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Sample records for exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia

  1. Exercise hypoxaemia as a predictor of pulmonary hypertension in COPD patients without severe resting hypoxaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tomoki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Arizono, Shinichi; Nishimura, Koichi; Sakamoto, Koji; Ito, Satoru; Ando, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in COPD is associated with morbidity and mortality. Previous studies showed a relationship between resting hypoxaemia and PH, but little is known about the relationship between exercise hypoxaemia and PH in COPD without resting hypoxaemia. A retrospective observational study of COPD patients without resting hypoxaemia was conducted to evaluate the relationships between exercise hypoxaemia and pulmonary haemodynamics. Clinical characteristics, pulmonary function, blood gas analysis, 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and oxygen saturation of peripheral artery (SpO 2 ) at the end of the 6-min walk test (6MWT) were reviewed. Correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis were performed to identify the predictor of mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP). Eighty-four consecutive patients with a mean predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) of 47 ± 21% were evaluated. In univariate analysis, mPAP had negative correlations with age (r = -0.27, P exercise hypoxaemia indicates PH in patients with COPD without resting hypoxaemia. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Exercise-induced quadriceps muscle fatigue in men and women: effects of arterial oxygen content and respiratory muscle work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominelli, Paolo B; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Griesdale, Donald E G; Peters, Carli M; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Sekhon, Mypinder; Dominelli, Giulio S; Henderson, William R; Foster, Glen E; Romer, Lee M; Koehle, Michael S; Sheel, A William

    2017-08-01

    High work of breathing and exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia (EIAH) can decrease O 2 delivery and exacerbate exercise-induced quadriceps fatigue in healthy men. Women have a higher work of breathing during exercise, dedicate a greater fraction of whole-body V̇O2 towards their respiratory muscles and develop EIAH. Despite a greater reduction in men's work of breathing, the attenuation of quadriceps fatigue was similar between the sexes. The degree of EIAH was similar between sexes, and regardless of sex, those who developed the greatest hypoxaemia during exercise demonstrated the most attenuation of quadriceps fatigue. Based on our previous finding that women have a greater relative oxygen cost of breathing, women appear to be especially susceptible to work of breathing-related changes in quadriceps muscle fatigue. Reducing the work of breathing or eliminating exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia (EIAH) during exercise decreases the severity of quadriceps fatigue in men. Women have a greater work of breathing during exercise, dedicate a greater fraction of whole-body V̇O2 towards their respiratory muscles, and demonstrate EIAH, suggesting women may be especially susceptible to quadriceps fatigue. Healthy subjects (8 male, 8 female) completed three constant load exercise tests over 4 days. During the first (control) test, subjects exercised at ∼85% of maximum while arterial blood gases and work of breathing were assessed. Subsequent constant load exercise tests were iso-time and iso-work rate, but with EIAH prevented by inspiring hyperoxic gas or work of breathing reduced via a proportional assist ventilator (PAV). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed by measuring force in response to femoral nerve stimulation. For both sexes, quadriceps force was equally reduced after the control trial (-27 ± 2% baseline) and was attenuated with hyperoxia and PAV (-18 ± 1 and -17 ± 2% baseline, P Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  3. Arterial hypoxaemia in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Hillingsø, Jens; Christensen, E

    1998-01-01

    characteristics. PATIENTS: One hundred and forty two patients with cirrhosis without significant hepatic encephalopathy (grades 0-I) (41 patients in Child class A, 57 in class B, and 44 in class C) and 21 patients with hepatic encephalopathy. RESULTS: Mean Po2 in kPa was 11.3 in Child class A, 10.8 in class B, 10...... resistance, and a low indocyanine green clearance (p hepatic dysfunction. Arterial hypoxaemia in patients with cirrhosis of differing.......6 in class C, and 10.6 in patients with encephalopathy (p C, and in patients with encephalopathy (p

  4. Arterial hypoxaemia in cirrhosis: fact or fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Hillingsø, J; Christensen, E

    1998-01-01

    characteristics. PATIENTS: One hundred and forty two patients with cirrhosis without significant hepatic encephalopathy (grades 0-I) (41 patients in Child class A, 57 in class B, and 44 in class C) and 21 patients with hepatic encephalopathy. RESULTS: Mean Po2 in kPa was 11.3 in Child class A, 10.8 in class B, 10...... resistance, and a low indocyanine green clearance (p hepatic dysfunction. Arterial hypoxaemia in patients with cirrhosis of differing.......6 in class C, and 10.6 in patients with encephalopathy (p C, and in patients with encephalopathy (p

  5. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity waveforms in fetal hypoxaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, S; Nicolaides, K H; Bower, S; Campbell, S

    1990-09-01

    In 81 small-for-gestational age fetuses (SGA) colour flow imaging was used to identify the fetal middle cerebral artery for subsequent pulsed Doppler studies. Impedence to flow (pulsatility index; PI) was significantly lower, and mean blood velocity was significantly higher, than the respective reference ranges with gestation. Fetal blood sampling by cordocentesis was performed in all SGA fetuses and a significant quadratic relation was found between fetal hypoxaemia and the degree of reduction in the PI of FVWs from the fetal middle cerebral artery. Thus, maximum reduction in PI is reached when the fetal PO2 is 2-4 SD below the normal mean for gestation. When the oxygen deficit is greater there is a tendency for the PI to rise, and this presumably reflects the development of brain oedema.

  6. Late post-operative hypoxaemia and organ dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Rosenberg, J

    1995-01-01

    an adverse effect of tissue hypoxia on wound healing and on resistance to bacterial wound infections. Finally, mental confusion and surgical delirium may be related to inadequate arterial oxygenation during the late post-operative period. Late post-operative constant and episodic hypoxaemia may therefore......Constant and episodic hypoxaemia are common after major operations in the late post-operative period in the surgical ward. Recent studies have shown that hypoxaemia may be related to the development of myocardial ischaemia and cardiac arrhythmias. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated...

  7. The contribution of intrapulmonary shunts to the alveolar-to-arterial oxygen difference during exercise is very small

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Boushel, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Exercise is well known to cause arterial PO2 to fall and the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference(Aa PO2 ) to increase. Until recently, the physiological basis for this was considered to be mostly ventilation/perfusion ((.)VA/(.)Q) inequality and alveolar-capillary diffusion limitation. Recently......, arterio-venous shunting through dilated pulmonary blood vessels has been proposed to explain a significant part of the Aa PO2 during exercise. To test this hypothesis we determined venous admixture during 5 min of near-maximal, constant-load, exercise in hypoxia (in inspired O2 fraction, FIO2 , 0...... venous admixture, Aa PO2 and hypoxaemia during heavy exercise....

  8. Hypoxaemia in the general surgical ward--a potential risk factor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J

    1994-01-01

    After major operations, hypoxaemia is common in the late postoperative period in the surgical ward. Recent studies of humans after major operations showed that such hypoxaemia may be related to the development of myocardial ischaemia and cardiac arrhythmias, even in patients with no preoperative...... signs or symptoms of coronary artery disease. Experimental studies have shown an adverse effect of tissue hypoxia on wound healing and on resistance to bacterial wound infections. Finally, mental confusion and surgical delirium may be related to inadequate arterial oxygenation during the late...

  9. Taurine supplementation attenuates delayed increase in exercise-induced arterial stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Song-Gyu; Choi, Youngju; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Ohmori, Hajime; Maeda, Seiji

    2016-06-01

    There is a delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise that is possibly mediated by the concurrent delayed increase in circulating oxidative stress. Taurine has anti-oxidant action, and taurine supplementation may be able to attenuate the increase in oxidative stress after exercise. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether taurine supplementation attenuates the delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise. In the present double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial, we divided 29 young, healthy men into 2 groups. Subjects received either 2.0 g of placebo (n = 14) or taurine (n = 15) 3 times per day for 14 days prior to the exercise, on the day of exercise, and the following 3 days. The exercise consisted of 2 sets of 20 maximal-effort eccentric repetitions with the nondominant arm only. On the morning of exercise and for 4 days thereafter, we measured serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) as indices of oxidative stress and arterial stiffness, respectively. On the third and fourth days after exercise, both MDA and cfPWV significantly increased in the placebo group. However, these elevations were significantly attenuated in the taurine group. The increase in MDA was associated with an increase in cfPWV from before exercise to 4 days after exercise (r = 0.597, p taurine group. Our results suggest that delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise was probably affected by the exercise-induced oxidative stress and was attenuated by the taurine supplementation.

  10. Review of hypoxaemia in anaesthetized horses: predisposing factors, consequences and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auckburally, Adam; Nyman, Görel

    2017-05-01

    To discuss how hypoxaemia might be harmful and why horses are particularly predisposed to developing it, to review the strategies that are used to manage hypoxaemia in anaesthetized horses, and to describe how successful these strategies are and the adverse effects associated with them. Google Scholar and PubMed, using the search terms horse, pony, exercise, anaesthesia, hypoxaemia, oxygen, mortality, morbidity and ventilation perfusion mismatch. Although there is no evidence that hypoxaemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in anaesthetized horses, most anaesthetists would agree that it is important to recognise and prevent or treat it. Favourable anatomical and physiological adaptations of a horse for exercise adversely affect gas exchange once the animal is recumbent. Hypoxaemia is recognised more frequently in horses than in other domestic species during general anaesthesia, although its incidence in healthy horses remains unreported. Management of hypoxaemia in anaesthetized horses is challenging and often unsuccessful. Positive pressure ventilation strategies to address alveolar atelectasis in humans have been modified for implementation in recumbent anaesthetized horses, but are often accompanied by unpredictable and unacceptable cardiopulmonary adverse effects, and some strategies are difficult or impossible to achieve in adult horses. Furthermore, anticipated beneficial effects of these techniques are inconsistent. Increasing the inspired fraction of oxygen during anaesthesia is often unsuccessful since much of the impairment in gas exchange is a direct result of shunt. Alternative approaches to the problem involve manipulation of pulmonary blood away from atelectatic regions of the lung to better ventilated areas. However, further work is essential, with particular focus on survival associated with general anaesthesia in horses, before any technique can be accepted into widespread clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Association of

  11. Exercise promotes collateral artery growth mediated by monocytic nitric oxide.

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    Schirmer, Stephan H; Millenaar, Dominic N; Werner, Christian; Schuh, Lisa; Degen, Achim; Bettink, Stephanie I; Lipp, Peter; van Rooijen, Nico; Meyer, Tim; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis) is an important adaptive response to hampered arterial perfusion. It is unknown whether preventive physical exercise before limb ischemia can improve arteriogenesis and modulate mononuclear cell function. This study aimed at investigating the effects of endurance exercise before arterial occlusion on MNC function and collateral artery growth. After 3 weeks of voluntary treadmill exercise, ligation of the right femoral artery was performed in mice. Hindlimb perfusion immediately after surgery did not differ from sedentary mice. However, previous exercise improved perfusion restoration ≤7 days after femoral artery ligation, also when exercise was stopped at ligation. This was accompanied by an accumulation of peri-collateral macrophages and increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in hindlimb collateral and in MNC of blood and spleen. Systemic monocyte and macrophage depletion by liposomal clodronate but not splenectomy attenuated exercise-induced perfusion restoration, collateral artery growth, peri-collateral macrophage accumulation, and upregulation of iNOS. iNOS-deficient mice did not show exercise-induced perfusion restoration. Transplantation of bone marrow-derived MNC from iNOS-deficient mice into wild-type animals inhibited exercise-induced collateral artery growth. In contrast to sedentary controls, thrice weekly aerobic exercise training for 6 months in humans increased peripheral blood MNC iNOS expression. Circulating mononuclear cell-derived inducible nitric oxide is an important mediator of exercise-induced collateral artery growth. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Effect of acute moderate exercise on induced inflammation and arterial function in older adults.

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    Ranadive, Sushant Mohan; Kappus, Rebecca Marie; Cook, Marc D; Yan, Huimin; Lane, Abbi Danielle; Woods, Jeffrey A; Wilund, Kenneth R; Iwamoto, Gary; Vanar, Vishwas; Tandon, Rudhir; Fernhall, Bo

    2014-04-01

    Acute inflammation reduces flow-mediated vasodilatation and increases arterial stiffness in young healthy individuals. However, this response has not been studied in older adults. The aim of this study, therefore, was to evaluate the effect of acute induced systemic inflammation on endothelial function and wave reflection in older adults. Furthermore, an acute bout of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can be anti-inflammatory. Taken together, we tested the hypothesis that acute moderate-intensity endurance exercise, immediately preceding induced inflammation, would be protective against the negative effects of acute systemic inflammation on vascular function. Fifty-nine healthy volunteers between 55 and 75 years of age were randomized to an exercise or a control group. Both groups received a vaccine (induced inflammation) and sham (saline) injection in a counterbalanced crossover design. Inflammatory markers, endothelial function (flow-mediated vasodilatation) and measures of wave reflection and arterial stiffness were evaluated at baseline and at 24 and 48 h after injections. There were no significant differences in endothelial function and arterial stiffness between the exercise and control group after induced inflammation. The groups were then analysed together, and we found significant differences in the inflammatory markers 24 and 48 h after induction of acute inflammation compared with sham injection. However, flow-mediated vasodilatation, augmentation index normalized for heart rate (AIx75) and β-stiffness did not change significantly. Our results suggest that acute inflammation induced by influenza vaccination did not affect endothelial function in older adults.

  13. Protective effect of prone posture against hypergravity-induced arterial hypoxaemia in humans

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    Rohdin, M; Petersson, J; Mure, M; Glenny, R W; Lindahl, S G E; Linnarsson, D

    2003-01-01

    Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome have increased lung tissue weight and therefore an increased hydrostatic pressure gradient down the lung. Also, they have a better arterial oxygenation in prone (face down) than in supine (face up) posture. We hypothesized that this effect of the direction of gravity also existed in healthy humans, when increased hydrostatic gradients were induced by hypergravity. Ten healthy subjects were studied in a human centrifuge while exposed to 1 or 5 G in anterio-posterior (supine) or posterio-anterior (prone) direction. We measured blood gases using remote-controlled sampling and gas exchange by mass spectrometry. Hypergravity led to marked impairments of arterial oxygenation in both postures and more so in supine posture. At 5 G, the arterial oxygen saturation was 84.6 ± 1.2 % (mean ±s.e.m.) in supine and 89.7 ± 1.4 % in prone posture (P postures. The alveolar-to-arterial PO2 difference increased at 5 G to 8.0 ± 0.2 kPa and 6.6 ± 0.3 kPa in supine and prone postures (P = 0.003). Arterial oxygenation was less impaired in prone during hypergravity due to a better-preserved alveolo-arterial oxygen transport. We speculate that mammals have developed a cardiopulmonary structure that favours function with the gravitational vector in the posterio-anterior direction. PMID:12598589

  14. Determinants of exercise-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voilliot, Damien; Magne, Julien; Dulgheru, Raluca; Kou, Seisyou; Henri, Christine; Laaraibi, Saloua; Sprynger, Muriel; Andre, Béatrice; Pierard, Luc A; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2014-05-15

    Exercise-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (EIPH) in systemic sclerosis (SSc) has already been observed but its determinants remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and the determinants of EIPH in SSc. We prospectively enrolled 63 patients with SSc (age 54±3years, 76% female) followed in CHU Sart-Tilman in Liège. All patients underwent graded semi-supine exercise echocardiography. Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) was derived from the peak velocity of the tricuspid regurgitation jet and adding the estimation of right atrial pressure, both at rest and during exercise. Resting pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) was defined as sPAP > 35 mmHg and EIPH as sPAP > 50 mmHg during exercise. The following formulas were used: mean PAP (mPAP) = 0.61 × sPAP + 2, left atrial pressure (LAP)=1.9+1.24 × left ventricular (LV) E/e' and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR)=(mPAP-LAP)/LV cardiac output (CO) and slope of mPAP-LVCO relationship=changes in mPAP/changes in LVCO. Resting PH was present in 3 patients (7%) and 21 patients developed EIPH (47%). Patients with EIPH had higher resting LAP (10.3 ± 2.2 versus 8.8 ± 2.3 mmHg; p = 0.03), resting PVR (2.6 ± 0.8 vs. 1.4 ± 1.1 Woods units; p=0.004), exercise LAP (13.3 ± 2.3 vs. 9 ± 1.7 mmHg; p exercise PVR (3.6 ± 0.7 vs. 2.1 ± 0.9 Woods units; p = 0.02) and slope of mPAP-LVCO (5.8 ± 2.4 vs. 2.9 ± 2.1 mmHg/L/min; p age and gender, exercise LAP (β=3.1 ± 0.8; p=0.001) and exercise PVR (β=7.9 ± 1.7; p=0.0001) were independent determinants of exercise sPAP. EIPH is frequent in SSc patients and is mainly related to both increased exercise LV filling pressure and exercise PVR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Myocardial fatty acid utilisation during exercise induced ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtanen, K.S.; Nikkinen, P.; Lindroth, L.; Kuikka, J.T.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Reversible or irreversible myocardial damage due to ischemia correlates with altered membrane functions of the cells. To compare myocardial free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism and flow during exercise induced ischemia we studied ten patients with coronary artery disease but without previous myocardial infarction. Methods: A series of post-exercise single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measurements was performed after injection of 123 I labelled heptadecanoic acid (HDA). Myocardial perfusion was estimated from the separately performed exercise-redistribution thallium study. Fatty acid metabolic rate, thallium uptake and washout were calculated for anterior, lateral, posterior and septal segments. Results: The more reduced post-exercise FFA metabolic rate (-63±18%, mean ±1 SD) compared to flow (-36±16%) was related to the severity of myocardial ischemia and wall motion abnormalities. Conclusion: In this small group of patients, the reduced post-exercise FFA metabolic rate tentatively suggests a parsimonious workload of the exercising myocardium by reducing oxygen consumption in patients with coronary artery disease. (orig.) [de

  16. Cardiac repolarization during hypoglycaemia and hypoxaemia in healthy males: impact of renin-angiotensin system activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Andersen, Rikke; Høi-Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2008-01-01

    . Hypoglycaemia and hypoxaemia induced QTc prolongation (P VR increased as a function of hypoglycaemia, but were unaffected by hypoxaemia. Low RAS activity was associated with a steeper QT/RR slope in the recovery phase after both stimuli: hypoglycaemia: P = 0...

  17. EXERCISE-INDUCED ARTERIAL ADAPTATIONS IN ELITE JUDO ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Karagounis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine exercise-induced arterial adaptations in elite Judo male and female athletes. 27 male Judo athletes (age 24.06 ± 2 years, 11 female Judoka (age 24.27 ± 1 years, 27 sedentary healthy men (age 24.01 ± 2 years and 11 women (age 24.21 ± 1 years participated in the current study. The examined vessels included brachial, radial, ulnar, popliteal, anterior and posterior tibial arteries. The experimental parameters were recorded with the use of Duplex ultrasound at rest. Diastolic diameter and blood mean flow velocity of the examined arteries in Judo athletes were found to be both significantly increased (p < 0.05 compared to the findings of the control groups. In male Judo athletes the brachial (p < 0.001, radial (p < 0.001, and anterior tibial artery (p < 0.001 presented the highest difference on the diastolic diameter, compared with the control male group. In female Judo athletes, ulnar (p < 0.001, radial (p < 0.001, and brachial (p < 0.001 arteries illustrated the highest diastolic diameter. The highest blood mean flow velocity was recorded in ulnar (p < 0.001 and popliteal arteries (p < 0.001 of the Judo athletes groups. Recording differences between the two genders, male participants presented larger arteries than females. Conclusively, Judo has been found to be a highly demanding physical sport, involving upper and lower limbs leading to significant arterial adaptations. Obtaining vascular parameters provide a useful tool to the medical team, not only in the direction of enhancement of the efficacy of physical training, but in unknown so far parameters that may influence athletic performance of both male and female elite Judokas

  18. Endothelial dysfunction, carotid artery plaque burden, and conventional exercise-induced myocardial ischemia as predictors of coronary artery disease prognosis

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    Ishihara Masayuki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While both flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD in the brachial artery (BA, which measures endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, and intima-media thickness (IMT in the carotid artery are correlated with the prognosis of coronary artery disease (CAD, it is not clear which modality is a better predictor of CAD. Furthermore, it has not been fully determined whether either of these modalities is superior to conventional ST-segment depression on exercise stress electrocardiogram (ECG as a predictor. Thus, the goal of the present study was to compare the predictive value of FMD, IMT, and stress ECG for CAD prognosis. Methods and Results A total of 103 consecutive patients (62 ± 9 years old, 79 men with clinically suspected CAD had FMD and nitroglycerin-induced dilation (NTG-D in the BA, carotid artery IMT measurement using high-resolution ultrasound, and exercise treadmill testing. The 73 CAD patients and 30 normal coronary patients were followed for 50 ± 15 months. Fifteen patients had coronary events during this period (1 cardiac death, 2 non-fatal myocardial infarctions, 3 acute heart failures, and 9 unstable anginas. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, only FMD and stress ECG were significant predictors for cardiac events. Conclusion Brachial endothelial function as reflected by FMD and conventional exercise stress testing has comparable prognostic value, whereas carotid artery plaque burden appears to be less powerful for predicting future cardiac events.

  19. The effect of α1 -adrenergic blockade on post-exercise brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation at sea level and high altitude.

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    Tymko, Michael M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Hansen, Alex B; Howe, Connor A; Willie, Chris K; Stembridge, Mike; Green, Daniel J; Hoiland, Ryan L; Subedi, Prajan; Anholm, James D; Ainslie, Philip N

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to quantify endothelial function (via brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation) at sea level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m) at rest and following both maximal exercise and 30 min of moderate-intensity cycling exercise with and without administration of an α 1 -adrenergic blockade. Brachial endothelial function did not differ between sea level and high altitude at rest, nor following maximal exercise. At sea level, endothelial function decreased following 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and this decrease was abolished with α 1 -adrenergic blockade. At high altitude, endothelial function did not decrease immediately after 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and administration of α 1 -adrenergic blockade resulted in an increase in flow-mediated dilatation. Our data indicate that post-exercise endothelial function is modified at high altitude (i.e. prolonged hypoxaemia). The current study helps to elucidate the physiological mechanisms associated with high-altitude acclimatization, and provides insight into the relationship between sympathetic nervous activity and vascular endothelial function. We examined the hypotheses that (1) at rest, endothelial function would be impaired at high altitude compared to sea level, (2) endothelial function would be reduced to a greater extent at sea level compared to high altitude after maximal exercise, and (3) reductions in endothelial function following moderate-intensity exercise at both sea level and high altitude are mediated via an α 1 -adrenergic pathway. In a double-blinded, counterbalanced, randomized and placebo-controlled design, nine healthy participants performed a maximal-exercise test, and two 30 min sessions of semi-recumbent cycling exercise at 50% peak output following either placebo or α 1 -adrenergic blockade (prazosin; 0.05 mg kg  -1 ). These experiments were completed at both sea-level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m). Blood pressure (finger photoplethysmography

  20. The effect of α1‐adrenergic blockade on post‐exercise brachial artery flow‐mediated dilatation at sea level and high altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Joshua C.; Hansen, Alex B.; Howe, Connor A.; Willie, Chris K.; Stembridge, Mike; Green, Daniel J.; Hoiland, Ryan L.; Subedi, Prajan; Anholm, James D.; Ainslie, Philip N.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Our objective was to quantify endothelial function (via brachial artery flow‐mediated dilatation) at sea level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m) at rest and following both maximal exercise and 30 min of moderate‐intensity cycling exercise with and without administration of an α1‐adrenergic blockade.Brachial endothelial function did not differ between sea level and high altitude at rest, nor following maximal exercise.At sea level, endothelial function decreased following 30 min of moderate‐intensity exercise, and this decrease was abolished with α1‐adrenergic blockade. At high altitude, endothelial function did not decrease immediately after 30 min of moderate‐intensity exercise, and administration of α1‐adrenergic blockade resulted in an increase in flow‐mediated dilatation.Our data indicate that post‐exercise endothelial function is modified at high altitude (i.e. prolonged hypoxaemia). The current study helps to elucidate the physiological mechanisms associated with high‐altitude acclimatization, and provides insight into the relationship between sympathetic nervous activity and vascular endothelial function. Abstract We examined the hypotheses that (1) at rest, endothelial function would be impaired at high altitude compared to sea level, (2) endothelial function would be reduced to a greater extent at sea level compared to high altitude after maximal exercise, and (3) reductions in endothelial function following moderate‐intensity exercise at both sea level and high altitude are mediated via an α1‐adrenergic pathway. In a double‐blinded, counterbalanced, randomized and placebo‐controlled design, nine healthy participants performed a maximal‐exercise test, and two 30 min sessions of semi‐recumbent cycling exercise at 50% peak output following either placebo or α1‐adrenergic blockade (prazosin; 0.05 mg kg −1). These experiments were completed at both sea‐level (344 m) and high altitude (3800

  1. Hepatopulmonary syndrome causing severe hypoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsøe, Bente Kjær; Andersen, Mette Winther; Eriksen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Dyspnoea is a common complaint in patients with chronic liver disease. Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is an important cause to be aware of in the setting of liver disease, dyspnoea and hypoxaemia. HPS causes microvascular dilatation, angiogenesis and arteriovenous bypassing. The patients suffer f...... from hypoxaemia in upright position and even during minimal psychical activity. Contrast echocardiography, using micro-bubbles as the contrast, is required to establish the diagnosis. No medical therapy is available, only liver transplantation can cure the disease....

  2. Adverse events with continuous doxapram infusion against late postoperative hypoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kristensen, P A; Pedersen, M H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A randomized double-blind controlled trial of doxapram versus placebo against late postoperative hypoxaemia was planned to include 40 patients (2 x 20). RESULTS: After inclusion of 18 patients a serious adverse event was encountered with development of a brain stem infarction in a 90-y...... promising, further studies on the effect of continuous nocturnal postoperative doxapram infusion on levels of arterial oxygen saturation should be postponed until more knowledge about the pharmacokinetics of doxapram in this particular clinical situation has been gathered....

  3. Significance of exercise-induced ST segment depression in patients with myocardial infarction involving the left circumflex artery. Evaluation by exercise thallium-201 myocardial single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koitabashi, Norimichi; Toyama, Takuji; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    The significance of exercise-induced ST segment depression in patients with left circumflex artery involvement was investigated by comparing exercise electrocardiography with exercise thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (Tl-SPECT) and the wall motion estimated by left ventriculography. Tl-SPECT and exercise electrocardiography were simultaneously performed in 51 patients with left circumflex artery involvement (angina pectoris 30, myocardial infarction 21). In patients with myocardial infarction, exercise-induced ST depression was frequently found in the V 2 , V 3 and V 4 leads. In patients with angina pectoris, ST depression was frequently found in the II, III, aV F , V 5 and V 6 leads. There was no obvious difference in the leads of ST depression in patients with myocardial infarction with ischemia and without ischemia on Tl-SPECT images. In patients with myocardial infarction, the lateral wall motion of the infarcted area evaluated by left ventriculography was more significantly impaired in the patients with ST depression than without ST depression (p<0.01). Exercise-induced ST depression in the precordial leads possibly reflects wall motion abnormality rather than ischemia in the lateral infarcted myocardium. (author)

  4. The relationship between exercise-induced muscle fatigue, arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion after 56 days local muscle unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias; Ducos, Michel; Mulder, Edwin; Beijer, Åsa; Herrera, Frankyn; Zange, Jochen; Degens, Hans; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    In the light of the dynamic nature of habitual plantar flexor activity, we utilized an incremental isokinetic exercise test (IIET) to assess the work-related power deficit (WoRPD) as a measure for exercise-induced muscle fatigue before and after prolonged calf muscle unloading and in relation to arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion. Eleven male subjects (31 ± 6 years) wore the HEPHAISTOS unloading orthosis unilaterally for 56 days. It allows habitual ambulation while greatly reducing plantar flexor activity and torque production. Endpoint measurements encompassed arterial blood flow, measured in the femoral artery using Doppler ultrasound, oxygenation of the soleus muscle assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy, lactate concentrations determined in capillary blood and muscle activity using soleus muscle surface electromyography. Furthermore, soleus muscle biopsies were taken to investigate morphological muscle changes. After the intervention, maximal isokinetic torque was reduced by 23·4 ± 8·2% (Pflow, tissue oxygenation, lactate concentrations and EMG median frequency kinematics during the exercise test were comparable before and after the intervention, whereas the increase of RMS in response to IIET was less following the intervention (P = 0·03). In conclusion, following submaximal isokinetic muscle work exercise-induced muscle fatigue is unaffected after prolonged local muscle unloading. The observation that arterial blood flow was maintained may underlie the unchanged fatigability. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Exercise in arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Hans-Georg; Schramm, Thomas

    2006-09-01

    Regular endurance training has established itself as a major therapeutic principle in the specter of nonpharmacological measures in arterial hypertension. An initial medical check as well as an adequate technique, dosage and intensity of the prescribed exercise training are mandatory. With respect to the concomitant pharmacological treatment, it should be considered that the beneficial effects of lifestyle modification will not be counteracted by the chosen antihypertensive drug but, ideally, synergistically supported. Based on the individual clinical situation, principally all antihypertensive drugs recommended by the current European guidelines, may be prescribed as mono- or combination therapy.beta-receptor blockers are especially capable of controlling excessive exercise-induced blood pressure increase; however, they have metabolic and exercise physiological limitations. The neutrality concerning metabolic and exercise physiological parameters as well as the positive profile of side effects favor ACE inhibitors, long-acting calcium channel blockers and especially AT(1) antagonists in physically active hypertensive patients with concomitant metabolic syndrome.

  6. Acute changes in arterial stiffness following exercise in people with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Jeyasundar; Swaminathan, Narasimman; Pereira, Natasha M; Henderson, Keiran; Brodie, David A

    This study aims to examine the changes in arterial stiffness immediately following sub-maximal exercise in people with metabolic syndrome. Ninety-four adult participants (19-80 years) with metabolic syndrome gave written consent and were measured for arterial stiffness using a SphygmoCor (SCOR-PVx, Version 8.0, Atcor Medical Private Ltd, USA) immediately before and within 5-10min after an incremental shuttle walk test. The arterial stiffness measures used were pulse wave velocity (PWV), aortic pulse pressure (PP), augmentation pressure, augmentation index (AI), subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) and ejection duration (ED). There was a significant increase (pexercise. Exercise capacity had a strong inverse correlation with arterial stiffness and age (pExercise capacity is inversely related to arterial stiffness and age in people with metabolic syndrome. Exercise induced changes in arterial stiffness measured using pulse wave analysis is an important tool that provides further evidence in studying cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exercise left ventricular performance in patients with chest pain, ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiograms, and angiographically normal coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.J.; Sands, M.J.; Davies, R.A.; Wackers, F.J.; Alexander, J.; Lachman, A.S.; Williams, B.W.; Zaret, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Left ventricular performance was evaluated using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in 31 patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and angiographically normal coronary arteries at rest and during maximal upright bicycle exercise. 201 Tl imaging was done in all patients after treadmill exercise and in selected patients after ergonovine provocation. Resting left ventricular performance was normal in all patients. An abnormal ejection fraction response to exercise was detected in 12 of 31 patients. Regional dysfunction was present during exercise in four patients, all of whom also had abnormal global responses. Three of these 12 patients and two additional patients had exercise-induced 201 Tl perfusion defects. In all nine patients who underwent ergonovine testing, there was no suggestion of coronary arterial spasm. Thus, left ventricular dysfunction during exercise, in the presence of normal resting performance, was found in a substantial number of patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and normal coronary arteries

  8. Impact of Age and Aerobic Exercise Training on Conduit Artery Wall Thickness: Role of the Shear Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Koichiro; Kosaki, Keisei; Sawano, Yuriko; Yoshikawa, Toru; Tagawa, Kaname; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Maeda, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Hemodynamic shear stress is the frictional force of blood on the arterial wall. The shear pattern in the conduit artery affects the endothelium and may participate in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. We investigated the role of the shear pattern in age- and aerobic exercise-induced changes in conduit artery wall thickness via cross-sectional and interventional studies. In a cross-sectional study, we found that brachial shear rate patterns and brachial artery intima-media thickness (IMT) correlated with age. Additionally, brachial artery shear rate patterns were associated with brachial artery IMT in 102 middle-aged and older individuals. In an interventional study, 39 middle-aged and older subjects were divided into 2 groups: control and exercise. The exercise group completed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise training. Aerobic exercise training significantly increased the antegrade shear rate and decreased the retrograde shear rate and brachial artery IMT. Moreover, changes in the brachial artery antegrade shear rate and the retrograde shear rate correlated with the change in brachial artery IMT. The results of the present study indicate that changes in brachial artery shear rate patterns may contribute to age- and aerobic exercise training-induced changes in brachial artery wall thickness. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Myocardial fatty acid utilisation during exercise induced ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, K.S. [First Dept. of Medicine, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland); Nikkinen, P. [Dept. of Clinical Chemistry, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland); Lindroth, L. [Medix Diacor Lab. Services, Ltd., Espoo (Finland); Kuikka, J.T. [Dept. of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio (Finland)

    2002-06-01

    Aim: Reversible or irreversible myocardial damage due to ischemia correlates with altered membrane functions of the cells. To compare myocardial free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism and flow during exercise induced ischemia we studied ten patients with coronary artery disease but without previous myocardial infarction. Methods: A series of post-exercise single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measurements was performed after injection of {sup 123}I labelled heptadecanoic acid (HDA). Myocardial perfusion was estimated from the separately performed exercise-redistribution thallium study. Fatty acid metabolic rate, thallium uptake and washout were calculated for anterior, lateral, posterior and septal segments. Results: The more reduced post-exercise FFA metabolic rate (-63{+-}18%, mean {+-}1 SD) compared to flow (-36{+-}16%) was related to the severity of myocardial ischemia and wall motion abnormalities. Conclusion: In this small group of patients, the reduced post-exercise FFA metabolic rate tentatively suggests a parsimonious workload of the exercising myocardium by reducing oxygen consumption in patients with coronary artery disease. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Bei reversibler und irreversibler Myokardschaedigung infolge Ischaemie sind die Membranfunktionen der Zellen veraendert. Um myokardialen Metabolismus freier Fettsaeuren (FFA) und Durchblutung bei belastungsinduzierter Ischaemie zu vergleichen, untersuchten wir zehn Patienten mit Koronarinsuffizienz, aber ohne vorangegangenen Myokardinfarkt. Methoden: Nach Injektion von {sup 123}I-markierter Heptadekansaeure (HDA) wurde eine Serie von SPECT-Messungen nach Belastung aufgenommen. Die myokardiale Perfusion wurde abgeschaetzt durch die separat durchgefuehrte Thalliumverteilungsstudie nach Belastung. Fettsaeurestoffwechsel, Thallium-Uptake und -Washout wurden fuer die anterioren, posterioren und septalen Segmente berechnet. Ergebnisse: Eine eingeschraenktere FFA-Stoffwechselrate (-63{+-}18%, {+-}1 SD

  10. Cerebral oximetry monitoring in the management of severe hypoxaemia associated with transposition of the great arteries with balloon atrial septostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Moreno, J C; Nájera Losada, D C; Sanabria Carretero, P; Paredes Lacave, Á; Benito Bartolomé, F

    2018-05-01

    Transposition of the great arteries (D-TGA) is one of the most common congenital heart diseases requiring neonatal surgical intervention. In the desperately ill neonate with TGA and the resultant hypoxaemia, acidemia, and congestive heart failure, improvement is often obtained with balloon atrial septostomy (BAS). Current methods employed to evaluate oxygen delivery and tissue consumption are frequently nonspecific. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows a continuous non-invasive measurement of tissue oxygenation which reflects perfusion status in real time. Because little is known about the direct effect of BAS on the neonatal brain and on cerebral oxygenation, we measured the effectiveness of BAS in two patients with D-TGA using NIRS before and after BAS. We concluded BAS improves cerebral oxygen saturation in neonates with D-TGA. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Exercise-induced arteriovenous intrapulmonary shunting in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickland, Michael K; Lovering, Andrew T; Eldridge, Marlowe W

    2007-08-01

    We have previously shown, using contrast echocardiography, that intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways are inducible in healthy humans during exercise; however, this technique does not allow for determination of arteriovenous vessel size or shunt magnitude. The purpose of this study was to determine whether large-diameter (more than 25 microm) intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways are present in the dog, and whether exercise recruits these conduits. Through the right forelimb, 10.8 million 25-microm stable isotope-labeled microspheres (BioPAL, Inc., Worcester, MA) were injected either at rest (n = 8) or during high-intensity exercise (6- 8 mph, 10-15% grade, n = 6). Systemic arterial blood was continuously sampled during and for 3 minutes after injection. After euthanasia, tissue samples were obtained from the heart, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle. In addition, 25- and 50-microm microspheres were infused into four isolated dog lungs that were ventilated and perfused at constant pressures similar to exercise. Blood and tissue samples were commercially analyzed for the presence of microspheres. No microspheres were detected in the arterial blood or tissue samples from resting dogs. In contrast, five of six exercising dogs showed evidence of exercise-induced intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting, as microspheres were detected in arterial blood and/or tissue. Furthermore, shunt magnitude was calculated to be 1.4 +/- 0.8% of cardiac output (n = 3). Evidence of intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses was also found in three of four isolated lungs. Consistent with previous human findings, these data demonstrate that intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways are functional in the dog and are recruited with exercise.

  12. Does lower limb exercise worsen renal artery hemodynamics in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Anqiang; Tian, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Zaipin; Deng, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) and renal complications emerge in some patients after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to treat abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA). The mechanisms for the causes of these problems are not clear. We hypothesized that for EVAR patients, lower limb exercise could negatively influence the physiology of the renal artery and the renal function, by decreasing the blood flow velocity and changing the hemodynamics in the renal arteries. To evaluate this hypothesis, pre- and post-operative models of the abdominal aorta were reconstructed based on CT images. The hemodynamic environment was numerically simulated under rest and lower limb exercise conditions. The results revealed that in the renal arteries, lower limb exercise decreased the wall shear stress (WSS), increased the oscillatory shear index (OSI) and increased the relative residence time (RRT). EVAR further enhanced these effects. Because these parameters are related to artery stenosis and atherosclerosis, this preliminary study concluded that lower limb exercise may increase the potential risk of inducing renal artery stenosis and renal complications for AAA patients. This finding could help elucidate the mechanism of renal artery stenosis and renal complications after EVAR and warn us to reconsider the management and nursing care of AAA patients.

  13. Bicarbonate attenuates arterial desaturation during maximal exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henning B; Bredmose, Per P; Strømstad, Morten

    2002-01-01

    The contribution of pH to exercise-induced arterial O2 desaturation was evaluated by intravenous infusion of sodium bicarbonate (Bic, 1 M; 200-350 ml) or an equal volume of saline (Sal; 1 M) at a constant infusion rate during a "2,000-m" maximal ergometer row in five male oarsmen. Blood...

  14. Update in the understanding of altitude-induced limitations to performance in team-sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Aughey, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The internationalism of field-based team sports (TS) such as football and rugby requires teams to compete in tournaments held at low to moderate altitude (∼1200-2500 m). In TS, acceleration, speed and aerobic endurance are physical characteristics associated with ball possession and, ultimately, scoring. While these qualities are affected by the development of neuromuscular fatigue at sea level, arterial hypoxaemia induced by exposure to altitude may further hinder the capacity to perform consecutive accelerations (CAC) or sprint endurance and thereby change the outcome of a match. The higher the altitude, the more severe the hypoxaemia, and thus, the larger the expected decline in aerobic endurance, CAC and match running performance. Therefore, it is critical for athletes and coaches to understand how arterial hypoxaemia affects aerobic endurance and CAC and the magnitude of decline they may face at altitude for optimal preparation and increased chances of success. This mini review summarises the effects of acute altitude/hypoxia exposure on aerobic endurance, CAC and activity profiles of TS athletes performing in the laboratory and during matches at natural altitude, and analyses the latest findings about the consequences of arterial hypoxaemia on the relationship between peripheral perturbations, neural adjustments and performance during repeated sprints or CAC. Finally, we briefly discuss how altitude training can potentially help athletes prepare for competition at altitude.

  15. Myocardial performance and perfusion during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease caused by Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paridon, S.M.; Ross, R.D.; Kuhns, L.R.; Pinsky, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    For a study of the natural history of coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease and their effect on myocardial blood flow reserve with exercise, five such patients underwent exercise testing on a bicycle. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, and electrocardiograms were monitored continuously. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed for all patients. One patient stopped exercise before exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve but had no evidence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities. Four patients terminated exercise because of exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve; one had normal cardiovascular reserve and thallium scintiscans, but the remaining patients had diminished cardiovascular reserve. Thallium scintigrams showed myocardial ischemia in two and infarction in one. No patient had exercise-induced electrocardiographic changes. These results indicate that patients with residual coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease frequently have reduced cardiovascular reserve during exercise. The addition of thallium scintigraphy and metabolic measurements to exercise testing improved the detection of exercise-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion

  16. Does lower limb exercise worsen renal artery hemodynamics in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anqiang Sun

    Full Text Available Renal artery stenosis (RAS and renal complications emerge in some patients after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR to treat abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA. The mechanisms for the causes of these problems are not clear. We hypothesized that for EVAR patients, lower limb exercise could negatively influence the physiology of the renal artery and the renal function, by decreasing the blood flow velocity and changing the hemodynamics in the renal arteries. To evaluate this hypothesis, pre- and post-operative models of the abdominal aorta were reconstructed based on CT images. The hemodynamic environment was numerically simulated under rest and lower limb exercise conditions. The results revealed that in the renal arteries, lower limb exercise decreased the wall shear stress (WSS, increased the oscillatory shear index (OSI and increased the relative residence time (RRT. EVAR further enhanced these effects. Because these parameters are related to artery stenosis and atherosclerosis, this preliminary study concluded that lower limb exercise may increase the potential risk of inducing renal artery stenosis and renal complications for AAA patients. This finding could help elucidate the mechanism of renal artery stenosis and renal complications after EVAR and warn us to reconsider the management and nursing care of AAA patients.

  17. Effect of exercise on arterial stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montero, David; Andersen, Andreas Breenfeldt; Oberholzer, Laura

    2017-01-01

    points (P = 0.196) although a linear decreasing trend was detected (P = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: Central AS augments during a conventional ET intervention that effectively enhances aerobic exercise capacity in young individuals. This suggests that normal, healthy elastic arteries are not amendable......BACKGROUND: Whether arterial stiffness (AS) can be improved by regular exercise in healthy individuals remains equivocal according to cross-sectional and longitudinal studies assessing arterial properties at discrete time points. The purpose of the present study was to pinpoint the time course......), in 9 previously untrained healthy normotensive adults (27 ± 4 years) with no history of cardiovascular disease. Exercise capacity was assessed by maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) elicited by incremental ergometry. RESULTS: VO2max increased throughout the ET intervention (+12% from week 0 to week 8...

  18. Low-fat diet and regular, supervised physical exercise in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease: reduction of stress-induced myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuler, G.; Schlierf, G.; Wirth, A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of physical exercise and normalization of serum lipoproteins on stress-induced myocardial ischemia were studied in 18 patients with coronary artery disease, stable angina pectoris, and mild hypercholesterolemia (total serum cholesterol 242 +/- 32 mg/dl). These patients underwent a combined regimen of low-fat/low-cholesterol diet and regular, supervised physical exercise at high intensity for 12 months. At 1 year serum lipoproteins has been lowered to ideal levels (serum cholesterol 202 +/- 31 mg/dl, low-density lipoproteins 130 +/- 30 mg/dl, very low-density lipoproteins 22 +/- 15 mg/dl, serum triglycerides 105 [69 to 304] mg/dl) and physical work capacity was improved by 21% (p less than .01). No significant effect was noted on high-density lipoproteins, probably as a result of the low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet. Stress-induced myocardial ischemia, as assessed by thallium-201 scintigraphy, was decreased by 54% (p less than .05) despite higher myocardial oxygen consumption. Eighteen patients matched for age and severity of coronary artery disease served as a control group and ''usual medical care'' was rendered by their private physicians. No significant changes with respect to serum lipoproteins, physical work capacity, maximal rate-pressure product, or stress-induced myocardial ischemia were observed in this group. These data indicate that regular physical exercise at high intensity, lowered body weight, and normalization of serum lipoproteins may alleviate compromised myocardial perfusion during stress

  19. Acute post-exercise change in blood pressure and exercise training response in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti M Kiviniemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that acute post-exercise change in blood pressure (BP may predict exercise training responses in BP in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Patients with CAD (n=116, age 62±5 years, 85 men underwent BP assessments at rest and during 10-min recovery following a symptom-limited exercise test before and after the 6-month training intervention (one strength and 3-4 aerobic moderate-intensity exercises weekly. Post-exercise change in systolic BP (SBP was calculated by subtracting resting SBP from lowest post-exercise SBP. The training-induced change in resting SBP was -2±13 mmHg (p=0.064, ranging from -42 to 35 mmHg. Larger post-exercise decrease in SBP and baseline resting SBP predicted a larger training-induced decrement in SBP (β=0.46 and β=-0.44, respectively, p<0.001 for both. Acute post-exercise decrease in SBP provided additive value to baseline resting SBP in the prediction of training-induced change in resting SBP (R squared from 0.20 to 0.26, p=0.002. After further adjustments for other potential confounders (sex, age, baseline body mass index, realized training load, post-exercise decrease in SBP still predicted the training response in resting SBP (β=0.26, p=0.015. Acute post-exercise change in SBP was associated with training-induced change in resting SBP in patients with CAD, providing significant predictive information beyond baseline resting SBP.

  20. The walking-induced transient hack concept is valid & relies on a transient early-exercise hypoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Bruneau

    Full Text Available Decreased arterial oxygen pressure obtained at peak exercise is strong evidence of walking-induced hypoxemia, assuming that the lower pressure occurs just before exercise is stopped. Using empirical predefined models and transcutaneous oximetry, we have shown that some patients reporting exercise intolerance show a minimal value at the onset of walking and a post-exercise overshoot. These changes are referred to as transcutaneous "walking-induced transient hacks".In 245 patients, walking-induced transcutaneous oxygen pressure changes in the chest were analyzed using observer-independent clustering techniques. Clustering classes were compared to the profile types previously proposed with the cross-correlation technique. The classifications of patients according to both approaches were compared using kappa statistics. In 10 patients showing a hack on transcutaneous oximetry, we analyzed the results of direct iterative arterial sampling recorded during a new walking treadmill test.Clustering analysis resulted in 4 classes that closely fit the 4 most frequently proposed empirical models (cross-correlation coefficients: 0.93 to 0.97. The kappa between the two classifications was 0.865. In 10 patients showing transcutaneous hacks, the minimal direct arterial oxygen pressure value occurred at exercise onset, and these patients exhibited a recovery overshoot reaching a maximum at two minutes of recovery, confirming the walking-induced transient hypoxemia.In patients reporting exercise intolerance, transcutaneous oximetry could help to detect walking-induced transient hypoxemia, while peak-exercise arterial oximetry might be normal.

  1. Arterial Ventricular Uncoupling with Age and Disease and Recoupling with Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantler, Paul D

    2017-01-01

    The deterioration in arterial and cardiac function with aging impairs arterial ventricular coupling, an important determinant of cardiovascular performance. However, exercise training improves arterial ventricular coupling especially during exercise during the age and disease process. This review examines the concept of arterial-ventricular coupling, and how age, and disease uncouples but exercise training recouples the heart and arterial system. PMID:28072585

  2. Edward F. Adolph Distinguished Lecture: The remarkable anti-aging effects of aerobic exercise on systemic arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in modern societies, and advancing age is the major risk factor for CVD. Arterial dysfunction, characterized by large elastic artery stiffening and endothelial dysfunction, is the key event leading to age-associated CVD. Our work shows that regular aerobic exercise inhibits large elastic artery stiffening with aging (optimizes arterial compliance) and preserves endothelial function. Importantly, among previously sedentary late middle-aged and older adults, aerobic exercise improves arterial stiffness and enhances endothelial function in most groups and, therefore, also can be considered a treatment for age-associated arterial dysfunction. The mechanisms by which regular aerobic exercise destiffens large elastic arteries are incompletely understood, but existing evidence suggests that reductions in oxidative stress associated with decreases in both adventitial collagen (fibrosis) and advanced glycation end-products (structural protein cross-linking molecules), play a key role. Aerobic exercise preserves endothelial function with aging by maintaining nitric oxide bioavailability via suppression of excessive superoxide-associated oxidative stress, and by inhibiting the development of chronic low-grade vascular inflammation. Recent work from our laboratory supports the novel hypothesis that aerobic exercise may exert these beneficial effects by directly inducing protection to aging arteries against multiple adverse factors to which they are chronically exposed. Regular aerobic exercise should be viewed as a “first line” strategy for prevention and treatment of arterial aging and a vital component of a contemporary public health approach for reducing the projected increase in population CVD burden. PMID:24855137

  3. Edward F. Adolph Distinguished Lecture: The remarkable anti-aging effects of aerobic exercise on systemic arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Douglas R

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in modern societies, and advancing age is the major risk factor for CVD. Arterial dysfunction, characterized by large elastic artery stiffening and endothelial dysfunction, is the key event leading to age-associated CVD. Our work shows that regular aerobic exercise inhibits large elastic artery stiffening with aging (optimizes arterial compliance) and preserves endothelial function. Importantly, among previously sedentary late middle-aged and older adults, aerobic exercise improves arterial stiffness and enhances endothelial function in most groups and, therefore, also can be considered a treatment for age-associated arterial dysfunction. The mechanisms by which regular aerobic exercise destiffens large elastic arteries are incompletely understood, but existing evidence suggests that reductions in oxidative stress associated with decreases in both adventitial collagen (fibrosis) and advanced glycation end-products (structural protein cross-linking molecules), play a key role. Aerobic exercise preserves endothelial function with aging by maintaining nitric oxide bioavailability via suppression of excessive superoxide-associated oxidative stress, and by inhibiting the development of chronic low-grade vascular inflammation. Recent work from our laboratory supports the novel hypothesis that aerobic exercise may exert these beneficial effects by directly inducing protection to aging arteries against multiple adverse factors to which they are chronically exposed. Regular aerobic exercise should be viewed as a "first line" strategy for prevention and treatment of arterial aging and a vital component of a contemporary public health approach for reducing the projected increase in population CVD burden. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Eijsvogels, T.M.; Bouts, Y.M.; Maiorana, A.J.; Naylor, L.H.; Scholten, R.R.; Spaanderman, M.E.; Pugh, C.J.; Sprung, V.S.; Schreuder, T.H.; Jones, H.; Cable, T.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk

  5. Gender-related difference in arterial elastance during exercise in patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungha; Ha, Jong-Won; Shim, Chi Young; Choi, Eui-Young; Kim, Jin-Mi; Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Se-Wha; Rim, Se-Joong; Chung, Namsik

    2008-04-01

    Exercise intolerance and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction are common in females. Recently, arterial stiffness has been suggested to be a significant contributor in the development of heart failure. How gender difference affects arterial stiffening and its response to exercise is not well known. We hypothesized that arterial elastance index during exercise would be more abnormal in females with hypertension than males. Arterial elastance index was estimated as arterial end systolic pressure/stroke volume controlled for body surface area and was measured at rest and during graded supine bicycle exercise (25 watts, 3-minute increments) in 298 patients with hypertension (149 males; 149 females; mean age, 59). The subjects were divided into 2 groups by gender. Exercise duration was significantly shorter in females compared to males (692+/-222 versus 483+/-128 seconds, Pexercise being significantly higher in females compared to males (0.69+/-0.83 versus 0.43+/-0.69, P=0.018). Arterial elastance index at each stage of exercise up to 75 W was independently associated with decreased exercise duration. In conclusion, despite lower arterial elastance index at rest, the increase during exercise was steeper in women with hypertension, suggesting a gender-related difference in dynamic arterial stiffness. The arterial elastance index during exercise was significantly associated with exercise duration in patients with hypertension.

  6. Clinical impact of exercise in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Marko; Jug, Borut; Lenasi, Helena

    2017-08-01

    Increasing prevalence, high morbidity and mortality, and decreased health-related quality of life are hallmarks of peripheral arterial disease. About one-third of peripheral arterial disease patients have intermittent claudication with deleterious effects on everyday activities, such as walking. Exercise training improves peripheral arterial disease symptoms and is recommended as first line therapy for peripheral arterial disease. This review examines the effects of exercise training beyond improvements in walking distance, namely on vascular function, parameters of inflammation, activated hemostasis and oxidative stress, and quality of life. Exercise training not only increases walking distance and physiologic parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease, but also improves the cardiovascular risk profile by helping patients achieve better control of hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity and dyslipidemia, thus further reducing cardiovascular risk and the prevalence of coexistent atherosclerotic diseases. American guidelines suggest supervised exercise training, performed for a minimum of 30-45 min, at least three times per week, for at least 12 weeks. Walking is the most studied exercise modality and its efficacy in improving cardiovascular parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease has been extensively proven. As studies have shown that supervised exercise training improves walking performance, cardiovascular parameters and quality of life in patients with peripheral arterial disease, it should be encouraged and more often prescribed.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms in Exercise-Induced Cardioprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Golbidi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is increasingly recognized as modifiable behavioral risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. A partial list of proposed mechanisms for exercise-induced cardioprotection include induction of heat shock proteins, increase in cardiac antioxidant capacity, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins, anatomical and physiological changes in the coronary arteries, changes in nitric oxide production, adaptational changes in cardiac mitochondria, increased autophagy, and improved function of sarcolemmal and/or mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels. It is currently unclear which of these protective mechanisms are essential for exercise-induced cardioprotection. However, most investigations focus on sarcolemmal KATP channels, NO production, and mitochondrial changes although it is very likely that other mechanisms may also exist. This paper discusses current information about these aforementioned topics and does not consider potentially important adaptations within blood or the autonomic nervous system. A better understanding of the molecular basis of exercise-induced cardioprotection will help to develop better therapeutic strategies.

