of infection are generally established to facilitate the potential licensure of candidate prophylactics and/or therapeutics. Consequently, aerosol-based animal infection models are needed to properly study and counter airborne infections. Ideally, experimental aerosol exposure should reliably result in animal disease that faithfully reproduces the modeled human disease. Few studies have been performed to explore the relationship between exposure particle size and induced disease course for infectious aerosol particles. The center flow tangential aerosol generator (CenTAG™) produces large-particle aerosols capable of safely delivering a variety of infectious aerosols to non-human primates (NHPs) within a Class III Biological Safety Cabinet (BSC) for establishment or refinement of NHP infectious disease models. Here, we report the adaptation of this technology to the Animal Biosafety Level 4 (ABSL-4) environment for the future study of high-consequence viral pathogens and the characterization of CenTAG™-created sham (no animal, no virus) aerosols using a variety of viral growth media and media supplements.

  12. Generation and characterization of large-particle aerosols using a center flow tangential aerosol generator with a nonhuman-primate, head-only aerosol chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, J. Kyle; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Wada, Jiro; Bollinger, Laura; Jahrling, Peter B.; Johnson, Reed F.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol droplets or particles produced from infected respiratory secretions have the potential to infect another host through inhalation. These respiratory particles can be polydisperse and range from 0.05–500 μm in diameter. Animal models of infection are generally established to facilitate the potential licensure of candidate prophylactics and/or therapeutics. Consequently, aerosol-based animal infection models are needed to properly study and counter airborne infections. Ideally, experimental aerosol exposure should reliably result in animal disease that faithfully reproduces the modelled human disease. Few studies have been performed to explore the relationship between exposure particle size and induced disease course for infectious aerosol particles. The center flow tangential aerosol generator (CenTAG™) produces large-particle aerosols capable of safely delivering a variety of infectious aerosols to nonhuman primates within a Class III Biological Safety Cabinet (BSC) for establishment or refinement of nonhuman primate infectious disease models. Here we report the adaptation of this technology to the Animal Biosafety Level 4 (ABSL-4) environment for the future study of high-consequence viral pathogens and the characterization of CenTAG™-created sham (no animal, no virus) aerosols using a variety of viral growth media and media supplements. PMID:25970823

  13. Soot Aerosol Particles as Cloud Condensation Nuclei: from Ice Nucleation Activity to Ice Crystal Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirim, Claire; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Ortega, Isamel Kenneth; Carpentier, Yvain; Focsa, Cristian; Chazallon, Bertrand; Ouf, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of solid-state particles (soot) from engine exhausts due to incomplete fuel combustion is considered to influence ice and liquid water cloud droplet activation [1]. The activity of these aerosols would originate from their ability to be important centers of ice-particle nucleation, as they would promote ice formation above water homogeneous freezing point. Soot particles are reported to be generally worse ice nuclei than mineral dust because they activate nucleation at higher ice-supersaturations for deposition nucleation and at lower temperatures for immersion freezing than ratios usually expected for homogeneous nucleation [2]. In fact, there are still numerous opened questions as to whether and how soot's physico-chemical properties (structure, morphology and chemical composition) can influence their nucleation ability. Therefore, systematic investigations of soot aerosol nucleation activity via one specific nucleation mode, here deposition nucleation, combined with thorough structural and compositional analyzes are needed in order to establish any association between the particles' activity and their physico-chemical properties. In addition, since the morphology of the ice crystals can influence their radiative properties [3], we investigated their morphology as they grow over both soot and pristine substrates at different temperatures and humidity ratios. In the present work, Combustion Aerosol STandart soot samples were produced from propane using various experimental conditions. Their nucleation activity was studied in deposition mode (from water vapor), and monitored using a temperature-controlled reactor in which the sample's relative humidity is precisely measured with a cryo-hygrometer. Formation of water/ice onto the particles is followed both optically and spectroscopically, using a microscope coupled to a Raman spectrometer. Vibrational signatures of hydroxyls (O-H) emerge when the particle becomes hydrated and are used to characterize ice

  14. EVALUATION OF ACOUSTIC FORCES ON A PARTICLE IN AEROSOL MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    The acoustic force exerted on a solid particle was evaluated to develop a fundamental understanding of the critical physical parameters or constraints affecting particle motion and capture in a collecting device. The application of an acoustic force to the collection of a range of submicron-to-micron particles in a highly turbulent airflow stream laden with solid particles was evaluated in the presence of other assisting and competing forces. This scoping estimate was based on the primary acoustic force acting directly on particles in a dilute aerosol system, neglecting secondary interparticle effects such as agglomeration of the sub-micron particles. A simplified analysis assuming a stable acoustic equilibrium with an infinite sound speed in the solid shows that for a solid-laden air flow in the presence of a standing wave, particles will move toward the nearest node. The results also show that the turbulent drag force on a 1-{micro}m particle resulting from eddy motion is dominant when compared with the electrostatic force or the ultrasonic acoustic force. At least 180 dB acoustic pressure level at 1 MHz is required for the acoustic force to be comparable to the electrostatic or turbulent drag forces in a high-speed air stream. It is noted that particle size and pressure amplitude are dominant parameters for the acoustic force. When acoustic pressure level becomes very large, the acoustic energy will heat up the surrounding air medium, which may cause air to expand. With an acoustic power of about 600 watts applied to a 2000-lpm air flow, the air temperature can increase by as much as 15 C at the exit of the collector.

  15. Accommodation coefficient of HOBr on deliquescent sodium bromide aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wachsmuth

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Uptake of HOBr on sea salt aerosol, sea salt brine or ice is believed to be a key process providing a source of photolabile bromine (Br2 and sustaining ozone depletion cycles in the Arctic troposphere. In the present study, uptake of HOBr on sodium bromide (NaBr aerosol particles was investigated at an extremely low HOBr concentration of 300 cm-3 using the short-lived radioactive isotopes 83-86Br. Under these conditions, at maximum one HOBr molecule was taken up per particle. The rate of uptake was clearly limited by the mass accommodation coefficient, which was calculated to be 0.6 ± 0.2. This value is a factor of 10 larger than estimates used in earlier models. The atmospheric implications are discussed using the box model "MOCCA'', showing that the increase of the accommodation coefficient of HOBr by a factor of 10 only slightly affects net ozone loss, but significantly increases chlorine release.

  16. A model study of the size and composition distribution of aerosols in an aircraft exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokin, A.A. [SRC `ECOLEN`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A two-dimensional, axisymmetric flow field model which includes water and sulphate aerosol formation represented by moments of the size and composition distribution function is used to calculate the effect of radial turbulent jet mixing on the aerosol size distribution and mean modal composition. (author) 6 refs.

  17. Aerosol particle properties in a South American megacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulke, Ana; Torres-Brizuela, Marcela; Raga, Graciela; Baumgardner, Darrel; Cancelada, Marcela

    2015-04-01

    The subtropical city of Buenos Aires is located on the western shore of Río de la Plata, on the southeastern coast of Argentina. It is the second largest metropolitan area in South America, with a population density of around 14 thousand people per km2. When all 24 counties of the Great Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area are included it is the third-largest conurbation in Latin America, with a population of around fifteen million inhabitants. The generalized worldwide trend to concentrate human activities in urban regions that continue to expand in area, threatens the local and regional environment. Air pollution in the Buenos Aires airshed is due to local sources (mainly the mobile sources, followed by the electric power plants and some industries) and to distant sources (like biomass burning, dust, marine aerosols and occasionally volcanic ash) whose products arrive in the city area due to the regional transport patterns. Previous research suggests that ambient aerosol particle concentrations should be considered an air quality problem. A field campaign was conducted in Buenos Aires in 2011 in order to characterize some aerosol particles properties measured for the first time in the city. Measurements began in mid- April and continued until December. The field observations were done in a collaborative effort between the Universities of Mexico (UNAM) and Buenos Aires (UBA). A suite of instruments was installed on the roof of an UBA laboratory and classroom buildings (34.54° S, 58.44° W) at an altitude of approximately 30 m above sea level. The measurements included the number concentration of condensation nuclei (CN) larger than approximately 50 nm, the mass concentration of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAH), the scattering (Bscat) and absorption (Babs) coefficients at 550 nm and the vertical profiles of backscattered light from aerosols at a wavelength of 910 nm using a ceilometer. In addition, a weather station recorded the meteorological

  18. Improved identification of primary biological aerosol particles using single-particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadowicz, Maria A.; Froyd, Karl D.; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP), especially at altitudes relevant to cloud formation, are scarce. Single-particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) has been used to probe aerosol chemical composition from ground and aircraft for over 20 years. Here we develop a method for identifying bioaerosols (PBAP and particles containing fragments of PBAP as part of an internal mixture) using SPMS. We show that identification of bioaerosol using SPMS is complicated because phosphorus-bearing mineral dust and phosphorus-rich combustion by-products such as fly ash produce mass spectra with peaks similar to those typically used as markers for bioaerosol. We have developed a methodology to differentiate and identify bioaerosol using machine learning statistical techniques applied to mass spectra of known particle types. This improved method provides far fewer false positives compared to approaches reported in the literature. The new method was then applied to two sets of ambient data collected at Storm Peak Laboratory and a forested site in Central Valley, California to show that 0.04-2 % of particles in the 200-3000 nm aerodynamic diameter range were identified as bioaerosol. In addition, 36-56 % of particles identified as biological also contained spectral features consistent with mineral dust, suggesting internal dust-biological mixtures.

  19. Review: engineering particles using the aerosol-through-plasma method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhrs, Claudia C [UNM; Richard, Monique [TEMA

    2009-01-01

    For decades, plasma processing of materials on the nanoscale has been an underlying enabling technology for many 'planar' technologies, particularly virtually every aspect of modern electronics from integrated-circuit fabrication with nanoscale elements to the newest generation of photovoltaics. However, it is only recent developments that suggest that plasma processing can be used to make 'particulate' structures of value in fields, including catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, higher energy density batteries, and other forms of energy storage. In this paper, the development of the science and technology of one class of plasma production of particulates, namely, aerosol-through-plasma (A-T-P), is reviewed. Various plasma systems, particularly RF and microwave, have been used to create nanoparticles of metals and ceramics, as well as supported metal catalysts. Gradually, the complexity of the nanoparticles, and concomitantly their potential value, has increased. First, unique two-layer particles were generated. These were postprocessed to create unique three-layer nanoscale particles. Also, the technique has been successfully employed to make other high-value materials, including carbon nanotubes, unsupported graphene, and spherical boron nitride. Some interesting plasma science has also emerged from efforts to characterize and map aerosol-containing plasmas. For example, it is clear that even a very low concentration of particles dramatically changes plasma characteristics. Some have also argued that the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium approach is inappropriate to these systems. Instead, it has been suggested that charged- and neutral-species models must be independently developed and allowed to 'interact' only in generation terms.

  20. Capture Efficiency of Cooking-Related Fine and Ultrafine Particles by Residential Exhaust Hoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Delp, William W.

    2014-06-05

    Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80percent. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38percent for low (51?68 L s-1) and 54?72percent for high (109?138 L s-1) settings. CEs for 0.3?2.0 ?m particles during front burner stir-frying were 3?11percent on low and 16?70percent on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80percent both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles.

  1. Single-particle Analyses of Compositions, Morphology, and Viscosity of Aerosol Particles Collected During GoAmazon2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, K.; Gong, Z.; Bateman, A. P.; Martin, S. T.; Cirino, G. G.; Artaxo, P.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles collected during the GoAmazon2014 campaign. These TEM results indicate aerosol types and mixing states, both of which are important for evaluating particle optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity. The samples were collected at the T3 site, which is located in the Amazon forest with influences from the urban pollution plume from Manaus. Samples were also collected from the T0 site, which is in the middle of the jungle with minimal to no influences of anthropogenic sources. The aerosol particles mainly originated from 1) anthropogenic pollution (e.g., nanosphere soot, sulfate), 2) biogenic emissions (e.g., primary biogenic particles, organic aerosols), and 3) long-range transport (e.g., sea salts). We found that the biogenic organic aerosol particles contain homogeneously distributed potassium. Particle viscosity is important for evaluating gas-particle interactions and atmospheric chemistry for the particles. Viscosity can be estimated from the rebounding behavior at controlled relative humidities, i.e., highly viscous particles display less rebound on a plate than low-viscosity particles. We collected 1) aerosol particles from a plate (non-rebounded), 2) those that had rebounded from the plate and were then captured onto an adjacent sampling plate, and 3) particles from ambient air using a separate impactor sampler. Preliminary results show that more than 90% of non-rebounded particles consisted of nanosphere soot with or without coatings. The coatings mostly consisted of organic matter. Although rebounded particles also contain nanosphere soot (number fraction 64-69%), they were mostly internally mixed with sulfate, organic matter, or their mixtures. TEM tilted images suggested that the rebounded particles were less deformed on the substrate, whereas the non-rebounded particles were more deformed, which could

  2. New aerosol particles formation in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Angel; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Ynoue, Rita

    2016-04-01

    The Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA), in the southeast region of Brazil, is considered a megalopolis comprised of Sao Paulo city and more 38 municipalities. The air pollutant emissions in the SPMA are related to the burning of the fuels: etanol, gasohol (gasoline with 25% ethanol) and diesel. According to CETESB (2013), the road vehicles contributed up to about 97, 87, and 80% of CO, VOCs and NOx emissions in 2012, respectively, being most of NOx associated to diesel combustion and most of CO and VOCs from gasohol and ethanol combustion. Studies conducted on ambient air pollution in the SPMA have shown that black carbon (BC) explains 21% of mass concentration of PM2.5 compared with 40% of organic carbon (OC), 20% of sulfates, and 12% of soil dust (Andrade et al., 2012). Most of the observed ambient PM2.5 mass concentration usually originates from precursors gases such as sulphur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and VOCs as well as through the physico-chemical processes such as the oxidation of low volatile hydrocarbons transferring to the condensed phase (McMurry et al., 2004). The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model (WRF-Chem; Grell et al. 2005), configured with three nested grid cells: 75, 15, and 3 km, is used as photochemical modeling to describe the physico-chemical processes leading to evolution of particles number and mass size distribution from a vehicular emission model developed by the IAG-USP laboratory of Atmospheric Processes and based on statistical information of vehicular activity. The spatial and temporal distributions of emissions in the finest grid cell are based on road density products compiled by the OpenStreetMap project and measurements performed inside tunnels in the SPMA, respectively. WRF-Chem simulation with coupled primary aerosol (dust and sea-salt) and biogenic emission modules and aerosol radiative effects turned on is conducted as the baseline simulation (Case_0) to evaluate the model

  3. Real-time measurement of aerosol particle concentration at high temperatures; Hiukkaspitoisuuden reaaliaikainen mittaaminen korkeassa laempoetilassa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskinen, J.; Hautanen, J.; Laitinen, A. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Physics

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a new method for continuous aerosol particle concentration measurement at elevated temperatures (up to 800-1000 deg C). The measured property of the aerosol particles is the so called Fuchs surface area. This quantity is relevant for diffusion limited mass transfer to particles. The principle of the method is as follows. First, aerosol particles are charged electrically by diffusion charging process. The charging takes place at high temperature. After the charging, aerosol is diluted and cooled. Finally, aerosol particles are collected and the total charge carried by the aerosol particles is measured. Particle collection and charge measurement take place at low temperature. Benefits of this measurement method are: particles are charged in-situ, charge of the particles is not affected by the temperature and pressure changes after sampling, particle collection and charge measurement are carried out outside the process conditions, and the measured quantity is well defined. The results of this study can be used when the formation of the fly ash particles is studied. Another field of applications is the study and the development of gasification processes. Possibly, the method can also be used for the monitoring the operation of the high temperature particle collection devices. (orig.)

  4. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  5. Chemical characterization of freshly emitted particulate matter from aircraft exhaust using single particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegglen, Manuel; Brem, B. T.; Ellenrieder, M.; Durdina, L.; Rindlisbacher, T.; Wang, J.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.

    2016-06-01

    Non-volatile aircraft engine emissions are an important anthropogenic source of soot particles in the upper troposphere and in the vicinity of airports. They influence climate and contribute to global warming. In addition, they impact air quality and thus human health and the environment. The chemical composition of non-volatile particulate matter emission from aircraft engines was investigated using single particle time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The exhaust from three different aircraft engines was sampled and analyzed. The soot particulate matter was sampled directly behind the turbine in a test cell at Zurich Airport. Single particle analyses will focus on metallic compounds. The particles analyzed herein represent a subset of the emissions composed of the largest particles with a mobility diameter >100 nm due to instrumental restrictions. A vast majority of the analyzed particles was shown to contain elemental carbon, and depending on the engine and the applied thrust the elemental carbon to total carbon ratio ranged from 83% to 99%. The detected metallic compounds were all internally mixed with the soot particles. The most abundant metals in the exhaust were Cr, Fe, Mo, Na, Ca and Al; V, Ba, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Mg, Mn, Si, Ti and Zr were also detected. We further investigated potential sources of the ATOFMS-detected metallic compounds using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The potential sources considered were kerosene, engine lubrication oil and abrasion from engine wearing components. An unambiguous source apportionment was not possible because most metallic compounds were detected in several of the analyzed sources.

  6. Single Particle Characterization of Free Tropospheric Aerosols at the Pico Mountain Observatory over the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Scarnato, B. V.; Moffet, R.; OBrien, R. E.; Gilles, M. K.; Fialho, P. J.; Ampadu, M.; Kumar, S.; Dzepina, K.; Wright, K.; Sharma, N.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Perlinger, J. A.; Jacques, H.; Helmig, D.; Dziobak, M.; Kramer, L. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    Free tropospheric aerosols are being studied at the Pico Mountain Observatory, located near the top of the Pico volcano in the Azores, Portugal (38.47°N, 28.40°W, 2225m asl). Typically above the marine boundary layer in the summer, this is an ideal site to study aerosol transported over long distances across the Atlantic Ocean. Aerosols reaching the Observatory often originate from North America and sometimes from Africa and Europe. Aerosols instrumentation deployed at the site include: a) an optical particle counter, b) a 7-wavelength aethalometer to measure black carbon equivalent mass concentration, c) a 3-wavelength nephelometer to measure total and backward light scattering, d) four high volume samplers for aerosol chemical characterization, and e) a sequential aerosol sampler and a 4-stage impactor to collect particles on different substrates for microscopy analysis. The origin and transport pathways of the air masses sampled at the site are determined using FLEXible PARTicle (FLEXPART) dispersion modeling retroplume analysis. Single particle morphology and mixing states were determined using electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. This study provides an overview of different types of aerosol collected at Pico Mountain Observatory. We investigated morphology and mixing of various types of particles, including dust, soot, salt and organic particles transported to the Observatory. Soot particles were often mixed/coated with other material and exhibited very compact shape. Dust particles were often mixed with sulfur containing species. We also observed dust particles that were mixed with coated soot particles. During some events, we observed soot and sulfate aerosol trapped within organic matter. The results of this study have implications on how aerosol particles and their internal mixing can be represented in numerical models for remote regions of the free troposphere.

  7. DNA damage in rats after a single oral exposure to diesel exhaust particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Risom, Lotte; Wallin, Håkan

    2008-01-01

    The gastrointestinal route of exposure to particulate matter is important because particles are ingested via contaminated foods and inhaled particles are swallowed when removed from the airways by the mucociliary clearance system. We investigated the effect of an intragastric administration by oral...... gavage of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in terms of DNA damage, oxidative stress and DNA repair in colon epithelial cells, liver, and lung of rats. Eight rats per group were exposed to Standard Reference Material 2975 at 0.064 or 0.64 mg/kg bodyweight for 6 and 24 h. Increased levels of 8-oxo-7......,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine lesions were observed at the highest dose after 6 and 24 h in all three organs. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine is repaired by oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1); upregulation of this repair system was observed as elevated pulmonary OGG1 mRNA levels after 24 h at both doses...

  8. Effect of 3-D magnetic fields on neutral particle fueling and exhaust in MAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Kurt; Kremeyer, Thierry; Waters, Ian; Schmitz, Oliver; Kirk, Andrew; Harrison, James

    2017-10-01

    The application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) is used to suppress edge localized modes but causes in many cases a density pump-out. At MAST, this particle pump out was found to be connected to an amplifying MHD plasma response. An analysis is presented on past MAST discharges to understand the effect of these RMPs on the neutral household and on changes in neutral fueling and exhaust during the pump out. A global, 0-D particle balance model was used to study the neutral dynamics and plasma confinement during shots with and without RMP application. Using the D α emission measured by filterscopes and a calibrated 1-D CCD camera, as well as S/XB coefficients determined by the edge plasma parameters, globally averaged ion confinement times were calculated. In L-mode, discharges with RMPs that caused an MHD response had a 15-20% decrease in confinement time but an increase in total recycling flux. The application of RMPs in H-mode caused either a decrease or no change in confinement, like those in L-mode, depending on the configuration of the RMPs and plasma response. A spectroscopically assisted Penning gauge is being prepared for the next campaign at MAST-U to extend this particle balance to study impurity exhaust with RMPs. This work was funded in part by the U.S. DoE under Grant DE-SC0012315.

  9. A recirculation aerosol wind tunnel for evaluating aerosol samplers and measuring particle penetration through protective clothing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaques, Peter A; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Gao, Pengfei

    2011-08-01

    A recirculation aerosol wind tunnel was designed to maintain a uniform airflow and stable aerosol size distribution for evaluating aerosol sampler performance and determining particle penetration through protective clothing materials. The oval-shaped wind tunnel was designed to be small enough to fit onto a lab bench, have optimized dimensions for uniformity in wind speed and particle size distributions, sufficient mixing for even distribution of particles, and minimum particle losses. Performance evaluation demonstrates a relatively high level of spatial uniformity, with a coefficient of variation of 1.5-6.2% for wind velocities between 0.4 and 2.8 m s(-1) and, in this range, 0.8-8.5% for particles between 50 and 450 nm. Aerosol concentration stabilized within the first 5-20 min with, approximately, a count median diameter of 135 nm and geometric standard deviation of 2.20. Negligible agglomerate growth and particle loss are suggested. The recirculation design appears to result in unique features as needed for our research.

  10. Microphysical Properties of Single Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Grazia; Song, Young-Chul; Pereira, Kelly; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Topping, David; Reid, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) deriving from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can account for a substantial fraction of the overall atmospheric aerosol mass.[1] Therefore, the investigation of SOA microphysical properties is crucial to better comprehend their role in the atmospheric processes they are involved in. This works describes a single particle approach to accurately characterise the hygroscopic response, the optical properties and the gas-particle partitioning kinetics of water and semivolatile components for laboratory generated SOA. SOA was generated from the oxidation of different VOCs precursors (e.g. α-pinene, toluene) in a photo-chemical flow reactor, which consists of a temperature and relative humidity controlled 300 L polyvinyl fluoride bag. Known VOC, NOx and ozone concentrations are introduced in the chamber and UV irradiation is performed by means of a Hg pen-ray. SOA samples were collected with an electrical low pressure impactor, wrapped in aluminium foil and kept refrigerated at -20°C. SOA samples were extracted in a 1:1 water/methanol mixture. Single charged SOA particles were generated from the obtained solution using a microdispenser and confined within an electrodynamic balance (EDB), where they sit in a T (250-320 K) and RH (0-95%) controlled nitrogen flow. Suspended droplets are irradiated with a 532 nm laser and the evolving angularly resolved scattered light is used to keep track of changes in droplet size. One of the key features of this experimental approach is that very little SOA solution is required because of the small volumes needed to load the dispensers (20000 s) allow the observation of slow SVOCs evaporation kinetics at different T and RH conditions. Water condensation/evaporation kinetics experiments onto/from trapped SOA droplets following fast RH step changes (<0.5 s) were also performed in order to evaluate possible kinetics limitations to water diffusion in the condensed phase resulting from the

  11. Metal particle emissions in the exhaust stream of diesel engines: an electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liati, Anthi; Schreiber, Daniel; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis; Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira

    2013-12-17

    Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to investigate the morphology, mode of occurrence and chemical composition of metal particles (diesel ash) in the exhaust stream of a small truck outfitted with a typical after-treatment system (a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a downstream diesel particulate filter (DPF)). Ash consists of Ca-Zn-P-Mg-S-Na-Al-K-phases (lube-oil related), Fe, Cr, Ni, Sn, Pb, Sn (engine wear), and Pd (DOC coating). Soot agglomerates of variable sizes (1-5 μm, exceptionally 13 μm), rarely engine wear and escape into the atmosphere.

  12. Molecular Diversity of Sea Spray Aerosol Particles: Impact of Ocean Biology on Particle Composition and Hygroscopicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Richard E.; Laskina, Olga; Trueblood, Jonathan; Estillore, Armando D.; Morris, Holly S.; Jayarathne, Thilina; Sultana, Camile M.; Lee, Christopher; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Dowling, Jackie; Qin, Zhen; Cappa, Christopher; Bertram, Timothy; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Stone, Elizabeth; Prather, Kimberly; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2017-05-01

    The impact of sea spray aerosol (SSA) on climate depends on the size and chemical composition of individual particles that make-up the total SSA ensemble. While the organic fraction of SSA has been characterized from a bulk perspective, there remains a lack of understanding as to the composition of individual particles within the SSA ensemble. To better understand the molecular components within SSA particles and how SSA composition changes with ocean biology, simultaneous measurements of seawater and SSA were made during a month-long mesocosm experiment performed in an ocean-atmosphere facility. Herein, we deconvolute the composition of freshly emitted SSA devoid of anthropogenic and terrestrial influences by characterizing classes of organic compounds as well as specific molecules within individual SSA particles. Analysis of SSA particles show that the diversity of molecules within the organic fraction varies between two size fractions (submicron and supermicron) with contributions from fatty acids, monosaccharides, polysaccharides and siliceous material. Significant changes in the distribution of these compounds within individual particles are observed to coincide with the rise and fall of phytoplankton and bacterial populations within the seawater. Furthermore, water uptake is impacted as shown by hygroscopicity measurements of model systems composed of representative organic compounds. Thus, the how changes in the hygroscopic growth of SSA evolves with composition can be elucidated. Overall, this study provides an important connection between biological processes that control the composition of seawater and changes in single particle composition which will enhances our ability to predict the impact of SSA on climate.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Brown Carbon in Biomass Burning Aerosol Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Peng; Aiona, Paige K.; Li, Ying; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Emissions from biomass burning are a significant source of brown carbon (BrC) in the atmosphere. In this study, we investigate the molecular composition of freshly-emitted biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) samples collected during test burns of selected biomass fuels: sawgrass, peat, ponderosa pine, and black spruce. We characterize individual BrC chromophores present in these samples using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a photodiode array detector and a high-resolution mass spectrometer. We demonstrate that both the overall BrC absorption and the chemical composition of light-absorbing compounds depend significantly on the type of biomass fuels and burning conditions. Common BrC chromophores in the selected BBOA samples include nitro-aromatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives, and polyphenols spanning a wide range of molecular weights, structures, and light absorption properties. A number of biofuel-specific BrC chromophores are observed, indicating that some of them may be used as potential markers of BrC originating from different biomass burning sources. On average, ~50% of the light absorption above 300 nm can be attributed to a limited number of strong BrC chromophores, which may serve as representative light-absorbing species for studying atmospheric processing of BrC aerosol. The absorption coefficients of BBOA are affected by solar photolysis. Specifically, under typical atmospheric conditions, the 300 nm absorbance decays with a half-life of 16 hours. A “molecular corridors” analysis of the BBOA volatility distribution suggests that many BrC compounds in the fresh BBOA have low volatility (<1 g m-1) and will be retained in the particle phase under atmospherically relevant conditions.

  14. Effect of short-term exposure to diesel exhaust particles and carboxylic acids on mitochondrial membrane disruption in airway epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Diesel exhaust has been shown to induce adverse pulmonary health effects; however, the underlying mechanisms for these effects are still unclear. Previous studies have imlplicated mitochondrial dysfunction in the toxicity of diesel exhaust particles (DEP). DEP contain...

  15. Study on Individual PAHs Content in Ultrafine Particles from Solid Fractions of Diesel and Biodiesel Exhaust Fumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Szewczyńska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize PAHs emissions of diesel engine fuelled with diesel and its blend (B20, B40. In the particle phase, PAHs in engine exhausts were collected by fiberglass filters using Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI and then determined by a high performance liquid chromatography with a fluorimetric detector (HPLC-FL. The main content in exhaust gases from diesel engine, regardless the type of applied fuel, is constituted by the particles fraction of diameter <0.25 μm. Particles sized <0.25 μm constituted on average approximately 68% of particles in diesel exhaust gases and approx. 50% of particles emitted by biodiesel B20 and B40. When the B100 bioester additive was applied, the total emission of particles was reduced thus the volume of toxic substances adsorbed on them was lower. The analysis of chemical composition of <0.25 μm exhaust gas fraction showed that there were mainly 3- and 4-ring aromatic hydrocarbons in the exhaust gas of diesel fuel while in B40 single PAHs with the number of rings of 4 and 5 were detected. An application of ELPI permitted a further separation of <0.25 μm particle’s fraction and a real-time determination of interalia number, mass, and surface concentrations.

  16. [Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble organic fraction in fine particles from solid fraction of biodiesel exhaust fumes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pośniak, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into the distribution of fine particles in the biodiesel exhaust fumes (bio-DEP), as well as into the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soluble organic fraction (SOF) in the study fractions. Samples of biodiesel B20 and B40 exhaust combustion fumes were generated at the model station composed of a diesel engine from Diesel TDI 2007 Volkswagen. Sioutas personal cascade impactor (SPCI) with Teflon filters and low-pressure impactor ELIPI (Dekati Low Pressure Impactor) were used for sampling diesel exhaust fine particles. The analysis of PAHs adsorbed on particulate fractions was performed by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC/FL). For the determination of dry residue soluble organic fraction of biodiesel exhaust particles the gravimetric method was used. The combustion exhaust fumes of 100% ON contained mainly naphthalene, acenaphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene and chrysene, whilst the exhaust of B40-single PAHs of 4 and 5 rings, such as chrysene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, dibenzo (ah)anthracene and benzo(ghi)perylene. The total content of PAHs in diesel exhaust particles averaged 910 ng/m3 for 100% ON and 340 ng/m3 for B40. The concentrations of benzo(a)antarcene were at the levels of 310 ng/m3 (100% ON) and 90 ng/m3 (B40). The investigations indicated that a fraction < 025 microm represents the main component of diesel exhaust particles, regardless of the used fuel. Bioester B 100 commonly added to diesel fuel (ON) causes a reduction of the total particulates emission and thus reduces the amount of toxic substances adsorbed on their surface.

  17. Aerosol characteristics and particle production in the upper troposphere over the Amazon Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne observations over the Amazon Basin showed high aerosol particle concentrations in the upper troposphere (UT between 8 and 15 km altitude, with number densities (normalized to standard temperature and pressure often exceeding those in the planetary boundary layer (PBL by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. The measurements were made during the German–Brazilian cooperative aircraft campaign ACRIDICON–CHUVA, where ACRIDICON stands for Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation, and Radiation Interactions and Dynamics of Convective Cloud Systems and CHUVA is the acronym for Cloud Processes of the Main Precipitation Systems in Brazil: A Contribution to Cloud Resolving Modeling and to the GPM (global precipitation measurement, on the German High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft (HALO. The campaign took place in September–October 2014, with the objective of studying tropical deep convective clouds over the Amazon rainforest and their interactions with atmospheric trace gases, aerosol particles, and atmospheric radiation. Aerosol enhancements were observed consistently on all flights during which the UT was probed, using several aerosol metrics, including condensation nuclei (CN and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN number concentrations and chemical species mass concentrations. The UT particles differed sharply in their chemical composition and size distribution from those in the PBL, ruling out convective transport of combustion-derived particles from the boundary layer (BL as a source. The air in the immediate outflow of deep convective clouds was depleted of aerosol particles, whereas strongly enhanced number concentrations of small particles (< 90 nm diameter were found in UT regions that had experienced outflow from deep convection in the preceding 5–72 h. We also found elevated concentrations of larger (> 90 nm particles in the UT, which consisted mostly of organic matter and nitrate and were very effective CCN. Our

  18. Aerosol characteristics and particle production in the upper troposphere over the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.; Afchine, Armin; Albrecht, Rachel; Amorim Holanda, Bruna; Artaxo, Paulo; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Borrmann, Stephan; Cecchini, Micael A.; Costa, Anja; Dollner, Maximilian; Fütterer, Daniel; Järvinen, Emma; Jurkat, Tina; Klimach, Thomas; Konemann, Tobias; Knote, Christoph; Krämer, Martina; Krisna, Trismono; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Mertes, Stephan; Minikin, Andreas; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Sauer, Daniel; Schlager, Hans; Schnaiter, Martin; Schneider, Johannes; Schulz, Christiane; Spanu, Antonio; Sperling, Vinicius B.; Voigt, Christiane; Walser, Adrian; Wang, Jian; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Wendisch, Manfred; Ziereis, Helmut

    2018-01-01

    Airborne observations over the Amazon Basin showed high aerosol particle concentrations in the upper troposphere (UT) between 8 and 15 km altitude, with number densities (normalized to standard temperature and pressure) often exceeding those in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. The measurements were made during the German-Brazilian cooperative aircraft campaign ACRIDICON-CHUVA, where ACRIDICON stands for Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation, and Radiation Interactions and Dynamics of Convective Cloud Systems and CHUVA is the acronym for Cloud Processes of the Main Precipitation Systems in Brazil: A Contribution to Cloud Resolving Modeling and to the GPM (global precipitation measurement), on the German High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft (HALO). The campaign took place in September-October 2014, with the objective of studying tropical deep convective clouds over the Amazon rainforest and their interactions with atmospheric trace gases, aerosol particles, and atmospheric radiation. Aerosol enhancements were observed consistently on all flights during which the UT was probed, using several aerosol metrics, including condensation nuclei (CN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations and chemical species mass concentrations. The UT particles differed sharply in their chemical composition and size distribution from those in the PBL, ruling out convective transport of combustion-derived particles from the boundary layer (BL) as a source. The air in the immediate outflow of deep convective clouds was depleted of aerosol particles, whereas strongly enhanced number concentrations of small particles ( 90 nm) particles in the UT, which consisted mostly of organic matter and nitrate and were very effective CCN. Our findings suggest a conceptual model, where production of new aerosol particles takes place in the continental UT from biogenic volatile organic material brought up by deep convection and converted to condensable

  19. A Micro Aerosol Sensor for the Measurement of Airborne Ultrafine Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Particle number concentration and particle size are the two key parameters used to characterize exposure to airborne nanoparticles or ultrafine particles that have attracted the most attention. This paper proposes a simple micro aerosol sensor for detecting the number concentration and particle size of ultrafine particles with diameters from 50 to 253 nm based on electrical diffusion charging. The sensor is composed of a micro channel and a couple of planar electrodes printed on two circuit boards assembled in parallel, which thus integrate charging, precipitating and measurement elements into one chip, the overall size of which is 98 × 38 × 25 mm3. The experiment results demonstrate that the sensor is useful for measuring monodisperse aerosol particles with number concentrations from 300 to 2.5 × 104 /cm3 and particle sizes from 50 to 253 nm. The aerosol sensor has a simple structure and small size, which is favorable for use in handheld devices.

  20. Hygroscopicity and chemical composition of Antarctic sub-micrometre aerosol particles and observations of new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Asmi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic near-coastal sub-micrometre aerosol particle features in summer were characterised based on measured data on aerosol hygroscopicity, size distributions, volatility and chemical ion and organic carbon mass concentrations. Hysplit model was used to calculate the history of the air masses to predict the particle origin. Additional measurements of meteorological parameters were utilised. The hygroscopic properties of particles mostly resembled those of marine aerosols. The measurements took place at 130 km from the Southern Ocean, which was the most significant factor affecting the particle properties. This is explained by the lack of additional sources on the continent of Antarctica. The Southern Ocean was thus a likely source of the particles and nucleating and condensing vapours. The particles were very hygroscopic (HGF 1.75 at 90 nm and very volatile. Most of the sub-100 nm particle volume volatilised below 100 °C. Based on chemical data, particle hygroscopic and volatile properties were explained by a large fraction of non-neutralised sulphuric acid together with organic material. The hygroscopic growth factors assessed from chemical data were similar to measured. Hygroscopicity was higher in dry continental air masses compared with the moist marine air masses. This was explained by the aging of the marine organic species and lower methanesulphonic acid volume fraction together with the changes in the inorganic aerosol chemistry as the aerosol had travelled long time over the continental Antarctica. Special focus was directed in detailed examination of the observed new particle formation events. Indications of the preference of negative over positive ions in nucleation could be detected. However, in a detailed case study, the neutral particles dominated the particle formation process. Freshly nucleated particles had the smallest hygroscopic growth factors, which increased subsequent to particle aging.

  1. Evaluation of cell sorting aerosols and containment by an optical airborne particle counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mike; Waring, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    Understanding aerosols produced by cell sorting is critical to biosafety risk assessment and validation of containment efficiency. In this study an Optical Airborne Particle Counter was used to analyze aerosols produced by the BD FACSAria and to assess the effectiveness of its aerosol containment. The suitability of using this device to validate containment was directly compared to the Glo-Germ method put forth by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) as a standard for testing. It was found that high concentrations of aerosols ranging from 0.3 µm to 10 µm can be detected in failure mode, with most less than 5 µm. In most cases, while numerous aerosols smaller than 5 µm were detected by the Optical Airborne Particle Counter, no Glo-Germ particles were detected, indicating that small aerosols are under-evaluated by the Glo-Germ method. The results demonstrate that the Optical Airborne Particle Counter offers a rapid, economic, and quantitative analysis of cell sorter aerosols and represents an improved method over Glo-Germ for the task of routine validation and monitoring of aerosol containment for cell sorting. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. Particle-Bound PAH Emission from the Exhaust of Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari Lamjiri, M.; Medrano, Y. S.; Guillaume, D. W.; Khachikian, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are harmful, semi-volatile organic compounds which are generated due to the incomplete combustion of organic substances. PAHs are of concern as a pollutant because some of these compounds are carcinogenic and mutagenic even at low levels. Most of the PAHs are recalcitrant and persistent in the environment. The PAHs carcinogenic potential can be increased by the adsorption onto small size particles (extracting the particles with dichloromethane followed by analysis via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In general, lower molecular weight PAHs emitted from the exhaust of combustion chamber are mostly in gas phase while PAHs of higher molecular weight are adsorbed onto particles. Preliminary results from GC/MS confirm the presence of higher molecular weight PAHs like Benzo[a]pyrene in most of the samples. Better recirculation between air and fuel in higher swirl numbers results in better combustion. In higher swirl numbers, the temperature of the combustion process increases which leads to a more complete combustion. Another result of higher swirl number is a longer residence time which allows the organic substances in the fuel to remain in the reaction longer and also leads to a more complete combustion. The preliminary results from particle analyzer show that the abundance ratio of smaller particles to larger particles increases at higher swirl numbers. For example, at swirl 86, the abundance ratio of 0.3 micron particles to 0.7 micron particles was 400 while at swirl 0, this ratio was 35. Smaller particles have higher specific surface area which allows for more PAH adsorption. The preliminary results show that operating the jet engine at higher swirl numbers can have positive or negative effects on particle-bound PAH emissions. Higher temperature and residence time as well as better mixture of fuel and air can reduce PAH emission while generating more small size particles can increase surface available for PAH

  3. Diesel exhaust particles. Effects of after-treatment, fuel and lubricant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaaraslahti, K.

    2006-07-01

    This thesis concentrates on studying diesel particles which are under a great attention due to their health effects. This has pushed the policymakers worldwide to limit the particle emissions of diesel vehicles. Engine manufacturers are developing their products to achieve the emission limits. Exhaust gas after-treatment systems are becoming general. In addition to fuel more attention is going to be paid to lubricant and its effects on emissions. This has also given the focus to present work, which studies the effects of after-treatment systems, fuels and lubricants on diesel particle emissions. The study utilizes regulated particle emissions measurements as a relevant reference. Although, the main focus is studying the particles further for size and number. This is done using two size distribution measurement devices, SMPS and ELPI. Only steady state driving conditions are used as they serve stable conditions for studying the particle formation using different after-treatment systems in combination with different fuels and lubricants. Oxidation catalysts and particle filters were used as after-treatment. The study of fuel effect was limited to study the effect of fuel sulfur level on the particle emission. The lubricants used contained both market general formulations and development formulations. The results showed that at high load conditions only soot particles with some absorbed/condensed volatile material were formed. Neither the fuels nor the lubricants tested had any significant effect on the soot particles. An oxidation catalyst was found to effectively reduce the soluble organic fraction but had only minor or no effect on the soot part. A catalyzed filter was found to effectively reduce the soot. At low load conditions in addition to soot particles, nanoparticles were formed. The used lubricant was found to significantly effect the nanoparticle formation although no correlation between the sulfur level and nanoparticles was found in this case. These

  4. Sources markers in aerosols, oceanic particles and sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliot A.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This review presents some diagnostic criteria used for identifying and quantifying terrestrial organic matter inputs to the ocean. Coupled to the isotopic composition of total organic carbon, the analysis of stable biomarkers permits to trace higher plant contributions in aerosols, dusts, sedimenting particles and dissolved phase in the water column and ultimately in recent and ancient sediments and soils. Some applications are presented, based on the analysis of n-alkyl compounds by a combination of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (n-alkanes, n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids and wax esters. Another approach has been developed using the analysis of macromolecular compounds present in higher plants. Abundances of the phenolic compounds from lignin, benzene carboxylic acids obtained during cupric oxide oxidation, Curie pyrolysis are used to characterise terrestrial organic matter sources and inputs. Finally due to the importance of biomass burning in continent-ocean transfers, biomarkers are presented in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon class and for monosaccharide derivatives from the breakdown of cellulose.

  5. Estimating marine aerosol particle volume and number from Maritime Aerosol Network data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Sayer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD, aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The "average solution" MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the "best solution" dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data. However, without accurate AOD data and prior knowledge of

  6. Aerosol fluxes and particle growth above managed grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Particle deposition velocities (11–3000 nm diameter measured above grassland by eddy covariance during the EU GRAMINAE experiment in June 2000 averaged 0.24 and 0.03 mm s−1 to long (0.75 m and short (0.07 m grass, respectively. After fertilisation with 108 kg N ha−1 as calcium ammonium nitrate, sustained apparent upward fluxes of particles were observed. Analysis of concentrations and fluxes of potential precursor gases, including NH3, HNO3, HCl and selected VOCs, shows that condensation of HNO3 and NH3 on the surface of existing particles is responsible for this effect. A novel approach is developed to derive particle growth rates at the field scale, from a combination of measurements of vertical fluxes and particle size-distributions. For the first 9 days after fertilization, growth rates of 11 nm particles of 7.04 nm hr−1 and 1.68 nm hr−1 were derived for day and night-time conditions, respectively. This implies total NH4NO3 production rates of 1.11 and 0.44 μg m−3 h−1, respectively. The effect translates into a small error in measured ammonia fluxes (0.06% day, 0.56% night and a large error in NH4+ and NO3 aerosol fluxes of 3.6% and 10%, respectively. By converting rapidly exchanged NH3 and HNO3 into slowly depositing NH4NO3, the reaction modifies the total N budget, though this effect is small (<1% for the 10 days following fertilization, as NH3 emission dominates the net flux. It is estimated that 3.8% of the fertilizer N was volatilised as NH3, of which 0.05% re-condensed to form NH4NO3 particles within the lowest 2 m of the surface layer. This surface induced process would at least scale up to a global NH4NO3 formation of ca. 0.21 kt N yr

  7. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 μm sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds.

  8. On the relation between the size and chemical composition of aerosol particles and their optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, A.; Mészáros, E.

    The light scattering and absorption coefficients of fine atmospheric aerosol particles were recorded in Hungary under rural conditions in 1998-1999 by an integrating nephelometer and particle soot absorption photometer, respectively. In some cases optical properties in the fine size range were compared to those in the coarse particles. Results obtained indicate, as expected, that fine particles control the scattering and absorption caused by the aerosol. In 1999 the size distribution of aerosol particles was also monitored by means of an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI). This makes it possible the study of the relationship between the number, surface and mass concentration in the size range of 0.1-1.0 μm and the optical characteristics by also considering the chemical composition of the particles.

  9. Inside versus Outside: Ion Redistribution in Nitric Acid Reacted Sea Spray Aerosol Particles as Determined by Single Particle Analysis (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, A. P.; Guasco, T.; Ryder, O. S.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Collins, D. B.; Ruppel, M. J.; Bertram, T. H.; Prather, K. A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles were generated under real-world conditions using natural seawater and a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves or a marine aerosol reference tank (MART) that replicates those conditions. The SSA particles were exposed to nitric acid in situ in a flow tube and the well-known chloride displacement and nitrate formation reaction was observed. However, as discussed here, little is known about how this anion displacement reaction affects the distribution of cations and other chemical constituents within and phase state of individual SSA particles. Single particle analysis of individual SSA particles shows that cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) within individual particles undergo a spatial redistribution after heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid, along with a more concentrated layer of organic matter at the surface of the particle. These data suggest that specific ion and aerosol pH effects play an important role in aerosol particle structure in ways that have not been previously recognized. The ordering of organic coatings can impact trace gas uptake, and subsequently impact trace gas budgets of O3 and NOx.

  10. EVALUATION OF DISPERSED PARTICLE CONTENT IN EXHAUST GAS OF DIESEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Kuharonak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollution of an atmosphere due to hazardous substances emissions deteriorates ecological environment in the world. Exhaust gases of diesel engines are considered as one of the main environmental pollutants. At the moment it is not possible to determine rate and limits of threshold level of air pollution which do not affect human health. The paper considers current issues pertaining to regulation and control over dispersed particles. The most convenient measuring methods for investigations are those which provide the opportunity to obtain immediate results. However, from the legislative point of view, a gravimetric investigation method is a legitimate one which requires compliance with certain procedures of adjustments and calculations. The method presupposes availability of complicated system for sample dilution and its adjustment must include temperature and kinetic parameters of the measured flow. In order to ensure measuring accuracy and results reproducibility filter loading should be in a regulated range and dilution parameters should be chosen according to not only engine type but also according to its emissions rate. Methods for evaluation of a hot exhaust gas sample is characterized by higher response and the results correlate with indices of combustion efficiency. However, such approach does not account for a number of processes that take place during gas cooling in the environment. Therefore, in this case, measuring results are to be evaluated within certain boundary conditions with respect to the object of investigations. Difficulty in achievement of modern ecologocal standards is substantiated by complicated fractional composition and multiple stage process in formation of hazardous components. The paper presents calculated dependences between particles and smokiness and contains a comparative analysis. Methods for measurement and investigations of dispersed particles have analyzed on the basis of the results obtainesd during engine

  11. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3- aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Ayres, B. R.; Ault, A.; Bondy, A.; Takahama, S.; Modini, R. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Knote, C.; Laskin, A.; Wang, B.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA) revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3-) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of supermicron crustal and sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 μm) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of crustal dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. Calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3- is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral cation-containing aerosol surface area. Modeling of NO3- and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas-aerosol phase partitioning.