  8. Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linkis, P; Jørgensen, L G; Olesen, H L

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity. J. Appl. Physiol. 78(1): 12-16, 1995.--Anterior (ACA) and middle (MCA) cerebral artery mean flow velocities (Vmean) and pulsatility indexes were determined using transcranial Doppler in 14 subjects during dynamic exercise afte...

  9. Decreased muscle oxygenation and increased arterial blood flow in the non-exercising limb during leg exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroishi, Kiyoshi; Kime, Ryotaro; Osada, Takuya; Murase, Norio; Shimomura, Kousuke; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated arterial blood flow, muscle tissue oxygenation and muscle metabolism in the non-exercising limb during leg cycling exercise. Ten healthy male volunteers performed a graded leg cycling exercise at 0, 40, 80, 120 and 160 watts (W) for 5 min each. Tissue oxygenation index (TOI) of the non-exercising left forearm muscle was measured using a near-infrared spatially resolved spectroscopy (NIR(SRS)), and non-exercising forearm blood flow ((NONEX)FBF) in the brachial artery was also evaluated by a Doppler ultrasound system. We also determined O(2) consumption of the non-exercising forearm muscle (NONEXV(O)(2mus)) by the rate of decrease in O(2)Hb during arterial occlusion at each work rate. TOI was significantly decreased at 160 W (p exercising muscle may be reduced, even though (NONEX)FBF increases at high work rates during leg cycling exercise.

  10. Physical exercise performance in temperate and warm environments is decreased by an impaired arterial baroreflex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Pires

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate whether running performance in different environments is dependent on intact arterial baroreceptor reflexes. We also assessed the exercise-induced cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses in animals lacking arterial baroafferent signals. To accomplish these goals, male Wistar rats were subjected to sinoaortic denervation (SAD or sham surgery (SHAM and had a catheter implanted into the ascending aorta to record arterial pressure and a telemetry sensor implanted in the abdominal cavity to record core temperature. After recovering from these surgeries, the animals were subjected to constant- or incremental-speed exercises performed until the voluntary interruption of effort under temperate (25° C and warm (35° C conditions. During the constant-speed exercises, the running time until the rats were fatigued was shorter in SAD rats in both environments. Although the core temperature was not significantly different between the groups, tail skin temperature was higher in SAD rats under temperate conditions. The denervated rats also displayed exaggerated increases in blood pressure and double product compared with the SHAM rats; in particular, in the warm environment, these exaggerated cardiovascular responses in the SAD rats persisted until they were fatigued. These SAD-mediated changes occurred in parallel with increased variability in the very low and low components of the systolic arterial pressure power spectrum. The running performance was also affected by SAD during the incremental-speed exercises, with the maximal speed attained being decreased by approximately 20% in both environments. Furthermore, at the maximal power output tolerated during the incremental exercises, the mean arterial pressure, heart rate and double product were exaggerated in the SAD relative to SHAM rats. In conclusion, the chronic absence of the arterial baroafferents accelerates exercise fatigue in temperate and warm

  11. Aerobic exercise reduces oxidative stress and improves vascular changes of small mesenteric and coronary arteries in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Fernanda R; Briones, Ana M; García-Redondo, Ana B; Galán, María; Martínez-Revelles, Sonia; Avendaño, Maria S; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Fernandes, Tiago; Vassallo, Dalton V; Oliveira, Edilamar M; Salaices, Mercedes

    2013-02-01

    Regular physical activity is an effective non-pharmacological therapy for prevention and control of hypertension. We investigated the effects of aerobic exercise training in vascular remodelling and in the mechanical and functional alterations of coronary and small mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY), SHR and SHR trained on a treadmill for 12 weeks were used to evaluate vascular structural, mechanical and functional properties. Exercise did not affect lumen diameter, wall thickness and wall/lumen ratio but reduced vascular stiffness of coronary and mesenteric arteries from SHR. Exercise also reduced collagen deposition and normalized altered internal elastic lamina organization and expression of MMP-9 in mesenteric arteries from SHR. Exercise did not affect contractile responses of coronary arteries but improved the endothelium-dependent relaxation in SHR. In mesenteric arteries, training normalized the increased contractile responses induced by U46619 and by high concentrations of acetylcholine. In vessels from SHR, exercise normalized the effects of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and the NOS inhibitor l-NAME in vasodilator or vasoconstrictor responses, normalized the increased O(2) (-) production and the reduced Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase expression and increased NO production. Exercise training of SHR improves endothelial function and vascular stiffness in coronary and small mesenteric arteries. This might be related to the concomitant decrease of oxidative stress and increase of NO bioavailability. Such effects demonstrate the beneficial effects of exercise on the vascular system and could contribute to a reduction in blood pressure. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Aerobic exercise reduces oxidative stress and improves vascular changes of small mesenteric and coronary arteries in hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Fernanda R; Briones, Ana M; García-Redondo, Ana B; Galán, María; Martínez-Revelles, Sonia; Avendaño, Maria S; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Fernandes, Tiago; Vassallo, Dalton V; Oliveira, Edilamar M; Salaices, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Regular physical activity is an effective non-pharmacological therapy for prevention and control of hypertension. We investigated the effects of aerobic exercise training in vascular remodelling and in the mechanical and functional alterations of coronary and small mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Experimental Approach Normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY), SHR and SHR trained on a treadmill for 12 weeks were used to evaluate vascular structural, mechanical and functional properties. Key Results Exercise did not affect lumen diameter, wall thickness and wall/lumen ratio but reduced vascular stiffness of coronary and mesenteric arteries from SHR. Exercise also reduced collagen deposition and normalized altered internal elastic lamina organization and expression of MMP-9 in mesenteric arteries from SHR. Exercise did not affect contractile responses of coronary arteries but improved the endothelium-dependent relaxation in SHR. In mesenteric arteries, training normalized the increased contractile responses induced by U46619 and by high concentrations of acetylcholine. In vessels from SHR, exercise normalized the effects of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and the NOS inhibitor l-NAME in vasodilator or vasoconstrictor responses, normalized the increased O2− production and the reduced Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase expression and increased NO production. Conclusions and Implications Exercise training of SHR improves endothelial function and vascular stiffness in coronary and small mesenteric arteries. This might be related to the concomitant decrease of oxidative stress and increase of NO bioavailability. Such effects demonstrate the beneficial effects of exercise on the vascular system and could contribute to a reduction in blood pressure. PMID:22994554

  13. Voluntary aerobic exercise increases arterial resilience and mitochondrial health with aging in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A.; Battson, Micah L.; Cuevas, Lauren M.; Zigler, Melanie C.; Sindler, Amy L.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysregulation and associated excessive reactive oxygen species (mtROS) production is a key source of oxidative stress in aging arteries that reduces baseline function and may influence resilience (ability to withstand stress). We hypothesized that voluntary aerobic exercise would increase arterial resilience in old mice. An acute mitochondrial stressor (rotenone) caused greater (further) impairment in peak carotid EDD in old (~27 mo., OC, n=12;−32.5±-10.5%) versus young (~7 mo., YC n=11;−5.4±- 3.7%) control male mice, whereas arteries from young and old exercising (YVR n=10 and OVR n=11, 10-wk voluntary running;−0.8±-2.1% and −8.0±4.9%, respectively) mice were protected. Ex-vivo simulated Western diet (WD, high glucose and palmitate) caused greater impairment in EDD in OC (-28.5±8.6%) versus YC (-16.9±5.2%) and YVR (-15.3±2.3%), whereas OVR (-8.9±3.9%) were more resilient (not different versus YC). Simultaneous ex-vivo treatment with mitochondria-specific antioxidant MitoQ attenuated WD-induced impairments in YC and OC, but not YVR or OVR, suggesting that exercise improved resilience to mtROS-mediated stress. Exercise normalized age-related alterations in aortic mitochondrial protein markers PGC-1α, SIRT-3 and Fis1 and augmented cellular antioxidant and stress response proteins. Our results indicate that arterial aging is accompanied by reduced resilience and mitochondrial health, which are restored by voluntary aerobic exercise. PMID:27875805

  14. Voluntary aerobic exercise increases arterial resilience and mitochondrial health with aging in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A; Battson, Micah L; Cuevas, Lauren M; Zigler, Melanie C; Sindler, Amy L; Seals, Douglas R

    2016-11-22

    Mitochondrial dysregulation and associated excessive reactive oxygen species (mtROS) production is a key source of oxidative stress in aging arteries that reduces baseline function and may influence resilience (ability to withstand stress). We hypothesized that voluntary aerobic exercise would increase arterial resilience in old mice. An acute mitochondrial stressor (rotenone) caused greater (further) impairment in peak carotid EDD in old (~27 mo., OC, n=12; -32.5±-10.5%) versus young (~7 mo., YC n=11; -5.4±- 3.7%) control male mice, whereas arteries from young and old exercising (YVR n=10 and OVR n=11, 10-wk voluntary running; -0.8±-2.1% and -8.0±4.9%, respectively) mice were protected. Ex-vivo simulated Western diet (WD, high glucose and palmitate) caused greater impairment in EDD in OC (-28.5±8.6%) versus YC (-16.9±5.2%) and YVR (-15.3±2.3%), whereas OVR (-8.9±3.9%) were more resilient (not different versus YC). Simultaneous ex-vivo treatment with mitochondria-specific antioxidant MitoQ attenuated WD-induced impairments in YC and OC, but not YVR or OVR, suggesting that exercise improved resilience to mtROS-mediated stress. Exercise normalized age-related alterations in aortic mitochondrial protein markers PGC-1α, SIRT-3 and Fis1 and augmented cellular antioxidant and stress response proteins. Our results indicate that arterial aging is accompanied by reduced resilience and mitochondrial health, which are restored by voluntary aerobic exercise.

  15. Improvement of exercise ventricular function in patients of coronary artery bypass surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasuji, Michio; Sawa, Shigeharu; Tedoriya, Takeo; Iwa, Takashi; Taki, Jun-ichi; Bunkou, Hisashi

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-five patients underwent exercise blood pool scintigraphy before and 4 weeks after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), peak ejection rate (PER), peak filling rate (PFR), and one third peak filling rate (1/3 FR) were calculated. Exercise-induced EF was significantly higher after than before CABG (+2.4±6.1% vs -3.9±7.3%). Irrespective of exercise, preoperative PER was unchanged. Postoperative exercise significantly increased PER from 2.88±0.71 sec -1 to 3.85±0.85 sec -1 (p<0.01). Exercise also significantly increased PFR after GABG when compared with that before GABF. 1/3FR did not differ before and after CABG. Exercise blood pool scintigraphy was useful in evaluating ventricular function before and after CABG. (Namekawa, K)

  16. Localization of coronary artery disease with exercise electrocardiography: correlation with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, R.F.; Freedman, B.; Bailey, I.K.; Uren, R.F.; Kelly, D.T.

    1981-01-01

    In 61 patients with single vessel coronary artery disease (70 percent or greater obstruction of luminal diameter in only one vessel) and no previous myocardial infarction, the sites of ischemic changes on 12 lead exercise electrocardiography and on thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning were related to the obstructed coronary artery. The site of exercise-induced S-T segment depression did not identify which coronary artery was obstructed. In the 37 patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in the inferior leads and leads V4 to V6, and in the 18 patients with right coronary artery disease and in the 6 patients with left circumflex artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in leads V5 and V6. Although S-T segment elevation was uncommon in most leads, it occurred in lead V1 or a VL, or both, in 51 percent of the patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease. A reversible anterior defect on exercise thallium scanning correlated with left anterior descending coronary artery disease (probability [p] less than 0.0001) and a reversible inferior thallium defect correlated with right coronary or left circumflex artery disease (p less than 0.0001). In patients with single vessel disease, the site of S-T segment depression does not identify the obstructed coronary artery; S-T segment elevation in lead V1 or aVL, or both, identifies left anterior descending coronary artery disease; and the site of reversible perfusion defect on thallium scanning identifies the site of myocardial ischemia and the obstructed coronary artery

  17. Impact of age on pulmonary artery systolic pressures at rest and with exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garvan C Kane

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It is not well known if advancing age influences normal rest or exercise pulmonary artery pressures. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association of increasing age with measurements of pulmonary artery systolic pressure at rest and with exercise. Subjects and methods: A total of 467 adults without cardiopulmonary disease and normal exercise capacity (age range: 18–85 years underwent symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing with Doppler measurement of rest and exercise pulmonary artery systolic pressure. Results: There was a progressive increase in rest and exercise pulmonary artery pressures with increasing age. Pulmonary artery systolic pressures at rest and with exercise were 25 ± 5 mmHg and 33 ± 9 mmHg, respectively, in those <40 years, and 30 ± 5 mmHg and 41 ± 12 mmHg, respectively, in those ≥70 years. While elevated left-sided cardiac filling pressures were excluded by protocol design, markers of arterial stiffness associated with the age-dependent effects on pulmonary pressures. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that in echocardiographically normal adults, pulmonary artery systolic pressure increases with advancing age. This increase is seen at rest and with exercise. These increases in pulmonary pressure occur in association with decreasing transpulmonary flow and increases in systemic pulse pressure, suggesting that age-associated blood vessel stiffening may contribute to these differences in pulmonary artery systolic pressure.

  18. Orthostatic hypoxaemia in dialysed adult polycystic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzets, Z; Golan, E; Ben-Chitrit, S; Smorjik, Y; Os, P; Bernheim, J

    1997-04-01

    Recently we observed a unique clinical phenomenon, namely, orthostatic or postural hypoxaemia in a 72-year-old female adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) patient, maintained on CAPD. Extensive investigations failed to yield a satisfactory explanation for her ambulatory hypoxaemia. To validate our observation, 15 dialysed patients underwent blood gases analyses in both the supine and ambulatory positions (SpO2 and ApO2 respectively). Patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (n-7) whose end-stage renal failure (ESRF) was due to APKD and group 2 (n-8) in whom ESRF was due to other causes. Both haemodialysed (HD) and CAPD patients were included. ApO2 was determined as the pO2 immediately upon standing up. Readings in HD patients were taken at the end of the dialysis session, that is, at the patients' dry weight. Respective SpO2 and ApO2 of the two groups were 85 +/- 17.1 and 78 +/- 20.5 vs 85.8 +/- 19 and 91 +/- 21 mmHg. Delta change in pO2 defined as the mean decrease (negative value) or mean increase (positive value) of ApO2 in relation to SpO2 was -7.85 (group 1) vs + 5.2 mmHg (group 2), P delta. In group 2, four of eight showed a positive delta whilst the remaining four had no change in the delta value. Orthostatic hypoxaemia may occur in dialysed patients whose ESRF is due to APKD.

  19. Exercise-induced ST-T changes and severity of myocardial ischemia in single-vessel coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimonagata, Tsuyoshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Hayashida, Kohei; Takamiya, Makoto; Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya; Saito, Muneyasu.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate how exercise-induced ST-T changes reflect the severity of myocardial ischemia in 66 patients with singlevessel disease (SVD) who underwent stress thallium scans. Quantitative assessment of myocardial ischemia was performed with thallium ischemic score (TIS) derived from circumferential profile analysis. Circumferential profiles of the initial and 4 hr redistribution myocardial image were generated for each of three views (ANT, LAO 45, LAO 70) and TIS was obtained as the average of the area between the initial and 4 hr redistribution profile for each view. In 66 patients with SVD, TIS were compared with coronary angiographic findings. TIS was correlated well with the severity of coronary artery stenosis. In addition, TIS was also correlated well with lung thallium uptake in 46 LAD disease. Therefore, these data proved that TIS was useful for the evaluation of the severity of myocardial ischemia. In 46 LAD disease, TIS, being as the indicator of the severity of myocardial ischemia, was compared precisely with results of stress electrocardiograms to evaluate how exercise-induced ST-T changes reflect the severity of myocardial ischemia. Patients with negative U wave had the highest mean TIS and those with horizontal or down sloping ST depression of 1.0 mm or more had higher mean TIS than those with slow upsloping ST depression of 1.5 mm or more, but there were no significant differences between these groups and those without ST-T change and the mean TIS was not different significantly between V 2-6 ST depression group and V 2-6 , II, III, a V F ST depression group. In conclusion, these results indicated that exercise-induced ST-T changes reflect the severity of myocardial ischemia in some degree but also has a limitation in evaluation of the severity of myocardial ischemia. (author)

  20. Impact of endothelin blockade on acute exercise-induced changes in blood flow and endothelial function in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Tim H A; van Lotringen, Jaap H; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-09-01

    Positive vascular effects of exercise training are mediated by acute increases in blood flow. Type 2 diabetes patients show attenuated exercise-induced increases in blood flow, possibly mediated by the endothelin pathway, preventing an optimal stimulus for vascular adaptation. We examined the impact of endothelin receptor blockade (bosentan) on exercise-induced blood flow in the brachial artery and on pre- and postexercise endothelial function in type 2 diabetes patients (n = 9, 60 ± 7 years old) and control subjects (n = 10, 60 ± 5 years old). Subjects reported twice to the laboratory to perform hand-grip exercise in the presence of endothelin receptor blockade or placebo. We examined brachial artery endothelial function (via flow-mediated dilatation) before and after exercise, as well as blood flow during exercise. Endothelin receptor blockade resulted in a larger increase in blood flow during exercise in type 2 diabetes patients (P = 0.046), but not in control subjects (P = 0.309). Exercise increased shear rate across the exercise protocol, unaffected by endothelin receptor blockade. Exercise did not alter brachial artery diameter in either group, but endothelin receptor blockade resulted in a larger brachial artery diameter in type 2 diabetes patients (P = 0.033). Exercise significantly increased brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation in both groups, unaffected by endothelin receptor blockade. Endothelin receptor blockade increased exercise-induced brachial artery blood flow in type 2 diabetes patients, but not in control subjects. Despite this effect of endothelin receptor blockade on blood flow, we found no impact on baseline or post-exercise endothelial function in type 2 diabetes patients or control subjects, possibly related to normalization of the shear stimulus during exercise. The successful increase in blood flow during exercise in type 2 diabetes patients through endothelin receptor blockade may have beneficial effects in

  1. Heat stress redistributes blood flow in arteries of the brain during dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Oue, Anna; Yoneya, Marina; Sadamoto, Tomoko; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that heat stress would decrease anterior and posterior cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise, and the reduction in anterior CBF would be partly associated with large increase in extracranial blood flow (BF). Nine subjects performed 40 min of semirecumbent cycling at 60% of the peak oxygen uptake in hot (35°C; Heat) and thermoneutral environments (25°C; Control). We evaluated BF and conductance (COND) in the external carotid artery (ECA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and vertebral artery (VA) using ultrasonography. During the Heat condition, ICA and VA BF were significantly increased 10 min after the start of exercise (P Heat. Compared with the Control, either BF or COND of ICA and VA at the end of Heat tended to be lower, but not significantly. In contrast, ECA BF and COND at the end of Heat were both higher than levels in the Control condition (P Heat, a reduction in ICA BF appears to be associated with a decline in end-tidal CO2 tension (r = 0.84), whereas VA BF appears to be affected by a change in cardiac output (r = 0.87). In addition, a change in ECA BF during Heat was negatively correlated with a change in ICA BF (r = -0.75). Heat stress resulted in modification of the vascular response of head and brain arteries to exercise, which resulted in an alteration in the distribution of cardiac output. Moreover, a hyperthermia-induced increase in extracranial BF might compromise anterior CBF during exercise with heat stress. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Diastolic compliance and exercise-induced left ventricular diastolic volume changes in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, W.; Varma, V.; Wasserman, A.; Katz, R.; Reba, R.; Ross, A.

    1983-01-01

    This study consists of 46 consecutive patients who had supine resting and exercise multigated (MUGA) blood pool studies. All patients had angio-graphically important coronary stenosis in at least one major vessel. Thirty-five out of 46 patients with coronary artery disease increased left ventricular end diastolic volume with a supine exercise. The remaining eleven patients dit not dilate the left ventricle. Those patients, who were able to increase their end diastolic volume during exercise, had better compliance of the left ventricle manifested by lower end diastolic pressures, whereas, patients with poor left ventricular compliance were unable to volume expand during supine exercise

  3. Mean arterial pressure following prolonged exercise in the heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, D; Lynn, A G; Binder, K

    2012-01-01

    benefit to its regulation. We examined MAP (Finometer) in eight trained (T) and eight untrained (UT) individuals prior to, and following, 120 min of cycling at 42 °C with (HYD) and without (DEHY) fluid replacement. Exercise during DEHY induced significant hyperthermia (T: 39.20 ± 0.52 °C vs UT: 38.70 ± 0......Prolonged exercise in the heat without fluid replacement represents a significant challenge to the regulation of mean arterial pressure (MAP). It is unknown, however, if MAP is equally challenged during the post-exercise period, and whether regular endurance exercise training can provide any.......36 °C, P = 0.941) and body weight losses (T: 3.4 ± 1.2% vs UT: 2.7 ± 0.9%, P = 0.332), which did not differ between groups. Although MAP was equally reduced 5 min into the post-exercise period of DEHY (T: -20 ± 11 mmHg vs UT: -22 ± 13 mmHg, P = 0.800), its subsequent recovery was significantly different...

  4. Dynamic Aerobic Exercise Induces Baroreflex Improvement in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute aerobic exercise on arterial pressure (AP, heart rate (HR, and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (n=8 and diabetic (n=8 groups. AP, HR, and BRS, which were measured by tachycardic and bradycardic (BR responses to AP changes, were evaluated at rest (R and postexercise session (PE on a treadmill. At rest, STZ diabetes induced AP and HR reductions, associated with BR impairment. Attenuation in resting diabetes-induced AP (R: 103±2 versus PE: 111±3 mmHg and HR (R: 290±7 versus PE: 328±10 bpm reductions and BR dysfunction (R: -0.70±0.06 versus PE: -1.21±0.09 bpm/mmHg was observed in the postexercise period. In conclusion, the hemodynamic and arterial baro-mediated control of circulation improvement in the postexercise period reinforces the role of exercise in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes.

  5. Dynamic Aerobic Exercise Induces Baroreflex Improvement in Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Luciana; da Pureza, Demilto Y.; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Conti, Filipe Fernandes; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute aerobic exercise on arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (n = 8) and diabetic (n = 8) groups. AP, HR, and BRS, which were measured by tachycardic and bradycardic (BR) responses to AP changes, were evaluated at rest (R) and postexercise session (PE) on a treadmill. At rest, STZ diabetes induced AP and HR reductions, associated with BR impairment. Attenuation in resting diabetes-induced AP (R: 103 ± 2 versus PE: 111 ± 3 mmHg) and HR (R: 290 ± 7 versus PE: 328 ± 10 bpm) reductions and BR dysfunction (R: −0.70 ± 0.06 versus PE: −1.21 ± 0.09 bpm/mmHg) was observed in the postexercise period. In conclusion, the hemodynamic and arterial baro-mediated control of circulation improvement in the postexercise period reinforces the role of exercise in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes. PMID:22203833

  6. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth / For Parents / Exercise-Induced Asthma What's in ... Exercise-Induced Asthma Print What Is Exercise-Induced Asthma? Most kids and teens with asthma have symptoms ...

  7. Abnormal shortened diastolic time length at increasing heart rates in patients with abnormal exercise-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombardini Tonino

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The degree of pulmonary hypertension is not independently related to the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction but is frequently associated with diastolic filling abnormalities. The aim of this study was to assess diastolic times at increasing heart rates in normal and in patients with and without abnormal exercise-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure (PASP. Methods. We enrolled 109 patients (78 males, age 62 ± 13 years referred for exercise stress echocardiography and 16 controls. The PASP was derived from the tricuspid Doppler tracing. A cut-off value of PASP ≥ 50 mmHg at peak stress was considered as indicative of abnormal increase in PASP. Diastolic times and the diastolic/systolic time ratio were recorded by a precordial cutaneous force sensor based on a linear accelerometer. Results At baseline, PASP was 30 ± 5 mmHg in patients and 25 ± 4 in controls. At peak stress the PASP was normal in 95 patients (Group 1; 14 patients (Group 2 showed an abnormal increase in PASP (from 35 ± 4 to 62 ± 12 mmHg; P Conclusion The first and second heart sound vibrations non-invasively monitored by a force sensor are useful for continuously assessing diastolic time during exercise. Exercise-induced abnormal PASP was associated with reduced diastolic time at heart rates beyond 100 beats per minute.

  8. Effects of Different Exercise Modes on Arterial Stiffness and Nitric Oxide Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Natsuki; Fujie, Shumpei; Horii, Naoki; Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri; Tsuji, Katsunori; Uchida, Masataka; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Tabata, Izumi; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2018-06-01

    Aerobic training (AT) and high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) reduce arterial stiffness, whereas resistance training (RT) induces deterioration of or no change in arterial stiffness. However, the molecular mechanism of these effects of different exercise modes remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify the difference of different exercise effects on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling pathway and arterial stiffness in rats and humans. In the animal study, forty 10-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: sedentary control (CON), AT (treadmill running, 60 min at 30 m·min, 5 d·wk for 8 wk), RT (ladder climbing, 8-10 sets per day, 3 d·wk for 8 wk), and HIIT (14 repeats of 20-s swimming session with 10-s pause between sessions, 4 d·wk for 6 wk from 12-wk-old) groups (n = 10 in each group). In the human study, we confirmed the effects of 6-wk HIIT and 8-wk AT interventions on central arterial stiffness and plasma nitrite/nitrate level in untrained healthy young men in randomized controlled trial (HIIT, AT, and CON; n = 7 in each group). In the animal study, the effect on aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), as an index of central arterial stiffness, after HIIT was the same as the decrease in aortic PWV and increase in arterial eNOS/Akt phosphorylation after AT, which was not changed by RT. A negative correlation between aortic PWV and eNOS phosphorylation was observed (r = -0.38, P HIIT- and AT-induced changes in carotid-femoral PWV (HIIT -115.3 ± 63.4 and AT -157.7 ± 45.7 vs CON 71.3 ± 61.1 m·s, each P HIIT may reduce central arterial stiffness via the increase in aortic nitric oxide bioavailability despite it being done in a short time and short term and has the same effects as AT.

  9. Aerobic exercise training reduces arterial stiffness in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donley, David A; Fournier, Sara B; Reger, Brian L; DeVallance, Evan; Bonner, Daniel E; Olfert, I Mark; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Chantler, Paul D

    2014-06-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a threefold increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality partly due to increased arterial stiffening. We compared the effects of aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffening/mechanics in MetS subjects without overt CVD or type 2 diabetes. MetS and healthy control (Con) subjects underwent 8 wk of exercise training (ExT; 11 MetS and 11 Con) or remained inactive (11 MetS and 10 Con). The following measures were performed pre- and postintervention: radial pulse wave analysis (applanation tonometry) was used to measure augmentation pressure and index, central pressures, and an estimate of myocardial efficiency; arterial stiffness was assessed from carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (cfPWV, applanation tonometry); carotid thickness was assessed from B-mode ultrasound; and peak aerobic capacity (gas exchange) was performed in the seated position. Plasma matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and CVD risk (Framingham risk score) were also assessed. cfPWV was reduced (P Exercise training reduced (P exercise training, thereby lowering their cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Aerobic Exercise Training and Arterial Changes in African-Americans versus Caucasians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranadive, Sushant M.; Yan, Huimin; Lane, Abbi D.; Kappus, Rebecca M.; Cook, Marc D.; Sun, Peng; Harvey, Idethia; Ploutz-Synder, Robert; Woods, Jeffrey A.; Wilund, Kenneth R.; Fernhall, Bo

    2015-01-01

    African-Americans (AA) have increased carotid artery intima-media thickness and decreased vascular function compared to their Caucasian (CA) peers. Aerobic exercise prevents and potentially reverses arterial dysfunction. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 8 weeks of moderate-high intensity aerobic training in young healthy sedentary AA and CA men and women. Methods Sixty-four healthy volunteers (men = 28, women = 36) with mean age = 24 underwent measures of arterial structure, function and blood pressure variables at baseline, post-4 week control period and 8 weeks post-training. Results There was a significant increase in VO2peak amongst both groups post exercise training. Brachial systolic blood pressure decreased significantly following control period in both groups but not following exercise training. Carotid pulse pressure decreased significantly in both groups post exercise training as compared to baseline. There was no change in any of the other blood pressure variables. AAs had a higher intima-media thickness at baseline and post-control period, but significantly decreased following exercise training compared to CAs. AAs had significantly lower baseline forearm blood flow and RH compared to CAs, but exercise training had no effect on these variables. There was no significant difference in arterial stiffness (cPWV) and wave-reflection (AIx) between the two groups at any time point. Conclusions This is the first study to show that, 8 weeks of aerobic exercise training causes significant improvement in the arterial structure in young, healthy AAs, making it comparable to the CAs and with minimal effects on blood pressure variables. PMID:26225767

  11. Local Injections of Superoxide Dismutase Attenuate the Exercise Pressor Reflex in Rats with Femoral Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Xing

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The exercise pressor reflex is amplified in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD and in an experimental PAD model of rats induced by femoral artery occlusion. Heightened blood pressure worsens the restricted blood flow directed to the limbs in this disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the role played by muscle oxidative stress in regulating the augmented pressor response to static exercise in PAD. We hypothesized that limb ischemia impairs muscle superoxide dismutase (SOD thereby leading to abnormal autonomic responsiveness observed in PAD animals, and a chronic compensation of SOD for anti-oxidation improves the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex. Our data show that femoral occlusion decreased the protein levels of SOD in ischemic muscle as compared with control muscle. Downregulation of SOD appeared to a greater degree in the oxidative (red muscle than in the glycolytic (white muscle under the condition of muscle ischemia. In addition, the exercise pressor response was assessed during electrically induced static contraction. The data demonstrates that the enhancement of the exercise pressor reflex was significantly attenuated after tempol (a mimetic of SOD, 30 mg over a period of 72 h was administered into the occluded hindlimb. In the occluded rats, mean arterial pressure (MAP response was 26 ± 3 mmHg with no tempol and 12 ± 2 mmHg with tempol application (P < 0.05 vs. group with no tempol; n = 6 in each group. There were no differences in muscle tension development (time-tension index: 12.1 ± 1.2 kgs with no tempol and 13.5 ± 1.1 kgs with tempol; P > 0.05 between groups. In conclusion, SOD is lessened in the ischemic muscles and supplement of SOD improves the amplified exercise pressor reflex, which is likely beneficial to the restricted blood flow to the limbs in PAD.

  12. Exercise and chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Katlynn M; Sturgeon, Kathleen M; Winkels, Renate M; Wiskemann, Joachim; Williams, Nancy I; Schmitz, Kathryn

    2018-07-01

    Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA) is the temporary or permanent loss of menses experienced by premenopausal women undergoing chemotherapy treatment for cancer. Two possible mechanisms through which chemotherapy induces CIA have been identified: systemic endothelial dysfunction, resulting in decreased blood flow to the ovaries, and increased oxidative stress within the ovaries, both of which are proposed to lead to apoptosis of follicles. Endothelial dysfunction in ovarian arteries in women undergoing or who have undergone chemotherapy treatment is characterized by prothrombotic changes and thickening of the vascular wall. These changes result in occlusion of the blood vessels. Oxidative stress is increased and antioxidants decreased in the ovaries secondary to chemotherapy drugs, specifically cyclophosphamide. It is hypothesized that low to moderate intensity aerobic exercise during chemotherapy may prevent these changes and lessen the risk for developing CIA in premenopausal women. Low to moderate intensity aerobic exercise has been shown to improve endothelial function and blood flow in patients with cardiovascular disease-a disease state characterized by endothelial dysfunction and for which patients who have undergone chemotherapy are at increased risk. In mice, moderate intensity aerobic exercise has been shown to decrease the amount of oxidative stress within the ovaries, and in humans, chronic aerobic exercise has been shown to increase antioxidant production systemically. This hypothesis should be tested in both a mouse model, using sedentary and exercising mice treated with chemotherapy drugs that commonly result in CIA, as well as a human model to determine the effects of low to moderate intensity aerobic exercise on ovarian function in premenopausal women undergoing chemotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Aerobic Exercise Training and Arterial Changes in African Americans versus Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranadive, Sushant M; Yan, Huimin; Lane, Abbi D; Kappus, Rebecca M; Cook, Marc D; Sun, Peng; Harvey, Idethia; Ploutz-Synder, Robert; Woods, Jeffrey A; Wilund, Kenneth R; Fernhall, B O

    2016-01-01

    African Americans (AA) have increased carotid artery intima-media thickness and decreased vascular function compared with their Caucasian (CA) peers. Aerobic exercise prevents and potentially reverses arterial dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 8 wk of moderate- to high-intensity aerobic training in young healthy sedentary AA and CA men and women. Sixty-four healthy volunteers (men, 28; women, 36) with mean age 24 yr underwent measures of arterial structure, function, and blood pressure (BP) variables at baseline, after the 4-wk control period, and 8 wk after training. There was a significant increase in VO2peak among both groups after exercise training. Brachial systolic BP decreased significantly after the control period in both groups but not after exercise training. Carotid pulse pressure decreased significantly in both groups after exercise training as compared with that in baseline. There was no change in any of the other BP variables. AA had higher intima-media thickness at baseline and after the control period but it significantly decreased after exercise training compared with that of CA. AA had significantly lower baseline forearm blood flow and reactive hyperemia compared with those of CA, but exercise training had no effect on these variables. There was no significant difference in arterial stiffness (central pulse wave velocity) and wave-reflection (augmentation index) between the two groups at any time point. This is the first study to show that 8 wk of aerobic exercise training causes significant improvement in the arterial structure in young, healthy AA, making it comparable with the CA and with minimal effects on BP variables.

  14. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  15. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%)

  16. Exercise-induced arterial hypertension - an independent factor for hypertrophy and a ticking clock for cardiac fatigue or atrial fibrillation in athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischik, Roman; Spelsberg, Norman; Niggemann, Hiltrud; Dworrak, Birgit; Tiroch, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background : Exercise-induced arterial hypertension (EIAH) leads to myocardial hypertrophy and is associated with a poor prognosis. EIAH might be related to the "cardiac fatigue" caused by endurance training. The goal of this study was to examine whether there is any relationship between EIAH and left ventricular hypertrophy in Ironman-triathletes. We used echocardiography and spiroergometry to determine the left ventricular mass (LVM), the aerobic/anaerobic thresholds and the steady-state blood pressure of 51 healthy male triathletes. The main inclusion criterion was the participation in at least one middle or long distance triathlon. When comparing triathletes with LVM 220g there was a significant difference between blood pressure values (BP) at the anaerobic threshold (185.2± 21.5 mmHg vs. 198.8 ±22.3 mmHg, p=0.037). The spiroergometric results were: maximum oxygen uptake (relative VO 2max) 57.3 ±7.5ml/min/kg vs. 59.8±9.5ml/min/kg (p=ns). Cut-point analysis for the relationship of BP >170 mmHg at the aerobic threshold and the probability of LVM >220g showed a sensitivity of 95.8%, a specificity of 33.3%, with a positive predictive value of 56.8 %, a good negative predictive value of 90%. The probability of LVM >220g increased with higher BP during exercise (OR: 1.027, 95% CI 1.002-1.052, p= 0.034) or with higher training volume (OR: 1.23, 95% CI 1.04 -1.47, p = 0.019). Echocardiography showed predominantly concentric remodelling, followed by concentric hypertrophy. Significant left ventricular hypertrophy with LVM >220g is associated with higher arterial blood pressure at the aerobic or anaerobic threshold. The endurance athletes with EIAH may require a therapeutic intervention to at least prevent extensive stiffening of the heart muscle and exercise-induced cardiac fatigue.

  17. Hemodynamic and arterial stiffness differences between African-Americans and Caucasians after maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant M; Heffernan, Kevin S; Lane, Abbi D; Kappus, Rebecca M; Cook, Marc D; Wu, Pei-Tzu; Sun, Peng; Harvey, Idethia S; Woods, Jeffrey A; Wilund, Kenneth R; Fernhall, Bo

    2014-01-01

    African-American (AA) men have higher arterial stiffness and augmentation index (AIx) than Caucasian-American (CA) men. Women have greater age-associated increases in arterial stiffness and AIx than men. This study examined racial and sex differences in arterial stiffness and central hemodynamics at rest and after an acute bout of maximal exercise in young healthy individuals. One hundred young, healthy individuals (28 AA men, 24 AA women, 25 CA men, and 23 CA women) underwent measurements of aortic blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness at rest and 15 and 30 min after an acute bout of graded maximal aerobic exercise. Aortic BP and AIx were derived from radial artery applanation tonometry. Aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral) was measured via pulse wave velocity. Aortic stiffness was increased in AA subjects but not in CA subjects (P < 0.05) after an acute bout of maximal cycling exercise, after controlling for body mass index. Aortic BP decreased after exercise in CA subjects but not in AA subjects (P < 0.05). Women exhibited greater reductions in AIx after maximal aerobic exercise compared with men (P < 0.05). In conclusion, race and sex impact vascular and central hemodynamic responses to exercise. Young AA and CA subjects exhibited differential responses in central stiffness and central BP after acute maximal exercise. Premenopausal women had greater augmented pressure at rest and after maximal aerobic exercise than men. Future research is needed to examine the potential mechanisms.

  18. Greater endurance capacity and improved dyspnoea with acute oxygen supplementation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients without resting hypoxaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowman, Leona M; McDonald, Christine F; Bozinovski, Steven; Vlahos, Ross; Gillies, Rebecca; Pouniotis, Dodie; Hill, Catherine J; Goh, Nicole S L; Holland, Anne E

    2017-07-01

    Supplemental oxygen is commonly prescribed in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), although its benefits have not been proven. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of oxygen on oxidative stress, cytokine production, skeletal muscle metabolism and physiological response to exercise in IPF. Eleven participants with IPF received either oxygen, at an FiO 2 of 0.50, or compressed air for 1 h at rest and during a cycle endurance test at 85% of peak work rate. Blood samples collected at rest and during exercise were analysed for markers of oxidative stress, skeletal muscle metabolism and cytokines. The protocol was repeated a week later with the alternate intervention. Compared with air, oxygen did not adversely affect biomarker concentrations at rest and significantly improved endurance time (mean difference = 99 ± 81s, P = 0.002), dyspnoea (-1 ± 1 U, P = 0.02), systolic blood pressure (BP; -11 ± 11 mm Hg, P = 0.006), nadir oxyhaemoglobin saturation (SpO 2 ; 8 ± 6%, P = 0.001), SpO 2 at 2-min (7 ± 6%, P = 0.003) and 5-min isotimes (5 ± 3, P < 0.001) and peak exercise xanthine concentrations (-42 ± 73 µmol/L, P = 0.03). Air significantly increased IL-10 (5 ± 5 pg/mL, P = 0.04) at 2-min isotime. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARs), IL-6, TNF-α, creatine kinase, lactate, heart rate and fatigue did not differ between the two interventions at any time point. In patients with IPF, breathing oxygen at FiO 2 of 0.50 at rest seems safe. During exercise, oxygen improves exercise tolerance, alleviates exercise-induced hypoxaemia and reduces dyspnoea. A potential relationship between oxygen administration and improved skeletal muscle metabolism should be explored in future studies. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  19. Diagnostic value of exercise induced 18F-FDG myocardial metabolism scintigraphy in myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Rui; He Zuoxiang; Shi Rongfang; Liu Xiujie; Tian Yueqin; Guo Feng; Wei Hongxing; Wu Yongjian; Qin Xuewen; Gao Runlin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of exercise induced myocardial imaging with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in myocardial ischemia. Methods: Twenty-six patients with known or suspected coronary artery, disease (CAD) and with no prior myocardial infarction underwent simultaneous myocardial perfusion and metabolism imaging following intravenous injection of 99 Tc m -methoxy-isobutylisonitrile ( 99 Tc m -sestamibi) and 18 F-FDG at peak exercise. Subsequently rest perfusion imaging and coronary angiography (CAG) were performed in all patients. Exercise 18 F-FDG myocardial imaging was compared with 99 Tc m -sestamibi imaging and CAG. Results: In 22 patients with ≥50% narrowing over l coronary artery, 18 had perfusion abnormalities (sensitivity 82%), whereas 20 had abnormal myocardial 18 F-FDG uptake (sensitivity 91%, P>0.05). Patients with reversible (12 cases) or partial reversible (3 cases) perfusion abnormalities had increased myocardial 18 F-FDG uptake in abnormal perfusion segments. Compared with CAG, perfusion defect was seen in myocardial segments corresponding to 25 vascular territories of 51 vessels with ≥50% narrowing in 22 patients in 99 Tc m -sestamibi imaging (sensitivity 49%), whereas increased 18 F-FDG uptake was seen in 34 vascular territories (sensitivity 67%, P=0.008). Conclusions: Exercise induced myocardial ischemia can be imaged directly with 18 F-FDG. Combined exercise 18 F-FDG and 99 Tc m -sestamibi imaging provides a better assessment of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia as compared with exercise-rest perfusion imaging. (authors)

  20. Does aerobic exercise mitigate the effects of cigarette smoking on arterial stiffness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wonil; Miyachi, Motohiko; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2014-09-01

    The largest percentage of mortality from tobacco smoking is cardiovascular-related. It is not known whether regular participation in exercise mitigates the adverse influence of smoking on vasculature. Accordingly, the authors determined whether regular aerobic exercise is associated with reduced arterial stiffness in men who smoke cigarettes. Using a cross-sectional study design, 78 young men were studied, including sedentary nonsmokers (n=20), sedentary smokers (n=12), physically active nonsmokers (n=21), and physically active smokers (n=25). Arterial stiffness was assessed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). There were no group differences in height, body fat, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. As expected, both physically active groups demonstrated greater maximal oxygen consumption and lower heart rate at rest than their sedentary peers. The sedentary smokers demonstrated greater baPWV than the sedentary nonsmokers (11.8±1 m/s vs 10.6±1 m/s, P=.036). baPWV values were not different between the physically active nonsmokers and the physically active smokers (10.8±1 m/s vs 10.7±1 m/s). Chronic smoking is associated with arterial stiffening in sedentary men but a significant smoking-induced increase in arterial stiffness was not observed in physically active adults. These results are consistent with the idea that regular participation in physical activity may mitigate the adverse effects of smoking on the vasculature. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Hypoxaemia on arrival in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit | de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is, however, potentially preventable. Objective. To determine the incidence of hypoxaemia on arrival in a tertiary multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) and to identify risk factors for this complication. Method. A retrospective observational study was conducted at King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban, South Africa, from May ...

  2. Thallium-201 exercise myocardial imaging to evaluate myocardial perfusion after coronary artery bypass surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirzel, H.O.; Nuesch, K.; Sialer, G.; Horst, W.; Krayenbuehl, H.P.

    1980-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of thallium-201 exercise scintigraphy in evaluating myocardial perfusion after coronary artery bypass surgery, imaging was performed after submaximal bicycle ergometry and at rest in 54 patients before and within 24 +- 10 (SD) weeks after operation. Scintigraphy identified 8 out of 20 patients who were symptom free after operation and showed normal exercise electrocardiograms as still having exercise-induced ischaemia and thus as having not truly benefited from the surgical intervention. In contrast, improvement in perfusion was documented in 17 out of 31 patients despite further complaints of chest pain and persistence of a pathological exercise electrocardiogram in 6 of them. Bypass graft patency rate paralleled the scintigraphic findings in the 35 patients who were restudied arteriographically. It was concluded that thallium-201 exercise scintigraphy is a useful technique to document changes in regional perfusion after surgery and is definitely superior to the clinical evaluation of patients including the exercise electrocardiogram. (author)

  3. Hypoxaemia in Mozambican children <5 years of age admitted to hospital with clinical severe pneumonia: clinical features and performance of predictor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassat, Quique; Lanaspa, Miguel; Machevo, Sónia; O'Callaghan-Gordo, Cristina; Madrid, Lola; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Acácio, Sozinho; Roca, Anna; Alonso, Pedro L

    2016-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of hypoxaemia among under-five children admitted to hospital with clinical severe pneumonia and to assess the performance to diagnose hypoxaemia of models based on clinical signs. We conducted a hospital-based survey in a district hospital from Southern Mozambique. A total of 825 children were recruited after obtaining an informed consent. The prevalence of hypoxaemia on admission was 27.9%, and 19.8% of these children died (OR compared with non-hypoxaemic children 3.22, 95% CI 1.98-5.21, P < 0.001). The model with larger area under the ROC curve (AUC-ROC) to predict hypoxaemia included cyanosis or thoracoabdominal breathing or respiratory rate ≥70 breaths per minute. None of the models performed well when tested in different case scenarios of oxygen availability through mathematical modelling, with over 50% of hypoxaemic children not receiving oxygen even in favourable case scenarios. Clinical signs alone or in combination are not suitable to diagnose hypoxaemia. The use of pulse oximeters should be strongly encouraged. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effects of exercise training in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Man, F.S.; Handoko, M.L.; Groepenhoff, H.; van 't Hul, A.J.; Abbink, J.; Koppers, R.J.H.; Grotjohan, H.P.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Bogaard, H.J.; Boonstra, A.; Postmus, P.E.; Westerhof, N.; van der Laarse, W.J.; Vonk Noordegraaf, A.

    2009-01-01

    We determined the physiological effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and quadriceps muscle function in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH). In total, 19 clinically stable iPAH patients (New York Heart Association II-III) underwent a supervised exercise

  5. Exercise training improves endothelial function in resistance arteries of young prehypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, D T; Martin, J S; Casey, D P; Braith, R W

    2014-05-01

    Prehypertension is associated with reduced conduit artery endothelial function and perturbation of oxidant/antioxidant status. It is unknown whether endothelial dysfunction persists to resistance arteries and whether exercise training affects oxidant/antioxidant balance in young prehypertensives. We examined resistance artery function using venous occlusion plethysmography measurement of forearm (FBF) and calf blood flow (CBF) at rest and during reactive hyperaemia (RH), as well as lipid peroxidation (8-iso-PGF2α) and antioxidant capacity (Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity; TEAC) before and after exercise intervention or time control. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive and 15 matched normotensive time controls met screening requirements and participated in the study (age: 21.1±0.8 years). Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to resistance exercise training (PHRT; n=15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n=13) or time-control groups (PHTC; n=15). Treatment groups exercised 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Peak and total FBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (12.7±1.2 ml min(-1) per100 ml tissue and 89.1±7.7 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue vs 16.3±1.0 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue and 123.3±6.4 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue, respectively; Pendurance training are effective in improving resistance artery endothelial function and oxidant/antioxidant balance in young prehypertensives.

  6. Transient left ventricular apical ballooning and exercise induced hypertension during treadmill exercise testing: is there a common hypersympathetic mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Jae K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To describe two cases of Takotsubo like myocardial contractile pattern during exercise stress test secondary to hypertensive response. Background Treadmill exercise testing is known to cause sympathetic stimulation, leading to increased levels of catecholamine, resulting in alteration in vascular tone. Hypertensive response during exercise testing can cause abnormal consequences, resulting in false positive results. Cases We present the cases of two patients experiencing apical and basal akinesis during exercise stress echocardiography, in whom normal wall motion response was observed on subsequent pharmacologic stress testing. The first patient developed transient left ventricular (LV apical akinesis during exercise stress echocardiography. Due to high suspicion that this abnormality might be secondary to hypertensive response, pharmacologic stress testing was performed after three days, which was completely normal and showed no such wall motion abnormality. Qualitative assessment of myocardial perfusion using contrast was also performed, which showed good myocardial blood flow, indicating low probability for significant obstructive coronary artery disease. The second patient developed LV basal akinesis as a result of hypertensive response during exercise testing. Coronary angiogram was not performed in either patient due to low suspicion for coronary artery disease, and subsequently negative stress studies. Results Transient stress induced cardiomyopathy can develop secondary to hypertensive response during exercise stress testing. Conclusion These cases provide supporting evidence to the hyper-sympathetic theory of left ventricular ballooning syndrome.

  7. Effect of hypoxaemia on water and sodium homeostatic hormones and renal function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    1995-01-01

    , a hypoxic ventilatory response produces hypocapnia and respiratory alkalosis. Acute hypoxaemia depresses aldosterone secretion secondary to a direct effect on adrenal cells. Also plasma renin is decreased in resting hypoxaemic conditions, but the mechanism remains unknown. These hormonal changes may have...

  8. Correlation between mild hypoxaemia and limb skeletal muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Leite Rodrigues

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Exercise capacity in COPD patients depends on the degree of airflow obstruction, the severity of the hypoxaemia and skeletal muscle function. Muscle atrophy and weakness are considered systemic consequences of COPD and are associated with reduced exercise capacity. Aims: To investigate the correlation between mild hypoxaemia and muscular strength, muscular fatigue and functional capacity in COPD patients. Methods: Ten patients enrolled on a PRP at the Hospital Universitário de Brasília – HUB were included in this study. Lung function was evaluated by spirometry and arterial blood gas analysis. Functional evaluation was made using the 6MWT and using isometric contraction of deltoid and quadriceps muscles. Results: There were positive correlations between PaO2, quadriceps strength (r2 = 0.61 and p = 0.007 and PaO2 and the 6MWT (r2 = 0.96, p = 0.001. There were negative correlations between PaO2 and median frequency of quadriceps (r2 = -0.42 and p = 0.04. We observed significant correlation between quadriceps strength and the 6MWT (r2 = 0.67 and p = 0.001. There was negative correlation between median frequency of quadriceps and the 6MWT (r2 = -0.42 and p = 0.04. We did not observe any correlation between PaO2 and strength or median frequency of deltoid muscle. Conclusions: PaO2 has important correlations with muscular function variables. The main negative impact of mild hypoxaemia and precocious limb muscular disability on COPD patients is decreased functional capacity. Resumo: Introdução: A capacidade de exercício em portadores de DPOC depende da gravidade da limitação ao fluxo aéreo, do grau de hipoxemia e da função muscular esquelética. Nesses doentes, a atrofia e a fraqueza da musculatura periférica são consideradas consequências sistémicas da DPOC e estão associadas à redução da capacidade de exercício. Objectivos

  9. Cardioprotective effects of early and late aerobic exercise training in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Ferreira, Rita; Fonseca, Hélder; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Moreno, Nuno; Silva, Ana Filipa; Vasques-Nóvoa, Francisco; Gonçalves, Nádia; Vieira, Sara; Santos, Mário; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2015-11-01

    Clinical studies suggest that aerobic exercise can exert beneficial effects in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We compared the impact of early or late aerobic exercise training on right ventricular function, remodeling and survival in experimental PAH. Male Wistar rats were submitted to normal cage activity (SED), exercise training in early (EarlyEX) and in late stage (LateEX) of PAH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 60 mg/kg). Both exercise interventions resulted in improved cardiac function despite persistent right pressure-overload, increased exercise tolerance and survival, with greater benefits in EarlyEX+MCT. This was accompanied by improvements in the markers of cardiac remodeling (SERCA2a), neurohumoral activation (lower endothelin-1, brain natriuretic peptide and preserved vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA), metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative stress in both exercise interventions. EarlyEX+MCT provided additional improvements in fibrosis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha/interleukin-10 and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA, and beta/alpha myosin heavy chain protein expression. The present study demonstrates important cardioprotective effects of aerobic exercise in experimental PAH, with greater benefits obtained when exercise training is initiated at an early stage of the disease.