  12. Exacerbation of allergic inflammation in mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles prior to viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chason Kelly D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral infections and exposure to oxidant air pollutants are two of the most important inducers of asthma exacerbation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to diesel exhaust increases the susceptibility to influenza virus infections both in epithelial cells in vitro and in mice in vivo. Therefore, we examined whether in the setting of allergic asthma, exposure to oxidant air pollutants enhances the susceptibility to respiratory virus infections, which in turn leads to increased virus-induced exacerbation of asthma. Ovalbumin-sensitized (OVA male C57BL/6 mice were instilled with diesel exhaust particles (DEP or saline and 24 hours later infected with influenza A/PR/8. Animals were sacrificed 24 hours post-infection and analyzed for markers of lung injury, allergic inflammation, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Results Exposure to DEP or infection with influenza alone had no significant effects on markers of injury or allergic inflammation. However, OVA-sensitized mice that were exposed to DEP and subsequently infected with influenza showed increased levels of eosinophils in lung lavage and tissue. In addition Th2-type cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13, and markers of eosinophil chemotaxis, such as CCL11 and CCR3, were increased in OVA-sensitized mice exposed to DEP prior to infection with influenza. These mice also showed increased levels of IL-1α, but not IL-10, RANTES, and MCP-1 in lung homogenates. Conclusion These data suggest that in the setting of allergic asthma, exposure to diesel exhaust could enhance virus-induced exacerbation of allergic inflammation.

  13. Regional particle size dependent deposition of inhaled aerosols in rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Philip J; Anderson, Tamara L; Candelaria, Gabriel; Gershman, Benjamin; Harlin, Ky; Hesterman, Jacob Y; Holmes, Thomas; Hoppin, John; Lackas, Christian; Norenberg, Jeffrey P; Yu, Hongang; McDonald, Jacob D

    2012-01-01

    The current data analysis tools in nuclear medicine have not been used to evaluate intra organ regional deposition patterns of pharmaceutical aerosols in preclinical species. This study evaluates aerosol deposition patterns as a function of particle size in rats and mice using novel image analysis techniques. Mice and rats were exposed to radiolabeled polydisperse aerosols at 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 µm MMAD followed by SPECT/CT imaging for deposition analysis. Images were quantified for both macro deposition patterns and regional deposition analysis using the LRRI-developed Onion Model. The deposition fraction in both rats and mice was shown to increase as the particle size decreased, with greater lung deposition in rats at all particle sizes. The Onion Model indicated that the smaller particle sizes resulted in increased peripheral deposition. These data contrast the commonly used 10% deposition fraction for all aerosols between 1.0 and 5.0 µm and indicate that lung deposition fraction in this range does change with particle size. When compared to historical data, the 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 µm particles result in similar lung deposition fractions; however, the 0.5 µm lung deposition fraction is markedly different. This is probably caused by the current aerosols that were polydisperse to reflect current pharmaceutical aerosols, while the historical data were generated with monodisperse aerosols. The deposition patterns of aerosols between 0.5 and 5.0 µm showed an increase in both overall and peripheral deposition as the particle size decreased. The Onion Model allows a more complex analysis of regional deposition in preclinical models.

  14. Reconciling satellite aerosol optical thickness and surface fine particle mass through aerosol liquid water: ALW AND AOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thien Khoi V. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick New Jersey USA; Ghate, Virendra P. [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois USA; Carlton, Annmarie G. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine California USA

    2016-11-22

    Summertime aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over the Southeast U.S. is sharply enhanced over wintertime values. This seasonal pattern is unique and of particular interest because temperatures there have not warmed over the past 100 years. Patterns in surface fine particle mass are inconsistent with satellite reported AOT. In this work, we attempt to reconcile the spatial and temporal distribution of AOT over the U.S. with particle mass measurements at the surface by examining trends in aerosol liquid water (ALW), a particle constituent that scatters radiation affecting the satellite AOT, but is removed in mass measurements at routine surface monitoring sites. We employ the thermodynamic model ISORROPIAv2.1 to estimate ALW mass concentrations at IMRPOVE sites using measured ion mass concentrations and NARR meteorological data. Our findings suggest ALW provides a plausible explanation for the geographical and seasonal patterns in AOT and can reconcile previously noted discrepancies with surface mass measurements.

  15. Metal and silicate particles including nanoparticles are present in electronic cigarette cartomizer fluid and aerosol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Williams

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (EC deliver aerosol by heating fluid containing nicotine. Cartomizer EC combine the fluid chamber and heating element in a single unit. Because EC do not burn tobacco, they may be safer than conventional cigarettes. Their use is rapidly increasing worldwide with little prior testing of their aerosol.We tested the hypothesis that EC aerosol contains metals derived from various components in EC.Cartomizer contents and aerosols were analyzed using light and electron microscopy, cytotoxicity testing, x-ray microanalysis, particle counting, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.The filament, a nickel-chromium wire, was coupled to a thicker copper wire coated with silver. The silver coating was sometimes missing. Four tin solder joints attached the wires to each other and coupled the copper/silver wire to the air tube and mouthpiece. All cartomizers had evidence of use before packaging (burn spots on the fibers and electrophoretic movement of fluid in the fibers. Fibers in two cartomizers had green deposits that contained copper. Centrifugation of the fibers produced large pellets containing tin. Tin particles and tin whiskers were identified in cartridge fluid and outer fibers. Cartomizer fluid with tin particles was cytotoxic in assays using human pulmonary fibroblasts. The aerosol contained particles >1 µm comprised of tin, silver, iron, nickel, aluminum, and silicate and nanoparticles (<100 nm of tin, chromium and nickel. The concentrations of nine of eleven elements in EC aerosol were higher than or equal to the corresponding concentrations in conventional cigarette smoke. Many of the elements identified in EC aerosol are known to cause respiratory distress and disease.The presence of metal and silicate particles in cartomizer aerosol demonstrates the need for improved quality control in EC design and manufacture and studies on how EC aerosol impacts the health of users and bystanders.

  16. Sub 2 nm Particle Characterization in Systems with Aerosol Formation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang

    Aerosol science and technology enable continual advances in material synthesis and atmospheric pollutant control. Among these advances, one important frontier is characterizing the initial stages of particle formation by real time measurement of particles below 2 nm in size. Sub 2 nm particles play important roles by acting as seeds for particle growth, ultimately determining the final properties of the generated particles. Tailoring nanoparticle properties requires a thorough understanding and precise control of the particle formation processes, which in turn requires characterizing nanoparticle formation from the initial stages. The knowledge on particle formation in early stages can also be applied in quantum dot synthesis and material doping. This dissertation pursued two approaches in investigating incipient particle characterization in systems with aerosol formation and growth: (1) using a high-resolution differential mobility analyzer (DMA) to measure the size distributions of sub 2 nm particles generated from high-temperature aerosol reactors, and (2) analyzing the physical and chemical pathways of aerosol formation during combustion. Part. 1. Particle size distributions reveal important information about particle formation dynamics. DMAs are widely utilized to measure particle size distributions. However, our knowledge of the initial stages of particle formation is incomplete, due to the Brownian broadening effects in conventional DMAs. The first part of this dissertation studied the applicability of high-resolution DMAs in characterizing sub 2 nm particles generated from high-temperature aerosol reactors, including a flame aerosol reactor (FLAR) and a furnace aerosol reactor (FUAR). Comparison against a conventional DMA (Nano DMA, Model 3085, TSI Inc.) demonstrated that the increased sheath flow rates and shortened residence time indeed greatly suppressed the diffusion broadening effect in a high-resolution DMA (half mini type). The incipient particle

  17. DNA damage in lung after oral exposure to diesel exhaust particles in Big Blue (R) rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne Kirstine; Farombi, E.O.; Møller, P.

    2004-01-01

    . Lung tissue is a target organ for DEP induced cancer following inhalation. Recent studies have provided evidence that the lung is also a target organ for DNA damage and cancer after oral exposure to other complex mixtures of PAHs. The genotoxic effect of oral administration of DEP was investigated......Several chemical mutagens and carcinogens, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrated PAHs, are adsorbed to the surface of diesel exhaust particles (DEP). DEP can induce formation of reactive oxygen species and cause oxidative DNA damage as well as bulky carcinogen DNA adducts......, in terms of markers of DNA damage, mutations and repair, in the lung of Big Blue(R) rats fed a diet with 0, 0.2, 0.8, 2, 8, 20 or 80 mg DEP/kg feed for 21 days. There was no significant increase in the mutation frequency in the cII gene. However, an increase of DNA damage measured as DNA strand breaks...

  18. Airborne observations of aerosol microphysical properties and particle ageing processes in the troposphere above Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hamburger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties were performed in May 2008 during the EUCAARI-LONGREX campaign. Two aircraft, the FAAM BAe-146 and DLR Falcon 20, operated from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. A comprehensive data set was obtained comprising the wider region of Europe north of the Alps throughout the whole tropospheric column. Prevailing stable synoptic conditions enabled measurements of accumulating emissions inside the continental boundary layer reaching a maximum total number concentration of 19 000 particles cm−3 stp. Ultra-fine particles as indicators for nucleation events were observed within the boundary layer during high pressure conditions and after updraft of emissions induced by frontal passages above 8 km altitude in the upper free troposphere. Aerosol ageing processes during air mass transport are analysed using trajectory analysis. The ratio of particles containing a non-volatile core (250 °C to the total aerosol number concentration was observed to increase within the first 12 to 48 h from the particle source from 50 to 85% due to coagulation. Aged aerosol also features an increased fraction of accumulation mode particles of approximately 40% of the total number concentration. The presented analysis provides an extensive data set of tropospheric aerosol microphysical properties on a continental scale which can be used for atmospheric aerosol models and comparisons of satellite retrievals.

  19. In Situ Single Particle Measurement of Atmospheric Aging of Carbonaceous Aerosols During CARES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, J. F.; Suski, K.; Hubbe, J.; Shilling, J.; Zaveri, R. A.; Springston, S. R.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aging of aerosols through photochemistry, heterogeneous reactions and aqueous processing can change their physical and chemical properties, impacting their gas uptake, radiative forcing, and activation of cloud nuclei. Understanding the timescale and magnitude of this aging process is essential for accurate aerosol-climate modeling and predictions. An aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (A-ATOFMS) measured single particle mixing state during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in the summer of 2010 over Sacramento, CA. On 6/23/10, flights in the morning and afternoon performed pseudo-Lagrangian sampling of the Sacramento urban plume. Carbonaceous particles from these flights were classified into 'aged' and 'fresh' classes based on their mixing state, with aged particles having more secondary species, such as nitrate and sulfate. In the morning flight, a clear decreasing trend in the ratio of fresh/aged particle types was seen as the flight progressed, whereas in the afternoon flight, the ratio was essentially constant. These data show that in the morning carbonaceous aerosols can become heavily oxidized in a few hours. Further analysis of particle mixing state and the timescale of carbonaceous aerosol aging will be presented

  20. Size Resolved Measurements of Springtime Aerosol Particles over the Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Samuel A.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Cliff, Stephen S.; Zhao, Yongjing; Lin, Neng-Huei; Tsay, Si-Chee; Chu, Yu-Chi; Westphal, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    Large sources of aerosol particles and their precursors are ubiquitous in East Asia. Such sources are known to impact the South China Sea (henceforth SCS), a sometimes heavily polluted region that has been suggested as particularly vulnerable to climate change. To help elucidate springtime aerosol transport into the SCS, an intensive study was performed on the remote Dongsha (aka Pratas) Islands Atoll in spring 2010. As part of this deployment, a Davis Rotating-drum Uniform size-cut Monitor (DRUM) cascade impactor was deployed to collect size-resolved aerosol samples at the surface that were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence for concentrations of selected elements. HYSPLIT backtrajectories indicated that the transport of aerosol observed at the surface at Dongsha was occurring primarily from regions generally to the north and east. This observation was consistent with the apparent persistence of pollution and dust aerosol, along with sea salt, in the ground-based dataset. In contrast to the sea-level observations, modeled aerosol transport suggested that the westerly flow aloft (w700 hPa) transported smoke-laden air toward the site from regions from the south and west. Measured aerosol optical depth at the site was highest during time periods of modeled heavy smoke loadings aloft. These periods did not coincide with elevated aerosol concentrations at the surface, although the model suggested sporadic mixing of this free-tropospheric aerosol to the surface over the SCS. A biomass burning signature was not clearly identified in the surface aerosol composition data, consistent with this aerosol type remaining primarily aloft and not mixing strongly to the surface during the study. Significant vertical wind shear in the region also supports the idea that different source regions lead to varying aerosol impacts in different vertical layers, and suggests the potential for considerable vertical inhomogeneity in the SCS aerosol environment.

  1. Influenza virus aerosols in human exhaled breath: particle size, culturability, and effect of surgical masks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald K Milton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The CDC recommends that healthcare settings provide influenza patients with facemasks as a means of reducing transmission to staff and other patients, and a recent report suggested that surgical masks can capture influenza virus in large droplet spray. However, there is minimal data on influenza virus aerosol shedding, the infectiousness of exhaled aerosols, and none on the impact of facemasks on viral aerosol shedding from patients with seasonal influenza. We collected samples of exhaled particles (one with and one without a facemask in two size fractions ("coarse">5 µm, "fine"≤5 µm from 37 volunteers within 5 days of seasonal influenza onset, measured viral copy number using quantitative RT-PCR, and tested the fine-particle fraction for culturable virus. Fine particles contained 8.8 (95% CI 4.1 to 19 fold more viral copies than did coarse particles. Surgical masks reduced viral copy numbers in the fine fraction by 2.8 fold (95% CI 1.5 to 5.2 and in the coarse fraction by 25 fold (95% CI 3.5 to 180. Overall, masks produced a 3.4 fold (95% CI 1.8 to 6.3 reduction in viral aerosol shedding. Correlations between nasopharyngeal swab and the aerosol fraction copy numbers were weak (r = 0.17, coarse; r = 0.29, fine fraction. Copy numbers in exhaled breath declined rapidly with day after onset of illness. Two subjects with the highest copy numbers gave culture positive fine particle samples. Surgical masks worn by patients reduce aerosols shedding of virus. The abundance of viral copies in fine particle aerosols and evidence for their infectiousness suggests an important role in seasonal influenza transmission. Monitoring exhaled virus aerosols will be important for validation of experimental transmission studies in humans.

  2. Investigating the use of secondary organic aerosol as seed particles in simulation chamber experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Hamilton

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of β-caryophyllene secondary organic aerosol particles as seeds for smog chamber simulations has been investigated. A series of experiments were carried out in the Manchester photochemical chamber as part of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES project to study the effect of seed particles on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA from limonene photo-oxidation. Rather than use a conventional seed aerosol containing ammonium sulfate or diesel particles, a method was developed to use in-situ chamber generated seed particles from β-caryophyllene photo-oxidation, which were then diluted to a desired mass loading (in this case 4–13 μg m−3. Limonene was then introduced into the chamber and oxidised, with the formation of SOA seen as a growth in the size of oxidised organic seed particles from 150 to 325 nm mean diameter. The effect of the partitioning of limonene oxidation products onto the seed aerosol was assessed using aerosol mass spectrometry during the experiment and the percentage of m/z 44, an indicator of degree of oxidation, increased from around 5 to 8 %. The hygroscopicity of the aerosol also changed, with the growth factor for 200 nm particles increasing from less than 1.05 to 1.25 at 90 % RH. The detailed chemical composition of the limonene SOA could be extracted from the complex β-caryophyllene matrix using two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. High resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICR-MS was used to determine exact molecular formulae of the seed and the limonene modified aerosol. The average O:C ratio was seen to increase from 0.32 to 0.37 after limonene oxidation products had condensed onto the organic seed.

  3. Aerosol Particle Number Emissions and Size Distributions: Implementation in the GAINS Model and Initial Results

    OpenAIRE

    Paasonen, P.; Visshedjik, A.; Kupiainen, K.; Klimont, Z.; Denier van der Gon, H.; Kulmala, M.

    2013-01-01

    Particulate matter affects our health and climate. In addition to well based knowledge on the adverse health effects related to particle mass concentrations, there is increasing evidence showing that the number concentrations of ultra-fine aerosol particles, with diameters below 0.1 um, have negative health impacts, which are significantly different from those caused by larger particles with sizes over 1 um. Particles with diameters between 0.1 and 1 um can also be activated as cloud droplets...

  4. Role of TLR4 in olfactory-based spatial learning activity of neonatal mice after developmental exposure to diesel exhaust origin secondary organic aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nway, Nay Chi; Fujitani, Yuji; Hirano, Seishiro; Mar, Ohn; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollutants has been reported to have various adverse health impacts. Ambient particulate matter comprises primary particles released directly via engine exhaust and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) formed from oxidative reactions of the ultrafine particle fraction of diesel exhaust (DE). Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is well known to initiate the inflammatory cascade in the central nervous system. However, whether and how DE and DE-SOA exposure influences TLR4 signaling in the immature brain remains unclear. We attempted to evaluate the roles of TLR-4, inflammatory mediators and microglial markers in the impaired spatial learning ability of neonatal mice exposed to DE and DE-SOAs. Pregnant C3H/HeN (TLR4-intact) and C3H/HeJ (TLR4- mutated) mice were exposed to clean air, DE or DE-SOA from gestational day 14 to postnatal day (PND) 10 (5h/day for 5days) in exposure chambers. PND11 neonatal mice were examined for their performance in the olfactory-based spatial learning test. After the spatial learning test, the hippocampi of the mice were removed and real-time RT-PCR analysis was performed to examine the neurological and immunological markers. Both male and female C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ neonatal mice exposed to DE and DE-SOAs showed poor performance in the test phase of spatial learning as compared to the mice exposed to clean air. However, this spatial learning deficit was prominent in C3H/HeJ neonatal mice. In the neonatal C3H/HeN male mice exposed to DE and DE-SOAs, the mRNA expression levels of the NMDA receptor subunits (NR1, NR2B), proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α and cyclooxygenase-2, oxidative stress marker, heme oxygenase-1, and microglial marker, Iba1, in the hippocampus were significantly increased, but these changes were not observed in female mice. Our findings indicate that activation of the neuroimmune system and TLR4 signaling may possibly be involved in environmental pollutant-induced spatial learning impairment

  5. Formation characteristics of aerosol particles from pulverized coal pyrolysis in high-temperature environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Du, Shan-Wen; Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Wu, Jheng-Syun

    2008-05-01

    The formation characteristics of aerosol particles from pulverized coal pyrolysis in high temperatures are studied experimentally. By conducting a drop-tube furnace, fuel pyrolysis processes in industrial furnaces are simulated in which three different reaction temperatures of 1000, 1200, and 1400 degrees C are considered. Experimental observations indicate that when the reaction temperature is 1000 degrees C, submicron particles are produced, whereas the particle size is dominated by nanoscale for the temperature of 1400 degrees C. Thermogravimetric analysis of the aerosol particles stemming from the pyrolysis temperature of 1000 degrees C reveals that the thermal behavior of the aerosol is characterized by a three-stage reaction with increasing heating temperature: (1) a volatile-reaction stage, (2) a weak-reaction stage, and (3) a soot-reaction stage. However, with the pyrolysis temperature of 1400 degrees C, the volatile- and weak-reaction stages almost merge together and evolve into a chemical-frozen stage. The submicron particles (i.e., 1000 degrees C) are mainly composed of volatiles, tar, and soot, with the main component of the nanoscale particles (i.e., 1400 degrees C) being soot. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in the aerosols are also analyzed. It is found that the PAH content in generated aerosols decreases dramatically as the pyrolysis temperature increases.

  6. [Hygroscopic Properties of Aerosol Particles in North Suburb of Nanjing in Spring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Ze-feng; Li, Yan-weil; Qin, Xin; Miao, Qing; Shen, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol particles have significant effects on spectral distribution, CCN activation, climate forcing, human health and so on. A Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) was utilized to analyze the hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles in the northern suburb of Nanjing during 16 April to 21 May, 2014. At relative humidity (RH) of 90%, for particles with dry diameters 30-230 nm, the probability distribution of GF (GF-PDF) shows a distinct bimodal pattern, with a dominant more-hygroscopic group and a smaller less-hygroscopic group. A contrast analysis between day and night suggests that, aerosol particles during day time have a stronger hygroscopicity and a higher number fraction of more-hygroscopic group than that at night overall. Aerosol particles during night have a higher degree of externally mixed state. Backward trajectory analysis using HYSPLIT mode reveals that, the sampling site is mainly affected by three air masses. For aitken nuclei, northwest continental air masses experience a longer aging process and have a stronger hygroscopicity. For condensation nuclei, east air masses have a stronger hygroscopicity and have a higher number fraction of more-hygroscopic group. Aerosol particles in local air masses have a high number fraction of more-hygroscopic group in the whole diameter range.

  7. Characterization of a Quadrotor Unmanned Aircraft System for Aerosol-Particle-Concentration Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, James M; Stokes, M Dale; Bonnardel, Jim; Bertram, Timothy H

    2016-02-02

    High-spatial-resolution, near-surface vertical profiling of atmospheric chemical composition is currently limited by the availability of experimental platforms that can sample in constrained environments. As a result, measurements of near-surface gradients in trace gas and aerosol particle concentrations have been limited to studies conducted from fixed location towers or tethered balloons. Here, we explore the utility of a quadrotor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) as a sampling platform to measure vertical and horizontal concentration gradients of trace gases and aerosol particles at high spatial resolution (1 m) within the mixed layer (0-100 m). A 3D Robotics Iris+ autonomous quadrotor UAS was outfitted with a sensor package consisting of a two-channel aerosol optical particle counter and a CO2 sensor. The UAS demonstrated high precision in both vertical (±0.5 m) and horizontal positions (±1 m), highlighting the potential utility of quadrotor UAS drones for aerosol- and trace-gas measurements within complex terrain, such as the urban environment, forest canopies, and above difficult-to-access areas such as breaking surf. Vertical profiles of aerosol particle number concentrations, acquired from flights conducted along the California coastline, were used to constrain sea-spray aerosol-emission rates from coastal wave breaking.

  8. Aerosolization, Chemical Characterization, Hygroscopicity and Ice Formation of Marine Biogenic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The oceans cover the majority of the earth's surface, host nearly half the total global primary productivity and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. However, effects of biological activity on sea spray generation and composition, and subsequent cloud formation are not well understood. Our goal is to elucidate these effects which will be particularly important over nutrient rich seas, where microorganisms can reach concentrations of 10^9 per mL and along with transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) can become aerosolized. Here we report the results of mesocosm experiments in which bubbles were generated by two methods, either recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits, in natural or artificial seawater containing bacteria and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Over time we followed the size distribution of aerosolized particles as well as their hygroscopicity, heterogeneous ice nucleation potential, and individual physical-chemical characteristics. Numbers of cells and the mass of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), TEP (which includes polysaccharide-containing microgels and nanogels >0.4 μm in diameter) were determined in the bulk water, the surface microlayer, and aerosolized material. Aerosolized particles were also impacted onto substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, elemental analysis using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), and determination of carbon bonding with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Regardless of bubble generation method, the overall concentration of aerosol particles, TEP, POC and DOC increased as concentrations of bacterial and phytoplankton cells increased, stabilized, and subsequently declined. Particles cloud formation and potential

  9. Tire-tread and bitumen particle concentrations in aerosol and soil samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Tjell, Jens Christian; Mosbæk, Hans

    2002-01-01

    ire and bitumen particle concentrations are determined in aerosol and soil samples. They each constitute about 5 wt-% of the total suspended particulate matter (TSP) in inner city air, collected with a Berner low pressure impactor, 5 m from a road. The particle size distribution shows that 92...

  10. A comparison between tracer gas and aerosol particles distribution indoors: The impact of ventilation rate, interaction of airflows, and presence of objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivolarova, M; Ondráček, J; Melikov, A; Ždímal, V

    2017-11-01

    The study investigated the separate and combined effects of ventilation rate, free convection flow produced by a thermal manikin, and the presence of objects on the distribution of tracer gas and particles in indoor air. The concentration of aerosol particles and tracer gas was measured in a test room with mixing ventilation. Three layouts were arranged: an empty room, an office room with an occupant sitting in front of a table, and a single-bed hospital room. The room occupant was simulated by a thermal manikin. Monodisperse particles of three sizes (0.07, 0.7, and 3.5 μm) and nitrous oxide tracer gas were generated simultaneously at the same location in the room. The particles and gas concentrations were measured in the bulk room air, in the breathing zone of the manikin, and in the exhaust air. Within the breathing zone of the sitting occupant, the tracer gas emerged as reliable predictor for the exposure to all different-sized test particles. A change in the ventilation rate did not affect the difference in concentration distribution between tracer gas and larger particle sizes. Increasing the room surface area did not influence the similarity in the dispersion of the aerosol particles and the tracer gas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Secondary Organic Aerosol Coating Formation and Evaporation: Chamber Studies Using Black Carbon Seed Aerosol and the Single-Particle Soot Photometer

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalf, Andrew R.; Loza, Christine L.; Coggon, Matthew M.; Craven, Jill S; Haflidi H. Jonsson; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H.

    2013-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02786826.2012.750712 We report a protocol for using black carbon (BC) aerosol as the seed for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in an environmental chamber. We employ a single-particle soot photometer (SP2) to probe single-particle SOA coating growth dynamics and find that SOA growth on nonspherical BC aerosol is diffusion- limited. Aerosol composition measurements with an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-...

  12. Cytokine expression in mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles by inhalation. Role of tumor necrosis factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loft Steffen

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate air pollution has been associated with lung and cardiovascular disease, for which lung inflammation may be a driving mechanism. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF has been suggested to have a key-role in particle-induced inflammation. We studied the time course of gene expression of inflammatory markers in the lungs of wild type mice and Tnf-/- mice after exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs. Mice were exposed to either a single or multiple doses of DEP by inhalation. We measured the mRNA level of the cytokines Tnf and interleukin-6 (Il-6 and the chemokines, monocyte chemoattractant protein (Mcp-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (Mip-2 and keratinocyte derived chemokine (Kc in the lung tissue at different time points after exposure. Results Tnf mRNA expression levels increased late after DEP-inhalation, whereas the expression levels of Il-6, Mcp-1 and Kc increased early. The expression of Mip-2 was independent of TNF if the dose was above a certain level. The expression levels of the cytokines Kc, Mcp-1 and Il-6, were increased in the absence of TNF. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that Tnf is not important in early DEP induced inflammation and rather exerts negative influence on Mcp-1 and Kc mRNA levels. This suggests that other signalling pathways are important, a candidate being one involving Mcp-1.

  13. Glyoxal processing by aerosol multiphase chemistry: towards a kinetic modeling framework of secondary organic aerosol formation in aqueous particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ervens

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a modeling framework based on laboratory data to describe the kinetics of glyoxal reactions that form secondary organic aerosol (SOA in aqueous aerosol particles. Recent laboratory results on glyoxal reactions are reviewed and a consistent set of empirical reaction rate constants is derived that captures the kinetics of glyoxal hydration and subsequent reversible and irreversible reactions in aqueous inorganic and water-soluble organic aerosol seeds. Products of these processes include (a oligomers, (b nitrogen-containing products, (c photochemical oxidation products with high molecular weight. These additional aqueous phase processes enhance the SOA formation rate in particles and yield two to three orders of magnitude more SOA than predicted based on reaction schemes for dilute aqueous phase (cloud chemistry for the same conditions (liquid water content, particle size.

    The application of the new module including detailed chemical processes in a box model demonstrates that both the time scale to reach aqueous phase equilibria and the choice of rate constants of irreversible reactions have a pronounced effect on the predicted atmospheric relevance of SOA formation from glyoxal. During day time, a photochemical (most likely radical-initiated process is the major SOA formation pathway forming ∼5 μg m−3 SOA over 12 h (assuming a constant glyoxal mixing ratio of 300 ppt. During night time, reactions of nitrogen-containing compounds (ammonium, amines, amino acids contribute most to the predicted SOA mass; however, the absolute predicted SOA masses are reduced by an order of magnitude as compared to day time production. The contribution of the ammonium reaction significantly increases in moderately acidic or neutral particles (5 < pH < 7.

    Glyoxal uptake into ammonium sulfate seed under dark conditions can be represented with a single reaction parameter keffupt that does not depend

  14. Bioassay-directed fractionation and sub-fractionation for mutagenicity and chemical analysis of diesel exhaust particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutlu, E.; Warren, S.H.; Matthews, P.P.; King, C.; Linak, W.P.; Kooter, I.M.; Schmid, J.E.; Ross, J.A.; Ian Gilmour, M.; DeMarini, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Several types of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) have been used for toxicology studies, including a highorganic automobile DEP (A-DEP) from Japan, and a low-organic forklift DEP developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (N-DEP). However, these DEPs were not characterized

  15. Lack of acute phase response in the livers of mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles or carbon black by inhalation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Anne T; Halappanavar, Sabina; Folkmann, Janne K

    2009-01-01

    phase responses, including C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) in humans. In this study we test the hypothesis that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) - or carbon black (CB)-induced lung inflammation initiates an acute phase response in the liver. RESULTS: Mice were exposed to filtered air...

  16. Modeling the Formation and Composition of Secondary Organic Aerosol from Diesel Exhaust Using Parameterized and Semi-Explicit Chemistry and Thermodynamic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluri, Sailaja

    Laboratory-based studies have shown that diesel-powered sources emit volatile organic compounds that can be photo-oxidized in the atmosphere to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA); in some cases, this SOA can exceed direct emissions of particulate matter (PM); PM is a criteria pollutant that is known to have adverse effects on air quality, climate, and human health. However, there are open questions surrounding how these laboratory experiments can be extrapolated to the real atmosphere and how they will help identify the most important species in diesel exhaust that contribute to SOA formation. Jathar et al. (2017) recently performed experiments using an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) to measure the photochemical production of SOA from a diesel engine operated at two different engine loads (idle, load), two fuel types (diesel, biodiesel) and two aftertreatment configurations (with and without an oxidation catalyst and particle filter). In this work, we will use two different SOA models, namely the volatility basis set (VBS) model and the statistical oxidation model (SOM), to simulate the formation, evolution and composition of SOA from the experiments of Jathar et al. (2017). Leveraging recent laboratory-based parameterizations, both frameworks accounted for a semi-volatile and reactive POA, SOA production from semi-volatile, intermediate-volatility and volatile organic compounds (SVOC, IVOC and VOC), NOx-dependent multigenerational gas-phase chemistry, and kinetic gas/particle partitioning. Both frameworks demonstrated that for model predictions of SOA mass and elemental composition to agree with measurements across all engine load-fuel-aftertreatment combinations, it was necessary to (a) model the kinetically-limited gas/particle partitioning likely in OFRs and (b) account for SOA formation from IVOCs (IVOCs were found to account for more than four-fifths of the model-predicted SOA). Model predictions of the gas-phase organic compounds (resolved in carbon and

  17. Particle size distribution of major inorganic species in atmospheric aerosols from Majorca (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu, J.; Forteza, R.; Cerdà, V.; Colom-Altés, M.

    1995-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosols collected by means of a cascade impaction system at the campus of the University of the Balearic Islands (Majorca, Spain) from November 1993 to February 1994 were analysed for chloride, nitrate, sulphate, ammonium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. Based on particle size distribution, the species studied were classified into three groups: (a) concentration decrease with particle size (sulphate and ammonium), (b) concentration increase with particle size (chloride, calcium, magnesium and sodium), and ( c) independent of particle size (nitrate and potassium). A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a clear relationship between particle size and analyte origin. Also, the origin of sulphate and potassium fine and coarse particles was found to be different.

  18. Aerosol particles scavenging by a droplet: Microphysical modeling in the Greenfield gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherrier, Gaël; Belut, Emmanuel; Gerardin, Fabien; Tanière, Anne; Rimbert, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    Studying the scavenging of aerosol particle by drops has been a key topic of atmospheric science since the late seventies, given its relationships with atmospheric depollution, with the physics of clouds and precipitations and with global warming. However, the efficiency with which falling droplets capture aerosol particles is still imprecisely known for a wide range of drop Reynolds number, Weber numbers, aerosol particles inertia and Brownian Schmidt number. In this paper, microphysical modeling is used to compute precisely the drop collection efficiency for aerosol particles around the Greenfield gap which are submitted to both drag force and Brownian motion, for droplets falling in quiescent air at moderate Reynolds number (Red ≤ 100). Depending on the impactional or diffusional parameters, the collection regions on the drop surface are highlighted. The results are then compressed by a correlation which extends the field of use of the theoretical model of Wang et al. (1978) by taking inertial capture into account. The proposed correlation is suitable to estimate the aerosol scavenging efficiency for a non-evaporating, non-deforming drop with Red ≤ 100 and particle Stokes number Stp ∈ [ 0 ; + ∞ ] . In case of evaporating or condensing droplets, the effect of thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis are also taken into account through an extension of the formulation proposed by Wang et al. (1978) and hence with similar accuracy.

  19. The formation of aerosol particles during combustion of biomass and waste. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjerrild Zeuthen, J.

    2007-05-15

    This thesis describes the formation of aerosol particles during combustion of biomass and waste. The formation of aerosol particles is investigated by studying condensation of alkali salts from synthetic flue gasses in a laboratory tubular furnace. In this so-called laminar flow aerosol condenser-furnace gaseous alkali chlorides are mixed with sulphur dioxide, water vapour and oxygen. At high temperatures the alkali chloride reacts with sulphur dioxide to form alkali sulphate. During subsequent cooling of the synthetic flue gas the chlorides and sulphates condense either as deposits on walls or on other particles or directly from the gas phase by homogenous nucleation. A previously developed computer code for simulation of one-component nucleation of particles in a cylindrical laminar flow is extended to include a homogeneous gas phase reaction to produce gaseous alkali sulphate. The formation of aerosol particles during full-scale combustion of wheat straw is investigated in a 100 MW grate-fired boiler. Finally, aerosols from incineration of waste are investigated during full-scale combustion of municipal waste in a 22 MW grate-fired unit. (BA)

  20. A laboratory investigation on the influence of adsorbed gases and particles from the exhaust of a kerosene burner on the evaporation rate of ice crystals and the ice nucleating ability of the exhaust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, K.; Mitra, S.K.; Pruppacher, H.R. [Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    Laboratory experiments are described during which the influence of the exhausts of a kerosene burner on microphysical processes were studied. In one experimental investigation the evaporation rates of polluted ice crystals were compared with the evaporation rates of pure ice crystals. During another experimental investigation the ice nucleating ability of the exhaust particles was studied. The results show that the evaporation rate of polluted ice crystals was significantly reduced and also that ice nucleation takes place between -20 and -38 deg C. (author) 7 refs.

  1. Diesel Exhaust Exposure Assessment Among Tunnel Construction Workers-Correlations Between Nitrogen Dioxide, Respirable Elemental Carbon, and Particle Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedmer, Maria; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Li, Huiqi; Albin, Maria; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Broberg, Karin

    2017-06-01

    Occupational exposure to diesel exhaust is common due the widespread use of diesel-powered combustion engines. Diesel exhaust is chemically complex and consists of thousands of compounds present as gases and particulate matter. Both nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and elemental carbon (EC) have been used as markers for diesel exhaust exposure. Currently EC is regarded as the best surrogate of diesel exhaust. The objective was to quantify the occupational exposure to diesel exhaust in underground tunnel construction work using a multi-metric approach, and to investigate the correlations between NO2, respirable EC, respirable organic carbon (OC), respirable total carbon (TC), respirable dust (RD), and particle number. Also, the use of NO2 as a proxy for diesel exhaust was evaluated, how much of the variability in the diesel exhaust exposure was attributed to within and between individual factors and if there was a difference between expert and self-administered measurements of NO2. The personal exposure to diesel exhaust was assessed by expert supervised measurements of NO2, EC, OC, TC, RD and particle number in the breathing zones of underground tunnel workers. Stationary sampling of NO2, EC, OC, TC, RD, size-fractioned mass concentration, and particle number were conducted. The personal and stationary measurements were conducted on three occasions simultaneously. The workers measured their exposure by repeated self-administered measurements of NO2. The self-administered measurements were performed twice for each worker with at least one month lag between the samplings. In the simultaneous sampling of diesel exhaust, the geometric mean (GM) concentration of NO2 and respirable EC were 72 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 34-140 µg m-3) and 2.6 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 1.6-7.3 µg m-3), respectively. The GM for OC and TC was 28 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 20-42 µg m-3) and 31 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 20-50 µg m-3), respectively. The GM for RD and particle number was

  2. The Humidity Dependence of N2O5 Uptake to Citric Acid Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzinic, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Tuerler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The heterogeneous loss of N2O5 to aerosol particles has remained uncertain, and reconciling lab and field data has demonstrated some gaps in our understanding of the detailed mechanism. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles in an aerosol flow reactor at ambient pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Citric acid, representing strongly oxidized polyfunctional organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols, has been chosen as a proxy due to its well established physical properties. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 15-75 % RH, within which the uptake coefficient varies between about 0.001 and about 0.02. Taking into account the well established hygroscopic properties of citric acid, we interpret uptake in terms of disproportionation of N2O5 into nitrate ion and nitronium ion and reaction of the latter with liquid water.

  3. Fluorescence from atmospheric aerosol detected by a lidar indicates biogenic particles in the lowermost stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Immler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available With a lidar system that was installed in Lindenberg/Germany, we observed in June 2003 an extended aerosol layer at 13km altitude in the lowermost stratosphere. This layer created an inelastic backscatter signal that we detected with a water vapour Raman channel, but that was not produced by Raman scattering. Also, we find evidence for inelastic scattering from a smoke plume from a forest fire that we observed in the troposphere. We interpret the unexpected properties of these aerosols as fluorescence induced by the laser beam at organic components of the aerosol particles. Fluorescence from ambient aerosol had not yet been considered detectable by lidar systems. However, organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sticking to the aerosol particles, or bioaerosol such as bacteria, spores or pollen fluoresce when excited with UV-radiation in a way that is detectable by our lidar system. Therefore, we conclude that fluorescence from organic material released by biomass burning creates, inelastic backscatter signals that we measured with our instrument and thus demonstrate a new and powerful way to characterize aerosols by a remote sensing technique. The stratospheric aerosol layer that we have observed in Lindenberg for three consecutive days is likely to be a remnant from Siberian forest fire plumes lifted across the tropopause and transported around the globe.

  4. Internally mixed soot, sulfates, and organic matter in aerosol particles from Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Adachi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles, which are aggregated carbonaceous spherules with graphitic structures, are major aerosol constituents that result from burning of fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass. Their properties commonly change through reaction with other particles or gases, resulting in complex internal mixtures. Using a transmission electron microscope (TEM for both imaging and chemical analysis, we measured ~8000 particles (25 samples with aerodynamic diameters from 0.05 to 0.3 μm that were collected in March 2006 from aircraft over Mexico City (MC and adjacent areas. Most particles are coated, consist of aggregates, or both. For example, almost all analyzed particles contain S and 70% also contain K, suggesting coagulation and condensation of sulfates and particles derived from biomass and biofuel burning. In the MC plumes, over half of all particles contained soot coated by organic matter and sulfates. The median value of the soot volume fraction in such coated particles is about 15%. In contrast to the assumptions used in many climate models, the soot particles did not become compact even when coated. Moreover, about 80% by volume of the particles consisting of organic matter with sulfate also contained soot, indicating the important role of soot in the formation of secondary aerosol particles. Coatings on soot particles can amplify their light absorption, and coagulation with sulfates changes their hygroscopic properties, resulting in shorter lifetimes. Through changes in their optical and hygroscopic properties, internally mixed soot particles have a greater effect on the regional climate of MC than uncoated soot particles.

  5. Density changes of aerosol particles as a result of chemical reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Katrib

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the capability to study simultaneously changes in the density, the chemical composition, the mobility diameter, the aerodynamic diameter, and the layer thickness of multi-layered aerosol particles as they are being altered by heterogeneous chemical reactions. A vaporization-condensation method is used to generate aerosol particles composed of oleic acid outer layers of 2 to 30nm on 101-nm polystyrene latex cores. The layer density is modified by reaction of oleic acid with ozone for variable exposure times. For increasing ozone exposure, the mobility diameter decreases while the vacuum aerodynamic diameter increases, which, for spherical particles, implies that particle density increases. The aerosol particles are confirmed as spherical based upon the small divergence of the particle beam in the aerosol mass spectrometer. The particle and layer densities are calculated by two independent methods, namely one based on the measured aerodynamic and mobility diameters and the other based on the measured mobility diameter and particle mass. The uncertainty estimates for density calculated by the second method are two to three times greater than those of the first method. Both methods indicate that the layer density increases from 0.89 to 1.12g·cm-3 with increasing ozone exposure. Aerosol mass spectrometry shows that, concomitant with the increase in the layer density, the oxygen content of the reacted layer increases. Even after all of the oleic acid has reacted, the layer density and the oxygen content continue to increase slowly with prolonged ozone exposure, a finding which indicates continued chemical reactions of the organic products either with ozone or with themselves. The results of this paper provide new insights into the complex changes occurring for atmospheric particles during the aging processes caused by gas-phase oxidants.

  6. Model of the deposition of aerosol particles in the respiratory tract of the rat. II. Hygroscopic particle deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferron, George A; Upadhyay, Swapna; Zimmermann, Ralf; Karg, Erwin

    2013-04-01

    Rats are frequently used to study the pharmacological and toxicological effects of inhaled aerosol particles. The deposition behavior of aerosol particles in airways is affected by their hygroscopic properties, which accordingly influence the results of such studies. A recently published nonhygroscopic aerosol particle deposition model for rat airways was extended with equations for hygroscopic particle growth in humid air and with a model to mimic the temperature and relative humidity conditions in the rat airways transformed from the upper human airways. As there are no experimental data available for hygroscopic deposition in rat lungs, several model assumptions were made for the humidity distribution in the upper rat airways. The total and regional deposition probability of salt particles in the diameter range 0.02 to 5 μm in rat lung was significantly changed by the hygroscopic properties. The maximum ratios of the total deposition of inhaled initially dry sodium chloride, cobalt chloride, and zinc sulfate particles compared with nonhygroscopic particles were 3.28, 2.44, and 2.13, respectively, and the minimum ratios 0.57, 0.63, and 0.70, respectively. The corresponding maximum (and minimum) ratios for the hygroscopic drugs histamine dihydrochloride, carbenicillin disodium, and atropine sulfate were 1.86 (0.65), 1.53 (0.70), and 1.35 (0.76), respectively. Total deposition was about 20% higher in human airways than in rat airways. The flow regime in the rat upper airways influenced total and regional deposition much less than it did in human airways. The hygroscopicity of salt and drug aerosol particles is an important factor in rat lung deposition.

  7. Single-particle characterization of the high-Arctic summertime aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sierau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mass-spectrometric measurements were carried out in the high Arctic north of 80° during summer 2008. The campaign took place onboard the icebreaker Oden and was part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS. The instrument deployed was an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS that provides information on the chemical composition of individual particles and their mixing state in real time. Aerosols were sampled in the marine boundary layer at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction of particles detected for subsequent analysis in the size range of the ATOFMS between approximately 200 and 3000 nm in diameter showed mass-spectrometric patterns, indicating an internal mixing state and a biomass burning and/or biofuel source. The majority of these particles were connected to an air mass layer of elevated particle concentration mixed into the surface mixed layer from the upper part of the marine boundary layer. The second largest fraction was represented by sea salt particles. The chemical analysis of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that reflect chemical aging of the particles during their long-range advection from the marginal ice zone, or open waters south thereof prior to detection at the ship. From our findings we conclude that long-range transport of particles is one source of aerosols in the high Arctic. To assess the importance of long-range particle sources for aerosol–cloud interactions over the inner Arctic in comparison to local and regional biogenic primary aerosol sources, the chemical composition of the detected particles was analyzed for indicators of marine biological origin. Only a minor fraction showed chemical signatures of potentially ocean-derived primary particles of that kind. However, a chemical bias in the ATOFMS's detection capabilities observed during ASCOS might suggest the presence of a particle type of

  8. Impeded ice nucleation in glassy and highly viscous aerosol particles: the role of water diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Zobrist, B.; Krieger, U. K.; Luo, B. P.; Soonsin, V.; Pedernera, D. A.; Koop, T.

    2010-05-01

    In situ and remote observations in the upper troposphere have disclosed the existence of water vapor pressures up to and even above water saturation. Under such conditions ice particle formation by homogeneous nucleation is expected to set in followed by ice crystal growth until the supersaturation is consumed. While the highest measured water vapor values might not withstand rigorous quality checks, values up to water saturation seem to be occurring. Since air masses appear to contain sufficient numbers of aerosol particles for cloud formation, the question arises why these aerosols are not successful at nucleating ice. The atmospheric aerosol is a complex mixture of various inorganic and organic components, whereas the organic fraction can represent more than 50% of the total aerosol mass. The homogeneous ice nucleation threshold was established for atmospherically relevant salt solutions and sulfuric acid, but only for a few organic species. The organic aerosol fraction tends to remain liquid instead of crystallizing as the temperature is decreased and, thus, organic aerosol particles may form highly viscous liquids. When the viscosity of such liquids reaches values in the order of 1012 Pa s, the molecular motion becomes so slow, that the sample vitrifies at the glass transition temperature Tg. If aerosol particles were present as glasses, this would influence several physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere significantly: Water uptake from the gas phase would be drastically impeded and ice nucleation inhibited. We investigated the glass transition temperature of a series of aqueous organic solutions such as polyols, sugars and dicarboxylic acids as a function of the solute concentration using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). These measurements show that the higher the molar mass of the organic solutes, the higher Tg of their respective solutions at a given water activity. Aerosol particles containing larger (≥150 g mol-1) organic molecules

  9. Method for the removal of smut, fine dust and exhaust gas particles, particle catch arrangement for use in this method and use of the particle catch arrangement to generate a static electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursem, W.N.J.; Marijnissen, J.C.; Roos, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    This inventions provides a method for the removal of smut, fine dust and exhaust gas particles from polluted air comprising providing a particle catch arrangement with a charged surface, the particle catch arrangement being arranged to generate a static electric field, wherein the electric field is

  10. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Skrotzki, J.; Leisner, T.; Wilson, T. W.; Malkin, T. L.; Murray, B. J.

    2012-09-01

    The ice nucleation potential of airborne glassy aqueous aerosol particles has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 247 and 216 K. Four different solutes were used as proxies for oxygenated organic matter found in the atmosphere: raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA), levoglucosan, and a multi-component mixture of raffinose with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate. Similar to previous experiments with citric acid aerosols, all particles were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously before reaching the homogeneous freezing threshold provided that the freezing cycles were started well below the respective glass transition temperatures of the compounds; this is discussed in detail in a separate article. In this contribution, we identify a further mechanism by which glassy aerosols can promote ice nucleation below the homogeneous freezing limit. If the glassy aerosol particles are probed in freezing cycles started only a few degrees below their respective glass transition temperatures, they enter the liquid regime of the state diagram upon increasing relative humidity (moisture-induced glass-to-liquid transition) before being able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Ice formation then only occurs by homogeneous freezing at elevated supersaturation levels. When ice forms the remaining solution freeze concentrates and re-vitrifies. If these ice cloud processed glassy aerosol particles are then probed in a second freezing cycle at the same temperature, they catalyse ice formation at a supersaturation threshold between 5 and 30% with respect to ice. By analogy with the enhanced ice nucleation ability of insoluble ice nuclei like mineral dusts after they nucleate ice once, we refer to this phenomenon as pre-activation. We propose a number of possible explanations for why glassy aerosol particles that have re-vitrified in contact

  11. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation potential of airborne glassy aqueous aerosol particles has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 247 and 216 K. Four different solutes were used as proxies for oxygenated organic matter found in the atmosphere: raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA, levoglucosan, and a multi-component mixture of raffinose with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate. Similar to previous experiments with citric acid aerosols, all particles were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously before reaching the homogeneous freezing threshold provided that the freezing cycles were started well below the respective glass transition temperatures of the compounds; this is discussed in detail in a separate article. In this contribution, we identify a further mechanism by which glassy aerosols can promote ice nucleation below the homogeneous freezing limit. If the glassy aerosol particles are probed in freezing cycles started only a few degrees below their respective glass transition temperatures, they enter the liquid regime of the state diagram upon increasing relative humidity (moisture-induced glass-to-liquid transition before being able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Ice formation then only occurs by homogeneous freezing at elevated supersaturation levels. When ice forms the remaining solution freeze concentrates and re-vitrifies. If these ice cloud processed glassy aerosol particles are then probed in a second freezing cycle at the same temperature, they catalyse ice formation at a supersaturation threshold between 5 and 30% with respect to ice. By analogy with the enhanced ice nucleation ability of insoluble ice nuclei like mineral dusts after they nucleate ice once, we refer to this phenomenon as pre-activation. We propose a number of possible explanations for why glassy aerosol particles that have re

  12. Effects of prenatal exposure to diesel exhaust particles on postnatal development, behavior, genotoxicity and inflammation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel Ulla

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results from epidemiological studies indicate that particulate air pollution constitutes a hazard for human health. Recent studies suggest that diesel exhaust possesses endocrine activity and therefore may affect reproductive outcome. This study in mice aimed to investigate whether exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP; NIST 2975 would affect gestation, postnatal development, activity, learning and memory, and biomarkers of transplacental toxicity. Pregnant mice (C57BL/6; BomTac were exposed to 19 mg/m3 DEP (~1·106 particles/cm3; mass median diameter ≅ 240 nm on gestational days 9–19, for 1 h/day. Results Gestational parameters were similar in control and diesel groups. Shortly after birth, body weights of DEP offspring were slightly lower than in controls. This difference increased during lactation, so by weaning the DEP exposed offspring weighed significantly less than the control progeny. Only slight effects of exposure were observed on cognitive function in female DEP offspring and on biomarkers of exposure to particles or genotoxic substances. Conclusion In utero exposure to DEP decreased weight gain during lactation. Cognitive function and levels of biomarkers of exposure to particles or to genotoxic substances were generally similar in exposed and control offspring. The particle size and chemical composition of the DEP and differences in exposure methods (fresh, whole exhaust versus aged, resuspended DEP may play a significant role on the biological effects observed in this compared to other studies.

  13. Reduced anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing caused by biogenic new particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Hamish; Sengupta, Kamalika; Rap, Alexandru; Duplissy, Jonathan; Frege, Carla; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Dunne, Eimear M; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill S; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Fischer, Lukas; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Monks, Sarah A; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty J; Richards, Nigel A D; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander Lucas; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Carslaw, Kenneth S

    2016-10-25

    The magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic emissions depends on the baseline state of the atmosphere under pristine preindustrial conditions. Measurements show that particle formation in atmospheric conditions can occur solely from biogenic vapors. Here, we evaluate the potential effect of this source of particles on preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing over the industrial period. Model simulations show that the pure biogenic particle formation mechanism has a much larger relative effect on CCN concentrations in the preindustrial atmosphere than in the present atmosphere because of the lower aerosol concentrations. Consequently, preindustrial cloud albedo is increased more than under present day conditions, and therefore the cooling forcing of anthropogenic aerosols is reduced. The mechanism increases CCN concentrations by 20-100% over a large fraction of the preindustrial lower atmosphere, and the magnitude of annual global mean radiative forcing caused by changes of cloud albedo since 1750 is reduced by [Formula: see text] (27%) to [Formula: see text] Model uncertainties, relatively slow formation rates, and limited available ambient measurements make it difficult to establish the significance of a mechanism that has its dominant effect under preindustrial conditions. Our simulations predict more particle formation in the Amazon than is observed. However, the first observation of pure organic nucleation has now been reported for the free troposphere. Given the potentially significant effect on anthropogenic forcing, effort should be made to better understand such naturally driven aerosol processes.

  14. Numerical investigation of the coagulation mixing between dust and hygroscopic aerosol particles and its impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, I.-Chun; Chen, Jen-Ping; Lin, Yi-Chiu; Chung-Kuang Chou, Charles; Chen, Wei-Nai

    2015-05-01

    A statistical-numerical aerosol parameterization was incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system to study the coagulation mixing process focusing on a dust storm event that occurred over East Asia. Simulation results show that the coagulation mixing process tends to decrease aerosol mass, surface area, and number concentrations over the dust source areas. Over the downwind oceanic areas, aerosol concentrations generally increased due to enhanced sedimentation as particles became larger upon coagulation. The mixture process can reduce the overall single-scattering albedo by up to 10% as a result of enhanced core with shell absorption by dust and reduction in the number of scattering particles. The enhanced dry deposition speed also altered the vertical distribution. In addition, the ability of aerosol particles to serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) increased from around 107 m-3 to above 109 m-3 over downwind areas because a large amount of mineral dust particles became effective CCN with solute coating, except over the highly polluted areas where multiple collections of hygroscopic particles by dust in effect reduced CCN number. This CCN effect is much stronger for coagulation mixing than by the uptake of sulfuric acid gas on dust, although the nitric acid gas uptake was not investigated. The ability of dust particles to serve as ice nuclei may decrease or increase at low or high subzero temperatures, respectively, due to the switching from deposition nucleation to immersion freezing or haze freezing.

  15. Development and experimental evaluation of an optical sensor for aerosol particle characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somesfalean, G.

    1998-03-01

    A sensor for individual aerosol particle characterization, based on a single-mode semiconductor laser coupled to an external cavity is presented. The light emitting semiconductor laser acts as a sensitive optical detector itself, and the whole system has the advantage of using conventional optical components and providing a compact set-up. Aerosol particles moving through the sensing volume, which is located in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, scatter and absorb light. Thereby they act as small disturbances on the electromagnetic field inside the dynamic multi-cavity laser system. From the temporal variation of the output light intensity, information about the number, velocity, size, and refractive index of the aerosol particles can be derived. The diffracted light in the near-forward scattering direction is collected and Fourier-transformed by a lens, and subsequently imaged on a CCD camera. The recorded Fraunhofer diffraction pattern provides information about the projected area of the scattering particle, and can thus be used to determine the size and the shape of aerosol particles. The sensor has been tested on fibers which are of interest in the field of working environment monitoring. The recorded output intensity variation has been analysed, and the relationship between the shape and the size of each fibre, and the resulting scattering profiles has been investigated. A simple one-dimensional model for the optical feedback variation due to the light-particle interaction in the external cavity is also discussed 34 refs, 26 figs, 6 tabs

  16. Physical properties of the arctic summer aerosol particles in relation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The increase in ice melting in summer in the open leads to increase in the biological activity of the region resulting in enrichment of DMS and its bio- genic precursor DMPS, dissolved combined–amino acid (DCAA), proteins and chlorophyll-a in micro- layer, which work as potential sources of the Arc- tic summer aerosols ...

  17. Spontaneous Aerosol Ejection: Origin of Inorganic Particles in Biomass Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Andrew R; Gantt, Rachel; Joseph, Kristeen E; Maduskar, Saurabh; Paulsen, Alex D; Krumm, Christoph; Zhu, Cheng; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2016-06-08

    At high thermal flux and temperatures of approximately 500 °C, lignocellulosic biomass transforms to a reactive liquid intermediate before evaporating to condensable bio-oil for downstream upgrading to renewable fuels and chemicals. However, the existence of a fraction of nonvolatile compounds in condensed bio-oil diminishes the product quality and, in the case of inorganic materials, catalyzes undesirable aging reactions within bio-oil. In this study, ablative pyrolysis of crystalline cellulose was evaluated, with and without doped calcium, for the generation of inorganic-transporting aerosols by reactive boiling ejection from liquid intermediate cellulose. Aerosols were characterized by laser diffraction light scattering, inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, and high-speed photography. Pyrolysis product fractionation revealed that approximately 3 % of the initial feed (both organic and inorganic) was transported to the gas phase as aerosols. Large bubble-to-aerosol size ratios and visualization of significant late-time ejections in the pyrolyzing cellulose suggest the formation of film bubbles in addition to the previously discovered jet formation mechanism. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. One-Year Observation of Water-Soluble Organic Aerosol Components in Fine and Coarse Aerosol Particle Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Winterhalter, R.; Su, H.; Moortgat, G. K.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, fine and coarse aerosol particle filter samples (3 µm cut-off diameter) were collected with a high-volume dichotomous sampler over a period of one year from May 2006 to May 2007 in Mainz, Germany. The water-soluble organic components have been extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). The detected and quantified compounds comprise nitrophenols, aliphatic and aromatic dicarboxylic acids, and a C8-tricarboxylic acid (204 Da) which is likely to be formed upon oxidation of pinic acid and may be useful as a tracer of aerosol aging processes. Kubátová et al. (2000) found the C8-tricarboxylic acid as a major component of pinene SOA in tropical rainforest aerosol from the Amazon basin and summertime aerosol from Ghent, Belgium. Recently, Szmigielski et al. (2007) identified it as 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid. The concentrations of the C8-tricarboxylic were closely correlated with the concentrations of pinic acid in the coarse particle samples, but not in the fine particle samples. Seasonal variations and the influence of solar radiation and atmospheric oxidizing capacity on the ratios of the C8-tricarboxylic acid to pinic acid and to other quantified compounds will be discussed. Acknowledgement: We thank M. Claeys for providing a reference sample of 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid and T. Hoffmann for helpful discussions. References: A. Kubátová, R. Vermeylen, M. Claeys, J. Cafmeyer, W. Maenhaut, G. Roberts, and P. Artaxo (2000). Carbonaceous aerosol characterisation in the Amazon basin, Brazil: Novel dicarboxylic acids and related compounds, Atmos. Environ., 34, 5037-5051. R. Szmigielski, J.D. Surratt, Y. Gómez-González, P. Van der Veken, I. Kourtchev, R. Vermeylen, F. Blockhuys, M. Jaoui, T.E. Kleindienst, M. Lewandowski, J.H. Offenberg, E.O. Edney, J.H. Seinfeld, W. Maenhaut, M. Claeys (2007). 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid: an atmospheric tracer for

  19. Determination of Chemical Composition of Marine Aerosol Particles and its Effects on Aerosol and Cloud Properties During the 2005 MASE Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Jayne, J.; Alexander, M.; Springston, S.; Wang, J.; Senum, G.; Hubbe, J.; Daum, P.

    2005-12-01

    Marine stratus clouds play an important role in Earth's radiation budget. Cloud microphysical properties such as size distribution and liquid water concentration which govern the aerosol indirect radiative effects are influenced in part by chemical composition of the pre-cloud aerosol particles. To investigate the role aerosol particles play in the properties of marine stratus clouds, we measured aerosol and cloud properties on board the DOE G1 aircraft in the marine atmosphere between Point Reyes and Monterey Peninsula, California in the month of July as part of the 2005 Marine Stratus Experiment (MASE, http://www.asp.bnl.gov/MASE/, supported by the DOE Atmospheric Science and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Programs). Aerosol chemical composition was measured using a PILS-IC and an Aerodyne AMS. The PILS-IC measured sodium, chloride, ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, potassium, calcium, magnesium, methanesulfonic acid, and format/acetate with a time resolution of 4 minutes and a limit of detection of ca. 0.2 microgram per cubic meter. The AMS measured size-resolved total organic compounds as well as ammonium, nitrate and sulfate at a one-minute time resolution. Other aerosol properties measured included size distribution, light scattering, light absorption and cloud condensation nuclei concentration. Measured cloud properties were cloud droplet size spectrum and liquid water concentration. We will report the chemical composition of aerosol particles and discuss the mechanisms governing their distributions and the relationships between aerosol chemical composition and aerosol and cloud properties.

  20. Quantification of bitumen particles in aerosol and soil samples using HP-GPC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Tjell, Jens Christian; Mosbæk, Hans

    2000-01-01

    A method for identifying and quantifying bitumen particles, generated from the wear of roadway asphalts, in aerosol and soil samples has been developed. Bitumen is found to be the only contributor to airborne particles containing organic molecules with molecular weights larger than 2000 g pr. mol....... These are separated and identified using High Performance Gel Permeation Chromatography (HP-GPC) with fluorescence detection. As an additional detection method Infra Red spectrometry (IR) is employed for selected samples. The methods have been used on aerosol, soil and other samples....

  1. Health risk assessment for residents exposed to atmospheric diesel exhaust particles in southern region of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Chia-Pin; Liao, Chung-Min; Tsai, Ying-I.; Cheng, Man-Ting; Chou, Wei-Chun

    2014-03-01

    Evidence shows a strong association among air pollution, oxidative stress (OS), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, and diseases. Recent studies indicated that the aging, human neurodegenerative diseases and cancers resulted from mitochondrial dysfunction and OS. The purpose of this study is to provide a probabilistic risk assessment model to quantify the atmospheric diesel exhaust particles (DEP)-induced pre-cancer biomarker response and cancer incidence risk for residents in south Taiwan. We conducted entirely monthly particulate matter sampling data at five sites in Kaohsiung of south Taiwan in the period 2002-2003. Three findings were found: (i) the DEP dose estimates and cancer risk quantification had heterogeneously spatiotemporal difference in south Taiwan, (ii) the pre-cancer DNA damage biomarker and cancer incidence estimates had a positive yet insignificant association, and (iii) all the estimates of cancer incidence in south Taiwan populations fell within and slight lower than the values from previous cancer epidemiological investigations. In this study, we successfully assessed the tumor incidence for residents posed by DEP exposure in south Taiwan compared with the epidemiological approach. Our approach provides a unique way for assessing human health risk for residences exposed to atmospheric DEP depending on specific combinations of local and regional conditions. Our work implicates the importance of incorporating both environmental and health risk impacts into models of air pollution exposure to guide adaptive mitigation strategies.

  2. Diesel Exhaust Particles Induce Impairment of Vascular and Cardiac Homeostasis in Mice: Ameliorative Effect of Emodin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahim Nemmar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: There is strong epidemiological and clinical evidence that components of the cardiovascular system are adversely affected by particulate air pollutants through the generation of inflammation and oxidative stress. Emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthraquinone, which is commonly found in the roots of rhubarb plant, has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, its possible protective effect on the cardiovascular effect of particulate air pollutants has never been reported before. Methods: We tested, in Tuck-Ordinary mice, the possible ameliorative effect of emodin on the acute (24h cardiovascular effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP, 1 mg/kg or saline (control. Emodin (4 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally 1h before and 7h after pulmonary exposure to DEP. Twenty four h following DEP exposure, several cardiovascular endpoints were assessed. Results: Emodin significantly prevented the increase of leukocyte (n=8, Pin vivo prothrombotic effect of DEP in pial arterioles (n=6, Pin vitro in whole blood (n=4-5, PConclusion: We conclude that emodin treatment has consistently protected against DEP-induced impairment of vascular and cardiac homeostasis in mice. Our study provides experimental evidence that the use of functional food such as emodin, pending further studies, can be considered a useful agent and may have the potential to protect or mitigate the cardiovascular detrimental effects observed in people living in cities with high concentrations of particulate air pollution.

  3. Self-consistent coupling of DSMC method and SOLPS code for modeling tokamak particle exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, F.; Varoutis, S.; Coster, D.; Day, C.; Zanino, R.; Contributors, JET

    2017-06-01

    In this work, an investigation of the neutral gas flow in the JET sub-divertor area is presented, with respect to the interaction between the plasma side and the pumping side. The edge plasma side is simulated with the SOLPS code, while the sub-divertor area is modeled by means of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, which in the last few years has proved well able to describe rarefied, collisional flows in tokamak sub-divertor structures. Four different plasma scenarios have been selected, and for each of them a user-defined, iterative procedure between SOLPS and DSMC has been established, using the neutral flux as the key communication term between the two codes. The goal is to understand and quantify the mutual influence between the two regions in a self-consistent manner, that is to say, how the particle exhaust pumping system controls the upstream plasma conditions. Parametric studies of the flow conditions in the sub-divertor, including additional flow outlets and variations of the cryopump capture coefficient, have been performed as well, in order to understand their overall impact on the flow field. The DSMC analyses resulted in the calculation of both the macroscopic quantities—i.e. temperature, number density and pressure—and the recirculation fluxes towards the plasma chamber. The consistent values for the recirculation rates were found to be smaller than those according to the initial standard assumption made by SOLPS.

  4. Mechanisms of GM-CSF increase by diesel exhaust particles in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, S; Bonvallot, V; Fournier, T; Baeza-Squiban, A; Aubier, M; Marano, F

    2000-01-01

    We have previously shown that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) stimulates human airway epithelial cells to secrete the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-8, interleukin-1beta, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) involved in allergic diseases. In the present paper, we studied the mechanisms underlying the increase in GM-CSF release elicited by DEPs using the human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE14o-. RT-PCR analysis has shown an increase in GM-CSF mRNA levels after DEP treatments. Comparison of the effects of DEPs, extracted DEPs, or extracts of DEPs has shown that the increase in GM-CSF release is mainly due to the adsorbed organic compounds and not to the metals present on the DEP surface because the metal chelator desferrioxamine had no inhibitory effect. Furthermore, radical scavengers inhibited the DEP-induced GM-CSF release, showing involvement of reactive oxygen species in this response. Moreover genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, abrogated the effects of DEPs on GM-CSF release, whereas protein kinase (PK) C, PKA, cyclooxygenase, or lipoxygenase inhibitors had no effect. PD-98059, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase, diminished the effects of DEPs, whereas SB-203580, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, had a lower effect, and DEPs did actually increase the active, phosphorylated form of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase as shown by Western blotting. In addition, cytochalasin D, which inhibits the phagocytosis of DEPs, reduced the increase in GM-CSF release after DEP treatment. Together, these data suggest that the increase in GM-CSF release is mainly due to the adsorbed organic compounds and that the effect of native DEPs requires endocytosis of the particles. Reactive oxygen species and tyrosine kinase(s) may be involved in the DEP-triggered signaling of the GM-CSF response.

  5. Bioassay-directed fractionation and salmonella mutagenicity of automobile and forklift diesel exhaust particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarini, David M; Brooks, Lance R; Warren, Sarah H; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Gilmour, M Ian; Singh, Pramila

    2004-06-01

    Many pulmonary toxicity studies of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) have used an automobile-generated sample (A-DEPs) whose mutagenicity has not been reported. In contrast, many mutagenicity studies of DEPs have used a forklift-generated sample (SRM 2975) that has been evaluated in only a few pulmonary toxicity studies. Therefore, we evaluated the mutagenicity of both DEPs in Salmonella coupled to a bioassay-directed fractionation. The percentage of extractable organic material (EOM) was 26.3% for A-DEPs and 2% for SRM 2975. Most of the A-EOM (~55%) eluted in the hexane fraction, reflecting the presence of alkanes and alkenes, typical of uncombusted fuel. In contrast, most of the SRM 2975 EOM (~58%) eluted in the polar methanol fraction, indicative of oxygenated and/or nitrated organics derived from combustion. Most of the direct-acting, base-substitution activity of the A-EOM eluted in the hexane/dichloromethane (DCM) fraction, but this activity eluted in the polar methanol fraction for the SRM 2975 EOM. The direct-acting frameshift mutagenicity eluted across fractions of A-EOM, whereas > 80% eluted only in the DCM fraction of SRM 2975 EOM. The A-DEPs were more mutagenic than SRM 2975 per mass of particle, having 227 times more polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-type and 8-45 more nitroarene-type mutagenic activity. These differences were associated with the different conditions under which the two DEP samples were generated and collected. A comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the health effects of DEPs requires the evaluation of DEP standards for a variety of end points, and our results highlight the need for multidisciplinary studies on a variety of representative samples of DEPs.

  6. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single-particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single-particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been determined using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC, organic aerosol (OA, ammonium, nitrate, sulfate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, a thermal–optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC. ATOFMS-derived estimated mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67–0.78, and 10 discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorisation, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulfate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA / EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidised OA (OOA was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the range of primary and secondary organic aerosol mixing states in Paris. Examination of the

  7. Morphology, Composition, and Mixing State of Individual Aerosol Particles in Northeast China during Wintertime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Northeast China is located in a high latitude area of the world and undergoes a cold season that lasts six months each year. Recently, regional haze episodes with high concentrations of fine particles (PM2.5 have frequently been occurring in Northeast China during the heating period, but little information has been available. Aerosol particles were collected in winter at a site in a suburban county town (T1 and a site in a background rural area (T2. Morphology, size, elemental composition, and mixing state of individual aerosol particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Aerosol particles were mainly composed of organic matter (OM and S-rich and certain amounts of soot and K-rich. OM represented the most abundant particles, accounting for 60.7% and 53.5% at the T1 and T2 sites, respectively. Abundant spherical OM particles were likely emitted directly from coal-burning stoves. Soot decreased from 16.9% at the T1 site to 4.6% at the T2 site and sulfate particles decrease from 35.9% at the T2 site to 15.7% at the T1 site, suggesting that long-range transport air masses experienced more aging processes and produced more secondary particles. Based on our investigations, we proposed that emissions from coal-burning stoves in most rural areas of the west part of Northeast China can induce regional haze episodes.

  8. A novel tandem differential mobility analyzer with organic vapor treatment of aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Joutsensaari

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method to characterize the organic composition of aerosol particles has been developed. The method is based on organic vapor interaction with aerosol particles and it has been named an Organic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (OTDMA. The OTDMA method has been tested for inorganic (sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate and organic (citric acid and adipic acid particles. Growth curves of the particles have been measured in ethanol vapor and as a comparison in water vapor as a function of saturation ratio. Measurements in water vapor show that sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate as well as citric acid particles grow at water saturation ratios (S of 0.8 and above, whereas adipic acid particles do not grow at S S = 0.75 and S = 0.79, respectively. Citric acid particles grow monotonously with increasing saturation ratios already at low saturation ratios and no clear deliquescence point is found. For sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate particles, no growth can be seen in ethanol vapor at saturation ratios below 0.93. In contrast, for adipic acid particles, the deliquescence takes place at around S = 0.95 in the ethanol vapor. The recrystallization of adipic acid takes place at S The results show that the working principles of the OTDMA are operational for single-component aerosols. Furthermore, the results indicate that the OTDMA method may prove useful in determining whether aerosol particles contain organic substances, especially if the OTDMA is operated in parallel with a hygroscopicity TDMA, as the growth of many substances is different in ethanol and water vapors.

  9. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  10. Size resolved chemical mass balance of aerosol particles over rural Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temesi, D.; Molnár, A.; Mészáros, E.; Feczkó, T.; Gelencsér, A.; Kiss, G.; Krivácsy, Z.

    The mass size distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles was determined by means of an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI) in rural air in Hungary. The particles captured on different stages of the impactor were chemically analyzed by capillary zone electrophoresis to quantify ionic components as well as by catalytic combustion method to detect total carbon in the samples. The results show that fine aerosol consists mainly of ammonium sulfate and organic carbon. These two species have rather different size distributions since very small particles are composed almost of carbon compounds. The analysis of fine aerosol samples collected simultaneously on filters indicates that an important part of organics is soluble in water. The mass balance of fine particles as a function of their size is estimated by taking into account the liquid water adsorbed by ammonium sulfate and by converting the mass of carbon to the mass of carbon compounds. Finally, the size resolved mass balance of fine aerosol particles is presented and discussed as a function of the origin of air masses.

  11. Particle size distribution of inorganic and organic ions in coastal and inland Antarctic aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Elena; Padoan, Sara; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Toscano, Giuseppa; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The concentration and particle-size distribution of ionic species in Antarctic aerosol samples were determined to investigate their potential sources, chemical evolution, and transport. We analyzed aerosol samples collected at two different Antarctic sites: a coastal site near Victoria Land close to the Italian Research Base "Mario Zucchelli", and another site located on the Antarctic plateau, close to Italian-French Concordia Research Station. We investigated anionic compounds using ion-chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and cationic species through capillary ion chromatography with conductometry. Aerosol collected close to the coast was mainly characterized by sea salt species such as Na+, Mg2+, and SO42-. These species represented a percentage of 88% of the total sum of all detected ionic species in the aerosol samples from the coastal site. These species were mainly distributed in the coarse fraction, confirming the presence of primary aerosol near the ocean source. Aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau was characterized by high acidity, with nss-SO42-, NO3-, and methanesulfonic acid as the most abundant species. These species were mainly distributed in the <0.49 μm fraction, and they had a behavior of a typical secondary aerosol, where several chemical and physical processes occurred.

  12. Atmospheric Black Carbon: Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Individual Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, M. K.; Tivanski, A. V.; Hopkins, R. J.; Marten, B. D.

    2006-12-01

    The formation of aerosols from both natural and anthropogenic sources affects the Earth's temperature and climate by altering the radiative properties of the atmosphere. Aerosols containing black carbon (BC) that are released into the atmosphere from the burning of biomass, natural fires and the combustion of coals, diesel and jet fuels, contribute a large positive component to this radiative forcing, thus causing a heating of the atmosphere. A distinct type of biomass burn aerosol referred to as "tar balls" has recently been reported in the literature and is characterized by a spherical morphology, high carbon content and ability to efficiently scatter and absorb light. At present, very little is known about the exact nature and variation of the range of BC aerosols in the atmosphere with regards to optical, chemical and physical properties. Additionally, the similarity of these aerosols to surrogates used in the laboratory as atmospheric mimics remains unclear. The local chemical bonding, structural ordering and carbon-to-oxygen ratios of a plethora of black carbon standard reference materials (BC SRMs), high molecular mass humic-like substances (HULIS) and atmospheric aerosols from a variety of sources are examined using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. STXM/NEXAFS enables single aerosol particles of diameter upwards of 100 nm to be studied, which allows the diversity of atmospheric aerosol collected during a variety of field missions to be assessed. We apply a semi-quantitative peak fitting method to the recorded NEXAFS spectral fingerprints allowing comparison of BC SRMs and HULIS to BC aerosol originating from anthropogenic combustion and biomass burning events. This method allows us to distinguish between anthropogenic combustion and biomass burn aerosol using both chemical bonding and structural ordering information. The STXM/NEXAFS technique has also been utilized to

  13. Particle integrity, sampling, and application of a DNA-tagged tracer for aerosol transport studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeser, Cynthia Jeanne [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2017-07-21

    Aerosols are an ever-present part of our daily environment and have extensive effects on both human and environmental health. Particles in the inhalable range (1-10 μm diameter) are of particular concern because their deposition in the lung can lead to a variety of illnesses including allergic reactions, viral or bacterial infections, and cancer. Understanding the transport of inhalable aerosols across both short and long distances is necessary to predict human exposures to aerosols. To assess the transport of hazardous aerosols, surrogate tracer particles are required to measure their transport through occupied spaces. These tracer particles must not only possess similar transport characteristics to those of interest but also be easily distinguished from the background at low levels and survive the environmental conditions of the testing environment. A previously-developed DNA-tagged particle (DNATrax), composed of food-grade sugar and a DNA oligonucleotide as a “barcode” label, shows promise as a new aerosol tracer. Herein, the use of DNATrax material is validated for use in both indoor and outdoor environments. Utilizing passive samplers made of materials commonly found in indoor environments followed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for endpoint particle detection, particles detection was achieved up to 90 m from the aerosolization location and across shorter distances with high spatial resolution. The unique DNA label and PCR assay specificity were leveraged to perform multiple simultaneous experiments. This allowed the assessment of experimental reproducibility, a rare occurrence among aerosol field tests. To transition to outdoor testing, the solid material provides some protection of the DNA label when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, with 60% of the DNA remaining intact after 60 minutes under a germicidal lamp and the rate of degradation declining with irradiation time. Additionally, exposure of the DNATrax material using

  14. An investigation into the effect of a ceramic particle trap on the chemical mutagens in diesel exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagley, S.T.; Dorie, L.D.; Leddy, D.G.; Johnson, J.H. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton (USA))

    1987-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles and vapor phase samples were collected from the diluted (15:1) exhaust of a 10.4 L displacement medium-duty engine (Caterpillar 3208), operated under EPA steady-state cycle Modes 4 and 5 conditions for load (50 and 75 percent, respectively) and speed (1680 rpm). Baseline (uncontrolled) emissions were compared to the exhaust modified by the use of an uncatalyzed monolithic ceramic trap (Corning). The Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity bioassay (Ames Test) was used to direct the course of chemical analyses. Total particulate matter (TPM), soluble organic fraction (SOF) (from TPM), sulfate fraction (SO4) (from TPM), and solid fraction (SOL) (from particle) were determined from dilute exhaust particles collected on 47 mm Teflon-coated woven glass fiber filters. Coincidentally, particles were collected on 508 x 508 mm Teflon-coated non-woven glass fiber filters, and vapor-phase samples were collected on XAD-2 resin. The SOF and VOC for chemical and biological characterization were obtained by Soxhlet extraction of samples with dichloromethane (DCM). Hydrocarbon mass balances were developed to evaluate the efficiency of the sampling system. Use of the ceramic traps caused no change in engine total hydrocarbon (HC) levels at Mode 4 but decreases in TPM, SOF, and NO2 were noted. In terms of HC emissions only, the percentage of SOF was significantly reduced, but the percentage of VOC was unchanged. For Mode 5, the engine HC levels were significantly reduced but the proportions of HC components, i.e. the percentage of SOF and the percentage of VOC, did not change significantly. Engine emission levels of TPM, SOF, and nitrogen dioxide were also significantly reduced at Mode 5. At both Modes 4 and 5, use of the ceramic particle traps caused an increase in the direct-acting (TA98) mutagenicity of the SOF and a decrease in the activity of the VOC.

  15. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Aerosol Optical Depth and Aerosol Particle Size Distribution Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particle size from the Visible Infrared Imaging...

  16. Production, Organic Characterization, and Phase Transformations of Marine Particles Aerosolized from a Laboratory Mesocosm Phytoplankton Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that particles emitted from bubble bursting and wave breaking of ocean waters with high biological activity can contain sea salts associated with organic material, with smaller particles containing a larger mass fraction of organics than larger particles. This likely indicates a link between phytoplankton productivity in oceans and particulate organic material in marine air. Once aerosolized, particles with significant amount of organic material can affect cloud activation and formation of ice crystals, among other atmospheric processes, thus influencing climate. This is significant for clouds and climate particularly over nutrient rich polar seas, in which concentrations of biological organisms can reach up to 109 cells per ml during spring phytoplankton blooms. Here we present results of bubble bursting aerosol production from a seawater mesocosm containing artificial seawater, natural seawater and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species. These phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emilianaia huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus), possessed siliceous frustules, calcareous frustules and no frustules, respectively. Bubbles were generated employing recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits. Dry and humidified aerosol size distributions and bulk aerosol organic composition were measured as a function of phytoplankton growth, and chlorophyll composition and particulate and dissolved organic carbon in the water were determined. Finally, particles were collected on substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, their elemental compositions were determined using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEMEDAX), and their carbon speciation was determined using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Particle size distributions exposed to dry and humidified air employing

  17. Mass analysis of charged aerosol particles in NLC and PMSE during the ECOMA/MASS campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Robertson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available MASS (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer is a multichannel mass spectrometer for charged aerosol particles, which was flown from the Andøya Rocket Range, Norway, through NLC and PMSE on 3 August 2007 and through PMSE on 6 August 2007. The eight-channel analyzers provided for the first time simultaneous measurements of the charge density residing on aerosol particles in four mass ranges, corresponding to ice particles with radii <0.5 nm (including ions, 0.5–1 nm, 1–2 nm, and >3 nm (approximately. Positive and negative particles were recorded on separate channels. Faraday rotation measurements provided electron density and a means of checking charge density measurements made by the spectrometer. Additional complementary measurements were made by rocket-borne dust impact detectors, electric field booms, a photometer and ground-based radar and lidar. The MASS data from the first flight showed negative charge number densities of 1500–3000 cm−3 for particles with radii >3 nm from 83–88 km approximately coincident with PMSE observed by the ALWIN radar and NLC observed by the ALOMAR lidar. For particles in the 1–2 nm range, number densities of positive and negative charge were similar in magnitude (~2000 cm−3 and for smaller particles, 0.5–1 nm in radius, positive charge was dominant. The occurrence of positive charge on the aerosol particles of the smallest size and predominately negative charge on the particles of largest size suggests that nucleation occurs on positive condensation nuclei and is followed by collection of negative charge during subsequent growth to larger size. Faraday rotation measurements show a bite-out in electron density that increases the time for positive aerosol particles to be neutralized and charged negatively. The larger particles (>3 nm are observed throughout the NLC region, 83–88 km, and the smaller particles are observed primarily at the high end of the range, 86–88 km

  18. Mass analysis of charged aerosol particles in NLC and PMSE during the ECOMA/MASS campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Robertson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available MASS (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer is a multichannel mass spectrometer for charged aerosol particles, which was flown from the Andøya Rocket Range, Norway, through NLC and PMSE on 3 August 2007 and through PMSE on 6 August 2007. The eight-channel analyzers provided for the first time simultaneous measurements of the charge density residing on aerosol particles in four mass ranges, corresponding to ice particles with radii <0.5 nm (including ions, 0.5–1 nm, 1–2 nm, and >3 nm (approximately. Positive and negative particles were recorded on separate channels. Faraday rotation measurements provided electron density and a means of checking charge density measurements made by the spectrometer. Additional complementary measurements were made by rocket-borne dust impact detectors, electric field booms, a photometer and ground-based radar and lidar. The MASS data from the first flight showed negative charge number densities of 1500–3000 cm−3 for particles with radii >3 nm from 83–88 km approximately coincident with PMSE observed by the ALWIN radar and NLC observed by the ALOMAR lidar. For particles in the 1–2 nm range, number densities of positive and negative charge were similar in magnitude (~2000 cm−3 and for smaller particles, 0.5–1 nm in radius, positive charge was dominant. The occurrence of positive charge on the aerosol particles of the smallest size and predominately negative charge on the particles of largest size suggests that nucleation occurs on positive condensation nuclei and is followed by collection of negative charge during subsequent growth to larger size. Faraday rotation measurements show a bite-out in electron density that increases the time for positive aerosol particles to be neutralized and charged negatively. The larger particles (>3 nm are observed throughout the NLC region, 83–88 km, and the smaller particles are observed primarily at the high end of the range, 86–88 km. The second flight into

  19. Heterogeneous Reactivity of Nitric Acid with Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol: Large Differences Observed between and within Individual Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Andrew P; Guasco, Timothy L; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Ryder, Olivia S; Trueblood, Jonathan V; Collins, Douglas B; Ruppel, Matthew J; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Prather, Kimberly A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2014-08-07

    Current climate and atmospheric chemistry models assume that all sea spray particles react as if they are pure NaCl. However, recent studies of sea spray aerosol particles have shown that distinct particle types exist (including sea salt, organic carbon, and biological particles) as well as mixtures of these and, within each particle type, there is a range of single-particle chemical compositions. Because of these differences, individual particles should display a range of reactivities with trace atmospheric gases. Herein, to address this, we study the composition of individual sea spray aerosol particles after heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid. As expected, a replacement reaction of chloride with nitrate is observed; however, there is a large range of reactivities spanning from no reaction to complete reaction between and within individual sea spray aerosol particles. These data clearly support the need for laboratory studies of individual, environmentally relevant particles to improve our fundamental understanding as to the properties that determine reactivity.

  20. Elucidating determinants of aerosol composition through particle-type-based receptor modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. McGuire

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS was deployed at a semi-rural site in southern Ontario to characterize the size and chemical composition of individual particles. Particle-type-based receptor modelling of these data was used to investigate the determinants of aerosol chemical composition in this region. Individual particles were classified into particle-types and positive matrix factorization (PMF was applied to their temporal trends to separate and cross-apportion particle-types to factors. The extent of chemical processing for each factor was assessed by evaluating the internal and external mixing state of the characteristic particle-types. The nine factors identified helped to elucidate the coupled interactions of these determinants. Nitrate-laden dust was found to be the dominant type of locally emitted particles measured by ATOFMS. Several factors associated with aerosol transported to the site from intermediate local-to-regional distances were identified: the Organic factor was associated with a combustion source to the north-west; the ECOC Day factor was characterized by nearby local-to-regional carbonaceous emissions transported from the south-west during the daytime; and the Fireworks factor consisted of pyrotechnic particles from the Detroit region following holiday fireworks displays. Regional aerosol from farther emissions sources was reflected through three factors: two Biomass Burning factors and a highly chemically processed Long Range Transport factor. The Biomass Burning factors were separated by PMF due to differences in chemical processing which were in part elucidated by the passage of two thunderstorm gust fronts with different air mass histories. The remaining two factors, ECOC Night and Nitrate Background, represented the night-time partitioning of nitrate to pre-existing particles of different origins. The distinct meteorological conditions observed during this month-long study in the summer of 2007

  1. Aerosol number size distributions over a coastal semi urban location: Seasonal changes and ultrafine particle bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, S. Suresh, E-mail: s_sureshbabu@vssc.gov.in [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram 695022 (India); Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram 695022 (India); Moorthy, K. Krishna [Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2016-09-01

    Number-size distribution is one of the important microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols that influence aerosol life cycle, aerosol-radiation interaction as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Making use of one-yearlong measurements of aerosol particle number-size distributions (PNSD) over a broad size spectrum (~ 15–15,000 nm) from a tropical coastal semi-urban location-Trivandrum (Thiruvananthapuram), the size characteristics, their seasonality and response to mesoscale and synoptic scale meteorology are examined. While the accumulation mode contributed mostly to the annual mean concentration, ultrafine particles (having diameter < 100 nm) contributed as much as 45% to the total concentration, and thus constitute a strong reservoir, that would add to the larger particles through size transformation. The size distributions were, in general, bimodal with well-defined modes in the accumulation and coarse regimes, with mode diameters lying in the range 141 to 167 nm and 1150 to 1760 nm respectively, in different seasons. Despite the contribution of the coarse sized particles to the total number concentration being meager, they contributed significantly to the surface area and volume, especially during transport of marine air mass highlighting the role of synoptic air mass changes. Significant diurnal variation occurred in the number concentrations, geometric mean diameters, which is mostly attributed to the dynamics of the local coastal atmospheric boundary layer and the effect of mesoscale land/sea breeze circulation. Bursts of ultrafine particles (UFP) occurred quite frequently, apparently during periods of land-sea breeze transitions, caused by the strong mixing of precursor-rich urban air mass with the cleaner marine air mass; the resulting turbulence along with boundary layer dynamics aiding the nucleation. These ex-situ particles were observed at the surface due to the transport associated with boundary layer dynamics. The particle growth rates from

  2. Measurements of airborne influenza virus in aerosol particles from human coughs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Lindsley

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is thought to be communicated from person to person by multiple pathways. However, the relative importance of different routes of influenza transmission is unclear. To better understand the potential for the airborne spread of influenza, we measured the amount and size of aerosol particles containing influenza virus that were produced by coughing. Subjects were recruited from patients presenting at a student health clinic with influenza-like symptoms. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from the volunteers and they were asked to cough three times into a spirometer. After each cough, the cough-generated aerosol was collected using a NIOSH two-stage bioaerosol cyclone sampler or an SKC BioSampler. The amount of influenza viral RNA contained in the samplers was analyzed using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qPCR targeting the matrix gene M1. For half of the subjects, viral plaque assays were performed on the nasopharyngeal swabs and cough aerosol samples to determine if viable virus was present. Fifty-eight subjects were tested, of whom 47 were positive for influenza virus by qPCR. Influenza viral RNA was detected in coughs from 38 of these subjects (81%. Thirty-five percent of the influenza RNA was contained in particles>4 µm in aerodynamic diameter, while 23% was in particles 1 to 4 µm and 42% in particles<1 µm. Viable influenza virus was detected in the cough aerosols from 2 of 21 subjects with influenza. These results show that coughing by influenza patients emits aerosol particles containing influenza virus and that much of the viral RNA is contained within particles in the respirable size range. The results support the idea that the airborne route may be a pathway for influenza transmission, especially in the immediate vicinity of an influenza patient. Further research is needed on the viability of airborne influenza viruses and the risk of transmission.

  3. Individual particle morphology, coatings, and impurities of black carbon aerosols in Antarctic ice and tropical rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Aja; Edwards, Ross; Saunders, Martin; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Subramanian, R.; Timms, Nicholas E.; Riessen, Arie; Smith, Andrew M.; Lambrinidis, Dionisia; Nunes, Laurie J.; Vallelonga, Paul; Goodwin, Ian D.; Moy, Andrew D.; Curran, Mark A. J.; Ommen, Tas D.

    2016-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols are a large source of climate warming, impact atmospheric chemistry, and are implicated in large-scale changes in atmospheric circulation. Inventories of BC emissions suggest significant changes in the global BC aerosol distribution due to human activity. However, little is known regarding BC's atmospheric distribution or aged particle characteristics before the twentieth century. Here we investigate the prevalence and structural properties of BC particles in Antarctic ice cores from 1759, 1838, and 1930 Common Era (C.E.) using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The study revealed an unexpected diversity in particle morphology, insoluble coatings, and association with metals. In addition to conventionally occurring BC aggregates, we observed single BC monomers, complex aggregates with internally, and externally mixed metal and mineral impurities, tar balls, and organonitrogen coatings. The results of the study show BC particles in the remote Antarctic atmosphere exhibit complexity that is unaccounted for in atmospheric models of BC.

  4. Aerosol decadal trends – Part 2: In-situ aerosol particle number concentrations at GAW and ACTRIS stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Asmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analysed the trends of total aerosol particle number concentrations (N measured at long-term measurement stations involved either in the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW and/or EU infrastructure project ACTRIS. The sites are located in Europe, North America, Antarctica, and on Pacific Ocean islands. The majority of the sites showed clear decreasing trends both in the full-length time series, and in the intra-site comparison period of 2001–2010, especially during the winter months. Several potential driving processes for the observed trends were studied, and even though there are some similarities between N trends and air temperature changes, the most likely cause of many northern hemisphere trends was found to be decreases in the anthropogenic emissions of primary particles, SO2 or some co-emitted species. We could not find a consistent agreement between the trends of N and particle optical properties in the few stations with long time series of all of these properties. The trends of N and the proxies for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN were generally consistent in the few European stations where the measurements were available. This work provides a useful comparison analysis for modelling studies of trends in aerosol number concentrations.

  5. Resonant fiber based aerosol particle sensor and method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and devices for determining the weight of small particles, typically being nano-sized particles by use of resonating fibers in the form of elongate members being driven into resonance by an actuator or e.g. thermal noise/fluctuation. The frequency shift in...... are deposited by letting a fluid with the particles flow past the elongate member....

  6. A Novel Aerosol Method for the Production of Hydrogel Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Guzman-Villanueva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method of generating hydrogel particles for various applications including drug delivery purposes was developed. This method is based on the production of hydrogel particles from sprayed polymeric nano/microdroplets obtained by a nebulization process that is immediately followed by gelation in a crosslinking fluid. In this study, particle synthesis parameters such as type of nebulizer, type of crosslinker, air pressure, and polymer concentration were investigated for their impact on the mean particle size, swelling behavior, and morphology of the developed particles. Spherical alginate-based hydrogel particles with a mean particle size in the range from 842 to 886 nm were obtained. Using statistical analysis of the factorial design of experiment it was found that the main factors influencing the size and swelling values of the particles are the alginate concentration and the air pressure. Thus, it was demonstrated that the method described in the current study is promising for the generation of hydrogel particles and it constitutes a relatively simple and low-cost system.

  7. Fluorescence calibration method for single-particle aerosol fluorescence instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley Robinson, Ellis; Gao, Ru-Shan; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Fahey, David W.; Perring, Anne E.

    2017-05-01

    Real-time, single-particle fluorescence instruments used to detect atmospheric bioaerosol particles are increasingly common, yet no standard fluorescence calibration method exists for this technique. This gap limits the utility of these instruments as quantitative tools and complicates comparisons between different measurement campaigns. To address this need, we have developed a method to produce size-selected particles with a known mass of fluorophore, which we use to calibrate the fluorescence detection of a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A). We use mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles to calibrate one detector (FL1; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 310-400 nm) and pure quinine particles to calibrate the other (FL2; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 420-650 nm). The relationship between fluorescence and mass for the mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles is linear, while that for the pure quinine particles is nonlinear, likely indicating that not all of the quinine mass contributes to the observed fluorescence. Nonetheless, both materials produce a repeatable response between observed fluorescence and particle mass. This procedure allows users to set the detector gains to achieve a known absolute response, calculate the limits of detection for a given instrument, improve the repeatability of the instrumental setup, and facilitate intercomparisons between different instruments. We recommend calibration of single-particle fluorescence instruments using these methods.