  10. The effect of acute maximal exercise on postexercise hemodynamics and central arterial stiffness in obese and normal-weight individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Ranadive, Sushant M; Lane-Cordova, Abbi D; Yan, Huimin; Kappus, Rebecca M; Fernhall, Bo; Baynard, Tracy

    2017-04-01

    Central arterial stiffness is associated with incident hypertension and negative cardiovascular outcomes. Obese individuals have higher central blood pressure (BP) and central arterial stiffness than their normal-weight counterparts, but it is unclear whether obesity also affects hemodynamics and central arterial stiffness after maximal exercise. We evaluated central hemodynamics and arterial stiffness during recovery from acute maximal aerobic exercise in obese and normal-weight individuals. Forty-six normal-weight and twenty-one obese individuals underwent measurements of central BP and central arterial stiffness at rest and 15 and 30 min following acute maximal exercise. Central BP and normalized augmentation index (AIx@75) were derived from radial artery applanation tonometry, and central arterial stiffness was obtained via carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cPWV) and corrected for central mean arterial pressure (cPWV/cMAP). Central arterial stiffness increased in obese individuals but decreased in normal-weight individuals following acute maximal exercise, after adjusting for fitness. Obese individuals also exhibited an overall higher central BP ( P  <   0.05), with no exercise effect. The increase in heart rate was greater in obese versus normal-weight individuals following exercise ( P  <   0.05), but there was no group differences or exercise effect for AIx@75 In conclusion, obese (but not normal-weight) individuals increased central arterial stiffness following acute maximal exercise. An assessment of arterial stiffness response to acute exercise may serve as a useful detection tool for subclinical vascular dysfunction. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  11. Impact of bed rest on conduit artery remodeling: effect of exercise countermeasures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, N.T.L. van; Green, D.J.; Felsenberg, D.; Belavy, D.L.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a potent stimulus for vascular remodeling, leading to a marked decrease in conduit artery diameter. However, little is known about the impact of physical inactivity on artery wall thickness or wall:lumen ratio or the potential of exercise countermeasures to modify artery wall

  12. High-Fat, High-Sugar Diet-Induced Subendothelial Matrix Stiffening is Mitigated by Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Julie C; Azar, Julian; Seta, Francesca; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2018-03-01

    Consumption of a high-fat, high-sugar diet and sedentary lifestyle are correlated with bulk arterial stiffening. While measurements of bulk arterial stiffening are used to assess cardiovascular health clinically, they cannot account for changes to the tissue occurring on the cellular scale. The compliance of the subendothelial matrix in the intima mediates vascular permeability, an initiating step in atherosclerosis. High-fat, high-sugar diet consumption and a sedentary lifestyle both cause micro-scale subendothelial matrix stiffening, but the impact of these factors in concert remains unknown. In this study, mice on a high-fat, high-sugar diet were treated with aerobic exercise or returned to a normal diet. We measured bulk arterial stiffness through pulse wave velocity and subendothelial matrix stiffness ex vivo through atomic force microscopy. Our data indicate that while diet reversal mitigates high-fat, high-sugar diet-induced macro- and micro-scale stiffening, exercise only significantly decreases micro-scale stiffness and not macro-scale stiffness, during the time-scale studied. These data underscore the need for both healthy diet and exercise to maintain vascular health. These data also indicate that exercise may serve as a key lifestyle modification to partially reverse the deleterious impacts of high-fat, high-sugar diet consumption, even while macro-scale stiffness indicators do not change.

  13. Flow-related Right Ventricular - Pulmonary Arterial Pressure Gradients during Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Buchan, Tayler A; Esfandiari, Sam; Granton, John T; Goodman, Jack M; Mak, Susanna

    2018-06-06

    The assumption of equivalence between right ventricular and pulmonary arterial systolic pressure is fundamental to several assessments of right ventricular or pulmonary vascular hemodynamic function. Our aims were to 1) determine whether systolic pressure gradients develop across the right ventricular outflow tract in healthy adults during exercise, 2) examine the potential correlates of such gradients, and 3) consider the effect of such gradients on calculated indices of right ventricular function. Healthy untrained and endurance-trained adult volunteers were studied using right-heart catheterization at rest and during submaximal cycle ergometry. Right ventricular and pulmonary artery pressures were simultaneously transduced, and cardiac output was determined by thermodilution. Systolic pressures, peak and mean gradients, and indices of chamber, vascular, and valve function were analyzed offline. Summary data are reported as mean ± standard deviation or median [interquartile range]. No significant right ventricular outflow tract gradients were observed at rest (mean gradient = 4 [3-5] mmHg), and calculated effective orifice area was 3.6±1.0 cm2. Right ventricular systolic pressure increases during exercise were greater than that of pulmonary artery systolic pressure. Accordingly, mean gradients developed during light exercise (8 [7-9] mmHg) and increased during moderate exercise (12 [9-14] mmHg, p < 0.001). The magnitude of the mean gradient was linearly related to cardiac output (r2 = 0.70, p < 0.001). In healthy adults without pulmonic stenosis, systolic pressure gradients develop during exercise, and the magnitude is related to blood flow rate.

  14. The clinical value and limitation of exercise electrocardiography and exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, with special reference to single vessel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Tatsuo; Shibata, Nitaro; Shimizu, Yoichi; Itoh, Yukiyoshi; Abe, Mitsuki; Tanaka, Toshihide; Matsuda, Mitsukazu; Obunai, Yoshio

    1984-01-01

    The clinical value and limitation of exercise electrocardiography and exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy were studied in 40 patients with no previous history of myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography was performed on all the patients. Compared with thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy, treadmill exercise electrocardiography showed greater sensitivity (84% versus 63%) in diagnosing coronary stenosis of more than 50%. In patients with single vessel discase, the results of sensitivities were similar (75% to 65%). However, the specificity of thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy was higher than that of exercise electrocardiography (100% compared to 63%). Nine patients with evidence of significant lesions using coronary angiography, showed normal conditions using exercise electrocardiography and thallium myocardial scintigraphy examinations as well. All these patients had a history of chest pain, and 4 of them experienced chest pain during exercise. In cases with false negative exercise tests, the clinical symptoms and exercise-induced chest pain seem to be important diagnostic signs when evaluating patients with coronary artery disease. In 15 patients with isolated single vessel coronary artery disease (more than 75% stenosis of luminal diameter in only one vessel), the site of ST segment depression did not coincide with the stenotic lesion. The site of reversible perfusion defect on thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy did, however, coincide with the site of myocardial ishemia and the stenotic lesion in most cases. (author)

  15. Chest pain in patients with arterial hypertension, angiographically normal coronary arteries and stiff aorta: the aortic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakos, Dimitrios A; Tziakas, Dimitrios N; Chalikias, George; Mitrousi, Konstantina; Tsigalou, Christina; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2013-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is often associated with a stiff aorta as a result of collagen accumulation in the aortic wall and may produce chest pain. In the present study, possible interrelationships between aortic function, collagen turnover and exercise-induced chest pain in patients with arterial hypertension and angiographically normal coronary arteries were investigated. Ninety-seven patients with arterial hypertension, angiographically normal coronary arteries and no evidence of myocardial ischemia on nuclear cardiac imaging during exercise test were studied. Of these, 43 developed chest pain during exercise (chest pain group) while 54 did not (no chest pain group). Carotid femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWVc-f) was used to assess the elastic properties of the aorta. Amino-terminal pro-peptides of pro-collagen type I, (PINP, reflecting collagen synthesis), serum telopeptides of collagen type I (CITP, reflecting collagen degradation), pro-metalloproteinase 1 (ProMMP-1), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1, related to collagen turnover) were measured in plasma by immunoassay. The chest pain group had higher PWVc-f, higher and /CITP ratio, and lower proMMP-1/ TIMP-1 ratio compared to the no chest pain group. PWVc-f (t=2.53, p=0.02) and PINP (t=2.42, p=0.02) were independently associated with the presence of chest pain in multiple regression analysis. Patients with arterial hypertension, exercise-induced chest pain and angiographically normal coronary arteries, without evidence of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia, had a stiffer aorta compared to those without chest pain. Alterations in collagen type I turnover that favor collagen accumulation in the aortic wall may contribute to aortic stiffening and chest pain in these patients.

  16. Effect of age on left ventricular function during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakki, A.H.; DePace, N.L.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of age on left ventricular performance during exercise in 79 patients with coronary artery disease (greater than or equal to 50% narrowing of one or more major coronary arteries). Fifty patients under the age of 60 years (group I) and 29 patients 60 years or older (group II) were studied. Radionuclide angiograms were obtained at rest and during symptom-limited upright bicycle exercise. The history of hypertension, angina or Q wave myocardial infarction was similar in both groups. Multivessel coronary artery disease was present in 30 patients (60%) in group I and in 19 patients (66%) in group II (p . not significant). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the hemodynamic variables (at rest or during exercise) of left ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and cardiac index. Exercise tolerance was higher in group I than in group II (7.8 +/- 0.4 versus 5.7 +/- 0.4 minutes, p . 0.009), although the exercise heart rate and rate-pressure product were not significantly different between the groups. There was poor correlation between age and ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume at rest and during exercise. Abnormal left ventricular function at rest or an abnormal response to exercise was noted in 42 patients (84%) in group I and in 25 patients (86%) in group II (p . not significant). Thus, in patients with coronary artery disease, age does not influence left ventricular function at rest or response to exercise. Older patients with coronary artery disease show changes in left ventricular function similar to those in younger patients with corresponding severity of coronary artery disease

  17. A multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system for studying the effect of exercise-induced wall shear stress on endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Xia; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Yong; Luan, Yong; Liu, Shu-Tian; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2016-12-28

    In vivo studies have demonstrated that reasonable exercise training can improve endothelial function. To confirm the key role of wall shear stress induced by exercise on endothelial cells, and to understand how wall shear stress affects the structure and the function of endothelial cells, it is crucial to design and fabricate an in vitro multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system which can closely replicate exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms in artery. The in vivo wall shear stress waveforms from the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer in resting and immediately after 30 min acute aerobic cycling exercise were first calculated by measuring the inner diameter and the center-line blood flow velocity with a color Doppler ultrasound. According to the above in vivo wall shear stress waveforms, we designed and fabricated a parallel-plate flow chamber system with appropriate components based on a lumped parameter hemodynamics model. To validate the feasibility of this system, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) line were cultured within the parallel-plate flow chamber under abovementioned two types of wall shear stress waveforms and the intracellular actin microfilaments and nitric oxide (NO) production level were evaluated using fluorescence microscope. Our results show that the trends of resting and exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms, especially the maximal, minimal and mean wall shear stress as well as oscillatory shear index, generated by the parallel-plate flow chamber system are similar to those acquired from the common carotid artery. In addition, the cellular experiments demonstrate that the actin microfilaments and the production of NO within cells exposed to the two different wall shear stress waveforms exhibit different dynamic behaviors; there are larger numbers of actin microfilaments and higher level NO in cells exposed in exercise-induced wall shear stress condition than resting wall shear stress condition

  18. Arterialized and venous blood lactate concentration difference during different exercise intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro C. Felippe

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: These results suggest a delayed lactate appearance in the venous blood, which is accentuated at higher exercise intensities. The lactate measured in arterialized and venous blood is interchangeable only when blood samples are collected at least 10 minutes after the exercise starts.

  19. Response of Arterial Stiffness Four Weeks After Terminating Short-term Aerobic Exercise Training in a Sedentary Lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykara, Murat; Demirel, Adnan; Yavuzatmaca, İhsan; Bilgen, Mehmet

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the response of arterial stiffness in individuals with a sedentary lifestyle at 4 weeks after terminating a 2-week aerobic exercise session. Arterial stiffness was evaluated in 38 participants before starting and after completing a prescribed aerobic exercise program and also at 4 weeks after returning back to their sedentary lifestyle. Parameters regarding arterial compliance, distensibility, wall stress, and the elastic modulus were estimated from the information gained from sonography on the dimensions of carotid and femoral arteries and a sphygmomanometer on the pulse pressure. Primary outcomes included whether short-term aerobic exercise reduced the heart rate, arterial pressure, and intima-media thickness and improved vascular biomechanics in physically inactive but otherwise healthy individuals. The benefits gained in arterial compliance and distensibility deteriorated with termination of exercise, but diastolic wall stress and the elastic modulus improved further. In individuals with sedentary lifestyles, short-term aerobic exercise has strong four-week residual benefits on diastolic wall stress and the elastic modulus, but the effects appear to be negligible on arterial stiffness and distensibility. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. Comparison of exercise stress testing with dobutamine stress echocardiography and exercise technetium-99m isonitrile single photon emission computerized tomography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguzhan, A.; Kisacik, H.L.; Ozdemir, K.

    1997-01-01

    To compare the value of exercise electrocardiography with dobutamine stress echocardiography and exercise technetium-99m isonitrile single-photon emission computed tomography for coronary artery disease, 70 patients with either suspected or proven coronary artery disease underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography, exercise technetium-99m isonitrile single-photon emission computed tomography (mibi-SPECT) and treadmill exercise electrocardiography (ECG). Dobutamine echocardiography and exercise mibi-SPECT revealed a higher overall sensitivity than exercise testing (90 vs 57%, p 0.05; 90 and 62% p<0.05, respectively) but the difference between dobutamine stress echocardiography and exercise mibi-SPECT was not statistically significant. Diagnostic accuracy of dobutamine stress echocardiography and exercise mibi-SPECT was higher than that of exercise testing (90 vs 59%, p<0.001; 89 vs 59%, p<0.001, respectively). Dobutamine stress echocardiography and exercise mibi-SPECT have superiority over exercise testing in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and dobutamine stress echocardiography is an alternative for exercise mibi-SPECT. (author)

  1. Effect of acute aerobic exercise and histamine receptor blockade on arterial stiffness in African Americans and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant M; Lane-Cordova, Abbi D; Kappus, Rebecca M; Behun, Michael A; Cook, Marc D; Woods, Jeffrey A; Wilund, Kenneth R; Baynard, Tracy; Halliwill, John R; Fernhall, Bo

    2017-02-01

    African Americans (AA) exhibit exaggerated central blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) in response to an acute bout of maximal exercise compared with Caucasians (CA). However, whether potential racial differences exist in central BP, elastic, or muscular arterial distensibility after submaximal aerobic exercise remains unknown. Histamine receptor activation mediates sustained postexercise hyperemia in CA but the effect on arterial stiffness is unknown. This study sought to determine the effects of an acute bout of aerobic exercise on central BP and arterial stiffness and the role of histamine receptors, in AA and CA. Forty-nine (22 AA, 27 CA) young and healthy subjects completed the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to take either histamine receptor antagonist or control placebo. Central blood BP and arterial stiffness measurements were obtained at baseline, and at 30, 60, and 90 min after 45 min of moderate treadmill exercise. AA exhibited greater central diastolic BP, elevated brachial PWV, and local carotid arterial stiffness after an acute bout of submaximal exercise compared with CA, which may contribute to their higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Unexpectedly, histamine receptor blockade did not affect central BP or PWV in AA or CA after exercise, but it may play a role in mediating local carotid arterial stiffness. Furthermore, histamine may mediate postexercise carotid arterial dilation in CA but not in AA. These observations provide evidence that young and healthy AA exhibit an exaggerated hemodynamic response to exercise and attenuated vasodilator response compared with CA. NEW & NOTEWORTHY African Americans are at greater risk for developing cardiovascular disease than Caucasians. We are the first to show that young and healthy African Americans exhibit greater central blood pressure, elevated brachial stiffness, and local carotid arterial stiffness following an acute bout of submaximal exercise

  2. Diagnostic value of myocardial tomographic imaging with 123I labelled BMIPP for exercise-induced angina pectoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lijuan; Kaname Akioka; Hiroyuki Yamagishi

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of resting myocardial tomographic imaging with 123 I labelled BMIPP ( 123 I-BMIPP SPECT) for exercise-induced angina pectoris by comparison with stress myocardial tomographic imaging with 201 Tl( 201 Tl SPECT). Methods: 123 I-BMIPP SPECT and 201 Tl SPECT were performed in 32 patients with exercise-induced angina pectoris and 12 normal controls. Left ventricle was divided into nine segments and uptake of 201 TL and 123 I-BMIPP was evaluated by four classes score method (defect score, DS). Results: In the patients with angina pectoris, segments of 201 Tl distribution abnormality were more than that of 123 I-BMIPP. Concordant rate between DS of the 20 '1Tl SPECT for detecting coronary artery stenosis were 62%, 92% and 70%, respectively, and 201 Tl SPECT were 84%, 83% and 84%, respectively. Sensitivity of 123 I-BMIPP SPECT was significantly lower than that of 201 Tl SPECT (P 123 I-BMIPP SPECT will be. Conclusions: The results indicated that to a certain extent, resting 123 I-BMIPP SPECT may has practical clinical value for detection of coronary artery stenosis, and determination of stenotic degree in the patients with exercise-induced angina pectoris

  3. Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    2014-11-03

    Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis, or exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER), is a clinical entity typically considered when someone presents with muscle stiffness, swelling, and pain out of proportion to the expected fatigue post exercise. The diagnosis is confirmed by myoglobinuria, and an elevated serum Creatinine Phosphokinase (CPK) level, usually 10 times the normal range. However, an elevation in CPK is seen in most forms of strenuous exercise, up to 20 times the upper normal range. Therefore, there is no definitive pathologic CPK cut-off. Fortunately the dreaded complication of acute renal failure is rare compared to other forms rhabdomyolysis. We review the risks, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment for exercise- induced rhabdomyolysis.

  4. Prevalence of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction in a general adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Henrik; Norlander, Katarina; Berglund, Lars; Janson, Christer; Malinovschi, Andrei; Nordvall, Lennart; Nordang, Leif; Emtner, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-induced respiratory symptoms are common among adolescents. Exercise is a known stimulus for transient narrowing of the airways, such as exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) and exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO). Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of EIB and EILO in a general population of adolescents. In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire on exercise-induced dyspnoea was sent to all adolescents born in 1997 and 1998 in Uppsala, Sweden (n=3838). A random subsample of 146 adolescents (99 with self-reported exercise-induced dyspnoea and 47 without this condition) underwent standardised treadmill exercise tests for EIB and EILO. The exercise test for EIB was performed while breathing dry air; a positive test was defined as a decrease of ≥10% in FEV1 from baseline. EILO was investigated using continuous laryngoscopy during exercise. The estimated prevalence of EIB and EILO in the total population was 19.2% and 5.7%, respectively. No gender differences were found. In adolescents with exercise-induced dyspnoea, 39.8% had EIB, 6% had EILO and 4.8% had both conditions. In this group, significantly more boys than girls had neither EIB nor EILO (64.7% vs 38.8%; p=0.026). There were no significant differences in body mass index, lung function, diagnosed asthma or medication between the participants with exercise-induced dyspnoea who had or did not have a positive EIB or EILO test result. Both EIB and EILO are common causes of exercise-induced dyspnoea in adolescents. EILO is equally common among girls and boys and can coexist with EIB. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Arterial Stiffness and Autonomic Modulation After Free-Weight Resistance Exercises in Resistance Trained Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, J Derek; Mayo, Xián; Tai, Yu Lun; Fennell, Curtis

    2016-12-01

    Kingsley, JD, Mayo, X, Tai, YL, and Fennell, C. Arterial stiffness and autonomic modulation after free-weight resistance exercises in resistance trained individuals. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3373-3380, 2016-We investigated the effects of an acute bout of free-weight, whole-body resistance exercise consisting of the squat, bench press, and deadlift on arterial stiffness and cardiac autonomic modulation in 16 (aged 23 ± 3 years; mean ± SD) resistance-trained individuals. Arterial stiffness, autonomic modulation, and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) were assessed at rest and after 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% 1-repetition maximum on each exercise with 2 minutes of rest between sets and exercises. Arterial stiffness was analyzed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV). Linear heart rate variability (log transformed [ln] absolute and normalized units [nu] of low-frequency [LF] and high-frequency [HF] power) and nonlinear heart rate complexity (Sample Entropy [SampEn], Lempel-Ziv Entropy [LZEn]) were measured to determine autonomic modulation. BRS was measured by the sequence method. A 2 × 2 repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze time (rest, recovery) across condition (acute resistance exercise, control). There were significant increases in cf-PWV (p = 0.05), heart rate (p = 0.0001), normalized LF (LFnu; p = 0.001), and the LF/HF ratio (p = 0.0001). Interactions were also noted for ln HF (p = 0.006), HFnu (p = 0.0001), SampEn (p = 0.001), LZEn (p = 0.005), and BRS (p = 0.0001) such that they significantly decreased during recovery from the resistance exercise compared with rest and the control. There was no effect on ln total power, or ln LF. These data suggest that a bout of resistance exercise using free-weights increases arterial stiffness and reduces vagal activity and BRS in comparison with a control session. Vagal tone may not be fully recovered up to 30 minutes after a resistance exercise bout.

  6. Training-induced increase in nitric oxide metabolites in chronic heart failure and coronary artery disease: an extra benefit of water-based exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Mourot; Daline, Teffaha; Malika, Bouhaddi; Fawzi, Ounissi; Philippe, Vernochet; Benoit, Dugue; Catherine, Monpère; Jacques, Regnard

    2009-04-01

    Rehabilitation programs involving immersed exercises are more and more frequently used, with severe cardiac patients as well. This study investigated whether a rehabilitation program including water-based exercises has additional effects on the cardiovascular system compared with a traditional land-based training in heart disease patients. Twenty-four male stable chronic heart failure patients and 24 male coronary artery disease patients with preserved left ventricular function participated in the study. Patients took part in the rehabilitation program performing cycle endurance exercises on land. They also performed gymnastic exercises either on land (first half of the participants) or in water (second half). Resting plasma concentration of nitric oxide metabolites (nitrate and nitrite) and catecholamine were evaluated, and a symptom-limited exercise test on a cycle ergometer was performed before and after the rehabilitation program. In the groups performing water-based exercises, the plasma concentration of nitrates was significantly increased (P = 0.035 for chronic heart failure and P = 0.042 for coronary artery disease), whereas it did not significantly change in the groups performing gymnastic exercise on land. No changes in plasma catecholamine concentration occurred. In every group, the cardiorespiratory capacity of patients was significantly increased after rehabilitation. The water-based exercises seemed to effectively increase the basal level of plasma nitrates. Such changes may be related to an enhancement of endothelial function and may be of importance for the health of the patients.

  7. Subclinical anaemia of chronic disease in adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'connor, T M

    2012-02-03

    Patients with chronic hypoxaemia develop secondary polycythaemia that improves oxygen-carrying capacity. Therefore, normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values in the presence of chronic arterial hypoxaemia in cystic fibrosis constitute \\'relative anaemia\\'. We sought to determine the cause of this relative anaemia in patients with cystic fibrosis. We studied haematological indices and oxygen saturation in healthy volunteers (n=17) and in adult patients with cystic fibrosis (n=15). Patients with cystic fibrosis had lower resting arterial oxygen saturation when compared with normal volunteers (P<0.0001), and exercise led to a greater reduction in arterial oxygen saturation (P<0.0001). However, haemoglobin and haematocrit values in patients with cystic fibrosis did not significantly differ from normal volunteers. Serum iron (P=0.002), transferrin (P=0.02), and total iron-binding capacity (P=0.01) were lower in patients with cystic fibrosis. There were no significant differences in serum ferritin, percentage iron saturation, serum erythropoietin or red cell volume between the groups. The data presented demonstrate a characteristic picture of anaemia of chronic disease in adult patients with cystic fibrosis, except for normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values. Normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values in patients with cystic fibrosis appear to represent a combination of the effects of arterial hypoxaemia promoting polycythaemia, counterbalanced by chronic inflammation promoting anaemia of chronic disease.

  8. Association of heart rate profile during exercise with the severity of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cay, Serkan; Ozturk, Sezgin; Biyikoglu, Funda; Yildiz, Abdulkadir; Cimen, Tolga; Uygur, Belma; Tuna, Funda

    2009-05-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. Autonomic nervous system abnormalities are associated with coronary artery disease and its complications. Exercise stress tests are routinely used for the detection of the presence of coronary artery disease. In this study, we observed the association between heart rate profile during exercise and the severity of coronary artery disease. One hundred and sixty patients with abnormal exercise treadmill test (> or =1 mm horizontal or downsloping ST-segment depression; 119 men, 41 women; mean age = 57 +/- 9 years) were included in the study. Use of any drug affecting heart rate was not permitted. Resting heart rate before exercise, maximum heart rate during exercise, and resting heart rate after exercise (5 min later) were measured and two parameters were calculated: heart rate increment (maximum heart rate - resting heart rate before exercise) and heart rate decrement (maximum heart rate - resting heart rate after exercise). All patients underwent selective coronary angiography and subclassified into two groups according to stenotic lesion severity. Group 1 had at least 50% of stenotic lesion and group 2 had less than 50%. Patients in the first group had increased resting heart rate, decreased maximum heart rate, decreased heart rate increment, and decreased heart rate decrement compared with second group. All patients were classified into tertiles of resting heart rate, heart rate increment, and heart rate decrement level to evaluate whether these parameters were associated with severity of coronary artery stenosis in the study. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio of the risk of severe coronary atherosclerosis was 21.888 (95% confidence interval 6.983-68.606) for the highest tertile of resting heart rate level compared with the lowest tertile. In addition, the multiple-adjusted odds ratio of the risk of severe coronary atherosclerosis was 20.987 (95% confidence interval 6

  9. Detection of coronary artery disease - comparison of exercise stress radionuclide angiocardiography and thallium stress perfusion scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jengo, J.A.; Freeman, R.; Brizendine, M.; Mena, I.; St. Mary Medical Center, Long Beach, Calif.)

    1980-01-01

    Exercise thallium scanning and stress radionuclide angiography were compared in 16 normal subjects and 42 patients with more than 75% coronary arterial obstruction in studies using upright exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Studies at rest were subsequently obtained. Exercise thallium scans in the control group were normal in 15 and showed a defect in 1. Ejection fraction increased in all 16. During exercise, regional wall motion increased uniformly. In the group with coronary artery disease, thallium scanning revealed a new defect in the distribution of the involved arteries in 24 patients. In 15 who had a defect at rest, no new defect developed, but in 9 of the 15 new segmental wall motion defects were evident on radionuclide angiography. With exercise, ejection fraction decreased slightly. Regional wall motion abnormalities developed in the areas corresponding to thallium defects in all. Thallium scanning had a 93% and radionuclide angiography a 98% sensitivity value in detecting coronary artery disease. The respective specificity values were 94 and 100%. In patients with prior myocardial infarction who manifested new exercise abnormalities, 50% showed new thallium defects and 81% new wall motion defects

  10. Use of post-exercise laryngoscopy to evaluate exercise induced dyspnea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNally, P

    2010-10-01

    We present the case of a child with asthma who continued to have marked exercise induced dyspnea despite appropriate treatment, and in the face of adequate control of all other asthma symptoms. Spirometry showed a marked truncation of inspiratory flow, and laryngoscopy performed immediately after exercise showed laryngomalacia with dynamic, partial inspiratory obstruction. Exercise induced laryngomalacia (EIL) is a rare cause of exercise induced dyspnea which is diagnosed by post exercise flexible laryngoscopy and may require supraglottoplasty.

  11. Reduced arterial diameter during static exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H L; Mitchell, J H; Friedman, D B

    1995-01-01

    In eight subjects luminal diameter of the resting limb radial and dorsalis pedis arteries was determined by high-resolution ultrasound (20 MHz). This measurement was followed during rest and during 2 min of static handgrip or of one-leg knee extension at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction...... exertion was approximately 15 units after both types of exercise. The dorsalis pedis arterial diameter was 1.50 +/- 0.20 mm (mean and SE) and the radial AD 2.45 +/- 0.12 mm. During both types of contractions the luminal diameters decreased approximately 3.5% within the first 30 s (P

  12. Effects of exercise training in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    de Man, F.S.; Handoko, M.L.; Groepenhoff, H.; van 't Hul, A.J.; Abbink, J.; Koppers, R.J.H.; Grotjohan, H.P.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Bogaard, H.J.; Boonstra, A.; Postmus, P.E.; Westerhof, N.; van der Laarse, W.J.; Vonk Noordegraaf, A.

    2009-01-01

    We determined the physiological effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and quadriceps muscle function in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH). In total, 19 clinically stable iPAH patients (New York Heart Association II-III) underwent a supervised exercise training programme for the duration of 12 weeks. Maximal capacity, endurance capacity and quadriceps function were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. In 12 patients, serial quadriceps muscle biopsi...

  13. Headache in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: effects of chronic hypoxaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Aynur; Ozge, Cengiz; Kaleagasi, Hakan; Yalin, Osman Ozgür; Unal, Ozgür; Ozgür, Eylem S

    2006-02-01

    The frequency and characteristics of headache in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are not clear and there are only a few studies that have assessed the relationship between chronic hypoxaemia and headache. We performed this study in order to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of headache in COPD patients. A total of 119 patients, with a mean age of 63.4 +/- 8.2 years, diagnosed with moderate or severe stable COPD were included in the study. Overall 31.9% of the patients complained of headache and 45.4% were reported to have sleep disorders. There were significant effects of family history of COPD, having other systemic disorders or sleep disorders (snoring, bruxism, restless leg syndrome, etc.) and laboratory data of chronic hypoxaemia and airway obstruction on headache co-morbidity. In conclusion, possibly being a specific subtype of elderly headache, headache in patients with moderate or severe COPD is a common problem and future studies are needed to obtain more knowledge about its pathophysiological and clinical basis.

  14. Short term effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gain Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in the understanding and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension have enabled earlier diagnosis and improved prognosis. However, despite best available therapy, symptoms of exertional dyspnoea and fatigue are commonly reported and result in a reduced capacity to perform daily activities and impaired quality of life. Exercise training has demonstrated efficacy in individuals with other respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Historically, however, exercise training has not been utilised as a form of therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension due to the perceived risk of sudden cardiac death and the theoretical possibility that exercise would lead to worsening pulmonary vascular haemodynamics and deterioration in right heart function. Now, with the advances in pharmaceutical management, determining the safety and benefits of exercise training in this population has become more relevant. Only three studies of supervised exercise training in pulmonary arterial hypertension have been published. These studies demonstrated improvements in exercise capacity and quality of life, in the absence of adverse events or clinical deterioration. However, these studies have not utilised an outpatient-based, whole body exercise training program, the most common format for exercise programs within Australia. It is uncertain whether this form of training is beneficial and capable of producing sustained benefits in exercise capacity and quality of life in this population. Design/Methods This randomised controlled trial will determine whether a 12 week, outpatient-based, supervised, whole body exercise training program, followed by a home-based exercise program, is safe and improves exercise capacity and quality of life in individuals with pulmonary arterial hypertension. This study aims to recruit 34 subjects who will be randomly allocated to the exercise group (supervised exercise training 3 times a week for 12 weeks, followed by

  15. Exercise-induced silent myocardial ischemia: Evaluation by thallium-201 emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, C.; Sakata, K.; Taguchi, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Yamazaki, N.

    1990-01-01

    Factors associated with silent myocardial ischemia (SMI) during exercise testing were studied by means of thallium-201 emission computed tomography (ECT) in 471 patients. Coronary angiography was done in 290, of whom 167 were found to have significant coronary artery disease (CAD). Exercise-induced ischemia and its severity were defined with ECT. During exercise 108 (62%) of 173 patients with ischemia and 57 (50%) of 115 with ischemia and angiographically documented CAD had no chest pain. One third of the patients showed an inconsistency between scintigraphic ischemia and ischemia ST depression. Age, sex, prior myocardial infarction, and diabetes mellitus were not related to SMI. Patients with SMI had less severe ischemia despite a higher peak double product compared to those with painful ischemia. Among 91 with prior myocardial infarction and exercise-induced ischemia, 51 with periinfarction ischemia had a higher frequency of SMI than did 14 with ischemia remote from the prior infarct zone despite similarities in the severity of ischemia. In conclusion, factors localized within ischemic myocardium such as less severe ischemia or adjacency to a prior infarct made SMI more prevalent

  16. [Evaluation of exercise capacity in pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Rengin; Küçükoğlu, Mehmet Serdar

    2010-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by increased pulmonary vascular resistance that leads to right ventricular failure. The most common clinical features of PAH are dyspnea and exercise intolerance. Measurement of exercise capacity is of considerable importance for the assessment of disease severity as well as routine monitoring of disease. Maximal, symptom-limited, cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) is the gold standard for the evaluation of exercise capacity, whereby functions of several systems involved in exercise can be assessed, including cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic systems. However, in order to derive the most useful diagnostic information on physiologic limitations to exercise, CPET requires maximal effort of the patient, which can be difficult and risky for some severely ill patients. Moreover, it requires specific exercise equipment and measurement systems, and experienced and trained personnel. Thus, routine clinical use of CPET to assess exercise capacity in patients with PAH may not always be feasible. A practical and simple alternative to CPET to determine exercise capacity is the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). It is simple to perform, safe, and reproducible. In contrast to CPET, the 6MWT reflects a submaximal level of exertion that is more consistent with the effort required for daily physical activities. This review focuses on the role of CPET and 6MWT in patients with PAH.

  17. Research progress of exercise-induced fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-yi DAI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced fatigue is a comprehensive response to a variety of physiological and biochemical changes in the body, and can affect people's quality of life to different extents. If no timely recovery after occurrence of fatigue, accumulated gradually, it can lead to "burnout", a "overtraining syndrome", "chronic fatigue syndrome", etc., which will cause endocrine disturbance, immune suppression, even physical illness. Exercise-induced fatigue becomes an important factor endangering human health. In recent years, many experts and scholars at home and abroad are committed to the research of exercise-induced fatigue, and have put forward a variety of hypothesis to explain the cause of exercise-induced fatigue. They expect to find out the methods for preventing and eliminating exercise-induced fatigue. This article discusses mainly the pathogenesis, model building, elimination/ relief, etc. of exercise-induced fatigue to point out the research achievements of exercise-induced fatigue and its existing problems. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.11.14

  18. Right ventricular ejection fraction during exercise in normal subjects and in coronary artery disease patients: assessment by multiple-gated equilibrium scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddahi, J.; Berman, D.S.; Matsuoka, D.T.; Waxman, A.D.; Forrester, J.S.; Swan, H.J.C.

    1980-01-01

    The response of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) during exercise and its relationship to the location and extent of coronary artery disease are not fully understood. We have recently developed and validated a new method for scintigraphic evaluation of RVEF using rapid multiple-gated equilibrium scintigraphy and multiple right ventricular regions of interest. The technique has been applied during upright bicycle exercise in 10 normal subjects and 20 patients with coronary artery disease. Resting RVEF was not significantly different between the groups (0.49 +- 0.04 vs 0.47 +- 0.09, respectively, mean +- SD). In all 10 normal subjects RVEF rose (0.49 +- 0.04 to 0.66 +- 0.08, p < 0.01) at peak exercise. At peak exercise in coronary artery disease patients, the group RVEF remained unchanged (0.47 +- 0.09 to 0.50 +- 0.11, p = NS), but the individual responses varied. In the coronary artery disease patients, the relationship between RVEF response to exercise and exercise left ventricular function, septal motion and right coronary artery stenosis were studied. Significant statistical association was found only between exercise RVEF and right coronary artery stenosis. RVEF rose during exercise in seven of seven patients without right coronary artery stenosis (0.42 +- 0.06 to 0.58 +- 0.08, p = 0.001) and was unchanged or fell in 12 of 13 patients with right coronary artery stenosis (0.50 +- 0.09 to 0.45 +- 0.10, p = NS). We conclude that (1) in normal subjects RVEF increases during upright exercise and (2) although RVEF at rest is not necessarily affected by coronary artery disease, failure of RVEF to increase during exercise, in the absence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or valvular heart disease, may be related to the presence of significant right coronary artery stenosis

  19. Right ventricular ejection fraction during exercise in normal subjects and in coronary artery disease patients: assessment by multiple-gated equilibrium scintigraphy

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    Maddahi, J.; Berman, D.S.; Matsuoka, D.T.; Waxman, A.D.; Forrester, J.S.; Swan, H.J.C.

    1980-07-01

    The response of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) during exercise and its relationship to the location and extent of coronary artery disease are not fully understood. We have recently developed and validated a new method for scintigraphic evaluation of RVEF using rapid multiple-gated equilibrium scintigraphy and multiple right ventricular regions of interest. The technique has been applied during upright bicycle exercise in 10 normal subjects and 20 patients with coronary artery disease. Resting RVEF was not significantly different between the groups (0.49 +- 0.04 vs 0.47 +- 0.09, respectively, mean +- SD). In all 10 normal subjects RVEF rose (0.49 +- 0.04 to 0.66 +- 0.08, p < 0.01) at peak exercise. At peak exercise in coronary artery disease patients, the group RVEF remained unchanged (0.47 +- 0.09 to 0.50 +- 0.11, p = NS), but the individual responses varied. In the coronary artery disease patients, the relationship between RVEF response to exercise and exercise left ventricular function, septal motion and right coronary artery stenosis were studied. Significant statistical association was found only between exercise RVEF and right coronary artery stenosis. RVEF rose during exercise in seven of seven patients without right coronary artery stenosis (0.42 +- 0.06 to 0.58 +- 0.08, p = 0.001) and was unchanged or fell in 12 of 13 patients with right coronary artery stenosis (0.50 +- 0.09 to 0.45 +- 0.10, p = NS). We conclude that (1) in normal subjects RVEF increases during upright exercise and (2) although RVEF at rest is not necessarily affected by coronary artery disease, failure of RVEF to increase during exercise, in the absence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or valvular heart disease, may be related to the presence of significant right coronary artery stenosis.

  20. Acute effects of repeated bouts of aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Hashimoto, Yuto; Hatakeyama, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Takanobu

    2018-03-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute repeated bouts of aerobic exercise decrease leg arterial stiffness. However, the influence of repeated bouts of aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion is unknown. The present study investigates the acute effects of repeated bouts of aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness after the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Ten healthy young men (age, 23.2 ± 0.9 years) performed repeated bouts of aerobic exercise trial (RE, 65% peak oxygen uptake; two 15 min bouts of cycling performed 20 min apart) and control trial (CON, seated and resting in a quiet room) at 80 min before the 75-g OGTT on separate days in a randomized, controlled crossover fashion. Carotid-femoral (aortic) and femoral-ankle (leg) pulse wave velocity, carotid augmentation index, brachial and ankle blood pressure, heart rate and blood glucose and insulin levels were measured before (baseline) and 30, 60 and 120 min after the 75-g OGTT. Leg pulse wave velocity, ankle systolic blood pressure and blood glucose levels increased from baseline after the 75-g OGTT in the CON trial, but not in the RE trial. The present findings indicate that acute repeated bouts of aerobic exercise before glucose ingestion suppress increases in leg arterial stiffness following glucose ingestion. RE trial repeated bouts of aerobic exercise trial; CON trial control trial; BG blood glucose; VO 2peak peak oxygen uptake; PWV Pulse wave velocity; AIx carotid augmentation index; BP blood pressure; HR heart rate; CVs coefficients of variation; RPE Ratings of perceived exertion; SE standard error.

  1. Exercise Performance in Patients with D-Loop Transposition of the Great Arteries After Arterial Switch Operation: Long-Term Outcomes and Longitudinal Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuebler, Joseph D; Chen, Ming-Hui; Alexander, Mark E; Rhodes, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    The first patients to undergo a successful arterial switch operation (ASO) for d-transposition of the great arteries (D-TGA) are now entering their fourth decade of life. Past studies of ASO survivors' exercise function have yielded conflicting results. We therefore undertook this study to describe the current function of ASO survivors, to identify factors related to inferior exercise performance and to determine whether their exercise function tends to deteriorate over time. A retrospective cohort study was designed examining all patients with D-TGA after the ASO who underwent comprehensive cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Patients with palliative surgery prior to ASO, ventricular hypoplasia or severe valvar dysfunction were excluded from the study. Data from CPETs in which the peak respiratory exchange ratio was <1.09 were also excluded. We identified 113 patients who met entry criteria and had 186 CPX at our institution between 1/2002 and 1/2013; 41 patients had at least 2 qualifying CPX. Mean age at the time of the initial test was 17 ± 1 year. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2) averaged 84 ± 2 % predicted. Peak VO2 was lower among patients with repaired ventricular septal defects (82 ± 4 vs. 86 ± 3 % predicted; p < 0.05) and among patients with ≥ moderate right-sided obstructive lesions (77 ± 5 vs. 87 ± 3 % predicted; p < 0.05). Surgery prior to 1991 was also associated with a lower peak VO2 (81 ± 3 vs. 87 ± 3 % predicted; p < 0.01). The mean % predicted peak heart rate was 92 ± 1 %, with no significant difference between any of the subgroups. Non-diagnostic exercise-induced STT changes developed in 10 patients (12 studies). In the subgroup with at least 2 exercise tests, the annual decline in % predicted peak VO2 was quite slow (-0.3 % points/year; p < 0.01 vs. expected normal age-related decline). The exercise capacity of ASO survivors is well preserved and is only mildly reduced compared to normal subjects. Moreover, there is only a slight

  2. Exercise training reduces peripheral arterial stiffness and myocardial oxygen demand in young prehypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Darren T; Martin, Jeffrey S; Casey, Darren P; Braith, Randy W

    2013-09-01

    Large artery stiffness is a major risk factor for the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Persistent prehypertension accelerates the progression of arterial stiffness. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure (SBP) = 120-139 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 80-89 mm Hg) men and women and 15 normotensive time-matched control subjects (NMTCs; n = 15) aged 18-35 years of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). Treatment groups performed exercise training 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and central and peripheral blood pressures were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP by 9.6±3.6mm Hg and 11.9±3.4mm Hg, respectively, and DBP by 8.0±5.1mm Hg and 7.2±3.4mm Hg, respectively (P endurance exercise alone effectively reduce peripheral arterial stiffness, central blood pressures, augmentation index, and myocardial oxygen demand in young prehypertensive subjects.

  3. Clinical significance of plasminogen activator inhibitor activity in patients with exercise-induced ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, K.; Kurata, C.; Taguchi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Yamazaki, N.; Rydzewski, A.; Takada, Y.; Takada, A.

    1990-01-01

    To assess the fibrinolytic system in patients with exercise-induced ischemia and its relation to ischemia and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD), 47 patients with CAD confirmed by results of coronary angiography underwent symptom-limited multistage exercise thallium-201 emission computed tomography. All patients with CAD had exercise-induced ischemia as assessed from thallium-201 images. Pre- and peak exercise blood samples from each patient and preexercise blood samples from control subjects were assayed for several fibrinolytic components and were also assayed for plasma adrenaline. The extent of ischemia was defined as delta visual uptake score (total visual uptake score in delayed images minus total visual uptake score in initial images) and the severity of CAD as the number of diseased vessels. In the basal condition, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) activity was significantly higher in patients with exercise-induced ischemia as compared to control subjects (p less than 0.01), although there were no significant differences in other fibrinolytic variables between the two groups. Moreover, PAI activity in the basal condition displayed a significantly positive correlation with the extent of ischemia (r = 0.47, p less than 0.01). Patients with exercise-induced ischemia were divided into two groups (24 with single-vessel disease and 23 with multivessel disease). There were no significant differences in coronary risk factors, hemodynamics, or plasma adrenaline levels during exercise between single-vessel and multivessel disease except that delta visual uptake score was significantly higher in multivessel disease (p less than 0.01)

  4. Exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy in the diagnosis and prognosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotler, T.S.; Diamond, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the discriminant accuracy of exercise thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy for the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. This is a survey of the National Library of Medicine MEDLINE database. The key medical subject headings used were coronary disease, myocardial infarction, radionuclide imaging, and thallium. A total of 122 retrieved studies were considered relevant and were reviewed in depth. Only studies reporting both the sensitivity and specificity of thallium scintigraphy were analyzed. Discriminant accuracy for diagnosis and prognosis was summarized in terms of pooled sensitivity and specificity. Exercise thallium scintigraphy is useful in the noninvasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease, especially in patients with abnormal resting electrocardiograms, restricted exercise tolerance, and intermediate probability of having disease at the time of testing as well as of defining the prognosis of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease, especially in those with previous myocardial infarction. Because of various shortcomings in the published record, however, the marginal discriminant accuracy and cost effectiveness of thallium scintigraphy compared with conventional clinical assessment and exercise electrocardiography remain controversial. 193 references

  5. Improved oxygenation during standing performance of deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure after cardiac surgery: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Henrik; Faager, Gun; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    Breathing exercises after cardiac surgery are often performed in a sitting position. It is unknown whether oxygenation would be better in the standing position. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxygenation and subjective breathing ability during sitting vs standing performance of deep breathing exercises on the second day after cardiac surgery. Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (n = 189) were randomized to sitting (controls) or standing. Both groups performed 3 × 10 deep breaths with a positive expiratory pressure device. Peripheral oxygen saturation was measured before, directly after, and 15 min after the intervention. Subjective breathing ability, blood pressure, heart rate, and pain were assessed. Oxygenation improved significantly in the standing group compared with controls directly after the breathing exercises (p < 0.001) and after 15 min rest (p = 0.027). The standing group reported better deep breathing ability compared with controls (p = 0.004). A slightly increased heart rate was found in the standing group (p = 0.047). After cardiac surgery, breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure, performed in a standing position, significantly improved oxygenation and subjective breathing ability compared with sitting performance. Performance of breathing exercises in the standing position is feasible and could be a valuable treatment for patients with postoperative hypoxaemia.

  6. Whole-body vibration exercise training reduces arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women with prehypertension and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Arturo; Kalfon, Roy; Madzima, Takudzwa A; Wong, Alexei

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise training on arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity [PWV]), blood pressure (BP), and leg muscle function in postmenopausal women. Twenty-five postmenopausal women with prehypertension and hypertension (mean [SE]; age, 56 [1] y; systolic BP, 139 [2] mm Hg; body mass index, 34.7 [0.8] kg/m2) were randomized to 12 weeks of WBV exercise training (n = 13) or to the no-exercise control group. Systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, carotid-femoral PWV, brachial-ankle PWV, femoral-ankle PWV (legPWV), leg lean mass, and leg muscle strength were measured before and after 12 weeks. There was a group-by-time interaction (P exercise training compared with no change after control. Heart rate decreased (-3 [1] beats/min, P exercise training, but there was no interaction (P > 0.05). Leg lean mass and carotid-femoral PWV were not significantly (P > 0.05) affected by WBV exercise training or control. Our findings indicate that WBV exercise training improves systemic and leg arterial stiffness, BP, and leg muscle strength in postmenopausal women with prehypertension or hypertension. WBV exercise training may decrease cardiovascular and disability risks in postmenopausal women by reducing legPWV and increasing leg muscle strength.

  7. Repeatability and responsiveness of exercise tests in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainguy, Vincent; Malenfant, Simon; Neyron, Anne-Sophie; Bonnet, Sébastien; Maltais, François; Saey, Didier; Provencher, Steeve

    2013-08-01

    Exercise tolerance in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is most commonly assessed by the 6-min walk test (6MWT). Whether endurance exercise tests are more responsive than the 6MWT remains unknown. 20 stable PAH patients (mean±sd age 53±15 years and mean pulmonary arterial pressure 44±16 mmHg) already on PAH monotherapy completed the 6MWT, the endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT) and the cycle endurance test (CET) before and after the addition of sildenafil citrate 20 mg three times daily or placebo for 28 days in a randomised double-blind crossover setting. Pre- or post-placebo tests were used to assess repeatability of each exercise test, whereas pre- or post-sildenafil citrate tests were used to assess their responsiveness. Sildenafil citrate led to placebo-corrected changes in exercise capacity of 18±25 m (p = 0.02), 58±235 s (p = 0.58) and 29±77 s (p = 0.09) for the 6MWT, the ESWT and the CET, respectively. The 6MWT was associated with a lower coefficient of variation between repeated measures (3% versus 18% versus 13%), resulting in a higher standardised response mean compared with endurance tests (0.72, 0.25 and 0.38 for the 6MWT, the ESWT and the CET, respectively). The 6MWT had the best ability to capture changes in exercise capacity when sildenafil citrate was combined with patients' baseline monotherapy, supporting its use as an outcome measure in PAH.

  8. Role of myocardial ischemia on exercise-induced ST elevation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Muneyasu; Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Hayashida, Kouhei; Haze, Kazuo; Fukami, Ken-ichi; Hiramori, Katsuhiko

    1986-01-01

    Exercise-induced ST elevation in patients with previous myocardial infarction (MI) has been recognized to be related to left ventricular (LV) asynergy, however it is also recognized that myocardial ischemia can induce ST elevation. In this study, factors which determine the extent of ST elevation, with special reference to myocardial ischemia, was re-evaluated using quantitative analysis of stress myocardial scintigraphy (S-SG). Among 65 patients with previous anterior myocardial infarction and documented single vessel disease of left anterior descending artery (LAD), 19 patients who had exercise-induced ST elevation (ΔST ≥ 2.0 mm) had more abnormal Q waves (p < 0.01), lower LV ejection fraction (EF) (p < 0.01), more severe LV asynergy (p < 0.05) and less incidence of post-MI angina pectoris (AP) (p < 0.01), compared to those with ΔST < 2.0 mm, indicating that ST elevation is primarily related to LV asynergy. Correlation studies among clinical, angiographic and scintigraphic parameters show that ΔST was significantly related to a size of MI represented by Tl score or relative defect Tl activity and number of abnormal Q waves (No.Q), the magnitude of work load expressed by changes in double product (ΔDP) and intervals between the onset and exercise test, as well as myocardial ischemia expressed by the extent of redistribution (%RD) in S-SG. Among 23 patients with post-MI AP, ΔST significantly correlated with %RD (r = 0.47), indicating that myocardial ischemia can be a mechanism of exercise-induced ST elevation in patients with previous MI. Furtheremore, among those with ST elevation, concave-type ST elevation was more related to myocardial ischemia compared to convex-type ST elevation as expressed by the incidence of post-MI AP and/or significant redistribution. (J.P.N.)

  9. Determinants of abnormal blood pressure response to exercise in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakki, A.H.; Munley, B.M.; Hadjimiltiades, S.; Meissner, M.D.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    This study assessed the determinants of exercise-induced abnormal systolic blood pressure (BP) response in 127 patients with documented coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy. Three types of systolic BP response to exercise were identified: an increase by more than 20 mm Hg (group I, n = 74); an increase by 20 mm Hg or less (group II, n = 36); and a decrease of at least 10 mm Hg (group III, n = 17). The 3 groups were not significantly different in age, gender or medications. The number of segments with perfusion defects was significantly higher in groups II and III than group I (group III, 2.9 +/- 1.5; group II, 2.9 +/- 2.1; and group I, 1.8 +/- 1.4, p = 0.009). Prior myocardial infarction, abnormal left ventricular ejection fraction, and multivessel CAD were more common in group III than in groups I and II. Stepwise discriminant analysis of 15 relevant clinical, angiographic and exercise scintigraphic descriptors showed that the number of thallium perfusion defects, abnormal LV ejection fraction at rest and multivessel CAD to be important predictors of hypotensive BP response. Multivariate analysis, however, showed that the number of thallium perfusion defects was the only important predictor of the hypotensive response. Thus, it is the functional significance of CAD assessed by the extent of thallium perfusion abnormalities rather than the extent of CAD or left ventricular dysfunction at rest that determines the systolic BP response to exercise

  10. Relation between exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias and myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients with intermediate pretest probability of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhendy, A.; Sozzi, F.B.; Van Domburg, R.T.; Bax, J.J.; Roelandt, J.R.T.C.

    2000-01-01

    We studied 302 patients (mean age 54±9 years, 152 men and 150 women) with intermediate pretest probability of CAD (range=0.25- 0.80, mean=0.43±0.20) by upright bicycle exercise stress test in conjunction with technetium-99m single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging. Exercise-induced VAs (frequent or complex premature ventricular contractions or ventricular tachycardia) occurred in 65 patients (22%). No significant difference was found between patients with and patient without VAs regarding the pretest probability of CAD (0.45±0.21 vs 0.43±0.20). Patients with exercise-induced VAs had a higher prevalence of perfusion abnormalities (52% vs 26%, P=0.002) and ischaemic electrocardiographic changes (31% vs 16%, P<0.05) compared to patients without VAs. A higher prevalence of perfusion abnormalities in patients with VAs was observed in both men (67% vs 35%, P<0.01) and women (38% vs 16%, P<0.05). However, the positive predictive value of exercise-induced VAs for the presence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities was higher in men than in women (67% vs 38%, P<0.05). The presence of abnormal myocardial perfusion was the only independent predictor of exercise-induced VAs (OR 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-4.2) by multivariate analysis of clinical and stress test variables. It is concluded that in patients with intermediate pretest probability of CAD, exercise-induced VAs are predictive of a higher prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in both men and women. However, the positive predictive value of exercise-induced VAs for perfusion abnormalities is higher in men. Because of the underestimation of ischaemia by electrocardiographic changes, exercise-induced VAs should be interpreted as a marker of a higher probability of CAD. (orig./MG) (orig.)