  8. Aerosol particle shrinkage event phenomenology in a South European suburban area during 2009-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Blanco, E.; Gómez-Moreno, F. J.; Núñez, L.; Pujadas, M.; Cusack, M.; Artíñano, B.

    2017-07-01

    A high number of aerosol particle shrinkage cases (70) have been identified and analyzed from an extensive and representative database of aerosol size distributions obtained between 2009 and 2015 at an urban background site in Madrid (Spain). A descriptive classification based on the process from which the shrinkage began is proposed according which shrinkage events were divided into three groups: (1) NPF + shrinkage (NPF + S) events, (2) aerosol particle growth process + shrinkage (G + S) events, and (3) pure shrinkage (S) events. The largest number of shrinkages corresponded to the S-type followed by NPF + S, while the G + S events were the least frequent group recorded. Duration of shrinkages varied widely from 0.75 to 8.5 h and SR from -1.0 to -11.1 nm h-1. These processes typically occurred in the afternoon, around 18:00 UTC, caused by two situations: i) a wind speed increase usually associated with a change in the wind direction (over 60% of the observations) and ii) the reduction of photochemical activity at the end of the day. All shrinkages were detected during the warm period, mainly between May and August, when local meteorological conditions (high solar irradiance and temperature and low relative humidity), atmospheric processes (high photochemical activity) and availability of aerosol-forming precursors were favorable for their development. As a consequence of these processes, the particles concentration corresponding to the Aitken mode decreased into the nucleation mode. The accumulation mode did not undergo significant changes during these processes. In some cases, a dilution of the particulate content in the ambient air was observed. This work, goes further than others works dealing with aerosol particles shrinkages, as it incorporates as a main novelty a classification methodology for studying these processes. Moreover, compared to other studies, it is supported by a high and representative number of observations. Thus, this study contributes to

  9. Oxidative DNA damage in vitamin C-supplemented guinea pigs after intratracheal instillation of diesel exhaust particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Daneshvar, B.; Loft, S.

    2003-01-01

    The health effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are thought to involve oxidative damage. We have investigated the effect of intratracheal DEP instillation to guinea pigs in three groups of 12 animals each given 0, 0.7, or 2.1 mg. Five days later guinea pigs exposed to DEP had increased levels...... for the study of oxidative damage induced by particulate matter. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved....

  10. Adsorption of NO{sub 2} on carbon aerosols particles at the low ppb-level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalberer, M.; Ammann, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The adsorption of NO{sub 2} at the low ppb-level (3-40 ppb) on carbon aerosol particles was investigated. A sticking coefficient of about 2.10{sup -4} was found, similar to that in previous studies using radioactively labeled {sup 13}NO{sub 2}. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  11. Individual aerosol particle composition variations in air masses crossing the North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    De Bock, L.A.; Van Malderen, H.; Van Grieken, R.

    1994-01-01

    Single-particle analysis on North Sea and rainwater samples was performed by electron-probe X-ray microanalysis (EPXMA). The analysis was mainly focused on the determination of the inorganic composition of giant particles with diameters above 1 µm. Multivariate techniques were used for the reduction of the data set and for source apportion. Based on the relative abundances found by hierarchical cluster analyses according to the Ward error sum method, three to eight different aerosol types wer...

  12. Effect of diesel exhaust particles on renal vascular responses in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Suleimani, Y M; Al Mahruqi, A S; Al Za'abi, M; Shalaby, A; Ashique, M; Nemmar, A; Ali, B H

    2017-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated the possible association between exposure to particulate air pollution and the increased rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with kidney diseases. The link of this observation to vascular damage has not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this study aims to investigate possible vascular damage that might be associated with exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DP) in adenine (AD)-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats, and the possible ameliorative effect of gum acacia (GA). CKD was induced by feeding AD (0.75%, w/w), and DP (0.5 mg/kg) was instilled intratracheally every second day and GA was given concomitantly in the drinking water at a dose of 15% w/v. All treatments were given concomitantly for 28 days. Changes in renal blood flow (RBF) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were monitored in these animals after anesthesia, together with several other endpoints. Exposure to DP significantly reduced RBF and this was significantly potentiated in AD-treated rats. Phenylephrine-induced decreases in RBF and increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were severely potentiated in rats exposed to DP, and these actions were significantly augmented in AD-treated rats. GA did not significantly affect the vascular impairment induced by AD and DP given together. This study provides experimental evidence that exposure to particulate air pollution can exacerbate the vascular damage seen in patients with CKD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 541-549, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. MISR Dark Water aerosol retrievals: operational algorithm sensitivity to particle non-sphericity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kalashnikova

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to theoretically investigate the sensitivity of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR operational (version 22 Dark Water retrieval algorithm to aerosol non-sphericity over the global oceans under actual observing conditions, accounting for current algorithm assumptions. Non-spherical (dust aerosol models, which were introduced in version 16 of the MISR aerosol product, improved the quality and coverage of retrievals in dusty regions. Due to the sensitivity of the retrieval to the presence of non-spherical aerosols, the MISR aerosol product has been successfully used to track the location and evolution of mineral dust plumes from the Sahara across the Atlantic, for example. However, the MISR global non-spherical aerosol optical depth (AOD fraction product has been found to have several climatological artifacts superimposed on valid detections of mineral dust, including high non-spherical fraction in the Southern Ocean and seasonally variable bands of high non-sphericity. In this paper we introduce a formal approach to examine the ability of the operational MISR Dark Water algorithm to distinguish among various spherical and non-spherical particles as a function of the variable MISR viewing geometry. We demonstrate the following under the criteria currently implemented: (1 Dark Water retrieval sensitivity to particle non-sphericity decreases for AOD below about 0.1 primarily due to an unnecessarily large lower bound imposed on the uncertainty in MISR observations at low light levels, and improves when this lower bound is removed; (2 Dark Water retrievals are able to distinguish between the spherical and non-spherical particles currently used for all MISR viewing geometries when the AOD exceeds 0.1; (3 the sensitivity of the MISR retrievals to aerosol non-sphericity varies in a complex way that depends on the sampling of the scattering phase function and the contribution from multiple scattering; and (4 non

  14. Real-Time Characterization of Aerosol Particle Composition above the Urban Canopy in Beijing: Insights into the Interactions between the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Aerosol Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yele; Du, Wei; Wang, Qingqing; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Chen; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhenyi; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa; Gao, Zhiqiu; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-10-06

    Despite extensive efforts into the characterization of air pollution during the past decade, real-time characterization of aerosol particle composition above the urban canopy in the megacity Beijing has never been performed to date. Here we conducted the first simultaneous real-time measurements of aerosol composition at two different heights at the same location in urban Beijing from December 19, 2013 to January 2, 2014. The nonrefractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ by a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer at near-ground level and an aerosol chemical speciation monitor at 260 m on a 325 m meteorological tower in Beijing. Secondary aerosol showed similar temporal variations between ground level and 260 m, whereas much weaker correlations were found for the primary aerosol. The diurnal evolution of the ratios and correlations of aerosol species between 260 m and the ground level further illustrated a complex interaction between vertical mixing processes and local source emissions on aerosol chemistry in the atmospheric boundary layer. As a result, the aerosol compositions at the two heights were substantially different. Organic aerosol (OA), mainly composed of primary OA (62%), at the ground level showed a higher contribution to NR-PM1 (65%) than at 260 m (54%), whereas a higher concentration and contribution (15%) of nitrate was observed at 260 m, probably due to the favorable gas-particle partitioning under lower temperature conditions. In addition, two different boundary layer structures were observed, each interacting differently with the evolution processes of aerosol chemistry.

  15. Mass transfer effects in hygroscopic measurements of aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Chan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA has been widely utilized to measure the hygroscopicity of laboratory-generated and atmospheric submicrometer particles. An important concern in investigating the hygroscopicity of the particles is if the particles have attained equilibrium state in the measurements. We present a literature survey to investigate the mass transfer effects in hygroscopicity measurements. In most TDMA studies, a residence time in the order of seconds is used for humidification (or dehumidification. NaCl and (NH42SO4 particles are usually used to verify the equilibrium measurements during this residence time, which is presumed to be sufficient for other particles. There have been observations that not all types of submicrometer particles, including atmospheric particles, attain their equilibrium sizes within this time scale. We recommend that experimentation with different residence times be conducted and that the residence time should be explicitly stated in future TDMA measurements. Mass transfer effects may also exist in the measurements of other properties related to the water uptake of atmospheric particles such as relative humidity dependent light scattering coefficients and cloud condensation nuclei activity.

  16. Infrared spectroscopy of solid mixed ammonia-water and acetylene-water aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenor, Merrill; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-04-01

    Mixed water aerosols are important components of planetary and lunar atmospheres. In this work, we use rapid-scan Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy to study solid ammonia-water and acetylene-water aerosol particles formed in a bath gas cooling cell at 78 K. With this set-up, we record time-dependent extinction spectra of particle ensembles in the mid-IR to monitor changes to the internal structure of the aerosol particles. Both ammonia-water and acetylene-water were found to form molecularly mixed structures. The mixing is observed by monitoring the profile for the ammonia ν2 band and the acetylene ν5 band, both of which are sensitive to particle properties. Depending on the injection conditions, the mixed particles form either immediately after sample injection or after a short mixing period of several tens of minutes. We confirm the formation of mixed particles by comparing the experimental spectra with spectra calculated with the vibrational exciton model.

  17. Constraining the heterogeneous loss of O3 on soot particles with observations in jet engine exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, R. S.; Kärcher, B.; Keim, E. R.; Fahey, D. W.

    In situ measurements in the engine exhaust of a Concorde supersonic aircraft in the lower stratosphere are used to constrain heterogeneous reaction rates on soot particles in a plume model. Upper limit values are obtained for the product of the reactive uptake coefficients of O3 and NO2 and the mean surface area of individual soot particles using the model and the well-established O3-N2O correlation in the lower stratosphere. The low reactivity value obtained for O3 implies that soot reactions cannot account for ozone trends in the lower stratosphere.

  18. Lack of acute phase response in the livers of mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles or carbon black by inhalation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Anne T; Halappanavar, Sabina; Folkmann, Janne K

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic and animal studies have shown that particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of lung and cardiovascular diseases. Although the exact mechanisms by which particles induce cardiovascular diseases are not known, studies suggest involvement of systemic acute...... phase responses, including C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) in humans. In this study we test the hypothesis that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) - or carbon black (CB)-induced lung inflammation initiates an acute phase response in the liver. RESULTS: Mice were exposed to filtered air...

  19. Physical properties of the arctic summer aerosol particles in relation to sources at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, C. G.; Kamra, A. K.

    2014-02-01

    Measurements of the number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles in the size range of 0.5-20 μm diameter were made with an aerodynamic particle sizer at an Arctic site at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard in August-September 2007 during the International Polar Year 2007-2008. Data are analyzed to study the aerosol number concentration-wind speed relationships. The sea-salt particles of marine origin generated within the Arctic circle are identified as the main source of the Arctic summer aerosols. Total number concentration of aerosol particles increases with increase in wind speed, the increase being more when winds from open leads over the oceanic sector are reaching the station as compared to when winds from pack ice in other directions are reaching the station. The larger increase with winds from the oceanic sector is attributed to the enhanced bubble-breaking activity and increased entrainment of dimethyl sulphide particles at the sea surface. Although, the increase in total aerosol number concentration associated with the winds from the oceanic sector is spread over the whole range of particle sizes, the increase in coarse mode particles is more prominent than that in the accumulation mode particles. The age of airmass over pack ice is also an important factor to determine the aerosol concentration over the Arctic region. The process of rainout/washout of the aerosol particles due to drizzle/snowfall is an effective sink mechanism in the Arctic environment. The aerosol particle concentration starts decreasing within a few minutes from the start of these events but requires a few hours to restore to the normal background aerosol level after the end of event.

  20. Effect of particle size of bronchodilator aerosols on lung distribution and pulmonary function in patients with chronic asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, D. M.; Solomon, M A; Tolfree, S E; Short, M; Spiro, S G

    1987-01-01

    The particle size of bronchodilator aerosols may be important in determining the site of deposition in the lung and their therapeutic effect. The distribution of aerosols (labelled with technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentacetic acid) of two different particle sizes has been studied by gamma camera imaging. The particles had mass median aerodynamic diameters (geometric standard deviations) of 1.4 (1.4) and 5.5 (2.3) micron, and they were administered from a jet nebuliser to eight patients ...

  1. Hazardous particle binder, coagulant and re-aerosolization inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauter, Paula; Zalk, David; Hoffman, D. Mark

    2012-07-10

    A copolymer and water/ethanol solvent solution capable of binding with airborne contaminants or potential airborne contaminants, such as biological weapon agents or toxic particulates, coagulating as the solvent evaporates, and adhering the contaminants to a surface so as to inhibit the re-suspension of such contaminants. The solution uses a water or ethanol/water mixture for the solvent, and a copolymer having one of several functional group sets so as to have physical and chemical characteristics of high adhesion, low viscosity, low surface tension, negative electrostatic charge, substantially neutral pH, and a low pKa. Use of the copolymer solution prevents re-aerosolization and transport of unwanted, reactive species thus increasing health and safety for personnel charged with decontamination of contaminated buildings and areas.

  2. In-situ observations of interstitial aerosol particles and cloud residues found in contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1997-12-31

    In spring 1994 a series of flights were conducted in cirrus clouds and contrails over southern Germany. One of the aims of this campaign was to study the phase partitioning of aerosols and water in these clouds. To achieve this separation of particles two complementary sampling probes were mounted on the research aircraft Falcon. These are the Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) or super-micrometer inlet, and the interstitial inlet or submicrometer inlet. The CVI is a device that inertially separates cloud elements larger than a certain aerodynamic size from the surrounding atmosphere into a warm, dry and particle free air. Assuming that each cloud element leaves behind only one residue particle, these measurements yield an equivalent number concentration for cloud particles having an aerodynamic diameter larger than the lower cut size of the CVI. The size distribution of the sampled aerosol and residual particles between 0.1 to 3.5 {mu}m diameter was measured by a PMS PCASP (Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer) working alternatively on both inlets. The gas-phase water vapor content was measured by a cryogenic frost point mirror. (R.P.) 4 refs.

  3. Characterization of new particle and secondary aerosol formation during summertime in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Sun, J. Y.; Lin, W. L.; Gong, S. L.; Shen, X. J.; Yang, S.

    2011-07-01

    Size-resolved aerosol number and mass concentrations and the mixing ratios of O3 and various trace gases were continuously measured at an urban station before and during the Beijing Olympic and Paralympic Games (5 June to 22 September, 2008). 23 new particle formation (NPF) events were identified; these usually were associated with changes in wind direction and/or rising concentrations of gas-phase precursors or after precipitation events. Most of the NPF events started in the morning and continued to noon as particles in the nucleation mode grew into the Aitken mode. From noon to midnight, the aerosols grew into the accumulation mode through condensation and coagulation. Ozone showed a gradual rise starting around 10:00 local time, reached its peak around 15:00 and then declined as the organics increased. The dominant new particle species were organics (40-75% of PM1) and sulphate; nitrate and ammonium were more minor contributors.

  4. Differences in physical chemistry and dissolution rate of solid particle aerosols from solution pressurised inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttini, Francesca; Miozzi, Michele; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Royall, Paul G; Brambilla, Gaetano; Colombo, Paolo; Bettini, Ruggero; Forbes, Ben

    2014-04-25

    Solution composition alters the dynamics of beclomethasone diproprionate (BDP) particle formation from droplets emitted by pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). The hypothesis that differences in inhaler solutions result in different solid particle physical chemistry was tested using a suite of complementary calorimetric techniques. The atomisation of BDP-ethanol solutions from commercial HFA-pMDI produced aerodynamically-equivalent solid particle aerosols. However, differences in particle physico-chemistry (morphology and solvate/clathrate formation) were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and supported by hot stage microscopy (HSM). Increasing the ethanol content of the formulation from 8 to 12% (w/w), which retards the evaporation of propellant and slows the increase in droplet surface viscosity, enhanced the likelihood of particles drying with a smooth surface. The dissolution rate of BDP from the 12% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (63% dissolved over 120 min) was reduced compared to the 8% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (86% dissolved over 120 min). The addition of 0.01% (w/w) formoterol fumarate or 1.3% (w/w) glycerol to the inhaler solution modified the particles and reduced the BDP dissolution rate further to 34% and 16% dissolved in 120 min, respectively. These data provide evidence that therapeutic aerosols from apparently similar inhaler products, including those with similar aerodynamic performance, may behave non-equivalently after deposition in the lungs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation and modelling of the size fractionated aerosol particle number concentration measurements nearby a major road in Helsinki ─ Part I: Modelling results within the LIPIKA project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ketzel

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A field measurement campaign was conducted near a major road "Itäväylä" in an urban area in Helsinki in 17–20 February 2003. Aerosol measurements were conducted using a mobile laboratory "Sniffer" at various distances from the road, and at an urban background location. Measurements included particle size distribution in the size range of 7 nm–10 μm (aerodynamic diameter by the Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI and in the size range of 3–50 nm (mobility diameter by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS, total number concentration of particles larger than 3 nm detected by an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, driving route of the mobile laboratory, and traffic density on the studied road. In this study, we have compared measured concentration data with the predictions of the road network dispersion model CAR-FMI used in combination with an aerosol process model MONO32. For model comparison purposes, one of the cases was additionally computed using the aerosol process model UHMA, combined with the CAR-FMI model. The vehicular exhaust emissions, and atmospheric dispersion and transformation of fine and ultrafine particles was evaluated within the distance scale of 200 m (corresponding to a time scale of a couple of minutes. We computed the temporal evolution of the number concentrations, size distributions and chemical compositions of various particle size classes. The atmospheric dilution rate of particles is obtained from the roadside dispersion model CAR-FMI. Considering the evolution of total number concentration, dilution was shown to be the most important process. The influence of coagulation and condensation on the number concentrations of particle size modes was found to be negligible on this distance scale. Condensation was found to affect the evolution of particle diameter in the two smallest particle modes. The assumed value of the concentration of

  6. Ice nucleation properties of atmospheric aerosol particles collected during a field campaign in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, Petya; Maier, Stefanie; Lang-Yona, Naama; Tamm, Alexandra; Meusel, Hannah; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, including desert and soil dust as well as marine aerosols, are well known to act as ice nuclei (IN) and thus have been investigated in numerous ice nucleation studies. Based on their cloud condensation nuclei potential and their impacts on radiative properties of clouds (via scattering and absorption of solar radiation), aerosol particles may significantly affect the cloud and precipitation development. Atmospheric aerosols of the Eastern Mediterranean have been described to be dominated by desert dust, but only little is known on their composition and ice nucleating properties. In this study we investigated the ice nucleating ability of total suspended particles (TSP), collected at the remote site Agia Marina Xyliatou on Cyprus during a field campaign in April 2016. Airborne TSP samples containing air masses of various types such as African (Saharan) and Arabian dust and European and Middle Eastern pollution were collected on glass fiber filters at 24 h intervals. Sampling was performed ˜5 m above ground level and ˜521 m above sea level. During the sampling period, two major dust storms (PM 10max 118 μg/m3 and 66 μg/m3) and a rain event (rainfall amount: 3.4 mm) were documented. Chemical and physical characterizations of the particles were analyzed experimentally through filtration, thermal, chemical and enzyme treatments. Immersion freezing experiments were performed at relatively high subzero temperatures (-1 to -15˚ C) using the mono ice nucleation array. Preliminary results indicate that highest IN particle numbers (INPs) occurred during the second dust storm event with lower particle concentrations. Treatments at 60˚ C lead to a gradual IN deactivation, indicating the presence of biological INPs, which were observed to be larger than 300 kDa. Additional results originating from this study will be shown. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Ice Nuclei Research Unit (INUIT).

  7. Isolation and Quantitative Estimation of Diesel Exhaust and Carbon Black Particles Ingested by Lung Epithelial Cells and Alveolar Macrophages In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new procedure for isolating and estimating ingested carbonaceous diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or carbon black (CB) particles by lung epithelial cells and macrophages is described. Cells were incubated with DEP or CB to examine cell-particle interaction and ingestion. After va...

  8. Regulation of human hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by diesel exhaust particle extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Le Vee

    Full Text Available Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs are common environmental air pollutants primarily affecting the lung. DEPs or chemicals adsorbed on DEPs also exert extra-pulmonary effects, including alteration of hepatic drug detoxifying enzyme expression. The present study was designed to determine whether organic DEP extract (DEPe may target hepatic drug transporters that contribute in a major way to drug detoxification. Using primary human hepatocytes and transporter-overexpressing cells, DEPe was first shown to strongly inhibit activities of the sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC uptake transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1 and of the canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC efflux pump multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, with IC50 values ranging from approximately 1 to 20 μg/mL and relevant to environmental exposure situations. By contrast, 25 μg/mL DEPe failed to alter activities of the SLC transporter organic cation transporter (OCT 1 and of the ABC efflux pumps P-glycoprotein and bile salt export pump (BSEP, whereas it only moderately inhibited those of sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. Treatment by 25 μg/mL DEPe was next demonstrated to induce expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in cultured human hepatic cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OCT1 and BSEP. Such changes in transporter expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR pathway. This suggests that DEPe, which is enriched in known ligands of AhR like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alters drug transporter expression via activation of the AhR cascade. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of organic chemicals containing in DEPs, which may contribute

  9. Tracking the pathway of diesel exhaust particles from the nose to the brain by X-ray florescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Yasuto [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: y.matsui@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakai, Nobumitsu [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: sakai@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tsuda, Akira [Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)], E-mail: atsuda@hsph.harvard.edu; Terada, Yasuko [JASRI, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)], E-mail: yterada@spring8.or.jp; Takaoka, Masaki [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: takaoka@epsehost.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fujimaki, Hidekazu [Division of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)], E-mail: fujimaki@nies.go.jp; Uchiyama, Iwao [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: uchiyama@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2009-08-15

    Studies have shown that exposure to nano-sized particles (< 50 nm) result in their translocation to the central nervous system through the olfactory nerve. Translocation commonly occurs via inhalation, ingestion and skin uptake. Little information is available on the specific pathway of cellular localization of nano-sized particles in the olfactory bulb. The nano-sized particles entrance into the postsynaptics cell is of particular interest because the mitral cell projects to the central nucleus of the amygdala and the piriform cortex. Therefore, our objective in this follow-up study has been to determine whether or not the mitral cells project nano-sized particles to the brain. Nano-sized particles in this study were generated using diesel exhaust. Lab mice were exposed for a period of 4 weeks. We employed synchrotron radiation (SPring-8, Japan) to determine the concentration levels of metal in the olfactory neuron pathway. Metal levels were assayed by mapping, using X-ray fluorescence analysis. The major metal components measured in the filter that collected the inhaled diesel exhaust particles were calcium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc. Our studies reveal an increase in the amount of nano-sized particles in the glomerular layer as well as in the neurons in the olfactory epithelium. Higher levels of nickel and iron were found in the olfactory epithelium's lamina propria mucosae in comparison to that in the control group. Higher levels of iron also were observed in the glomerular layer. Our studies do not clarify the specifics of metal adhesion and detachment. This remains to be one of the key issues requiring further clarification.

  10. Simulation of particle size distribution with a global aerosol model: contribution of nucleation to aerosol and CCN number concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available An advanced particle microphysics model with a number of computationally efficient schemes has been incorporated into a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem to simulate particle number size distributions and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations in the atmosphere. Size-resolved microphysics for secondary particles (i.e., those formed from gaseous species and sea salt has been treated in the present study. The growth of nucleated particles through the condensation of sulfuric acid vapor and equilibrium uptake of nitrate, ammonium, and secondary organic aerosol is explicitly simulated, along with the scavenging of secondary particles by primary particles (dust, black carbon, organic carbon, and sea salt. We calculate secondary particle formation rate based on ion-mediated nucleation (IMN mechanism and constrain the parameterizations of primary particle emissions with various observations. Our simulations indicate that secondary particles formed via IMN appear to be able to account for the particle number concentrations observed in many parts of the troposphere. A comparison of the simulated annual mean concentrations of condensation nuclei larger than 10 nm (CN10 with those measured values show very good agreement (within a factor of two in near all 22 sites around the globe that have at least one full year of CN10 measurements. Secondary particles appear to dominate the number abundance in most parts of the troposphere. Calculated CCN concentration at supersaturation of 0.4% (CCN0.4 and the fraction of CCN0.4 that is secondary (fsecCCN have large spatial variations. Over the middle latitude in the Northern Hemisphere, zonally averaged CCN0.4 decreases from ~400–700 cm−3 in the boundary layer (BL to below 100 cm−3 above altitude of ~4 km, the corresponding fsecCCN values change from 50–60% to above ~70%. In the Southern Hemisphere, the zonally

  11. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry of coal combustion particles associated with high lung cancer rates in Xuanwei and Fuyuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Senlin; Tan, Zhengying; Liu, Pinwei; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Dingyu; Yu, Shang; Cheng, Ping; Win, Myat Sandar; Hu, Jiwen; Tian, Linwei; Wu, Minghong; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2017-11-01

    Coal combustion particles (CCPs) are linked to the high incidence of lung cancer in Xuanwei and in Fuyuan, China, but studies on the chemical composition of the CCPs are still limited. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was recently developed to measure the chemical composition and size of single particles in real-time. In this study, SPAMS was used to measure individual combustion particles emitted from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal samples and the results were compared with those by ICP-MS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The total of 38,372 particles mass-analyzed by SPAMS can be divided into 9 groups based on their chemical composition and their number percentages: carbonaceous, Na-rich, K-rich, Al-rich, Fe-rich, Si-rich, Ca-rich, heavy metal-bearing, and PAH-bearing particles. The carbonaceous and PAH-bearing particles are enriched in the size range below 0.56 μm, Fe-bearing particles range from 0.56 to 1.0 μm in size, and heavy metals such as Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb have diameters below 1 μm. The TEM results show that the particles from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal combustion can be classified into soot aggregates, Fe-rich particles, heavy metal containing particles, and mineral particles. Non-volatile particles detected by SPAMS could also be observed with TEM. The number percentages by SPAMS also correlate with the mass concentrations measured by ICP-MS. Our results could provide valuable insight for understanding high lung cancer incidence in the area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Source contributions to black carbon mass fractions in aerosol particles over the northwestern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Seizi; Maeda, Takahisa; Kaneyasu, Naoki

    Aerosol particle number size distributions above 0.3 μm in diameter and black carbon mass concentrations in aerosols were observed on Chichi-jima of the Ogasawara Islands in the northwestern Pacific from January 2000 to December 2002. Chichi-jima is suitable to observe polluted air masses from East Asia in winter and clean air masses over the western North Pacific in summer. In winter, aerosols over Chichi-jima were strongly affected by anthropogenic emissions in East Asia. The form of energy consumption in East Asia varies in various regions. Hence, each source region is expected to be characterized by an individual black carbon mass fraction. A three-dimensional Eulerian transport model was used to estimate contribution rates to air pollutants from each source region in East Asia. Because the Miyake-jima eruption began at the end of June 2000, the influence of smokes from Miyake-jima was also considered in the model calculation. The results of model calculations represent what must be noticed about smokes from volcanoes including Miyake-jima to interpret temporal variations of sulfur compounds over the northwestern Pacific. To evaluate black carbon mass fractions in anthropogenic aerosols as a function of source region, the relationships between the volume concentration of aerosol particles and the black carbon mass concentration in the winter were classified under each source region in East Asia. Consequently, the black carbon mass fractions in aerosols from China, Japan and the Korean Peninsula, and other regions were estimated to be 9-13%, 5-7%, and 4-5%, respectively.

  13. TSI Model 3936 Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The Model 3936 Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) measures the size distribution of aerosols ranging from 10 nm up to 1000 nm. The SMPS uses a bipolar aerosol charger to keep particles within a known charge distribution. Charged particles are classified according to their electrical mobility, using a long-column differential mobility analyzer (DMA). Particle concentration is measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC). The SMPS is well-suited for applications including: nanoparticle research, atmospheric aerosol studies, pollution studies, smog chamber evaluations, engine exhaust and combustion studies, materials synthesis, filter efficiency testing, nucleation/condensation studies, and rapidly changing aerosol systems.

  14. Analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft exhaust dispersion and deposition using a Lagrangian particle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecorari, Eliana, E-mail: eliana.pecorari@unive.it [Department of Environmental Science, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca’ Foscari Venice, Calle Larga Santa Marta 2137, Dorsoduro, 30123 Venezia (Italy); Mantovani, Alice [OSMOTECH S.r.l., via Francesco Sforza, 15, 20122 Milano (Italy); Franceschini, Chiara [Department of Environmental Science, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca’ Foscari Venice, Calle Larga Santa Marta 2137, Dorsoduro, 30123 Venezia (Italy); Bassano, Davide [SAVE S.p.A., Marco Polo Venice airport viale G. Galilei 30/1, 30173 Tessera-Venezia (Italy); Palmeri, Luca [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Padova, v. Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova (Italy); Rampazzo, Giancarlo [Department of Environmental Science, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca’ Foscari Venice, Calle Larga Santa Marta 2137, Dorsoduro, 30123 Venezia (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    The risk of air quality degradation is of considerable concern particularly for those airports that are located near urban areas. The ability to quantitatively predict the effects of air pollutants originated by airport operations is important for assessing air quality and the related impacts on human health. Current emission regulations have focused on local air quality in the proximity of airports. However, an integrated study should consider the effects of meteorological events, at both regional and local level, that can affect the dispersion and the deposition of exhausts. Rigorous scientific studies and extensive experimental data could contribute to the analysis of the impacts of airports expansion plans. This paper is focused on the analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft emission for the Marco Polo Airport in Venice. This is the most important international airport in the eastern part of the Po’ Valley, one of the most polluted area in Europe. Air pollution is exacerbated by meteorology that is a combination of large and local scale effects that do not allow significant dispersion. Moreover, the airport is located near Venice, a city of noteworthy cultural and architectural relevance, and nearby the lagoon that hosts several areas of outstanding ecological importance at European level (Natura 2000 sites). Dispersion and deposit of the main aircraft exhausts (NOx, HC and CO) have been evaluated by using a Lagrangian particle model. Spatial and temporal aircraft exhaust dispersion has been analyzed for LTO cycle. Aircraft taxiing resulted to be the most impacting aircraft operation especially for the airport working area and its surroundings, however occasionally peaks may be observed even at high altitudes when cruise mode starts. Mixing height can affect concentrations more significantly than the concentrations in the exhausts themselves. An increase of HC and CO concentrations (15–50%) has been observed during specific meteorological events

  15. [Development and Performance Evaluation of a Supermicron Particle Generation System for Aerosol Instrument Calibration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-tong; Jiang, Jing-kun; Deng, Jian-guo; Duan, Lei; Hao, Ji-ming

    2016-03-15

    Accurate calibration of aerosol measurement instruments is critical for ensuring the data quality when sampling ambient particulate matter (PM) or those from emission sources. A system for calibrating these instruments was set up, which included an ultrasonic device to generate polydisperse supermicron particles, a chamber, and an aerodynamic particle spectrometer to measure particle size distribution. We verified its performance in stably generated testing aerosol with good spatial uniformity, controlled size distributions and concentrations. The testing aerosol generated had a lognormal distribution. A PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ two-stage virtual impactor was calibrated using this online method. Collection efficiencies of PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ stages calibrated by an off-line method using monodisperse particles were also used for comparison. The results from two different methods were consistent with each other. Though the off-line method has been widely used to calibrate PM samplers, it suffers from long experimental duration (2-3 days for calibrating one sampler). In contrast, the online method allows for a rapid calibration (less than half a day for calibrating one sampler).

  16. An inverse modeling procedure to determine particle growth and nucleation rates from measured aerosol size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Verheggen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical nucleation theory is unable to explain the ubiquity of nucleation events observed in the atmosphere. This shows a need for an empirical determination of the nucleation rate. Here we present a novel inverse modeling procedure to determine particle nucleation and growth rates based on consecutive measurements of the aerosol size distribution. The particle growth rate is determined by regression analysis of the measured change in the aerosol size distribution over time, taking into account the effects of processes such as coagulation, deposition and/or dilution. This allows the growth rate to be determined with a higher time-resolution than can be deduced from inspecting contour plots ('banana-plots''. Knowing the growth rate as a function of time enables the evaluation of the time of nucleation of measured particles of a certain size. The nucleation rate is then obtained by integrating the particle losses from time of measurement to time of nucleation. The regression analysis can also be used to determine or verify the optimum value of other parameters of interest, such as the wall loss or coagulation rate constants. As an example, the method is applied to smog chamber measurements. This program offers a powerful interpretive tool to study empirical aerosol population dynamics in general, and nucleation and growth in particular.

  17. Aerosol synthesis of nano and micro-scale zero valent metal particles from oxide precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM; Lesman, Zayd [UNM; Soliman, Haytham [UNM; Zea, Hugo [UNM

    2010-01-01

    In this work a novel aerosol method, derived form the batch Reduction/Expansion Synthesis (RES) method, for production of nano / micro-scale metal particles from oxides and hydroxides is presented. In the Aerosol-RES (A-RES) method, an aerosol, consisting of a physical mixture of urea and metal oxide or hydroxides, is passed through a heated oven (1000 C) with a residence time of the order of 1 second, producing pure (zero valent) metal particles. It appears that the process is flexible regarding metal or alloy identity, allows control of particle size and can be readily scaled to very large throughput. Current work is focused on creating nanoparticles of metal and metal alloy using this method. Although this is primarily a report on observations, some key elements of the chemistry are clear. In particular, the reducing species produced by urea decomposition are the primary agents responsible for reduction of oxides and hydroxides to metal. It is also likely that the rapid expansion that takes place when solid/liquid urea decomposes to form gas species influences the final morphology of the particles.

  18. An effective inversion algorithm for retrieving bimodal aerosol particle size distribution from spectral extinction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Yao, Yuchen; Ruan, Liming

    2014-12-01

    The Ant Colony Optimization algorithm based on the probability density function (PDF-ACO) is applied to estimate the bimodal aerosol particle size distribution (PSD). The direct problem is solved by the modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA, as an approximation for optically large and soft spheres, i.e., χ≫1 and |m-1|≪1) and the Beer-Lambert law. First, a popular bimodal aerosol PSD and three other bimodal PSDs are retrieved in the dependent model by the multi-wavelength extinction technique. All the results reveal that the PDF-ACO algorithm can be used as an effective technique to investigate the bimodal PSD. Then, the Johnson's SB (J-SB) function and the modified beta (M-β) function are employed as the general distribution function to retrieve the bimodal PSDs under the independent model. Finally, the J-SB and M-β functions are applied to recover actual measurement aerosol PSDs over Beijing and Shanghai obtained from the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that these two general functions, especially the J-SB function, can be used as a versatile distribution function to retrieve the bimodal aerosol PSD when no priori information about the PSD is available.

  19. Single-particle chemical characterization and source apportionment of iron-containing atmospheric aerosols in Asian outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Hiroshi; Jung, Jinyoung; Miura, Kazuhiko; Takami, Akinori; Kato, Shungo; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    2011-09-01

    Using a single-particle mass spectrometer, the size and chemical composition of individual Fe-containing atmospheric aerosols (Fe aerosols) with diameter from 100 to 1800 nm were characterized during Asian outflow season (spring of 2008) in Okinawa Island, Japan and their sources were determined. Fe aerosols were classified into five unique particle types which were mixed with specific compound(s) and related to their sources (crustal, fly ash/K-biomass burning, elemental carbon, metals, and vanadium). Particle number-based contribution of the crustal particle type, which has been thought to be the main source of aerosol Fe, was quite small (2 ˜ 10%) in all size ranges, while anthropogenic Fe aerosols were the dominant contributor in this study. Fly ash/K-biomass burning type was the most abundant particle types, which contributed ˜50%. Metals and elemental carbon types contributed ˜20% and ˜10%, respectively. Contribution of vanadium type was variable (5 ˜ 50%), which is attributed to ship emission. The frequent appearance of lithium ion peak in the fly ash/K-biomass burning type strongly suggests that large fraction of the type is coal combustion origin, reflecting high coal usage in China. These results show that anthropogenic sources contributes significant portion of Fe aerosols in Asian outflow. Excluding the vanadium type, relative contribution of the remaining four particle types was constant over the course of study, which remained even when the total concentration of Fe aerosols changed and fraction of the Fe aerosols among atmospheric aerosols decreased significantly by the switch of air mass type into marine type. We concluded that the observed constant relative abundance reflected the relative source strength of Fe aerosols in Asian outflow, particularly emphasizing the importance of coal combustion source in East Asia.

  20. The Orientation Distribution of Nonspherical Aerosol Particles within a Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    a . a component of the fluid velocity). The use of the solution is based on the estimate that, even for the highest ( Kolmogoroff ) frequency...average of F, ( r(CJ) ,~ ,It ),for a space -time point is actually F (wx ,) for that point and that t’ ’ - D F V (3) The particles considered were...taken to be much smaller than the Kolmogoroff scale; so, the turbulent rotational diffusion coefficient itself, r was assumed in the second model to

  1. Effect of particle size of bronchodilator aerosols on lung distribution and pulmonary function in patients with chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D M; Solomon, M A; Tolfree, S E; Short, M; Spiro, S G

    1987-06-01

    The particle size of bronchodilator aerosols may be important in determining the site of deposition in the lung and their therapeutic effect. The distribution of aerosols (labelled with technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentacetic acid) of two different particle sizes has been studied by gamma camera imaging. The particles had mass median aerodynamic diameters (geometric standard deviations) of 1.4 (1.4) and 5.5 (2.3) micron, and they were administered from a jet nebuliser to eight patients with chronic severe stable asthma. There was no significant difference in peripheral lung deposition with the two aerosols in any patient. The bronchodilator effect of the two aerosols was determined from cumulative dose-response studies. To avoid large doses that might mask possible differences in effect due to aerosol size, small, precisely determined incremental amounts of salbutamol (25-250 micrograms total lung dose) were used. The two doses were given via a nebuliser on separate occasions and the bronchodilator response was measured from FEV1, forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow 30 minutes after each dose. Bronchodilatation was similar with the two aerosols at each dose of salbutamol. There was therefore no difference in distribution within the lung or any difference in bronchodilator effect between an aerosol of small (1.4 micron) particle size and an aerosol of 5.5 microns in patients with severe but stable asthma.

  2. Investigation of aerosol particle size distributions in the San Diego Bay area by means of multi-band transmissometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.N. de; Eijk, A.M.J. van; Moerman, M.M.; Cohen, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of atmospheric aerosols along the line of sight of infrared and electro-optical sensors greatly determines the range performance of these devices. On the one hand the aerosol particles scatter background (including sun) radiance into the field of view of the sensor, on the other hand

  3. Preliminary observations of organic gas-particle partitioning from biomass combustion smoke using an aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Lee; S. M. Kreidenweis; J. L. Collett; A. P. Sullivan; C. M. Carrico; J. L. Jimenez; M. Cubison; S. Saarikoski; D. R. Worsnop; T. B. Onasch; E. Fortner; W. C. Malm; E. Lincoln; Cyle Wold; WeiMin Hao

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols play important roles in adverse health effects, indirect and direct forcing of Earth’s climate, and visibility degradation. Biomass burning emissions from wild and prescribed fires can make a significant contribution to ambient aerosol mass in many locations and seasons. In order to better understand the chemical properties of particles produced by combustion...

  4. Composition of carbonaceous smoke particles from prescribed burning of a Canadian boreal forest: 1. Organic aerosol characterization by gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurek, M.A.; Laterza, C.; Newman, L.; Daum, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Winstead, E.L. [Science Applications International Corporation, Hampton, VA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    In this study we examine the molecular organic constituents (C8 to C40 lipid compounds) collected as smoke particles from a Canadian boreal forest prescribed burn. Of special interest are (1) the molecular identity of polar organic aerosols, and (2) the amount of polar organic matter relative to the total mass of aerosol particulate carbon. Organic extracts of smoke aerosol particles show complex distributions of the lipid compounds when analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The molecular constituents present as smoke aerosol are grouped into non-polar (hydrocarbons) and polar {minus}2 oxygen atoms) subtractions. The dominant chemical species found in the boreal forest smoke aerosol are unaltered resin compounds (C20 terpenes) which are abundant in unburned conifer wood, plus thermally altered wood lignins and other polar aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results show that smoke aerosols contain molecular tracers which are related to the biofuel consumed. These smoke tracers can be related structurally back to the consumed softwood and hardwood vegetation. In addition, combustion of boreal forest materials produces smoke aerosol particles that are both oxygen-rich and chemically complex, yielding a carbonaceous aerosol matrix that is enriched in polar substances. As a consequence, emissions of carbonaceous smoke particles from large-scale combustion of boreal forest land may have a disproportionate effect on regional atmospheric chemistry and on cloud microphysical processes.

  5. Combustion characteristics of water-insoluble elemental and organic carbon in size selected ambient aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Wittmaack

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion of elemental carbon (EC and organic carbon (OC contained in ambient aerosol matter was explored using scanning electron microscopy (SEM in combination with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. To ease identification of the particles of interest and to avoid or at least reduce interaction with simultaneously sampled inorganic oxides and salts, the approach used in this work differed in two ways from commonly applied procedures. First, rather than using a mixture of particles of vastly different sizes, as in PM10 or PM2.5, aerosol matter was collected in a 5-stage impactor. Second, the water soluble fraction of the collected matter was removed prior to analysis. Diesel soot particles, which appeared in the well-known form of chain-type aggregates, constituted the major fraction of EC. In contrast, OC containing particles were observed in a variety of shapes, including a sizable amount of bioaerosol matter appearing mostly in the size range above about 1 µm. During heating in ambient air for 1h, diesel soot particles were found to be stable up to 470°C, but complete combustion occurred in a narrow temperature interval between about 480 and 510°C. After diesel soot combustion, minute quantities of 'ash' were observed in the form of aggregated tiny particles with sizes less than 10 nm. These particles could be due to elemental or oxidic contaminants of diesel soot. Combustion of OC was observed over a wide range of temperatures, from well below 200°C to at least 500°C. Incompletely burnt bioaerosol matter was still found after heating to 600°C. The results imply that the EC fraction in aerosol matter can be overestimated significantly if the contribution of OC to a thermogram is not well separated.

  6. Uptake of 13N-labeled N2O5 to citric acid aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzinic, Goran; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Birrer, Mario; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Furthermore it's suspected of being a non negligible source of tropospheric Cl, even over continental areas [1,2]. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N delivered by PSI's PROTRAC facility [3] in conjunction with an aerosol flow tube reactor in order to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles. 13NO is mixed with non labeled NO and O3 in a gas reactor where N2O5 is synthesized under dry conditions to prevent hydrolysis on the reactor walls. The resulting N2O5 flow is fed into an aerosol flow tube reactor together with a humidified aerosol flow. By using movable inlets we can vary the length of the aerosol flow tube and thus the reaction time. The gas feed from the reactor is then directed into a narrow parallel plate diffusion denuder system that allows for selective separation of the gaseous species present in the gas phase. Aerosol particles are trapped on a particle filter placed at the end of the denuder system. The activity of 13N labeled species trapped on the denuder plates and in the particle filter can be monitored via scintillation counters. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 27-61.5% RH. The results obtained from our measurements have shown that the uptake coefficient increases with humidity from 1.65±0.3x10-3 (~27% RH) to 1.25±0.3x10-2 (45% RH) and 2.00±0.3x10-2 (61.5% RH). Comparison to literature data shows that this is similar to values reported for some polycarboxylic acids (like malonic acid), while being higher than some others [4]. The increase is likely related to the increasing amount of water associated

  7. Airborne measurements of trace gas and aerosol particle emissions from biomass burning in Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guyon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the LBA-SMOCC (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall, and Climate 2002 campaign, we studied the emission of carbon monoxide (CO, carbon dioxide (CO2, and aerosol particles from Amazonian deforestation fires using an instrumented aircraft. Emission ratios for aerosol number (CN relative to CO (ERCN/CO fell in the range 14-32 cm-3 ppb-1 in most of the investigated smoke plumes. Particle number emission ratios have to our knowledge not been previously measured in tropical deforestation fires, but our results are in agreement with values usually found from tropical savanna fires. The number of particles emitted per amount biomass burned was found to be dependent on the fire conditions (combustion efficiency. Variability in ERCN/CO between fires was similar to the variability caused by variations in combustion behavior within each individual fire. This was confirmed by observations of CO-to-CO2 emission ratios (ERCO/CO2, which stretched across the same wide range of values for individual fires as for all the fires observed during the sampling campaign, reflecting the fact that flaming and smoldering phases are present simultaneously in deforestation fires. Emission factors (EF for CO and aerosol particles were computed and a correction was applied for the residual smoldering combustion (RSC fraction of emissions that are not sampled by the aircraft, which increased the EF by a factor of 1.5-2.1. Vertical transport of smoke from the boundary layer (BL to the cloud detrainment layer (CDL and the free troposphere (FT was found to be a very common phenomenon. We observed a 20% loss in particle number as a result of this vertical transport and subsequent cloud processing, attributable to in-cloud coagulation. This small loss fraction suggests that this mode of transport is very efficient in terms of particle numbers and occurs mostly via non-precipitating clouds. The detrained aerosol

  8. The Formation of Porous Membranes by Filtration of Aerosol Nano-particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Klint; Johannessen, Tue; Mosleh, Majid

    2002-01-01

    Flame-generated aerosol particles of Al2O3 were deposited by gas filtration on two types of porous and ceramic tubes of α-Al2O3 with mean pore diameters of 450 and 2700 nm, respectively. The particles were aggregates with average mobility diameters in the range of 30¨¢100 nm and primary particle...... diameters of 4¨¢8 nm. The particles are characterized by differential mobility analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and by their specific surface area. The deposited membranes are characterized by gas permeability measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and by their pore size distribution from...... nitrogen capillary condensation. The particles form a distinct, homogeneous membrane layer with a porosity of ∼90% on top of the substrate surface and only penetrate slightly into the substrate structure. The mean pore sizes of the deposited membranes determined by nitrogen condensation agree approximately...

  9. DNA adducts induced by in vitro activation of extracts of diesel and biodiesel exhaust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractContext: Biodiesel and biodiesel-blend fuels offer a renewable alternative to petroleum diesel, but few data are available concerning the carcinogenic potential of biodiesel exhausts. Objectives: We compared the formation of covalent DNA adducts by the in vitro metabol...

  10. Liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles: Imaging at the Nanometer Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Lundt, Nils; You, Yuan; Bertram, Allan K.; Leone, Stephen R.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2015-04-21

    Atmospheric aerosols can undergo phase transitions including liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) while responding to changes in the ambient relative humidity (RH). Here, we report results of chemical imaging experiments using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to investigate the LLPS of micron sized particles undergoing a full hydration-dehydration cycle. Internally mixed particles composed of ammonium sulfate (AS) and either: limonene secondary organic carbon (LSOC), a, 4-dihydroxy-3-methoxybenzeneaceticacid (HMMA), or polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) were studied. Events of LLPS with apparent core-shell particle morphology were observed for all samples with both techniques. Chemical imaging with STXM showed that both LSOC/AS and HMMA/AS particles were never homogeneously mixed for all measured RH’s above the deliquescence point and that the majority of the organic component was located in the shell. The shell composition was estimated as 65:35 organic: inorganic in LSOC/AS and as 50:50 organic: inorganic for HMMA/AS. PEG-400/AS particles showed fully homogeneous mixtures at high RH and phase separated below 89-92% RH with an estimated 50:50% organic to inorganic mix in the shell. These two chemical imaging techniques are well suited for in-situ analysis of the hygroscopic behavior, phase separation, and surface composition of collected ambient aerosol particles.

  11. Microscopic Characterization of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particle Aging in the Outflow from Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffet, R. C.; Henn, T. R.; Tivanski, A. V.; Hopkins, R. J.; Desyaterik, Y.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Tyliszczak, T.; Fast, J.; Barnard, J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Cliff, S.S.; Perry, K. D.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.

    2009-09-16

    This study was part of the Megacities Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field campaign conducted in Mexico City Metropolitan Area during spring 2006. The physical and chemical transformations of particles aged in the outflow from Mexico City were investigated for the transport event of 22 March 2006. A detailed chemical analysis of individual particles was performed using a combination of complementary microscopy and micro-spectroscopy techniques. The applied techniques included scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (CCSEM/EDX). As the aerosol plume evolves from the city center, the organic mass per particle increases and the fraction of carbon-carbon double bonds (associated with elemental carbon) decreases. Organic functional groups enhanced with particle age include: carboxylic acids, alkyl groups, and oxygen bonded alkyl groups. At the city center (T0) the most prevalent aerosol type contained inorganic species (composed of sulfur, nitrogen, oxygen, and potassium) coated with organic material. At the T1 and T2 sites, located northeast of T0 (~;;29 km and ~;;65 km, respectively), the fraction of homogenously mixed organic particles increased in both size and number. These observations illustrate the evolution of the physical mixing state and organic bonding in individual particles in a photochemically active environment.

  12. Tuning the structure of platinum particles on ceria in situ for enhancing the catalytic performance of exhaust gas catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaenzler, Andreas M.; Casapu, Maria; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry (ITCP), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Vernoux, Philippe; Loridant, Stephane; Cadete Santos Aires, Francisco J. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l' Environnement de Lyon, UMR 5256, CNRS, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Epicier, Thierry [Materiaux, Ingenierie et Science, UMR 5510, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Betz, Benjamin [Umicore AG and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany); Ernst-Berl Institut, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Hoyer, Ruediger [Umicore AG and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2017-10-09

    A dynamic structural behavior of Pt nanoparticles on the ceria surface under reducing/oxidizing conditions was found at moderate temperatures (<500 C) and exploited to enhance the catalytic activity of Pt/CeO{sub 2}-based exhaust gas catalysts. Redispersion of platinum in an oxidizing atmosphere already occurred at 400 C. A protocol with reducing pulses at 250-400 C was applied in a subsequent step for controlled Pt-particle formation. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy unraveled the different extent of reduction and sintering of Pt particles: The choice of the reductant allowed the tuning of the reduction degree/particle size and thus the catalytic activity (CO>H{sub 2}>C{sub 3}H{sub 6}). This dynamic nature of Pt on ceria at such low temperatures (250-500 C) was additionally confirmed by in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy. A general concept is proposed to adjust the noble metal dispersion (size, structure), for example, during operation of an exhaust gas catalyst. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Determination of dust aerosol particle size at Gale Crater using REMS UVS and Mastcam measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Retortillo, Álvaro; Martínez, Germán. M.; Renno, Nilton O.; Lemmon, Mark T.; de la Torre-Juárez, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    We calculate the seasonal and interannual variation in dust aerosol particle size above Gale Crater during the first 1413 Martian solar days (sols = 24.6 h) of the Mars Science Laboratory mission. Measurements of UV radiation made by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station in combination with atmospheric opacities retrieved from the Mastcam instrument are used for the calculations. Our results indicate that the dust effective radius varies significantly with season, ranging from 0.6 μm during the low opacity season (Ls = 60°-140°) to 2 μm during the high opacity season (Ls = 180°-360°). Our results suggest that Gale Crater is affected by dust events of high aerosol content originated at various distances from it. Our results improve the accuracy of estimations of ultraviolet radiation fluxes at the Martian surface. Moreover, our results have important implications because the lifetime of suspended dust and its ability to nucleate clouds are affected by particle size.

  14. Characterization of aerosol particle episodes in Finland caused by wildfires in Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Niemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the sources, compositions and size distributions of aerosol particles during long-range transport (LRT PM2.5 episodes which occurred on 12–15 August, 26–28 August and 5–6 September 2002 in Finland. Backward air mass trajectories, satellite detections of fire areas and dispersion modelling results indicate that emissions from wildfires in Russia and other Eastern European countries arrived in Finland during these episodes. Elemental analyses using scanning electron microscopy (SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalyses (EDX showed that the proportions of S-rich particles and agglomerates (agglomeration was caused partly by the sampling method used increased during the episodes, and they contained elevated fractions of K, indicating emissions from biomass burning. These aerosols were mixed with S-rich emissions from fossil fuel burning during transport since air masses came through polluted areas of Europe. Minor amounts of coarse Ca-rich particles were also brought by LRT during the episodes, and they probably originated from wildfires and/or from Estonian and Russian oil-shale-burning industrial areas. Ion chromatography analysis showed that concentrations of sulphate (SO42-, total nitrate (NO3-+HNO3(g and total ammonium (NH4++NH3(g increased during the episodes, but the ratio of the total amount of these ions to PM10 concentration decreased, indicating unusually high fractions of other chemical components. Particle number size distribution measurements with differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS revealed that concentrations of particles 90–500 nm increased during the episodes, while concentrations of particles smaller than 90 nm decreased. The reduction of the smallest particles was caused by suppressed new particle formation due to vapour and molecular cluster uptake of LRT particles. Our results show that emissions from wildfires in Russian and other Eastern European countries deteriorated air quality of

  15. Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational eXperiment (TARFOX) - Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer from Wallops ground station

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TARFOX_WALLOPS_SMPS is the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational eXperiment (TARFOX) Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) data set from Wallops...

  16. Aerosol-CFD modelling of ultrafine and black carbon particle emission, dilution, and growth near roadways

    OpenAIRE

    L. Huang; S. L. Gong; M. Gordon; J. Liggio; R. M. Staebler; C. A. Stroud; G. Lu; C. Mihele; J. R. Brook; C. Q. Jia

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have shown that on-road vehicle emissions are the dominant source of ultrafine particles (UFP; diameter < 100 nm) in urban areas and near-roadway environments. In order to advance our knowledge on the complex interactions and competition among atmospheric dilution, dispersion and dynamics of UFPs, an aerosol dynamics-CFD coupled model is developed and validated against field measurements. A unique approach of applying periodic boundary condition...

  17. Removal of Aerosol Particles Generated from Vitrification Process for High-Level Liquid Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    加藤 功

    1990-01-01

    The vitrification technology has been developed for the high-level liquid waste (HLLW) from reprocessing nuclear spent fuel in PNC. The removal performance of the aerosol particles generated from the melting process was studied in a nonradioactive full-scale mock-up test facility (MTF). The off-gas treatment system consists of submerged bed scrubber (SBS), venturi scrubber, NOx absorber, high efficiency mist eliminater (HEME). Deoomtamination factors (DFs) were derived from the mass ratio of ...

  18. Effects of prenatal exposure to diesel exhaust particles on postnatal development, behavior, genotoxicity and inflammation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, K. S.; Jensen, K. A.; Nordly, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Results from epidemiological studies indicate that particulate air pollution constitutes a hazard for human health. Recent studies suggest that diesel exhaust possesses endocrine activity and therefore may affect reproductive outcome. This study in mice aimed to investigate whether...... significantly less than the control progeny. Only slight effects of exposure were observed on cognitive function in female DEP offspring and on biomarkers of exposure to particles or genotoxic substances. Conclusion: In utero exposure to DEP decreased weight gain during lactation. Cognitive function and levels...... effects observed in this compared to other studies....

  19. Decadal-scale trends in regional aerosol particle properties and their linkage to emission changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Gu, Yu; Diner, David; Worden, John; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Su, Hui; Xing, Jia; Garay, Michael; Huang, Lei

    2017-05-01

    Understanding long-term trends in aerosol loading and properties is essential for evaluating the health and climatic effects of these airborne particulates as well as the effectiveness of pollution control policies. While many studies have used satellite data to examine the trends in aerosol optical depth (AOD), very few have investigated the trends in aerosol properties associated with particle size, morphology, and light absorption. In this study, we investigate decadal-scale (13-15 year) trends in aerosol loading and properties during 2001-2015 over three populous regions: the Eastern United States (EUS), Western Europe (WEU), and Eastern and Central China (ECC). We use observations from MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) and MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). Relationships between aerosol property trends and air pollutant emission changes are examined. We find that annual mean AOD shows pronounced decreasing trends over EUS and WEU regions, as a result of considerable emission reductions in all major pollutants except for mineral dust and ammonia (NH3). Over the ECC region, AOD increases before 2006 due to emission increases induced by rapid economic development, fluctuates between 2006 and 2011, and subsequently decreases after 2011 in conjunction with effective emission reduction in anthropogenic primary aerosols, sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). The fraction of small-size AOD (albedo have generally decreased, while the fractions of large-size (>1.4 μm diameter), nonspherical and absorbing AOD have generally shown increasing trends over EUS and WEU regions, indicating that fine and light-scattering aerosol constituents have been more effectively reduced than coarse and light-absorbing constituents. These trends are consistent with the larger reduction ratios in SO2 and NOx emissions than in primary aerosols, including mineral dust and black carbon (BC). Over the ECC region, no significant trends are observed with

  20. Aerosol and CCN properties at Princess Elisabeth station, East Antarctica: seasonality, new particle formation events and properties around precipitation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; De Backer, Hugo; Herenz, Paul; Wex, Heike; Gossart, Alexandra; Souverijns, Niels; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Since 2010, several complementary ground-based instruments for measuring the aerosol composition of the Antarctic atmosphere have been operated at the Belgian Antarctic research station Princess Elisabeth, in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (71.95° S, 23.35° E, 1390 m asl.). In addition, three ground-based remote sensing instruments for cloud and precipitation observations have been installed for continuous operation, including a ceilometer (cloud base height, type, vertical extent), a 24 Ghz micro-rain radar (vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (cloud base temperature). The station is inhabited from November to end of February and operates under remote control during the other months. In this contribution, the general aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties will be described with a special focus on new particle formation events and around precipitation events. New particle formation events are important for the atmospheric aerosol budget and they also show that aerosols are not only transported to Antarctica but are also produced there, also inland. Aerosols are essential for cloud formation and therefore also for precipitation, which is the only source for mass gain of the Antarctic ice sheet. Measured aerosol properties comprise size distribution, total number, total mass concentration, mass concentration of light-absorbing aerosol and absorption coefficient and total scattering coefficient. In addition, a CCN counter has been operated during austral summers 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16. The baseline total number concentration N-total was around some hundreds of particles/cm3. During new particle formation events N-total increased to some thousands of particles/cm3. Simultaneous measurements of N-total, size distribution and CCN number revealed that mostly the number of particles smaller than 100 nm increased and that the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei increased only very

  1. Concentrations, size distributions and temporal variations of fluorescent biological aerosol particles in southern tropical India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Krishna R, Ravi; CV, Biju; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. The Indian tropical region, where large fraction of the world's total population is residing, experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to be very diverse over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the seasons. Here we characterize the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) at a high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) in South India during the South-West monsoon, which constitute around 80 percent of the annual rainfall in Munnar. Continuous three months measurements (from 01 June 2014 to 21 Aug 2104) FBAPs were carried out at Munnar using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) during IMS. The mean number and mass concentration of coarse FBAP averaged over the entire campaign was 1.7 x 10-2 cm-3 and 0.24 µg m-3 respectively, which corresponds to 2 percent and 6 percent of total aerosol particle number and mass concentration. In agreement to other previous measurements the number size distribution of FBAP also peaks at 3.2 micron indicating the strong presence of fungal spores. This was also supported by the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis of bioaerosols on filter paper. They also displayed a strong diurnal cycle with maximum concentration occurring at early morning hours. During periods of heavy and continuous rain where the wind is consistently blowing from South-West direction it was

  2. Aerosol particle size does not predict pharmacokinetic determined lung dose in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Chawes, Bo L K; Vindfeld, Signe

    2013-01-01

    an in vivo estimate of lung dose of inhaled drug in children and the corresponding particle size segments assessed ex vivo. Lung dose of fluticasone propionate after inhalation from a dry powder inhaler (Diskus®) was studied in 23 children aged 4-7 and 12-15 years with mild asthma. Six-hour pharmacokinetics...... was assessed after single inhalation. The corresponding emitted mass of drug in segments of aerosol particle size was assessed ex vivo by replicating the inhalation flows recorded by transducers built into the Diskus® inhaler and re-playing them in a breathing simulator. There was no correlation between any...

  3. Analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft exhaust dispersion and deposition using a Lagrangian particle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorari, Eliana; Mantovani, Alice; Franceschini, Chiara; Bassano, Davide; Palmeri, Luca; Rampazzo, Giancarlo

    2016-01-15

    The risk of air quality degradation is of considerable concern particularly for those airports that are located near urban areas. The ability to quantitatively predict the effects of air pollutants originated by airport operations is important for assessing air quality and the related impacts on human health. Current emission regulations have focused on local air quality in the proximity of airports. However, an integrated study should consider the effects of meteorological events, at both regional and local level, that can affect the dispersion and the deposition of exhausts. Rigorous scientific studies and extensive experimental data could contribute to the analysis of the impacts of airports expansion plans. This paper is focused on the analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft emission for the Marco Polo Airport in Venice. This is the most important international airport in the eastern part of the Po' Valley, one of the most polluted area in Europe. Air pollution is exacerbated by meteorology that is a combination of large and local scale effects that do not allow significant dispersion. Moreover, the airport is located near Venice, a city of noteworthy cultural and architectural relevance, and nearby the lagoon that hosts several areas of outstanding ecological importance at European level (Natura 2000 sites). Dispersion and deposit of the main aircraft exhausts (NOx, HC and CO) have been evaluated by using a Lagrangian particle model. Spatial and temporal aircraft exhaust dispersion has been analyzed for LTO cycle. Aircraft taxiing resulted to be the most impacting aircraft operation especially for the airport working area and its surroundings, however occasionally peaks may be observed even at high altitudes when cruise mode starts. Mixing height can affect concentrations more significantly than the concentrations in the exhausts themselves. An increase of HC and CO concentrations (15-50%) has been observed during specific meteorological events

  4. Variations in Aerosol Chemical Composition during New Particle Formation and Growth Events Downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2016-12-01

    New particle formation and growth has been characterized through various field studies using scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). However, there is insufficient knowledge of the variation of aerosol chemical compositions during those events. We investigated the variation of aerosol chemical composition during new particle formation and growth events downwind of Seoul. New particle formation and growth events were identified based on the evolution of the number size distribution measured by SMPS. The concentrations of inorganic ions and black carbon were measured using a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) coupled with an ion chromatograph (IC) and multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), respectively. We also measured concentrations of gaseous precursors (SO2, NO2) along with meteorological parameters using an automatic weather station. The measurements were conducted on the rooftop of a five-story building on a hill (37.34°N, 127.27°E, 167 m above sea level) at the Global Campus of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, located about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul. The measurement periods were from February 12 to April 1, 2015 and from April 13 to June 12, 2016. We investigated the difference in chemical compositions between event and non-event days and its association with the variations in precursor concentrations and meteorological parameters.

  5. Dispersion of aerosol particles in the free atmosphere using ensemble forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Haszpra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion of aerosol particle pollutants is studied using 50 members of an ensemble forecast in the example of a hypothetical free atmospheric emission above Fukushima over a period of 2.5 days. Considerable differences are found among the dispersion predictions of the different ensemble members, as well as between the ensemble mean and the deterministic result at the end of the observation period. The variance is found to decrease with the particle size. The geographical area where a threshold concentration is exceeded in at least one ensemble member expands to a 5–10 times larger region than the area from the deterministic forecast, both for air column "concentration" and in the "deposition" field. We demonstrate that the root-mean-square distance of any particle from its own clones in the ensemble members can reach values on the order of one thousand kilometers. Even the centers of mass of the particle cloud of the ensemble members deviate considerably from that obtained by the deterministic forecast. All these indicate that an investigation of the dispersion of aerosol particles in the spirit of ensemble forecast contains useful hints for the improvement of risk assessment.

  6. Study of particle size distribution and formation mechanism of radioactive aerosols generated in high-energy neutron fields

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Noguchi, H; Tanaka, S; Iida, T; Furuichi, S; Kanda, Y; Oki, Y

    2003-01-01

    The size distributions of sup 3 sup 8 Cl, sup 3 sup 9 Cl, sup 8 sup 2 Br and sup 8 sup 4 Br aerosols generated by irradiations of argon and krypton gases containing di-octyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols with 45 MeV and 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were measured in order to study the formation mechanism of radioactive particles in high energy radiation fields. The effects of the size distribution of the radioactive aerosols on the size of the added DOP aerosols, the energy of the neutrons and the kinds of nuclides were studied. The observed size distributions of the radioactive particles were explained by attachment of the radioactive atoms generated by the neutron-induced reactions to the DOP aerosols. (author)

  7. Vertical Profiles and Chemical Properties of Aerosol Particles upon Ny-Ålesund (Svalbard Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Moroni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Size-segregated particle samples were collected in the Arctic (Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in April 2011 both at ground level and in the free atmosphere exploiting a tethered balloon equipped also with an optical particle counter (OPC and meteorological sensors. Individual particle properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive microanalysis (SEM-EDS. Results of the SEM-EDS were integrated with particle size and optical measurements of the aerosols properties at ground level and along the vertical profiles. Detailed analysis of two case studies reveals significant differences in composition despite the similar structure (layering and the comparable texture (grain size distribution of particles in the air column. Differences in the mineral chemistry of samples point at both local (plutonic/metamorphic complexes in Svalbard and remote (basic/ultrabasic magmatic complexes in Greenland and/or Iceland geological source regions for dust. Differences in the particle size and shape are put into relationship with the mechanism of particle formation, that is, primary (well sorted, small or secondary (idiomorphic, fine to coarse grained origin for chloride and sulfate crystals and transport/settling for soil (silicate, carbonate and metal oxide particles. The influence of size, shape, and mixing state of particles on ice nucleation and radiative properties is also discussed.

  8. Mutagenicity of diesel engine exhaust is eliminated in the gas phase by an oxidation catalyst but only slightly reduced in the particle phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Götz A; Krahl, Jürgen; Munack, Axel; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schröder, Olaf; Hallier, Ernst; Brüning, Thomas; Bünger, Jürgen

    2012-06-05

    Concerns about adverse health effects of diesel engine emissions prompted strong efforts to minimize this hazard, including exhaust treatment by diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC). The effectiveness of such measures is usually assessed by the analysis of the legally regulated exhaust components. In recent years additional analytical and toxicological tests were included in the test panel with the aim to fill possible analytical gaps, for example, mutagenic potency of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitrated derivatives (nPAH). This investigation focuses on the effect of a DOC on health hazards from combustion of four different fuels: rapeseed methyl ester (RME), common mineral diesel fuel (DF), SHELL V-Power Diesel (V-Power), and ARAL Ultimate Diesel containing 5% RME (B5ULT). We applied the European Stationary Cycle (ESC) to a 6.4 L turbo-charged heavy load engine fulfilling the EURO III standard. The engine was operated with and without DOC. Besides regulated emissions we measured particle size and number distributions, determined the soluble and solid fractions of the particles and characterized the bacterial mutagenicity in the gas phase and the particles of the exhaust. The effectiveness of the DOC differed strongly in regard to the different exhaust constituents: Total hydrocarbons were reduced up to 90% and carbon monoxide up to 98%, whereas nitrogen oxides (NO(X)) remained almost unaffected. Total particle mass (TPM) was reduced by 50% with DOC in common petrol diesel fuel and by 30% in the other fuels. This effect was mainly due to a reduction of the soluble organic particle fraction. The DOC caused an increase of the water-soluble fraction in the exhaust of RME, V-Power, and B5ULT, as well as a pronounced increase of nitrate in all exhausts. A high proportion of ultrafine particles (10-30 nm) in RME exhaust could be ascribed to vaporizable particles. Mutagenicity of the exhaust was low compared to previous investigations. The DOC reduced

  9. Oxidative damage to DNA by diesel exhaust particle exposure in co-cultures of human lung epithelial cells and macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Kim; Roursgaard, Martin; Madsen, Claus Desler

    2012-01-01

    Studies in mono-culture of cells have shown that diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress-related damage to DNA. However, the level of particle-generated genotoxicity may depend on interplay between different cell types, e.g. lung...... relationship between levels of respiration and ROS production. In conclusion, exposure of mono-cultured cells to DEPs generated oxidative stress to DNA, whereas co-cultures with macrophages had lower levels of oxidatively damaged DNA than A549 epithelial cells....... treatment with standard reference DEPs, SRM2975 and SRM1650b. The exposure to DEPs did not affect the colony-forming ability of A549 cells in co-culture with THP-1a cells. The DEPs generated DNA strand breaks and oxidatively damaged DNA, measured using the alkaline comet assay as formamidopyrimidine...

  10. Measurement, growth types and shrinkage of newly formed aerosol particles at an urban research platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Imre; Németh, Zoltán; Weidinger, Tamás; Kovács, Boldizsár; Kristóf, Gergely

    2016-06-01

    Budapest platform for Aerosol Research and Training (BpART) was created for advancing long-term on-line atmospheric measurements and intensive aerosol sample collection campaigns in Budapest. A joint study including atmospheric chemistry or physics, meteorology, and fluid dynamics on several-year-long data sets obtained at the platform confirmed that the location represents a well-mixed, average atmospheric environment for the city centre. The air streamlines indicated that the host and neighbouring buildings together with the natural orography play an important role in the near-field dispersion processes. Details and features of the airflow structure were derived, and they can be readily utilised for further interpretations. An experimental method to determine particle diffusion losses in the differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) system of the BpART facility was proposed. It is based on CPC-CPC (condensation particle counter) and DMPS-CPC comparisons. Growth types of nucleated particles observed in 4 years of measurements were presented and discussed specifically for cities. Arch-shaped size distribution surface plots consisting of a growth phase followed by a shrinkage phase were characterised separately since they supply information on nucleated particles. They were observed in 4.5 % of quantifiable nucleation events. The shrinkage phase took 1 h 34 min in general, and the mean shrinkage rate with standard deviation was -3.8 ± 1.0 nm h-1. The shrinkage of particles was mostly linked to changes in local atmospheric conditions, especially in global radiation and the gas-phase H2SO4 concentration through its proxy, or to atmospheric mixing in few cases. Some indirect results indicate that variations in the formation and growth rates of nucleated particles during their atmospheric transport could be a driving force of shrinkage for particles of very small sizes and on specific occasions.

  11. Numerical investigation of diesel exhaust particle transport and deposition in the CT-scan based lung airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad S.; Saha, Suvash C.; Sauret, Emilie; Gu, Y. T.; Molla, Md Mamun

    2017-06-01

    Diesel exhaust particulates matter (DEPM) is a compound mixture of gasses and fine particles that contain more than 40 toxic air pollutants including benzene, formaldehyde, and nitrogen oxides. Exposure of DEPM to human lung airway during respiratory inhalation causes severe health hazards like diverse pulmonary diseases. This paper studies the DEPM transport and deposition in upper three generations of the realistic lung airways. A 3-D digital airway bifurcation model is constructed from the computerized tomography (CT) scan data of a healthy adult man. The Euler-Lagrange approach is used to solve the continuum and disperse phases of the calculation. Local averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved to calculate the transport of the continuum phase. Lagrangian based Discrete Phase Model (DPM) is used to investigate the particle transport and deposition in the current anatomical model. The effects of size specific monodispersed particles on deposition are extensively investigated during different breathing pattern. The numerical results illustrate that particle diameter and breathing pattern have a substantial impact on particles transport and deposition in the tracheobronchial airways. The present realistic bifurcation model also depicts a new deposition hot spot which could advance the understanding of the therapeutic drug delivery system to the specific position of the respiratory airways.

  12. Interactions of mineral dust with pollution and clouds: An individual-particle TEM study of atmospheric aerosol from Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pósfai, Mihály; Axisa, Duncan; Tompa, Éva; Freney, Evelyn; Bruintjes, Roelof; Buseck, Peter R.

    2013-03-01

    Aerosol particles from desert dust interact with clouds and influence climate on regional and global scales. The Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) aerosol campaign was initiated to study the effects of dust particles on cloud droplet nucleation and cloud properties. Here we report the results of individual-particle studies of samples that were collected from an aircraft in April 2007. We used analytical transmission electron microscopy, including energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, electron diffraction, and imaging techniques for the morphological, chemical, and structural characterization of the particles. Dust storms and regional background conditions were encountered during four days of sampling. Under dusty conditions, the coarse (supermicrometer) fraction resembles freshly crushed rock. The particles are almost exclusively mineral dust grains and include common rock-forming minerals, among which clay minerals, particularly smectites, are most abundant. Unaltered calcite grains also occur, indicating no significant atmospheric processing. The particles have no visible coatings but some contain traces of sulfur. The fine (submicrometer) fraction is dominated by particles of anthropogenic origin, primarily ammonium sulfate (with variable organic coating and some with soot inclusions) and combustion-derived particles (mostly soot). In addition, submicrometer, iron-bearing clay particles also occur, many of which are internally mixed with ammonium sulfate, soot, or both. We studied the relationships between the properties of the aerosol and the droplet microphysics of cumulus clouds that formed above the aerosol layer. Under dusty conditions, when a large concentration of coarse-fraction mineral particles was in the aerosol, cloud drop concentrations were lower and droplet diameters larger than under regional background conditions, when the aerosol was dominated by submicrometer sulfate particles.

  13. Modeling global impacts of heterogeneous loss of HO2 on cloud droplets, ice particles and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijnen, V.; Williams, J. E.; Flemming, J.

    2014-03-01

    The abundance and spatial variability of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) in the troposphere strongly affects atmospheric composition through tropospheric ozone production and associated HOx chemistry. One of the largest uncertainties in the chemical HO2 budget is its heterogeneous loss on the surface of cloud droplets, ice particles and aerosols. We quantify the importance of the heterogeneous HO2 loss at global scale using the latest recommendations on the scavenging efficiency on various surfaces. For this we included the simultaneous loss on cloud droplets and ice particles as well as aerosol in the Composition-Integrated Forecast System (C-IFS). We show that cloud surface area density (SAD) is typically an order of magnitude larger than aerosol SAD, using assimilated satellite retrievals to constrain both meteorology and global aerosol distributions. Depending on the assumed uptake coefficients, loss on liquid water droplets and ice particles accounts for ∼53-70% of the total heterogeneous loss of HO2, due to the ubiquitous presence of cloud droplets. This indicates that HO2 uptake on cloud should be included in chemistry transport models that already include uptake on aerosol. Our simulations suggest that the zonal mean mixing ratios of HO2 are reduced by ∼25% in the tropics and up to ∼50% elsewhere. The subsequent decrease in oxidative capacity leads to a global increase of the tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) burden of up to 7%, and an increase in the ozone tropospheric lifetime of ∼6%. This increase results in an improvement in the global distribution when compared against CO surface observations over the Northern Hemisphere, although it does not fully resolve the wintertime bias in the C-IFS. There is a simultaneous increase in the high bias in C-IFS for tropospheric CO over the Southern Hemisphere, which constrains on the assumptions regarding HO2 uptake on a global scale. We show that enhanced HO2 uptake on aerosol types associated with

  14. An investigation into the effect of a ceramic particle trap on the chemical mutagens in diesel exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, S T; Dorie, L D; Leddy, D G; Johnson, J H

    1987-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles and vapor phase samples were collected from the diluted (15:1) exhaust of a 10.4 L displacement medium-duty engine (Caterpillar 3208), operated under EPA steady-state cycle Modes 4 and 5 conditions for load (50 and 75 percent, respectively) and speed (1680 rpm). Baseline (uncontrolled) emissions were compared to the exhaust modified by the use of an uncatalyzed monolithic ceramic trap (Corning). The Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity bioassay (Ames Test) was used to direct the course of chemical analyses. Total particulate matter (TPM), soluble organic fraction (SOF) (from TPM), sulfate fraction (SO4) (from TPM), and solid fraction (SOL) (from particle) were determined from dilute exhaust particles collected on 47 mm Teflon-coated woven glass fiber filters. Coincidentally, particles were collected on 508 x 508 mm Teflon-coated non-woven glass fiber filters, and vapor-phase samples were collected on XAD-2 resin. The SOF and VOC for chemical and biological characterization were obtained by Soxhlet extraction of samples with dichloromethane (DCM). Hydrocarbon mass balances were developed to evaluate the efficiency of the sampling system. Use of the ceramic traps caused no change in engine total hydrocarbon (HC) levels at Mode 4 but decreases in TPM, SOF, and NO2 were noted. In terms of HC emissions only, the percentage of SOF was significantly reduced, but the percentage of VOC was unchanged. For Mode 5, the engine HC levels were significantly reduced but the proportions of HC components, i.e. the percentage of SOF and the percentage of VOC, did not change significantly. Engine emission levels of TPM, SOF, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were also significantly reduced at Mode 5. At both Modes 4 and 5, use of the ceramic particle traps caused an increase in the direct-acting (TA98) mutagenicity (revertants/microgram) of the SOF and a decrease in the activity of the VOC. The traps caused a 70 percent reduction of TPM at Mode 4 but only a 45 percent

  15. Laser Velocimeter Seed Particle Sizing by the Whisker Particle Collector and Laser Aerosol Spectrometer Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    USA. At the AEDC, the LAS was interfaced to a Digital Equipment Corporation (Maynard, Massachusetts, USA) Model 11/23 microcomputer system and a...The photodiode output is amplified by a digitally programmed amplifier section operating at gain settings commensurate with the size ranges...Elektrischen Aerosol Analysator der Firma Thermo-Systems, Inc. (TSI) and Vergleich mit der Whiakernetz-Methode." Note N 612/76, ISL Saint Louis, France

  16. A complete parameterisation of the relative humidity and wavelength dependence of the refractive index of hygroscopic inorganic aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterell, Michael I.; Willoughby, Rose E.; Bzdek, Bryan R.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2017-08-01

    Calculations of aerosol radiative forcing require knowledge of wavelength-dependent aerosol optical properties, such as single-scattering albedo. These aerosol optical properties can be calculated using Mie theory from knowledge of the key microphysical properties of particle size and refractive index, assuming that atmospheric particles are well-approximated to be spherical and homogeneous. We provide refractive index determinations for aqueous aerosol particles containing the key atmospherically relevant inorganic solutes of NaCl, NaNO3, (NH4)2SO4, NH4HSO4 and Na2SO4, reporting the refractive index variation with both wavelength (400-650 nm) and relative humidity (from 100 % to the efflorescence value of the salt). The accurate and precise retrieval of refractive index is performed using single-particle cavity ring-down spectroscopy. This approach involves probing a single aerosol particle confined in a Bessel laser beam optical trap through a combination of extinction measurements using cavity ring-down spectroscopy and elastic light-scattering measurements. Further, we assess the accuracy of these refractive index measurements, comparing our data with previously reported data sets from different measurement techniques but at a single wavelength. Finally, we provide a Cauchy dispersion model that parameterises refractive index measurements in terms of both wavelength and relative humidity. Our parameterisations should provide useful information to researchers requiring an accurate and comprehensive treatment of the wavelength and relative humidity dependence of refractive index for the inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol.

  17. Highly Acidic Ambient Particles, Soluble Metals, and Oxidative Potential: A Link between Sulfate and Aerosol Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ting; Guo, Hongyu; Zeng, Linghan; Verma, Vishal; Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney J

    2017-03-07

    Soluble transition metals in particulate matter (PM) can generate reactive oxygen species in vivo by redox cycling, leading to oxidative stress and adverse health effects. Most metals, such as those from roadway traffic, are emitted in an insoluble form, but must be soluble for redox cycling. Here we present the mechanism of metals dissolution by highly acidic sulfate aerosol and the effect on particle oxidative potential (OP) through analysis of size distributions. Size-segregated ambient PM were collected from a road-side and representative urban site in Atlanta, GA. Elemental and organic carbon, ions, total and water-soluble metals, and water-soluble OP were measured. Particle pH was determined with a thermodynamic model using measured ionic species. Sulfate was spatially uniform and found mainly in the fine mode, whereas total metals and mineral dust cations were highest at the road-side site and in the coarse mode, resulting in a fine mode pH metals and OP peaked at the intersection of these modes demonstrating that sulfate plays a key role in producing highly acidic fine aerosols capable of dissolving primary transition metals that contribute to aerosol OP. Sulfate-driven metals dissolution may account for sulfate-health associations reported in past studies.

  18. Comparative mutagenicity and genotoxicity of particles and aerosols emitted by the combustion of standard vs. rapeseed methyl ester supplemented bio-diesel fuels: impact of after treatment devices: oxidation catalyst and particulate filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, V; Barraud, C; Capron, D; Preterre, D; Keravec, V; Vendeville, C; Cazier, F; Pottier, D; Morin, J P; Sichel, F

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhausts are partly responsible for the deleterious effects on human health associated with urban pollution, including cardiovascular diseases, asthma, COPD, and possibly lung cancer. Particulate fraction has been incriminated and thus largely investigated for its genotoxic properties, based on exposure conditions that are, however, not relevant for human risk assessment. In this paper, original and more realistic protocols were used to investigate the hazards induced by exhausts emitted by the combustion of standard (DF0) vs. bio-diesel fuels (DF7 and DF30) and to assess the impact of exhaust treatment devices (DOC and DPF). Mutagenicity and genotoxicity were evaluated for (1) resuspended particles ("off line" exposure that takes into account the bioavailability of adsorbed chemicals) and for (2) the whole aerosols (particles+gas phase components) under continuous flow exposure ("on line" exposure). Native particles displayed mutagenic properties associated with nitroaromatic profiles (YG1041), whereas PAHs did not seem to be involved. After DOC treatment, the mutagenicity of particles was fully abolished. In contrast, the level of particle deposition was low under continuous flow exposure, and the observed mutagenicity in TA98 and TA102 was thus attributable to the gas phase. A bactericidal effect was also observed in TA102 after DOC treatment, and a weak but significant mutagenicity persisted after DPF treatment for bio-diesel fuels. No formation of bulky DNA-adducts was observed on A549 cells exposed to diesel exhaust, even in very drastic conditions (organic extracts corresponding to 500 μg equivalent particule/mL, 48 h exposure). Taken together, these data indicate that the exhausts issued from the bio-diesel fuels supplemented with rapseed methyl ester (RME), and generated by current diesel engines equipped with after treatment devices are less mutagenic than older ones. The residual mutagenicity is linked to the gas phase and could be due to pro

  19. Factors affecting non-tailpipe aerosol particle emissions from paved roads: On-road measurements in Stockholm, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Tareq; Johansson, Christer; Karlsson, Hans; Hansson, Hans-Christen

    A large fraction of urban PM 10 concentrations is due to non-exhaust traffic emissions. In this paper, a mobile measurement system has been used to quantify the relative importance of road particle emission and suspension of accumulated dust versus direct pavement wear, tire type (studded, friction, and summer), pavement type, and vehicle speed. Measurements were performed during May-September on selected roads with different pavements and traffic conditions in the Stockholm region. The highest particle mass concentrations were always observed behind the studded tire and the lowest were behind the summer tire; studded-to-summer ratios were 4.4-17.3 and studded-to-friction ratios were 2.0-6.4. This indicates that studded tires lead to higher emissions than friction and summer tires regardless to the asphalt type. By comparing with measurements in a road simulator, it could be estimated that the pavement wear due to the friction tires was 0.018-0.068 of the suspension of accumulated road dust. Likewise for studded tires road-wear was estimated to be 1.2-4.8 the suspension of accumulated dust. This indicates that wear due to friction tires is very small compared to the suspension of accumulated dust and that suspension due to studded tires may sometimes be as large as the wear of the road. But this will vary depending on, e.g. the amount of dust accumulated on the roads. An important dependence on vehicle speed was also observed. During May, the particle mass concentrations behind the studded tire at vehicle speed 100 km h -1 were about 10 times higher than that at 20 km h -1. The speed dependence was not so pronounced in September, which could be due to less accumulated dust on the roads. The particle number size distribution of the emissions due to road wear by studded tire was characterized by a clear increase in number concentrations of the coarse fraction of aerosol particles, with a geometric mean diameter between 3 and 5 μm. The size distribution of the

  20. Targeting aerosolized drugs to the conducting airways using very large particles and extremely slow inhalations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Kirby L; Wu, Jihong; Bennett, William D

    2010-12-01

    The site of deposition in the respiratory tract for aerosolized, inhaled therapeutic drugs depends on both the particles' aerodynamic size and the patient's breathing pattern. In 21 healthy subjects with normal lung function, we evaluated an extremely slow inhalation of a large 9.5-μm MMAD particle aerosol (ESI-9) for its ability to enhance the delivery of radiolabeled particles ((99m)Tc-labeled sulfur colloid) to the conducting airways. The regional deposition of the large particles (modified Pari-Boy jet nebulizer), inhaled at the extremely low rate of 0.080 Lps for 10 sec, was compared to the deposition of 5-μm MMAD particles inhaled during cyclic resting tidal breathing (TVB-5-) (mean 0.44 L and 0.46 Lps). Gamma scintigraphy gave an estimate of conducting airway deposition (% CAD) as a fraction of all deposited particles by multiplying the percent of activity in both lungs immediately postdeposition relative to the total deposition (i.e., lungs + mouth + esophagus + stomach) times the percent of activity cleared from the lungs over 24 h. % CAD for healthy subjects for the ESI-9 and TVB-5 maneuvers was 35% (±8%) and 27% (±11%), respectively, p = 0.004). The amount deposited within the oropharynx was 26% (±7%) and 37% (±11%), respectively, p < 0.001. Higher therapeutic value of a medication delivered to the conducting airways where the primary defect is associated with many diseases, and with fewer losses to the extrathoracic surfaces, may be obtained by using an "extremely slow inhalation and large particle" routine when compared to a normal tidal volume breathing associated with typical nebulizers.

  1. Mutagenicity of biodiesel or diesel exhaust particles and the effect of engine operating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisin, Elena R; Shi, X C; Keane, Michael J; Bugarski, Aleksandar B; Shvedova, Anna A

    2013-03-01

    Changing the fuel supply from petroleum based ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) to biodiesel and its blends is considered by many to be a viable option for controlling exposures to particulate material (PM). This is critical in the mining industry where approximately 28,000 underground miners are potentially exposed to relatively high concentrations of diesel particulate matter (DPM). This study was conducted to investigate the mutagenic potential of diesel engine emissions (DEE) from neat (B100) and blended (B50) soy-based fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biodiesel in comparison with ULSD PM using different engine operating conditions and exhaust aftertreatment configurations. The DPM samples were collected for engine equipped with either a standard muffler or a combination of the muffler and diesel oxidation catalytic converter (DOC) that was operated at four different steady-state modes. Bacterial gene mutation activity of DPM was tested on the organic solvent extracts using the Ames Salmonella assay. The results indicate that mutagenic activity of DPM was strongly affected by fuels, engine operating conditions, and exhaust aftertreatment systems. The mutagenicity was increased with the fraction of biodiesel in the fuel. While the mutagenic activity was observed in B50 and B100 samples collected from both light-and heavy-load operating conditions, the ULSD samples were mutagenic only at light-load conditions. The presence of DOC in the exhaust system resulted in the decreased mutagenicity when engine was fueled with B100 and B50 and operated at light-load conditions. This was not the case when engine was fueled with ULSD. Heavy-load operating condition in the presence of DOC resulted in a decrease of mutagenicity only when engine was fueled with B50, but not B100 or ULSD. Therefore, the results indicate that DPM from neat or blended biodiesel has a higher mutagenic potency than that one of ULSD. Further research is needed to investigate the health effect of biodiesel

  2. Estimation of aerosol particle composition using ground-based sun-sky radiometer measurements at typical sites in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Gu, X.; Wang, L.; Li, D.; Xing, X.; Gai, J.; Wang, Q.; Li, K.; Li, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol affects climate and environment through radiative and health effects determined by its physical and chemical properties. In this study, we modeled aerosol by an internal mixture of different components like water, sulfate and black carbon following Maxwell-Garnett effective medium approximation theory. In order to deal with complex aerosol mixing situation in China, we considered extra mineral dust component in case of large particles. Remote sensing data obtained from ground-based CE318 sun-sky radiometers in typical China sites are used to derive the aerosol mixture model. Measurements are firstly calibrated by using intercomparison and vicarious calibration methods and then retrieved by using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) inversion algorithm to obtain refractive indices of the mixture, which are then used to yield aerosol component fraction. Results at typical China regions like megacity, industrial, arid, oceanic and background sites show considerable difference between their aerosol particle compositions and agree with a priori information like regional aerosol sources and formation processes.

  3. Composition and sources of organic tracers in aerosol particles of industrial central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Basant; Patel, Khageshwar S.; Jaiswal, Nitin K.; Sharma, Saroj; Ambade, Balram; Wang, Wentao; Simonich, Staci L. Massey; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2013-02-01

    Organic aerosols are important atmospheric components, and their formation and sources represent important aspects of urban air quality and health effects. Asia, including India, is the largest global source of aerosol particles due to regional natural advection (e.g. desert and soil dust) and anthropogenic activities (e.g. emissions from traffic, industry and burning of coal, biomass and agricultural waste) that generate vast amounts of particulate matter (PM) significantly contributing to climate change. This article reports on the distributions, concentrations, and sources of organic compounds (i.e., alkanes, carboxylic acids, carbonyl compounds, alcohols, plasticizers, PAHs, biomarkers) of PM in the ambient atmosphere of an extensively industrialized area of central India (Raipur, Chhattisgarh, a coal mega-burning region). The dominant components are emissions from fossil fuel utilization, burning of biomass and plastics, and fugitive sources. Speciation and variations of potential new tracer compounds identified are also described.

  4. Criteria for significance of simultaneous presence of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles on mass transfer (deposition) rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    The simultaneous presence of aerosol particles and condensible vapors in a saturated boundary layer which may affect deposition rates to subcooled surfaces because of vapor-particle interactions is discussed. Scavenging of condensible vapors by aerosol particles may lead to increased particle size and decreased vapor mass fraction, which alters both vapor and particle deposition rates. Particles, if sufficiently concentrated, may also coagulate. Criteria are provided to assess the significance of such phenomena when particles are already present in the mainstream and are not created inside the boundary layer via homogeneous nucleation. It is determined that there is direct proportionality with: (1) the mass concentration of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles; and (2) the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio (delta d sub p) square. Inverse proportionality was found for mainstream to surface temperature difference if thermophoresis dominates particle transport. It is concluded that the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio is the most critical factor to consider in deciding when to neglect vapor-particle interactions.

  5. Impacts of aerosol particles on the microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds over the southeast Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohy, C. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R. C.; Wood, R.; Saide, P.; Spak, S.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2013-03-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles on the stratocumulus deck was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties on an E-W track along 20° S from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics, including their significance, from eight flights and many individual legs were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. Single particle analysis was used to reveal types and sources of the enhanced particle number that influence droplet concentration. While a variety of particle types were found throughout the region, the dominant particles near shore were partially neutralized sulfates. Modeling and chemical analysis indicated that the predominant source of these particles in the marine boundary layer along 20° S was anthropogenic pollution from central Chilean sources, with copper smelters a relatively small contribution. Cloud droplets were smaller in regions of enhanced particles near shore. However, physically thinner clouds, and not just higher droplet number concentrations from pollution, both contributed to the smaller droplets. Satellite measurements were used to show that cloud albedo was highest 500-1000 km offshore, and actually slightly lower closer to shore due to the generally thinner clouds and lower liquid water paths

  6. Impacts of aerosol particles on the microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds over the southeast Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Twohy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles on the stratocumulus deck was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI, and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties on an E-W track along 20° S from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics, including their significance, from eight flights and many individual legs were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. Single particle analysis was used to reveal types and sources of the enhanced particle number that influence droplet concentration. While a variety of particle types were found throughout the region, the dominant particles near shore were partially neutralized sulfates. Modeling and chemical analysis indicated that the predominant source of these particles in the marine boundary layer along 20° S was anthropogenic pollution from central Chilean sources, with copper smelters a relatively small contribution. Cloud droplets were smaller in regions of enhanced particles near shore. However, physically thinner clouds, and not just higher droplet number concentrations from pollution, both contributed to the smaller droplets. Satellite measurements were used to show that cloud albedo was highest 500–1000 km offshore, and actually slightly lower closer to shore due to the generally thinner clouds and lower

  7. Chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles over the Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezantakos, S.; Barmpounis, K.; Giamarelou, M.; Bossioli, E.; Tombrou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Kalogiros, J.; Allan, J. D.; Bacak, A.; Percival, C. J.; Coe, H.; Biskos, G.