  11. Arm exercise-thallium imaging testing for the detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balady, G.J.; Weiner, D.A.; Rothendler, J.A.; Ryan, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with lower limb impairment are often unable to undergo a standard bicycle or treadmill test for the evaluation of coronary artery disease. To establish an alternative method of testing, 50 subjects (aged 56 +/- 10 years) performed arm ergometry testing in conjunction with myocardial thallium scintigraphy. All underwent coronary angiography; significant coronary artery disease (greater than or equal to 70% stenosis) in at least one vessel was present in 41 (82%) of the 50 patients. Thallium scintigraphy was found to have an 83% sensitivity and 78% specificity for detecting coronary disease, compared with a sensitivity and specificity of 54% (p less than 0.01) and 67% (p = NS), respectively, for exercise electrocardiography. In the subgroup of 23 patients who had no prior myocardial infarction or left bundle branch block and were not taking digitalis, thallium scintigraphy had a sensitivity of 80% versus 50% for exercise electrocardiography. Scintigraphy yielded a sensitivity of 84, 74 and 90% for one, two and three vessel disease, respectively. Noninvasive arm ergometry exercise-thallium imaging testing appears to be reliable and useful and should be considered in the evaluation of coronary artery disease in patients with lower limb impairment

  12. Exercise induced asthma and endogenous opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, R C; Bachman, M; Rochat, T; Egger, D; de Haller, R; Junod, A F

    1986-01-01

    Concentrations of endogenous opioid peptides in the plasma are increased during exercise and these substances have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma induced by chloropropramide and alcohol in diabetic patients. This work was undertaken to determine whether exercise induced asthma might be mediated by endogenous opioids. Plasma beta endorphin, met-enkephalin, and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) concentrations were measured in five asthmatic patients and five normal volunteers breathing cold air during exercise. In four of the patients the effect of an infusion of naloxone on FEV1 was also measured during exercise induced asthma. Exercise produced acute bronchoconstriction in all asthmatics, characterised by a fall in FEV1; whereas no change occurred in normal subjects. There was no difference in plasma met-enkephalin, beta endorphin, and ACTH concentration between the two groups. Infusion of naloxone neither prevented nor worsened exercise induced asthma. These data suggest that endogenous opioids probably do not play a part in the development of exercise induced asthma. PMID:2944240

  13. Exercise Training Reduces Peripheral Arterial Stiffness and Myocardial Oxygen Demand in Young Prehypertensive Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Large artery stiffness is a major risk factor for the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Persistent prehypertension accelerates the progression of arterial stiffness. METHODS Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure (SBP) = 120–139mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 80–89mm Hg) men and women and 15 normotensive time-matched control subjects (NMTCs; n = 15) aged 18–35 years of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). Treatment groups performed exercise training 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and central and peripheral blood pressures were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. RESULTS PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP by 9.6±3.6mm Hg and 11.9±3.4mm Hg, respectively, and DBP by 8.0±5.1mm Hg and 7.2±3.4mm Hg, respectively (P endurance exercise alone effectively reduce peripheral arterial stiffness, central blood pressures, augmentation index, and myocardial oxygen demand in young prehypertensive subjects. PMID:23736111

  14. Improved arterial-ventricular coupling in metabolic syndrome after exercise training: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Sara B; Donley, David A; Bonner, Daniel E; Devallance, Evan; Olfert, I Mark; Chantler, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with threefold increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality, which is partly due to a blunted CV reserve capacity, reflected by a reduced peak exercise left ventricular (LV) contractility and aerobic capacity and a blunted peak arterial-ventricular coupling. To date, no study has examined whether aerobic exercise training in MetS can reverse peak exercise CV dysfunction. Furthermore, examining how exercise training alters CV function in a group of individuals with MetS before the development of diabetes and/or overt CV disease can provide insights into whether some of the pathophysiological CV changes can be delayed/reversed, lowering their CV risk. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of 8 wk of aerobic exercise training in individuals with MetS on resting and peak exercise CV function. Twenty participants with MetS underwent either 8 wk of aerobic exercise training (MetS-ExT, n = 10) or remained sedentary (MetS-NonT, n = 10) during this period. Resting and peak exercise CV function was characterized using Doppler echocardiography and gas exchange. Exercise training did not alter resting LV diastolic or systolic function and arterial-ventricular coupling in MetS. In contrast, at peak exercise, an increase in LV contractility (40%, P < 0.01), cardiac output (28%, P < 0.05), and aerobic capacity (20%, P < 0.01), but a reduction in vascular resistance (30%, P < 0.05) and arterial-ventricular coupling (27%, P < 0.01), were noted in the MetS-ExT but not in the MetS-NonT group. Furthermore, an improvement in lifetime risk score was also noted in the MetS-ExT group. These findings have clinical importance because they provide insight that some of the pathophysiological changes associated with MetS can be improved and can lower the risk of CV disease.

  15. Suppression of exercise-induced angina by magnesium sulfate in patients with variant angina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugiyama, K.; Yasue, H.; Okumura, K.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of intravenous magnesium on exercise-induced angina were examined in 15 patients with variant angina and in 13 patients with stable effort angina and were compared with those of placebo. Symptom-limited bicycle exercise and thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy were performed after intravenous administration of 0.27 mmol/kg body weight of magnesium sulfate and after placebo on different days. In all patients, serum magnesium levels after administration of magnesium sulfate were about twofold higher than levels after placebo. Exercise-induced angina associated with transient ST segment elevation occurred in 11 patients with variant angina receiving placebo and in only 2 of these patients receiving magnesium (p less than 0.005). On the other hand, exercise-induced angina was not suppressed by magnesium in any patient with stable effort angina. In these patients there was no significant difference in exercise duration after administration of placebo versus after administration of magnesium. The size of the perfusion defect as measured by thallium-201 scintigraphy was significantly less in patients with variant angina receiving magnesium than that in those receiving placebo (p less than 0.001), whereas it was not significantly different in patients with stable effort angina receiving placebo versus magnesium. In conclusion, exercise-induced angina is suppressed by intravenous magnesium in patients with variant angina but not in patients with stable effort angina. This beneficial effect of magnesium in patients with variant angina is most likely due to improvement of regional myocardial blood flow by suppression of coronary artery spasm

  16. The Role of Exercise Testing in the Modern Management of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K. Johnson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A culture of exercise testing is firmly embedded in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH but its clinical relevance and utility have recently been under some debate. The six minute walk test (6MWT has been used as a primary outcome measure to enable the licensing of many of the medications used for this condition. Recent reviews have questioned the validity of this test as a surrogate of clinical outcomes. At the same time, other questions are emerging where exercise testing may be the solution. With the rise in understanding of genetic markers of idiopathic PAH (IPAH, the screening of an otherwise healthy population for incipient pulmonary hypertension (PH will be required. The proliferation in treatment choices and identification of populations with PH where PAH treatment is not indicated, such as left heart and lung disease, requires more definitive differentiation from patients with PAH. There is a continuing question about the existence and clinical relevance of exercise induced PAH as a cause of unexplained dyspnoea and fatigue and as a latent phase of resting PH. This review presents a summary and critical analysis of the current role of exercise testing in PAH and speculates on future trends.

  17. Gender, exercise training, and eNOS expression in porcine skeletal muscle arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, M Harold; Welshons, Wade V; Sturek, Michael; Rush, James W E; Turk, James R; Taylor, Julia A; Judy, Barbara M; Henderson, Kyle K; Ganjam, V K

    2003-07-01

    Our purpose was to determine the effects of gender and exercise training on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) protein content of porcine skeletal muscle arteries and to evaluate the role of 17beta-estradiol (E2) in these effects. We measured eNOS and SOD content with immunoblots and immunohistochemistry in femoral and brachial arteries of trained and sedentary male and female pigs and measured estrogen receptor (ER) mRNA and alpha-ER and beta-ER protein in aortas of male and female pigs. Results indicate that female arteries contain more eNOS than male arteries and that exercise training increases eNOS content independent of gender. Male and female pigs expressed similar levels of alpha-ER mRNA and protein and similar amounts beta-ER protein in their arteries. E2 concentrations as measured by RIA were 180 +/- 34 pg/ml in male sera and approximately 5 pg/ml in female sera, and neither was changed by training. However, bioassay indicated that biologically active estrogen equivalent to only 35 +/- 5 pg/ml was present in male sera. E2 in female pigs, whether measured by RIA or bioassay, was approximately 24 pg/ml at peak estrous and 2 pg/ml on day 5 diestrus. The free fraction of E2 in sera did not explain the low measurements, relative to RIA, of E2. We conclude that 1). gender has significant influence on eNOS and SOD content of porcine skeletal muscle arteries; 2). the effects of gender and exercise training vary among arteries of different anatomic origin; 3). male sera contains compounds that cause RIA to overestimate circulating estrogenic activity; and 4). relative to human men, the male pig is not biologically estrogenized by high levels of E2 reported by RIA, whereas in female pigs E2 levels are lower than in the blood of human women.

  18. Management of Postoperative Hypoxaemia in Patients Following Upper Abdominal Laparoscopic Surgery. - A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampa Datta Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive ventilation has been shown to reduce acute postoperative hypoxaemia, with significant reduction in the incidence of re-intubation, complications and a trend towards lower mortality. The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of CPAP vs venturi therapy in early achievement of oxygenation goals and in prevention of re-intubation for management of postoperative hypoxaemia following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Forty adult patients of ASA physical status I& II, scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, those were unable to maintain SpO2 > 95% breathing room air after extubation, were recruited for a prospective, randomized comparative study. Patients with PaO2 / FiO2 between 250 and 300 were included in the study and were randomly allocated to one of the two groups to receive oxygen therapy either using a CPAP of 10 cm of water and a FiO2 of 0.5 (Group A or using a venturi mask of FiO2 of 0.5 (Group B . All patients were observed postoperatively upto 18 h and were screened by ABG analyses at 6, 12 and 18 h of treatment. SpO2, ECG, heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature and NIBP were monitored throughout the study period. Patients in Group A showed significant improvement in early achievement of adequate oxygenation than those in Group B, although, due to intolerance to CPAP therapy two patients in Group A needed reintubation to maintain adequate oxygenation. To conclude, oxygenation using continuous positive airway pressure is a safe and effective means in improving gas exchange to treat acute postoperative hypoxaemia in conscious and cooperative patients.

  19. Impact of exercise training on arterial wall thickness in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Thickening of the carotid artery wall has been adopted as a surrogate marker of pre-clinical atherosclerosis, which is strongly related to increased cardiovascular risk. The cardioprotective effects of exercise training, including direct effects on vascular function and lumen dimension, have been

  20. Blood pressure and calf muscle oxygen extraction during plantar flexion exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, J Carter; Miller, Amanda J; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F; Proctor, David N; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Muller, Matthew D

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects 200 million people worldwide. Although PAD primarily affects large arteries, it is also associated with microvascular dysfunction, an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise, and high cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that fatiguing plantar flexion exercise that evokes claudication elicits a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation (SmO 2 ) and a higher rise in BP in PAD compared with age-matched healthy subjects, but low-intensity steady-state plantar flexion elicits similar responses between groups. In the first experiment, eight patients with PAD and eight healthy controls performed fatiguing plantar flexion exercise (from 0.5 to 7 kg for up to 14 min). In the second experiment, seven patients with PAD and seven healthy controls performed low-intensity plantar flexion exercise (2.0 kg for 14 min). BP, heart rate (HR), and SmO 2 were measured continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). SmO 2 is the ratio of oxygenated hemoglobin to total hemoglobin, expressed as a percent. At fatigue, patients with PAD had a greater increase in mean arterial BP (18 ± 2 vs. vs. 10 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.029) and HR (14 ± 2 vs. 6 ± 2 beats/min, P = 0.033) and a greater reduction in SmO 2 (-54 ± 10 vs. -12 ± 4%, P = 0.001). However, both groups had similar physiological responses to low-intensity, nonpainful plantar flexion exercise. These data suggest that patients with PAD have altered oxygen uptake and/or utilization during fatiguing exercise coincident with an augmented BP response. NEW & NOTEWORTHY In this laboratory study, patients with peripheral artery disease performed plantar flexion exercise in the supine posture until symptoms of claudication occurred. Relative to age- and sex-matched healthy subjects we found that patients had a higher blood pressure response, a higher heart rate response, and a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation as

  1. Exercise training starting at weaning age preserves cardiac pacemaker function in adulthood of diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho de Lima, Daniel; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; Rodovalho, Gisele Vieira; Silveira, Simonton Andrade; Haibara, Andrea Siqueira; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2014-08-01

    Peripheral sympathetic overdrive in young obese subjects contributes to further aggravation of insulin resistance, diabetes, and hypertension, thus inducing worsening clinical conditions in adulthood. Exercise training has been considered a strategy to repair obesity autonomic dysfunction, thereby reducing the cardiometabolic risk. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of early exercise training, starting immediately after weaning, on cardiac autonomic control in diet-induced obese rats. Male Wistar rats (weaning) were divided into four groups: (i) a control group (n = 6); (ii) an exercise-trained control group (n = 6); (iii) a diet-induced obesity group (n = 6); and (iv) an exercise-trained diet-induced obesity group (n = 6). The development of obesity was induced by 9 weeks of palatable diet intake, and the training program was implemented in a motor-driven treadmill (5 times per week) during the same period. After this period, animals were submitted to vein and artery catheter implantation to assess cardiac autonomic balance by methylatropine (3 mg/kg) and propranolol (4 mg/kg) administration. Exercise training increased running performance in both groups (p Exercise training also prevented the increased resting heart rate in obese rats, which seemed to be related to cardiac pacemaker activity preservation (p exercise program beginning at weaning age prevents cardiovascular dysfunction in obese rats, indicating that exercise training may be used as a nonpharmacological therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiometabolic diseases.

  2. The mechano-gated channel inhibitor GsMTx4 reduces the exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Steven W; Kim, Joyce S; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising from contracting muscles evoke the exercise pressor reflex. This reflex is greater in a rat model of simulated peripheral arterial disease in which a femoral artery is chronically ligated than it is in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. The role played by the mechanically sensitive component of the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in ligated rats is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the mechano-gated channel inhibitor GsMTx4, a relatively selective inhibitor of mechano-gated Piezo channels, reduces the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats with ligated femoral arteries. Injection of 10 μg of GsMTx4 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced the pressor response to Achilles tendon stretch (a purely mechanical stimulus) but had no effect on the pressor responses to intra-arterial injection of α,β-methylene ATP or lactic acid (purely metabolic stimuli). Moreover, injection of 10 μg of GsMTx4 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced both the integrated pressor area (control 535 ± 21, GsMTx4 218 ± 24 mmHg·s; P reflex contributes to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex during intermittent hindlimb muscle contractions in rats with ligated femoral arteries. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Characteristic findings of exercise ECG test, perfusion SPECT and coronary angiography in patients with exercise induced myocardial stunning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Seo, Ji Hyoung; Bae, Jin Ho; Jeong, Shin Young; Park, Hun Sik; Lee, Jae Tae; Chae, Shung Chull; Lee, Kyu Bo [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-01

    Transient wall motion abnormality and contractile dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV) can be observed in patients with coronary artery disease due to post-stress myocardial stunning. To understand clinical characteristics of stress induced LV dysfunction, we have compared the findings of exercise stress test, myocardial perfusion SPECT and coronary angiography between subjects with and without post-stress LV dysfunction. Among subjects who underwent exercise stress test, myocardial perfusion SPECT and coronary angiography within a month of interval, we enrolled 36 patients with post-stress LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was {>=}5% lower than rest (stunning group) and 16 patients with difference of post-stress and rest LVEF was lesser than 1% (non-stunning group) for this study. Treadmill exercise stress gated myocardial perfusion SPECT was performed with dual head SPECT camera using 740 MBq Tc-99m MIBI and coronary angiography was also performed by conventional Judkins method. Stunning group had a significantly higher incidence of hypercholesterolemia than non-stunning group(45.5 vs 7.1%, p=0.01). Stunning group also had higher incidence of diabetes mellitus and lower incidence of hypertension, but these were not statistically significant. Stunning group had larger and more severe perfusion defect in stress perfusion myocardial SPECT than non-stunning group(extent 18.2 vs 9.2%, p=0.029; severity 13.5 vs 6.9, p=0.040). Stunning group also had higher degree of reversibility of perfusion defect, higher incidence of positive exercise stress test and higher incidence of having severe stenosis(80{approx}99%) in coronary angiography than non-stunning group, but these were not statistically significant. In stunning group, all of 4 patients without perfusion defect had significant coronary artery stenosis and had received revascularization treatment. Patients with post-stress LV dysfunction had larger and more severe perfusion defect and severe coronary artery stenosis than

  4. Impact of medical training and clinical experience on the assessment of oxygenation and hypoxaemia after general anaesthesia: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, Hansjörg; Kranke, Peter; Eberhart, Leopold H J; Afshari, Arash; Weber, Frank; Brieskorn, Melanie; Heine, Julian; Arndt, Christian; Rüsch, Dirk

    2015-06-01

    In Germany it is common practice to use pulse oximetry and supplementary oxygen only on request in patients breathing spontaneously transferred to the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU) following surgery under general anaesthesia. The main aim was to study the influence of medical training and clinical experience on assessing SpO(2) and detecting hypoxaemia in these patients. The second aim was to do a preliminary assessment whether this practice can be found in countries other than Germany. Anaesthetists, nurses and medical students estimated SpO(2) in patients breathing room air at the end of transfer to the PACU following surgery (including all major surgical fields) under general anaesthesia. Estimated SpO(2) was compared to SpO(2) measured by pulse oximetry. A survey was carried out among European anaesthesists concerning the use of pulse oximetry and supplementary oxygen during patient transfer to the PACU. Hypoxaemia (SpO(2) < 90 %) occurred in 154 (13.5 %) out of 1,138 patients. Anaesthetists, nurses, and medical students identified only 25, 23, and 21 patients of those as being hypoxaemic, respectively. Clinical experience did not improve detection of hypoxaemia both in anaesthetists (p = 0.63) and nurses (p = 0.18). Use of pulse oximetry and supplemental oxygen during patient transfer to the PACU in European countries differs to a large extent. It seems to be applied only on request in many hospitals. Considering the uncertainty about deleterious effects of transient, short lasting hypoxaemia routine use of pulse oximetry is advocated for patient transfer to the PACU.

  5. Exercise Training Prevents Cardiovascular Derangements Induced by Fructose Overload in Developing Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Farah

    Full Text Available The risks of chronic diseases associated with the increasing consumption of fructose-laden foods are amplified by the lack of regular physical activity and have become a serious public health issue worldwide. Moreover, childhood eating habits are strongly related to metabolic syndrome in adults. Thus, we aimed to investigate the preventive role of exercise training undertaken concurrently with a high fructose diet on cardiac function, hemodynamics, cardiovascular autonomic modulation and oxidative stress in male rats after weaning. Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 8/group: Sedentary control (SC, Trained control (TC, Sedentary Fructose (SF and Trained Fructose (TF. Training was performed on a treadmill (8 weeks, 40-60% of maximum exercise test. Evaluations of cardiac function, hemodynamics, cardiovascular autonomic modulation and oxidative stress in plasma and in left ventricle (LV were performed. Chronic fructose overload induced glucose intolerance and an increase in white adipose tissue (WAT weight, in myocardial performance index (MPI (SF:0.42±0.04 vs. SC:0.24±0.05 and in arterial pressure (SF:122±3 vs. SC:113±1 mmHg associated with increased cardiac and vascular sympathetic modulation. Fructose also induced unfavorable changes in oxidative stress profile (plasmatic protein oxidation- SF:3.30±0.09 vs. SC:1.45±0.08 nmol/mg prot; and LV total antioxidant capacity (TRAP- SF: 2.5±0.5 vs. SC:12.7±1.7 uM trolox. The TF group showed reduced WAT, glucose intolerance, MPI (0.35±0.04, arterial pressure (118±2mmHg, sympathetic modulation, plasmatic protein oxidation and increased TRAP when compared to SF group. Therefore, our findings indicate that cardiometabolic dysfunctions induced by fructose overload early in life may be prevented by moderate aerobic exercise training.

  6. Exercise Training Prevents Cardiovascular Derangements Induced by Fructose Overload in Developing Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Daniela; Nunes, Jonas; Sartori, Michelle; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Sirvente, Raquel; Silva, Maikon B.; Fiorino, Patrícia; Morris, Mariana; Llesuy, Susana; Farah, Vera; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2016-01-01

    The risks of chronic diseases associated with the increasing consumption of fructose-laden foods are amplified by the lack of regular physical activity and have become a serious public health issue worldwide. Moreover, childhood eating habits are strongly related to metabolic syndrome in adults. Thus, we aimed to investigate the preventive role of exercise training undertaken concurrently with a high fructose diet on cardiac function, hemodynamics, cardiovascular autonomic modulation and oxidative stress in male rats after weaning. Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 8/group): Sedentary control (SC), Trained control (TC), Sedentary Fructose (SF) and Trained Fructose (TF). Training was performed on a treadmill (8 weeks, 40–60% of maximum exercise test). Evaluations of cardiac function, hemodynamics, cardiovascular autonomic modulation and oxidative stress in plasma and in left ventricle (LV) were performed. Chronic fructose overload induced glucose intolerance and an increase in white adipose tissue (WAT) weight, in myocardial performance index (MPI) (SF:0.42±0.04 vs. SC:0.24±0.05) and in arterial pressure (SF:122±3 vs. SC:113±1 mmHg) associated with increased cardiac and vascular sympathetic modulation. Fructose also induced unfavorable changes in oxidative stress profile (plasmatic protein oxidation- SF:3.30±0.09 vs. SC:1.45±0.08 nmol/mg prot; and LV total antioxidant capacity (TRAP)- SF: 2.5±0.5 vs. SC:12.7±1.7 uM trolox). The TF group showed reduced WAT, glucose intolerance, MPI (0.35±0.04), arterial pressure (118±2mmHg), sympathetic modulation, plasmatic protein oxidation and increased TRAP when compared to SF group. Therefore, our findings indicate that cardiometabolic dysfunctions induced by fructose overload early in life may be prevented by moderate aerobic exercise training. PMID:27930685

  7. The effects of resistance exercise training on arterial stiffness in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVallance, E; Fournier, S; Lemaster, K; Moore, C; Asano, S; Bonner, D; Donley, D; Olfert, I M; Chantler, P D

    2016-05-01

    Arterial stiffness is a strong independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is elevated in individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Resistance training is a popular form of exercise that has beneficial effects on muscle mass, strength, balance and glucose control. However, it is unknown whether resistance exercise training (RT) can lower arterial stiffness in patients with MetS. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine whether a progressive RT program would improve arterial stiffness in MetS. A total of 57 subjects (28 healthy sedentary subjects; 29 MetS) were evaluated for arterial structure and function, including pulse wave velocity (cfPWV: arterial stiffness), before and after an 8-week period of RT or continuation of sedentary lifestyle. We found that 8 weeks of progressive RT increased skeletal muscle strength in both Con and MetS, but did not change arterial stiffness in either MetS (cfPWV; Pre 7.9 ± 0.4 m/s vs. Post 7.7 ± 0.4 m/s) or healthy controls (cfPWV; Pre 6.9 ± 0.3 m/s vs. Post 7.0 ± 0.3 m/s). However, when cfPWV is considered as a continuous variable, high baseline measures of cfPWV tended to show a decrease in cfPWV following RT. Eight weeks of progressive RT did not decrease the group mean values of arterial stiffness in individuals with MetS or healthy controls.

  8. Effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of female patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Kim, Eon-Ho; Ko, Kwang-Jun

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness or female patients with metabolic syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise group (n=12) or a control group (n=11). Subjects in the exercise group performed aerobic exercise at 60-80% of maximum heart rate for 40 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks. The changes in metabolic syndrome risk factors, resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness were measured and analyzed before and after initiation of the exercise program to determine the effect of exercise. Arterial stiffness was assessed based on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV). [Results] Compared to the control group; The metabolic syndrome risk factors (weight, % body fat, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and HDL-Cholesterol) were significantly improved in the exercise: resting heart rate was significantly decreased; VO2max, muscle strength and muscle endurance were significantly increased; and ba-PWV was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise had beneficial effects on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of patients with metabolic syndrome.

  9. A comparison of the ventilatory response of sleeping newborn lambs to step and progressive hypoxaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, G; Malcolm, G; Henderson-Smart, D

    1997-01-01

    1. Slight variations in the rate at which hypoxaemia develops may significantly alter the ventilatory response (VR) elicited. Here we have developed a technique to compare the VRs elicited from sleeping newborn lambs by specific (step versus progressive), short-duration ( or = 9 days (10 +/- 0.3 days) were also compared. There was an upward shift in the position of step and progressive response curves of older lambs, reflecting primarily the increased vigour of the initial hyperpnoea elicited by step (delta Vi at 1 min = +20 +/- 4% at 4 days vs. +40 +/- 11% at 10 days) as well as progressive (delta Vi at 1 min = +6 +/- 2% at 4 days vs. +17 +/- 5% at 10 days) hypoxaemia. 5. Qualitatively different VRs may be elicited from the newborn, depending upon the specific hypoxaemic profile administered. Therefore, to evaluate the significance of VRs elicited in response to classical, steady-state hypoxia at different postnatal ages properly, the stimulus must be accurately described. PMID:9288688

  10. Trauma-induced systemic inflammatory response versus exercise-induced immunomodulatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbach, Elvira; Schneider, Marion E

    2006-01-01

    Accidental trauma and heavy endurance exercise, both induce a kind of systemic inflammatory response, also called systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Exercise-related SIRS is conditioned by hyperthermia and concomitant heat shock responses, whereas trauma-induced SIRS manifests concomitantly with tissue necrosis and immune activation, secondarily followed by fever. Inflammatory cytokines are common denominators in both trauma and exercise, although there are marked quantitative differences. Different anti-inflammatory cytokines may be involved in the control of inflammation in trauma- and exercise-induced stress. Exercise leads to a balanced equilibrium between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses. Intermittent states of rest, as well as anti-oxidant capacity, are lacking or minor in trauma but are high in exercising individuals. Regular training may enhance immune competence, whereas trauma-induced SIRS often paves the way for infectious complications, such as sepsis.

  11. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness and cerebrovascular pulsatility in adults with and without hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefferts, Wesley K; DeBlois, Jacob P; Receno, Candace N; Barreira, Tiago V; Brutsaert, Tom D; Carhart, Robert L; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2018-04-19

    Stiffer central arteries, as seen in hypertension (HTN), foster transmission of pulsatile hemodynamics into fragile cerebral vessels. Aerobic exercise is recommended for adults with HTN, but its effects on arterial stiffness and pulsatility in this group are unclear. This study sought to investigate the effect of acute aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness and cerebrovascular pulsatility in 30 adults with treated HTN and 30 age, sex, and BMI-matched adults without HTN (56 ± 6 years, BMI 28.2 ± 2.9 kg/m; 28 women). Patients underwent hemodynamic measures before/after 30-min cycling (≈55% peak oxygen consumption). Aortic stiffness was measured using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and carotid artery stiffness was assessed with β-stiffness via ultrasound. Aortic/carotid pulse pressure (aortic via radial generalized transfer function) was measured by tonometry and calibrated to brachial mean pressure and diastolic pressure. Carotid/middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood velocity pulsatility indices were measured using Doppler. Carotid wave intensity analysis was used to derive forward wave intensity (W1). Exercise impacted hemodynamics similarly in HTN compared to no-HTN. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, MCA pulsatility index, carotid pulsatility index, and W1 increased similarly after exercise in both groups (P < 0.05). Carotid pulse pressure and β-stiffness were unaltered after exercise. Postexercise changes in W1 were positively associated with carotid pulsatility index, which was further associated with MCA pulsatility index. These data suggest adults with treated HTN experience similar increases in aortic stiffness and cerebrovascular hemodynamic pulsatility during early recovery from acute aerobic exercise as their counterparts without HTN.

  12. Test-retest reliabilty of exercise-induced hypoalgesia after aerobic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Dørge, Daniel Bandholtz; Schmidt, Kristian Sonne

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Exercise increases pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in exercising and nonexercising muscles, known as exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). No studies have investigated the test-retest reliability of change in PPTs after aerobic exercise. Primary objectives were to compare the effect...

  13. The pacing stress test: thallium-201 myocardial imaging after atrial pacing. Diagnostic value in detecting coronary artery disease compared with exercise testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, G.V.; Aroesty, J.M.; Parker, J.A.; McKay, R.G.; Silverman, K.J.; Als, A.V.; Come, P.C.; Kolodny, G.M.; Grossman, W.

    1984-01-01

    Many patients suspected of having coronary artery disease are unable to undergo adequate exercise testing. An alternate stress, pacing tachycardia, has been shown to produce electrocardiographic changes that are as sensitive and specific as those observed during exercise testing. To compare thallium-201 imaging after atrial pacing stress with thallium imaging after exercise stress, 22 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization were studied with both standard exercise thallium imaging and pacing thallium imaging. Positive ischemic electrocardiographic changes (greater than 1 mm ST segment depression) were noted in 11 of 16 patients with coronary artery disease during exercise, and in 15 of the 16 patients during atrial pacing. One of six patients with normal or trivial coronary artery disease had a positive electrocardiogram with each test. Exercise thallium imaging was positive in 13 of 16 patients with coronary artery disease compared with 15 of 16 patients during atrial pacing. Three of six patients without coronary artery disease had a positive scan with exercise testing, and two of these same patients developed a positive scan with atrial pacing. Of those patients with coronary artery disease and an abnormal scan, 85% showed redistribution with exercise testing compared with 87% during atrial pacing. Segment by segment comparison of thallium imaging after either atrial pacing or exercise showed that there was a good correlation of the location and severity of the thallium defects (r . 0.83, p . 0.0001, Spearman rank correlation). It is concluded that the location and presence of both fixed and transient thallium defects after atrial pacing are closely correlated with the findings after exercise testing

  14. A simplified approach for evaluating multiple test outcomes and multiple disease states in relation to the exercise thallium-201 stress test in suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, S.G.; Watson, D.D.; Gibson, R.S.; Beller, G.A.; Kaul, S.

    1989-01-01

    This study describes a simplified approach for the interpretation of electrocardiographic and thallium-201 imaging data derived from the same patient during exercise. The 383 patients in this study had also undergone selective coronary arteriography within 3 months of the exercise test. This matrix approach allows for multiple test outcomes (both tests positive, both negative, 1 test positive and 1 negative) and multiple disease states (no coronary artery disease vs 1-vessel vs multivessel coronary artery disease). Because this approach analyzes the results of 2 test outcomes simultaneously rather than serially, it also negates the lack of test independence, if such an effect is present. It is also demonstrated that ST-segment depression on the electrocardiogram and defects on initial thallium-201 images provide conditionally independent information regarding the presence of coronary artery disease in patients without prior myocardial infarction. In contrast, ST-segment depression on the electrocardiogram and redistribution on the delayed thallium-201 images may not provide totally independent information regarding the presence of exercise-induced ischemia in patients with or without myocardial infarction

  15. Analysis of the degree of pulmonary thallium washout after exercise in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.; Rozanski, A.; Berman, D.S.; Garcia, E.; Van Train, K.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    An abnormal increase in pulmonary thallium activity may be visualized on post-stress thallium images in patients with coronary artery disease. Because this increased pulmonary thallium activity usually disappears by the time of redistribution imaging, this study was designed to assess whether measurement of the degree of pulmonary thallium washout between stress and redistribution might improve the detection of increased pulmonary thallium activity in patients with coronary artery disease. Quantitative analysis revealed abnormal (that is, greater than 2 standard deviations of normal values) pulmonary thallium washouts in 59 (64%) of 92 patients with coronary artery disease, but in only 2 (25%) of 8 subjects with angiographically normal arteries (p less than 0.06). By comparison, the visual analysis of pulmonary thallium washout and use of initial pulmonary to myocardial thallium ratio were significantly (p less than 0.05) less sensitive in detecting abnormality in patients with coronary artery disease. Abnormal pulmonary thallium washout was related to both the anatomic extent and functional severity of disease: it occurred with greatest frequency in patients with multivessel disease and in those with exercise-induced left ventricular dysfunction (p less than 0.005). When added to the quantitative analysis of myocardial scintigraphy, the analysis of pulmonary thallium washout increased the detection of coronary artery disease from 84 to 93% (p less than 0.05), but the sample size was too small to assess specificity

  16. Pseudonormalization of transmitral flow pattern during exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiota, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Tsuguya; Takenaka, Katsu; Amano, Keiko; Amano, Wataru; Igarashi, Tsutomu; Otake, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Tsuneaki

    1993-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the usefulness of Doppler parameters and transmitral blood velocity for detecting abnormalities of left ventricular diastolic function during low-level exercise thallium-201 imaging. The study population consisted of 16 thallium perfusion defect patients with coronary artery disease (mean 61±8 years) and 21 age-matched control subjects (mean 55±5 years) without any thallium perfusion defect. Of the 16 thallium perfusion defect patients, 12 were examined by coronary arteriography, of whom single vessel coronary artery disease was seen in 2 and multivessel coronary artery disease in 10. Patients with mitral regurgitant murmurs were excluded from the study. Peak mitral blood flow velocity was measured in early diastole (E) and during atrial systole (A) and the A/E ratio was calculated. The changes in blood pressure and heart rate after low-level exercise were not significantly different between control and thallium perfusion defect groups. The A/E ratio increased slightly in control subjects from 93±14% at baseline to 100±15% during low-level exercise (p<0.05), whereas in patients with thallium perfusion defect, it decreased significantly from 119±33% at baseline to 92±23% during low-level exercise (p<0.01). Thus pseudonormalization of the A/E ratio during low-level exercise may be valuable in the evaluation of patients with severe or multivessel coronary artery disease. (author)

  17. Effect of Acute Resistance Exercise on Carotid Artery Stiffness and Cerebral Blood Flow Pulsatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley K Lefferts

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness is associated with cerebral flow pulsatility. Arterial stiffness increases following acute resistance exercise (RE. Whether this acute RE-induced vascular stiffening affects cerebral pulsatility remains unknown. Purpose: To investigate the effects of acute RE on common carotid artery (CCA stiffness and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv pulsatility. Methods: Eighteen healthy men (22 ± 1 yr; 23.7 ± 0.5 kg∙m-2 underwent acute RE (5 sets, 5-RM bench press, 5 sets 10-RM bicep curls with 90 s rest intervals or a time control condition (seated rest in a randomized order. CCA stiffness (β-stiffness, Elastic Modulus (Ep and hemodynamics (pulsatility index, forward wave intensity and reflected wave intensity were assessed using a combination of Doppler ultrasound, wave intensity analysis and applanation tonometry at baseline and 3 times post-RE. CBFv pulsatility index was measured with transcranial Doppler at the middle cerebral artery (MCA. Results: CCA β-stiffness, Ep and CCA pulse pressure significantly increased post-RE and remained elevated throughout post-testing (p 0.05. There were significant increases in forward wave intensity post-RE (p0.05. Conclusion: Although acute RE increases CCA stiffness and pressure pulsatility, it may not affect CCA or MCA flow pulsatility. Increases in pressure pulsatility may be due to increased forward wave intensity and not pressure from wave reflections.

  18. Response of right ventricular ejection fraction to exercise stress in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Murano, Kenichi; Usami, Masahisa

    1985-01-01

    The right ventricular (RV) response to exercise was assessed in 28 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 9 normal subjects. The relationship between RV reserve, exercise left ventricular (LV) reserve and the presence of proximal right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis were evaluated. RV and LV ejection fraction (EF) were determined by multiple-gated equilibrium blood pool imaging with sup(99m)Tc in the modified left anterior oblique position. Graded supine exercise stress blood pool imaging was performed at the same position by using bicycle ergometer. For calculation of RVEF, variable ROIs were used. In normal subjects, both RVEF and LVEF increased significantly during exercise (%ΔRVEF 18.9+-5.9%, %ΔLVEF 16.3%+-4.7%). In CAD groups with and without RCA stenosis, LVEF and RVEF showed decrease or no change during exercise. Although magnitude of change in LVEF from rest to exercise (%ΔLVEF) was not significantly different in both CAD groups (4.1+-9.0% in cases with RCA disease and 6.2+-14.6% in cases without RCA disease), %ΔRVEF was different significantly (16.0+-14.3% in cases with RCA disease and 1.4+-14.1% in cases without RCA disease, p<0.05). In patients with RCA disease, 3 patients (25%) showed depression in RVEF with exercise regardless of the increase in LVEF. However, none of the patients without RCA disease showed depression in RVEF with the increment in LVEF during exercise. These findings suggested that proximal RCA stenosis is one major determinant of exercise RVEF response. But in 9 of 16 patients without RCA disease (56%) both RVEF and LVEF decreased during exercise. Besides, in patients without RCA disease there was a significant linear relationship between the direction and magnitude of change from rest to exercise of LVEF and RVEF (r=0.69). (J.P.N.)

  19. Late postoperative nocturnal episodic hypoxaemia and associated sleep pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Wildschiødtz, G; Pedersen, M H

    1994-01-01

    significantly after surgery (P REM) sleep decreased significantly on the first night after operation (P REM sleep (rebound) on the second, third or both nights after operation compared with the preoperative night. Slow wave sleep...... was depressed significantly on the first two nights after operation (P REM sleep-associated hypoxaemic episodes for individual patients increased about three-fold on the second and third nights after operation compared with the night before operation (P sleep...... pattern is disturbed severely with early depression of REM and slow wave sleep and with rebound of REM sleep on the second and third nights. Postoperative rebound of REM sleep may contribute to the development of sleep disordered breathing and nocturnal episodic hypoxaemia....

  20. Copper Induces Vasorelaxation and Antagonizes Noradrenaline -Induced Vasoconstriction in Rat Mesenteric Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Copper is an essential trace element for normal cellular function and contributes to critical physiological or pathological processes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of copper on vascular tone of rat mesenteric artery and compare the effects of copper on noradrenaline (NA and high K+ induced vasoconstriction. Methods: The rat mesenteric arteries were isolated and the vessel tone was measured by using multi wire myograph system in vitro. Blood pressure of carotid artery in rabbits was measured by using physiological data acquisition and analysis system in vivo. Results: Copper dose-dependently blunted NA-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. Copper-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited when the vessels were pretreated with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. Copper did not blunt high K+-induced vasoconstriction. Copper preincubation inhibited NA-evoked vasoconstriction and the inhibition was not affected by the presence of L-NAME. Copper preincubation showed no effect on high K+-evoked vasoconstriction. Copper chelator diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (DTC antagonized the vasoactivity induced by copper in rat mesenteric artery. In vivo experiments showed that copper injection (iv significantly decreased blood pressure of rabbits and NA or DTC injection (iv did not rescue the copper-induced hypotension and animal death. Conclusion: Copper blunted NA but not high K+-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. The acute effect of copper on NA-induced vasoconstriction was depended on nitric oxide (NO, but the effect of copper pretreatment on NA-induced vasoconstriction was independed on NO, suggesting that copper affected NA-induced vasoconstriction by two distinct mechanisms.

  1. Does Lower Limb Exercise Worsen Renal Artery Hemodynamics in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm?

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Anqiang; Tian, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Zaipin; Deng, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) and renal complications emerge in some patients after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to treat abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA). The mechanisms for the causes of these problems are not clear. We hypothesized that for EVAR patients, lower limb exercise could negatively influence the physiology of the renal artery and the renal function, by decreasing the blood flow velocity and changing the hemodynamics in the renal arteries. To evaluate this hypothesis, pre- and ...

  2. PERSONALITY DOES NOT INFLUENCE EXERCISE-INDUCED MOOD ENHANCEMENT AMONG FEMALE EXERCISERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Lane

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the influence of personality on exercise-induced mood changes. It was hypothesised that (a exercise would be associated with significant mood enhancement across all personality types, (b extroversion would be associated with positive mood and neuroticism with negative mood both pre- and post-exercise, and (c personality measures would interact with exercise-induced mood changes. Participants were 90 female exercisers (M = 25.8 yr, SD = 9.0 yr who completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI once and the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS before and after a 60-minute exercise session. Median splits were used to group participants into four personality types: stable introverts (n = 25, stable extroverts (n = 20, neurotic introverts (n = 26, and neurotic extroverts (n = 19. Repeated measures MANOVA showed significant mood enhancement following exercise across all personality types. Neuroticism was associated with negative mood scores pre- and post-exercise but the effect of extroversion on reported mood was relatively weak. There was no significant interaction effect between exercise-induced mood enhancement and personality. In conclusion, findings lend support to the notion that exercise is associated with improved mood. However, findings show that personality did not influence this effect, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood

  3. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity and blood flow during exercise and muscle ischemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Perko, M; Hanel, B

    1992-01-01

    Changes in middle cerebral artery flow velocity (Vmean), measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound, were used to determine whether increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) or brain activation enhance cerebral perfusion during exercise. We also evaluated the role of "central command......, they support the hypothesis that cerebral perfusion during exercise reflects an increase in brain activation that is independent of MAP, central command, and muscle metaboreceptors but is likely to depend on influence of mechanoreceptors.......," mechanoreceptors, and/or muscle "metaboreceptors" on cerebral perfusion. Ten healthy subjects performed two levels of dynamic exercise corresponding to a heart rate of 110 (range 89-134) and 148 (129-170) beats/min, respectively, and exhaustive one-legged static knee extension. Measurements were continued during 2...

  4. Factor analysis of radionuclide ejection fraction response during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamuro, Masashi

    1986-01-01

    In 204 patients with ischemic heart disease and 25 normal subjects who underwent exercise radionuclide ventriculography (RNV), multivariate analyses and other statistical methods were employed to study factors affecting changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (ΔEF). Twenty one variables were obtained from clinical diagnosis, cardiac catheterization, and RNV. Multivariate analyses showed that coronary score for the severity of coronary artery lesions was the most significant factor, followed by exercise duration, resting heart rate, the number of diseased vessels, and exercise heart rate. Statistically significant decrease in ΔEF was associated with regional wall motion abnormality, ECG changes, and chest pain. Lesions in the left main trunk and the proximal area of left anterior descending artery were greatly involved in the decrease of ΔEF. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Bronchial or Laryngeal Obstruction Induced by Exercise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Bey

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A child suspected of exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction and asthma is examined by laryngoscopy and respiratory resistance (Rrs after exercise challenge. Immediately at exercise cessation, the visualized adduction of the larynx in inspiration is reflected in a paroxystic increase in Rrs. While normal breathing has apparently resumed later on during recovery from exercise, the pattern of Rrs in inspiration is observed to reoccur following a deep breath or swallowing. The procedure may thus help diagnosing the site of exercise-induced obstruction when laryngoscopy is not available and identify re-inducers of laryngeal dysfunction.

  6. [Exercise-induced inspiratory stridor. An important differential diagnosis of exercise-induced asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Pernille; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Rasmussen, Niels; Backer, Vibeke

    2007-11-19

    Recent studies suggest that exercise-induced inspiratory stridor (EIIS) is an important and often overlooked differential diagnosis of exercise-induced asthma. EIIS is characterised by astma-like symptoms, but differs by inspiratory limitation, fast recovery, and a lack of effect of inhaled bronchodilators. The prevalence of EIIS is reported to be 5-27%, and affects both children and adults. The pathophysiology, the pathogenesis, and the treatment of the condition are not yet clarified. At present, a population-based study is being conducted in order to address these points.

  7. Comparison of adenosine and treadmill exercise thallium-201 stress tests for the detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Shinya; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Chiba, Junya; Ikeda, Kozue; Tomoike, Hitonobu

    1993-01-01

    To determine the clinical usefulness of adenosine Tl-201 imaging for the evaluation of coronary artery disease, 22 patients with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent adenosine and exercise Tl-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were studied. The peak levels of heart rate (83 vs 123 bpm, p<0.001), systolic blood pressure (124 vs 164 mmHg, p<0.001), diastolic blood pressure (70 vs 86 mmHg, p<0.01) and rate pressure products (10220 vs 20410 bpm x mmHg, p<0.001) were markedly smaller during adenosine infusion than during exercise. Segmental agreements between adenosine and exercise tests were 90% (218 of 242 segments) regarding the presence of perfusion defects and 89% (215 of 242 segments) regarding the presence of redistribution. Regional Tl-201 uptake (r=0.85, p<0.001) and the extent (r=0.75, p<0.001) and intensity (r=0.83, p<0.001) of Tl-201 defects during adenosine testing were closely correlated with those of exercise testing. Adenosine and exercise tests showed similar sensitivities for the identification of individual coronary stenosis (85% vs 78%). However, in patients who were unable to perform adequate exercise (maximal heart rate<120 bpm), the sensitivity of adenosine imaging tended to be higher than that of exercise imaging (92% vs 69%, p=0.07). Adenosine Tl-201 imaging is an alternative to the exercise test for assessing the severity and loci of coronary artery disease, especially in patients who are unable to perform adequate physical exercise. (author)

  8. Exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging in left main coronary artery disease: sensitive but not specific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, T.; Griffith, L.S.; Achuff, S.C.; Bailey, I.K.; Bulkley, B.H.; Burow, R.; Pitt, B.; Becker, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of thallium-201 scintigraphy for identifying left main coronary artery disease, the results of scintigraphy at rest and during exercise were compared in 24 patients with 50 percent or greater narrowing of the left main coronary artery and 80 patients with 50 percent or greater narrowing of one or more of the major coronary arteries but without left main coronary involvement. By segmental analysis of the scintigrams, perfusion defects were assigned to the left anterior descending, left circumflex or right coronary artery, singly or in combination, and the pattern of simultaneous left anterior descending and circumflex arterial defects was used to identify left main coronary artery disease. Of the 24 patients with left main coronary artery disease, 22 (92 percent) had abnormal exercise scintigrams. Despite this high sensitivity, the pattern of perfusion defects was not specific; the ''left main pattern'' was found in 3 patients (13 percent) with left main coronary artery disease but also in 3 (33 percent) of 9 patients with combined left anterior descending and left circumflex arterial disease, 4 (19 percent) of 21 patients with three vessel disease and 3 (6 percent) of 50 patients with one or two vessel disease but excluding the group with left anterior descending plus left circumflex arterial disease. The pattern of perfusion defects in the patients with left main coronary artery disease was determined by the location and severity of narrowings in the coronary arteries downstream from the left main arterial lesion. Concomitant lesions in other arteries were found in all patients with left main coronary disease (one vessel in 1 patient, two vessels in 7 patients and three vessels in 16). For this reason, it is unlikely that even with improvements in radiopharmaceutical agents and imaging techniques, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy will be sufficiently specific for definitive identification of left main coronary artery disease

  9. Nonischemic changes in right ventricular function on exercise. Do normal volunteers differ from patients with normal coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplin, J.L.; Maltz, M.B.; Flatman, W.D.; Dymond, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    Factors other than ischemia may alter right ventricular function both at rest and on exercise. Normal volunteers differ from cardiac patients with normal coronary arteries with regard to their left ventricular response to exercise. This study examined changes in right ventricular function on exercise in 21 normal volunteers and 13 patients with normal coronary arteries, using first-pass radionuclide angiography. There were large ranges of right ventricular ejection fraction in the two groups, both at rest and on exercise. Resting right ventricular ejection fraction was 40.2 +/- 10.6% (mean +/- SD) in the volunteers and 38.6 +/- 9.7% in the patients, p = not significant, and on exercise rose significantly in both groups to 46.1 +/- 9.9% and 45.8 +/- 9.7%, respectively. The difference between the groups was not significant. In both groups some subjects with high resting values showed large decreases in ejection fraction on exercise, and there were significant negative correlations between resting ejection fraction and the change on exercise, r = -0.59 (p less than 0.01) in volunteers, and r = -0.66 (p less than 0.05) in patients. Older volunteers tended to have lower rest and exercise ejection fractions, but there was no difference between normotensive and hypertensive patients in their rest or exercise values. In conclusion, changes in right ventricular function on exercise are similar in normal volunteers and in patients with normal coronary arteries. Some subjects show decreases in right ventricular ejection fraction on exercise which do not appear to be related to ischemia

  10. Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training decreases peripheral but not central artery wall thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Munckhof, I.C.L. van den; Poelkens, F.; Hopman, M.T.; Thijssen, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the impact of exercise training on conduit artery wall thickness in type 2 diabetes. We examined the local and systemic impact of exercise training on superficial femoral (SFA), brachial (BA), and carotid artery (CA) wall thickness in type 2 diabetes patients and

  11. Exercise, stress or what. The non-invasive detection of latent coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltart, J.; Robinson, P.S.

    1978-01-01

    This communication discusses the methods of detecting latent coronary artery disease in an entirely asymptomatic individual with no previous symptoms or signs suggestive of coronary artery disease. Isotope techniques are being increasingly employed in the detection and assessment of coronary artery disease in that they may enable the confirmation of the presence of ischaemia, the extent and location of the underlying coronary artery disease and the effect of ischaemia on overall and regional left ventricular function. Three groups of techniques are commonly employed: 1. assessment of myocardial perfusion; 2. labelling of acute myocardial infarction; 3. overall and regional left ventricular function studies. Isotopes of potassium were initially studied, and, despite technical problems with imaging, 43 K has proved a useful agent in that over a range of coronary flow rates from normal to severely reduced flow, myocardial uptake parallels myocardial blood flow. Myocardial perfusion imaging should enhance the sensitivity and specificity of exercise testing in the symptomatic population and should also be helpful in the asymptomatic population although data on such populations are as yet extremely limited. Acute infarct labelling has little relevance to the very early detection of coronary artery disease. Assessment of overall and regional left ventricular function using gated blood pool scanning at rest and possibly also during exercise has potentially very wide applications in ischaemic heart disease and in combination with myocardial perfusion scanning in the assessment of symptomatic ischaemic heart disease and the detection of ischaemia and coronary artery disease in the asymptomatic population. (Auth.)

  12. [Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis - a new trend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardal, Hilde; Gøransson, Lasse G

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not there has been an increase in the number of admissions for exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis at Stavanger University Hospital (SUS) in recent years. The study is a retrospective review of patients discharged over the period January 2010 to March 2015 with a diagnosis of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis and with maximum creatine kinase (CK) levels more than ten times the upper reference limit. A total of 33 patients, 21 women and 12 men, with a median age of 28 years (18 - 68), were included in the study. Of the 33 patients, three quarters (25) were admitted in 2014 - 15, compared with eight over the period 2010 - 13. One patient developed kidney failure that required dialysis. The treatment depended more on the attending physician and department than on the patient's clinical condition and CK-level, but this did not seem to affect the rate of complications. The incidence of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis at SUS increased from autumn 2014, and this coincided with increased media attention and a new exercise trend. We recommend standardising the treatment of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis, as current treatment recommendations are based on rhabdomyolysis triggered by causes other than exercise.

  13. Accuracy of diagnosis of coronary artery disease by radionuclide management of left ventricular function during rest and exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; McEwan, P.; Newman, G.E.; Port, S.; Rerych, S.K.; Scholz, P.M.; Upton, M.T.; Peter, C.A.; Austin, E.H.; Leong, K.H.; Gibbons, R.J.; Cobb, F.R.; Coleman, R.E.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Rest and exercise radionuclide angiocardiographic measurements of left ventricular function were obtained in 496 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization for chest pain. Two hundred forty-eight of these patients also had an exercise treadmill test. An ejection fraction less than 50% was the abnormality of resting left ventricular function that provided the greatest diagnostic information. In patients with normal resting left ventricular function, exercise abnormalities that were optimal for diagnosis of coronary artery disease were an injection fraction at least 6% less than predicted, an increase greater than 20 ml in end-systolic volume and the appearance of an exercise-induced wall motion abnormality. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were lower in patients who were taking propranolol at the time of study and in patients who failed to achieve an adequate exercise end point. In the 387 patients with an optimal study, the test had a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 58%. Radionuclide angiocardiography was more sensitive and less specific than the exercise treadmill test. The high degree of sensitivity of the radionuclide test suggests that it is most appropriately applied to patient groups with a high prevalence of disease, including those considered for cardiac catheterization

  14. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T

    2013-01-01

    for eight subjects, respectively, were excluded from analysis because of insufficient signal quality. Running increased mean arterial pressure and mean MCA velocity and induced rhythmic oscillations in BP and in MCA velocity corresponding to the difference between step rate and heart rate (HR) frequencies....... During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow...

  15. Mechanism underlying the absence of ischemic changes on the exercise electrocardiogram in patients with abnormal exercise thallium-201 imaging and coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coplan, N.L.; Horowitz, S.F.; Hoffman, D.P.; Goldman, M.E.; Machac, J.

    1985-01-01

    Patients with coronary artery disease may have reversible abnormalities on a thallium myocardial perfusion study without simultaneous ischemic changes on the exercise electrocardiogram, but the mechanisms responsible for this disparity have not been fully elucidated. A group of 37 patients with angiographically demonstrated coronary artery disease and abnormal thallium perfusion imaging were divided into two groups on the basis of their exercise electrocardiographic ST segment response. Thirteen patients (Group A) had no significant electrocardiographic changes with exercise, while 24 patients (Group B) had ST changes consistent with ischemia during the test. There were no significant differences in clinical or angiographic characteristics between the two groups. Stress test results showed a similar mean duration of exercise in the two groups, but the patients in Group A achieved a significantly lower mean maximal heart rate and mean maximal double product. These results suggest that exercise thallium-electrocardiogram discordance is mediated by the level of myocardial workload achieved. An abnormal perfusion scan accompanying an exercise electrocardiogram which does not demonstrate any ischemic ST change may occur when there is sufficient increase in myocardial oxygen demand to result in differential augmentation of myocardial blood flow, but insufficient imbalance of supply and demand to result in signs of ischemia on the surface electrocardiogram

  16. Exercise restriction is not associated with increasing body mass index over time in patients with anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, James M; Elias, Matthew D; Wilder, Travis J; O'Brien, James E; Kim, Richard W; Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G; Brothers, Julie; Cohen, Meryl S; McCrindle, Brian W

    2017-10-01

    Anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries is associated with exercise-induced ischaemia, leading some physicians to restrict exercise in patients with this condition. We sought to determine whether exercise restriction was associated with increasing body mass index over time. From 1998 to 2015, 440 patients ⩽30 years old were enrolled into an inception cohort. Exercise-restriction status was documented in 143 patients. Using linear mixed model repeated-measures regression, factors associated with increasing body mass index z-score over time, including exercise restriction and surgical intervention as time-varying covariates, were investigated. The 143 patients attended 558 clinic visits for which exercise-restriction status was recorded. The mean number of clinic visits per patient was 4, and the median duration of follow-up was 1.7 years (interquartile range (IQR) 0.5-4.4). The median age at first clinic visit was 10.3 years (IQR 7.1-13.9), and 71% (101/143) were males. All patients were alive at their most recent follow-up. At the first clinic visit, 54% (78/143) were exercise restricted, and restriction status changed in 34% (48/143) during follow-up. The median baseline body mass index z-score was 0.2 (IQR 0.3-0.9). In repeated-measures analysis, neither time-related exercise restriction nor its interaction with time was associated with increasing body mass index z-score. Surgical intervention and its interaction with time were associated with decreasing body mass index z-score. Although exercise restriction was not associated with increasing body mass index over time, surgical intervention was associated with decreasing body mass index z-score over time in patients with anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries.