    2013-11-01

    The chemical composition and water uptake characteristics of sub-micrometre atmospheric particles over the region of the Aegean Sea were measured between 25 August and 11 September 2011 within the framework of the Aegean-Game campaign. High temporal-resolution measurements of the chemical composition of the particles were conducted using an airborne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (cToF-AMS). These measurements were performed during two flights from the island of Crete to the island of Lemnos and back. A hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA) located on the island of Lemnos was used to measure the ability of the particles to take up water. The HTDMA measurements showed that the particles in the dominant mode were internally mixed, having hygroscopic growth factors that ranged from 1.00 to 1.59 when exposed to 85% relative humidity. When the aircraft flew near the ground station on Lemnos, the cToF-AMS measurements showed that the organic volume fraction of the particles ranged from 43 to 56%. These measurements corroborate the range of hygroscopic growth factors measured by the HTDMA during that time. Good closure between HTDMA and cToF-AMS measurements was achieved when assuming that the organic species were less hygroscopic and had an average density that corresponds to aged organic species. Using the results from the closure study, the cToF-AMS measurements were employed to determine vertical profiles of a representative aerosol hygroscopic parameter κmix. Calculated κmix values ranged from 0.19 to 0.84 during the first flight and from 0.22 to 0.80 during the second flight. Air masses of different origin as determined by back trajectory calculations can explain the spatial variation in chemical composition and κmix values of the particles observed in the region.

  8. Possible effect of extreme solar energetic particle event of 20 January 2005 on polar stratospheric aerosols: direct observational evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Mironova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Energetic cosmic rays are the main source of ionization of the low-middle atmosphere, leading to associated changes in atmospheric properties. Via the hypothetical influence of ionization on aerosol growth and facilitated formation of clouds, this may be an important indirect link relating solar variability to climate. This effect is highly debated, however, since the proposed theoretical mechanisms still remain illusive and qualitative, and observational evidence is inconclusive and controversial. Therefore, important questions regarding the existence and magnitude of the effect, and particularly the fraction of aerosol particles that can form and grow, are still open. Here we present empirical evidence of the possible effect caused by cosmic rays upon polar stratospheric aerosols, based on a case study of an extreme solar energetic particle (SEP event of 20 January 2005. Using aerosol data obtained over polar regions from different satellites with optical instruments that were operating during January 2005, such as the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III, and Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS, we found a significant simultaneous change in aerosol properties in both the Southern and Northern Polar regions in temporal association with the SEP event. We speculate that ionization of the atmosphere, which was abnormally high in the lower stratosphere during the extreme SEP event, might have led to formation of new particles and/or growth of preexisting ultrafine particles in the polar stratospheric region. However, a detailed interpretation of the effect is left for subsequent studies. This is the first time high vertical resolution measurements have been used to discuss possible production of stratospheric aerosols under the influence of cosmic ray induced ionization. The observed effect is marginally detectable for the analyzed severe SEP event and can be undetectable for the majority of weak

  9. Particle deposition in a child respiratory tract model: in vivo regional deposition of fine and ultrafine aerosols in baboons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Albuquerque-Silva

    Full Text Available To relate exposure to adverse health effects, it is necessary to know where particles in the submicron range deposit in the respiratory tract. The possibly higher vulnerability of children requires specific inhalation studies. However, radio-aerosol deposition experiments involving children are rare because of ethical restrictions related to radiation exposure. Thus, an in vivo study was conducted using three baboons as a child respiratory tract model to assess regional deposition patterns (thoracic region vs. extrathoracic region of radioactive polydisperse aerosols ([d16-d84], equal to [0.15 µm-0.5 µm], [0.25 µm-1 µm], or [1 µm-9 µm]. Results clearly demonstrated that aerosol deposition within the thoracic region and the extrathoraic region varied substantially according to particle size. High deposition in the extrathoracic region was observed for the [1 µm-9 µm] aerosol (72% ± 17%. The [0.15 µm-0.5 µm] aerosol was associated almost exclusively with thoracic region deposition (84% ± 4%. Airborne particles in the range of [0.25 µm-1 µm] showed an intermediate deposition pattern, with 49% ± 8% in the extrathoracic region and 51% ± 8% in the thoracic region. Finally, comparison of baboon and human inhalation experiments for the [1 µm-9 µm] aerosol showed similar regional deposition, leading to the conclusion that regional deposition is species-independent for this airborne particle sizes.

  10. Possible effect of extreme solar energetic particle events of September–October 1989 on polar stratospheric aerosols: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Mironova

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main ionization source of the middle and low Earth's atmosphere is related to energetic particles coming from outer space. Usually it is ionization from cosmic rays that is always present in the atmosphere. But in a case of a very strong solar eruption, some solar energetic particles (SEPs can reach middle/low atmosphere increasing the ionization rate up to some orders of magnitude at polar latitudes. We continue investigating such a special class of solar events and their possible applications for natural variations of the aerosol content. After the case study of the extreme SEP event of January 2005 and its possible effect upon polar stratospheric aerosols, here we analyze atmospheric applications of the sequence of several events that took place over autumn 1989. Using aerosol data obtained over polar regions from two satellites with space-borne optical instruments SAGE II and SAM II that were operating during September–October 1989, we found that an extreme major SEP event might have led to formation of new particles and/or growth of preexisting ultrafine particles in the polar stratospheric region. However, the effect of the additional ambient air ionization on the aerosol formation is minor, in comparison with temperature effect, and can take place only in the cold polar atmospheric conditions. The extra aerosol mass formed under the temperature effect allows attributing most of the changes to the "ion–aerosol clear sky mechanism".

  11. Size and composition measurements of background aerosol and new particle growth in a Finnish forest during QUEST 2 using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Allan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the growth of nucleation-mode particles is important, as this prevents their loss through diffusion and allows them to reach sizes where they may become effective cloud condensation nuclei. Hyytiälä, a forested site in southern Finland, frequently experiences particle nucleation events during the spring and autumn, where particles first appear during the morning and continue to grow for several hours afterwards. As part of the QUEST 2 intensive field campaign during March and April 2003, an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS was deployed alongside other aerosol instrumentation to study the particulate composition and dynamics of growth events and characterise the background aerosol. Despite the small mass concentrations, the AMS was able to distinguish the grown particles in the <100 nm regime several hours after an event and confirm that the particles were principally organic in composition. The AMS was also able to derive a mass spectral fingerprint for the organic species present, and found that it was consistent between events and independent of the mean particle diameter during non-polluted cases, implying the same species were also condensing onto the accumulation mode. The results were compared with those from offline analyses such as GC-MS and were consistent with the hypothesis that the main components were alkanes from plant waxes and the oxidation products of terpenes.

  12. Seasonal variations of ultra-fine and submicron aerosols in Taipei, Taiwan: implications for particle formation processes in a subtropical urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Cheung

    2016-02-01

    , which was characterized by average particle growth and formation rates of 4.0 ± 1.1 nm h−1 and 1.4 ± 0.8 cm−3 s−1, respectively. The prevalence of new particle formation (NPF in summer was suggested as a result of seasonally enhanced photochemical oxidation of SO2 that contributed to the production of H2SO4, and a low level of PM10 (d ≤ 10 µm that served as the condensation sink. Regarding the sources of aerosol particles, correlation analysis of the PNCs against NOx revealed that the local vehicular exhaust was the dominant contributor of the UFPs throughout the year. Conversely, the Asian pollution outbreaks had significant influence in the PNC of accumulation-mode particles during the seasons of winter monsoons. The results of this study implied the significance of secondary organic aerosols in the seasonal variations of UFPs and the influences of continental pollution outbreaks in the downwind areas of Asian outflows.

  13. Single particle analysis of eastern Mediterranean aerosol particles: Influence of the source region on the chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemen, Hans-Christian; Schneider, Johannes; Köllner, Franziska; Klimach, Thomas; Pikridas, Michael; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Sciare, Jean; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    The Mediterranean region is one of the most climatically sensitive areas and is influenced by air masses of different origin. Aerosol particles are one important factor contributing to the Earth's radiative forcing, but knowledge about their composition and sources is still limited. Here, we report on results from the INUIT-BACCHUS-ACTRIS campaign, which was conducted at the Cyprus Atmospheric Observatory (CAO, Agia Marina Xyliatou) in Cyprus in April 2016. Our results show that the chemical composition of the aerosol particles in the eastern Mediterranean is strongly dependent on their source region. The composition of particles in a size range between 150 nm and 3 μm was measured using the Aircraft-based Laser ABlation Aerosol MAss spectrometer (ALABAMA), which is a single particle laser ablation instrument using a bipolar time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The mass spectral information on cations and anions allow for the analysis of different molecular fragments. The information about the source regions results from backward trajectories using HYSPLIT Trajectory Model (Trajectory Ensemble) on hourly basis. To assess the influence of certain source regions on the air masses arriving at CAO, we consider the number of trajectories that crossed the respective source region within defined time steps. For a more detailed picture also the height and the velocity of the air masses during their overpass above the source regions will be considered. During the campaign at CAO in April 2016 three main air mass source regions were observed: 1) Northern Central Europe, likely with an enhanced anthropogenic influence (e.g. sulfate and black carbon from combustion processes, fly ash particles from power plants, characterized by Sr and Ba), 2) Southwest Europe, with a higher influence of the Mediterranean Sea including sea salt particles (characterized by, e.g., NaxCly, NaClxNOy), 3) Northern Africa/Sahara, with air masses that are expected to have a higher load of mineral dust

  14. Individual aerosol particles in and below clouds along a Mt. Fuji slope: Modification of sea-salt-containing particles by in-cloud processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, S.; Hirose, Y.; Miura, K.; Okochi, H.

    2014-02-01

    Sizes and compositions of atmospheric aerosol particles can be altered by in-cloud processing by absorption/adsorption of gaseous and particulate materials and drying of aerosol particles that were formerly activated as cloud condensation nuclei. To elucidate differences of aerosol particles before and after in-cloud processing, aerosols were observed along a slope of Mt. Fuji, Japan (3776 m a.s.l.) during the summer in 2011 and 2012 using a portable laser particle counter (LPC) and an aerosol sampler. Aerosol samples for analyses of elemental compositions were obtained using a cascade impactor at top-of-cloud, in-cloud, and below-cloud altitudes. To investigate composition changes via in-cloud processing, individual particles (0.5-2 μm diameter) of samples from five cases (days) collected at different altitudes under similar backward air mass trajectory conditions were analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. For most cases (four cases), most particles at all altitudes mainly comprised sea salts: mainly Na with some S and/or Cl. Of those, in two cases, sea-salt-containing particles with Cl were found in below-cloud samples, although sea-salt-containing particles in top-of-cloud samples did not contain Cl. This result suggests that Cl in the sea salt was displaced by other cloud components. In the other two cases, sea-salt-containing particles on samples at all altitudes were without Cl. However, molar ratios of S to Na (S/Na) of the sea-salt-containing particles of top-of-cloud samples were higher than those of below-cloud samples, suggesting that sulfuric acid or sulfate was added to sea-salt-containing particles after complete displacement of Cl by absorption of SO2 or coagulation with sulfate. The additional volume of sulfuric acid in clouds for the two cases was estimated using the observed S/Na values of sea-salt-containing particles. The estimation revealed that size changes by in

  15. Quantification of environmentally persistent free radicals and reactive oxygen species in atmospheric aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arangio, Andrea M.; Tong, Haijie; Socorro, Joanna; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-10-01

    Fine particulate matter plays a central role in the adverse health effects of air pollution. Inhalation and deposition of aerosol particles in the respiratory tract can lead to the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause oxidative stress. In this study, we have detected and quantified a wide range of particle-associated radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Ambient particle samples were collected using a cascade impactor at a semi-urban site in central Europe, Mainz, Germany, in May-June 2015. Concentrations of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR), most likely semiquinone radicals, were found to be in the range of (1-7) × 1011 spins µg-1 for particles in the accumulation mode, whereas coarse particles with a diameter larger than 1 µm did not contain substantial amounts of EPFR. Using a spin trapping technique followed by deconvolution of EPR spectra, we have also characterized and quantified ROS, including OH, superoxide (O2-) and carbon- and oxygen-centered organic radicals, which were formed upon extraction of the particle samples in water. Total ROS amounts of (0.1-3) × 1011 spins µg-1 were released by submicron particle samples and the relative contributions of OH, O2-, C-centered and O-centered organic radicals were ˜ 11-31, ˜ 2-8, ˜ 41-72 and ˜ 0-25 %, respectively, depending on particle sizes. OH was the dominant species for coarse particles. Based on comparisons of the EPR spectra of ambient particulate matter with those of mixtures of organic hydroperoxides, quinones and iron ions followed by chemical analysis using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we suggest that the particle-associated ROS were formed by decomposition of organic hydroperoxides interacting with transition metal ions and quinones contained in atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS).

  16. submitter On the composition of ammonia–sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, S; Bianchi, F; Rondo, L; Duplissy, J; Kürten, A; Ortega, I K; Metzger, A; Schnitzhofer, R; Almeida, J; Amorim, A; Dommen, J; Dunne, E M; Ehn, M; Gagné, S; Ickes, L; Junninen, H; Hansel, A; Kerminen, V -M; Kirkby, J; Kupc, A; Laaksonen, A; Lehtipalo, K; Mathot, S; Onnela, A; Petäjä, T; Riccobono, F; Santos, F D; Sipilä, M; Tomé, A; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Viisanen, Y; Wagner, P E; Wimmer, D; Curtius, J; Donahue, N M; Baltensperger, U; Kulmala, M; Worsnop, D R

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia $(NH_3)$ and sulfuric acid $(H-2SO_4)$. Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small $NH_3–H_2SO_4$ clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from 10. Positively charged clusters grew on average by Δm/Δn = 1.05 and were only observed at sufficiently high $[NH_3]$ / $[H_2SO_4]$. The $H_2SO_4$ molecules of these clusters are partially neutralized by $NH_3$, in close resemblance...

  17. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, S; Bianchi, F; Rondo, L; Duplissy, J; Kürten, A; Ortega, I K; Metzger, A; Schnitzhofer, R; Almeida, J; Amorim, A; Dommen, J; Dunne, E M; Ehn, M; Gagné, S; Ickes, L; Junninen, H; Hansel, A; Kerminen, V-M; Kirkby, J; Kupc, A; Laaksonen, A; Lehtipalo, K; Mathot, S; Onnela, A; Petäjä, T; Riccobono, F; Santos, F D; Sipilä, M; Tomé, A; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Viisanen, Y; Wagner, P E; Wimmer, D; Curtius, J; Donahue, N M; Baltensperger, U; Kulmala, M; Worsnop, D R

    2014-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from 10. Positively charged clusters grew on average by Δm / Δn = 1.05 and were only observed at sufficiently high [NH3] / [H2SO4]. The H2SO4 molecules of these clusters are partially neutralized by NH3, in close resemblance to the acid-base bindings ...

  18. Use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in size segregated aerosol particles for the O/I penetration evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Garbariene, Inga; Masalaite, Agne; Ceburnis, Darius; Krugly, Edvinas; Kvietkus, Kestutis; Remeikis, Vidmantas; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio are successfully used in the atmospheric aerosol particle source identification [1, 2], transformation, pollution [3] research. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the penetration of atmospheric aerosol particles from outdoor to indoor using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Six houses in Kaunas (Lithuania) were investigated during February and March 2013. Electrical low pressure impactor was used to measure in real time concentration and size distribution of outdoor aerosol particles. ELPI+ includes 15 channels covering the size range from 0.017 to 10.0 µm. The 25 mm diameter aluminium foils were used to collect aerosol particles. Gravimetric analysis of samples was made using microbalance. In parallel, indoor aerosol samples were collected with a micro-orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI model 110), where the aerosol particles were separated with the nominal D50 cut-off sizes of 0.056, 0.1, 0.18,0.32,0.56, 1.0, 1.8, 3.2, 5.6, 10, 18 μm for impactor stages 1-11, respectively. The impactor was run at a flow rate of 30 L/min. Air quality meters were used to record meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity) during the investigated period. All aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents and their isotopic compositions using elemental analyzer (EA) connected to the stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). TC concentration in indoors ranged from 1.5 to 247.5 µg/m3. During the sampling period outdoors TN levels ranged from 0.1 to 10.9 µg/m3. The obtained outdoor δ13C(PM2.5) values varied from -24.21 to -26.3‰, while the δ15N values varied from 2.4 to 11.1 ‰ (average 7.2±2.5 ‰). Indoors carbonaceous aerosol particles were depleted in 13C compared to outdoors in all sampling sites. This depletion in δ13C varied from 0.1 to 3.2 ‰. We think that this depletion occurs due ongoing chemical reactions (oxidation) when aerosol

  19. Hygrosopicity measurements of aerosol particles in the San Joaquin Valley, CA, Baltimore, MD, and Golden, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Daniel; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Berkoff, T.; Zhang, Q.; Delgado, R.; Hennigan, C. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Young, D. E.; Parworth, C.; Kim, H.; Hoff, R. M.

    2016-06-01

    Aerosol hygroscopicity was investigated using a novel dryer-humidifier system, coupled to a TSI-3563 nephelometer, to obtain the light scattering coefficient (σscat) as a function of relative humidity (RH) in hydration and dehydration modes. The measurements were performed in Porterville, CA (10 January to 6 February 2013), Baltimore, MD (3-30 July 2013), and Golden, CO (12 July to 10 August 2014). Observations in Porterville and Golden were part of the NASA-sponsored Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality project. The measured σscat under varying RH in the three sites was combined with ground aerosol extinction, PM2.5 mass concentrations, and particle composition measurements and compared with airborne observations performed during campaigns. The enhancement factor, f(RH), defined as the ratio of σscat(RH) at a certain RH divided by σscat at a dry value, was used to evaluate the aerosol hygroscopicity. Particles in Porterville showed low average f(RH = 80%) (1.42) which was attributed to the high carbonaceous loading in the region where residential biomass burning and traffic emissions contribute heavily to air pollution. In Baltimore, the high average f(RH = 80%) (2.06) was attributed to the large contribution of SO42- in the region. The lowest water uptake was observed in Golden, with an average f(RH = 80%) = 1.24 where organic carbon dominated the particle loading. Different empirical fits were evaluated using the f(RH) data. The widely used Kasten (gamma) model was found least satisfactory, as it overestimates f(RH) for RH < 75%. A better empirical fit with two power law curve fitting parameters c and k was found to replicate f(RH) accurately from the three sites. The relationship between the organic carbon mass and the species that are affected by RH and f(RH) was also studied and categorized.

  20. Observations of bromine monoxide transport in the Arctic sustained on aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Peter K.; Pöhler, Denis; Sihler, Holger; Zielcke, Johannes; General, Stephan; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich; Simpson, William R.; Nghiem, Son V.; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Dhaniyala, Suresh; Wagner, Thomas; Caulton, Dana R.; Fuentes, Jose D.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-06-01

    The return of sunlight in the polar spring leads to the production of reactive halogen species from the surface snowpack, significantly altering the chemical composition of the Arctic near-surface atmosphere and the fate of long-range transported pollutants, including mercury. Recent work has shown the initial production of reactive bromine at the Arctic surface snowpack; however, we have limited knowledge of the vertical extent of this chemistry, as well as the lifetime and possible transport of reactive bromine aloft. Here, we present bromine monoxide (BrO) and aerosol particle measurements obtained during the March 2012 BRomine Ozone Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX) near Utqiaġvik (Barrow), AK. The airborne differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements provided an unprecedented level of spatial resolution, over 2 orders of magnitude greater than satellite observations and with vertical resolution unable to be achieved by satellite methods, for BrO in the Arctic. This novel method provided quantitative identification of a BrO plume, between 500 m and 1 km aloft, moving at the speed of the air mass. Concurrent aerosol particle measurements suggest that this lofted reactive bromine plume was transported and maintained at elevated levels through heterogeneous reactions on colocated supermicron aerosol particles, independent of surface snowpack bromine chemistry. This chemical transport mechanism explains the large spatial extents often observed for reactive bromine chemistry, which impacts atmospheric composition and pollutant fate across the Arctic region, beyond areas of initial snowpack halogen production. The possibility of BrO enhancements disconnected from the surface potentially contributes to sustaining BrO in the free troposphere and must also be considered in the interpretation of satellite BrO column observations, particularly in the context of the rapidly changing Arctic sea ice and snowpack.

  1. Observations of bromine monoxide transport in the Arctic sustained on aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Peterson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The return of sunlight in the polar spring leads to the production of reactive halogen species from the surface snowpack, significantly altering the chemical composition of the Arctic near-surface atmosphere and the fate of long-range transported pollutants, including mercury. Recent work has shown the initial production of reactive bromine at the Arctic surface snowpack; however, we have limited knowledge of the vertical extent of this chemistry, as well as the lifetime and possible transport of reactive bromine aloft. Here, we present bromine monoxide (BrO and aerosol particle measurements obtained during the March 2012 BRomine Ozone Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX near Utqiaġvik (Barrow, AK. The airborne differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS measurements provided an unprecedented level of spatial resolution, over 2 orders of magnitude greater than satellite observations and with vertical resolution unable to be achieved by satellite methods, for BrO in the Arctic. This novel method provided quantitative identification of a BrO plume, between 500 m and 1 km aloft, moving at the speed of the air mass. Concurrent aerosol particle measurements suggest that this lofted reactive bromine plume was transported and maintained at elevated levels through heterogeneous reactions on colocated supermicron aerosol particles, independent of surface snowpack bromine chemistry. This chemical transport mechanism explains the large spatial extents often observed for reactive bromine chemistry, which impacts atmospheric composition and pollutant fate across the Arctic region, beyond areas of initial snowpack halogen production. The possibility of BrO enhancements disconnected from the surface potentially contributes to sustaining BrO in the free troposphere and must also be considered in the interpretation of satellite BrO column observations, particularly in the context of the rapidly changing Arctic sea ice and snowpack.

  2. Particle sizing of pharmaceutical aerosols via direct imaging of particle settling velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishler, Rami; Verhoeven, Frank; de Kruijf, Wilbur; Sznitman, Josué

    2018-02-15

    We present a novel method for characterizing in near real-time the aerodynamic particle size distributions from pharmaceutical inhalers. The proposed method is based on direct imaging of airborne particles followed by a particle-by-particle measurement of settling velocities using image analysis and particle tracking algorithms. Due to the simplicity of the principle of operation, this method has the potential of circumventing potential biases of current real-time particle analyzers (e.g. Time of Flight analysis), while offering a cost effective solution. The simple device can also be constructed in laboratory settings from off-the-shelf materials for research purposes. To demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the measurement technique, we have conducted benchmark experiments whereby aerodynamic particle size distributions are obtained from several commercially-available dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Our measurements yield size distributions (i.e. MMAD and GSD) that are closely in line with those obtained from Time of Flight analysis and cascade impactors suggesting that our imaging-based method may embody an attractive methodology for rapid inhaler testing and characterization. In a final step, we discuss some of the ongoing limitations of the current prototype and conceivable routes for improving the technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dissolution process of atmospheric aerosol particles into cloud droplets; Processus de dissolution des aerosols atmospheriques au sein des gouttes d'eau nuageuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desboeufs, K.

    2001-01-15

    Clouds affect both climate via the role they play in the Earth's radiation balance and tropospheric chemistry since they are efficient reaction media for chemical transformation of soluble species. Cloud droplets are formed in the atmosphere by condensation of water vapour onto aerosol particles, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The water soluble fraction of these CCN governs the cloud micro-physics, which is the paramount factor playing on the radiative properties of clouds. Moreover, this soluble fraction is the source of species imply in the oxidation/reduction reactions in the aqueous phase. Thus, it is of particular importance to understand the process controlling the solubilization of aerosols in the cloud droplets. The main purpose of this work is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the dissolution of particles incorporated in the aqueous phase. From the studies conducted up to now, we have identify several factors playing on the dissolution reaction of aerosols. However, the quantification of the effects of these factors is difficult since the current means of study are not adapted to the complexity of cloud systems. First, this work consisted to perform a experimental system, compound by an open flow reactor, enabling to follow the kinetic of dissolution in conditions representative of cloud. This experimental device is used to a systematic characterisation of the known factors playing on the dissolution, i.e. pH, aerosol nature, aerosol weathering... and also for the identification and the quantification of the effects of other factors: ionic strength, acid nature, clouds processes. These experiments gave quantitative results, which are used to elaborate a simple model of aerosol dissolution in the aqueous phase. This model considers the main factors playing on the dissolution and results in a general mechanism of aerosol dissolution extrapolated to the cloud droplets. (author)

  4. Toxicity of Exhaust Gases and Particles from IC-Engines – International Activities Survey (EngToxIn). 2nd Information Report for IEA Implementing Agreement AMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, J. [University for Applied Sciences, Biel-Bienne (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    Exhaust gases from engines, as well as from other technical combustion processes contain gaseous, semi volatile and solid compounds which are toxic. Some of these compounds are not yet limited by the respective legislations; but may need to be based on ongoing health research findings and some new substances did appear recently, due to the progressing technical developments providing new systems of exhaust gas aftertreatment. A new approach described here is that the toxic effects of exhaust gases as an aerosol containing gaseous components as well as particulate matter and nanoparticles can be investigated in a global way, by exposing the living cells, or cell cultures to the aerosol, which means a simultaneous superposition of all toxic effects from all active components. At several research sites it has been showed, that this method offers more objective results of validation of toxicity, than other methods used until now. It also enables a relatively quick insight in the toxic effects with consideration of all superimposed influences of the aerosol. This new methodology can be applied for all kinds of emission sources. It also bears the potential of giving new contributions to the present state of knowledge in this domain and can in some cases lead to a change of paradigma. The present report gives information about activities concerning the research on toxicity of exhaust gases from IC-engines in different countries. It also gives some ideas about the available information sources. The general situation and the basic information have not changed much so the chapters 1 and 2 are repeated from the last year report, [1] with only a few modifications. We observe fast increasing research activities concerning health effects worldwide. They have different objectives, different approaches and methodologies and sometimes the results can be directly compared to each other. There are mostly common lines and with appropriate efforts there might be possible ways to

  5. Linking variations in sea spray aerosol particle hygroscopicity to composition during two microcosm experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Forestieri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which water uptake influences the light scattering ability of marine sea spray aerosol (SSA particles depends critically on SSA chemical composition. The organic fraction of SSA can increase during phytoplankton blooms, decreasing the salt content and therefore the hygroscopicity of the particles. In this study, subsaturated hygroscopic growth factors at 85 % relative humidity (GF(85 % of predominately submicron SSA particles were quantified during two induced phytoplankton blooms in marine aerosol reference tanks (MARTs. One MART was illuminated with fluorescent lights and the other was illuminated with sunlight, referred to as the "indoor" and "outdoor" MARTs, respectively. Optically weighted GF(85 % values for SSA particles were derived from measurements of light scattering and particle size distributions. The mean optically weighted SSA diameters were 530 and 570 nm for the indoor and outdoor MARTs, respectively. The GF(85 % measurements were made concurrently with online particle composition measurements, including bulk composition (using an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer and single particle (using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer measurement, and a variety of water-composition measurements. During both microcosm experiments, the observed optically weighted GF(85 % values were depressed substantially relative to pure inorganic sea salt by 5 to 15 %. There was also a time lag between GF(85 % depression and the peak chlorophyll a (Chl a concentrations by either 1 (indoor MART or 3-to-6 (outdoor MART days. The fraction of organic matter in the SSA particles generally increased after the Chl a peaked, also with a time lag, and ranged from about 0.25 to 0.5 by volume. The observed depression in the GF(85 % values (relative to pure sea salt is consistent with the large observed volume fractions of non-refractory organic matter (NR-OM comprising the SSA. The GF(85 % values

  6. Simulating Marine New Particle Formation and Growth Using the M7 Modal Aerosol Dynamics Modal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran Monahan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A modal atmospheric aerosol model (M7 is evaluated in terms of predicting marine new particle formation and growth. Simulations were carried out for three different nucleation schemes involving (1 kinetic self-nucleation of OIO (2 nucleation via OIO activation by H2SO4 and (3 nucleation via OIO activation by H2SO4 plus condensation of a low-volatility organic vapour. Peak OIO and H2SO4 vapour concentrations were both limited to 6×106 molecules cm-3 at noontime while the peak organic vapour concentration was limited to 12×106 molecules cm-3. All simulations produced significant concentrations of new particles in the Aitken mode. From a base case particle concentration of 222 cm-3 at radii >15 nm, increases in concentrations to 366 cm-3 were predicted from the OIO-OIO case, 722 cm-3 for the OIO-H2SO4 case, and 1584 cm-3 for the OIO-H2SO4 case with additional condensing organic vapours. The results indicate that open ocean new particle production is feasible for clean conditions; however, new particle production becomes most significant when an additional condensable organic vapour is available to grow the newly formed particles to larger sizes. Comparison to sectional model for a typical case study demonstrated good agreement and the validity of using the modal model.

  7. The concept of apparent polarizability for calculating the extinction of electromagnetic radiation by porous aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haspel, C.; Adler, G.

    2017-04-01

    In the current study, the electromagnetic properties of porous aerosol particles are calculated in two ways. In the first, a porous target input file is generated by carving out voids in an otherwise homogeneous particle, and the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) is used to compute the extinction efficiency of the particle assuming that the voids are near vacuum dielectrics and assuming random particle orientation. In the second, an effective medium approximation (EMA) style approach is employed in which an apparent polarizability of the voids is defined based on the well-known solution to the problem in classical electrostatics of a spherical cavity within a dielectric. It is found that for porous particles with smaller overall diameter with respect to the wavelength of incident radiation, describing the voids as near vacuum dielectrics within the DDA sufficiently reproduces measured values of extinction efficiency, whereas for porous particles with moderate to larger overall diameters with respect to the wavelength of the radiation, the apparent polarizability EMA approach better reproduces the measured values of extinction efficiency.

  8. Aerosol particles in the Mexican East Pacific Part I: processing and vertical redistribution by clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baumgardner

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements of aerosol particle size distributions were made in the Mexican Intertropical Convergence Zone. The volume concentrations of submicron and super micron particles at cloud base were compared with those in near-cloud regions over a range of altitudes. Of 78 near-cloud regions analyzed, 68% and 45% had enhanced volumes of submicron particles and supermicron particles, respectively. In addition, 35% of these regions had supermicron particles removed, presumably by precipitation. In 61% of the cases the enhancement in volume occurred over the size range from 0.1 to 50 μm whereas only submicron volumes were enhanced in 35% of the cases. In regions near clouds that were formed in air of maritime origin the frequency of volume enhancement decreased with increasing altitude and was twice as frequent on the dissipating side of clouds compared to the growing side. No such differences were found in the regions near clouds formed in air originating from the land. The frequency and average magnitude of volume enhancement are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with previous observational and theoretical studies that relate enhancements in particle mass to the uptake by cloud droplets of SO2 accompanied by additional growth by droplet coalescence.

  9. Fucoidan Extracted from Hijiki Protects Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells Against Diesel Exhaust Particle Exposure-Induced Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Sook; Eom, Sang-Yong; Kim, In-Soo; Ali, Syed F; Kleinman, Michael T; Kim, Yong-Dae; Kim, Heon

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of fucoidan against the decreased function of primary cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BBMECs) after exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). BBMECs were extracted from bovine brains and cultured until confluent. To evaluate the function of BBMECs, we performed a permeability test using cell-by-cell equipment and by Western blot analysis for zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1), which is a tight junction protein of BMECs, and evaluated oxidative stress in BBMECs using the DCFH-DA assay and the CUPRAC-BCS assay. The increased oxidative stress in BBMECs following DEP exposure was suppressed by fucoidan. In addition, permeability of BBMECs induced by DEP exposure was decreased by fucoidan treatment. Our results showed that fucoidan protects against BBMEC disruption induced by DEP exposure. This study provides evidence that fucoidan might protect the central nervous system (CNS) against DEP exposure.

  10. Optical Properties of the Urban Aerosol Particles Obtained from Ground Based Measurements and Satellite-Based Modelling Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genrik Mordas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Applications of satellite remote sensing data combined with ground measurements and model simulation were applied to study aerosol optical properties as well as aerosol long-range transport under the impact of large scale circulation in the urban environment in Lithuania (Vilnius. Measurements included the light scattering coefficients at 3 wavelengths (450, 550, and 700 nm measured with an integrating nephelometer and aerosol particle size distribution (0.5–12 μm and number concentration (Dpa > 0.5 μm registered by aerodynamic particle sizer. Particle number concentration and mean light scattering coefficient varied from relatively low values of 6.0 cm−3 and 12.8 Mm−1 associated with air masses passed over Atlantic Ocean to relatively high value of 119 cm−3 and 276 Mm−1 associated with South-Western air masses. Analysis shows such increase in the aerosol light scattering coefficient (276 Mm−1 during the 3rd of July 2012 was attributed to a major Sahara dust storm. Aerosol size distribution with pronounced coarse particles dominance was attributed to the presence of dust particles, while resuspended dust within the urban environment was not observed.

  11. Distinct high molecular weight organic compound (HMW-OC) types in aerosol particles collected at a coastal urban site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Healy, R. M.; Wenger, J. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; Harrison, Roy M.; Beddows, D. C. S.

    2017-12-01

    Organic oligomers were discovered in laboratory-generated atmospheric aerosol over a decade ago. However, evidence for the presence of oligomers in ambient aerosols is scarce and mechanisms for their formation have yet to be fully elucidated. In this work, three unique aerosol particle types internally mixed with High molecular weight organic compounds (HMW-OC) species - likely oligomers - were detected in ambient air using single particle Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS) in Cork (Ireland) during winter 2009. These particle types can be described as follows: (1) HMW-OCs rich in organic nitrogen - possibly containing nitrocatechols and nitroguaiacols - originating from primary emissions of biomass burning particles during evening times; (2) HMW-OCs internally mixed with nitric acid, occurring in stagnant conditions during night time; and (3) HMW-OCs internally mixed with sea salt, likely formed via photochemical reactions during day time. The study exemplifies the power of methodologies capable of monitoring the simultaneous formation of organic and inorganic particle-phase reaction products. Primary emissions and atmospheric aging of different types of HMW-OC contributes to aerosol with a range of acidity, hygroscopic and optical properties, which can have different impacts on climate and health.

  12. Evaluating the applicability of a semi-continuous aerosol sampler to measure Asian dust particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Se-Chang; Park, Seung Shik

    2015-03-01

    A Korean prototype semi-continuous aerosol sampler was used to measure Asian dust particles. During two dust-storm periods, concentrations of crustal and trace elements were significantly enriched. Dust storms are one of the most significant natural sources of air pollution in East Asia. The present study aimed to evaluate use of a Korean semi-continuous aerosol sampler (K-SAS) in observation of mineral dust particles during dust storm events. Aerosol slurry samples were collected at 60 min intervals using the K-SAS, which was operated at a sampling flow rate of 16.7 L min(-1) through a PM10 cyclone inlet. The measurements were made during dust storm events at an urban site, Gwangju in Korea, between April 30 and May 5, 2011. The K-SAS uses particle growth technology as a means of collecting atmospheric aerosol particles. Concentrations of 16 elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Ca, K, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ti, V, Ni, Co, As, and Se) were determined off-line in the collected slurry samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The sampling periods were classified into two types, based on the source regions of the dust storms and the transport pathways of the air masses reaching the sampling site. The first period "A" was associated with dust particles with high Ca content, originating from the Gobi desert regions of northern China and southern Mongolia. The second period "B" was associated with dust particles with low Ca content, originating from northeastern Chinese sandy deserts. The results from the K-SAS indicated noticeable differences in concentrations of crustal and trace elements in the two sampling periods, as a result of differences in the source regions of the dust storms, the air mass transport pathways, and the impact of smoke from forest fires. The concentrations of the crustal (Al, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe) and anthropogenic trace elements (Vi, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, and Pb) were enriched significantly during the two dust storm periods. However, the

  13. Influence of collecting substrates on the characterization of hygroscopic properties of inorganic aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Li, Xue; Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, Hyekyeong; Ro, Chul-Un

    2014-03-04

    The influence of six collecting substrates with different physical properties on the hygroscopicity measurement of inorganic aerosol particle surrogates and the potential applications of these substrates were examined experimentally. Laboratory-generated single salt particles, such as NaCl, KCl, and (NH4)2SO4, 1-5 μm in size, were deposited on transmission electron microscopy grids (TEM grids), parafilm-M, Al foil, Ag foil, silicon wafer, and cover glass. The particle hygroscopic properties were examined by optical microscopy. Contact angle measurements showed that parafilm-M is hydrophobic, and cover glass, silicon wafer, Al foil, and Ag foil substrates are hydrophilic. The observed deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) values for NaCl, KCl, and (NH4)2SO4 on the TEM grids and parafilm-M substrates agreed well with the literature values, whereas the DRHs obtained on the hydrophilic substrates were consistently ∼1-2% lower, compared to those on the hydrophobic substrates. The water layer adsorbed on the salt crystals prior to deliquescence increases the Gibb's free energy of the salt crystal-substrate system compared to the free energy of the salt droplet-substrate system, which in turn reduces the DRHs. The hydrophilic nature of the substrate does not affect the measured efflorescence RH (ERH) values. However, the Cl(-) or SO4(2-) ions in aqueous salt droplets seem to have reacted with Ag foil to form AgCl or Ag2SO4, respectively, which in turn acts as seeds for the heterogeneous nucleation of the original salts, leading to higher ERHs. The TEM grids were found to be most suitable for the hygroscopic measurements of individual inorganic aerosol particles by optical microscopy and when multiple analytical techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, TEM-EDX, and/or Raman microspectrometry, are applied to the same individual particles.

  14. Measurements of the absorption and scattering coefficients of aerosol particles in suburb of Nanjing (China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yan; Chen, Yu; Wang, Weiwei; Yan, Jiade; Qian, Ling; Tong, Yaoqing; Lin, Zhenyi

    2008-08-01

    The absorption and scattering coefficients of atmospheric aerosols were continuously measured with a Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS, DMT Inc. USA) at a suburb site of Nanjing, one of the regions experiencing rapid industrialization in China. The measurements were carried out during autumn and winter 2007. A preliminary analysis of the data shows that, the scattering coefficient, Bscat, is two to ten times larger than the absorption coefficient, Babs, implying that the aerosols formed/emitted in this area are more scattering than previous assumed, and can be more important in cooling the Earth-atmosphere system. The results also indicate that the absolute values of both parameters are very much dependent on the meteorological conditions, such as wind speed and direction, fog, rain, etc. as well as the time of the day. Higher values often appear at nighttimes when wind is weak, especially when a temperature inverse layer is present near the surface. Higher values of Bscat and Babs were also observed under hazy and foggy weather conditions or when wind is blown from east, where a large industrial zone is located. Simultaneous measurements of the number concentrations, chemical compositions, and size distributions of aerosol particles are used to explain the characteristics of the changes in Bscat and Babs.

  15. Measurement of the deposition of aerosol particles to skin, hair and clothing

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, K F

    1998-01-01

    efficient. range 1.3 -15x10 sup - sup 3 ms sup - sup 1 were recorded, values which are approximately an order of magnitude higher than the equivalent values onto the floor of the test room. These values suggest that the exposure route of radioactive aerosol particles deposited on the skin may be more significant than hitherto had been assumed. The possible mechanisms leading to this relatively high deposition were investigated experimentally and the results suggested that a combination of factors such as the body's electrostatic field, surface temperature and surface roughness were contributors. A wind tunnel was used to carry out experiments to compare the deposition velocities of a 1.4 mu m mean diameter aerosol onto human body phantoms in a simulated outdoor environment with the values from the test chamber experiments. The measured aerosol deposition velocities were found to vary with wind velocity; values in the range 6.8 - 11x10 sup - sup 3 ms sup - sup 1 were recorded. The clearance of deposited aeroso...

  16. The size distribution of primary biological aerosol particles with radii > 0.2 μm in an urban/rural influenced region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias-Maser, S.; Jaenicke, R.

    Primary biological aerosol particles including pollen, spores, plant debris, epithelial cells, bacteria, algae, protozoa and viruses, are an ubiquitous component of the atmospheric aerosol, they are most probably present in all size ranges. Besides their effects on air hygiene and health, biological particles play an important role in cloud physics, for example some bacteria are able to accumulate water and act as ice nuclei. To sample aerosols a two-stage-slit-impactor and a wing-impactor are used to collect particles for a following single particle analysis. The coarse particles are sampled on dyed glycerine jelly. The biological particles become stained and can be distinguished in contrast to the non-dyed particles using a light microscope. The small particles are examined in a scanning-electron-microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer after sampling on graphitic foils. Three criteria were used to characterize the particles: the morphology, the elemental composition and the behaviour during the microanalysis. With this method the size distributions of the primary biological aerosol particles were determined in an urban/rural influenced region. Considering all measurements we calculated a mean number concentration of 1.9 cm -3 of biological aerosol particles ≈30% of the total aerosol particles. The mean volume concentration was about 15% of the total volume. A model size distribution for primary biological aerosol particles was obtained by performing a non-linear fitting procedure.

  17. Seasonality of New Particle Formation in Vienna, Austria - Influence of Air Mass Origin and Aerosol Chemical Composition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wonaschütz, A.; Demattio, A.; Wagner, R.; Burkart, J.; Zíková, Naděžda; Vodička, Petr; Ludwig, W.; Steiner, G.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Hitzenberger, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 118, OCT 2015 (2015), s. 118-126 ISSN 1352-2310 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7AMB12AT021; GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147 Grant - others:FWF(AT) P19515-N20 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : urban aerosol * aerosol chemical composition * new particle formation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.459, year: 2015

  18. Contribution of feldspar and marine organic aerosols to global ice nucleating particle concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergara-Temprado, Jesús; Murray, Benjamin J.; Wilson, Theodore W.; O& amp; apos; Sullivan, Daniel; Browse, Jo; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Ardon-Dryer, Karin; Bertram, Allan K.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Ceburnis, Darius; DeMott, Paul J.; Mason, Ryan H.; O& amp; apos; Dowd, Colin D.; Rinaldi, Matteo; Carslaw, Ken S.

    2017-01-01

    Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are known to affect the amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, thereby influencing many of their properties. The atmospheric INP concentration changes by orders of magnitude from terrestrial to marine environments, which typically contain much lower concentrations. Many modelling studies use parameterizations for heterogeneous ice nucleation and cloud ice processes that do not account for this difference because they were developed based on INP measurements made predominantly in terrestrial environments without considering the aerosol composition. Errors in the assumed INP concentration will influence the simulated amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, leading to errors in top-of-atmosphere radiative flux and ultimately the climate sensitivity of the model. Here we develop a global model of INP concentrations relevant for mixed-phase clouds based on laboratory and field measurements of ice nucleation by K-feldspar (an ice-active component of desert dust) and marine organic aerosols (from sea spray). The simulated global distribution of INP concentrations based on these two species agrees much better with currently available ambient measurements than when INP concentrations are assumed to depend only on temperature or particle size. Underestimation of INP concentrations in some terrestrial locations may be due to the neglect of INPs from other terrestrial sources. Our model indicates that, on a monthly average basis, desert dusts dominate the contribution to the INP population over much of the world, but marine organics become increasingly important over remote oceans and they dominate over the Southern Ocean. However, day-to-day variability is important. Because desert dust aerosol tends to be sporadic, marine organic aerosols dominate the INP population on many days per month over much of the mid- and high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. This study advances our understanding of which aerosol species need to be included in order to

  19. Contribution of feldspar and marine organic aerosols to global ice nucleating particle concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Temprado, Jesús; Murray, Benjamin J.; Wilson, Theodore W.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Browse, Jo; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Ardon-Dryer, Karin; Bertram, Allan K.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Ceburnis, Darius; DeMott, Paul J.; Mason, Ryan H.; O'Dowd, Colin D.; Rinaldi, Matteo; Carslaw, Ken S.