  17. Aerobic exercise acutely prevents the endothelial dysfunction induced by mental stress among subjects with metabolic syndrome: the role of shear rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Allan R K; Fernandes, Igor A; Rocha, Natália G; Costa, Lucas S; Rocha, Helena N M; Mattos, João D M; Vianna, Lauro C; Silva, Bruno M; Nóbrega, Antonio C L

    2014-04-01

    Mental stress induces transient endothelial dysfunction, which is an important finding for subjects at cardiometabolic risk. Thus, we tested whether aerobic exercise prevents this dysfunction among subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and whether an increase in shear rate during exercise plays a role in this phenomenon. Subjects with MetS participated in two protocols. In protocol 1 (n = 16), endothelial function was assessed using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Subjects then underwent a mental stress test followed by either 40 min of leg cycling or rest across two randomized sessions. FMD was assessed again at 30 and 60 min after exercise or rest, with a second mental stress test in between. Mental stress reduced FMD at 30 and 60 min after the rest session (baseline: 7.7 ± 0.4%, 30 min: 5.4 ± 0.5%, and 60 min: 3.9 ± 0.5%, P exercise prevented this reduction (baseline: 7.5 ± 0.4%, 30 min: 7.2 ± 0.7%, and 60 min: 8.7 ± 0.8%, P > 0.05 vs. baseline). Protocol 2 (n = 5) was similar to protocol 1 except that the first period of mental stress was followed by either exercise in which the brachial artery shear rate was attenuated via forearm cuff inflation or exercise without a cuff. Noncuffed exercise prevented the reduction in FMD (baseline: 7.5 ± 0.7%, 30 min: 7.0 ± 0.7%, and 60 min: 8.7 ± 0.8%, P > 0.05 vs. baseline), whereas cuffed exercise failed to prevent this reduction (baseline: 7.5 ± 0.6%, 30 min: 5.4 ± 0.8%, and 60 min: 4.1 ± 0.9%, P exercise prevented mental stress-induced endothelial dysfunction among subjects with MetS, and an increase in shear rate during exercise mediated this effect.

  18. Combined resistance and endurance exercise training improves arterial stiffness, blood pressure, and muscle strength in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Arturo; Park, Song Y; Seo, Dae Y; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A; Baek, Yeong H

    2011-09-01

    Menopause is associated with increased arterial stiffness and reduced muscle strength. Combined resistance (RE) and endurance (EE) exercise training can decrease brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), an index of arterial stiffness, in young men. We tested the hypothesis that combined circuit RE and EE training would improve baPWV, blood pressure (BP), and muscle strength in postmenopausal women. Twenty-four postmenopausal women (age 47-68 y) were randomly assigned to a "no exercise" control (n = 12) or to combined exercise training (EX; n = 12) group. The EX group performed concurrent circuit RE training followed by EE training at 60% of the predicted maximal heart rate (HR) 3 days per week. Brachial systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, baPWV, HR, and dynamic and isometric muscle strength were measured before and after the 12-week study. Mean ± SE baPWV (-0.8 ± 0.2 meters/s), systolic BP (-6.0 ± 1.9 mm Hg), diastolic BP (-4.8 ± 1.7 mm Hg), HR (-4.0 ± 1.0 beats/min), and mean arterial pressure (-5.1 ± 1.6 mm Hg) decreased (P hypertension and frailty in postmenopausal women.

  19. Correlation between left ventricular filling and ischemic extent during exercise-induced myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Akitada; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Iwase, Mitsunori

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how the extent of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia influence left ventricular filling. Twenty-two consecutive patients with effort angina, consisting of 16 with single vessel disease and 6 with double vessel disease, underwent exercise studies in lying and sitting positions. Extent score (ES) and severity score (SS) were calculated on polar map prepared from early exercise Tl-201 myocardial SPECT images to determine ischemic extent. Pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (PAWP), as obtained at exercise in lying position, correlated significantly well with both ES (r=0.75, p<0.001) and SS (r=0.61, p<0.01). There was, however, no significant correlation between the other hemodynamic parameters, such as heart rate, systolic pressure, rate-pressure product, cardiac index and stroke index, and both ES and SS. Either increased PAWP or ischemic extent was not dependent on the number of diseased vessels. In conclusion, the extent of increased left ventricular filling did not correlate with the number of diseased vessels, but correlated positively with ischemic extent. (N.K.)

  20. Effects of exercise training in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Man, F S; Handoko, M L; Groepenhoff, H; van 't Hul, A J; Abbink, J; Koppers, R J H; Grotjohan, H P; Twisk, J W R; Bogaard, H-J; Boonstra, A; Postmus, P E; Westerhof, N; van der Laarse, W J; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A

    2009-09-01

    We determined the physiological effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and quadriceps muscle function in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH). In total, 19 clinically stable iPAH patients (New York Heart Association II-III) underwent a supervised exercise training programme for the duration of 12 weeks. Maximal capacity, endurance capacity and quadriceps function were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. In 12 patients, serial quadriceps muscle biopsies were obtained. 6-min walk distance and peak exercise capacity did not change after training. However, endurance capacity improved significantly after training, demonstrated by a shift of the anaerobic threshold to a higher workload (from 32+/-5 to 46+/-6 W; p = 0.003) together with an increase in exercise endurance time (pendurance by 34% (p = 0.001). Training enhanced aerobic capacity of the quadriceps, by increasing capillarisation (1.36+/-0.10 to 1.78+/-0.13 capillaries per muscle fibre; pendurance and quadriceps muscle function, which is also reflected by structural changes of the quadriceps.

  1. Impact of medical training and clinical experience on the assessment of oxygenation and hypoxaemia after general anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aust, Hansjörg; Kranke, Peter; Eberhart, Leopold H J

    2015-01-01

    and clinical experience on assessing SpO(2) and detecting hypoxaemia in these patients. The second aim was to do a preliminary assessment whether this practice can be found in countries other than Germany. Anaesthetists, nurses and medical students estimated SpO(2) in patients breathing room air at the end...

  2. Effect of angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension on the voltage-dependent contractions of mouse arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Paul; Van Hove, Cor E; Leloup, Arthur J A; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; De Keulenaer, Gilles W

    2016-02-01

    Arterial hypertension (AHT) affects the voltage dependency of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes. We analyzed the effect of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AHT on L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated isometric contractions in conduit arteries. AHT was induced in C57Bl6 mice with AngII-filled osmotic mini-pumps (4 weeks). Normotensive mice treated with saline-filled osmotic mini-pumps were used for comparison. Voltage-dependent contractions mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels were studied in vaso-reactive studies in vitro in isolated aortic and femoral arteries by using extracellular K(+) concentration-response (KDR) experiments. In aortic segments, AngII-induced AHT significantly sensitized isometric contractions induced by elevated extracellular K(+) and depolarization. This sensitization was partly prevented by normalizing blood pressure with hydralazine, suggesting that it was caused by AHT rather than by direct AngII effects on aortic smooth muscle cells. The EC50 for extracellular K(+) obtained in vitro correlated significantly with the rise in arterial blood pressure induced by AngII in vivo. The AHT-induced sensitization persisted when aortic segments were exposed to levcromakalim or to inhibitors of basal nitric oxide release. Consistent with these observations, AngII-treatment also sensitized the vaso-relaxing effects of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker diltiazem during K(+)-induced contractions. Unlike aorta, AngII-treatment desensitized the isometric contractions to depolarization in femoral arteries pointing to vascular bed specific responses of arteries to hypertension. AHT affects the voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated contraction of conduit arteries. This effect may contribute to the decreased vascular compliance in AHT and explain the efficacy of Ca(2+) channel blockers to reduce vascular stiffness and central blood pressure in AHT.

  3. Vasoactive enzymes and blood flow responses to passive and active exercise in peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Meegan A.; Høier, Birgitte; Walker, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterised by impaired leg blood flow, which contributes to claudication and reduced exercise capacity. This study investigated to what extent vasoactive enzymes might contribute to altered blood flow in PAD (Fontaine stage II). Methods: We...... compared femoral artery blood flow during reactive hyperaemia, leg-extension exercise and passive leg movement, and determined the level of vasoactive enzymes in skeletal muscle samples from the vastus lateralis in PAD (n = 10, 68.5 ± 6.5 years) and healthy controls (CON, n = 9, 62.1 ± 12.3 years). Leg...... than CON (1.04 ± 0.19 vs 0.50 ± 0.06 AU, P = 0.02), with no differences for other enzymes. Leg blood flow during exercise was correlated with prostacyclin synthase (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Elevated NADPH oxidase indicates that oxidative stress may be a primary cause of low nitric oxide availability...

  4. Individual assessment of intensity-level for exercise training in patients with coronary artery disease is necessary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwland, W; Berkhuysen, MA; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Rispens, P

    Background: Target intensity-level of exercise training in patients with coronary artery disease is adjusted usually by a target heart rate (THR). This THR is aimed to be at or nearby the anaerobic threshold (AT) and is calculated commonly from parameters of regular exercise training, instead of an

  5. Serial right ventricle 201Tl imaging after exercise: relation to anatomy of the right coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Strauss, H.W.; McKusick, K.A.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    The relation of the appearance of the right ventricle on serium 201 Tl myocardial imaging to coronary artery anatomy was examined in 88 consecutive patients undergoing exercise 201 Tl testing and coronary angiography for the evaluation of chest pain. Transient defects in the right ventricle were found in 8 patients. All had high grade (greater than or equal to 90%) stenosis of the proximal right coronary artery. Nonvisualization of right ventricular (RV) activity occurred in 10 patients. Nine of the 10 (90%) had significant (greater than or equal to 50% stenosis) disease of the proximal right coronary artery and 7 (70%) had high grade stenosis. The right ventricle appeared normal in 70 patients. Twenty-nine (41%) of these patients had significant proximal right coronary artery disease. Right ventricular appearance was not affected by the presence or absence of disease of the left anterior descending or left circumflex artery or by the appearance of the left ventricle. Thus, with serial RV thallium-201 myocardial imaging after exercise, we found that (1) RV transient defects suggest the presence of high grade proximal right coronary artery stenosis, (2) non-visualization of RV activity also predicts significant proximal right coronary disease, and (3) the right ventricle frequently appears normal despite proximal right coronary artery disease and therefore this finding does not exclude such disease

  6. Transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing analysis of rat skeletal muscle feed arteries. II. Impact of exercise training in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Nathan T.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Rector, R. Scott; Davis, J. Wade; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2014-01-01

    We employed next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology to determine the extent to which exercise training alters global gene expression in skeletal muscle feed arteries and aortic endothelial cells of obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Transcriptional profiles of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle feed arteries (SFA and GFA, respectively) and aortic endothelial cell-enriched samples from rats that underwent an endurance exercise training program (EndEx; n = 12) or a interval sprint training program (IST; n = 12) or remained sedentary (Sed; n = 12) were examined. In response to EndEx, there were 39 upregulated (e.g., MANF) and 20 downregulated (e.g., ALOX15) genes in SFA and 1 upregulated (i.e., Wisp2) and 1 downregulated (i.e., Crem) gene in GFA [false discovery rate (FDR) exercise programs. Expression of only two genes (Tubb2b and Slc9a3r2) was altered (i.e., increased) by exercise in all three arteries. The finding that both EndEx and IST produced greater transcriptional changes in the SFA compared with the GFA is intriguing when considering the fact that treadmill bouts of exercise are associated with greater relative increases in blood flow to the gastrocnemius muscle compared with the soleus muscle. PMID:24408995

  7. Incremental value of clinical assessment, supine exercise electrocardiography, and biplane exercise radionuclide ventriculography in the prediction of coronary artery disease in men with chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, P.J.; Kelly, M.J.; Harper, R.W.; Federman, J.; Kalff, V.; Anderson, S.T.; Pitt, A.

    1983-01-01

    The incremental value of clinical assessment, exercise electrocardiography (ECG) and biplane radionuclide ventriculography (RVG) in the prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) was assessed in 105 men without myocardial infarction who were undergoing coronary angiography for investigation of chest pain. Independent clinical assessment of chest pain was made prospectively by 2 physicians. Graded supine bicycle exercise testing was symptom-limited. Right anterior oblique ECG-gated first-pass RVG and left anterior oblique ECG-gated equilibrium RVG were performed at rest and exercise. Regional wall motion abnormalities were defined by agreement of 2 of 3 blinded observers. A combined strongly positive exercise ECG response was defined as greater than or equal to 2 mm ST depression or 1.0 to 1.9 mm ST depression with exercise-induced chest pain. A multivariate logistic regression model for the preexercise prediction of CAD was derived from the clinical data and selected 2 variables: chest pain class and cholesterol level. A second model assessed the incremental value of the exercise test in prediction of CAD and found 2 exercise variables that improved prediction: RVG wall motion abnormalities, and a combined strongly positive ECG response. Applying the derived predictive models, 37 of the 58 patients (64%) with preexercise probabilities of 10 to 90% crossed either below the 10% probability threshold or above the 90% threshold and 28 (48%) also moved across the 5 and 95% thresholds. Supine exercise testing with ECG and biplane RVG together, but neither test alone, effectively adds to clinical prediction of CAD. It is most useful in men with atypical chest pain and when the ECG and RVG results are concordant

  8. PREFERRED MODALITY INFLUENCES ON EXERCISE-INDUCED MOOD CHANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Lane

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study tested, both retrospectively and prospectively, exercise-induced mood changes among regular exercisers. Specifically, it examined the extent to which preferred exercise modality promoted greater mood benefits. A group of 25 exercise participants (M = 35.5 yr., SD = 10.5 yr. took part in the study. All participants had exercised at least three times a week (M = 3.5, SD = 2.3 during the previous year. Participants completed a 14-item Exercise Preference Questionnaire to provide retrospective evaluations of their most- and least-preferred type of exercise. For the prospective investigation, participants completed the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS 15 minutes before and immediately after their most- and least-preferred exercise sessions. One week separated completion of each exercise session. Retrospective assessment of exercise-induced mood changes showed strong support for enhanced mood following the preferred mode of exercise. Also, as hypothesized, prospective results showed that mood enhancement was greater following the preferred exercise modality, but significant mood enhancement also occurred following the least-preferred modality among experienced exercisers. In conclusions, findings support the principle that exercise can provide psychological benefits to its participants, in the form of positive affective outcomes, something that appears to be enhanced by preferred exercise modality. Given the important public health implications of exercise adherence, future research should seek to further investigate the mechanisms of exercise-induced mood enhancement

  9. MCA Vmean and the arterial lactate-to-pyruvate ratio correlate during rhythmic handgrip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Plomgaard, Peter; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke

    2006-01-01

    /P ratio at two plasma lactate levels. MCA Vmean was determined by ultrasound Doppler sonography at rest, during 10 min of rhythmic handgrip exercise at approximately 65% of maximal voluntary contraction force, and during 20 min of recovery in seven healthy male volunteers during control...... and a approximately 15 mmol/l hyperglycemic clamp. Cerebral arteriovenous differences for metabolites were obtained by brachial artery and retrograde jugular venous catheterization. Control resting arterial lactate was 0.78 +/- 0.09 mmol/l (mean +/- SE) and pyruvate 55.7 +/- 12.0 micromol/l (L/P ratio 16.4 +/- 1......Regulation of cerebral blood flow during physiological activation including exercise remains unknown but may be related to the arterial lactate-to-pyruvate (L/P) ratio. We evaluated whether an exercise-induced increase in middle cerebral artery mean velocity (MCA Vmean) relates to the arterial L...

  10. Evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease during exercise: the relation between extent of disease and perfusion deficit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakki, A.H.; DePace, N.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between the extent of coronary artery disease (CAD) and size of exercise-induced myocardial hypoperfusion in 79 patients with angiographically documented CAD. None of the patients had Q-wave myocardial infarction. Fifty patients had one-vessel disease, ten had two-vessel disease, and 19 patients had three-vessel or left main disease. From a scintigraphic functional standpoint, patients were classified into two groups: 28 patients (35%) had large perfusion defects and 51 patients (65%) had small defects. The size of the thallium-201 perfusion defect during exercise was assessed as the perimeter of the defect in each projection expressed as a percentage abnormality of the total left ventricular perimeter in that projection. The average abnormality from the three projections was used in the final analysis. Eleven patients with large defects (39%) had one-vessel disease and 12 patients with small defects (24%) had multivessel disease. Stepwise multivariate discriminate analysis identified the number of diseased vessels (F . 13.9), the change in systolic blood pressure from rest to exercise (F . 10.8), the exercise heart rate (F . 9.1), and exercise electrocardiographic response (F . 7.8) as significant associates of the size of the perfusion defect (predictive accuracy . 70%). We conclude that the size of hypoperfused myocardium during exercise is variable in patients with CAD. Discriminate analysis identified the extent of CAD, exercise heart rate, change in systolic pressure from rest to exercise, and exercise electrocardiographic response as significant associates of the size of the defect

  11. Reproducibility of proximal and distal transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurements during exercise in stage 2 arterial claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyé, P; Picquet, J; Jaquinandi, V; Enon, B; Leftheriotis, G; Saumet, J-L; Abraham, P

    2004-06-01

    Although transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurements (tcpO2) are largely used in the investigation of vascular patients, its reproducibility is still debated. Indeed an unpredictable gradient exists between arterial and transcutaneous oxygen pressure. We hypothesised that indices taking into account changes over time and independent of absolute starting values would be more reproducible than other indices. comparative test-retest procedure (1 to 13 days between tests). institutional practice, ambulatory care. 15 subjects with stage 2 claudication. tcpO2 recordings at rest and at exercise during the 2 treadmill tests. calculation of the Delta-from-rest of oxygen pressure index (limb tcpO2 changes minus chest tcpO2 changes), of the resting - or minimal values attained during exercise - of absolute tcpO2 and of the regional perfusion index (regional perfusion index: ration of limb to chest). Both absolute tcpO2 and regional perfusion index at rest showed low reproducibility. During exercise the best reproducibility was attained through Delta-from-rest of oxygen pressure index calculation. Equations from the linear regression analysis (test 2 versus test 1) were 0.88 x -4.2 (r(2)=0.82) at the buttock level and 0.82 x -3.8 (r(2)=0.80) at the calf level. TcpO2 measurement on the calf or buttock during exercise, is a reproducible measurement in patients with vascular claudication, specifically when corrected for exercise-induced systemic pO2 changes trough Delta-from-rest of oxygen pressure calculation.

  12. Physiological Adaptations to Chronic Endurance Exercise Training in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1987

    1987-01-01

    In a roundtable format, five doctors explore the reasons why regular physical activity should continue to play a significant role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease. Endurance exercise training improves aerobic capacity, reduces blood pressure, and decreases risk. (Author/MT)

  13. AMPKα in Exercise-Induced Substrate Metabolism and Exercise Training-Induced Metabolic and Mitochondrial Adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Joachim

    in response to 4 weeks of voluntary running wheel exercise training. However, the acute exercise-induced increase in mRNA expression of several metabolic and mitochondrial marker genes is impaired in the mice lacking AMPKα1 and α2. In addition to the two studies and some currently unpublished data this thesis...

  14. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis to flaxseed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Gall

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports on a 26-year-old atopic patient suffering from seasonal rhinoconjunctivitis and flexural eczemas. On two occasions, he experienced nausea, generalized urticaria and dyspnea within 2 h after consumption of a wholemeal roll and subsequent exercise (football training or walking. In each case, the episode necessitated intravenous emergency therapy with an antihistamine and a corticosteroid. In order to elucidate the two exercise-induced anaphylactic events we performed prick tests and the radioallergosorbent test (RAST with the ingredients of the wholemeal roll. Only flaxseed gave positive results. In addition, we performed an exercise test on a bicycle ergometer (15 min at 150 W and an oral challenge test with foods, using a double-blind and placebo-controlled study. Only oral challenge with a teaspoon of flaxseed with additional exercise on the bicycle ergometer elicited itching, urticaria, nausea, coughing and dyspnea. The oral challenge with flaxseed followed by exercise induced immediate-type reactions and, thus, led to the diagnosis of food-dependent exercise- induced anaphylaxis to flaxseed.

  15. Exercise-induced inspiratory symptoms in school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchvald, Frederik; Phillipsen, Lue Drasbaek; Hjuler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Exercise-induced inspiratory symptoms (EIIS) have multiple causes, one of which is exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO). There is limited knowledge regarding EIIS in children, both in primary care practices and in pediatric asthma clinics. The aim of this study was t...

  16. Reproducibility of rest and exercise stress contrast-enhanced calf perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiji Ronny S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose was to determine the reproducibility and utility of rest, exercise, and perfusion reserve (PR measures by contrast-enhanced (CE calf perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the calf in normal subjects (NL and patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD. Methods Eleven PAD patients with claudication (ankle-brachial index 0.67 ±0.14 and 16 age-matched NL underwent symptom-limited CE-MRI using a pedal ergometer. Tissue perfusion and arterial input were measured at rest and peak exercise after injection of 0.1 mM/kg of gadolinium-diethylnetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA. Tissue function (TF and arterial input function (AIF measurements were made from the slope of time-intensity curves in muscle and artery, respectively, and normalized to proton density signal to correct for coil inhomogeneity. Perfusion index (PI = TF/AIF. Perfusion reserve (PR = exercise TF/ rest TF. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was calculated from 11 NL and 10 PAD with repeated MRI on a different day. Results Resting TF was low in NL and PAD (mean ± SD 0.25 ± 0.18 vs 0.35 ± 0.71, p = 0.59 but reproducible (ICC 0.76. Exercise TF was higher in NL than PAD (5.5 ± 3.2 vs. 3.4 ± 1.6, p = 0.04. Perfusion reserve was similar between groups and highly variable (28.6 ± 19.8 vs. 42.6 ± 41.0, p = 0.26. Exercise TF and PI were reproducible measures (ICC 0.63 and 0.60, respectively. Conclusion Although rest measures are reproducible, they are quite low, do not distinguish NL from PAD, and lead to variability in perfusion reserve measures. Exercise TF and PI are the most reproducible MRI perfusion measures in PAD for use in clinical trials.

  17. Oxygen therapy reduces postoperative tachycardia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stausholm, K; Kehlet, H; Rosenberg, J

    1995-01-01

    Concomitant hypoxaemia and tachycardia in the postoperative period is unfavourable for the myocardium. Since hypoxaemia per se may be involved in the pathogenesis of postoperative tachycardia, we have studied the effect of oxygen therapy on tachycardia in 12 patients randomly allocated to blinded...... air or oxygen by facemask on the second or third day after major surgery. Inclusion criteria were arterial hypoxaemia (oxygen saturation 90 beat.min-1). Each patient responded similarly to oxygen therapy: an increase in arterial oxygen saturation and a decrease...... in heart rate (p oxygen has a positive effect on the cardiac oxygen delivery and demand balance....

  18. Effects of combined aerobic and resistance exercise on central arterial stiffness and gait velocity in patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Park, Soo Hyun; Yoon, Eun Sun; Lee, Chong-Do; Wee, Sang Ouk; Fernhall, Bo; Jae, Sae Young

    2015-09-01

    The effects of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training on central arterial stiffness and gait velocity in patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis were investigated. Twenty-six patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis were randomly assigned to either the combined aerobic and resistance exercise group (n = 14) or the control group (n = 12). The exercise intervention group received a combined aerobic and resistance exercise training (1 hr/day, three times/week for 16 wks), whereas the control group received usual care. Central arterial stiffness was determined by pulse wave velocity and augmentation index. Gait velocity was assessed using the 6-min walk test, 10-m walk test, and the Timed Up-and-Go test. Patients in the exercise intervention group had greater improvement of mean pulse wave velocity (P hemiparesis.

  19. Inducible limb-shaking transitory ischemic attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Sverre; Ovesen, Christian; Futrell, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    with exercise-induced weakness associated with tremor in his right arm. His left internal carotid artery was occluded at the bifurcation. Administration of statin and antiplatelet did not relieve his symptoms, and his stereotypic, exercise-induced "limb-shaking" episodes persisted. He underwent successful...

  20. Comparison of exercise stress testing with dobutamine stress echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdemir, K.; Kisacik, H.L.; Oguzhan, A.

    1999-01-01

    Dobutamine stress echocardiography, Tc-99m radionuclide ventriculography (RNVG), and exercise stress testing were performed prospectively in 63 patients with suspected coronary artery disease to compare the values of exercise testing, dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG in the non-invasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The sensitivities of dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG were found to be higher than that of exercise testing (93-62%, p 0.05). There were no differences between the sensitivities of the three techniques in multiple vessel disease (p>0.05). The specificities of dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG were higher than that of exercise testing (for both of the tests 86-62%, p 0.05). The results of dobutamine stress echocardiography RNVG were concordant with each other in 46 patients (76%, kappa=65%) in sectional analysis. Dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG tests were comparable with each other in 85% of the 189 segments (kappa=64%). The expected 5% decrease at peak doses of dobutamine was not detected in stress echocardiography in 25 patients and in RNVG in 26 of the patients. Dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG are superior to exercise testing in the diagnosis of single vessel disease and there is no significant difference between the two techniques. When the ejection fraction is considered in dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG, it does not make an additional contribution to the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. (author)

  1. Quantitative angiography of the left anterior descending coronary artery: correlations with pressure gradient and exercise thallium scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiber, J.H.C.; Serruys, P.W.; Slager, C.J.; Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam

    1986-01-01

    In order to evaluate during cardiac catheterization what constitutes a physiologically significant obstruction to blood flow in the human coronary system, computer based quantitative analysis of coronary angiograms was performed in 31 patients with isolated proximal left anterior descending coronary artery disease. The angiographic severity of the stenosis was compared with the transstenotic pressure gradient measured with the dilatation catheter during angioplasty and the results of exercise thallium scintigraphy. A curvilinear relation was found between the pressure gradient across the stenosis (normalized for the mean aortic pressure) and the residual minimal obstruction area (after subtracting the area of the angioplasty catheter). This relation was best fitted by the equation: normalized mean pressure gradient = a + b · log [obstruction area], r = 0.74. The measurements of the percent area stenosis (cut-off 80%) and of the transstenotic pressure gradient (cut-off 0.30) obtained at rest, correctly predicted the occurrence of thallium perfusion defects induced by exercise in 83% of the patients. (Auth.)

  2. Exercise-induced hypertension, cardiovascular events, and mortality in patients undergoing exercise stress testing: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Martin G; Otahal, Petr; Cleland, Verity J; Blizzard, Leigh; Marwick, Thomas H; Sharman, James E

    2013-03-01

    The prognostic relevance of a hypertensive response to exercise (HRE) is ill-defined in individuals undergoing exercise stress testing. The study described here was intended to provide a systematic review and meta-analysis of published literature to determine the value of exercise-related blood pressure (BP) (independent of office BP) for predicting cardiovascular (CV) events and mortality. Online databases were searched for published longitudinal studies reporting exercise-related BP and CV events and mortality rates. We identified for review 12 longitudinal studies with a total of 46,314 individuals without significant coronary artery disease, with total CV event and mortality rates recorded over a mean follow-up of 15.2±4.0 years. After adjustment for age, office BP, and CV risk factors, an HRE at moderate exercise intensity carried a 36% greater rate of CV events and mortality (95% CI, 1.02-1.83, P = 0.039) than that of subjects without an HRE. Additionally, each 10mm Hg increase in systolic BP during exercise at moderate intensity was accompanied by a 4% increase in CV events and mortality, independent of office BP, age, or CV risk factors (95% CI, 1.01-1.07, P = 0.02). Systolic BP at maximal workload was not significantly associated with the outcome of an increased rate of CV, whether analyzed as a categorical (HR=1.49, 95% CI, 0.90-2.46, P = 0.12) or a continuous (HR=1.01, 95% CI, 0.98-1.04, P = 0.53) variable. An HRE at moderate exercise intensity during exercise stress testing is an independent risk factor for CV events and mortality. This highlights the need to determine underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of exercise-induced hypertension.

  3. The relation between angina and myocardial ischemia during exercise stress in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Murano, Kenichi; Usami, Masahisa

    1988-01-01

    To examine the mechanism of occurrence of anginal chest pain from the aspect of myocardial ischemia, myocardial Tl-201 SPECT scans were obtained immediately and 3 hr after exercise (Ex) in 35 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The extent of ischemia was defined as the percentage of ischemic segments to the entire left ventricle. The minimum washout (WO) rate correlated well with the ratio of Tl uptake in the ischemic area to that in the normal area during Ex in the other 9 patients having single vessel CAD without previous history of myocardial infarction. This suggested that the miminum WO rate reflects the severity of Ex-induced ischemia. According to the development of angina during Ex, patients were classified as having either symptomatic ischemia (n = 16) or silent ischemia (n = 19). In regard to age, sex, a history of myocardial infarction, severity of CAD, and the extent of Ex-induced ischemia, there was no difference between the two groups. The minimum WO rate and the incidence of Ex-induced ST depression were significantly lower and higher, respectively, in the group with symptomatic ischemia than that with silent ischemia. The severity of Ex-induced ischemia has important implications for the development of anginal chest pain. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Blockade of acid sensing ion channels attenuates the augmented exercise pressor reflex in rats with chronic femoral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Yamauchi, Katsuya; McCord, Jennifer L; Kaufman, Marc P

    2011-12-15

    We found previously that static contraction of the hindlimb muscles of rats whose femoral artery was ligated evoked a larger reflex pressor response (i.e. exercise pressor reflex) than did static contraction of the contralateral hindlimb muscles which were freely perfused. Ligating a femoral artery in rats results in blood flow patterns to the muscles that are remarkably similar to those displayed by humans with peripheral artery disease. Using decerebrated rats, we tested the hypothesis that the augmented exercise pressor reflex in rats with a ligated femoral artery is attenuated by blockade of the acid sensing ion channel (ASIC) 3. We found that femoral arterial injection of either amiloride (5 and 50 μg kg(-1)) or APETx2 (100 μg kg(-1)) markedly attenuated the reflex in rats with a ligated femoral artery. In contrast, these ASIC antagonists had only modest effects on the reflex in rats with freely perfused hindlimbs. Tests of specificity of the two antagonists revealed that the low dose of amiloride and APETx2 greatly attenuated the pressor response to lactic acid, an ASIC agonist, but did not attenuate the pressor response to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist. In contrast, the high dose of amiloride attenuated the pressor responses to lactic acid, but also attenuated the pressor response to capsaicin. We conclude that ASIC3 on thin fibre muscle afferents plays an important role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in rats with a compromised arterial blood supply to the working muscles.

  5. Exercise body surface potential mapping in single and multiple coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montague, T.J.; Witkowski, F.X.; Miller, R.M.; Johnstone, D.E.; MacKenzie, R.B.; Spencer, C.A.; Horacek, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    Body surface ST integral maps were recorded in 36 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients at: rest; peak, angina-limited exercise; and, 1 and 5 min of recovery. They were compared to maps of 15 CAD patients who exercised to fatigue, without angina, and eight normal subjects. Peak exercise heart rates were similar (NS) in all groups. With exercise angina, patients with two and three vessel CAD had significantly (p less than 0.05) greater decrease in the body surface sum of ST integral values than patients with single vessel CAD. CAD patients with exercise fatigue, in the absence of angina, had decreased ST integrals similar (NS) to patients with single vessel CAD who manifested angina and the normal control subjects. There was, however, considerable overlap among individuals; some patients with single vessel CAD had as much exercise ST integral decrease as patients with three vessel CAD. All CAD patients had persistent ST integral decreases at 5 min of recovery and there was a direct correlation of the recovery and peak exercise ST changes. Exercise ST changes correlated, as well, with quantitative CAD angiographic scores, but not with thallium perfusion scores. These data suggest exercise ST integral body surface mapping allows quantitation of myocardium at ischemic risk in patients with CAD, irrespective of the presence or absence of ischemic symptoms during exercise. A major potential application of this technique is selection of CAD therapy guided by quantitative assessment of ischemic myocardial risk

  6. The CSF and arterial to internal jugular venous hormonal differences during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, M.K.; Ott, P.; Dela, F.

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous exercise increases the cerebral uptake of carbohydrate out of proportion to that of oxygen, but it is unknown whether such enhanced carbohydrate uptake is influenced by the marked endocrine response to exercise. During exhaustive exercise this study evaluated the a-v differences across...... the brain (a-v diff) of hormones that could influence its carbohydrate uptake (n= 9). In addition, neuroendocrine activity and a potential uptake of hormones via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were assessed by lumbar puncture postexercise and at rest (n= 6). Exercise increased the arterial concentration......)(+) and its a-v diff, which increased from 1 (-12 to 5) to 17 (5-41) micromol l(-1) (P brain of interleukin (IL)-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), heatshock...

  7. Evaluación de la función diastólica durante y post-ejercicio isométrico en pacientes con hipertensión arterial Evaluation of diastolic function during and post-exercise in patients with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Pascua

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Es conocido que los pacientes con hipertrofia ventricular por hipertensión arterial presentan alteraciones diastólicas, particularmente durante el ejercicio. Sin embargo, es controvertido si luego del esfuerzo esta disfunción se normaliza. El objetivo fue evaluar la función diastólica durante y después de la realización de ejercicio, en pacientes con hipertensión arterial. Se estudiaron 6 pacientes controles (grupo 1, G1 y 7 con diagnóstico de hipertensión arterial (Grupo 2, G2. Los pacientes fueron sometidos a un cateterismo cardíaco y realizaron ejercicio isométrico durante el estudio, hasta que la frecuencia cardíaca se incrementó un 43±7% (pIt is known that patients with arterial hypertension and ventricular hypertrophy have diastolic alterations, in particular during exercise. However, it is controversial if diastolic dysfunction continues once exercise had concluded. The objective was to assess the effects of isometric exercise on the diastolic function in patients with arterial hypertension. Five control patients (group 1, G1 and 7 patients with arterial hyper-tension (group 2, G2 were studied. All patients underwent cardiac catheterization and performed isometric exercise until heart rate increased 43±7%. Left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP and end diastolic pressure (LVEDP were measured. We calculated, +dP/dt max, the time constant of isovolumic pressure decay (tau and t1/2 were all measured. Results: The LVSP increased in G1 and G2 during exercise from 140±3 to 195±14 mm Hg (p<0.05 and 161±9 to 238±15 mm Hg, respectively; returning to their basal values once exercise had concluded. The tau (t and t1/2 increased, while exercising in G2, from 23±2 and 15±2 msec to 35±7 and 23±4 msec, respectively. After exercise both variables continued elevated reaching 41±6 msec (p<0.05 and 23±3 msec (p<0.05, respectively. In conclusion, isometric exercise decreases relaxation rate and increases LVEDP in patients with

  8. Exercise excess pressure and exercise-induced albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climie, Rachel E D; Srikanth, Velandai; Keith, Laura J; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-05-01

    Exercise-induced albuminuria is common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in response to maximal exercise, but the response to light-moderate exercise is unclear. Patients with T2DM have abnormal central hemodynamics and greater propensity for exercise hypertension. This study sought to determine the relationship between light-moderate exercise central hemodynamics (including aortic reservoir and excess pressure) and exercise-induced albuminuria. Thirty-nine T2DM (62 ± 9 yr; 49% male) and 39 nondiabetic controls (53 ± 9 yr; 51% male) were examined at rest and during 20 min of light-moderate cycle exercise (30 W; 50 revolutions/min). Albuminuria was assessed by the albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) at rest and 30 min postexercise. Hemodynamics recorded included brachial and central blood pressure (BP), aortic stiffness, augmented pressure (AP), aortic reservoir pressure, and excess pressure integral (Pexcess). There was no difference in ACR between groups before exercise (P > 0.05). Exercise induced a significant rise in ACR in T2DM but not controls (1.73 ± 1.43 vs. 0.53 ± 1.0 mg/mol, P = 0.002). All central hemodynamic variables were significantly higher during exercise in T2DM (i.e., Pexcess, systolic BP and AP; P exercise Pexcess was associated with postexercise ACR (r = 0.51, P = 0.002), and this relationship was independent of age, sex, body mass index, heart rate, aortic stiffness, antihypertensive medication, and ambulatory daytime systolic BP (β = 0.003, P = 0.003). Light-moderate exercise induced a significant rise in ACR in T2DM, and this was independently associated with Pexcess, a potential marker of vascular dysfunction. These novel findings suggest that Pexcess could be important for appropriate renal function in T2DM. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. A model to predict multivessel coronary artery disease from the exercise thallium-201 stress test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, S.G.; Abbott, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.; Watson, D.D.; Kaul, S.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to (1) determine whether nonimaging variables add to the diagnostic information available from exercise thallium-201 images for the detection of multivessel coronary artery disease; and (2) to develop a model based on the exercise thallium-201 stress test to predict the presence of multivessel disease. The study populations included 383 patients referred to the University of Virginia and 325 patients referred to the Massachusetts General Hospital for evaluation of chest pain. All patients underwent both cardiac catheterization and exercise thallium-201 stress testing between 1978 and 1981. In the University of Virginia cohort, at each level of thallium-201 abnormality (no defects, one defect, more than one defect), ST depression and patient age added significantly in the detection of multivessel disease. Logistic regression analysis using data from these patients identified three independent predictors of multivessel disease: initial thallium-201 defects, ST depression, and age. A model was developed to predict multivessel disease based on these variables. As might be expected, the risk of multivessel disease predicted by the model was similar to that actually observed in the University of Virginia population. More importantly, however, the model was accurate in predicting the occurrence of multivessel disease in the unrelated population studied at the Massachusetts General Hospital. It is, therefore, concluded that (1) nonimaging variables (age and exercise-induced ST depression) add independent information to thallium-201 imaging data in the detection of multivessel disease; and (2) a model has been developed based on the exercise thallium-201 stress test that can accurately predict the probability of multivessel disease in other populations

  10. Effects of One Resistance Exercise Session on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Hypertensive Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a public health problem and increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. To evaluate the effects of a resistance exercise session on the contractile and relaxing mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle in mesenteric arteries of N G -nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (C), hypertensive (H), and exercised hypertensive (EH). Hypertension was induced by administration of 20 mg/kg of L-NAME for 7 days prior to experimental protocols. The resistance exercise protocol consisted of 10 sets of 10 repetitions and intensity of 40% of one repetition maximum. The reactivity of vascular smooth muscle was evaluated by concentration‑response curves to phenylephrine (PHEN), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Rats treated with L-NAME showed an increase (p < 0.001) in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) compared to the initial period of induction. No difference in PHEN sensitivity was observed between groups H and EH. Acute resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.001) the contractile response induced by KCl at concentrations of 40 and 60 mM in group EH. Greater (p < 0.01) smooth muscle sensitivity to NPS was observed in group EH as compared to group H. One resistance exercise session reduces the contractile response induced by KCl in addition to increasing the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats

  11. Effects of One Resistance Exercise Session on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Hypertensive Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana, E-mail: marciorvsantos@bol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    Hypertension is a public health problem and increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. To evaluate the effects of a resistance exercise session on the contractile and relaxing mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle in mesenteric arteries of N{sup G}-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (C), hypertensive (H), and exercised hypertensive (EH). Hypertension was induced by administration of 20 mg/kg of L-NAME for 7 days prior to experimental protocols. The resistance exercise protocol consisted of 10 sets of 10 repetitions and intensity of 40% of one repetition maximum. The reactivity of vascular smooth muscle was evaluated by concentration‑response curves to phenylephrine (PHEN), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Rats treated with L-NAME showed an increase (p < 0.001) in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) compared to the initial period of induction. No difference in PHEN sensitivity was observed between groups H and EH. Acute resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.001) the contractile response induced by KCl at concentrations of 40 and 60 mM in group EH. Greater (p < 0.01) smooth muscle sensitivity to NPS was observed in group EH as compared to group H. One resistance exercise session reduces the contractile response induced by KCl in addition to increasing the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats.

  12. Effects of One Resistance Exercise Session on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hypertension is a public health problem and increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Objective: To evaluate the effects of a resistance exercise session on the contractile and relaxing mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle in mesenteric arteries of NG-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats. Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (C, hypertensive (H, and exercised hypertensive (EH. Hypertension was induced by administration of 20 mg/kg of L-NAME for 7 days prior to experimental protocols. The resistance exercise protocol consisted of 10 sets of 10 repetitions and intensity of 40% of one repetition maximum. The reactivity of vascular smooth muscle was evaluated by concentration‑response curves to phenylephrine (PHEN, potassium chloride (KCl and sodium nitroprusside (SNP. Results: Rats treated with L-NAME showed an increase (p < 0.001 in systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP and mean arterial pressure (MAP compared to the initial period of induction. No difference in PHEN sensitivity was observed between groups H and EH. Acute resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.001 the contractile response induced by KCl at concentrations of 40 and 60 mM in group EH. Greater (p < 0.01 smooth muscle sensitivity to NPS was observed in group EH as compared to group H. Conclusion: One resistance exercise session reduces the contractile response induced by KCl in addition to increasing the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats.

  13. Clinical value of 201Tl lung/heart ratio during exercise in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Wei; He Guorong; Liu Jinhua; Huang Yuying

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship between 201 Tl lung/heart ratio during exercise and left ventricular diastolic function and its diagnostic value on severity of coronary artery disease. Methods: One hundred and two patients with documented coronary artery disease were divided into three groups, including no hypertension, hypertension without or with left ventricular hypertrophy groups. Exercise/delay 201 Tl myocardial perfusion tomography was performed on all patients included. Lung/heart ratio was defined on the anterior planar image obtained during exercise tomography. Results: The lung/heart ratios during exercise in no hypertension (0.43 +- 0.09, P 0.05). The lung/heart ratios of multi-vessel disease subgroup in no hypertension (0.46 +- 0.10 vs 0.40 +- 0.09, P 0.05). When lung/heart ratio was≥0.45, the sensitivities for predicting the presence of multi-vessel disease were 82%, 90%, 40% and specificities were 75%, 75%, 45%, respectively, in no hypertension, hypertension without and with hypertrophy groups. In no hypertension (r=0.402, P 0.05). In no hypertension (r=-0.413, P<0.01), hypertension without (r=-0.662, P<0.01) and with hypertrophy groups (r=-0.408, P<0.05), lung/heart ratios all showed a significant reverse correlation with correspondent E/A ratios. Conclusions: The exercise lung/heart ratios has a better diagnostic value for multi-vessel disease and left ventricular diastolic function abnormalities of coronary artery disease with or without hypertension, but not for multi-vessel disease in hypertension patients complicated with myocardial hypertrophy

  14. Detection of coronary artery disease by exercise radionuclide ventriculography, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Saito, Muneyasu; Uehara, Toshiisa; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1982-01-01

    In order to assess the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) and LV functional reserve, exercise radionuclide ventriculography (ERV) were performed in 80 patients who underwent selective cardiac catneterization for evaluation of chest pain syndrome. 70 patients had CAD (30 patients with angina pectoris and 40 patients with myocardial infarction) and 10 did not. In this study, to obtain accurate data by ERV, its practical consideration were metioned. Radionuclide cardioangiography with sup(99m)Tc-invivo RBC labelling were performed using an Anger camera attached with high-sense collimator and on-line minicomputer system. For data aquisition, multi-gated method were used, especially during exercise, list mode collection was suitable for ERV because of variable R-R intervals. Patient stability was performed with an adjustable shoulder support and hand grip, ECG monitoring system by carbon electrolode was used to obtain during exercise. Exercise protocal was graded bicycle ergometer in supine position. As the results, in the patients of CAD, changes of LVEF from rest to exercise were under 5%, while in normal patients, LVEF increased over 5% in all patients. In 30 patients with angina pectoris, the ERV was abnormal in 25 for a sensitivity of 83.3% and specificity of 100%. The ERV were thought to be superior than stress ECG for the detection of CAD. In conclusion, with increasing clinical application, the use of ERV is rapidly becoming wider-spread but the excellent results were thought to depend upon the careful attention to equipment and exercise procedure. (author)

  15. Nox4 Is Dispensable for Exercise Induced Muscle Fibre Switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juri Vogel

    Full Text Available By producing H2O2, the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is involved in differentiation of mesenchymal cells. Exercise alters the composition of slow and fast twitch fibres in skeletal. Here we hypothesized that Nox4 contributes to exercise-induced adaptation such as changes in muscle metabolism or muscle fibre specification and studied this in wildtype and Nox4-/- mice.Exercise, as induced by voluntary running in a running wheel or forced running on a treadmill induced a switch from fast twitch to intermediate fibres. However the induced muscle fibre switch was similar between Nox4-/- and wildtype mice. The same held true for exercise-induced expression of PGC1α or AMPK activation. Both are increased in response to exercise, but with no difference was observed between wildtype and Nox4-/- mice.Thus, exercise-induced muscle fibre switch is Nox4-independent.

  16. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T

    1993-01-01

    Results obtained by the 133Xe clearance method with external detectors and by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) suggest that dynamic exercise causes an increase of global average cerebral blood flow (CBF). These data are contradicted by earlier data obtained during less-well-defined conditions....... To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow velocity...... in the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean). For values of CBF and MCA Vmean a correction for an observed small drop in arterial PCO2 was carried out. Baseline values for global CBF and CMRO2 were 50.7 and 3.63 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. The same values were found during dynamic exercise, whereas a 22% (P

  17. PGC-1alpha in exercise- and exercise training-induced metabolic adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm

    and interferes with the exercise-induced adaptive response in human skeletal muscle. Study II demonstrates that mouse liver glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) mRNA content increased in recovery from acute exercise in both wildtype (WT) and PGC-1α knockout (KO) mice, while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK......) and pyruvate carboxylase mRNA content did not change in either genotype. Exercise training increased PEPCK protein content in both WT and PGC-1α KO mice. In addition, the mRNA and protein content of cytochrome (Cyt) c and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit I increased in response to acute exercise and exercise...

  18. Four-dimensional echocardiography area strain combined with exercise stress echocardiography to evaluate left ventricular regional systolic function in patients with mild single vessel coronary artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Peng, Long; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Yin, Li-Xue; Li, Chun-Mei; Wang, Yi; Rao, Li

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the diagnosis value of four-dimensional echocardiography area strain (AS) combined with exercise stress echocardiography to evaluate left ventricular regional systolic function in patients with mild single vessel coronary artery stenosis. Based on treadmill exercise load status, two-dimensional conventional echocardiography and four-dimensional echocardiography area strain were performed on patients suspected coronary artery disease before coronary angiogram. Thirty patients (case group) with mild left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis (stenosis Four-dimensional echocardiography area strain combined with exercise stress echocardiography could sensitively find left ventricular regional systolic function abnormality in patients with mild single vessel coronary artery stenosis, and locate stenosis coronary artery accordingly. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Prevention of subsequent exercise-induced periinfarct ischemia by emergency coronary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction: comparison with intracoronary streptokinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, A.Y.; Lai, P.; Juni, J.E.; Bourdillon, P.D.; Walton, J.A. Jr.; Laufer, N.; Buda, A.J.; Pitt, B.; O'Neill, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of emergency percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and intracoronary streptokinase in preventing exercise-induced periinfarct ischemia, 28 patients presenting within 12 hours of the onset of symptoms of acute myocardial infarction were prospectively randomized. Of these, 14 patients were treated with emergency angioplasty and 14 patients received intracoronary streptokinase. Recatheterization and submaximal exercise thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography were performed before hospital discharge. Periinfarct ischemia was defined as a reversible thallium defect adjacent to a fixed defect assessed qualitatively. Successful reperfusion was achieved in 86% of patients treated with emergency angioplasty and 86% of patients treated with intracoronary streptokinase (p = NS). Residual stenosis of the infarct-related coronary artery shown at predischarge angiography was 43.8 +/- 31.4% for the angioplasty group and 75.0 +/- 15.6% for the streptokinase group (p less than 0.05). Of the angioplasty group, 9% developed exercise-induced periinfarct ischemia compared with 60% of the streptokinase group (p less than 0.05). Thus, patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with emergency angioplasty had significantly less severe residual coronary stenosis and exercise-induced periinfarct ischemia than did those treated with intracoronary streptokinase. These results suggest further application of coronary angioplasty in the management of acute myocardial infarction

  20. Short-term regular aerobic exercise reduces oxidative stress produced by acute in the adipose microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Austin T; Fancher, Ibra S; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Bian, Jing Tan; Cook, Marc D; Mahmoud, Abeer M; Ali, Mohamed M; Ushio-Fukai, Masuko; Brown, Michael D; Fukai, Tohru; Phillips, Shane A

    2017-05-01

    High blood pressure has been shown to elicit impaired dilation in the vasculature. The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the mechanisms through which high pressure may elicit vascular dysfunction and determine the mechanisms through which regular aerobic exercise protects arteries against high pressure. Male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 2 wk of voluntary running (~6 km/day) for comparison with sedentary controls. Hindlimb adipose resistance arteries were dissected from mice for measurements of flow-induced dilation (FID; with or without high intraluminal pressure exposure) or protein expression of NADPH oxidase II (NOX II) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Microvascular endothelial cells were subjected to high physiological laminar shear stress (20 dyn/cm 2 ) or static condition and treated with ANG II + pharmacological inhibitors. Cells were analyzed for the detection of ROS or collected for Western blot determination of NOX II and SOD. Resistance arteries from exercised mice demonstrated preserved FID after high pressure exposure, whereas FID was impaired in control mouse arteries. Inhibition of ANG II or NOX II restored impaired FID in control mouse arteries. High pressure increased superoxide levels in control mouse arteries but not in exercise mouse arteries, which exhibited greater ability to convert superoxide to H 2 O 2 Arteries from exercised mice exhibited less NOX II protein expression, more SOD isoform expression, and less sensitivity to ANG II. Endothelial cells subjected to laminar shear stress exhibited less NOX II subunit expression. In conclusion, aerobic exercise prevents high pressure-induced vascular dysfunction through an improved redox environment in the adipose microvasculature. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We describe potential mechanisms contributing to aerobic exercise-conferred protection against high intravascular pressure. Subcutaneous adipose microvessels from exercise mice express less NADPH oxidase (NOX) II and more superoxide

  1. Pulmonary O2 uptake and leg blood flow kinetics during moderate exercise are slowed by hyperventilation-induced hypocapnic alkalosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lisa M. K.; Heigenhauser, George J. F.; Paterson, Donald H.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of hyperventilation-induced hypocapnic alkalosis (Hypo) on the adjustment of pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2p) and leg femoral conduit artery (“bulk”) blood flow (LBF) during moderate-intensity exercise (Mod) was examined in eight young male adults. Subjects completed four to six repetitions of alternate-leg knee-extension exercise during normal breathing [Con; end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PetCO2) ∼40 mmHg] and sustained hyperventilation (Hypo; PetCO2 ∼20 mmHg). Increases in work rate were made instantaneously from baseline (3 W) to Mod (80% estimated lactate threshold). V̇o2p was measured breath by breath by mass spectrometry and volume turbine, and LBF (calculated from mean femoral artery blood velocity and femoral artery diameter) was measured simultaneously by Doppler ultrasound. Concentration changes of deoxy (Δ[HHb])-, oxy (Δ[O2Hb])-, and total hemoglobin-myoglobin (Δ[HbTot]) of the vastus lateralis muscle were measured continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The kinetics of V̇o2p, LBF, and Δ[HHb] were modeled using a monoexponential equation by nonlinear regression. The time constants for the phase 2 V̇o2p (Hypo, 49 ± 26 s; Con, 28 ± 8 s) and LBF (Hypo, 46 ± 16 s; Con, 23 ± 6 s) were greater (P alkalosis is associated with slower convective (i.e., slowed femoral artery and microvascular blood flow) and diffusive (i.e., greater fractional O2 extraction for a given ΔV̇o2p) O2 delivery, which may contribute to the hyperventilation-induced slowing of V̇o2p (and muscle O2 utilization) kinetics. PMID:20339012

  2. Exercise-mediated changes in conduit artery wall thickness in humans: role of shear stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Dawson, E.A.; Munckhof, I.C. van den; Tinken, T.M.; Drijver, E. den; Hopkins, N.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Episodic increases in shear stress have been proposed as a mechanism that induces training-induced adaptation in arterial wall remodeling in humans. To address this hypothesis in humans, we examined bilateral brachial artery wall thickness using high-resolution ultrasound in healthy men across an

  3. Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis - a patient series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazmini, Kiarash; Schreiner, Christoffer; Bruserud, Sidsel; Raastad, Truls; Solberg, Erik Ekker

    2017-11-14

    No guidelines are available for the treatment and follow up of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis. The purpose of this study was to describe the treatment, complications and follow-up of patients with exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis at Diakonhjemmet Hospital. A retrospective observational study from 2011 up to and including 2015 of patients with exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis ≥ 18 years and with creatine kinase > 5 000 IU/l. We registered a total of 42 patients and obtained informed consent from 31. Twenty were treated as inpatients with a median hospitalisation time of 2.5 (1–6) days. Median creatine kinase was 36 797 (17 172–53 548) IU/l upon admission and 16 051 (11 845–26 505) IU/l at discharge. Median intravenous fluid volume was 6 000 (1 000–27 700) ml. Eleven patients underwent urinary alkalinisation. None developed severe kidney injury or other serious complications such as electrolyte imbalance, compartment syndrome or disseminated intravascular coagulation, either during hospitalisation or in the course of the study period. Healthy persons with exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis have a very low risk of complications. Our patients are treated as outpatients or considered for discharge with creatine kinase < 40 000 IU/l measured at least three days after their workout, and if they have no risk factors or other complications.

  4. Dasatinib-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension - A rare late complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Uroosa; Saqib, Amina; Dhar, Vidhya; Odaimi, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    Dasatinib is a dual Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for frontline and second line treatment of chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is defined by an increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure >25 mmHg at rest. Dasatinib-induced pulmonary hypertension has been reported in less than 1% of patients on chronic dasatinib treatment for chronic myelogenous leukemia. The pulmonary arterial hypertension from dasatinib may be categorized as either group 1 (drug-induced) or group 5 based on various mechanisms that may be involved including the pathogenesis of the disease process of chronic myelogenous leukemia. There have been reports of dasatinib-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension being reversible. We report a case of pulmonary arterial hypertension in a 46-year-old female patient with chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia on dasatinib treatment for over 10 years. She had significant improvement in symptoms after discontinuation of dasatinib and initiation of vasodilators. Several clinical questions arise once patients experience significant adverse effects as discussed in our case.

  5. Peripheral and central vascular conductance influence on post-exercise hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endo Masako Y

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-exercise hypotension (PEH following prolonged dynamic exercise arises from increased total vascular conductance (TVC via skeletal muscle vasodilation. However, arterial vasodilation of skeletal musculatures does not entirely account for the rise in TVC. The aim of the present study was to determine the contribution of vascular conductance (VC of the legs, arms, kidneys and viscera to TVC during PEH. Methods Eight subjects performed a single period of cycling at 60% of heart rate (HR reserve for 60 minutes. Blood flow in the right renal, superior mesenteric, right brachial and right femoral arteries was measured by Doppler ultrasonography in a supine position before exercise and during recovery. HR and mean arterial pressure (MAP were measured continuously. MAP decreased significantly from approximately 25 minutes after exercise cessation compared with pre-exercise baseline. TVC significantly increased (approximately 23%; P Conclusion PEH was not induced by decreased cardiac output, but by increased TVC, two-thirds of the rise in which can be attributed to increased VC in active and inactive limbs.

  6. Effect of preceding exercise on cerebral and splanchnic vascular responses to mental task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Someya Nami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effect of preceding acute exercise on the peripheral vascular response to a mental task, we measured splanchnic and cerebral blood flow responses to performing a mental task after exercise and resting. Methods In the exercise trial, 11 males exercised for 30 min on a cycle ergometer with a workload set at 70% of the age-predicted maximal heart rate for each individual. After a 15-min recovery period, the subjects rested for 5 min for pre-task baseline measurement and then performed mental arithmetic for 5 min followed by 5 min of post-task measurement. In the resting trial, they rested for 45 min and pre-task baseline data was obtained for 5 min. Then mental arithmetic was performed for 5 min followed by post-task measurement. We measured the mean blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery and superior mesenteric artery and the mean arterial pressure. Results Mean arterial pressure and mean blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery were significantly higher than the baseline during mental arithmetic in both exercise and resting trials. Mean blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery during mental arithmetic was greater in the control trial than the exercise trial. Mean blood velocity in the superior mesenteric artery showed no significant change during mental arithmetic from baseline in both trials. Conclusion These results suggest that acute exercise can moderate the increase in cerebral blood flow induced by a mental task.

  7. Pulmonary Artery Wedge Pressure Relative to Exercise Work Rate in Older Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, Sam; Wright, Stephen P; Goodman, Jack M; Sasson, Zion; Mak, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    An augmented pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) response may explain exercise intolerance in some humans. However, routine use of exercise hemodynamic testing is limited by a lack of data from normal older men and women. Our objective was to evaluate the exercise PAWP response and the potential for sexual dimorphism in healthy, nondyspneic older adults. Thirty-six healthy volunteers (18 men [54 ± 7 yr] and 18 women [58 ± 6 yr]) were studied at rest (control) and during two stages of semi-upright cycle ergometry, at heart rates of 100 bpm (light exercise) and 120 bpm (moderate exercise). Right heart catheterization was performed to measure pulmonary pressures. The PAWP response to exercise was assessed in context of exercise work rate and body size. At control, PAWP was similar between men and women. Work rates were significantly smaller in women at comparable HR (P exercise, with no further increase at moderate exercise. When indexed to work rate alone or work rate adjusted to body weight and height, the PAWP response at light and moderate exercise was significantly elevated in women compared with men (P exercise. The similar rise in the PAWP response to submaximal exercise occurs despite lower work rate in healthy older women compared with men, even when adjusted for smaller body size. It is important to consider sex in the development of normal reference ranges for exercise hemodynamic testing.

  8. Exercise aggravates cardiovascular risks and mortality in rats with disrupted nitric oxide pathway and treated with recombinant human erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziri, Fayçal; Binda, Delphine; Touati, Sabeur; Pellegrin, Maxime; Berthelot, Alain; Touyz, Rhian M; Laurant, Pascal

    2011-08-01

    Chronic administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) can generate serious cardiovascular side effects such as arterial hypertension (HTA) in clinical and sport fields. It is hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) can protect from noxious cardiovascular effects induced by chronic administration of rHuEPO. On this base, we studied the cardiovascular effects of chronic administration of rHuEPO in exercise-trained rats treated with an inhibitor of NO synthesis (L-NAME). Rats were treated or not with rHuEPO and/or L-NAME during 6 weeks. During the same period, rats were subjected to treadmill exercise. The blood pressure was measured weekly. Endothelial function of isolated aorta and small mesenteric arteries were studied and the morphology of the latter was investigated. L-NAME induced hypertension (197 ± 6 mmHg, at the end of the protocol). Exercise prevented the rise in blood pressure induced by L-NAME (170 ± 5 mmHg). However, exercise-trained rats treated with both rHuEPO and L-NAME developed severe hypertension (228 ± 9 mmHg). Furthermore, in these exercise-trained rats treated with rHuEPO/L-NAME, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was markedly impaired in isolated aorta (60% of maximal relaxation) and small mesenteric arteries (53%). L-NAME hypertension induced an internal remodeling of small mesenteric arteries that was not modified by exercise, rHuEPO or both. Vascular ET-1 production was not increased in rHuEPO/L-NAME/training hypertensive rats. Furthermore, we observed that rHuEPO/L-NAME/training hypertensive rats died during the exercise or the recovery period (mortality 51%). Our findings suggest that the use of rHuEPO in sport, in order to improve physical performance, represents a high and fatal risk factor, especially with pre-existing cardiovascular risk.

  9. Exercise transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurement has good sensitivity and specificity to detect lower extremity arterial stenosis assessed by computed tomography angiography

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Caroline; Chauve, Emmanuel; Chaudru, S?gol?ne; Le Faucheur, Alexis; Jaquinandi, Vincent; Mah?, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a highly prevalent disease diagnosed by the use of ankle-brachial index (ABI) at rest. In some clinical conditions (diabetes, renal insufficiency, advanced age), ABI can be falsely normal and other tests are required for the PAD diagnosis (American Heart Association statement). This study was conducted to determine the accuracy of exercise transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurement (exercise-TcPo2) in detection of arterial stenosis ?50% using comput...

  10. [Supervised exercise training in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension - analyses of the effectiveness and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxer, S; Rhyner, M; Treder, U; Speich, R; van Gestel, A J R

    2012-02-01

    Both in today's scientific research and in clinical practice, there exists a need to address the uncertainty concerning the effectiveness and safety of cardiopulmonary exercise training (CPET) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). It is commonly believed that CPET may be dangerous for patients with PAH, because increasing pressure on the pulmonary arteries may worsen right-sided heart failure. Recently, the first clinical trials on exercise training in patients with pulmonary hypertension reported promising results. Extension of the walking distance at the 6-minute walk test improved quality of life, endurance capacity and a reduction in symptoms were observed after CPET. Furthermore, CPET was well tolerated by the patients in five clinical trials. In conclusion, it may be postulated that CPET is an effective therapy in patients with PAH and was tendentially well tolerated by the patients.

  11. Comparison of exercise radionuclide angiography with thallium SPECT imaging for detection of significant narrowing of the left circumflex coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilsizian, V.; Perrone-Filardi, P.; Cannon, R.O. III; Freedman, N.M.; Bacharach, S.L.; Bonow, R.O.

    1991-01-01

    Although quantitation of exercise thallium tomograms has enhanced the noninvasive diagnosis and localization of coronary artery disease, the detection of stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery remains suboptimal. Because posterolateral regional wall motion during exercise is well assessed by radionuclide angiography, this study determined whether regional dysfunction of the posterolateral wall during exercise radionuclide angiography is more sensitive in identifying left circumflex disease than thallium perfusion abnormalities assessed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). One hundred ten consecutive patients with CAD were studied, of whom 70 had a significant stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery or a major obtuse marginal branch. Both regional function and segmental thallium activity of the posterolateral wall were assessed using visual and quantitative analysis. Left ventricular regional function was assessed objectively by dividing the left ventricular region of interest into 20 sectors; the 8 sectors corresponding to the posterolateral free wall were used to assess function in the left circumflex artery distribution. Similarly, using circumferential profile analysis of short-axis thallium tomograms, left ventricular myocardial activity was subdivided into 64 sectors; the 16 sectors corresponding to the posterolateral region were used to assess thallium perfusion abnormalities in the left circumflex artery territory. Qualitative posterolateral wall motion analysis detected 76% of patients with left circumflex coronary artery stenosis, with a specificity of 83%, compared with only 44% by qualitative thallium tomography (p less than 0.001) and a specificity of 92%

  12. Exercise-induced phospho-proteins in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, A S; Hawley, J A; Zierath, J R

    2008-01-01

    Efforts to identify exercise-induced signaling events in skeletal muscle have been influenced by ground-breaking discoveries in the insulin action field. Initial discoveries demonstrating that exercise enhances insulin sensitivity raised the possibility that contraction directly modulates insulin...... receptor signaling events. Although the acute effects of exercise on glucose metabolism are clearly insulin-independent, the canonical insulin signaling cascade has been used as a framework by investigators in an attempt to resolve the mechanisms by which muscle contraction governs glucose metabolism....... This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of exercise-induced signaling pathways governing glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. Particular emphasis will be placed on the characterization of AS160, a novel Akt substrate that plays a role in the regulation of glucose transport....

  13. Benefits of skeletal-muscle exercise training in pulmonary arterial hypertension: The WHOLEi+12 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saiz, Laura; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Quezada-Loaiza, Carlos A; Flox-Camacho, Angela; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Ara, Ignacio; Santalla, Alfredo; Morán, María; Sanz-Ayan, Paz; Escribano-Subías, Pilar; Lucia, Alejandro

    2017-03-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is often associated with skeletal-muscle weakness. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effects of an 8-week intervention combining muscle resistance, aerobic and inspiratory pressure-load exercises on upper/lower-body muscle power and other functional variables in patients with this disease. Participants were allocated to a control (standard care) or intervention (exercise) group (n=20 each, 45±12 and 46±11years, 60% women and 10% patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension per group). The intervention included five, three and six supervised (inhospital) sessions/week of aerobic, resistance and inspiratory muscle training, respectively. The primary endpoint was peak muscle power during bench/leg press; secondary outcomes included N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels, 6-min walking distance, five-repetition sit-to-stand test, maximal inspiratory pressure, cardiopulmonary exercise testing variables (e.g., peak oxygen uptake), health-related quality of life, physical activity levels, and safety. Adherence to training sessions averaged 94±0.5% (aerobic), 98±0.3% (resistance) and 91±1% (inspiratory training). Analysis of variance showed a significant interaction (group×time) effect for leg/bench press (Pexercise group (P0.1). We found a significant interaction effect (Pexercise. An 8-week exercise intervention including aerobic, resistance and specific inspiratory muscle training is safe for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and yields significant improvements in muscle power and other functional variables. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. AMPKα is essential for acute exercise-induced gene responses but not for exercise training-induced adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Joachim; Kjøbsted, Rasmus; Maag Kristensen, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    -induced increases in exercise capacity and expression of metabolic proteins as well as acute exercise-induced gene regulation would be compromised in AMPKα1 and -α2 muscle-specific double knockout (mdKO) mice. An acute bout of exercise increased skeletal muscle mRNA content of cytochrome C oxidase subunit I......, glucose transporter 4 and VEGF in an AMPK-dependent manner, while cluster of differentiation 36 and fatty acid transport protein 1 mRNA content increased similarly in AMPKα wild type (WT) and mdKO mice. During four weeks of voluntary running wheel exercise training, the AMPKα mdKO mice ran less than WT...

  15. Effect of exercise on circulating atrial natriuretic peptide and left ventricular ejection fraction in healthy persons and patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ichikawa, Shuichi; Sakamaki, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Tadashi; Iizuka, Toshio; Yagi, Atsuko; Kurashina, Toshiaki; Kumakura, Hisao; Murata, Kazuhiko

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide angiographic measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction were performed at rest and during exercise in 10 normal persons and 11 patients with coronary artery disease. Exercise was continued on a supine bicycle exercise table up to a symptom-limited maximum. Plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were also determined at rest and during exercise. Ejection fraction in the normal volunteers was 59±3% (mean±SEM) at rest and increased significantly (p<0.01) to 69±3% during exercise. Ejection fraction in the patients was 47±5% at rest and did not change significantly during exercise (51±7%). Plasma ANP in the normals rose significantly (p<0.01) from 62±16 pg/ml at rest to 454±94 pg/ml during exercise. Plasma ANP in the patients also rose significantly (p<0.01) from 231±102 pg/ml to 794±170 pg/ml. The response of plasma ANP to exercise was enhanced significantly (p<0.05) in the patients as compared with the normals in relation to ejection fraction by analysis of covariance. In both the normals and the patients, plasma ANP was inversely and significantly correlated with ejection fraction during exercise (r=0.46, p<0.05, n=21), however, not at rest. Because it has been reported that plasma ANP is correlated positively with pulmonary artery wedge pressure, the estimation of plasma ANP during an exercise stress test might be used for the evaluation of cardiac reserve in coronary artery disease. (author)

  16. Reduced peripheral arterial blood flow with preserved cardiac output during submaximal bicycle exercise in elderly heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng Xiaoyan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older heart failure (HF patients exhibit exercise intolerance during activities of daily living. We hypothesized that reduced lower extremity blood flow (LBF due to reduced forward cardiac output would contribute to submaximal exercise intolerance in older HF patients. Methods and Results Twelve HF patients both with preserved and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF (aged 68 ± 10 years without large (aorta or medium sized (iliac or femoral artery vessel atherosclerosis, and 13 age and gender matched healthy volunteers underwent a sophisticated battery of assessments including a peak exercise oxygen consumption (peak VO2, b physical function, c cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR submaximal exercise measures of aortic and femoral arterial blood flow, and d determination of thigh muscle area. Peak VO2 was reduced in HF subjects (14 ± 3 ml/kg/min compared to healthy elderly subjects (20 ± 6 ml/kg/min (p = 0.01. Four-meter walk speed was 1.35 ± 0.24 m/sec in healthy elderly verses 0.98 ± 0.15 m/sec in HF subjects (p p ≤ 0.03. Conclusion During CMR submaximal bike exercise in the elderly with heart failure, mechanisms other than low cardiac output are responsible for reduced lower extremity blood flow.

  17. Exercise-induced arterial hypertension - an independent factor for hypertrophy and a ticking clock for cardiac fatigue or atrial fibrillation in athletes? [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3b4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Leischik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exercise-induced arterial hypertension (EIAH leads to myocardial hypertrophy and is associated with a poor prognosis. EIAH might be related to the “cardiac fatigue” caused by endurance training. The goal of this study was to examine whether there is any relationship between EIAH and left ventricular hypertrophy in Ironman-triathletes. Methods: We used echocardiography and spiroergometry to determine the left ventricular mass (LVM, the aerobic/anaerobic thresholds and the steady-state blood pressure of 51 healthy male triathletes. The main inclusion criterion was the participation in at least one middle or long distance triathlon. Results: When comparing triathletes with LVM 220g there was a significant difference between blood pressure values (BP at the anaerobic threshold (185.2± 21.5 mmHg vs. 198.8 ±22.3 mmHg, p=0.037. The spiroergometric results were: maximum oxygen uptake (relative VO2max 57.3 ±7.5ml/min/kg vs. 59.8±9.5ml/min/kg (p=ns. Cut-point analysis for the relationship of BP >170 mmHg at the aerobic threshold and the probability of LVM >220g showed a sensitivity of 95.8%, a specificity of 33.3%, with a positive predictive value of 56.8 %, a good negative predictive value of 90%. The probability of LVM >220g increased with higher BP during exercise (OR: 1.027, 95% CI 1.002-1.052, p= 0.034 or with higher training volume (OR: 1.23, 95% CI 1.04 -1.47, p = 0.019. Echocardiography showed predominantly concentric remodelling, followed by concentric hypertrophy. Conclusion: Significant left ventricular hypertrophy with LVM >220g is associated with higher arterial blood pressure at the aerobic or anaerobic threshold. The endurance athletes with EIAH may require a therapeutic intervention to at least prevent extensive stiffening of the heart muscle and exercise-induced cardiac fatigue.

  18. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging at rest and during exercise. Comparative sensitivity to electrocardiography in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, I.K.; Griffith, L.S.C.; Rouleau, J.; Strauss, H.W.; Pitt, B.

    1977-01-01

    The sensitivity of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using thallium-201 injected both at rest and during peak exercise was compared to simultaneously recorded 12 lead electrocardiography (ECG) for the detection of transient ischemia in 20 normal subjects and 63 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). No significant perfusion defects or ECG changes were seen on either the rest or exercise studies in any of the normal subjects. Fifty-six percent of patients with CAD developed new perfusion defects with exercise compared to 38 percent who developed ischemic ST-segment depression (P < 0.02). However, when chest pain and/or ST depression were considered indices of ischemia, the sensitivity of exercise testing and thallium-201 MPI was similar. The increased sensitivity of MPI compared to ST-segment depression on the ECG was due to patients with baseline ECG abnormalities and those who failed to achieve 85 percent of predicted maximum heart rate with exercise. Analysis of the exercise results according to the extent of coronary artery disease revealed a progressive increase in both positive ECGs and MPI with the number of vessels involved. In patients with single vessel disease the MPI was more sensitive than the ECG (P < 0.02). The combination of the rest and exercise ECG, MPI and chest pain during exercise failed to identify 11 percent of patients with CAD. Exercise thallium-201 MPI is a useful adjunct to conventional exercise testing particularly when evaluating patients with abnormal resting ECGs, those who develop ventricular conduction defects or arrhythmias during exercise, and those who fail to achieve their predicted heart rate because of fatigue or breathlessness

  19. Simulation of Exercise-Induced Syncope in a Heart Model with Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Sever

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS can cause an exercise-induced reflex syncope (RS. The precise mechanism of this syncope is not known. The changes in hemodynamics are variable, including arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia, and one of the few consistent changes is a sudden fall in systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures (suggesting a reduced vascular resistance followed by a decline in heart rate. The contribution of the cardioinhibitory and vasodepressor components of the RS to hemodynamics was evaluated by a computer model. This lumped-parameter computer simulation was based on equivalent electronic circuits (EECs that reflect the hemodynamic conditions of a heart with severe AVS and a concomitantly decreased contractility as a long-term detrimental consequence of compensatory left ventricular hypertrophy. In addition, the EECs model simulated the resetting of the sympathetic nervous tone in the heart and systemic circuit during exercise and exercise-induced syncope, the fluctuating intra-thoracic pressure during respiration, and the passive relaxation of ventricle during diastole. The results of this simulation were consistent with the published case reports of exertional syncope in patients with AVS. The value of the EEC model is its ability to quantify the effect of a selective and gradable change in heart rate, ventricular contractility, or systemic vascular resistance on the hemodynamics during an exertional syncope in patients with severe AVS.

  20. Decline in arterial partial pressure of oxygen after exercise: a surrogate marker of pulmonary vascular obstructive disease in patients with atrial septal defect and severe pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laksmivenkateshiah, Srinivas; Singhi, Anil K; Vaidyanathan, Balu; Francis, Edwin; Karimassery, Sundaram R; Kumar, Raman K

    2011-06-01

    To examine the utility of decline in arterial partial pressure of oxygen after exercise as a marker of pulmonary vascular obstructive disease in patients with atrial septal defect and pulmonary hypertension. Treadmill exercise was performed in 18 patients with atrial septal defect and pulmonary hypertension. Arterial blood gas samples were obtained before and after peak exercise. A decline in the arterial pressure of oxygen of more than 10 millimetres of mercury after exercise was considered significant based on preliminary tests conducted on the controls. Cardiac catheterisation was performed in all patients and haemodynamic data sets were obtained on room air, oxygen, and a mixture of oxygen and nitric oxide (30-40 parts per million). There were 10 patients who had more than a 10 millimetres of mercury drop in arterial partial pressure of oxygen after exercise and who had a basal pulmonary vascular resistance index of more than 7 Wood units per square metre. Out of eight patients who had less than a 10 millimetres of mercury drop in arterial partial pressure of oxygen after exercise, seven had a basal pulmonary vascular resistance index of less than 7 Wood units per square metre, p equals 0.0001. A decline in arterial partial pressure of oxygen of more than 10 millimetres of mercury predicted a basal pulmonary vascular resistance index of more than 7 Wood units per square metre with a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 90%. A decline in arterial partial pressure of oxygen following exercise appears to predict a high pulmonary vascular resistance index in patients with atrial septal defect and pulmonary hypertension. This test is a useful non-invasive marker of pulmonary vascular obstructive disease in this subset.

  1. Influence of pre-exercise muscle glycogen content on exercise-induced transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Keller, Charlotte; Steensberg, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise in skeletal muscle of humans. To determine whether pre-exercise muscle glycogen content influences the magnitude and/or duration of this adaptive response, six male subjects performed one-legged cycling exercise...... to lower muscle glycogen content in one leg and then, the following day, completed 2.5 h low intensity two-legged cycling exercise. Nuclei and mRNA were isolated from biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of the control and reduced glycogen (pre-exercise glycogen = 609 +/- 47 and 337 +/- 33...... mmol kg(-1) dry weight, respectively) legs before and after 0, 2 and 5 h of recovery. Exercise induced a significant (P glycogen leg only. Although PDK4...

  2. Quantitative angiography of the left anterior descending coronary artery: correlations with pressure gradient and results of exercise thallium scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijns, W.; Serruys, P.W.; Reiber, J.H.; van den Brand, M.; Simoons, M.L.; Kooijman, C.J.; Balakumaran, K.; Hugenholtz, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate, during cardiac catheterization, what constitutes a physiologically significant obstruction to blood flow in the human coronary system, computer-based quantitative analysis of coronary angiograms was performed on the angiograms of 31 patients with isolated disease of the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. The angiographic severity of stenosis was compared with the transstenotic pressure gradient measured with the dilation catheter during angioplasty and with the results of exercise thallium scintigraphy. A curvilinear relationship was found between the pressure gradient across the stenosis (normalized for the mean aortic pressure) and the residual minimal area of obstruction (after subtracting the area of the angioplasty catheter). This relationship was best fitted by the equation: normalized mean pressure gradient . a + b . log [obstruction area], r . .74. The measurements of the percent area of stenosis (cutoff 80%) and of the transstenotic pressure gradient (cutoff 0.30) obtained at rest correctly predicted the occurrence of thallium perfusion defects induced by exercise in 83% of the patients

  3. Prognostic value and limitations of exercise radionuclide angiography in medically treated coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taliercio, C.P.; Clements, I.P.; Zinsmeister, A.R.; Gibbons, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated whether exercise radionuclide angiography provides prognostic information in addition to that identified by resting left ventricular function and coronary anatomy in patients with medically treated coronary artery disease. Clinical follow-up (median, 21.7 months) was obtained in 424 medically treated patients who underwent exercise radionuclide angiography and coronary angiography. The mean age of the study population was 58 years, and 67% were men. Cardiac death occurred in 16 patients, nonfatal myocardial infarction in 16, and nonfatal out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in 1. Univariate analysis showed that multiple variables were associated with future cardiac events, including number of diseased vessels, exercise and rest radionuclide ejection fraction, history of myocardial infarction, exercise and rest left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic volume indices, peak exercise workload, age, abnormal resting electrocardiogram, and peak exercise ST-segment depression. Only three variables were independently associated with cardiac events on follow-up: number of diseased vessels, radionuclide ejection fraction at rest, and age. In patients with three-vessel disease and a resting radionuclide ejection fraction of more than 40%, a subgroup with higher risk could not be identified on the basis of exercise radionuclide response

  4. Exercise-induced thallium-201 myocardial perfusion defects in angina pectoris without significant coronary artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazato, Masayasu; Maruoka, Yuji; Sunagawa, Osahiko; Kinjo, Kunihiko; Tomori, Masayuki; Fukiyama, Koshiro

    1990-01-01

    We performed exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in 32 patients with angina pectoris to study the incidence of perfusion defects, who had no significant organic stenosis on coronary angiography. None of them had myocardial infarction or cardiomyopathy. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy and 12-lead ECG recording were performed during supine bicycle ergometer exercise. Perfusion defects in thallium-201 scintigrams in SPECT images were assessed during visual analysis by two observers. In the coronary angiograms obtained during intravenous infusion of nitroglycerin, the luminal diameter of 75% stenosis or less in the AHA classification was regarded as an insignificant organic stenosis. Myocardial perfusion defects in the thallium-201 scintigrams were detected in eight (25%) of the 32 patients. Six of these eight patients had variant angina documented during spontaneous attacks with ST elevations in standard 12-lead ECGs. Perfusion defects were demonstrated at the inferior or infero-posterior regions in six patients, one of whom had concomitant anteroseptal defect. The defects were not always accompanied by chest pain. All but one patient demonstrating inferior or inferoposterior defects showed ST depression in leads II, III and aV F on their ECGs, corresponding to inferior wall ischemia. The exception was a case with right bundle branch block. Thus, 25% of the patients with angina pectoris, who had no evidence of significant organic stenosis on their coronary angiograms, exhibited exercise-induced perfusion defects in their thallium-201 scintigrams. Coronary spasms might have caused myocardial ischemia in these patients. (author)

  5. Quantitative analysis of exercise 201Tl myocardial emission CT in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Mitsuhiro; Kawai, Naoki; Yamamoto, Shuhei

    1984-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of quantitative analysis of exercise thallium-201 myocardial emission computed tomography (ECT) was evaluated in coronary artery disease (CAD). The subjects consisted of 20 CAD patients and five normal controls. All CAD patients underwent coronary angiography. Tomographic thallium-201 myocardial imaging was performed with a rotating gamma camera, and long-axial and short-axial myocardial images of the left ventricle were reconstructed. The tomographic images were interpreted quantitatively using circumferential profile analysis. Based on features of regional myocardial thallium-201 kinetics, two types of abnormalities were studied: (1) diminished initial distribution (stress defect) and (2) slow washout of thallium-201, as evidenced by patients' initial thallium-201 uptake and 3-hour washout rate profiles which fell below the normal limits, respectively. Two diagnostic criteria including the stress defect and a combination of the stress defect and slow washout were used to detect coronary artery lesions of significance (>=75 % luminal narrowing). The ischemic volumes were also evaluated by quantitative analysis using thallium-201 ECT. The diagnostic accuracy of the stress defect criterion was 95 % for left anterior descending, 90 % for right, and 70 % for left circumflex coronary artery lesions. The combined criteria of the stress defect and slow washout increased detection sensitivity with a moderate loss of specificity for identifying individual coronary artery lesion. A relatively high diagnostic accuracy was obtained using the stress defect criterion for multiple vessel disease (75 %). Ischemic myocardial volume was significantly larger in triple vessel than in single vessel disease (p < 0.05) using the combined criteria. It was concluded that quantitative analysis of exercise thallium-201 myocardial ECT images proves useful for evaluating coronary artery lesions. (author)

  6. Exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy in evaluating aortocoronary bypass surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Haaz, W.; Segal, B.L.; Kane, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty patients with recurrent symptoms after aortocoronary bypass graft surgery underwent angiography as well as exercise thallium 201 imaging. Exercise imaging has been shown to be highly specific (100 percent in our study) in evaluating patients after bypass surgery. Patients with complete revascularization have normal thallium 201 images. Similarly, exercise-induced defects are seen only in the presence of incomplete revascularization. There are patients, however, with incomplete revascularization with normal exercise images, but these generally limited to the right coronary artery or the diagonal vessels or their grafts

  7. Pulmonary arterial capacitance in children with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease: relation to pulmonary vascular resistance, exercise capacity, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajan, Imran; Manlhiot, Cedric; Reyes, Janette; McCrindle, Brian W; Humpl, Tilman; Friedberg, Mark K

    2011-09-01

    Pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), whether idiopathic PAH (iPAH) or PAH associated with congenital heart disease (aPAH), carries high morbidity and mortality. Low pulmonary arterial capacitance (PAC), defined as right ventricular stroke volume/pulmonary artery pulse pressure, is a risk factor for mortality in adults with PAH. However, the relation of PAC to pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), exercise endurance, and survival is poorly defined in children. Catheterization and clinical data of children with PAH (mean pulmonary artery pressure >25 mm Hg) were reviewed. Children with pulmonary shunts, stents, collaterals, or pulmonary venous hypertension were excluded. Primary outcomes were 6-minute walk distance and freedom from death/lung transplant. Forty-seven patients were studied. Nineteen (43%) had iPAH, and 28 (57%) had aPAH (7.1 ± 6.2 vs 8.4 ± 5.5 years, P = .45). Patients with iPAH had higher PVR indexed for body surface area (PVRi), lower indexed PAC (PACi), lower exercise tolerance, and lower freedom from death/lung transplant than patients with aPAH. Both higher PVRi (P 1.25 mL/mm Hg per square meter and a PVRi >13 Wood units × m(2) were associated with decreased freedom from death or lung transplant. The relationships between PVRi and PACi and survival were independent of each other and not confounded by etiologic group. Low PACi and high PVRi are independently associated with low 6-minute walk distance and survival in children with PAH. Therefore, both should be assessed for better prognostication and management in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Brain Natriuretic Peptide, Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Endothelin-1 response to peak exercise in patients with coronary artery disease and correlation with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbas, B.; Ergun, E.; Koray, Z.; Kabakci, G.; Yildirir, A.; Kes, S.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) has been known as a promising marker of ventricular dysfunction in cardiac patients. There are conflicting reports about its response to exercise testing. Therefore, this study was performed to investigate the exercise induced changes in BNP, Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) and Endothelin-1 (E) levels and their correlation with perfusion abnormalities on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). Materials and Methods: Study group consisted of 35 patients (mean age=53.9+11.8) who underwent MPS with suspicion or diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Plasma levels of BNP, ANP, and E were measured at rest and after symptom-limited ergometry. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of perfusion abnormality (i.e. ischemia or infarction) on MPS. Results: BNP, ANP and E levels did not change significantly with exercise, however baseline levels of BNP, ANP levels and peak-exercise level of BNP in patients with perfusion abnormalities were significantly higher. Hypertensive patients with or without perfusion abnormalities had higher baseline BNP, ANP levels, and peak-exercise BNP levels compared to normotensives. BNP levels at rest and after exercise had a significant correlation with age (r=0.57, p=0.04; r=0.58, p=0.04), as well as baseline ANP values (r=0.37, p=0.033). Highest baseline BNP, ANP and exercise BNP levels were observed in patients with infarction. Conclusion: Exercise-testing did not induce significant changes in plasma levels of BNP, ANP and E. Higher BNP levels had correlation with the presence of ischemia, infarction and hypertension, as well as, increasing age

  9. Clinical assessment of first pass radionuclide ventriculography after dipyridamole infusion in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Tohru; Tono-oka, Ichiro; Satoh, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiko; Hoshi, Hikaru; Ikeda, Kozue; Tsuiki, Kai; Yasui, Shoji; Komatani, Akio

    1986-01-01

    First pass radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was performed after dipyridamole (D) infusion in 33 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 15 normal volunteers. RNV findings after D infusion were compared with those of conventional exercise RNV and body surface ECG mapping (MAP). For patients with multiple vessel disease, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was significantly lower after D infusion than at rest. Wall motion abnormality (WMA) sites induced by D infusion were well coincident with those induced by exercise. Pressure rate product at exercise was significantly higher than that after D infusion, suggesting the different mechanism of the occurrence of WMA after D infusion and at exercise. The incidence of ischemic reaction tended to be higher after D infusion than at exercise in 25 patients with CAD. There was negative correlation between ST depression on MAP after D infusion and LVEF on RNV after D infusion. This RNV after D infusion can be used as a supplement tool to conventional exercise RNV in the evaluation of the degree of coronary artery lesions and preserved left ventricular function. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. R wave amplitude: a new determinant of failure of patients with coronary heart disease to manifest ST segment depression during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakki, A.H.; Iskandrian, A.S.; Kutalek, S.; Hare, T.W.; Sokoloff, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Patients with coronary artery disease may not manifest ST segment depression during exercise. Inadequate stress, mild coronary artery disease and severe left ventricular dysfunction have been postulated as mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of exercise R wave amplitude on ST segment depression in 81 patients with coronary artery disease (50% or greater diameter narrowing of one or more vessels). All patients underwent symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing and 71 patients (88%) had concomitant thallium-201 imaging. In 26 patients, the exercise R wave amplitude in electrocardiographic lead V5 was less than 11 mm (Group I), and in 55 patients it was 11 mm or greater (Group II). The two groups were similar with regard to age, sex, propranolol administration and left ventricular function. There was a significant difference in the incidence of positive exercise electrocardiograms in the two groups (2 patients [8%] in Group I and 27 patients [49%] in Group II; p . 0.002), despite similar exercise heart rate and extent of coronary artery disease. Myocardial ischemia, manifested by exercise-induced angina or exercise-induced thallium-201 perfusion defects, was similar in both groups. Thallium-201 imaging showed perfusion defects in 73% of patients in Group I and in 76% of patients in Group II (p . not significant). Thus, R wave amplitude is a new determinant of failure to develop ST depression during exercise. A low R wave amplitude (less than 11 mm) is rarely associated with ST depression, even in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease. Exercise thallium-201 imaging is a valuable diagnostic tool in patients with low R wave amplitude

  11. Usefulness of lung and right ventricular thallium-201 uptake during single photon emission computed tomography in exercise testing of patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoh, Fumitaka; Tawarahara, Kei; Mikami, Naoshi

    2005-01-01

    Increased pulmonary or right ventricular 201 Tl uptake during the exercise test has been used as a marker of multivessel coronary artery disease. The most useful method for assessing the severity of coronary artery disease was evaluated among conventional evaluation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), measurement of lung to heart uptake ratio (L/H), and right ventricular to left ventricular uptake ratio (RV/LV) on 201 Tl images during exercise testing. Regions-of-interest (4 x 4 pixels) were placed at the lung and the heart, and L/H was defined as mean lung uptake/mean heart uptake. Correspondingly, regions-of-interest (4 x 4 pixels) were placed at the RV and the LV, and RV/LV was defined as maximum RV uptake/maximum LV uptake. L/H and RV/LV on the initial image were analyzed in 216 patients (angiographically normal coronary arteries: 89, single-vessel disease: 82, multivessel disease: 45). The diagnostic value was evaluated using the receiver operating characteristic curve. All methods showed significantly higher values in patients with multivessel disease than in patients with no coronary artery disease or single-vessel disease. L/H was significantly higher in patients with prior myocardial infarction and RV/LV was significantly higher in patients without infarction. The sensitivity of only conventional SPECT evaluation for multivessel coronary artery disease was low (sensitivity 53%, specificity 94%). However, addition of evaluation of L/H and RV/LV to SPECT improved the sensitivity for multivessel coronary artery disease (sensitivity 93%, specificity 49%). The diagnostic sensitivity for multivessel coronary artery disease was improved by adding L/H and RV/LV to conventional evaluation of exercise 201 Tl SPECT. L/H and RV/LV during exercise 201 Tl imaging may provide additional information regarding the severity of coronary artery disease. (author)

  12. Correlação entre hipoxemia moderada e função muscular esquelética periférica na doença pulmonar obstrutiva crónica - Estudo-piloto Correlation between mild hypoxaemia and limb skeletal muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Leite Rodrigues

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: A capacidade de exercício em portadores de DPOC depende da gravidade da limitação ao fluxo aéreo, do grau de hipoxemia e da função muscular esquelética. Nesses doentes, a atrofia e a fraqueza da musculatura periférica são consideradas consequências sistémicas da DPOC e estão associadas à redução da capacidade de exercício. Objectivos: Investigar a possível correlação entre hipoxemia moderada e o comprometimento muscular periférico na DPOC. Doentes e métodos: Dez doentes encaminhados ao Programa de Reabilitação Pulmonar do Hospital Universitário de Brasília foram incluídos neste estudo. A função pulmonar foi avaliada por espirometria, gasometria arterial e avaliação funcional pelo teste de caminhada de seis minutos, sinal electromiográfico e força de deltóide e quadricípetes. Resultados: As correlações entre PaO2 e a força quadricíptica (r2 = 0,61 e p = 0,007 e a distância percorrida no TC6 (r2 = 0,96 e p = 0,001 foram positivas e significativas. Houve correlação negativa e significativa entre PaO2 e a frequência mediana de quadricípetes (r2 = -0,42 e p = 0,04. Observámos também correlação significativa entre força de quadricípetes e o TC6 (r2 = 0,67 e p = 0,001. Assim como houve correlação negativa e significativa entre a frequência mediana de quadricípetes, e o TC6 (r2 = -0,42 e p = 0,04. Não encontrámos correlação significativa entre a PaO2 e força ou frequência mediana do músculo deltóide. Conclusão: A PaO2 tem correlação importante e significativa com variáveis de função muscular periférica. A hipoxemia moderada e a disfunção muscular periférica precoce possuem como principal impacto negativo a deterioração da capacidade funcional de portadores de DPOC.Rationale: Exercise capacity in COPD patients depends on the degree of airflow obstruction, the severity of the hypoxaemia and skeletal muscle function. Muscle atrophy and weakness are considered systemic

  13. Rest/exercise thallium myocardial perfusion imaging: a new and rapid technique to evaluate coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segall, G.M.; Zipkin, R.E.; Stanford Univ., CA

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-six patients underwent conventional exercise/4-h redistribution thallium myocardial perfusion imaging as well as rest/exercise imaging on different days. For the rest/exercise study, patients were inmaged 10 min after receiving 1 mCi thallium at rest. The resting study was immediately followed by symptom-limited treadmill exercise. Patients were injected with 2 mCi thallium at peak exercise and imaged 10 min later. The entire rest/exercise study was completed in 2 h. There was a high degree of correlation between the two studies. Of the 130 segments analysed, 84 were normal and 46 were abnormal by exercise/redistribution imaging whereas 88 were normal and 42 were abnormal by rest/exercise imaging. Among the 14 patients who had coronary arteriography, both exercise/redistribution and rest/exercise imaging correctly identified 23/35 segments as abnormal (sensitivity [pi003] 66% and 34/35 segments as normal (specificity=97%). Furthermore, abnormal segments were more likely to be reversible on the rest/exercise study. The results suggest that the accuracy of rest/exercise thallium imaging is equal to conventional exercise/redistribution imaging in the evaluation of coronary artery disease. The significant time economy and possible improvement in assessing myocardial viability are important potential advantages of this new technique. (Author)

  14. Usefulness of exercise echocardiography in ischemic heart disease. Comparison with exercise cardiac scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Hideki; Koyanagi, Samon; Narabayashi, Hideki; Inou, Tetsuji; Takeshita, Akira

    1999-01-01

    Exercise echocardiography and exercise thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were performed in 152 patients with suspected coronary artery disease, including 61 patients with old myocardial infarction. All patients underwent coronary arteriography, and coronary artery disease was defined as ≥75% diameter stenosis. Digital two-dimensional echocardiography was performed before and after the treadmill exercise test, and wall motion abnormality was evaluated using quad-screen. Sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease were similar for the 2 exercise tests (77% and 80% for echocardiography and 75%, and 83% for SPECT, respectively). Diagnoses for one-vessel disease, 2-vessel disease and 3-vessel disease were similar for echocardiography (79%, 72% and 77%, respectively) and SPECT (74%, 75% and 77%, respectively). Sensitivity for the diagnosis of ischemia at the area remote from infarct area was low for both exercise echocardiography and exercise SPECT (45% and 48%, respectively). Exercise echocardiography has comparable diagnostic value to SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease. However, both exercise tests have limitations for the diagnosis of ischemia at the area remote from infarct area. (author)

  15. Comparison of electron beam computed tomography and exercise electrocardiography in detecting coronary artery disease in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Shinji; Mitsunami, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Masahiko

    1998-01-01

    Although exercise electrocardiography (ECG) is a useful noninvasive screening test for coronary artery disease (CAD), one prerequisite for ECG screening is that patient be able to exercise enough to evoke myocardial ischemia. Thus, exercise ECG may not be suitable for, some elderly people with CAD who cannot exercise enough. We compared electron beam Computed Tomography (EBCT) with exercise ECG for detecting CAD in 196 patients (mean age, 58.4±12.5 (standard deviation)) who had undergone coronary angiography. Using the angiographic findings as the ''gold standard'', we found that the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 88%, 77%, 89%, and 77%, respectively, for EBCT, and 66%, 72%, 83%, and 52%, respectively, for exercise ECG. Although the results were similar when the subjects were divided into different age groups, the negative predictive value for exercise ECG, among older patients was very low. These findings suggest that EBCT is superior to exercise ECG in detecting CAD in the elderly. (author)

  16. Correlates of lung/heart ratio of thallium-201 in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, S.; Kaul, S.; Boucher, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    We studied 306 patients with chest pain (262 with coronary artery disease and 44 with no coronary artery disease) to determine which of 23 clinical, exercise, thallium, and angiographic variables best discriminate between patients with increased lung/heart ratios of thallium versus those with normal ratios. Normal lung/heart ratio values were defined using an additional 45 subjects with less than 1% probability of coronary artery disease. The number of diseased vessels was the best discriminator between patients with increased ratios versus those with normal ratios. Double product at peak exercise, number of segments with abnormal wall motion, patient gender, and duration of exercise were also significant discriminators. Using discriminant function analysis these variables could correctly identify 81% of cases with increased lung/heart ratios and 72% of cases with normal ratios. These results indicate that an increased lung/heart ratio of thallium reflects exercise-induced left ventricular dysfunction and affords a better understanding of why this thallium parameter is a powerful prognostic indicator in patients with chest pain

  17. Exercisers achieve greater acute exercise-induced mood enhancement than nonexercisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Martin D; Hoffman, Debi Rufi

    2008-02-01

    To determine whether a single session of exercise of appropriate intensity and duration for aerobic conditioning has a different acute effect on mood for nonexercisers than regular exercisers. Repeated-measures design. Research laboratory. Adult nonexercisers, moderate exercisers, and ultramarathon runners (8 men, 8 women in each group). Treadmill exercise at self-selected speeds to induce a rating of perceived exertion (RPE) of 13 (somewhat hard) for 20 minutes, preceded and followed by 5 minutes at an RPE of 9 (very light). Profile of Mood States before and 5 minutes after exercise. Vigor increased by a mean +/- standard deviation of 8+/-7 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 5-12) among the ultramarathon runners and 5+/-4 points (95% CI, 2-9) among the moderate exercisers, with no improvement among the nonexercisers. Fatigue decreased by 5+/-6 points (95% CI, 2-8) for the ultramarathon runners and 4+/-4 points (95% CI, 1-7) for the moderate exercisers, with no improvement among the nonexercisers. Postexercise total mood disturbance decreased by a mean of 21+/-16 points (95% CI, 12-29) among the ultramarathon runners, 16+/-10 points (95% CI, 7-24) among the moderate exercisers, and 9+/-13 points (95% CI, 1-18) among the nonexercisers. A single session of moderate aerobic exercise improves vigor and decreases fatigue among regular exercisers but causes no change in these scores for nonexercisers. Although total mood disturbance improves postexercise in exercisers and nonexercisers, regular exercisers have approximately twice the effect as nonexercisers. This limited postexercise mood improvement among nonexercisers may be an important deterrent for persistence with an exercise program.

  18. Altered arterial stiffness and subendocardial viability ratio in young healthy light smokers after acute exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Doonan

    Full Text Available Studies showed that long-standing smokers have stiffer arteries at rest. However, the effect of smoking on the ability of the vascular system to respond to increased demands (physical stress has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effect of smoking on arterial stiffness and subendocardial viability ratio, at rest and after acute exercise in young healthy individuals.Healthy light smokers (n = 24, pack-years = 2.9 and non-smokers (n = 53 underwent pulse wave analysis and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements at rest, and 2, 5, 10, and 15 minutes following an exercise test to exhaustion. Smokers were tested, 1 after 12h abstinence from smoking (chronic condition and 2 immediately after smoking one cigarette (acute condition. At rest, chronic smokers had higher augmentation index and lower aortic pulse pressure than non-smokers, while subendocardial viability ratio was not significantly different. Acute smoking increased resting augmentation index and decreased subendocardial viability ratio compared with non-smokers, and decreased subendocardial viability ratio compared with the chronic condition. After exercise, subendocardial viability ratio was lower, and augmentation index and aortic pulse pressure were higher in non-smokers than smokers in the chronic and acute conditions. cfPWV rate of recovery of was greater in non-smokers than chronic smokers after exercise. Non-smokers were also able to achieve higher workloads than smokers in both conditions.Chronic and acute smoking appears to diminish the vascular response to physical stress. This can be seen as an impaired 'vascular reserve' or a blunted ability of the blood vessels to accommodate the changes required to achieve higher workloads. These changes were noted before changes in arterial stiffness or subendocardial viability ratio occurred at rest. Even light smoking in young healthy individuals appears to have harmful effects on vascular

  19. Assessment of Nephroprotective Potential of Histochrome during Induced Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, I G; Bogdanovich, R N; Kolosova, N G

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic resonance tomography was employed to verify endothelial dysfunction of renal arteries in Wistar and OXYS rats under conditions of induced arterial hypertension. Angiography revealed changes in the size and form of renal arteries of hypertensive animals. In hypertensive rats, histochrome exerted a benevolent therapeutic effect in renal arteries: it decreased BP, diminished thrombus formation in fi ne capillaries and arterioles, demonstrated the anticoagulant properties, partially improved endothelial dysfunction of small renal arteries, and up-regulated the glomerular filtration.

  20. Exercise-induced albuminuria vs circadian variations in blood pressure in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadida Meli, Isabelle Hota; Tankeu, Aurel T; Dehayem, Mesmin Y; Chelo, David; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2017-02-15

    To investigated the relationship between exercise-induced ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) abnormalities in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) adolescents. We conducted a case-control at the National Obesity Center of the Yaoundé Central Hospital, Cameroon. We compared 24 h ABPM and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) at rest and after a standardized treadmill exercise between 20 Cameroonian T1DM patients and 20 matched controls. T1DM adolescents were aged 12-18 years, with diabetes for at least one year, without proteinuria, with normal office blood pressure (BP) and renal function according to the general reference population. Non-diabetic controls were adolescents of general population matched for sex, age and BMI. Mean duration of diabetes was 4.2 ± 2.8 years. The mean 24 h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were respectively 116 ± 9 mmHg in the diabetic group vs 111 ± 8 mmHg in the non-diabetic ( P = 0.06), and 69 ± 7 mm Hg vs 66 ± 5 mm Hg ( P = 0.19). There was no difference in the diurnal pattern of BP in diabetes patients and non-diabetic controls (SBP: 118 ± 10 mmHg vs 114 ± 10 mmHg, P = 0.11; DBP: 71 ± 7 mmHg vs 68 ± 6 mmHg, P = 0.22). Nighttime BP was higher in the diabetic group with respect to SBP (112 ± 11 mmHg vs 106 ± 7 mmHg, P = 0.06) and to the mean arterial pressure (MAP) (89 ± 9 mmHg vs 81 ± 6 mmHg, P = 0.06). ACR at rest was similar in both groups (5.5 mg/g vs 5.5 mg/g, P = 0.74), but significantly higher in diabetes patients after exercise (10.5 mg/g vs 5.5 mg/g, P = 0.03). SBP was higher in patients having exercise-induced albuminuria (116 ± 10 mmHg vs 108 ± 10 mmHg, P = 0.09). Exercise-induced albuminuria could be useful for early diagnosis of kidney damage in adolescents with T1DM.

  1. Diagnostic ability of Tc-99m MIBI SPECT in coronary artery diseases in not affected by the degree of exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Kim, Jong Soo; Chun, Kyung Ah; Lee, Sang Woo; Kang, Do Young; Cho, Yong Keun; Chae, Shung Chull; Lee, Kyu Bo

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of ST-depression in the electrocardiogram during exercise is influenced by the level of efforts. However, unlike the prevalence of ST-depression of exercise ECG, the degree of exercise is reported to do not influence the diagnostic ability of myocardial perfusion scan. Furthermore, the relation between the prevalence of myocardial ischemia and effort is still controversial. We evaluated the effect of the degree of exercise on the ability of SPECT imaging to detect coronary artery stenosis. The patient population was comprised of 111 patients (73 men and 38 women, mean age 56 years) who underwent an exercise test in conjunction with Tc-99m MIBI and cardiac catheterization within 3 months apart each other. The degree of exercise was classified into four groups according to the percentage of maximal predicted heart rate. The sensitivity and specificity was compared between each group. The overall diagnostic sensitivity was significantly higher with Tc-99m MIBI SPECT than exercise ECG. The specificity was not significantly different between two tests. Sensitivity and specificity of Tc-99m MIBI was not different between four groups. Sensitivity for individual coronary stenosis seemed to be lower in subjects who had premature termination of exercise due to early appearance of ST depression. These results suggest that the overall diagnostic sensitivity of Tc-99m MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT is not significantly affected by the degree of exercise in stable patients undergoing symptom-limited treadmil exercise testing. Myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging should be added to routine exercise stress testing for the detection of coronary artery disease

  2. Aerobic interval training and continuous training equally improve aerobic exercise capacity in patients with coronary artery disease : The SAINTEX-CAD study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conraads, V.; Pattyn, N.; de Maeyer, C.; Beckers, P.; Coeckelberghs, E.; Cornelissen, V.A.; Denollet, J.; Frederix, G.; Goetschalckx, K.; Hoymans, V.Y.; Possemiers, N.; Schepers, D.; Shivalkar, B.; Voigt, J.U.; van Craenenbroeck, E.M.; Vanhees, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation increases peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2), which is an important predictor of mortality in cardiac patients. However, it remains unclear which exercise characteristics are most effective for improving peak VO2 in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients.

  3. Radionuclide methods of identifying patients who may require coronary artery bypass surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beller, G.A.; Gibson, R.S.; Watson, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    Myocardial thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) scintigraphy or radionuclide angiography performed in conjunction with exercise stress testing can provide clinically useful information regarding the functional significance of underlying coronary artery stenoses in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Knowledge of type, location, and extent of myocardial 201 Tl perfusion abnormalities or the severity of exercise-induced global and regional dysfunction has prognostic value. Risk stratification can be undertaken with either radionuclide technique by consideration of the magnitude of the ischemic response and may assist in the selection of patients for coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). In patients with coronary artery disease, delayed 201 Tl redistribution observed on exercise or dipyridamole 201 Tl scintigraphy, particularly when present in multiple vascular regions and associated with increased lung 201 Tl uptake, has been shown to be predictive of an adverse outcome, whereas patients with chest pain and a normal exercise 201 Tl scintigram have a good prognosis with medical treatment. Similarly, a marked fall in the radionuclide ejection fraction from rest to exercise has been found to correlate with high-risk anatomic disease. Another important application of radionuclide imaging in patients being considered for CABG (particularly those with a depressed resting left ventricular ejection fraction) is the determination of myocardial viability and potential for improved blood flow and enhanced regional function after revascularization. 69 references

  4. Antioxidant mechanism of Rutin on hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Qiu, Yanli; Mao, Min; Lv, Jinying; Zhang, Lixin; Li, Shuzhen; Li, Xia; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2014-11-18

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the pathologic process of pulmonary arterial hypertension as either mediators or inducers. Rutin is a type of flavonoid which exhibits significant scavenging properties on oxygen radicals both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we proposed that rutin attenuated hypoxia-induced pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation by scavenging ROS. Immunofluorescence data showed that rutin decreased the production of ROS, which was mainly generated through mitochondria and NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs). Western blot results provided further evidence on rutin increasing expression of Nox4 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Moreover, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry indicated that proliferation of PASMCs triggered by hypoxia was also repressed by rutin. However, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a scavenger of ROS, abolished or diminished the capability of rutin in repressing hypoxia-induced cell proliferation. These data suggest that rutin shows a potential benefit against the development of hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension by inhibiting ROS, subsequently preventing hypoxia-induced PASMC proliferation.