    2017-03-01

    Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are known to affect the amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, thereby influencing many of their properties. The atmospheric INP concentration changes by orders of magnitude from terrestrial to marine environments, which typically contain much lower concentrations. Many modelling studies use parameterizations for heterogeneous ice nucleation and cloud ice processes that do not account for this difference because they were developed based on INP measurements made predominantly in terrestrial environments without considering the aerosol composition. Errors in the assumed INP concentration will influence the simulated amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, leading to errors in top-of-atmosphere radiative flux and ultimately the climate sensitivity of the model. Here we develop a global model of INP concentrations relevant for mixed-phase clouds based on laboratory and field measurements of ice nucleation by K-feldspar (an ice-active component of desert dust) and marine organic aerosols (from sea spray). The simulated global distribution of INP concentrations based on these two species agrees much better with currently available ambient measurements than when INP concentrations are assumed to depend only on temperature or particle size. Underestimation of INP concentrations in some terrestrial locations may be due to the neglect of INPs from other terrestrial sources. Our model indicates that, on a monthly average basis, desert dusts dominate the contribution to the INP population over much of the world, but marine organics become increasingly important over remote oceans and they dominate over the Southern Ocean. However, day-to-day variability is important. Because desert dust aerosol tends to be sporadic, marine organic aerosols dominate the INP population on many days per month over much of the mid- and high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. This study advances our understanding of which aerosol species need to be included in order to

  20. A New Method Using Single-Particle Mass Spectrometry Data to Distinguish Mineral Dust and Biological Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mashat, H.; Kristensen, L.; Sultana, C. M.; Prather, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to distinguish types of particles present within a cloud is important for determining accurate inputs to climate models. The chemical composition of particles within cloud liquid droplets and ice crystals can have a significant impact on the timing, location, and amount of precipitation that falls. Precipitation efficiency is increased by the presence of ice crystals in clouds, and both mineral dust and biological aerosols have been shown to be effective ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the atmosphere. A current challenge in aerosol science is distinguishing mineral dust and biological material in the analysis of real-time, ambient, single-particle mass spectral data. Single-particle mass spectrometers are capable of measuring the size-resolved chemical composition of individual atmospheric particles. However, there is no consistent analytical method for distinguishing dust and biological aerosols. Sampling and characterization of control samples (i.e. of known identity) of mineral dust and bacteria were performed by the Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the Fifth Ice Nucleation (FIN01) Workshop at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility in Karlsruhe, Germany. Using data collected by the ATOFMS of control samples, a new metric has been developed to classify single particles as dust or biological independent of spectral cluster analysis. This method, involving the use of a ratio of mass spectral peak areas for organic nitrogen and silicates, is easily reproducible and does not rely on extensive knowledge of particle chemistry or the ionization characteristics of mass spectrometers. This represents a step toward rapidly distinguishing particle types responsible for ice nucleation activity during real-time sampling in clouds. The ability to distinguish types of particles present within a cloud is important for determining accurate inputs to climate models. The chemical composition of particles

  1. Measurement of ambient aerosols in northern Mexico City by single particle mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Moffet

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous ambient measurements with aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS were made in an industrial/residential section in the northern part of Mexico City as part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area-2006 campaign (MCMA-2006. Results are presented for the period of 15–27 March 2006. The submicron size mode contained both fresh and aged biomass burning, aged organic carbon (OC mixed with nitrate and sulfate, elemental carbon (EC, nitrogen-organic carbon, industrial metal, and inorganic NaK inorganic particles. Overall, biomass burning and aged OC particle types comprised 40% and 31%, respectively, of the submicron mode. In contrast, the supermicron mode was dominated by inorganic NaK particle types (42% which represented a mixture of dry lake bed dust and industrial NaK emissions mixed with soot. Additionally, aluminosilicate dust, transition metals, OC, and biomass burning contributed to the supermicron particles. Early morning periods (2–6 a.m. showed high fractions of inorganic particles from industrial sources in the northeast, composed of internal mixtures of Pb, Zn, EC and Cl, representing up to 73% of the particles in the 0.2–3μm size range. A unique nitrogen-containing organic carbon (NOC particle type, peaking in the early morning hours, was hypothesized to be amines from local industrial emissions based on the time series profile and back trajectory analysis. A strong dependence on wind speed and direction was observed in the single particle types that were present during different times of the day. The early morning (3:30–10 a.m. showed the greatest contributions from industrial emissions. During mid to late mornings (7–11 a.m., weak northerly winds were observed along with the most highly aged particles. Stronger winds from the south picked up in the late morning (after 11 a.m., resulting in a decrease in the concentrations of the major aged particle types and an increase in the number fraction of fresh

  2. The real part of the refractive indices and effective densities for chemically segregated ambient aerosols in Guangzhou measured by a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols is essential to better evaluate their radiative forcing. This paper presents an estimate of the real part of the refractive indices (n and effective densities (ρeff of chemically segregated atmospheric aerosols in Guangzhou, China. Vacuum aerodynamic diameter, chemical compositions, and light-scattering intensities of individual particles were simultaneously measured by a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS during the fall of 2012. On the basis of Mie theory, n at a wavelength of 532 nm and ρeff were estimated for 17 particle types in four categories: organics (OC, elemental carbon (EC, internally mixed EC and OC (ECOC, and Metal-rich. The results indicate the presence of spherical or nearly spherical shapes for the majority of particle types, whose partial scattering cross-section versus sizes were well fitted to Mie theoretical modeling results. While sharing n in a narrow range (1.47–1.53, majority of particle types exhibited a wide range of ρeff (0.87–1.51 g cm−3. The OC group is associated with the lowest ρeff (0.87–1.07 g cm−3, and the Metal-rich group with the highest ones (1.29–1.51 g cm−3. It is noteworthy that a specific EC type exhibits a complex scattering curve versus size due to the presence of both compact and irregularly shaped particles. Overall, the results on the detailed relationship between physical and chemical properties benefits future research on the impact of aerosols on visibility and climate.

  3. Evaluation of aerosol processes between roadside and neighbourhood scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Pirjola, Liisa; Keuken, Menno P.

    2015-04-01

    Particle emissions from road transport include vehicle exhaust emissions, tire/brake wear and re-suspension of road dust. Vehicle exhaust emissions usually constitute the most significant source of ultrafine particles (UFP), i.e. particles with diameters air pollution legislation. UFP emitted from road traffic are subject to complex dilution and transformation processes in the urban environment. This model study evaluates the influence of aerosol processes on PN concentration on the spatial and temporal range between the roadside, typically represented by measurements at a traffic monitoring site, and the neighbourhood scale, extending from several hundred meters to several kilometres. Several dispersion scenarios for the cities Oslo, Helsinki and Rotterdam were simulated using the multicomponent aerosol dynamics process model MAFOR, approximating dilution by a power-law function. Aerosol processes considered in this study were condensation/evaporation of n-alkanes, coagulation and the dry deposition of particles. Under typical dispersion conditions dilution clearly dominated the change of total PN on the neighbourhood scale. Dry deposition and coagulation of particles were identified to be the most important aerosol dynamical processes controlling the removal of particles from emitted from vehicular exhaust on urban time scales. The effect of condensation/evaporation of organic vapours emitted by vehicles on particle numbers and on particle size distributions was examined. A simplified parameterization for the implementation of coagulation and dry deposition of particles in urban air quality models is presented. Further work is needed to validate size segregated PN concentration distributions modelled by the urban models.

  4. Dust Aerosol Particle Size at the Mars Science Laboratory Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Retortillo, Alvaro; Martínez, Germán; Renno, Nilton; Lemmon, Mark; de la Torre-Juárez, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a new methodology to retrieve dust aerosol particle size from Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) observations [1]. We use photodiode output currents measured by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) UV sensor (UVS), ancillary data records (ADR) containing the geometry of the rover and the Sun, and values of the atmospheric opacity retrieved from Mastcam measurements. In particular, we analyze REMS UVS measurements when the Sun is blocked by the masthead and the mast of the rover since the behavior of the output currents during these shadow events depends on the dust phase function, which depends on particle size. The retrieved dust effective radii show a significant seasonal variability, ranging from 0.6 μm during the low opacity season (Ls = 60° - 140°) to 2 μm during the high opacity season (Ls = 180° - 360°). The relationship between atmospheric opacity and dust particle size indicates that dust-lifting events originate at various distances from Gale Crater. The external origin of high dust content events is consistent with the strong and persistent northerly and northwesterly winds at Gale Crater during the perihelion season centered around Ls = 270° [2]. From an interannual perspective, the general behavior of the particle size evolution in MY 31-32 is similar to that in MY 32-33, although some differences are noted. During the low opacity season (Ls = 60° - 140°), the retrieved dust effective radii in MY 33 are significantly lower than in MY 32. A larger contribution of water ice clouds to the total atmospheric opacity during the aphelion season of MY 33 can partially explain such a departure. Differences during the perihelion season are caused by interannual variability of enhanced opacity events. The determination of dust aerosol particle size is important to improve the accuracy of models in simulating the UV environment at the surface [3] and in predicting heating rates, which affect the atmospheric thermal and dynamical

  5. Mixing times of organic molecules within secondary organic aerosol particles: a global planetary boundary layer perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Adrian M.; Butenhoff, Christopher L.; Grayson, James W.; Barsanti, Kelley; Jimenez, Jose L.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2017-11-01

    When simulating the formation and life cycle of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) with chemical transport models, it is often assumed that organic molecules are well mixed within SOA particles on the timescale of 1 h. While this assumption has been debated vigorously in the literature, the issue remains unresolved in part due to a lack of information on the mixing times within SOA particles as a function of both temperature and relative humidity. Using laboratory data, meteorological fields, and a chemical transport model, we estimated how often mixing times are 0.5 µg m-3 at the surface). Next, as a starting point to quantify how often mixing times of organic molecules are good proxy for anthropogenic SOA, 70 and 83 % of the mixing times within anthropogenic SOA in the PBL are < 1 h for January and July, respectively, when concentrations are significant. These percentages are likely lower limits due to the assumptions used to calculate mixing times.

  6. Rat inhalation test with particles from biomass combustion and biomass co-firing exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmann, B.; Creutzenberg, O.; Ernst, H.; Muhle, H.

    2009-02-01

    The health effects of 6 different fly ash samples from biomass combustion plants (bark, wood chips, waste wood, and straw), and co-firing plants (coal, co-firing of coal and sawdust) were investigated in a 28-day nose-only inhalation study with Wistar WU rats. Respirable fractions of carbon black (Printex 90) and of titanium dioxide (Bayertitan T) were used as reference materials for positive and negative controls. The exposure was done 6 hours per day, 5 days per week at an aerosol concentration of 16 mg/m3. The MMAD of all fly ash samples and reference materials in the inhalation unit were in the range from 1.5 to 3 μm. The investigations focused predominantly on the analysis of inflammatory effects in the lungs of rats using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology. Different parameters (percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), interleukin-8 and interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung tissue) indicating inflammatory effects in the lung, showed a statistically significant increase in the groups exposed to carbon black (positive control), C1 (coal) and C1+BM4 (co-firing of coal and sawdust) fly ashes. Additionally, for the same groups a statistically significant increase of cell proliferation in the lung epithelium was detected. No significant effects were detected in the animal groups exposed to BM1 (bark), BM2 (wood chips), BM3 (waste wood), BM6 (straw) or titanium dioxide.

  7. Rat inhalation test with particles from biomass combustion and biomass co-firing exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Bellmann; O. Creutzenberg; H. Ernst; H. Muhle [Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The health effects of 6 different fly ash samples from biomass combustion plants (bark, wood chips, waste wood, and straw), and co-firing plants (coal, co-firing of coal and sawdust) were investigated in a 28-day nose-only inhalation study with Wistar WU rats. Respirable fractions of carbon black (Printex 90) and of titanium dioxide (Bayertitan T) were used as reference materials for positive and negative controls. The exposure was done 6 hours per day, 5 days per week at an aerosol concentration of 16 mg/m{sup 3}. The MMAD of all fly ash samples and reference materials in the inhalation unit were in the range from 1.5 to 3 {mu}m. The investigations focused predominantly on the analysis of inflammatory effects in the lungs of rats using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology. Different parameters (percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), interleukin-8 and interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung tissue) indicating inflammatory effects in the lung, showed a statistically significant increase in the groups exposed to carbon black (positive control), C1 (coal) and C1+BM4 (co-firing of coal and sawdust) fly ashes. Additionally, for the same groups a statistically significant increase of cell proliferation in the lung epithelium was detected. No significant effects were detected in the animal groups exposed to BM1 (bark), BM2 (wood chips), BM3 (waste wood), BM6 (straw) or titanium dioxide. 7 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Rat inhalation test with particles from biomass combustion and biomass co-firing exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellmann, B; Creutzenberg, O; Ernst, H; Muhle, H, E-mail: bernd.bellmann@item.fraunhofer.d [Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Nikolai-Fuchs-Str.1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2009-02-01

    The health effects of 6 different fly ash samples from biomass combustion plants (bark, wood chips, waste wood, and straw), and co-firing plants (coal, co-firing of coal and sawdust) were investigated in a 28-day nose-only inhalation study with Wistar WU rats. Respirable fractions of carbon black (Printex 90) and of titanium dioxide (Bayertitan T) were used as reference materials for positive and negative controls. The exposure was done 6 hours per day, 5 days per week at an aerosol concentration of 16 mg/m{sup 3}. The MMAD of all fly ash samples and reference materials in the inhalation unit were in the range from 1.5 to 3 mum. The investigations focused predominantly on the analysis of inflammatory effects in the lungs of rats using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology. Different parameters (percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), interleukin-8 and interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung tissue) indicating inflammatory effects in the lung, showed a statistically significant increase in the groups exposed to carbon black (positive control), C1 (coal) and C1+BM4 (co-firing of coal and sawdust) fly ashes. Additionally, for the same groups a statistically significant increase of cell proliferation in the lung epithelium was detected. No significant effects were detected in the animal groups exposed to BM1 (bark), BM2 (wood chips), BM3 (waste wood), BM6 (straw) or titanium dioxide.

  9. Detailed heterogeneous oxidation of soot surfaces in a particle-resolved aerosol model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Kaiser

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Using the particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC, we simulate the heterogeneous oxidation of a monolayer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs on soot particles in an urban atmosphere. We focus on the interaction of the major atmospheric oxidants (O3, NO2, OH, and NO3 with PAHs and include competitive co-adsorption of water vapour for a range of atmospheric conditions. For the first time detailed heterogeneous chemistry based on the Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann (PRA framework is modelled on soot particles with a realistic size distribution and a continuous range of chemical ages. We find PAHs half-lives, τ1/2, on the order of seconds during the night, when the PAHs are rapidly oxidised by the gas-surface reaction with NO3. During the day, τ1/2 is on the order of minutes and determined mostly by the surface layer reaction of PAHs with adsorbed O3. Such short half-lives of surface-bound PAHs may lead to efficient conversion of hydrophobic soot into more hygroscopic particles, thus increasing the particles' aerosol-cloud interaction potential. Despite its high reactivity OH appears to have a negligible effect on PAH degradation which can be explained by its very low concentration in the atmosphere. An increase of relative humidity (RH from 30 % to 80 % increases PAH half-lives by up to 50 % for daytime degradation and by up to 100 % or more for nighttime degradation. Uptake coefficients, averaged over the particle population, are found to be relatively constant over time for O3 (∼2 × 10−7 to ∼2 × 10−6 and NO2 (∼5 × 10−6 to ∼10−5 at the different levels of NOx emissions and RH considered in this study. In contrast, those for OH and NO3 depend strongly on the surface concentration of PAHs. We do not find a significant influence of heterogeneous reactions on soot

  10. Hygroscopic analysis of individual Beijing haze aerosol particles by environmental scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhangpeng; Ji, Yuan; Pi, Yiqun; Yang, Kaixiang; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yinqi; Zhai, Yadi; Yan, Zhengguang; Han, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    Investigating the hygroscopic behavior of haze aerosol particles is essential for understanding their physicochemical properties and their impacts on regional weather and visibility. An environmental scanning electron microscope equipped with a home-made transmission-scattering electron imaging setup and an energy dispersive spectrometer was used for in-situ observations of pure water-soluble (WS) salts and Beijing haze particles. This imaging setup showed obvious advantages for improving the resolution and acquiring internal information of mixed particles in hydrated environments. We measured the deliquescence relative humidity of pure NaCl, NH4NO3, and (NH4)2SO4 by deliquescence-crystallization processes with an accuracy of up to 0.3% RH. The mixed haze particles showed hygroscopic activation like water uptake and morphological changes when they included WS components such as nitrates, sulfates, halides, ammoniums, and alkali metal salts. In addition, the hygroscopic behavior provides complementary information for analyzing possible phases in mixed haze particles.

  11. SEM Imaging and Chemical Analysis of Aerosol Particles from Surface and Hi-altitudes in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandamede, M.; Boaggio, K.; Bancroft, L.; Hurler, K.; Magee, N. B.

    2016-12-01

    We report on Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis of aerosol particle morphology and chemistry. The work includes the first comparative SEM analysis of aerosol particles captured by balloon at high altitude. The particles were acquired in an urban/suburban environment in central New-Jersey. Particles were sampled from near the surface using ambient air filtration and at high-altitudes using a novel balloon-borne instrument (ICE-Ball, see abstract by K. Boaggio). Particle images and 3D geometry are acquired by a Hitachi SU-5000 SEM, with resolution to approximately 3 nm. Elemental analysis on particles is provided by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS, EDAX, Inc.). Uncoated imaging is conducted in low vacuum within the variable-pressure SEM, which provides improved detection and analysis of light-element compositions including Carbon. Preliminary results suggest that some similar particle types and chemical species are sampled at both surface and high-altitude. However, as expected, particle morphologies, concentrations, chemistry, and apparent origin vary significantly at different altitudes and under different atmospheric flow regimes. Improved characterization of high-altitude aerosol particles, and differences from surface particulate composition, may advance inputs for atmospheric cloud and radiation models.

  12. Impact of Wildfire Emissions on Chloride and Bromide Depletion in Marine Aerosol Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Rachel A; Dadashazar, Hossein; MacDonald, Alexander B; Aldhaif, Abdulamonam M; Maudlin, Lindsay C; Crosbie, Ewan; Aghdam, Mojtaba Azadi; Hossein Mardi, Ali; Sorooshian, Armin

    2017-08-15

    This work examines particulate chloride (Cl-) and bromide (Br-) depletion in marine aerosol particles influenced by wildfires at a coastal California site in the summers of 2013 and 2016. Chloride exhibited a dominant coarse mode due to sea salt influence, with substantially diminished concentrations during fire periods as compared to nonfire periods. Bromide exhibited a peak in the submicrometer range during fire and nonfire periods, with an additional supermicrometer peak in the latter periods. Chloride and Br- depletions were enhanced during fire periods as compared to nonfire periods. The highest observed %Cl- depletion occurred in the submicrometer range, with maximum values of 98.9% (0.32-0.56 μm) and 85.6% (0.56-1 μm) during fire and nonfire periods, respectively. The highest %Br- depletion occurred in the supermicrometer range during fire and nonfire periods with peak depletion between 1.8-3.2 μm (78.8% and 58.6%, respectively). When accounting for the neutralization of sulfate by ammonium, organic acid particles showed the greatest influence on Cl- depletion in the submicrometer range. These results have implications for aerosol hygroscopicity and radiative forcing in areas with wildfire influence owing to depletion effects on composition.

  13. Sugar markers in aerosol particles from an agro-industrial region in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, R. C.; Alves, C. A.; Allen, A. G.; Cardoso, A. A.; Queiroz, M. E. C.; Campos, M. L. A. M.

    2014-06-01

    This work aimed to better understand how aerosol particles from sugar cane burning contribute to the chemical composition of the lower troposphere in an agro-industrial region of São Paulo State (Brazil) affected by sugar and ethanol fuel production. During a period of 21 months, we collected 105 samples and quantified 20 saccharides by GC-MS. The average concentrations of levoglucosan (L), mannosan (M), and galactosan (G) for 24-h sampling were 116, 16, and 11 ng m-3 respectively. The three anhydrosugars had higher and more variable concentrations in the nighttime and during the sugar cane harvest period, due to more intense biomass burning practices. The calculated L/M ratio, which may serve as a signature for sugar cane smoke particles, was 9 ± 5. Although the total concentrations of the anhydrosugars varied greatly among samples, the relative mass size distributions of the saccharides were reasonably constant. Emissions due to biomass burning were estimated to correspond to 69% (mass) of the sugars quantified in the harvest samples, whereas biogenic emissions corresponded to 10%. In the non-harvest period, these values were 44 and 27%, respectively, indicating that biomass burning is an important source of aerosol to the regional atmosphere during the whole year.

  14. Pore engineering towards highly efficient electrospun nanofibrous membranes for aerosol particle removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Attabi, Riyadh; Dumée, Ludovic F; Schütz, Jürg A; Morsi, Yosry

    2018-01-03

    Electrospun nanofibrous membranes were engineered for aerosol particle removal by controlling the fiber density and alignment across electrospun mats. Electrospun nanofiber membranes were deposited on both, rotatory drum and stationary collectors, to investigate the effect of fiber alignment on filtration performance. Poly(acrylonitrile)/dimethyl formamide (PAN/DMF) solutions were used to produce membranes for applications in air purification. The air filtration performance of as-produced and hot-compacted membranes were systematically evaluated with regard to penetration, pressure drop, and quality factor when subjected to potassium chloride (KCl) aerosol particles in the size-range of 300nm to 12μm. The membranes offered air filtration efficiencies in the range of 77.7% to 99.616% and quality factors between 0.0026 and 0.0204 (1/Pa). The samples were benchmarked against commercial filters and were found to exhibit similar quality factors but higher air filtration efficiencies. These results were correlated to differences in pore morphologies and fiber orientation distributions generated from the different processing techniques, which revealed that the alteration of the fiber density is an effective method for enhancing air filtration performance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Lienhard

    2015-12-01

    secondary organic aerosol (SOA material produced by oxidation of α-pinene and in a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA, levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose are presented. These indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA particles suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  16. Chemical composition of ambient aerosol, ice residues and cloud droplet residues in mixed-phase clouds: single particle analysis during the Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamphus

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Two different single particle mass spectrometers were operated in parallel at the Swiss High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (JFJ, 3580 m a.s.l. during the Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6 in February and March 2007. During mixed phase cloud events ice crystals from 5–20 μm were separated from larger ice aggregates, non-activated, interstitial aerosol particles and supercooled droplets using an Ice-Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI. During one cloud period supercooled droplets were additionally sampled and analyzed by changing the Ice-CVI setup. The small ice particles and droplets were evaporated by injection into dry air inside the Ice-CVI. The resulting ice and droplet residues (IR and DR were analyzed for size and composition by the two single particle mass spectrometers: a custom-built Single Particle Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SPLAT and a commercial Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS, TSI Model 3800. During CLACE 6 the SPLAT instrument characterized 355 individual IR that produced a mass spectrum for at least one polarity and the ATOFMS measured 152 IR. The mass spectra were binned in classes, based on the combination of dominating substances, such as mineral dust, sulfate, potassium and elemental carbon or organic material. The derived chemical information from the ice residues is compared to the JFJ ambient aerosol that was sampled while the measurement station was out of clouds (several thousand particles analyzed by SPLAT and ATOFMS and to the composition of the residues of supercooled cloud droplets (SPLAT: 162 cloud droplet residues analyzed, ATOFMS: 1094. The measurements showed that mineral dust was strongly enhanced in the ice particle residues. Close to all of the SPLAT spectra from ice residues did contain signatures from mineral compounds, albeit connected with varying amounts of soluble compounds. Similarly, close to all of the ATOFMS IR spectra show a

  17. Real-Time Characterization of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles for Clear and Haze Episodes in Winter Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, S.; Fu, P.; Ren, H.; Fan, S.; Wei, L.; Hou, S.; Sun, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) such as pollen, fungal spore, bacteria and virus represent a major subset of particulate compositions for both coarse and fine aerosols. This category of aerosols affects weather, climate and human and plant health. We report the first multi-band quantification of fluorescent biological aerosol particles in Beijing, China in winter. The number concentrations and size distributions of FBAP were acquired by a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A). Three-hour samples of total suspended particles (TSP) were concurrently collected during a transition of a haze event to a clear period. It was found that the fraction of FBAP in all particles (> 0.8 µm) in pollution episodes (average value: 17%) was slightly higher than that during clear periods (13%). Besides, size-segregated FBAP in different fluorescent channels were less correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient) and existed diverse diurnal trends, indicating various sources of FBAP. Our results provide a better understanding of the roles of biological aerosols in an urban environment that is frequently suffered from severe air pollution.

  18. Hygroscopic properties of submicrometer atmospheric aerosol particles measured with H-TDMA instruments in various environments-a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swietlicki, E.; Hansson, H.-C.; Hämeri, K.; Svenningsson, B.; Massling, A.; McFiggans, G.; McMurry, P. H.; Petäjä, T.; Tunved, P.; Gysel, M.; Topping, D.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Rissler, J.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2008-07-01

    The hygroscopic properties play a vital role for the direct and indirect effects of aerosols on climate, as well as the health effects of particulate matter (PM) by modifying the deposition pattern of inhaled particles in the humid human respiratory tract. Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA) instruments have been used in field campaigns in various environments globally over the last 25 yr to determine the water uptake on submicrometre particles at subsaturated conditions. These investigations have yielded valuable and comprehensive information regarding the particle hygroscopic properties of the atmospheric aerosol, including state of mixing. These properties determine the equilibrium particle size at ambient relative humidities and have successfully been used to calculate the activation of particles at water vapour supersaturation. This paper summarizes the existing published H-TDMA results on the size-resolved submicrometre aerosol particle hygroscopic properties obtained from ground-based measurements at multiple marine, rural, urban and free tropospheric measurement sites. The data is classified into groups of hygroscopic growth indicating the external mixture, and providing clues to the sources and processes controlling the aerosol. An evaluation is given on how different chemical and physical properties affect the hygroscopic growth.

  19. Nano-Sized Secondary Organic Aerosol of Diesel Engine Exhaust Origin Impairs Olfactory-Based Spatial Learning Performance in Preweaning Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Kyi-Tha-Thu, Chaw; Moe, Yadanar; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Yanagisawa, Rie; Furuyama, Akiko; Tsukahara, Shinji; Fujitani, Yuji; Hirano, Seishiro

    2015-06-30

    The aims of our present study were to establish a novel olfactory-based spatial learning test and to examine the effects of exposure to nano-sized diesel exhaust-origin secondary organic aerosol (SOA), a model environmental pollutant, on the learning performance in preweaning mice. Pregnant BALB/c mice were exposed to clean air, diesel exhaust (DE), or DE-origin SOA (DE-SOA) from gestational day 14 to postnatal day (PND) 10 in exposure chambers. On PND 11, the preweaning mice were examined by the olfactory-based spatial learning test. After completion of the spatial learning test, the hippocampus from each mouse was removed and examined for the expressions of neurological and immunological markers using real-time RT-PCR. In the test phase of the study, the mice exposed to DE or DE-SOA took a longer time to reach the target as compared to the control mice. The expression levels of neurological markers such as the N -methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B, and of immunological markers such as TNF-α, COX2, and Iba1 were significantly increased in the hippocampi of the DE-SOA-exposed preweaning mice as compared to the control mice. Our results indicate that DE-SOA exposure in utero and in the neonatal period may affect the olfactory-based spatial learning behavior in preweaning mice by modulating the expressions of memory function-related pathway genes and inflammatory markers in the hippocampus.

  20. Impacts of aerosol particles on the microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds over the Southeast Pacific ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohy, C. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R. C.; Wood, R.; Saide, P.; Spak, S.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2012-08-01

    The Southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles such as power plants, urban pollution and smelters on the stratocumulus deck was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties on an E-W track along 20° S from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics from seven flights and many individual legs were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. Single particle analysis was used to reveal types and sources of the enhanced particle number. While a variety of particle types were found throughout the region, the dominant particles near shore were partially neutralized sulfates. Modeling and chemical analysis indicated that the predominant source of these particles in the marine boundary layer along 20° S was anthropogenic pollution from central Chilean sources, with copper smelters a relatively small contribution. Cloud droplets were more numerous and smaller near shore, and there was less drizzle. Higher droplet number concentration and physically thinner clouds both contributed to the smaller droplets near shore. Satellite measurements were used to show that cloud albedo was highest 500-1000 km offshore, and actually lower closer to shore due to the generally thinner clouds and lower liquid water paths there. Differences in the size

  1. Measurement of the light absorbing properties of diesel exhaust particles using a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuesong; Nakayama, Tomoki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tonokura, Kenichi; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    Diesel-exhaust particles (DEP) are one of the main anthropogenic sources of black carbon (BC) and organic matter (OM). Understanding the optical properties of DEP, including the enhancement of light absorption by BC due to coating and light absorption by OM, is important for evaluating the climate impact of DEP. In this study, a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (405, 532, and 781 nm) was used to investigate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of DEP emitted from a diesel engine vehicle running on a chassis dynamometer in transient driving mode (JE-05) and at a constant speed (either idling or driving at 70 km/h). Optical properties were measured after passing the diluted exhaust through a heater, set at 20, 47, or 300 °C (transient driving mode) or between 20 and 400 °C (constant driving mode). The OM accounted for, on average, ∼40 and ∼35% of the total mass concentration of DEP during the transient and constant driving modes, respectively. In transient driving mode, enhancements of scattering coefficients at 20 and 47 °C, and of the mass concentration of organics, were observed during the high-speed driving period (∼80 km/h) corresponding to driving on a highway. No difference was observed in the absorption coefficients between heated and unheated particles at 781 nm for either the transient (including the high-speed driving period) or constant driving modes. These results indicate a lack of enhancement due to the lensing effect, possibly because the BC was mainly mixed externally with the OM or because it was located at the edges of particles under these experimental conditions. Contributions to total light absorption at 405 nm by the OM were estimated by comparing the wavelength dependence of the absorption coefficients with and without heating. A significant contribution by light-absorbing OM (20 ± 7%) to total light absorption at 405 nm was observed during the high-speed driving period of the JE-05 mode, while the

  2. Virus-Like Particle Vaccination Protects Nonhuman Primates from Lethal Aerosol Exposure with Marburgvirus (VLP Vaccination Protects Macaques against Aerosol Challenges).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, John M; Warfield, Kelly L; Wells, Jay B; Unfer, Robert C; Shulenin, Sergey; Vu, Hong; Nichols, Donald K; Aman, M Javad; Bavari, Sina

    2016-04-08

    Marburg virus (MARV) was the first filovirus to be identified following an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in Marburg, Germany in 1967. Due to several factors inherent to filoviruses, they are considered a potential bioweapon that could be disseminated via an aerosol route. Previous studies demonstrated that MARV virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP), matrix protein VP40 and nucleoprotein (NP) generated using a baculovirus/insect cell expression system could protect macaques from subcutaneous (SQ) challenge with multiple species of marburgviruses. In the current study, the protective efficacy of the MARV VLPs in conjunction with two different adjuvants: QS-21, a saponin derivative, and poly I:C against homologous aerosol challenge was assessed in cynomolgus macaques. Antibody responses against the GP antigen were equivalent in all groups receiving MARV VLPs irrespective of the adjuvant; adjuvant only-vaccinated macaques did not demonstrate appreciable antibody responses. All macaques were subsequently challenged with lethal doses of MARV via aerosol or SQ as a positive control. All MARV VLP-vaccinated macaques survived either aerosol or SQ challenge while animals administered adjuvant only exhibited clinical signs and lesions consistent with MARV disease and were euthanized after meeting the predetermined criteria. Therefore, MARV VLPs induce IgG antibodies recognizing MARV GP and VP40 and protect cynomolgus macaques from an otherwise lethal aerosol exposure with MARV.

  3. Virus-Like Particle Vaccination Protects Nonhuman Primates from Lethal Aerosol Exposure with Marburgvirus (VLP Vaccination Protects Macaques against Aerosol Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Dye

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marburg virus (MARV was the first filovirus to be identified following an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in Marburg, Germany in 1967. Due to several factors inherent to filoviruses, they are considered a potential bioweapon that could be disseminated via an aerosol route. Previous studies demonstrated that MARV virus-like particles (VLPs containing the glycoprotein (GP, matrix protein VP40 and nucleoprotein (NP generated using a baculovirus/insect cell expression system could protect macaques from subcutaneous (SQ challenge with multiple species of marburgviruses. In the current study, the protective efficacy of the MARV VLPs in conjunction with two different adjuvants: QS-21, a saponin derivative, and poly I:C against homologous aerosol challenge was assessed in cynomolgus macaques. Antibody responses against the GP antigen were equivalent in all groups receiving MARV VLPs irrespective of the adjuvant; adjuvant only-vaccinated macaques did not demonstrate appreciable antibody responses. All macaques were subsequently challenged with lethal doses of MARV via aerosol or SQ as a positive control. All MARV VLP-vaccinated macaques survived either aerosol or SQ challenge while animals administered adjuvant only exhibited clinical signs and lesions consistent with MARV disease and were euthanized after meeting the predetermined criteria. Therefore, MARV VLPs induce IgG antibodies recognizing MARV GP and VP40 and protect cynomolgus macaques from an otherwise lethal aerosol exposure with MARV.

  4. Massive-scale aircraft observations of giant sea-salt aerosol particle size distributions in atmospheric marine boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    iant sea-salt aerosol particles (dry radius, rd > 0.5 μm) occur nearly everywhere in the marine boundary layer and frequently above. This study presents observations of atmospheric sea-salt size distributions in the range 0.7 Chile and the 2011 ICE-T in the Caribbean. In each deployment, size distributions using hundreds of slides are used to relate fitted log-normal size distributions parameters to wind speed, altitude and other atmospheric conditions. The size distributions provide a unique observational set for initializing cloud models with coarse-mode aerosol particle observations for marine atmospheres.

  5. DNA strand breaks, acute phase response and inflammation following pulmonary exposure by instillation to the diesel exhaust particle NIST1650b in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Saber, Anne T.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the inflammatory response, acute phase response and genotoxic effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs, NIST1650b) following a single intratracheal instillation. C57BL/6J BomTac mice received 18, 54 or 162 µg/mouse and were killed 1, 3 and 28 days post-exposure. Vehicle controls a...

  6. The Effect of Pt Particle Size on the Oxidation of CO, C3H6, and NO Over Pt/Al2O3 for Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Klint; Høj, Martin; Hansen, Brian Brun

    2017-01-01

    Platinum-based oxidation catalysts applied for diesel exhaust aftertreatment constitute a significant part of system costs. Effective utilization of platinum is therefore relevant to reduce costs while retaining performance. To this end, the influence of Pt particle size on catalytic activity...

  7. Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA) Investigation of Airborne Particle Health Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) is a well-known cause of heart disease, cardiovascular and respiratory illness, low birth weight, and lung cancer. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study ranks PM as a major environmental risk factor worldwide. Global maps of PM2.5concentrations derived from satellite instruments, including MISR and MODIS, have provided key contributions to the GBD and many other health-related investigations. Although it is well established that PM exposure increases the risks of mortality and morbidity, our understanding of the relative toxicity of specific PM types is relatively poor. To address this, the Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA) investigation was proposed to NASA's third Earth Venture Instrument (EVI-3) solicitation. The satellite instrument that is part of the investigation is a multiangle, multispectral, and polarimetric camera system based on the first and second generation Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imagers, AirMSPI and AirMSPI-2. MAIA was selected for funding in March 2016. Estimates of the abundances of different aerosol types from the WRF-Chem model will be combined with MAIA instrument data. Geostatistical models derived from collocated surface and MAIA retrievals will then be used to relate retrieved fractional column aerosol optical depths to near-surface concentrations of major PM constituents, including sulfate, nitrate, organic carbon, black carbon, and dust. Epidemiological analyses of geocoded birth, death, and hospital records will be used to associate exposure to PM types with adverse health outcomes. MAIA launch is planned for early in the next decade. The MAIA instrument incorporates a pair of cameras on a two-axis gimbal to provide regional multiangle observations of selected, globally distributed target areas. Primary Target Areas (PTAs) on five continents are chosen to include major population centers covering a range of PM concentrations and particle types, surface-based aerosol sunphotometers

  8. Characterization of trace metals in airborne carbonaceous aerosols by single-particle EDX – Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrodangelo A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fine and ultrafine metal particles has been evidenced in size segregated airborne carbonaceous aerosols collected at one industrial and two background (urban and rural sites during an extended field campaign in Central Italy. Analysis of the backscattered electrons (BSE by SEM – EDX demonstrated an effective potential in evidencing main structural features of the metal content in identified carbon aerosols. Many observed ultrafine metal particles appear embedded in the skeleton of carbonaceous individual particles and aggregates in the coarse fraction, while the same is not evident in the case of mixed carbon-sulphates aerosol that has been detected in the submicron size. These carbon-sulphates formations include indeed nano-sized metal particles that appear physically combined but not embedded. Also, larger metal particles (ranging around 1 μm physical size were observed close to carbon materials, but not included in their structure. Main compositional differences of metal particles with size segregation could be evidenced by energy – dispersive X ray spectrometry (EDX. Larger particles are mainly rich in Fe, frequently in presence of Mn, Cu, Cr and Zn in variable proportions; either oxidized or elemental metals were detected. On the other hand, ultrafine particles associated with carbon–sulphates aerosol are enriched in Pb and Zn, although the presence of other trace elements not detectable by SEM – EDX technique cannot be excluded. Moreover, Ce-enriched ultrafine particles were clearly determined in cenospheres. Conversely, inclusion of fine and ultrafine metal particles was rarely or not observed in soot aggregates.

  9. Virus-Like Particle Vaccination Protects Nonhuman Primates from Lethal Aerosol Exposure with Marburgvirus (VLP Vaccination Protects Macaques against Aerosol Challenges)

    OpenAIRE

    John M. Dye; Warfield, Kelly L; Jay B. Wells; Unfer, Robert C.; Sergey Shulenin; Hong Vu; Donald K. Nichols; M Javad Aman; Sina Bavari

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) was the first filovirus to be identified following an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in Marburg, Germany in 1967. Due to several factors inherent to filoviruses, they are considered a potential bioweapon that could be disseminated via an aerosol route. Previous studies demonstrated that MARV virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP), matrix protein VP40 and nucleoprotein (NP) generated using a baculovirus/insect cell expression system could...

  10. Seasonal variations in aerosol particle composition at the puy-de-Dôme research station in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Freney

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Detailed investigations of the chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol particles were performed at the puy-de-Dôme (pdD research station (1465 m in autumn (September and October 2008, winter (February and March 2009, and summer (June 2010 using a compact Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (cToF-AMS. Over the three campaigns, the average mass concentrations of the non-refractory submicron particles ranged from 10 μg m−3 up to 27 μg m−3. Highest nitrate and ammonium mass concentrations were measured during the winter and during periods when marine modified airmasses were arriving at the site, whereas highest concentrations of organic particles were measured during the summer and during periods when continental airmasses arrived at the site. The measurements reported in this paper show that atmospheric particle composition is strongly influenced by both the season and the origin of the airmass. The total organic mass spectra were analysed using positive matrix factorisation to separate individual organic components contributing to the overall organic particle mass concentrations. These organic components include a low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol particle (LV-OOA and a semi-volatile organic aerosol particle (SV-OOA. Correlations of the LV-OOA components with fragments of m/z 60 and m/z 73 (mass spectral markers of wood burning during the winter campaign suggest that wintertime LV-OOA are related to aged biomass burning emissions, whereas organic aerosol particles measured during the summer are likely linked to biogenic sources. Equivalent potential temperature calculations, gas-phase, and LIDAR measurements define whether the research site is in the planetary boundary layer (PBL or in the free troposphere (FT/residual layer (RL. We observe that SV-OOA and nitrate particles are associated with air masses arriving from the PBL where as particle composition measured from RL

  11. Particle Morphology and Size Results from the Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Greenberg, Paul S.; Fischer, David; Meyer, Marit; Mulholland, George; Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Bryg, Victoria; Cleary, Thomas; Yang, Jiann

    2012-01-01

    Results are presented from the Reflight of the Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment (SAME-2) which was conducted during Expedition 24 (July-September 2010). The reflight experiment built upon the results of the original flight during Expedition 15 by adding diagnostic measurements and expanding the test matrix. Five different materials representative of those found in spacecraft (Teflon, Kapton, cotton, silicone rubber and Pyrell) were heated to temperatures below the ignition point with conditions controlled to provide repeatable sample surface temperatures and air flow. The air flow past the sample during the heating period ranged from quiescent to 8 cm/s. The smoke was initially collected in an aging chamber to simulate the transport time from the smoke source to the detector. This effective transport time was varied by holding the smoke in the aging chamber for times ranging from 11 to 1800 s. Smoke particle samples were collected on Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) grids for post-flight analysis. The TEM grids were analyzed to observe the particle morphology and size parameters. The diagnostics included a prototype two-moment smoke detector and three different measures of moments of the particle size distribution. These moment diagnostics were used to determine the particle number concentration (zeroth moment), the diameter concentration (first moment), and the mass concentration (third moment). These statistics were combined to determine the diameter of average mass and the count mean diameter and, by assuming a log-normal distribution, the geometric mean diameter and the geometric standard deviations can also be calculated. Overall the majority of the average smoke particle sizes were found to be in the 200 nm to 400 nm range with the quiescent cases producing some cases with substantially larger particles.

  12. Organic peroxides' gas-particle partitioning and rapid heterogeneous decomposition on secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Organic peroxides, important species in the atmosphere, promote secondary organic aerosol (SOA aging, affect HOx radicals cycling, and cause adverse health effects. However, the formation, gas-particle partitioning, and evolution of organic peroxides are complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigated in the laboratory the production and gas-particle partitioning of peroxides from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, which is one of the major biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere and an important precursor for SOA at a global scale. We have determined the molar yields of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, hydromethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP, peroxyformic acid (PFA, peroxyacetic acid (PAA, and total peroxides (TPOs, including unknown peroxides and the fraction of peroxides in α-pinene/O3 SOA. Comparing the gas-phase peroxides with the particle-phase peroxides, we find that gas-particle partitioning coefficients of PFA and PAA are 104 times higher than the values from the theoretical prediction, indicating that organic peroxides play a more important role in SOA formation than previously expected. Here, the partitioning coefficients of TPO were determined to be as high as (2–3  ×  10−4 m3 µg−1. Even so, more than 80 % of the peroxides formed in the reaction remain in the gas phase. Water changes the distribution of gaseous peroxides, while it does not affect the total amount of peroxides in either the gas or the particle phase. Approx. 18 % of gaseous peroxides undergo rapid heterogeneous decomposition on SOA particles in the presence of water vapor, resulting in the additional production of H2O2. This process can partially explain the unexpectedly high H2O2 yields under wet conditions. Transformation of organic peroxides to H2O2 also preserves OH in the atmosphere, helping to improve the understanding of OH cycling.

  13. Effects of flame made zinc oxide particles in human lung cells - a comparison of aerosol and suspension exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raemy David O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predominantly, studies of nanoparticle (NPs toxicology in vitro are based upon the exposure of submerged cell cultures to particle suspensions. Such an approach however, does not reflect particle inhalation. As a more realistic simulation of such a scenario, efforts were made towards direct delivery of aerosols to air-liquid-interface cultivated cell cultures by the use of aerosol exposure systems. This study aims to provide a direct comparison of the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO NPs when delivered as either an aerosol, or in suspension to a triple cell co-culture model of the epithelial airway barrier. To ensure dose–equivalence, ZnO-deposition was determined in each exposure scenario by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Biological endpoints being investigated after 4 or 24h incubation include cytotoxicity, total reduced glutathione, induction of antioxidative genes such as heme-oxygenase 1 (HO–1 as well as the release of the (pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Results Off-gases released as by-product of flame ZnO synthesis caused a significant decrease of total reduced GSH and induced further the release of the cytokine TNFα, demonstrating the influence of the gas phase on aerosol toxicology. No direct effects could be attributed to ZnO particles. By performing suspension exposure to avoid the factor “flame-gases”, particle specific effects become apparent. Other parameters such as LDH and HO–1 were not influenced by gaseous compounds: Following aerosol exposure, LDH levels appeared elevated at both timepoints and the HO–1 transcript correlated positively with deposited ZnO-dose. Under submerged conditions, the HO–1 induction scheme deviated for 4 and 24h and increased extracellular LDH was found following 24h exposure. Conclusion In the current study, aerosol and suspension-exposure has been compared by exposing cell cultures to equivalent amounts of ZnO. Both exposure strategies differ fundamentally in their

  14. Combined use of optical and electron microscopic techniques for the measurement of hygroscopic property, chemical composition, and morphology of individual aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kang-Ho; Kim, Sun-Man; Jung, Hae-Jin; Lee, Mi-Jung; Eom, Hyo-Jin; Maskey, Shila; Ro, Chul-Un

    2010-10-01

    In this work, an analytical method for the characterization of the hygroscopic property, chemical composition, and morphology of individual aerosol particles is introduced. The method, which is based on the combined use of optical and electron microscopic techniques, is simple and easy to apply. An optical microscopic technique was used to perform the visual observation of the phase transformation and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles on a single particle level. A quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis, named low-Z particle EPMA, was used to perform a quantitative chemical speciation of the same individual particles after the measurement of the hygroscopic property. To validate the analytical methodology, the hygroscopic properties of artificially generated NaCl, KCl, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and Na(2)SO(4) aerosol particles of micrometer size were investigated. The practical applicability of the analytical method for studying the hygroscopic property, chemical composition, and morphology of ambient aerosol particles is demonstrated.

  15. Primary and secondary organic aerosol origin by combined gas-particle phase source apportionment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Crippa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA, a prominent fraction of particulate organic mass (OA, remains poorly constrained. Its formation involves several unknown precursors, formation and evolution pathways and multiple natural and anthropogenic sources. Here a combined gas-particle phase source apportionment is applied to wintertime and summertime data collected in the megacity of Paris in order to investigate SOA origin during both seasons. This was possible by combining the information provided by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS. A better constrained apportionment of primary OA (POA sources is also achieved using this methodology, making use of gas-phase tracers. These tracers made possible the discrimination between biogenic and continental/anthropogenic sources of SOA. We found that continental SOA was dominant during both seasons (24–50% of total OA, while contributions from photochemistry-driven SOA (9% of total OA and marine emissions (13% of total OA were also observed during summertime. A semi-volatile nighttime component was also identified (up to 18% of total OA during wintertime. This approach was successfully applied here and implemented in a new source apportionment toolkit.

  16. Hygroscopic growth of sub-micrometer and one-micrometer aerosol particles measured during ACE-Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Massling

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles in the sub-micrometer and one-micrometer size ranges were measured during the ACE-Asia study (Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia in spring 2001. The measurements took place off the coasts of Japan, Korea, and China. All instruments contributing to this study were deployed in a container on the forward deck of the NOAA Research Vessel Ronald H. Brown. Air masses with primarily marine influence and air masses from the Asian continent affected by both anthropogenic sources and by the transport of desert dust aerosol were encountered during the cruise.

    Results showed very different hygroscopic behavior in the sub-micrometer size range compared to the one-micrometer size range. In general, for all continentally influenced air masses, the one-micrometer particle population was characterized by two different particle groups – a nearly hydrophobic fraction with growth factors around 1.0 representative of dust particles and a sea salt fraction with hygroscopic growth factors around 2.0. The number fraction of dust particles was generally about 60% independent of long-range air mass origin.

    For sub-micrometer particles, a dominant, more hygroscopic particle fraction with growth factors between 1.5 and 1.9 (depending on dry particle size consistent with ammonium sulfate or non-neutralized sulfates as major component was always found. In marine air masses and for larger sizes within the sub-micrometer range (Dp=250 and 350 nm, a sea salt fraction with growth factors between 2.0 and 2.1 was also observed. For all other air masses, the more hygroscopic particle fraction in the sub-micrometer size range was mostly accompanied by a less hygroscopic particle fraction with growth factors between 1.20 and 1.55 depending on both the continental sources and the dry particle size. Number fractions of this particle group varied between 4 and 39% depending on dry particle size and air mass

  17. Reconciliation of coarse mode sea-salt aerosol particle size measurements and parameterizations at a subtropical ocean receptor site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reid, J.S.; Brooks, B.; Crahan, K.K.; Leeuw, G. de; Reid, E.A.; Anderson, F.D.; Hegg, D.A.; Eck, T.F.; O'Neill, N.

    2006-01-01

    In August/September of 2001, the R/P FLIP and CIRPAS Twin Otter research aircraft were deployed to the eastern coast of Oahu, Hawaii, as part of the Rough Evaporation Duct (RED) experiment. Goals included the study of the air/sea exchange, turbulence, and sea-salt aerosol particle characteristics at

  18. Numerical simulation of aerosol particle transport by oscillating flow in respiratory airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, J K; Frank, D D; James, A C; Eyler, L L

    1992-01-01

    Particle transport by oscillating flow in a tapered channel or in a tapered tube was computed from the complete equations of motion. These geometries represent a simplified model of the divergent flow field of the mammalian bronchial tree. The computed deformation profile of a line of particles, transported by the oscillatory motion, was compared with prior experimental results and analytical calculations. All three methods agree that there is transport in the divergent direction of the tube by an axial stream of steady drift in the core for moderately high frequency of oscillation (Womersley parameter in the range of 1 to 10). Bidirectional flow is established by an annular stream in the convergent direction, with no net flow on integral cycles of the oscillating fluid. At higher frequency, however, the steady stream transforms to a different shape in the tapered tube, with transport in the divergent direction nearer the walls of the tube, rather than in the core. Transport by the continuing streams with oscillatory ventilation of the respiratory tract should deliver medicinal aerosols of low intrinsic particle mobility to the peripheral regions of the lungs.