  5. Antioxidant Mechanism of Rutin on Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are involved in the pathologic process of pulmonary arterial hypertension as either mediators or inducers. Rutin is a type of flavonoid which exhibits significant scavenging properties on oxygen radicals both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we proposed that rutin attenuated hypoxia-induced pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC proliferation by scavenging ROS. Immunofluorescence data showed that rutin decreased the production of ROS, which was mainly generated through mitochondria and NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4 in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs. Western blot results provided further evidence on rutin increasing expression of Nox4 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α. Moreover, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry indicated that proliferation of PASMCs triggered by hypoxia was also repressed by rutin. However, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a scavenger of ROS, abolished or diminished the capability of rutin in repressing hypoxia-induced cell proliferation. These data suggest that rutin shows a potential benefit against the development of hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension by inhibiting ROS, subsequently preventing hypoxia-induced PASMC proliferation.

  6. Arterial stiffening precedes systolic hypertension in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, Robert M; Shiang, Tina; Al Sayah, Leona; Fry, Jessica L; Bajpai, Saumendra; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A; Lob, Heinrich E; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Mitchell, Gary; Cohen, Richard A; Seta, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Stiffening of conduit arteries is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity. Aortic wall stiffening increases pulsatile hemodynamic forces that are detrimental to the microcirculation in highly perfused organs, such as the heart, brain, and kidney. Arterial stiffness is associated with hypertension but presumed to be due to an adaptive response to increased hemodynamic load. In contrast, a recent clinical study found that stiffness precedes and may contribute to the development of hypertension although the mechanisms underlying hypertension are unknown. Here, we report that in a diet-induced model of obesity, arterial stiffness, measured in vivo, develops within 1 month of the initiation of the diet and precedes the development of hypertension by 5 months. Diet-induced obese mice recapitulate the metabolic syndrome and are characterized by inflammation in visceral fat and aorta. Normalization of the metabolic state by weight loss resulted in return of arterial stiffness and blood pressure to normal. Our findings support the hypothesis that arterial stiffness is a cause rather than a consequence of hypertension.

  7. Combined exercise reduces arterial stiffness, blood pressure, and blood markers for cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Won-Mok; Sung, Ki-Dong; Cho, Jae-Min; Park, Song-Young

    2017-03-01

    Postmenopausal women exhibit elevated brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), an indicator of arterial stiffness, which is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of combined resistance and aerobic exercise training on baPWV, blood pressure (BP), and cardiovascular fitness in postmenopausal women with stage 1 hypertension. Twenty postmenopausal women (age, 75 ± 2 y; systolic BP, 152 ± 2 mm Hg, diastolic BP, 95 ± 3 mm Hg) were randomly assigned to a "no-exercise" (CON, n = 10) or combined exercise (EX, n = 10) group. The EX group performed resistance and aerobic exercise for 12 weeks, 3 times per week. Exercise intensity was increased gradually, from 40% to 70% of heart rate reserve, every 4 weeks. BaPWV, BP, blood nitrite/nitrate, endothelin-1 (ET-1), cardiovascular fitness, and body composition were measured before and after the 12-week intervention. BP, baPWV (-1.2 ± 0.4 m/s), ET-1 (-2.7 ± 0.3 μmol/mL), nitrite/nitrate (+4.5 ± 0.5 μM), functional capacity, and body composition were significantly improved (P exercise training improves arterial stiffness, BP, ET-1, blood nitrite/nitrate, functional capacity, and body composition in postmenopausal women with stage 1 hypertension. Thus, this study provides evidence that combined exercise training is a useful therapeutic method to improve cardiovascular health which can reduce cardiovascular disease risk in postmenopausal women with hypertension.

  8. Catalase activity prevents exercise-induced up-regulation of vasoprotective proteins in venous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Floeren, Melanie; Kumpf, Stephanie; Both, Charlotte; Peter, Bärbel; Balz, Vera; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Kojda, Georg

    2011-11-01

    Physical activity induces favourable changes of arterial gene expression and protein activity, although little is known about its effect in venous tissue. Although our understanding of the initiating molecular signals is still incomplete, increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is considered a key event. This study sought to investigate the effects of two different training protocols on the expression of eNOS and extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) in venous and lung tissue and to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms. C57Bl/6 mice underwent voluntary exercise or forced physical activity. Changes of vascular mRNA and protein levels and activity of eNOS, ecSOD and catalase were determined in aorta, heart, lung and vena cava. Both training protocols similarly increased relative heart weight and resulted in up-regulation of aortic and myocardial eNOS. In striking contrast, eNOS expression in vena cava and lung remained unchanged. Likewise, exercise up-regulated ecSOD in the aorta and in left ventricular tissue but remained unchanged in lung tissue. Catalase expression in lung tissue and vena cava of exercised mice exceeded that in aorta by 6.9- and 10-fold, respectively, suggesting a lack of stimulatory effects of hydrogen peroxide. In accordance, treatment of mice with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole for 6 weeks resulted in significant up-regulation of eNOS and ecSOD in vena cava. These data suggest that physiological venous catalase activity prevents exercise-induced up-regulation of eNOS and ecSOD. Furthermore, therapeutic inhibition of vascular catalase might improve pulmonary rehabilitation. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Exercise-induced maximum metabolic rate scaled to body mass by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exercise-induced maximum metabolic rate scaled to body mass by the fractal ... rate scaling is that exercise-induced maximum aerobic metabolic rate (MMR) is ... muscle stress limitation, and maximized oxygen delivery and metabolic rates.

  10. Additional prognostic value of physical examination, exercise testing, and arterial ultrasonography for coronary risk assessment in primary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournot, Maxime; Taraszkiewicz, Dorota; Cambou, Jean-Pierre; Galinier, Michel; Boccalon, Henri; Hanaire-Broutin, Hélène; Chamontin, Bernard; Carrié, Didier; Ferrières, Jean

    2009-11-01

    The choice of noninvasive tests used in primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases must be based on medical evidence. The aim of this study was to assess the additional prognostic value, over conventional risk factors, of physical examination, exercise testing, and arterial ultrasonography, in predicting a first coronary event. A prospective cohort study was conducted between 1996 and 2004 (n = 2,709), with follow-up in 2006 (response rate 96.6%). Participants had no history or symptoms of cardiovascular disease and had a standardized physical examination, a cardiac exercise testing, and carotid and femoral ultrasonography at baseline. Incident cases of definite coronary events were recorded during follow-up. Over the Framingham risk score, femoral bruit, positive exercise test, intima-media thickness >0.63 mm, and a femoral plaque provided significant additional information to the prediction model. The addition of the exercise test to the traditional risk factors, then the intima-media thickness and lastly the presence of femoral plaques, produces incremental increases in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.73-0.78, P = .02) and about a 50% increase in the positive predictive value (15.8%-31.4%), with no effect on the negative predictive value (96.4%-96.9%). Physical examination, exercise testing, and arterial ultrasonography provide incremental information on the risk of coronary event in asymptomatic adults. Exercise testing and femoral ultrasonography also improve the accuracy of the risk stratification.

  11. Pulmonary gas exchange and acid–base status during immobilisation of black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Fahlman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available When immobilising wildlife, adverse side effects can include hypoxaemia, acidosis and hypertension. Pulmonary gas exchange and acid–base status were evaluated during immobilisation of 25 free-ranging and one boma-held black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis in Zimbabwe. The effect of different body positions on arterial oxygenation was evaluated. A combination of the following drugs was used: an opioid (etorphine or thiafentanil, azaperone and an a2 -adrenoceptor agonist (detomidine or xylazine. Respiratory and heart rates, rectal temperature and pulse oximetry–derived haemoglobin oxygen saturation were recorded. Serial arterial blood samples were analysed immediately in the field. Marked hypoxaemia and hypercapnia were recorded in immobilised free-ranging black rhinoceroses. Arterial oxygenation was higher during sternal compared to lateral recumbency. Most rhinoceroses developed acidaemia of respiratory and metabolic origin. Initially high lactate concentrations in free-ranging rhinoceroses decreased during immobilisation. Pulse oximetry was unreliable in the detection of hypoxaemia. Positioning in sternal recumbency and routine use of oxygen supplementation are recommended in the management of immobilised rhinoceroses as measures to improve arterial oxygenation.

  12. Effects of exercise training on calf muscle oxygen extraction and blood flow in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Wesley B; Li, Zhe; Schenkel, Steven S; Chandra, Malavika; Busch, David R; Englund, Erin K; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Yodh, Arjun G; Floyd, Thomas F; Mohler, Emile R

    2017-12-01

    We employed near-infrared optical techniques, diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), and frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (FD-NIRS) to test the hypothesis that supervised exercise training increases skeletal muscle microvascular blood flow and oxygen extraction in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) who experience claudication. PAD patients ( n = 64) were randomly assigned to exercise and control groups. Patients in the exercise group received 3 mo of supervised exercise training. Calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction were optically monitored before, during, and after performance of a graded treadmill protocol at baseline and at 3 mo in both groups. Additionally, measurements of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) and peak walking time (PWT) to maximal claudication were made during each patient visit. Supervised exercise training was found to increase the maximal calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction levels during treadmill exercise by 29% (13%, 50%) and 8% (1%, 12%), respectively [ P group population were significantly higher than corresponding changes in the control group ( P training also increased PWT by 49% (18%, 101%) ( P = 0.01). However, within statistical error, the ABI, resting calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction, and the recovery half-time for hemoglobin\\myoglobin desaturation following cessation of maximal exercise were not altered by exercise training. The concurrent monitoring of both blood flow and oxygen extraction with the hybrid DCS/FD-NIRS instrument revealed enhanced muscle oxidative metabolism during physical activity from exercise training, which could be an underlying mechanism for the observed improvement in PWT. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We report on noninvasive optical measurements of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction dynamics before/during/after treadmill exercise in peripheral artery disease patients who experience claudication. The measurements tracked the effects of a 3-mo supervised

  13. Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis from stationary biking: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inklebarger, J; Galanis, N; Kirkos, J; Kapetanos, G

    2010-10-01

    There are several reports concerning exercise and rabdomyolysis. There has been no report in the English literature of exercise induced rabdomyolisis from a stationary bike.A 63-year-old female recreational athlete presented to our hospital seeking treatment for lower back, leg pain and stiffness after exercising on a stationary bicycle one day prior. Blood work showed a raised CK of 38,120 U/L, a myoglobin of 5330 and an AST 495 U/L with normal urea and electrolytes. Urinalysis remained negative. She was admitted for oral and intravenous hydration and fluid balance monitoringThis is a very rare case of rhabdomyolysis due to exercise. This study highlights the difficulties faced by accident and emergency teams in distinguishing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) from exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis, and reinforces the concept that rhabdomyolysis can occur at any level of exercise intensity.

  14. Changes in myocardial perfusion due to physical exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendziorra, Kai; Foerster, Marcus; Sabri, Osama; Kluge, Regine; Walther, Claudia; Moebius-Winkler, Sven; Conradi, Katrin; Schuler, Gerhard; Hambrecht, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is one of the main therapy options for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), resulting in an improvement in myocardial perfusion and exercise capacity. Nevertheless, studies have also demonstrated a positive effect of regular exercise training on myocardial perfusion and maximum exercise capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in myocardial stress perfusion after 1 year of exercise training in comparison with the effects of PTCA in patients with CAD. In 66 male patients with angiographically confirmed significant coronary artery stenosis in one target vessel, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy was performed at baseline and 12 months after randomisation into either a physical exercise group or a PTCA group. Circumferential count rate profiles in 16 wall segments were classified according to their relative count rate and localisation within or outside the area supplied by the stenosed vessel. Ischaemic segments showed a significant improvement in myocardial count rate within the target area after 12 months in both the PTCA and the training group (PTCA group: from 76.8±4.9% to 86.6±10.9%, p=0.03; training group: from 74.0±7.3% to 83.7±10.8%, p<0.01). Outside the target area only the training group showed a significant improvement (from 77.7±4.4% to 91.7±4.8%, p<0.01). Our data indicate a significant improvement in stress myocardial perfusion in the training group after 12 months. The ischaemia is reduced not only in the target region of the leading stenosis but also in other ischaemic myocardial areas. In contrast, after PTCA stress perfusion improves only in the initially ischaemic parts of the target area. (orig.)

  15. Value of exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients with diagnostic and nondiagnostic exercise electrocardiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Segal, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    The role of exercise imaging with thallium-201 in the evaluation of patients suspected of having coronary artery disease was studied in 194 patients undergoing diagnostic coronary arteriography. Ninety-eight patients had 70 percent or more narrowing of one or more coronary vessels and 96 patients had either no or insignificant coronary artery disease. One hundren twenty-three of the 194 patients had conclusive treadmill exercise electrocardiograms (either positive or negative), and 71 had inconclusive exercise electrocardiograms. The specificity of exercise imaging (97 percent) was higher than that of exercise electrocardiograms (86 percent, p less than 0.02). The specificity of both tests combined was not significantly different from that of exercise electrocardiograms alone. The sensitivity (79 percent) and specificity (95 percent) of exercise imaging were not significantly different in patients with inconclusive exercise electrocardiograms when compared with those in patients whose exercise electrocardiograms were conclusive. These data indicate that exercise imaging is sensitive and specific in diagnosing coronary artery disease in the presence of diagnostic as well as nondiagnostic exercise electrocardiograms and that propranolol therapy does not affect the results

  16. INDUCIBLE TRANSIENT CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY VASOSPASM: A CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishulin, Aleksey; Ghandi, Sachin; Apple, Daniel; Lin, Xihui; Hu, Jonathan; Abrams, Gary W

    2017-09-27

    To report a case of inducible transient central retinal artery vasospasm with associated imaging. Observational case report. A 51-year-old man presented for outpatient follow-up for recurrent inducible transient vision loss in his right eye. He experienced an episode during examination and was found to have central retinal artery vasospasm. Fundus photography and fluorescein angiography obtained during his vasospastic attack confirmed retinal arterial vasospasm. Treatment with a calcium-channel blocker (nifedipine) has been effective in preventing recurrent attacks. Idiopathic primary vasospasm is a rare cause of transient vision loss that is difficult to confirm because of the transient nature. We obtained imaging showing the initiation and resolution of the vasospastic event. The patient was then successfully treated with a calcium-channel blocker.

  17. Beneficial effects of neuropeptide galanin on reinstatement of exercise-induced somatic and psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Biao; Fang, Penghua; Guo, Lili; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Xu, Bo; Bo, Ping; Zhang, Zhenwen

    2017-04-01

    Galanin is a versatile neuropeptide that is distinctly upregulated by exercise in exercise-related tissues. Although benefits from exercise-induced upregulation of this peptide have been identified, many issues require additional exploration. This Review summarizes the information currently available on the relationship between galanin and exercise-induced physical and psychological damage. On the one hand, body movement, exercise damage, and exercise-induced stress and pain significantly increase local and circulatory galanin levels. On the other hand, galanin plays an exercise-protective role to inhibit the flexor reflex and prevent excessive movement of skeletal muscles through enhancing response threshold and reducing acetylcholine release. Additionally, elevated galanin levels can boost repair of the exercise-induced damage in exercise-related tissues, including peripheral nerve, skeletal muscle, blood vessel, skin, bone, articulation, and ligament. Moreover, elevated galanin levels may serve as effective signals to buffer sport-induced stress and pain via inhibiting nociceptive signal transmission and enhancing pain threshold. This Review deepens our understanding of the profitable roles of galanin in exercise protection, exercise injury repair, and exercise-induced stress and pain. Galanin and its agonists may be used to develop a novel preventive and therapeutic strategy to prevent and treat exercise-induced somatic and psychological trauma. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Exercise-induced metallothionein expression in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Keller, Pernille; Keller, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    in both type I and II muscle fibres. This is the first report demonstrating that MT-I + II are significantly induced in human skeletal muscle fibres following exercise. As MT-I + II are antioxidant factors that protect various tissues during pathological conditions, the MT-I + II increases post exercise......Exercise induces free oxygen radicals that cause oxidative stress, and metallothioneins (MTs) are increased in states of oxidative stress and possess anti-apoptotic effects. We therefore studied expression of the antioxidant factors metallothionein I and II (MT-I + II) in muscle biopsies obtained...... in response to 3 h of bicycle exercise performed by healthy men and in resting controls. Both MT-I + II proteins and MT-II mRNA expression increased significantly in both type I and II muscle fibres after exercise. Moreover, 24 h after exercise the levels of MT-II mRNA and MT-I + II proteins were still highly...

  19. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Responses in the Pediatric Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Avloniti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adults demonstrate an upregulation of their pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms in response to acute exercise while systematic exercise training enhances their antioxidant capacity, thereby leading to a reduced generation of free radicals both at rest and in response to exercise stress. However, less information exists regarding oxidative stress responses and the underlying mechanisms in the pediatric population. Evidence suggests that exercise-induced redox perturbations may be valuable in order to monitor exercise-induced inflammatory responses and as such training overload in children and adolescents as well as monitor optimal growth and development. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on oxidative stress responses to acute and chronic exercise in youth. It has been documented that acute exercise induces age-specific transient alterations in both oxidant and antioxidant markers in children and adolescents. However, these responses seem to be affected by factors such as training phase, training load, fitness level, mode of exercise etc. In relation to chronic adaptation, the role of training on oxidative stress adaptation has not been adequately investigated. The two studies performed so far indicate that children and adolescents exhibit positive adaptations of their antioxidant system, as adults do. More studies are needed in order to shed light on oxidative stress and antioxidant responses, following acute exercise and training adaptations in youth. Available evidence suggests that small amounts of oxidative stress may be necessary for growth whereas the transition to adolescence from childhood may promote maturation of pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms. Available evidence also suggests that obesity may negatively affect basal and exercise-related antioxidant responses in the peripubertal period during pre- and early-puberty.

  20. Long-term facial artery catheter implantation for serial arterial blood sampling and invasive arterial blood pressure measurement in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Deborah Penteado Martins; Teixeira, Luisa Gouvêa; Canola, Paulo Aléscio; Albernaz, Raquel Mincarelli; Marques, José Antônio; Neto, José Corrêa de Lacerda

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate surgical catheter implantation in the facial artery of horses and the long-term maintenance of such arteries using heparin and ascorbic acid as filling solution. Nine horses were implanted with a polyurethane catheter. The catheters were flushed with a heparin/ascorbic acid solution every 8h and remained patent for 25 days. Arterial blood samples were collected twice a day, and one exercise test that included serial blood samples and arterial pressure recordings was performed on a treadmill. Polyurethane catheters surgically implanted in the facial artery can be kept patent by filling with a heparin/ascorbic acid solution and provide convenient invasive arterial access in horses which is suitable for use for serial blood sampling and blood pressure recordings, even during exercise on treadmill. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Exercise does not protect against MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in BDNF haploinsufficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim M Gerecke

    Full Text Available Exercise has been demonstrated to potently protect substantia nigra pars compacta (SN dopaminergic neurons from 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. One mechanism proposed to account for this neuroprotection is the upregulation of neurotrophic factors. Several neurotrophic factors, including Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF, have been shown to upregulate in response to exercise. In order to determine if exercise-induced neuroprotection is dependent upon BDNF, we compared the neuroprotective effects of voluntary exercise in mice heterozygous for the BDNF gene (BDNF+/- with strain-matched wild-type (WT mice. Stereological estimates of SNpc DA neurons from WT mice allowed 90 days exercise via unrestricted running demonstrated complete protection against the MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. However, BDNF+/- mice allowed 90 days of unrestricted exercise were not protected from MPTP-induced SNpc DA neuron loss. Proteomic analysis comparing SN and striatum from 90 day exercised WT and BDNF+/- mice showed differential expression of proteins related to energy regulation, intracellular signaling and trafficking. These results suggest that a full genetic complement of BDNF is critical for the exercise-induced neuroprotection of SNpc DA neurons.

  2. Food-Dependent, Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis: Diagnosis and Management in the Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldweg, Anna M

    Food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis is a disorder in which anaphylaxis develops most predictably during exercise, when exercise takes place within a few hours of ingesting a specific food. IgE to that food should be demonstrable. It is the combination of the food and exercise that precipitates attacks, whereas the food and exercise are each tolerated independently. Recently, it was demonstrated that exercise is not essential for the development of symptoms, and that if enough of the culprit food is ingested, often with additional augmentation factors, such as alcohol or acetylsalicylic acid, symptoms can be induced at rest in the challenge setting. Thus, food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis appears to be more correctly characterized as a food allergy syndrome in which symptoms develop only in the presence of various augmentation factors, with exercise being the primary one. However, additional factors are not usually present when the patient exercises normally, so ongoing investigation is needed into the physiologic and cellular changes that occur during exercise to facilitate food-induced anaphylaxis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation-induced carotid artery atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujral, Dorothy M.; Chahal, Navtej; Senior, Roxy; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Carotid arteries frequently receive significant doses of radiation as collateral structures in the treatment of malignant diseases. Vascular injury following treatment may result in carotid artery stenosis (CAS) and increased risk of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA). This systematic review examines the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on the carotid arteries, looking at the incidence of stroke in patients receiving neck radiotherapy. In addition, we consider possible surrogate endpoints such as CAS and carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT) and summarise the evidence for radiation-induced carotid atherosclerosis. Materials and methods: From 853 references, 34 articles met the criteria for inclusion in this systematic review. These papers described 9 studies investigating the incidence of stroke/TIA in irradiated patients, 11 looking at CAS, and 14 examining CIMT. Results: The majority of studies utilised suboptimally-matched controls for each endpoint. The relative risk of stroke in irradiated patients ranged from 1.12 in patients with breast cancer to 5.6 in patients treated for head and neck cancer. The prevalence of CAS was increased by 16–55%, with the more modest increase seen in a study using matched controls. CIMT was increased in irradiated carotid arteries by 18–40%. Only two matched-control studies demonstrated a significant increase in CIMT of 36% and 22% (p = 0.003 and <0.001, respectively). Early prospective data demonstrated a significant increase in CIMT in irradiated arteries at 1 and 2 years after RT (p < 0.001 and <0.01, respectively). Conclusions: The incidence of stroke was significantly increased in patients receiving RT to the neck. There was a consistent difference in CAS and CIMT between irradiated and unirradiated carotid arteries. Future studies should optimise control groups

  4. Detection of coronary artery disease with exercise 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT in patients with atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Minfu; Guo Xinhua; He Zuoxiang; Tou Kefei; Yang Yuejin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the ability of exercise myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods: Fifty-eight consecutive patients with AF during symptom-limited exercise 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) SPECT imaging were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent coronary angiography within an interval of 90 d. Results: The overall diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of exercise 99 Tc m -MIBI SPECT were 60% (9/15), 88% (38/43) and 81% (47/58), respectively. Among patients without valvular disease, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 60% (9/15) and 96% (22/23). The diagnostic accuracy was 80% (16/20) in patients with valvular heart disease. Conclusion: In patients with AF during exercise test, exercise MPI has a moderate sensitivity and an excellent specificity in detection of CAD to those without valvular disease, and has a high diagnostic accuracy in patients with valvular heart disease. (authors)

  5. Hypoxia compounds exercise-induced free radical formation in humans; partitioning contributions from the cerebral and femoral circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Damian M; Rasmussen, Peter; Evans, Kevin A

    2018-01-01

    This study examined to what extent the human cerebral and femoral circulation contribute to free radical formation during basal and exercise-induced responses to hypoxia. Healthy participants (5♂, 5♀) were randomly assigned single-blinded to normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (10% O2) trials...... hypoxia (P free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation subsequent to inadequate antioxidant defense. This was pronounced during exercise across the femoral circulation in proportion to the increase in local O2 uptake (r = -0.397 to -0.459, P = 0.037 to 0...... with measurements taken at rest and 30min after cycling at 70% of maximal power output in hypoxia and equivalent relative and absolute intensities in normoxia. Blood was sampled from the brachial artery (a), internal jugular and femoral veins (v) for non-enzymatic antioxidants (HPLC), ascorbate radical (A...

  6. Exercise reverses metabolic syndrome in high-fat diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, Sabeur; Meziri, Fayçal; Devaux, Sylvie; Berthelot, Alain; Touyz, Rhian M; Laurant, Pascal

    2011-03-01

    Chronic consumption of a high-fat diet induces obesity. We investigated whether exercise would reverse the cardiometabolic disorders associated with obesity without it being necessary to change from a high- to normal-fat diet. Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a high-fat (HFD) or control diet (CD) for 12 wk. HFD rats were then divided into four groups: sedentary HFD (HFD-S), exercise trained (motor treadmill for 12 wk) HFD (HFD-Ex), modified diet (HFD to CD; HF/CD-S), and exercise trained with modified diet (HF/CD-Ex). Cardiovascular risk parameters associated with metabolic syndrome were measured, and contents of aortic Akt, phospho-Akt at Ser (473), total endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and phospho-eNOS at Ser (1177) were determined by Western blotting. Chronic consumption of HFD induced a metabolic syndrome. Exercise and dietary modifications reduced adiposity, improved glucose and insulin levels and plasma lipid profile, and exerted an antihypertensive effect. Exercise was more effective than dietary modification in improving plasma levels of thiobarbituric acid-reacting substance and in correcting the endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine and insulin. Furthermore, independent of the diet used, exercise increased Akt and eNOS phosphorylation. Metabolic syndrome induced by HFD is reversed by exercise and diet modification. It is demonstrated that exercise training induces these beneficial effects without the requirement for dietary modification, and these beneficial effects may be mediated by shear stress-induced Akt/eNOS pathway activation. Thus, exercise may be an effective strategy to reverse almost all the atherosclerotic risk factors linked to obesity, particularly in the vasculature.

  7. Brachial Artery Flow-mediated Dilation Following Exercise with Augmented Oscillatory and Retrograde Shear Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Blair D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute doses of elevated retrograde shear rate (SR appear to be detrimental to endothelial function in resting humans. However, retrograde shear increases during moderate intensity exercise which also enhances post-exercise endothelial function. Since SR patterns differ with the modality of exercise, it is important to determine if augmented retrograde SR during exercise influences post-exercise endothelial function. This study tested the hypothesis that (1 increased doses of retrograde SR in the brachial artery during lower body supine cycle ergometer exercise would attenuate post-exercise flow-mediated dilation (FMD in a dose-dependent manner, and (2 antioxidant vitamin C supplementation would prevent the attenuated post-exercise FMD response. Methods Twelve men participated in four randomized exercise sessions (90 W for 20 minutes on separate days. During three of the sessions, one arm was subjected to increased oscillatory and retrograde SR using three different forearm cuff pressures (20, 40, 60 mmHg (contralateral arm served as the control and subjects ingested placebo capsules prior to exercise. A fourth session with 60 mmHg cuff pressure was performed with 1 g of vitamin C ingested prior to the session. Results Post-exercise FMD following the placebo conditions were lower in the cuffed arm versus the control arm (arm main effect: P P > 0.05. Following vitamin C treatment, post-exercise FMD in the cuffed and control arm increased from baseline (P P > 0.05. Conclusions These results indicate that augmented oscillatory and retrograde SR in non-working limbs during lower body exercise attenuates post-exercise FMD without an evident dose–response in the range of cuff pressures evaluated. Vitamin C supplementation prevented the attenuation of FMD following exercise with augmented oscillatory and retrograde SR suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to the adverse effects of oscillatory and

  8. Self-selected music-induced reduction of perceived exertion during moderate-intensity exercise does not interfere with post-exercise improvements in inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Daichi; Tsukamoto, Hayato; Suga, Tadashi; Takenaka, Saki; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Isaka, Tadao

    2018-05-26

    Acute aerobic exercise improves inhibitory control (IC). This improvement is often associated with increases in perceived exertion during exercise. However, listening to music during aerobic exercise mitigates an exercise-induced increase in perceived exertion. Thus, it is hypothesized that such effects of music may interfere with exercise-induced improvements in IC. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of music on post-exercise IC improvements that were induced by moderate-intensity exercise. Fifteen healthy young men performed cycle ergometer exercise with music or non-music. The exercise was performed using a moderate-intensity of 60% of VO 2 peak for 30 min. The music condition was performed while listening to self-selected music. The non-music condition involved no music. To evaluate IC, the Stroop task was administered before exercise, immediately after exercise, and during the 30-min post-exercise recovery period. The rate of perceived exertion immediately before moderate-intensity exercise completed was significantly lower in music condition than in non-music condition. The IC significantly improved immediately after exercise and during the post-exercise recovery period compared to before exercise in both music and non-music conditions. The post-exercise IC improvements did not significantly differ between the two conditions. These findings indicate that self-selected music-induced mitigation of the increase in perceived exertion during moderate-intensity exercise dose not interfere with exercise-induced improvements in IC. Therefore, we suggest that listening to music may be a beneficial strategy in mitigating the increase in perceived exertion during aerobic exercise without decreasing the positive effects on IC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute Effects of Exercise Mode on Arterial Stiffness and Wave Reflection in Healthy Young Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris R. Pierce

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: This systematic review and meta-analysis quantified the effect of acute exercise mode on arterial stiffness and wave reflection measures including carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV, augmentation index (AIx, and heart rate corrected AIx (AIx75.Methods: Using standardized terms, database searches from inception until 2017 identified 45 studies. Eligible studies included acute aerobic and/or resistance exercise in healthy adults, pre- and post-intervention measurements or change values, and described their study design. Data from included studies were analyzed and reported in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions and PRISMA guidelines. Meta-analytical data were reported via forest plots using absolute differences with 95% confidence intervals with the random effects model accounting for between-study heterogeneity. Reporting bias was assessed via funnel plots and, individual studies were evaluated for bias using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. A modified PEDro Scale was applied to appraise methodological concerns inherent to included studies.Results: Acute aerobic exercise failed to change cf-PWV (mean difference: 0.00 ms−1 [95% confidence interval: −0.11, 0.11], p = 0.96, significantly reduced AIx (−4.54% [−7.05, −2.04], p = 0.0004 and significantly increased AIx75 (3.58% [0.56, 6.61], p = 0.02. Contrastingly, acute resistance exercise significantly increased cf-PWV (0.42 ms−1 [0.17, 0.66], p = 0.0008, did not change AIx (1.63% [−3.83, 7.09], p = 0.56, and significantly increased AIx75 (15.02% [8.71, 21.33], p < 0.00001. Significant heterogeneity was evident within all comparisons except cf-PWV following resistance exercise, and several methodological concerns including low applicability of exercise protocols and lack of control intervention were identified.Conclusions: Distinct arterial stiffness and wave reflection responses were identified

  10. Increased pulmonary artery pressures during exercise are related to persistent tricuspid regurgitation after atrial septal defect closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meester, Pieter; Van De Bruaene, Alexander; Herijgers, Paul; Voigt, Jens-Uwe; Vanhees, Luc; Budts, Werner

    2013-08-01

    Although closure of an atrial septal defect type secundum often normalizes right heart dimensions and pressures, mild tricuspid insufficiency might persist. This study aimed at (1) identification of determinants explaining the persistence of tricuspid insufficiency after atrial septal defect closure, and (2) evaluation of functional capacity of patients with persistent mild tricuspid insufficiency. Twenty-five consecutive patients (age 42+17 y) were included from the outpatient clinic of congenital heart disease at the University Hospitals of Leuven. All underwent transthoracic echocardiography, semi-supine bicycle stress echocardiography and cardio-pulmonary exercise testing. Six patients (24%) had mild tricuspid insufficiency (2/4) compared to 19 patients (76%) with no or minimal tricuspid insufficiency ( 1/4) as assessed by semi-quantitative colour Doppler echocardiography. Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests were performed where applicable. Patients with persistent mild tricuspid insufficiency were significantly older than those with no or minimal tricuspid insufficiency (P = 0.042). At rest, no differences in right heart configuration, mean pulmonary artery pressure or right ventricular function were found. At peak exercise, mean pulmonary artery pressure was significantly higher in patients with mild persistent tricuspid insufficiency (P = 0.026). Peak oxygen uptake was significantly lower in patients with mild persistent tricuspid insufficiency (P = 0.019). Mild tricuspid insufficiency after atrial septal defect repair occurs more frequently in older patients and in patients with higher mean pulmonary artery pressure at peak exercise. In patients with mild tricuspid insufficiency, functional capacity was more reduced. Mild tricuspid insufficiency could be a marker of subclinical persistent pressure load on the right ventricle.

  11. Effects of nicorandil on coronary collateral circulation depend on the donor arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Shigeo; Ogawara, Shigeko; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Igawa, Masayuki; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Inada, Mihoe; Korenaga, Masayoshi; Hiroe, Michiaki; Marumo, Fumiaki.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of nicorandil on coronary collateral circulation during exercise-induced ischemia were compared between the different donor arteries in 13 patients with effort angina, 7 with complete obstruction of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with well-developed collateral vessels from the right coronary artery (RCA) (LAD group), and 6 with complete occlusion of the RCA (segment 2-3) with well-developed collateral vessels from the LAD (RCA group). Initial percentage thallium (%Tl) uptake (thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography) and washout rate were measured in the anterior, septal and posterior regions during ergometer exercise. The submaximal treadmill exercise test was also performed using a cardiopulmonary monitoring system to measure Vo 2 at anaerobic threshold (AT). After the controls were obtained, nicorandil (15 mg/day) was administered for 4 weeks, during which ergometer exercise and treadmill exercise tests were carried out repeatedly. A significant improvement of initial %Tl uptake on exercise was observed in the LAD group with nicorandil therapy, but no improvement was shown in the RCA group. The AT significantly increased after nicorandil treatment in the LAD group (13.9±0.38 → 16.8±1.18 ml/min/kg), reflecting the improvement of cardiac function through the increased collateral flow. However, in the RCA group, it remained unchanged, suggesting no improvement of cardiac function. Nicorandil was effective to increase collateral flow from the RCA, but ineffective on that from the LAD. Nicorandil is an effective coronary dilator and is reported to affect both large and small coronary arteries. The effect on the collateral circulation is dependent on the donor artery supplying different areas. The vasodilator effect of nicorandil is mainly on the LAD, which is large enough to supply blood to a wider area of the heart, rather than the RCA. (author)

  12. Relationship Between Adenosine - Induced ST Segment Depression During 99mTc-MIBI Scintigraphy and The Severity of Coronary Artery Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jung Ah; Choi, Jung Il; Kwak, Dong Suk

    1994-01-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation in conjunction with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy has become an alternative to dynamic exercise test for the diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease, especially in patients who are unable to perform adequate exercise. Dipyridamole and adenosine have been used for pharmacologic stress testing with myocardial perfusion imaging. Adenosine is a potent, coronary vasodilator with rapid onset of action, short half life, near maximal coronary vasodilation and less serious side effects. ST segment depression has been reported in about 7-15% of patients with coronary artery disease receiving dipyridamole in conjunction with myocardial perfusion imaging. The exact cause and clinical significance are not known. In order to evaluate the relationship between adenosine-induced ST segment depression during 99m Tc-MIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and the severity of coronary artery disease, we performed 99m -MIBI imaging after intravenous infusion of adenosine in 120 patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Of the 120 patients, 28 also performed coronary angiography. There were 24 patients with ST segment depression during 99m Tc-MIIBI scintigraphy and 96 patients without ST segment depression. Adenosine was infused intravenously at a dose of 0.14 mg/kg per minute for 6 minutes and 99 MmTc-MIB1 was injected at 3 minute. We then compared the hemodynamic changes, side effects, scintigraphic and angiographic findings. Heart rate increased 90 ± 19 beats/minute in the group with ST depression compared with 80 ±16 beats/minute in the group without ST depression(p 9m Tc-MIBI images were abnormal in 23(96%) patients with ST segment depression and 66(69%) patients without ST segment depression(p 99m Tc-MIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with intravenous adenosine is related to the severity of coronary artery disease.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of myocardial perfusion SPECT for diagnosis of coronary artery disease in Korea: comparison with exercise ECG and coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Keon Wook; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Jang, Myung Jin; Lee, Myoung Mook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2000-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness of myocardial SPECT for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease was investigated considering the present and amended costs of myocardial SPECT and exercise ECG in Korea. Four diagnostic tactics such as 1) coronary angiography (CAG) after exercise ECG, 2) CAG after myocardial SPECT, 3) direct CAG, and 4) CAG after myocardial SPECT following exercise ECG were chosen. Costs were calculated using the present costs of various tests and effects represented by Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) were estimated. Difference of QALY (ΔQALY) was calculated by subtracting QALY of diagnosed/treated cases from QALY of undiagnosed cases. Cost/ΔQALY was calculated and compared between four different tactics according to pre-test probability. When pre-test probability was equal to or larger than 0.6, direct CAG was the most cost-effective. When pre-test probability was between 0.2 and 0.6, CAG after myocardial SPECT following exercise ECG was the most cost-effective. CAG after myocardial SPECT was the second most cost-effective. Cost-effectiveness was similar when the costs of exercise ECG were doubled or quadrupled. CAG after exercise ECG was always the least cost-effective. Myocardial SPECT with or without preceding exercise ECG was the most cost-effective method to diagnose coronary artery disease in the present or expected amended cost system

  14. Moderate exercise prevents neurodegeneration in D-galactose-induced aging mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available D-galactose has been widely used in aging research because of its efficacy in inducing senescence and accelerating aging in animal models. The present study investigated the benefits of exercise for preventing neurodegeneration, such as synaptic plasticity, spatial learning and memory abilities, in mouse models of aging. D-galactose-induced aging mice were administered daily subcutaneous injections of D-galactose at the base of the neck for 10 consecutive weeks. Then, the mice were subjected to exercise training by running on a treadmill for 6 days a week. Shortened escape latency in a Morris water maze test indicated that exercise improved learning and memory in aging mice. The ameliorative changes were likely induced by an upregulation of Bcl-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, the repression of apoptosis factors such as Fas and Bax, and an increase in the activity of glucose transporters-1 and 4. The data suggest moderate exercise may retard or inhibit neurodegeneration in D-galactose-induced aging mice.

  15. Perivascular delivery of Notch 1 siRNA inhibits injury-induced arterial remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M Redmond

    Full Text Available To determine the efficacy of perivascular delivery of Notch 1 siRNA in preventing injury-induced arterial remodeling.Carotid artery ligation was performed to induce arterial remodeling. After 14 days, morphometric analysis confirmed increased vSMC growth and subsequent media thickening and neointimal formation. Laser capture microdissection, quantitative qRT-PCR and immunoblot analysis of medial tissue revealed a significant increase in Notch1 receptor and notch target gene, Hrt 1 and 2 expression in the injured vessels. Perivascular delivery of Notch 1 siRNA by pluronic gel inhibited the injury-induced increase in Notch 1 receptor and target gene expression when compared to scrambled siRNA controls while concomitantly reducing media thickening and neointimal formation to pre-injury, sham-operated levels. Selective Notch 1 knockdown also reversed the injury-induced inhibition of pro-apoptotic Bax expression while decreasing injury-induced anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL expression to sham-operated control levels. In parallel experiments, proliferative cyclin levels, as measured by PCNA expression, were reversed to sham-operated control levels following selective Notch 1 knockdown.These results suggest that injury-induced arterial remodeling can be successfully inhibited by localized perivascular delivery of Notch 1 siRNA.

  16. An increase in the number of admitted patients with exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalborg, Christian; Rød-Larsen, Cecilie; Leiro, Ingjerd; Aasebø, Willy

    2016-10-01

    Rhabdomyolysis may lead to serious complications, and treatment is both time-consuming and costly. The condition can be caused by many factors, including intense exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the number of hospitalisations due to exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis has changed in recent years. We describe the disease course in hospitalised patients, and compare disease course in individuals with exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis and rhabdomyolysis due to other causes. The study is a systematic review of medical records from Akershus University Hospital for the years 2008 and 2011 – 14. All hospitalised patients with diagnostic codes M62.8, M62.9 and T79.6 and creatine kinase levels > 5 000 IU/l were included. The cause of the rhabdomyolysis was recorded in addition to patient characteristics and the results of various laboratory tests. Of 161 patients who were hospitalised with rhabdomyolysis during the study period, 44 cases (27  %) were classified as exercise-induced. In 2008 there were no admissions due to exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis; in 2011 and 2012 there were six and four admissions respectively, while in 2014 there were 22. This gives an estimated incidence of 0.8/100 000 in 2012 and 4.6/100 000 in 2014. Strength-training was the cause of hospitalisation in 35 patients (80  % of the exercise-induced cases). Three patients (7  % of the exercise-induced cases) had transient stage 1 kidney injury, but there were no cases with stage 2 or stage 3 injury. By comparison, 52  % of patients with rhabdomyolysis due to another cause had kidney injury, of which 28  % was stage 2 or 3. The number of persons hospitalised with exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis has increased four-fold from 2011 to 2014, possibly due to changes in exercise habits in the population. None of the patients with exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis had serological signs of kidney injury upon hospital discharge.

  17. Role of exercise thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in predicting prognosis in suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koss, J.H.; Kobren, S.M.; Grunwald, A.M.; Bodenheimer, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    While exercise thallium imaging has improved sensitivity and specificity for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD), its predictive value for morbid cardiac events is unclear. Of 532 consecutive patients who underwent exercise thallium imaging, follow-up was complete in 515 (97%) after an average of 36 months (range 31 to 48). Two hundred six patients had an abnormal exercise thallium response and 309 had a normal response. Twenty morbid cardiac events occurred (13 deaths and 7 acute myocardial infarctions [AMI]). Of the 13 patients who died, 12 had abnormal thallium results. Overall, 5.8% of the patients with abnormal thallium results died, in contrast to 0.3% of patients with normal results. Of the 7 patients who had a nonfatal AMI, 3 had abnormal exercise thallium results. Moreover, similar proportions of patients (1.4% and 1.3%) with normal and abnormal exercise thallium results had nonfatal AMI. Presence or absence of pathologic Q waves and inclusion of exercise electrocardiographic results did not significantly alter the results. Thus, although a normal exercise thallium response significantly reduces the likelihood of cardiovascular death, its predictive value for nonfatal AMI is limited. Moreover, the relatively low event rate for patients with a positive exercise thallium response further limits its prognostic value

  18. Multistage treadmill exercise testing with a multiple unipolar precordial lead system in the evaluation of effort angina pectoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiki, Kazuhito; Tsuzuki, Masato; Kawai, Naoki; Kondo, Teruo; Sotobata, Iwao

    1984-01-01

    Sixty-one patients who had angina pectoris without prior myocardial infarction and 24 healthy men were studied by multistage treadmill exercise testing with 20 unipolar leads covering the left anterolateral hemithorax. Exercise-induced ST- segment changes were compared with the results of stress thallium-201 myocardial images and also with coronary arteriographic fingings. All patients had more than 75% narrowing of at least one major coronary artery. Fifty-one of the 61 patients had diagnostically significant exercise-induced ischemic ST-segment depression (sensitivity 83.6%) and all of the 24 controls showed a negative exercise test (specificity 100%). The exercise-induced ST-segment depressions appeared most often in the area just below V 5 . The number of leads with ST-segment depression and the sum of the depths of ST-segment depressions significantly correlated with the number of regions-of-interest of stress-induced hypoperfusion of myocardial scintigraphy (r = 0.62 and r = 0.61, respectively). These parameters increased as the number of diseased coronary arteries increased, but were not influenced by the presence or absence of coronary collateral circulation. The maximum depth of ST-segment depression was greater in triple vessel disease than in single or double vessel disease (p 5 . (J.P.N.)

  19. Purinergic 2X receptors play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in rats with peripheral artery insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Audrey J; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kaufman, Marc P

    2014-02-01

    Purinergic 2X (P2X) receptors on the endings of thin fiber afferents have been shown to play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in cats. In this study, we attempted to extend this finding to decerebrated, unanesthetized rats whose femoral arteries were either freely perfused or were ligated 72 h before the start of the experiment. We first established that our dose of pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS; 10 mg/kg), a P2X receptor antagonist, attenuated the pressor response to α,β-methylene ATP (10 μg/kg), a P2X receptor agonist. We then compared the exercise pressor reflex before and after infusing PPADS into the arterial supply of the hindlimb muscles that were statically contracted. In rats with freely perfused femoral arteries, the peak pressor responses to contraction were not significantly attenuated by PPADS (before PPADS: 19 ± 2 mmHg, 13 min after PPADS: 17 ± 2 mmHg, and 25 min after PPADS: 17 ± 3 mmHg). Likewise, the cardioaccelerator and renal sympathetic nerve responses were not significantly attenuated. In contrast, we found that in rats whose femoral arteries were ligated PPADS significantly attenuated the peak pressor responses to contraction (before PPADS: 37 ± 5 mmHg, 13 min after PPADS: 27 ± 6 mmHg, and 25 min after PPADS: 25 ± 5 mmHg; P reflex in rats whose femoral arteries were ligated but play only a minimal role in evoking the reflex in rats whose femoral arteries were freely perfused.

  20. Coupling between the blood lactate-to-pyruvate ratio and MCA Vmean at the onset of exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Madsen, Camilla A; Nielsen, Henning B

    2009-01-01

    Activation-induced increase in cerebral blood flow is coupled to enhanced metabolic activity, maybe with brain tissue redox state and oxygen tension as key modulators. To evaluate this hypothesis at the onset of exercise in humans, blood was sampled at 0.1 to 0.2 Hz from the radial artery and right...... internal jugular vein, while middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) was recorded. Both the arterial and venous lactate-to-pyruvate ratio increased after 10 s (P capillary...... state and oxygenation as potential modulators of an increase in cerebral blood flow at the onset of exercise....

  1. Role of secretory phospholipase A(2) in rhythmic contraction of pulmonary arteries of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Yoshiyuki; Saito-Tanji, Maki; Morikawa, Yuki; Kamataki, Akihisa; Sawai, Takashi; Nakayama, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Excessive stretching of the vascular wall in accordance with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induces a variety of pathogenic cellular events in the pulmonary arteries. We previously reported that indoxam, a selective inhibitor for secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), blocked the stretch-induced contraction of rabbit pulmonary arteries by inhibition of untransformed prostaglandin H(2) (PGH(2)) production. The present study was undertaken to investigate involvement of sPLA(2) and untransformed PGH(2) in the enhanced contractility of pulmonary arteries of experimental PAH in rats. Among all the known isoforms of sPLA(2), sPLA(2)-X transcript was most significantly augmented in the pulmonary arteries of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension (MCT-PHR). The pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR frequently showed two types of spontaneous contraction in response to stretch; 27% showed rhythmic contraction, which was sensitive to indoxam and SC-560 (selective COX-1 inhibitor), but less sensitive to NS-398 (selective COX-2 inhibitor); and 47% showed sustained incremental tension (tonic contraction), which was insensitive to indoxam and SC-560, but sensitive to NS-398 and was attenuated to 45% of the control. Only the rhythmically contracting pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR produced a substantial amount of untransformed PGH(2), which was abolished by indoxam. These results suggest that sPLA(2)-mediated PGH(2) synthesis plays an important role in the rhythmic contraction of pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR.

  2. Oxygen uptake kinetics during and after exercise are useful markers of coronary artery disease in patients with exercise electrocardiography suggesting myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Akihiko; Ohkoshi, Nobuyuki; Kawara, Tokuhiro; Aizawa, Tadanori; Itoh, Haruki; Maeda, Tomoko; Osada, Naohiko; Omiya, Kazuto; Wasserman, K.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine if the slowed exercise oxygen uptake (VO 2 ) kinetics, which is developed by myocardial ischemia, would be accompanied by delayed recovery VO 2 kinetics in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Thirty-seven patients with significant ST depression during treadmill exercise underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing with cycle ergometer. Measurements performed are the ratios of change in increase in oxygen (O 2 ) uptake relative to increase in work rate (ΔVO 2 /ΔWR) across anaerobic threshold (AT) and 1 mm ST depression point (ST-dep), the time constants of VO 2 during recovery (T 1/2 VO 2 ), stress radio-isotope scintigraphy and coronary angiography. Patients were divided into CAD positive (CAD+) and CAD negative (CAD-) groups, based on coronary angiography. In CAD+, ΔVO 2 /ΔWR decreased above AT and ST-dep, in contrast to CAD- patients. The T 1/2 VO 2 in CAD+ (103.1±13.0 s) was greater than that of CAD- (76.5±8.7 s) and showed negative correlations to the ratios of ΔVO 2 /ΔWR across AT and ST-dep. These parameters improved in the patients who underwent coronary bypass surgery. Exercise and recovery VO 2 kinetics were slowed when myocardial ischemia was provoked by exercise. Measurement of exercise and recovery VO 2 kinetics improve the accuracy of the exercise electrocardiogram diagnosis of CAD. (author)

  3. Radiation-induced bilateral common carotid artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Nakagawa, Yoku; Tashiro, Kunio; Abe, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    A case of radiation-induced bilateral common carotid artery stenosis is reported. This 60 years old housewife was hospitalized in 1982 because of sudden onset of mild left hemiparesis. Twenty-five years ago, she underwent radiation therapy of approximately 5,000 rads to the anterior cervical region because of thyroid cancer. Angiograms in 1982 revealed bilateral common carotid artery stenosis, especially in the right common carotid artery, the legion of which were included within the field of radiation performed in 1952. Right thromboendarterectomy was performed in 1983. At operation, slight periarterial fibrosis with calcified arteriosclerotic change was found, and dissection between the thickened intima and the media was not so difficult. Histological change of resected thromboendarterium was similar to the one observed in the pure arteriosclerotic disease. (author)

  4. The CSF and arterial to internal jugular venous hormonal differences during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Ott, Peter; Dela, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    the brain (a-v diff) of hormones that could influence its carbohydrate uptake (n= 9). In addition, neuroendocrine activity and a potential uptake of hormones via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were assessed by lumbar puncture postexercise and at rest (n= 6). Exercise increased the arterial concentration...... of noradrenaline and adrenaline, but there was no cerebral uptake. However, following exercise CSF noradrenaline was 1.4 (0.73-5.5) nmol l(-1), and higher than at rest, 0.3 (0.19-1.84) nmol l(-1) (P ...)(+) and its a-v diff, which increased from 1 (-12 to 5) to 17 (5-41) micromol l(-1) (P CSF NH(4)(+) was reduced to 7 (0-10) versus 11 (7-16) micromol l(-1) (P

  5. Exercise-induced circulating extracellular vesicles protect against cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yihua; Xu, Tianzhao; Lv, Dongchao; Yu, Pujiao; Xu, Jiahong; Che, Lin; Das, Avash; Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vassilios; Ghiran, Ionita; Shah, Ravi; Li, Yongqin; Zhang, Yuhui; Das, Saumya; Xiao, Junjie

    2017-07-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) serve an important function as mediators of intercellular communication. Exercise is protective for the heart, although the signaling mechanisms that mediate this cardioprotection have not been fully elucidated. Here using nano-flow cytometry, we found a rapid increase in plasma EVs in human subjects undergoing exercise stress testing. We subsequently identified that serum EVs were increased by ~1.85-fold in mice after 3-week swimming. Intramyocardial injection of equivalent quantities of EVs from exercised mice and non-exercised controls provided similar protective effects against acute ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in mice. However, injection of exercise-induced EVs in a quantity equivalent to the increase seen with exercise (1.85 swim group) significantly enhanced the protective effect. Similarly, treatment with exercise-induced increased EVs provided additional anti-apoptotic effect in H 2 O 2 -treated H9C2 cardiomyocytes mediated by the activation of ERK1/2 and HSP27 signaling. Finally, by treating H9C2 cells with insulin-like growth factor-1 to mimic exercise stimulus in vitro, we found an increased release of EVs from cardiomyocytes associated with ALIX and RAB35 activation. Collectively, our results show that exercise-induced increase in circulating EVs enhances the protective effects of endogenous EVs against cardiac I/R injury. Exercise-derived EVs might serve as a potent therapy for myocardial injury in the future.