  19. Photodegradation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles as a Source of Small, Oxygenated Volatile Organic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecha, Kurtis T; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2016-09-20

    We investigated the photodegradation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles by near-UV radiation and photoproduction of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) from various types of SOA. We used a smog chamber to generate SOA from α-pinene, guaiacol, isoprene, tetradecane, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene under high-NOx, low-NOx, or ozone oxidation conditions. The SOA particles were collected on a substrate, and the resulting material was exposed to several mW of near-UV radiation (λ ∼ 300 nm) from a light-emitting diode. Various OVOCs, including acetic acid, formic acid, acetaldehyde, and acetone were observed during photodegradation, and their SOA-mass-normalized fluxes were estimated with a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). All the SOA, with the exception of guaiacol SOA, emitted OVOCs upon irradiation. Based on the measured OVOC emission rates, we estimate that SOA particles would lose at least ∼1% of their mass over a 24 h period during summertime conditions in Los Angeles, California. This condensed-phase photochemical process may produce a few Tg/year of gaseous formic acid, the amount comparable to its primary sources. The condensed-phase SOA photodegradation processes could therefore measurably affect the budgets of both particulate and gaseous atmospheric organic compounds on a global scale.

  20. Pilot Study of Inhaled Aerosols Targeted via Magnetic Alignment of High Aspect Ratio Particles in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian E. S. Redman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, inhaled pharmaceutical aerosols have seen increased investigation in the treatment of lung cancer, where the inability to deliver adequate therapeutic drug concentrations to tumour sites may be overcome with improved targeted delivery to the site of the tumour. In this study, the feasibility of magnetically targeted delivery of high aspect ratio particles loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles was studied in 19 New Zealand White rabbits. Half of the exposed rabbits had a magnetic field placed externally over their right lung. Iron sensitive magnetic resonance images of the lungs were acquired to determine the iron concentrations in the right and left lung of each animal. The right/left ratio increased in the middle and basal regions of the lung where, due to the morphology of the rabbit lung, this method of targeting is most effective. With further optimization, this technique could be an effective method for increasing the dose of drug delivered to a specific site within the lung.

  1. Light scattering properties of sea-salt aerosol particles inferred from modeling studies and ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamaillard, K.; Kleefeld, C.; Jennings, S. G.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2006-10-01

    Direct climate radiative forcing depends on the aerosol optical depth τ, the single scattering albedo ϖ, and the up-scatter fraction β; these quantities are functions of the refractive index of the particles, their size relative to the incident wavelength, and their shape. Sea-salt aerosols crystallize into cubic shapes or in agglomerates of cubic particles under low relative humidity conditions. The present study investigates the effects of the shape of dried sea-salt particles on the detection of light scattering from the particles. Ground-based measurements of scattering and backscattering coefficients have been performed with an integrating nephelometer instrument for a wavelength λ=0.55μm. The measurements are compared to two models: the Mie theory assuming a spherical shape for the particles and the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) model for the hypothesis of cubic shape of the sea-salt aerosols. The comparison is made accurately by taking into account the actual range of the scattering angles measured by the nephelometer in both models that is from 7° to 170° for the scattering coefficient and from 90° to 170° for the backscattering coefficient. Modeled scattering and backscattering coefficients increase for nonspherical particles compared to spherical shape of particles with diameter larger than about 1 μm. However, the comparison of the modeling results with the measurements gives best agreement for particles diameter less than about 1 μm. The size distribution of the particles is measured with two instruments with different size bins: an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). It is found that the size of the bins of the instruments to determine the number concentration of the particles in accordance with their diameter is critical in the comparison of measurements with modeling.

  2. Light scattering properties of sea-salt aerosol particles inferred from modeling studies and ground-based measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamaillard, K. [Atmospheric Research Group, Department of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)]. E-mail: karine.chamaillard@nuigalway.ie; Kleefeld, C. [Atmospheric Research Group, Department of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Jennings, S.G. [Atmospheric Research Group, Department of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Ceburnis, D. [Atmospheric Research Group, Department of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); O' Dowd, C.D. [Atmospheric Research Group, Department of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2006-10-15

    Direct climate radiative forcing depends on the aerosol optical depth {tau}, the single scattering albedo {pi}, and the up-scatter fraction {beta}; these quantities are functions of the refractive index of the particles, their size relative to the incident wavelength, and their shape. Sea-salt aerosols crystallize into cubic shapes or in agglomerates of cubic particles under low relative humidity conditions. The present study investigates the effects of the shape of dried sea-salt particles on the detection of light scattering from the particles. Ground-based measurements of scattering and backscattering coefficients have been performed with an integrating nephelometer instrument for a wavelength {lambda}=0.55{mu}m. The measurements are compared to two models: the Mie theory assuming a spherical shape for the particles and the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) model for the hypothesis of cubic shape of the sea-salt aerosols. The comparison is made accurately by taking into account the actual range of the scattering angles measured by the nephelometer in both models that is from 7{sup o} to 170{sup o} for the scattering coefficient and from 90{sup o} to 170{sup o} for the backscattering coefficient. Modeled scattering and backscattering coefficients increase for nonspherical particles compared to spherical shape of particles with diameter larger than about 1{mu}m. However, the comparison of the modeling results with the measurements gives best agreement for particles diameter less than about 1{mu}m. The size distribution of the particles is measured with two instruments with different size bins: an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). It is found that the size of the bins of the instruments to determine the number concentration of the particles in accordance with their diameter is critical in the comparison of measurements with modeling.

  3. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Cross

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the first single particle results obtained with an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer coupled with a light scattering module (LS-ToF-AMS. The instrument was deployed at the T1 ground site approximately 40 km northeast of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area as part of the MILAGRO field study in March of 2006. The LS-ToF-AMS acquires both ensemble average and single particle data. Over a 75-h sampling period from 27–30 March 2006, 12 853 single particle mass spectra were optically-triggered and saved. The single particles were classified based on observed vaporization histories and measured chemical compositions. The single particle data is shown to provide insights on internal AMS collection efficiencies and ambient mixing state information that augments the ensemble data.

    Detection of correlated light scattering and chemical ion signals allowed for a detailed examination of the vaporization/ionization process for single particles measured with the AMS instrument. Three particle vaporization event types were identified as a fraction of the total number of particles detected: (1 23% with prompt vaporization, (2 26% with delayed vaporization, and (3 51% characterized as null. Internal consistency checks show that average single particle nonrefractory mass and chemical composition measurements were in reasonable agreement with ensemble measurements and suggest that delayed and null vaporization events are the dominant source of the nonunit collection efficiency of the AMS. Taken together, the simultaneous prompt single particle and aerosol ensemble measurements offer insight into the mixing state and atmospheric transformations of ambient aerosol particles.

  4. Pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles induces airway inflammation and cytokine expression in NC/Nga mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Yanagisawa, Rie [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Inhalation Toxicology and Pathophysiology Research Team, Tsukuba (Japan); Takano, Hirohisa [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Inhalation Toxicology and Pathophysiology Research Team, Tsukuba (Japan); Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Inflammation and Immunology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan); Ichinose, Takamichi [Oita University of Nursing and Health Science, Department of Health Science, Oita (Japan); Shimada, Akinori [Tottori University, Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori (Japan); Yoshikawa, Toshikazu [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Inflammation and Immunology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    Although several studies have reported that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) affect cardiorespiratory health in animals and humans, the effect of DEP on animal models with spontaneous allergic disorders has been far less intensively studied. The Nc/Nga mouse is known to be a typical animal model for human atopic dermatitis (AD). In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated pulmonary exposure to DEP on airway inflammation and cytokine expression in NC/Nga mice. The animals were randomized into two experimental groups that received vehicle or DEP by intratracheal instillation weekly for six weeks. Cellular profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and expressions of cytokines and chemokines in both the BAL fluid and lung tissues were evaluated 24 h after the last instillation. The DEP challenge produced an increase in the numbers of total cells, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in BAL fluid as compared to the vehicle challenge (P<0.01). DEP exposure significantly induced the lung expressions of interleukin (IL)-4, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1{alpha} when compared to the vehicle challenge. These results indicate that intratracheal exposure to DEP induces the recruitment of inflammatory cells, at least partially, through the local expression of IL-4 and chemokines in NC/Nga mice. (orig.)

  5. The role of jet and film drops in controlling the mixing state of submicron sea spray aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deane, Grant B; Moore, Kathryn A; Ryder, Olivia S; Stokes, M Dale; Beall, Charlotte M; Collins, Douglas B; Santander, Mitchell V; Burrows, Susannah M; Sultana, Camille M; Prather, Kimberly A

    2017-07-03

    The oceans represent a significant global source of atmospheric aerosols. Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles comprise sea salts and organic species in varying proportions. In addition to size, the overall composition of SSA particles determines how effectively they can form cloud droplets and ice crystals. Thus, understanding the factors controlling SSA composition is critical to predicting aerosol impacts on clouds and climate. It is often assumed that submicrometer SSAs are mainly formed by film drops produced from bursting bubble-cap films, which become enriched with hydrophobic organic species contained within the sea surface microlayer. In contrast, jet drops formed from the base of bursting bubbles are postulated to mainly produce larger supermicrometer particles from bulk seawater, which comprises largely salts and water-soluble organic species. However, here we demonstrate that jet drops produce up to 43% of total submicrometer SSA number concentrations, and that the fraction of SSA produced by jet drops can be modulated by marine biological activity. We show that the chemical composition, organic volume fraction, and ice nucleating ability of submicrometer particles from jet drops differ from those formed from film drops. Thus, the chemical composition of a substantial fraction of submicrometer particles will not be controlled by the composition of the sea surface microlayer, a major assumption in previous studies. This finding has significant ramifications for understanding the factors controlling the mixing state of submicrometer SSA particles and must be taken into consideration when predicting SSA impacts on clouds and climate.

  6. The role of jet and film drops in controlling the mixing state of submicron sea spray aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deane, Grant B.; Moore, Kathryn A.; Ryder, Olivia S.; Stokes, M. Dale; Beall, Charlotte M.; Collins, Douglas B.; Santander, Mitchell V.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Sultana, Camille M.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2017-07-01

    The oceans represent a significant global source of atmospheric aerosols. Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles comprise sea salts and organic species in varying proportions. In addition to size, the overall composition of SSA particles determines how effectively they can form cloud droplets and ice crystals. Thus, understanding the factors controlling SSA composition is critical to predicting aerosol impacts on clouds and climate. It is often assumed that submicrometer SSAs are mainly formed by film drops produced from bursting bubble-cap films, which become enriched with hydrophobic organic species contained within the sea surface microlayer. In contrast, jet drops formed from the base of bursting bubbles are postulated to mainly produce larger supermicrometer particles from bulk seawater, which comprises largely salts and water-soluble organic species. However, here we demonstrate that jet drops produce up to 43% of total submicrometer SSA number concentrations, and that the fraction of SSA produced by jet drops can be modulated by marine biological activity. We show that the chemical composition, organic volume fraction, and ice nucleating ability of submicrometer particles from jet drops differ from those formed from film drops. Thus, the chemical composition of a substantial fraction of submicrometer particles will not be controlled by the composition of the sea surface microlayer, a major assumption in previous studies. This finding has significant ramifications for understanding the factors controlling the mixing state of submicrometer SSA particles and must be taken into consideration when predicting SSA impacts on clouds and climate.

  7. Complementary online aerosol mass spectrometry and offline FT-IR spectroscopy measurements: Prospects and challenges for the analysis of anthropogenic aerosol particle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Peter; Drewnick, Frank; Bierl, Reinhard; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-10-01

    The aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) is well established in investigating highly time-resolved dynamics of submicron aerosol chemical composition including organic aerosol (OA). However, interpretation of mass spectra on molecular level is limited due to strong fragmentation of organic substances and potential reactions inside the AMS ion chamber. Results from complementary filter-based FT-IR absorption measurements were used to explain features in high-resolution AMS mass spectra of different types of OA (e.g. cooking OA, cigarette smoking OA, wood burning OA). Using this approach some AMS fragment ions were validated in this study as appropriate and rather specific markers for a certain class of organic compounds for all particle types under investigation. These markers can therefore be used to get deeper insights in the chemical composition of OA based on AMS mass spectra in upcoming studies. However, the specificity of other fragment ions such as C2H4O2+ (m/z 60.02114) remains ambiguous. In such cases, complementary FT-IR measurements allow the interpretation of highly time-resolved AMS mass spectra at the level of molecular functional groups. Furthermore, this study discusses the challenges in reducing inorganic interferences (e.g. from water and ammonium salts) in FT-IR spectra of atmospheric aerosols to decrease spectral uncertainties for better comparisons and, thus, to get more robust results.

  8. Aerosol surface area concentration: a governing factor in new particle formation in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The predominating role of aerosol Fuchs surface area, AFuchs, in determining the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF events in Beijing was elucidated in this study. The analysis was based on a field campaign from 12 March to 6 April 2016 in Beijing, during which aerosol size distributions down to  ∼  1 nm and sulfuric acid concentrations were simultaneously monitored. The 26 days were classified into 11 typical NPF days, 2 undefined days, and 13 non-event days. A dimensionless factor, LΓ, characterized by the relative ratio of the coagulation scavenging rate over the condensational growth rate (Kuang et al., 2010, was applied in this work to reveal the governing factors for NPF events in Beijing. The three parameters determining LΓ are sulfuric acid concentration, the growth enhancement factor characterized by contribution of other gaseous precursors to particle growth, Γ, and AFuchs. Different from other atmospheric environments, such as in Boulder and Hyytiälä, the daily-maximum sulfuric acid concentration and Γ in Beijing varied in a narrow range with geometric standard deviations of 1.40 and 1.31, respectively. A positive correlation between the estimated new particle formation rate, J1.5, and sulfuric acid concentration was found with a mean fitted exponent of 2.4. However, the maximum sulfuric acid concentrations on NPF days were not significantly higher (even lower, sometimes than those on non-event days, indicating that the abundance of sulfuric acid in Beijing was high enough to initiate nucleation, but may not necessarily lead to NPF events. Instead, AFuchs in Beijing varied greatly among days with a geometric standard deviation of 2.56, whereas the variabilities of AFuchs in Tecamac, Atlanta, and Boulder were reported to be much smaller. In addition, there was a good correlation between AFuchs and LΓ in Beijing (R2 = 0.88. Therefore, it was AFuchs that fundamentally determined the occurrence of NPF events

  9. Aerosol surface area concentration: a governing factor in new particle formation in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Runlong; Yang, Dongsen; Fu, Yueyun; Wang, Xing; Li, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Yan; Hao, Jiming; Zheng, Jun; Jiang, Jingkun

    2017-10-01

    The predominating role of aerosol Fuchs surface area, AFuchs, in determining the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF) events in Beijing was elucidated in this study. The analysis was based on a field campaign from 12 March to 6 April 2016 in Beijing, during which aerosol size distributions down to ˜ 1 nm and sulfuric acid concentrations were simultaneously monitored. The 26 days were classified into 11 typical NPF days, 2 undefined days, and 13 non-event days. A dimensionless factor, LΓ, characterized by the relative ratio of the coagulation scavenging rate over the condensational growth rate (Kuang et al., 2010), was applied in this work to reveal the governing factors for NPF events in Beijing. The three parameters determining LΓ are sulfuric acid concentration, the growth enhancement factor characterized by contribution of other gaseous precursors to particle growth, Γ, and AFuchs. Different from other atmospheric environments, such as in Boulder and Hyytiälä, the daily-maximum sulfuric acid concentration and Γ in Beijing varied in a narrow range with geometric standard deviations of 1.40 and 1.31, respectively. A positive correlation between the estimated new particle formation rate, J1.5, and sulfuric acid concentration was found with a mean fitted exponent of 2.4. However, the maximum sulfuric acid concentrations on NPF days were not significantly higher (even lower, sometimes) than those on non-event days, indicating that the abundance of sulfuric acid in Beijing was high enough to initiate nucleation, but may not necessarily lead to NPF events. Instead, AFuchs in Beijing varied greatly among days with a geometric standard deviation of 2.56, whereas the variabilities of AFuchs in Tecamac, Atlanta, and Boulder were reported to be much smaller. In addition, there was a good correlation between AFuchs and LΓ in Beijing (R2 = 0.88). Therefore, it was AFuchs that fundamentally determined the occurrence of NPF events. Among 11 observed NPF events, 10

  10. CFD-aerosol modeling of the effects of wall composition and inlet conditions on carbon nanotube catalyst particle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David P; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2008-08-01

    The evolution of iron catalyst particles during aerosol (floating catalyst) Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) from CO is computed using a multi species Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model incorporating a lognormal aerosol method of moments (MOM) to describe their dynamics and a combined chemical kinetics and equilibrium model for catalytic production of CO2. The influence of the presence of iron at the reactor walls, the fed particle size, number concentration and polydispersity and the effect of the catalytic production of CO2 at the reactor wall are studied in terms of particle size, concentration and polydispersity and reagent concentration during CNT synthesis. It is found that iron catalyst particle dynamics are essentially insensitive to wall iron concentrations and, for a wide range of particle sizes and concentrations, it is found that the catalyst particles are stable up to a critical CNT window in which CNT nucleation and growth occurs. Concentrations of catalyst particles significantly above 1 x 10(14) #/m3, however, lead to poor control over catalyst particle size and polydispersity at the CNT nucleation front which, in turn, leads to poor control over CNT diameter. The location of the growth window is shown to be directly associated with the availability of catalytically produced CO2 diffusing from the reactor walls to the reactor core. These results help to explain the large variations in CNT diameter and chirality and the inefficient use of catalyst material in other floating catalyst CNT processes based on in-situ catalyst particle synthesis.

  11. Particle size distribution of the radon progeny and ambient aerosols in the Underground Tourist Route "Liczyrzepa" Mine in Kowary Adit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wołoszczuk, Katarzyna; Skubacz, Krystian

    2018-01-01

    Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection, in cooperation with Central Mining Institute performed measurements of radon concentration in air, potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC), particle size distribution of the radon progeny and ambient aerosols in the Underground Tourist-Educational Route "Liczyrzepa" Mine in Kowary Adit. A research study was developed to investigate the appropriate dose conversion factors for short-lived radon progeny. The particle size distribution of radon progeny was determined using Radon Progeny Particle Size Spectrometer (RPPSS). The device allows to receive the distribution of PAEC in the particle size range from 0.6 nm to 2494 nm, based on their activity measured on 8 stages composed of impaction plates or diffusion screens. The measurements of the ambient airborne particle size distribution were performed in the range from a few nanometres to about 20 micrometres using Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) spectrometer and the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer Spectrometer (SMPS).

  12. The Role of HO(x) in Super- and Subsonic Aircraft Exhaust Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Keim, E. R.; Gao, R. S.; Wamsley, R. C.; Donnelly, S. G.; DelNegro, L. A.; hide

    1997-01-01

    The generation of sulfuric acid aerosols in aircraft exhaust has emerged as a critical issue in determining the impact of supersonic aircraft on stratospheric ozone. It has long been held that the first step in the mechanism of aerosol formation is the oxidation of SO2 emitted from the engine by OH in the exhaust plume. We report in situ measurements of OH and HO2 in the exhaust plumes of a supersonic (Air France Concorde) and a subsonic (NASA ER-2) aircraft in the lower stratosphere. These measurements imply that reactions with OH are responsible for oxidizing only a small fraction of SO2 (2%), and thus cannot explain the large number of particles observed in the exhaust wake of the Concorde.

  13. The role of HOx in super- and subsonic aircraft exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Keim, E. R.; Gao, R. S.; Wamsley, R. C.; Donnelly, S. G.; Del Negro, L. A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Kelly, K. K.; Proffitt, M. H.

    The generation of sulfuric acid aerosols in aircraft exhaust has emerged as a critical issue in determining the impact of supersonic aircraft on stratospheric ozone. It has long been held that the first step in the mechanism of aerosol formation is the oxidation of SO2 emitted from the engine by OH in the exhaust plume. We report in situ measurements of OH and HO2 in the exhaust plumes of a supersonic (Air France Concorde) and a subsonic (NASA ER-2) aircraft in the lower stratosphere. These measurements imply that reactions with OH are responsible for oxidizing only a small fraction of SO2 (2%), and thus cannot explain the large number of particles observed in the exhaust wake of the Concorde.

  14. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate particles by OH: implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    Multiphase OH and O3 oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low-soluble single-component OA by OH and O3 can increase their water solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate particles exposed to OH and O3 is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH and O3 exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc) coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O3 exposure. Following exposure to OH, κ of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~ 0.1, indicating that chemically aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in κ was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. κ of the internally mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH-exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1 : 1 by mass MNC : KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or inorganic ions, chemical

  15. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate-particles by OH: implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Multiphase OH and O3 oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low soluble single-component OA by OH and O3 can increase their water-solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water-solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate-particles exposed to OH and O3 is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH/O3 exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc) coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O3 exposure. Following exposure to OH, κ of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~0.1, indicating that chemically-aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in κ was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. κ of the internally-mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1 : 1 by mass MNC : KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or inorganic ions, chemical aging

  16. Nicotine, aerosol particles, carbonyls and volatile organic compounds in tobacco- and menthol-flavored e-cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Sun; LeBouf, Ryan F; Son, Youn-Suk; Koutrakis, Petros; Christiani, David C

    2017-04-27

    We aimed to assess the content of electronic cigarette (EC) emissions for five groups of potentially toxic compounds that are known to be present in tobacco smoke: nicotine, particles, carbonyls, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and trace elements by flavor and puffing time. We used ECs containing a common nicotine strength (1.8%) and the most popular flavors, tobacco and menthol. An automatic multiple smoking machine was used to generate EC aerosols under controlled conditions. Using a dilution chamber, we targeted nicotine concentrations similar to that of exposure in a general indoor environment. The selected toxic compounds were extracted from EC aerosols into a solid or liquid phase and analyzed with chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. We found that EC aerosols contained toxic compounds including nicotine, fine and nanoparticles, carbonyls, and some toxic VOCs such as benzene and toluene. Higher mass and number concentrations of aerosol particles were generated from tobacco-flavored ECs than from menthol-flavored ECs. We found that diluted machine-generated EC aerosols contain some pollutants. These findings are limited by the small number of ECs tested and the conditions of testing. More comprehensive research on EC exposure extending to more brands and flavor compounds is warranted.

  17. Designing, construction, assessment, and efficiency of local exhaust ventilation in controlling crystalline silica dust and particles, and formaldehyde in a foundry industry plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morteza, Mortezavi Mehrizi; Hossein, Kakooi; Amirhossein, Matin; Naser, Hasheminegad; Gholamhossein, Halvani; Hossein, Fallah

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design and assess the efficiency of a local exhaust ventilation system used in a foundry operation to control inhalable dust and particles, microcrystal particles, and noxious gases and vapours affecting workers during the foundry process. It was designed based on recommendations from the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygiene. After designing a local exhaust ventilation system (LEV), we prepared and submitted the implementation plan to the manufacturer. High concentrations of crystalline silica dust and formaldehyde, which are common toxic air pollutants in foundries, were ultimately measured as an indicator for studying the efficiency of this system in controlling inhalable dust and particles as well as other air pollutants. The level of occupational exposure to silica and formaldehyde as major air pollutants was assessed in two modes: first, when the LEV was on, and second, when it was off. Air samples from the exposure area were obtained using a personal sampling pump and analysed using the No. 7601 method for crystal silica and the No. 2541 method for formaldehyde of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Silica and formaldehyde concentrations were determined by visible absorption spectrophotometry and gas chromatography. The results showed that local exhaust ventilation was successful in preserving the crystal silica particles in the work environment at a level below the NIOSH maximum allowed concentration (0.05 mg m-3). In contrast, formaldehyde exceeded the NIOSH limit (1 ppm or 1.228 mg m-3).

  18. Precipitation scavenging of aerosol particles at a rural site in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikova, Nadezda; Zdimal, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    Wet deposition is an important removal mechanism of atmospheric aerosol (AA) in the troposphere, transferring AA to the Earth surface in an aqueous form (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998). Deposition consists of in-cloud (ICS) and below-cloud (BCS) scavenging, both processes depending on the size, chemical composition and concentration of the AA particles (e.g. Laakso et al., 2003; Ladino et al., 2011). Due to the complexity of the processes and high instrumentation and time demands, a complete understanding is still a challenge, although both phenomena have been extensively studied recently (e.g. Andronache et al. 2006; Chate et al. 2011; Collett et al. 2008). In this work, the influence of ICS and BCS, described by the obscurities (mist, fog and shallow fog) and precipitation (drizzle, rain, snow, rain with snow), on submicron atmospheric aerosol particle number size distributions (PNSD) was studied using 5 years of measurements at the rural background station Košetice. The typical PNSD during individual meteorological phenomena were compared, and the change in the concentrations before and after the beginning of the phenomenon, the scavenging coefficient lambda_s, and the rate of change of the AA concentrations with time were computed. It was found that both obscurities and precipitation have a strong influence on the AA concentrations, both on the total number concentrations and on the particle number size distributions. The scavenging not only lowers the total AA concentrations, it even changes the number of modes on the PNSDs. The PNSD main mode is shifted to the larger particles, and the concentrations of particles smaller than 50 nm in diameter are considerably lower. In nucleation mode, however, wet scavenging does not seem to be the main process influencing the AA concentrations, although its considerable effect on the concentration was proved. During obscurities, there is a typical PNSD to which the PNSD converge at any mist/fog/shallow fog event. The

  19. Interaction of aerosol particles composed of protein and saltswith water vapor: hygroscopic growth and microstructural rearrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mikhailov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of aerosol particles composed of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA and the inorganic salts sodium chloride and ammonium nitrate with water vapor has been investigated by hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA experiments complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and Köhler theory calculations (100-300nm particle size range, 298K, 960hPa. BSA was chosen as a well-defined model substance for proteins and other macromolecular compounds, which constitute a large fraction of the water-soluble organic component of air particulate matter. Pure BSA particles exhibited deliquescence and efflorescence transitions at 35% relative humidity ( and a hygroscopic diameter increase by up to 10% at 95% in good agreement with model calculations based on a simple parameterisation of the osmotic coefficient. Pure NaCl particles were converted from near-cubic to near-spherical shape upon interaction with water vapor at relative humidities below the deliquescence threshold (partial surface dissolution and recrystallisation, and the diameters of pure NH4NO3 particles decreased by up to 10% due to chemical decomposition and evaporation. Mixed NaCl-BSA and NH4NO3-BSA particles interacting with water vapor exhibited mobility equivalent diameter reductions of up to 20%, depending on particle generation, conditioning, size, and chemical composition (BSA dry mass fraction 10-90%. These observations can be explained by formation of porous agglomerates (envelope void fractions up to 50% due to ion-protein interactions and electric charge effects on the one hand, and by compaction of the agglomerate structure due to capillary condensation effects on the other. The size of NH4NO3-BSA particles was apparently also influenced by volatilisation of NH4NO3, but not as much as for pure salt particles, i.e. the protein inhibited the decomposition of NH4NO3 or the evaporation of the decomposition products NH3 and HNO3. The

  20. Solid-phase extraction of organic compounds in atmospheric aerosol particles collected with the particle-into-liquid sampler and analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Hartonen, Kari; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2010-01-15

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, collected with the particle-into-liquid sampler at SMEARII station in Finland in mid-August 2007, were analysed for biogenic acids. The sample pretreatment method, comprising solid-phase extraction with anion exchange and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance materials, was optimized. Extraction efficiencies of solid-phase extraction from 10 and 20ml samples were about 100%, with average relative standard deviation of 8.9%, in concentration range from 12.5 to 50ng/ml of the acid. Extraction of aldehydes was less successful, with efficiencies from 69 to 163% and average 10% deviation. Pretreated samples were analysed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography with ion trap mass spectrometric detection. Limits of detection achieved for organic acids with the analytical procedure developed ranged from 9 to 27microg/l of extracted sample, while limits of quantitation were from 31 to 90microg/l. Oxidation with ozone was used for the preparation of the acid of beta-caryophyllene (beta-caryophyllinic acid), which was also studied in aerosol samples. MS(2) experiments were used to confirm the identification of trans-pinic, trans-pinonic and beta-caryophyllinic acids. Azelaic, hexadecanoic, cis-pinonic, and cis- and trans-pinic acids were quantitated in the samples with use of authentic standards, while the concentrations of trans-pinonic and beta-caryophyllinic acids were determined with cis-pinonic acid as surrogate. Also, the contribution of beta-caryophyllene oxidation products to aerosol organic carbon was evaluated. Aldehydes could not be analysed in real samples due to the insufficient extraction. The particle-into-liquid sampler proved to be suitable for the collection of aerosol particles for the elucidation of daily and diurnal variation of selected species. The optimized sample pretreatment, together with the analysis method, offer a promising approach for the study of aerosol chemical composition, where artifact formation is

  1. Aerosol particle measurements at three stationary sites in the megacity of Paris during summer 2009: meteorology and air mass origin dominate aerosol particle composition and size distribution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freutel, F; Schneider, J; Drewnick, F; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L; Crippa, M; Prévôt, A. S. H; Baltensperger, U; Poulain, L; Wiedensohler, A; Sciare, J; Sarda-Estève, R; Burkhart, J. F; Eckhardt, S; Stohl, A; Gros, V; Colomb, A; Michoud, V; Doussin, J. F; Borbon, A; Haeffelin, M; Morille, Y; Beekmann, M; Borrmann, S

    2013-01-01

    .... It was found that the origin of air masses had a large influence on measured mass concentrations of the secondary species particulate sulphate, nitrate, ammonium, and oxygenated organic aerosol...

  2. Synergetic formation of secondary inorganic and organic aerosol: effect of SO2 and NH3 on particle formation and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Biwu; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Sun, Yele; Jiang, Jingkun; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming

    2016-11-01

    The effects of SO2 and NH3 on secondary organic aerosol formation have rarely been investigated together, while the interactive effects between inorganic and organic species under highly complex pollution conditions remain uncertain. Here we studied the effects of SO2 and NH3 on secondary aerosol formation in the photooxidation system of toluene/NOx in the presence or absence of Al2O3 seed aerosols in a 2 m3 smog chamber. The presence of SO2 increased new particle formation and particle growth significantly, regardless of whether NH3 was present. Sulfate, organic aerosol, nitrate, and ammonium were all found to increase linearly with increasing SO2 concentrations. The increases in these four species were more obvious under NH3-rich conditions, and the generation of nitrate, ammonium, and organic aerosol increased more significantly than sulfate with respect to SO2 concentration, while sulfate was the most sensitive species under NH3-poor conditions. The synergistic effects between SO2 and NH3 in the heterogeneous process contributed greatly to secondary aerosol formation. Specifically, the generation of NH4NO3 was found to be highly dependent on the surface area concentration of suspended particles, and increased most significantly with SO2 concentration among the four species under NH3-rich conditions. Meanwhile, the absorbed NH3 might provide a liquid surface layer for the absorption and subsequent reaction of SO2 and organic products and, therefore, enhance sulfate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. This effect mainly occurred in the heterogeneous process and resulted in a significantly higher growth rate of seed aerosols compared to without NH3. By applying positive matrix factorisation (PMF) analysis to the AMS data, two factors were identified for the generated SOA. One factor, assigned to less-oxidised organic aerosol and some oligomers, increased with increasing SO2 under NH3-poor conditions, mainly due to the well-known acid catalytic effect of

  3. Explaining global surface aerosol number concentrations in terms of primary emissions and particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We synthesised observations of total particle number (CN concentration from 36 sites around the world. We found that annual mean CN concentrations are typically 300–2000 cm−3 in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT and 1000–10 000 cm−3 in the continental boundary layer (BL. Many sites exhibit pronounced seasonality with summer time concentrations a factor of 2–10 greater than wintertime concentrations. We used these CN observations to evaluate primary and secondary sources of particle number in a global aerosol microphysics model. We found that emissions of primary particles can reasonably reproduce the spatial pattern of observed CN concentration (R2=0.46 but fail to explain the observed seasonal cycle (R2=0.1. The modeled CN concentration in the FT was biased low (normalised mean bias, NMB=−88% unless a secondary source of particles was included, for example from binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water (NMB=−25%. Simulated CN concentrations in the continental BL were also biased low (NMB=−74% unless the number emission of anthropogenic primary particles was increased or a mechanism that results in particle formation in the BL was included. We ran a number of simulations where we included an empirical BL nucleation mechanism either using the activation-type mechanism (nucleation rate, J, proportional to gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration to the power one or kinetic-type mechanism (J proportional to sulfuric acid to the power two with a range of nucleation coefficients. We found that the seasonal CN cycle observed at continental BL sites was better simulated by BL particle formation (R2=0.3 than by increasing the number emission from primary anthropogenic sources (R2=0.18. The nucleation constants that resulted in best overall match between model and observed CN concentrations were

  4. Effects of the physical state of tropospheric ammonium-sulfate-nitrate particles on global aerosol direct radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Martin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of aqueous versus crystalline sulfate-nitrate-ammonium tropospheric particles on global aerosol direct radiative forcing is assessed. A global three-dimensional chemical transport model predicts sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium aerosol mass. An aerosol thermodynamics model is called twice, once for the upper side (US and once for lower side (LS of the hysteresis loop of particle phase. On the LS, the sulfate mass budget is 40% solid ammonium sulfate, 12% letovicite, 11% ammonium bisulfate, and 37% aqueous. The LS nitrate mass budget is 26% solid ammonium nitrate, 7% aqueous, and 67% gas-phase nitric acid release due to increased volatility upon crystallization. The LS ammonium budget is 45% solid ammonium sulfate, 10% letovicite, 6% ammonium bisulfate, 4% ammonium nitrate, 7% ammonia release due to increased volatility, and 28% aqueous. LS aerosol water mass partitions as 22% effloresced to the gas-phase and 78% remaining as aerosol mass. The predicted US/LS global fields of aerosol mass are employed in a Mie scattering model to generate global US/LS aerosol optical properties, including scattering efficiency, single scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Global annual average LS optical depth and mass scattering efficiency are, respectively, 0.023 and 10.7 m2 (g SO4-2-1, which compare to US values of 0.030 and 13.9 m2 (g SO4-2-1. Radiative transport is computed, first for a base case having no aerosol and then for the two global fields corresponding to the US and LS of the hysteresis loop. Regional, global, seasonal, and annual averages of top-of-the-atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing on the LS and US (FL and FU, respectively, in W m-2 are calculated. Including both anthropogenic and natural emissions, we obtain global annual averages of FL=-0.750, FU=-0.930, and DFU,L=24% for full sky calculations without clouds and FL=-0.485, FU=-0.605, and DFU,L=25% when clouds are included. Regionally, DFU,L=48% over the USA, 55% over Europe

  5. Lack of acute phase response in the livers of mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles or carbon black by inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Andrew

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiologic and animal studies have shown that particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of lung and cardiovascular diseases. Although the exact mechanisms by which particles induce cardiovascular diseases are not known, studies suggest involvement of systemic acute phase responses, including C-reactive protein (CRP and serum amyloid A (SAA in humans. In this study we test the hypothesis that diesel exhaust particles (DEP – or carbon black (CB-induced lung inflammation initiates an acute phase response in the liver. Results Mice were exposed to filtered air, 20 mg/m3 DEP or CB by inhalation for 90 minutes/day for four consecutive days; we have previously shown that these mice exhibit pulmonary inflammation (Saber AT, Bornholdt J, Dybdahl M, Sharma AK, Loft S, Vogel U, Wallin H. Tumor necrosis factor is not required for particle-induced genotoxicity and pulmonary inflammation., Arch. Toxicol. 79 (2005 177–182. As a positive control for the induction of an acute phase response, mice were exposed to 12.5 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS intraperitoneally. Quantitative real time RT-PCR was used to examine the hepatic mRNA expression of acute phase proteins, serum amyloid P (Sap (the murine homologue of Crp and Saa1 and Saa3. While significant increases in the hepatic expression of Sap, Saa1 and Saa3 were observed in response to LPS, their levels did not change in response to DEP or CB. In a comprehensive search for markers of an acute phase response, we analyzed liver tissue from these mice using high density DNA microarrays. Globally, 28 genes were found to be significantly differentially expressed in response to DEP or CB. The mRNA expression of three of the genes (serine (or cysteine proteinase inhibitor, clade A, member 3C, apolipoprotein E and transmembrane emp24 domain containing 3 responded to both exposures. However, these changes were very subtle and were not confirmed by real time RT

  6. Hygroscopic properties of potassium chloride and its internal mixtures with organic compounds relevant to biomass burning aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Wang, Yidan; Liu, Qifan; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2017-02-27

    While water uptake of aerosols exerts considerable impacts on climate, the effects of aerosol composition and potential interactions between species on hygroscopicity of atmospheric particles have not been fully characterized. The water uptake behaviors of potassium chloride and its internal mixtures with water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) related to biomass burning aerosols including oxalic acid, levoglucosan and humic acid at different mass ratios were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). Deliquescence points of KCl/organic mixtures were observed to occur at lower RH values and over a broader RH range eventually disappearing at high organic mass fractions. This leads to substantial under-prediction of water uptake at intermediate RH. Large discrepancies for water content between model predictions and measurements were observed for KCl aerosols with 75 wt% oxalic acid content, which is likely due to the formation of less hygroscopic potassium oxalate from interactions between KCl and oxalic acid without taken into account in the model methods. Our results also indicate strong influence of levoglucosan on hygroscopic behaviors of multicomponent mixed particles. These findings are important in further understanding the role of interactions between WSOCs and inorganic salt on hygroscopic behaviors and environmental effects of atmospheric particles.

  7. Protection of firefighters against combustion aerosol particles: simulated workplace protection factor of a half-mask respirator (pilot study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, James; Yermakov, Michael; Reponen, Tiina; Kulkarni, Pramod; Qi, Chaolong; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the penetration of ultrafine particles originated by combustion of different materials into elastomeric half-mask respirators equipped with two P100 filters. We determined the Simulated Workplace Protection Factor (SWPF) for 11 firefighters wearing elastomeric half-mask respirators and performing activities simulating those conducted during fire overhaul operations. The tests were performed in a controlled laboratory setting. A newly-developed battery-operated Portable Aerosol Mobility Spectrometer (PAMS) was used to measure size-resolved aerosol particle concentrations outside (C(out)) and inside (Cin) of an air-purifying respirator donned on a firefighter, and the SWPF was calculated as C(out)/C(in). Based on the total aerosol concentration, the "total" SWPF ranged from 4,222 (minimum) to 35,534 (maximum) with values falling primarily in a range from 11,171 (25 percentile) to 26,604 (75 percentile) and a median value being ≈15,000. This is consistent with the recently reported fit factor (FF) data base.((1)) The size-resolved SWPF data revealed a dependency on the particle size. It was concluded that a portable device such as PAMS can be used on firefighters during overhaul operations (as well as on other workers wearing elastomeric half-mask respirators) to monitor the aerosol concentrations in real time and ultimately help prevent overexposure.

  8. The role of jet and film drops in controlling the mixing state of submicron sea spray aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deane, Grant B.; Moore, Kathryn A.; Ryder, Olivia S.; Stokes, M. Dale; Beall, Charlotte M.; Collins, Douglas B.; Santander, Mitchell V.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Sultana, Camille M.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2017-06-19

    Covering 71% of the Earth’s surface, oceans represent a significant global source of atmospheric aerosols. The size and composition of sea spray aerosols (SSA) affect their ability to serve as cloud seeds and thus understanding the factors controlling their composition is critical to predicting their impact on clouds and climate. SSA particles have been shown to be an external mixture of particles with different compositions. Film and jet drop production mechanisms ultimately determine the individual particle compositions which are comprised of an array of salt/organic mixtures ranging from pure sea salt to nearly pure organic particles. It is often assumed that the majority of submicron SSA are formed by film drops produced from bursting hydrophobic organic-rich bubble film caps at the sea surface, and in contrast, jet drops are postulated to produce larger supermicron particles from underlying seawater comprised largely of salts and water soluble organic species. However, here we show that jet drops produced by bursting sub-100 m bubbles account for up to 40 % of all submicron particles. They have distinct chemical compositions, organic volume fractions and ice nucleating activities from submicron film drops. Thus a substantial fraction of submicron particles will not necessarily be controlled by the composition of the sea surface microlayer as has been assumed in many studies. This finding has significant ramifications for the size-resolved mixing states of SSA particles which must be taken into consideration when accessing SSA impacts on clouds.

  9. Size-resolved chemical composition of aerosol particles during a monsoonal transition period over the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, M. T.; Holecek, J. C.; Corrigan, C. E.; Ramanathan, V.; Prather, K. A.

    2008-08-01

    An aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) was used to measure the size-resolved mixing state of particles over the northern Indian Ocean in October and November 2004. This period was chosen to observe the impact of the monsoonal transition on the size, chemistry, sources, and radiative properties of atmospheric aerosols in the region. Overall, elemental carbon with sulfate (EC-sulfate), biomass/biofuel burning, fresh sea salt (SS), aged sea salt, fly ash, and EC mixed with sea salt were the dominant supermicron particle types, whereas EC-sulfate, biomass/biofuel burning, and fly ash were the dominant submicron particle types. Interestingly, particles composed mostly of aged organic carbon and nitrate were virtually absent during the campaign. This is possibly from low ozone formation in the region or selective scavenging during transport. Notably, during long-range transport periods when an aethalometer measured the highest black carbon concentrations, 77% of submicron particles between 0.5 and 2.5 μm and 71% of EC/soot particles contained an intense 39K+ ion (a known tracer for biomass/biofuel combustion). These observations suggest when the air mass originated from India, biofuel combustion represented a significant source of the regional atmospheric brown cloud. The majority (˜80%) of EC and biomass/biofuel burning particles were mixed with significant amounts of sulfate due to extensive secondary processing of these particles during transport. EC mixed with sea salt was also observed suggesting the particles had undergone cloud processing and become internally mixed during transport. These measurements support the use of an internal mixture of sulfate with EC/soot and biomass/biofuel burning in models to accurately calculate radiative forcing by aerosols in this region.

  10. The white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS – a novel airborne system to characterize aerosol hygroscopicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rosati

    2015-02-01

    ranges. The effective index of refraction of the dry particles is retrieved from the optical diameter measured for size-selected aerosol samples with a well-defined dry mobility diameter. The data analysis approach for the optical sizing and retrieval of the index of refraction was extensively tested in laboratory experiments with polystyrene latex size standards and ammonium sulfate particles of different diameters. The hygroscopic growth factor (GF distribution and aerosol mixing state is inferred from the optical size distribution measured for the size-selected and humidified aerosol sample. Laboratory experiments with pure ammonium sulfate particles revealed good agreement with Köhler theory (mean bias of ~3% and maximal deviation of 8% for GFs at RH = 95%. During first airborne measurements in the Netherlands, GFs (mean value of the GF distribution at RH = 95% between 1.79 and 2.43 with a median of 2.02 were observed for particles with a dry diameter of 500 nm. This corresponds to hygroscopicity parameters (κ between 0.25 and 0.75 with a median of 0.38. The GF distributions indicate externally mixed particles covering the whole range of GFs between ~1.0 and 3.0. On average, ~74% of the 500 nm particles had GFs > 1.5, ~15% had GF 2, indicating influence of sea-salt particles, consistent with previous ground-based particle hygroscopicity measurements in this area. The mean dry effective index of refraction for 500 nm particles was found to be rather constant with a value of 1.42 ± 0.04 (mean ± 1SD.

  11. Modeling the formation and properties of traditional and non-traditional secondary organic aerosol: problem formulation and application to aircraft exhaust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Jathar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a methodology to model secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from the photo-oxidation of unspeciated low-volatility organics (semi-volatile and intermediate volatile organic compounds emitted by combustion systems. It is formulated using the volatility basis-set approach. Unspeciated low-volatility organics are classified by volatility and then allowed to react with the hydroxyl radical. The new methodology allows for larger reductions in volatility with each oxidation step than previous volatility basis set models, which is more consistent with the addition of common functional groups and similar to those used by traditional SOA models. The methodology is illustrated using data collected during two field campaigns that characterized the atmospheric evolution of dilute gas-turbine engine emissions using a smog chamber. In those experiments, photo-oxidation formed a significant amount of SOA, much of which could not be explained based on the emissions of traditional speciated precursors; we refer to the unexplained SOA as non-traditional SOA (NT-SOA. The NT-SOA can be explained by emissions of unspeciated low-volatility organics measured using sorbents. We show that the parameterization proposed by Robinson et al. (2007 is unable to explain the timing of the NT-SOA formation in the aircraft experiments because it assumes a very modest reduction in volatility of the precursors with every oxidation reaction. In contrast the new method better reproduces the NT-SOA formation. The NT-SOA yields estimated for the unspeciated low-volatility organic emissions in aircraft exhaust are similar to literature data for large n-alkanes and other low-volatility organics. The estimated yields vary with fuel composition (Jet Propellent-8 versus Fischer-Tropsch and engine load (ground idle versus non-ground idle. The framework developed here is suitable for modeling SOA formation from emissions from other combustion systems.

  12. On the role of particle inorganic mixing state in the reactive uptake of N2O5 to ambient aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Olivia S; Ault, Andrew P; Cahill, John F; Guasco, Timothy L; Riedel, Theran P; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Gaston, Cassandra J; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Lee, Christopher; Prather, Kimberly A; Bertram, Timothy H

    2014-01-01

    The rates of heterogeneous reactions of trace gases with aerosol particles are complex functions of particle chemical composition, morphology, and phase state. Currently, the majority of model parametrizations of heterogeneous reaction kinetics focus on the population average of aerosol particle mass, assuming that individual particles have the same chemical composition as the average state. Here we assess the impact of particle mixing state on heterogeneous reaction kinetics using the N2O5 reactive uptake coefficient, γ(N2O5), and dependence on the particulate chloride-to-nitrate ratio (nCl(-)/nNO3(-)). We describe the first simultaneous ambient observations of single particle chemical composition and in situ determinations