  6. Thallium - 201 miocardial perfusion scintigraphy in patients with mitral valve prolapse, with and without coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, A.G. de; Sousa, J.E.M.R.; Thom, A.F.; Martins, L.R.F.; Meneghelo, R.S.; Pimentel Filho, W.A.; Marioni Filho, H.; Gimenes, V.M.L.; Pontes Junior, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty patients with precordial pain and mitral valve prolapse diagnosed by cineangiography and M-mode echocardiography were submitted to Thallium-201 myocardial stress perfusion scintillography. They were divided into two groups: group I - eighteen patients with mitral valve prolapse and normal coronary arteries, of which ten presented positive exercise stress test (55.6%); eight patients had a negative exercise test. Thallium-201 myocardial stress perfusion scintillagraphy was normal in 14 (77.8%) patients, and four with positive stress perfursion scintillography, (three with inferior perfusion defects and one with a lateral one); group II - twelve patients with mitral valve prolapse and severe coronary artery disease (stenosis >= 60% in at least one main vessel of the coronary circulation), of which nine presented positive exercise stress test (75%) and three negative. Thallium-201 exercise myocardial perfusion scintillography was abnormal in nine (75%), six with stress induced ischemia and three with resting defect. Myocardial perfusion scintillography with Thallium-201 was more sensitive to detect the presence of coronary artery disease in patients with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) than the exercise stress test in spite of the fact that a small number of patients (22%) with MVP and normal coronary arteries exhibited abnormal myocardial stress perfusion during scintillography. (Author) [pt

  7. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Barreto, André Sales; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos [Departamento de Fisiologia - Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Oliveira, Antônio Cesar Cabral de; Wichi, Rogério Brandão [Departamento de Educação Física - UFS, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana, E-mail: marciorvsantos@bol.com.br [Departamento de Fisiologia - Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

  8. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Mendonça Mota

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. Objectives: The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8; sedentary diabetic (n = 8; and trained diabetic (n = 8. Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. Results: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2% and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3% without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05 in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05 in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Conclusions: Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

  9. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Barreto, André Sales; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; Oliveira, Antônio Cesar Cabral de; Wichi, Rogério Brandão; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2014-01-01

    Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats

  10. Exacerbation of Brain Injury by Post-Stroke Exercise Is Contingent Upon Exercise Initiation Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengwu Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that post-stroke physical rehabilitation may reduce morbidity. The effectiveness of post-stroke exercise, however, appears to be contingent upon exercise initiation. This study assessed the hypothesis that very early exercise exacerbates brain injury, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and promotes energy failure. A total of 230 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery (MCA occlusion for 2 h, and randomized into eight groups, including two sham injury control groups, three non-exercise and three exercise groups. Exercise was initiated after 6 h, 24 h and 3 days of reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after completion of exercise (and at corresponding time points in non-exercise controls, infarct volumes and apoptotic cell death were examined. Early brain oxidative metabolism was quantified by examining ROS, ATP and NADH levels 0.5 h after completion of exercise. Furthermore, protein expressions of angiogenic growth factors were measured in order to determine whether post-stroke angiogenesis played a role in rehabilitation. As expected, ischemic stroke resulted in brain infarction, apoptotic cell death and ROS generation, and diminished NADH and ATP production. Infarct volumes and apoptotic cell death were enhanced (p < 0.05 by exercise that was initiated after 6 h of reperfusion, but decreased by late exercise (24 h, 3 days. This exacerbated brain injury at 6 h was associated with increased ROS levels (p < 0.05, and decreased (p < 0.05 NADH and ATP levels. In conclusion, very early exercise aggravated brain damage, and early exercise-induced energy failure with ROS generation may underlie the exacerbation of brain injury. These results shed light on the manner in which exercise initiation timing may affect post-stroke rehabilitation.

  11. Myocardial perfusion after prolonged submaximal exercise in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flotats, A.; Mena, E.; Camacho, V.; Tembl, A.; Hernandez, M.A.; Estorch, M.; Carrio, I.; Serra-Grima, R.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Exercise training in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) has established benefits. We assessed myocardial perfusion after submaximal but prolonged exercise in patients with CAD, who were enrolled in supervised exercise rehabilitation programs. Material and Methods: Nine patients with CAD enrolled in supervised exercise rehabilitation programs (7 men, 2 women; mean age 54±9 years), 7 with prior AMI and 2 with re-vascularized (CABG) multiple vessel disease, were encouraged to walk/run actively around the perimeter of our Hospital during the annual social sporting event organised in our Institution. Patients were studied by means of perfusion Tc-99m tetrofosmin SPECT imaging after prolonged exercise and at rest (gated SPECT), for two consecutive years. All patients remained symptom free during this interval period. Quantitative analysis was performed dividing polar map images in 13 segments. Tracer activity 9% in the resting image. The analysis was focused on those segments showing perfusion defects. Results: No symptoms other than fatigue were registered during prolonged exercise (range 1-2 hr). There were no significant differences in distance covered (7,462±3,031 m vs. 8,456±2,998 m), heart rate (92±11 bpm vs. 85±13 bpm) and rate-pressure product at the end of exercise (10,804±2,467 vs. 10,403±2,955) or gated SPECT calculated LVEF (44%±19 vs. 46%±20) between the two consecutive annual sporting events. Tracer activity in segments with perfusion defects did not significantly differ between both events. Overall agreement between both examinations regarding patient classification as having scar/ischemia was 77% (kappa=0.49). There was one patient who showed partial reversibility in three segments, consistent with mild anteroapical ischemia, only in the first examination. On the other hand, another patient showed reversibility in one segment (medium septum), only in the second examination, when he covered a distance 1.3 times superior. Conclusions

  12. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriacou, P A; Shafqat, K; Pal, S K

    2007-01-01

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO 2 sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures. Both pulse

  13. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriacou, P. A.; Shafqat, K.; Pal, S. K.

    2007-10-01

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO2 sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures. Both pulse

  14. Systemic Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia Following Isometric Exercise Reduces Conditioned Pain Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsouhibani, Ali; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Hoeger Bement, Marie

    2018-04-03

    Physically active individuals show greater conditioned pain modulation (CPM) compared with less active individuals. Understanding the effects of acute exercise on CPM may allow for a more targeted use of exercise in the management of pain. This study investigated the effects of acute isometric exercise on CPM. In addition, the between-session and within-session reliability of CPM was investigated. Experimental, randomized crossover study. Laboratory at Marquette University. Thirty healthy adults (19.3±1.5 years, 15 males). Subjects underwent CPM testing before and after isometric exercise (knee extension, 30% maximum voluntary contraction for three minutes) and quiet rest in two separate experimental sessions. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at the quadriceps and upper trapezius muscles were assessed before, during, and after ice water immersions. PPTs increased during ice water immersion (i.e., CPM), and quadriceps PPT increased after exercise (P CPM decreased similarly following exercise and quiet rest (P > 0.05). CPM within-session reliability was fair to good (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.43-0.70), and the between-session reliability was poor (ICC = 0.20-0.35). Due to the variability in the systemic exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) response, participants were divided into systemic EIH responders (N = 9) and nonresponders (N = 21). EIH responders experienced attenuated CPM following exercise (P = 0.03), whereas the nonresponders showed no significant change (P > 0.05). Isometric exercise decreased CPM in individuals who reported systemic EIH, suggesting activation of shared mechanisms between CPM and systemic EIH responses. These results may improve the understanding of increased pain after exercise in patients with chronic pain and potentially attenuated CPM.

  15. Astragalus membranaceus Improves Exercise Performance and Ameliorates Exercise-Induced Fatigue in Trained Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Shao Yeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Astragalus membranaceus (AM is a popular “Qi-tonifying” herb with a long history of use as a Traditional Chinese Medicine with multiple biological functions. However, evidence for the effects of AM on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. We evaluated the potential beneficial effects of AM on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR strain mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10 per group for treatment: (1 sedentary control and vehicle treatment (vehicle control; (2 exercise training with vehicle treatment (exercise control; and (3 exercise training with AM treatment at 0.615 g/kg/day (Ex-AM1 or (4 3.075 g/kg/day (Ex-AM5. Both the vehicle and AM were orally administered for 6 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after 15-min swimming exercise. Exercise training combined with AM supplementation increased endurance exercise capacity and increased hepatic and muscle glycogen content. AM reduced exercise-induced accumulation of the byproducts blood lactate and ammonia with acute exercise challenge. Moreover, we found no deleterious effects from AM treatment. Therefore, AM supplementation improved exercise performance and had anti-fatigue effects in mice. It may be an effective ergogenic aid in exercise training.

  16. Reduced endothelial activation after exercise is associated with improved HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrkjeland, Rune; Njerve, Ida U; Arnesen, Harald; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Solheim, Svein

    2017-03-01

    We have previously reported insignificant changes in HbA 1c after exercise in patients with both type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of exercise on endothelial function and possible associations between changes in endothelial function and HbA 1c . Patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease ( n = 137) were randomised to 12 months exercise or standard follow-up. Endothelial function was assessed by circulating biomarkers (E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, von Willebrand factor, tissue plasminogen activator antigen, asymmetric dimethylarginine and L-arginine/asymmetric dimethylarginine ratio). Differences between the randomised groups were analysed by analysis of covariance and correlations by Spearman's rho or Pearson's correlation. No effect of exercise on endothelial function was demonstrated. The changes in HbA 1c in the exercise group correlated with changes in E-selectin ( r = 0.56, p < 0.001), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 ( r = 0.27, p = 0.052), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 ( r = 0.32, p = 0.022) and tissue plasminogen activator antigen ( r = 0.35, p =  0.011). HbA 1c decreased significantly more in patients with versus without a concomitant reduction in E-selectin ( p =  0.002), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 ( p =  0.011), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 ( p =  0.028) and tissue plasminogen activator antigen ( p =  0.009). Exercise did not affect biomarkers of endothelial function in patients with both type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. However, changes in biomarkers of endothelial activation correlated with changes in HbA 1c , and reduced endothelial activation was associated with improved HbA 1c after exercise.

  17. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema in a Triathlon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotomo Yamanashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Family physicians have more opportunities to attend athletic competitions as medical staff at first-aid centers because of the increasing popularity of endurance sports. Case. A 38-year-old man who participated in a triathlon race experienced difficulty in breathing after swimming and was moved to a first-aid center. His initial oxygen saturation was 82% and a thoracic computed tomography scan showed bilateral ground glass opacity in the peripheral lungs. His diagnosis was noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with exercise or swimming: exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE or swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE. Treatment with furosemide and corticosteroid relieved his symptoms of pulmonary edema. Discussion. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with endurance sports is not common, but knowledge about EIPE/SIPE or neurogenic pulmonary edema associated with hyponatremia, which is called Ayus-Arieff syndrome, is crucial. Knowledge and caution for possible risk factors, such as exposure to cold water or overhydration, are essential for both medical staff and endurance athletes. Conclusion. To determine the presence of pulmonary edema associated with strenuous exercise, oxygen saturation should be used as a screening tool at a first-aid center. To avoid risks for EIPE/SIPE, knowledge about these diseases is essential for medical staff and for athletes who perform extreme exercise.

  18. Effects of Uric Acid on Exercise-induced Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    平井, 富弘

    2001-01-01

    We studied effects of uric acid on exercise― induced oxidative stress in humans based on a hypothesis that uric acid acts as an antioxidant to prevent from exercise―induced oxidative stress. Relation between uric acid level in plasma and increase of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS)after the cycle ergometer exercise was examined. Thiobarbituricacid reactive substance in plasma increased after the ergometer exercise. High uric acid in plasma did not result in low increase of TBARS...

  19. Does exercise pulmonary hypertension exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Edmund M; Chemla, Denis; Whyte, Kenneth; Kovacs, Gabor; Olschewski, Horst; Herve, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    The exercise definition of pulmonary hypertension using a mean pulmonary artery pressure threshold of greater than 30 mmHg was abandoned following the 4th World Pulmonary Hypertension Symposium in 2008, as this definition was not supported by evidence and healthy individuals frequently exceed this threshold. Meanwhile, the clinical value of exercise pulmonary hemodynamic testing has also been questioned. Recent data support the notion that an abnormal pulmonary hemodynamic response during exercise (or exercise pulmonary hypertension) is associated with symptoms and exercise limitation. Pathophysiologic mechanisms accounting for the development of exercise pulmonary hypertension include increased vascular resistance, excessive elevation in left atrial pressure and/or increased volume of trapped air during exercise, resulting in a steep rise in pulmonary artery pressure relative to cardiac output. Recent evidence suggests that exercise pulmonary hypertension may be defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure surpassing 30 mmHg together with a simultaneous total pulmonary resistance exceeding 3 WU. Exercise pulmonary hypertension is a clinically relevant entity and an improved definition has been suggested based on new evidence. Exercise pulmonary hemodynamics may help unmask early or latent disease, particularly in populations that are at high risk for the development of pulmonary hypertension.

  20. Quality of life and exercise performance in unoperated children with anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery from the opposite sinus of valsalva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Alan C; Tsaur, Stephen; Paridon, Stephen M; Brothers, Julie A

    2017-07-01

    Anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery is a congenital cardiac condition that can be associated with increased risk of sudden death. To date, quality of life and exercise performance have not been evaluated in patients with this condition who do not undergo surgical repair. We carried out a cross-sectional analysis of patients with unoperated anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery at our institution from 1 January, 2000 to 31 January, 2016. We prospectively assessed quality of life using standardised questionnaires. Medical records were reviewed for clinical and exercise stress test data. Statistical analyses were performed using Student's t-tests and Spearman's correlation coefficients. In total, 56 families completed the questionnaires. The average age at enrolment was 14.7±6 years. The majority were male (n=44, 78.6%) and had interarterial anomalous right coronary artery (n=38, 67.9%). Patients had normal quality of life on the PedsQL 4.0 Report, Child Health Questionnaire Child Form 87, and SF-36v2. Their parents had normal quality of life on the PedsQL 4.0 Parent Report, but parents of exercise-restricted patients had decreased Physical Functioning, General Health Perception, Emotional Impact on Parent, and Physical Summary scores (pquality of life, but parents of exercise-restricted patients have decreased general health and emotional and physical quality of life scores. Improved counselling of families may be beneficial in this group. Future studies with more patients should evaluate quality of life and exercise performance over time.

  1. Comparison of exercise electrocardiography and quantitative thallium imaging for one-vessel coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, S.; Kiess, M.; Liu, P.; Guiney, T.E.; Pohost, G.M.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The relative value of exercise electrocardiography and computer analyzed thallium-201 imaging was compared in 124 patients with 1-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD). Of these, 78 had left anterior descending (LAD), 32 right and 14 left circumflex (LC) CAD. In patients with no previous myocardial infarction (MI), thallium imaging was more sensitive than the electrocardiogram (78% vs 64%, p less than 0.01), but in patients with previous MI, sensitivity was similar. Further, thallium imaging was more sensitive only in LAD and LC disease. Redistribution was compared with ST-segment depression as a marker of ischemia. Only in patients with prior MI (76% vs 44%, p less than 0.01) and only in LC and right CAD did redistribution occur more often than ST depression. Thallium imaging was more accurate in localizing stenoses than the electrocardiogram (p less than 0.001), but did not always correctly predict coronary anatomy. Septal thallium defects were associated with LAD disease in 84%, inferior defects with right CAD in 40% and posterolateral lesion defects with LC CAD in 22%. The results indicate the overall superiority of thallium imaging in 1-vessel CAD compared with exercise electrocardiography; however, there is a wide spectrum of extent and location of perfusion defects associated with each coronary artery. Thallium imaging complements coronary angiography by demonstrating the functional impact of CAD on myocardial perfusion

  2. Mechanisms and management of exercise-induced asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Norsk, Peter; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is often reported by elite athletes, especially endurance athletes. The aim of this article is to review current knowledge of mechanisms and management of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) in adult elite athletes.......Asthma is often reported by elite athletes, especially endurance athletes. The aim of this article is to review current knowledge of mechanisms and management of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) in adult elite athletes....

  3. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriacou, P A [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Shafqat, K [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Pal, S K [St Andrew' s Centre for Plastic Surgery and Burns, Broomfield Hospital, Chelmsford, CM1 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO{sub 2}) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO{sub 2}) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO{sub 2} sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures

  4. Implications of normal exercise electrocardiographic results in patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease. Correlation with left ventricular function and myocardial perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakki, A.H.; DePace, N.L.; Colby, J.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence and implications of false-negative exercise electrocardiographic results among 216 consecutive patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease (50 percent diameter narrowing or greater of one or more vessels). Exercise electrocardiography gave negative (false-negative) results in 23 patients and positive (true-positive) results in 102 patients, and were nondiagnostic in the rest. Exercise thallium-201 imaging was performed in 88 patients. The extent of coronary artery disease was quantitated by a scoring system that takes into consideration the degree and site of narrowing in the major vessels and their branches. The exercise heart rate was higher in patients with false-negative than in patients with true-positive exercise electrocardiographic results (161 +/- 18 versus 133 +/- 24 beats per minute, mean +/- SD; p less than 0.0001). Q-wave infarction was present in two patients (9 percent) with false-negative and 20 patients (20 percent) with true-positive exercise electrocardiographic results; left ventricular asynergy at rest was observed in 13 patients (57 percent) with false-negative and in 74 patients (74 percent) with true-positive results. Patients with false-negative results had less extensive coronary disease than did patients with true-positive results (score 5.8 +/- 3.6 versus 9.2 +/- 5.0; p . 0.0025). Angina during exercise was less frequent in patients with false-negative results (p less than 0.01). Abnormal exercise thallium-201 images were seen in 15 of 20 patients (75 percent) with false-negative results and in 56 of 68 patients (82 percent) with true-positive results

  5. The Curious Question of Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L. Bates

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The question of whether pulmonary edema develops during exercise on land is controversial. Yet, the development of pulmonary edema during swimming and diving is well established. This paper addresses the current controversies that exist in the field of exercise-induced pulmonary edema on land and with water immersion. It also discusses the mechanisms by which pulmonary edema can develop during land exercise, swimming, and diving and the current gaps in knowledge that exist. Finally, this paper discusses how these fields can continue to advance and the areas where clinical knowledge is lacking.

  6. Exercise-induced heat stress disrupts the shear-dilatory relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Stephen J; Lefferts, Wesley K; Wharton, Margret; Fehling, Patricia C; Smith, Denise L

    2016-12-01

    What is the central question of this study? Although heat stress is known to increase cardiovascular strain, no study, to date, had explored the potential impact of exercise-induced heat stress on vascular function. What is the main finding and its importance? We found that acute exercise tended to reduce flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), owing in part to reduced reactive hyperaemia/shear stimulus; thus, when FMD is normalized to shear no postexercise deficit exists. Exercise-induced heat stress increased reactive hyperaemia, shear rate, coupled with a sustained FMD postexercise, suggests that exercise-induced heat stress increases the amount of shear stimulus to elicit a similar response, indicating reduced vascular responsiveness, or reserve, which might increase cardiovascular susceptibility. Heat stress increases cardiovascular strain and is of particular concern in occupations, such as firefighting, in which individuals are required to perform strenuous work while wearing personal protective equipment. Sudden cardiac events are associated with strenuous activity and are the leading cause of duty-related death among firefighters, accounting for ∼50% of duty-related fatalities per year. Understanding the acute effects of exercise-induced heat stress (EIHS) on vascular endothelial function may provide insight into the mechanisms precipitating acute coronary events in firefighters. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine the effects of EIHS on vascular endothelial function. Using a balanced crossover design, 12 healthy men performed 100 min of moderate-intensity, intermittent exercise with and without EIHS (personal protective equipment or cooling vest, respectively). Measurements of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), reactive hyperaemia and shear rate area under the curve (SR AUC ) were performed pre- and postexercise. During EIHS, core temperature was significantly higher (38 ± 0.1 versus 37 ± 0.1°C). Postexercise FMD tended to be suppressed

  7. Psychiatric disorders and cardiac anxiety in exercising and sedentary coronary artery disease patients: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sardinha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Regular physical exercise has been shown to favorably influence mood and anxiety; however, there are few studies regarding psychiatric aspects of physically active patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. The objective of the present study was to compare the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and cardiac anxiety in sedentary and exercising CAD patients. A total sample of 119 CAD patients (74 men were enrolled in a case-control study. The subjects were interviewed to identify psychiatric disorders and responded to the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire. In the exercise group (N = 60, there was a lower prevalence (45 vs 81%; P < 0.001 of at least one psychiatric diagnosis, as well as multiple comorbidities, when compared to the sedentary group (N = 59. Considering the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, sedentary patients presented higher scores compared to exercisers (mean ± SEM = 55.8 ± 1.9 vs 37.3 ± 1.6; P < 0.001. In a regression model, to be attending a medically supervised exercise program presented a relevant potential for a 35% reduction in cardiac anxiety. CAD patients regularly attending an exercise program presented less current psychiatric diagnoses and multiple mental-related comorbidities and lower scores of cardiac anxiety. These salutary mental effects add to the already known health benefits of exercise for CAD patients.

  8. Global Proteome Changes in the Rat Diaphragm Induced by Endurance Exercise Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt J Sollanek

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life-saving intervention for many critically ill patients. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragmatic atrophy and weakness. Importantly, endurance exercise training results in a diaphragmatic phenotype that is protected against ventilator-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and weakness. The mechanisms responsible for this exercise-induced protection against ventilator-induced diaphragmatic atrophy remain unknown. Therefore, to investigate exercise-induced changes in diaphragm muscle proteins, we compared the diaphragmatic proteome from sedentary and exercise-trained rats. Specifically, using label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we performed a proteomics analysis of both soluble proteins and mitochondrial proteins isolated from diaphragm muscle. The total number of diaphragm proteins profiled in the soluble protein fraction and mitochondrial protein fraction were 813 and 732, respectively. Endurance exercise training significantly (P<0.05, FDR <10% altered the abundance of 70 proteins in the soluble diaphragm proteome and 25 proteins of the mitochondrial proteome. In particular, key cytoprotective proteins that increased in relative abundance following exercise training included mitochondrial fission process 1 (Mtfp1; MTP18, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MPST, microsomal glutathione S-transferase 3 (Mgst3; GST-III, and heat shock protein 70 kDa protein 1A/1B (HSP70. While these proteins are known to be cytoprotective in several cell types, the cyto-protective roles of these proteins have yet to be fully elucidated in diaphragm muscle fibers. Based upon these important findings, future experiments can now determine which of these diaphragmatic proteins are sufficient and/or required to promote exercise-induced protection against inactivity-induced muscle atrophy.

  9. Hypoperfusion Induced by Preconditioning Treadmill Training in Hyper-Early Reperfusion After Cerebral Ischemia: A Laser Speckle Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhijie; Lu, Hongyang; Yang, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Li; Wu, Yi; Niu, Wenxiu; Ding, Li; Wang, Guili; Tong, Shanbao; Jia, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Exercise preconditioning induces neuroprotective effects during cerebral ischemia and reperfusion, which involves the recovery of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of re-established CBF following ischemia and reperfusion are unclear. The present study investigated CBF in hyper-early stage of reperfusion by laser speckle contrast imaging, a full-field high-resolution optical imaging technique. Rats with or without treadmill training were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. CBF in arteries, veins, and capillaries in hyper-early stage of reperfusion (1, 2, and 3 h after reperfusion) and in subacute stage (24 h after reperfusion) were measured. Neurological scoring and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were further applied to determine the neuroprotective effects of exercise preconditioning. In hyper-early stage of reperfusion, CBF in the rats with exercise preconditioning was reduced significantly in arteries and veins, respectively, compared to rats with no exercise preconditioning. Capillary CBF remained stable in the hyper-early stage of reperfusion, though it increased significantly 24 h after reperfusion in the rats with exercise preconditioning. As a neuroprotective strategy, exercise preconditioning reduced the blood perfusion of arteries and veins in the hyper-early stage of reperfusion, which indicated intervention-induced neuroprotective hypoperfusion after reperfusion onset.

  10. Exercise through a cardiac rehabilitation program attenuates oxidative stress in patients submitted to coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taty Zau, José Francisco; Costa Zeferino, Rodrigo; Sandrine Mota, Nádia; Fernandes Martins, Gerez; Manoel Serra, Salvador; Bonates da Cunha, Therezil; Medeiros Lima, Daniel; Bragança Pereira, Basilio de; Matos do Nascimento, Emília; Filho, Danilo Wilhelm; Curi Pedrosa, Rozangela; Pedrosa, Roberto Coury

    2018-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in the world and oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis. Cardiac rehabilitation in patients with coronary artery disease submitted to coronary artery bypass grafting may prevent cardiovascular events probably through the attenuation of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits of a cardiac rehabilitation program in the control of the systemic oxidative stress. The studied population consisted of 40 patients, with chronic stable coronary artery disease submitted to coronary artery bypass grafting, who attended a cardiac rehabilitation program. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were evaluated in the blood of these patients at different moments. After the onset of cardiac rehabilitation, there was a significant and progressive decrease in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels and protein carbonyls, an initial increase and subsequent decrease in superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities. Also, a progressive increase of uric acid, while ferric reducing antioxidant power levels increased only at the end of the cardiac rehabilitation and a tendency to increase of glutathione contents. The results suggest that regular exercise through a cardiac rehabilitation program can attenuate oxidative stress in chronic coronary artery disease patients submitted to coronary artery bypass grafting.

  11. ALDH2 restores exhaustive exercise-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qiuping; Zheng, Jianheng; Qiu, Jun; Wu, Xiahong; Xu, Yangshuo; Shen, Weili; Sun, Mengwei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is highly expressed in heart and skeletal muscles, and is the major enzyme that metabolizes acetaldehyde and toxic aldehydes. The cardioprotective effects of ALDH2 during cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury have been recognized. However, less is known about the function of ALDH2 in skeletal muscle. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of ALDH2 on exhaustive exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury. Methods: We created transgenic mice expressing ALDH2 in skeletal muscles. Male wild-type C57/BL6 (WT) and ALDH2 transgenic mice (ALDH2-Tg), 8-weeks old, were challenged with exhaustive exercise for 1 week to induce skeletal muscle injury. Animals were sacrificed 24 h post-exercise and muscle tissue was excised. Results: ALDH2-Tg mice displayed significantly increased treadmill exercise capacity compared to WT mice. Exhaustive exercise caused an increase in mRNA levels of the muscle atrophy markers, Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, and reduced mitochondrial biogenesis and fusion in WT skeletal muscles; these effects were attenuated in ALDH2-Tg mice. Exhaustive exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of Beclin1 and Bnip3; the effects of which were mitigated by ALDH2 overexpression. In addition, ALDH2-Tg reversed the increase of an oxidative stress biomarker (4-hydroxynonenal) and decreased levels of mitochondrial antioxidant proteins, including manganese superoxide dismutase and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, in skeletal muscle induced by exhaustive exercise. Conclusion: ALDH2 may reverse skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction due to exhaustive exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quality of mitochondria. - Highlights: • Skeletal muscle ALDH2 expression and activity declines during exhaustive exercise. • ALDH2 overexpression enhances physical performance and restores muscle

  12. Fatty acid-inducible ANGPTL4 governs lipid metabolic response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catoire, Milène; Alex, Sheril; Paraskevopulos, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity increases energy metabolism in exercising muscle. Whether acute exercise elicits metabolic changes in nonexercising muscles remains unclear. We show that one of the few genes that is more highly induced in nonexercising muscle than in exercising human muscle during acute exercis...

  13. The effectiveness of the treatment of severe exercise-induced asthma in schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Garas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bronchial asthma is one of the most common chronic multifactorial diseases of the lungs. At least 10–12 % of patients with bronchial asthma are suffering from a severe form of the disease. One aspect of inadequate severe asthma control is its phenotypic heterogeneity, interest of experts increases to the problem of exercise-induced asthma. The purpose of the study was to increase efficiency of treatment for severe exercise-induced asthma in schoolchildren based on the analysis of the attack dynamics and to achieve disease control according to main inflammatometric and spirometric indices. Materials and methods. We examined 46 children with severe persistent bronchial asthma, in particular, 15 schoolchildren suffering from severe exercise-induced asthma, the second clinical group (comparison one consisted of 31 children suffering from severe type of the disease, with no signs of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Basic therapy effectiveness was determined prospectively by assessing the disease control using AST-test with an interval of 3 months. The severity of bronchial obstruction syndrome in patients on admission to hospital during exacerbation was assessed by score scale. Airway hyperresponsiveness was evaluated according to the results of bronchoprovocation with histamine. Results. Children of I clinical group had more significant manifestations of bronchial obstruction during the week of inpatient treatment than the comparison group of patients, including significantly more severe manifestations of bronchial obstruction were verified on 1st and 7th day of hospitalization. Due to the analysis of basic therapy effectiveness, only a quarter of I clinical group patients and a larger part of schoolchildren in comparison group achieved the partial control after a 3-month course of anti-inflammatory treatment. Eosinophilic inflammation was observed in most children with severe exercise-induced asthma (60.1 % and in 47.2 % of

  14. Stress hormones at rest and following exercise testing predict coronary artery disease severity and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Dejana; Damjanovic, Svetozar; Djordjevic, Tea; Martic, Dejana; Ignjatovic, Svetlana; Milinkovic, Neda; Banovic, Marko; Lasica, Ratko; Petrovic, Milan; Guazzi, Marco; Arena, Ross

    2017-09-01

    Despite considerable knowledge regarding the importance of stress in coronary artery disease (CAD) pathogenesis, its underestimation persists in routine clinical practice, in part attributable to lack of a standardized, objective assessment. The current study examined the ability of stress hormones to predict CAD severity and prognosis at basal conditions as well as during and following an exertional stimulus. Forty Caucasian subjects with significant coronary artery lesions (≥50%) were included. Within 2 months of coronary angiography, cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) on a recumbent ergometer was performed in conjunction with stress echocardiography (SE). At rest, peak and after 3 min of recovery following CPET, plasma levels of cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and NT-pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) were measured by immunoassay sandwich technique, radioimmunoassay, and radioimmunometric technique, respectively. Subjects were subsequently followed a mean of 32 ± 10 months. Mean ejection fraction was 56.7 ± 9.6%. Subjects with 1-2 stenotic coronary arteries (SCA) demonstrated a significantly lower plasma cortisol levels during CPET compared to those with 3-SCA (p  .05). Among CPET, SE, and hormonal parameters, cortisol at rest and during CPET recovery demonstrated the best predictive value in distinguishing between 1-, 2-, and 3-SCA [area under ROC curve 0.75 and 0.77 (SE = 0.11, 0.10; p = .043, .04) for rest and recovery, respectively]. ΔCortisol peak/rest predicted cumulative cardiac events (area under ROC curve 0.75, SE = 0.10, p = .049). Cortisol at rest and following an exercise test holds predictive value for CAD severity and prognosis, further demonstrating a link between stress and unwanted cardiac events.

  15. Exercise Does Not Protect against MPTP-Induced Neurotoxicity in BDNF Happloinsufficent Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gerecke, Kim M.; Jiao, Yun; Pagala, Viswajeeth; Smeyne, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Exercise has been demonstrated to potently protect substantia nigra pars compacta (SN) dopaminergic neurons from 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced neurotoxicity. One mechanism proposed to account for this neuroprotection is the upregulation of neurotrophic factors. Several neurotrophic factors, including Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), have been shown to upregulate in response to exercise. In order to determine if exercise-induced neuroprotection is depende...

  16. Evaluation of coronary hemodynamics and exercise 201Tl-myocardial scintigraphy in patients with vasospastic angina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kentaro; Nakase, Emiko; Haiyama, Tohru; Hasegawa, Akira; Saito, Takayuki

    1992-01-01

    To clarify the coronary hemodynamics and myocardial perfusion in patients with vasospastic angina, we performed exercise 201 Tl-myocardial scintigraphy (planar and SPECT) in 72 patients and left coronary digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in 37 patients without significant organic coronary artery stenosis. Coronary artery spasm was documented by coronary angiography in all patients. Fifty-four patients (75%) developed exercise-induced 201 Tl-myocardial perfusion defect on SPECT. 201 Tl pulmonary uptake (L/H) was significantly increased in patients with vasospastic angina. Especially, L/H was higher in patients with multiple small perfusion defect on 201 Tl-SPECT, so that exercise-induced left ventricular dysfunction existed in patients with vasospastic angina and especially in cases of multiple small perfusion defect on 201 Tl-SPECT. The left coronary circulation time (CCT) was prolonged in patients with vasospastic angina. The mechanism of prolonged CCT is still unknown, but we suspected that prolonged CCT was induced by increased peripheral coronary vascular resistance in patients with vasospastic angina. It was concluded that the peripheral coronary circulation was disturbed in patients with vasospastic angina, but its abnormal coronary circulation had no relation to location of spasm-induced vessels. We concluded that impaired coronary microcirculation was taken a part of pathophysiology in vasospastic angina. (author)

  17. A comparative study of 99Tcm-MIBI exercise myocardial perfusion imaging and the coronary arteriography in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiaohong; Yan Aiping; Li Yuren; Hou Zhenwen; Jiang Ningyi; Lu Xianping

    2003-01-01

    Objective: A comparative evaluation of 99 Tc m -MIBI exercise myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and coronary arteriography (CAG) in diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Methods: MPI and CAG were performed on 92 patients with clinical equivocal diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The results were comparatively studied. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of MPI were 83.9% and 69.1%. Both modalities matched in 78.3% cases. Conclusion: MPI offers useful information for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. And patients with a normal MPI don't need a further coronary angiography

  18. Exercise-induced asthma: critical analysis of the protective role of montelukast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence W Carver Jr

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Terrence W Carver JrThe Children’s Mercy Hospital and Clinics, Kansas City, MO, USAAbstract: Exercise-induced asthma/exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIA/EIB is a prevalent and clinically important disease affecting young children through older adulthood. These terms are often used interchangeably and the differences are not clearly defined in the literature. The pathogenesis of EIA/EIB may be different in those with persistent asthma compared to those with exercise-induced symptoms only. The natural history of EIA is unclear and may be different for elite athletes. Leukotriene biology has helped the understanding of EIB. The type and intensity of exercise are important factors for EIB. Exercise participation is necessary for proper development and control of EIA is recommended. Symptoms of EIB should be confirmed by proper testing. Biologic markers may also be helpful in diagnosis. Not all exercise symptoms are from EIB. Many medication and nonpharmacologic treatments are available. Asthma education is an important component of managing EIA. Many medications have been tested and the comparisons are complicated. Montelukast is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved asthma and EIB controller and has a number of potential advantages to other asthma medications including short onset of action, ease of use, and lack of tolerance. Not all patients improve with montelukast and rescue medication should be available.Keywords: exercise, asthma, montelukast, Singulair, bronchospasm, leukotrienes

  19. Comparison of transient arterial occlusion and muscle exercise provocation for assessment of perfusion reserve in skeletal muscle with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krix, Martin; Krakowski-Roosen, Holger; Armarteifio, Erick; Fuerstenberger, Susanne; Delorme, Stefan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is able to quantify muscle perfusion and changes in perfusion due to muscle exercise in real-time. However, reliable measurement of standardized muscle exercise is difficult to perform in clinical examinations. We compared perfusion reserve assessed by CEUS after transient arterial occlusion and exercise to find the most suitable measurement for clinical application. Methods: Contrast pulse sequencing (7 MHz) during continuous IV infusion of SonoVue (4.8 mL/300 s) was used in 8 healthy volunteers to monitor muscle perfusion of the gastrocnemius muscle during transient (1 min) arterial occlusion produced by a thigh cuff of a venous occlusion plethysmograph. Isometric muscle exercise (50% of individual maximum strength for 20 s) was subsequently performed during the same examination, and several CEUS parameters obtained from ultrasound-signal-intensity-time curves and its calculation errors were compared. Results: The mean maximum local blood volume after occlusion was 13.9 [∼mL] (range, 4.5-28.8 [∼mL]), and similar values were measured after sub-maximum exercise 13.8 [∼mL], (range, 4.6-22.2 [∼mL]. The areas under the curve during reperfusion vs. recovery were also similar (515.2 ± 257.5 compared to 482.2 ± 187.5 [∼mL s]) with a strong correlation (r = 0.65), as were the times to maximum (15.3 s vs. 15.9 s), with a significantly smaller variation for the occlusion method (±2.1 s vs. ±9.0 s, p = 0.03). The mean errors for all calculated CEUS parameters were lower for the occlusion method than for the exercise test. Conclusions: CEUS muscle perfusion measurements can be easily performed after transient arterial occlusion. It delivers data which are comparable to CEUS measurements after muscle exercise but with a higher robustness. This method can be easily applied in clinical examination of patients with e.g. PAOD or diabetic microvessel diseases to assess perfusion reserve.

  20. Association of aortic coarctation and malignant right coronary artery anomaly: an unusual cause of angina pectoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Rubens Sirtoli; de Almeida, Leonardo Cao Cãmbra; Sirtoli, Maysa Godoy Gomes Mazurek; Pilatti, Liliana Pena; de Carvalho, Marcelo Valladão; Schafranski, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with exercise-induced ischemia was referred for investigation. Coronary angiography revealed a right coronary artery originating from the trunk of the left coronary artery, and an aortic coarctation was observed on aortography. A CT angiogram confirmed these findings. Resection of the aortic coarctation and reimplantation of the ostial portion of right coronary artery into its native site was performed, and resulted in a satisfactory outcome. The association of an anomalous right coronary artery with aortic coarctation has rarely been described and represents a critical situation where early diagnosis and prompt intervention are essential. PMID:23754906

  1. Hypotensive effect and vascular relaxation in different arteries induced by the nitric oxide donor RuBPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Amanda de Carvalho; Araújo, Alice Valença; Paulo, Michele; Andrade, Fernanda Aparecida de; Silva, Bruno Rodrigues; Vercesi, Juliana Aparecida; da Silva, Roberto Santana; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria

    2017-01-30

    NO donors are compounds that release NO that can be used when the endogenous NO bioavailability is impaired. The compound cis-[Ru(bpy) 2 (py)(NO 2 )](PF 6 ) (RuBPY) is a nitrite-ruthenium, since it has a NO 2 in its molecule. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of RuBPY on arterial pressure, as well as on the vascular relaxation of different vascular arteries in renal hypertensive (2K-1C) and normotensive (2K) rats. We have evaluated the arterial pressure and heart rate changes as well as the RuBPY and SNP-induced relaxation (thoracic aorta, mesenteric resistance, coronary and basilar arteries). The administration of RuBPY in awake rats evoked a smaller but long lasting hypotensive effect when compared to SNP, with no increase in heart rate. The relaxation induced by RuBPY was similar between 2K-1C and 2K rats in thoracic aorta, mesenteric resistance and coronary arteries. However, the relaxation induced by RuBPY was smaller in basilar arteries from 2K-1C than in 2K. Taken together, our results show that RuBPY presents several advantages over SNP, since it does not induce hypotensive effect in normotensive animals, the hypotensive effect is slower, with no reflex tachycardia, and it is long lasting. In addition, RuBPY induces coronary artery relaxation (useful for angina) and presented only a small effect on basilar artery (may not induce headache). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis with a high level of plasma noradrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yukihiko; Nagai, Ayako; Saito, Masuyoshi; Ito, Tomonobu; Koga, Michiyuki; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2007-02-01

    Ingesting certain foods sometimes triggers anaphylaxis when followed by exercise (food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, FDEIA). Specific food-induced mucocutaneous urticaria may also progress to anaphylaxis (oral allergy syndrome, OAS). A positive skin test and/or radioallergosorbent test (RAST) to the foods suggest involvement of immunoglobulin (Ig)E-anaphylaxis in both disorders. The triggering foods and initial target organs are usually different in each case. In the present study, a 32-year-old male reported dyspnea accompanied by wheals, and symptoms of low blood pressure while walking after eating Chinese noodles and donuts. He also reported uncomfortable sensations in his mouth and throat after ingesting melon. Exercise challenge tests were administered. Serum histamine, plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine were measured pre- and post-test. No symptoms were induced by exercise or by the ingestion of any single food item before exercise. However, numerous wheals appeared when exercise followed the combined ingestion of foods. Likewise, the sequence of eating pancakes and then exercising resulted in numerous wheals and anaphylaxis. Olopatadine hydrochloride and ketotifen fumarate completely inhibited this anaphylaxis. The skin prick tests resulted in fruit-induced erythema and wheals. The results of these tests with wheat, butter and sugar were negative, and no symptoms were induced by the exercise test after ingestion of watermelon, melon or apple. The anaphylactoid symptoms were accompanied by a significant increase of plasma noradrenaline. In this case, not only wheat, but sugar and butter may induce the onset of FDEIA. There was no significant correlation between the intensity of the symptoms and the serum histamine levels in the present case. Noradrenaline may be involved in the onset of FDEIA, since noradrenaline may selectively inhibit T-helper (Th)1 functions while favoring Th2 responses. The tests showed no cross-reactivity between the

  3. Longitudinal changes in reproductive hormones and menstrual cyclicity in cynomolgus monkeys during strenuous exercise training: abrupt transition to exercise-induced amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, N I; Caston-Balderrama, A L; Helmreich, D L; Parfitt, D B; Nosbisch, C; Cameron, J L

    2001-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies of exercise-induced reproductive dysfunction have documented a high proportion of menstrual cycle disturbances in women involved in strenuous exercise training. However, longitudinal studies have been needed to examine individual susceptibility to exercise-induced reproductive dysfunction and to elucidate the progression of changes in reproductive function that occur with strenuous exercise training. Using the female cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), we documented changes in menstrual cyclicity and patterns of LH, FSH, estradiol, and progesterone secretion as the animals developed exercise-induced amenorrhea. As monkeys gradually increased running to 12.3 +/- 0.9 km/day, body weight did not change significantly although food intake remained constant. The time spent training until amenorrhea developed varied widely among animals (7-24 months; mean = 14.3 +/- 2.2 months) and was not correlated with initial body weight, training distance, or food intake. Consistent changes in function of the reproductive axis occurred abruptly, one to two menstrual cycles before the development of amenorrhea. These included significant declines in plasma reproductive hormone concentrations, an increase in follicular phase length, and a decrease in luteal phase progesterone secretion. These data document a high level of interindividual variability in the development of exercise-induced reproductive dysfunction, delineate the progression of changes in reproductive hormone secretion that occur with exercise training, and illustrate an abrupt transition from normal cyclicity to an amenorrheic state in exercising individuals, that is not necessarily associated with weight loss.

  4. Characterization of 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced contraction and acetylcholine-induced relaxation in isolated chicken basilar artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, F; Watanabe, Y; Obi, T; Islam, M Z; Yamazaki-Himeno, E; Shiraishi, M; Miyamoto, A

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the responsiveness of the chicken basilar artery to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and acetylcholine (ACh) and to characterize the related receptor subtypes in vitro. Basilar arteries were obtained from freshly slaughtered broiler chickens. The 5-HT induced concentration-dependent contraction of the arteries. The concentration-response curves for 5-HT were shifted 30-fold to the right by methiothepin (a 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist) and 3-fold to the right by ketanserin (a 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist). In the presence of ketanserin, the concentration-response curve for 5-HT was shifted 10-fold to the right by methiothepin. The pA(2) value for methiothepin was 8.26. The ACh induced concentration-dependent relaxation under conditions of precontraction by 5-HT. The concentration-response curve for ACh was shifted to the right by atropine [a nonselective muscarinic (M) receptor antagonist] and hexahydro-sila-difenidol hydrochloride, a p-fluoroanalog (pFHHSiD, an M(3) receptor antagonist), but not by pirenzepine (an M(1) receptor antagonist) or methoctramine (an M(2) receptor antagonist). The pA(2) value for pFHHSiD was 7.55. Nω-Nitro-l-arginine (a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) inhibited ACh-induced relaxation by approximately 50%. These results suggest that 5-HT induces contraction via activation of 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2) receptors and that ACh induces relaxation via activation of the M(3) receptor. The 5-HT(1) receptor might play a dominant role in 5-HT-induced contraction. One of the factors involved in ACh-induced relaxation is probably nitric oxide released from endothelial cells.

  5. Evidence of a Redox-Dependent Regulation of Immune Responses to Exercise-Induced Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Sakelliou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We used thiol-based antioxidant supplementation (n-acetylcysteine, NAC to determine whether immune mobilisation following skeletal muscle microtrauma induced by exercise is redox-sensitive in healthy humans. According to a two-trial, double-blind, crossover, repeated measures design, 10 young men received either placebo or NAC (20 mg/kg/day immediately after a muscle-damaging exercise protocol (300 eccentric contractions and for eight consecutive days. Blood sampling and performance assessments were performed before exercise, after exercise, and daily throughout recovery. NAC reduced the decline of reduced glutathione in erythrocytes and the increase of plasma protein carbonyls, serum TAC and erythrocyte oxidized glutathione, and TBARS and catalase activity during recovery thereby altering postexercise redox status. The rise of muscle damage and inflammatory markers (muscle strength, creatine kinase activity, CRP, proinflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules was less pronounced in NAC during the first phase of recovery. The rise of leukocyte and neutrophil count was decreased by NAC after exercise. Results on immune cell subpopulations obtained by flow cytometry indicated that NAC ingestion reduced the exercise-induced rise of total macrophages, HLA+ macrophages, and 11B+ macrophages and abolished the exercise-induced upregulation of B lymphocytes. Natural killer cells declined only in PLA immediately after exercise. These results indicate that thiol-based antioxidant supplementation blunts immune cell mobilisation in response to exercise-induced inflammation suggesting that leukocyte mobilization may be under redox-dependent regulation.

  6. Heat stress exacerbates the reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity during prolonged self-paced exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périard, J D; Racinais, S

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the influence of hyperthermia on middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean). Eleven cyclists undertook a 750 kJ self-paced time trial in HOT (35 °C) and COOL (20 °C) conditions. Exercise time was longer in HOT (56 min) compared with COOL (49 min; P blood flow, and heart rate were higher throughout HOT compared with COOL (P blood pressure and oxygen uptake were lower from 50% of work completed onward in HOT compared with COOL (P heat appears to have exacerbated the reduction in MCA Vmean, in part via increases in peripheral blood flow and a decrease in arterial blood pressure. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Increased pain sensitivity but normal function of exercise induced analgesia in hip and knee osteoarthritis - treatment effects of neuromuscular exercise and total joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, E; Roos, Ewa M.; Ageberg, E

    2013-01-01

    To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters.......To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters....

  8. Exercise-induced muscle-derived cytokines inhibit mammary cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojman, Pernille; Dethlefsen, Christine; Brandt, Claus; Hansen, Jakob; Pedersen, Line; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2011-09-01

    Regular physical activity protects against the development of breast and colon cancer, since it reduces the risk of developing these by 25-30%. During exercise, humoral factors are released from the working muscles for endocrinal signaling to other organs. We hypothesized that these myokines mediate some of the inhibitory effects of exercise on mammary cancer cell proliferation. Serum and muscles were collected from mice after an exercise bout. Incubation with exercise-conditioned serum inhibited MCF-7 cell proliferation by 52% and increased caspase activity by 54%. A similar increase in caspase activity was found after incubation of MCF-7 cells with conditioned media from electrically stimulated myotubes. PCR array analysis (CAPM-0838E; SABiosciences) revealed that seven genes were upregulated in the muscles after exercise, and of these oncostatin M (OSM) proved to inhibit MCF-7 proliferation by 42%, increase caspase activity by 46%, and induce apoptosis. Blocking OSM signaling with anti-OSM antibodies reduced the induction of caspase activity by 51%. To verify that OSM was a myokine, we showed that it was significantly upregulated in serum and in three muscles, tibialis cranialis, gastronemius, and soleus, after an exercise bout. In contrast, OSM expression remained unchanged in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, liver, and spleen (mononuclear cells). We conclude that postexercise serum inhibits mammary cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis of these cells. We suggest that one or more myokines secreted from working muscles may be mediating this effect and that OSM is a possible candidate. These findings emphasize that role of physical activity in cancer treatment, showing a direct link between exercise-induced humoral factors and decreased tumor cell growth.

  9. Maintenance of exercise-induced benefits in physical functioning and bone among elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karinkanta, S; Heinonen, A; Sievänen, H; Uusi-Rasi, K; Fogelholm, M; Kannus, P

    2009-04-01

    This study showed that about a half of the exercise-induced gain in dynamic balance and bone strength was maintained one year after cessation of the supervised high-intensity training of home-dwelling elderly women. However, to maintain exercise-induced gains in lower limb muscle force and physical functioning, continued training seems necessary. Maintenance of exercise-induced benefits in physical functioning and bone structure was assessed one year after cessation of 12-month randomized controlled exercise intervention. Originally 149 healthy women 70-78 years of age participated in the 12-month exercise RCT and 120 (81%) of them completed the follow-up study. Self-rated physical functioning, dynamic balance, leg extensor force, and bone structure were assessed. During the intervention, exercise increased dynamic balance by 7% in the combination resistance and balance-jumping training group (COMB). At the follow-up, a 4% (95% CI: 1-8%) gain compared with the controls was still seen, while the exercise-induced isometric leg extension force and self-rated physical functioning benefits had disappeared. During the intervention, at least twice a week trained COMB subjects obtained a significant 2% benefit in tibial shaft bone strength index compared to the controls. A half of this benefit seemed to be maintained at the follow-up. Exercise-induced benefits in dynamic balance and rigidity in the tibial shaft may partly be maintained one year after cessation of a supervised 12-month multi-component training in initially healthy elderly women. However, to maintain the achieved gains in muscle force and physical functioning, continued training seems necessary.

  10. N-acetylcysteine enhances nitroglycerin-induced headache and cranial arterial responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1992-01-01

    The effects of N-acetylcysteine, a sulfhydryl group donor, on nitroglycerin-induced headache and dilation of temporal and radial arteries were investigated in 11 healthy volunteers. Nitroglycerin, 0.06 microgram/kg/min, was infused for 20 minutes immediately after and 120 minutes after pretreatment...... response (median headache score, 3 versus 1), and the headache retained its vascular characteristics. Temporal artery dilation was also potentiated by N-acetylcysteine, 139% +/- 3% versus 127% +/- 3% of baseline, whereas the radial artery was unaffected. The potentiation was most pronounced after the first...... nitroglycerin infusion (12% versus 4.5% compared with placebo). A prolonged dilation of the temporal artery was observed only after the first nitroglycerin infusion, when high levels of N-acetylcysteine were present....

  11. Exercise training improves ambulatory blood pressure but not arterial stiffness in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoalino, Lucas Nóbilo; Ciolac, Emmanuel Gomes; Tavares, Aline Cristina; Castro, Rafael Ertner; Ayub-Ferreira, Silvia Moreira; Bacal, Fernando; Issa, Victor Sarli; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga

    2015-05-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent comorbidity after heart transplantation (HT). Exercise training (ET) is widely recommended as a key non-pharmacologic intervention for the prevention and management of hypertension, but its effects on ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and some mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension have not been studied in this population. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ET on ABP and arterial stiffness of HT recipients. 40 HT patients, randomized to ET (n = 31) or a control group (n = 9) underwent a maximal graded exercise test, 24-hour ABP monitoring, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) assessment before the intervention and at a 12-week follow-up assessment. The ET program was performed thrice-weekly and consisted primarily of endurance exercise (40 minutes) at ~70% of maximum oxygen uptake (Vo2MAX). The ET group had reduced 24-hour (4.0 ± 1.4 mm Hg, p endurance ET may be a tool to counteract hypertension in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of birth weight and 12 weeks of exercise training on exercise-induced AMPK signaling in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Brynjulf; Hingst, Janne Rasmuss; Frederiksen, Nicklas

    2013-01-01

    . We investigated 21 LBW and 21 normal birth weight (NBW) subjects during 1 hour of acute exercise performed at the same relative workload before and after 12 weeks of exercise training. Multiple skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained before and after exercise. Protein levels and phosphorylation status......Subjects with a low birth weight (LBW) display increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). We hypothesized that this is associated with defects in muscle adaptations following acute and regular physical activity, evident by impairments in the exercise-induced activation of AMPK signaling...... were determined by Western blotting. AMPK activities were measured using activity assays. Protein levels of AMPK isoforms a1 and ¿1 were significantly increased while ¿3 levels decreased with training independent of group. The LBW group had higher exercise-induced AMPK Thr(172) phosphorylation before...

  13. Nonpharmacologic strategies to manage exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickinson, John; Amirav, Israel; Hostrup, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Pharmacologic management of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is the mainstay of preventative therapy. There are some nonpharmacologic interventions, however, that may assist the management of EIB. This review discusses these nonpharmacologic interventions and how they may be applied to ...

  14. Vitamins C and E for asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Hart, Anna; Milan, Stephen J; Sugumar, Karnam

    2014-06-17

    The association between dietary antioxidants and asthma or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is not fully understood. Vitamin C and vitamin E are natural antioxidants that are predominantly present in fruits and vegetables; inadequate vitamin E intake is associated with airway inflammation. It has been postulated that the combination may be more beneficial than either single antioxidant for people with asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. To assess the effects of supplementation of vitamins C and E versus placebo (or no vitamin C and E supplementation) on exacerbations and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in adults and children with chronic asthma. To also examine the potential effects of vitamins C and E on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in people with asthma and in people without a diagnosis of asthma who experience symptoms only on exercise. Trials were identified from the Cochrane Airways Review Group Specialised Register and from trial registry websites. Searches were conducted in September 2013. We included randomised controlled trials of adults and children with a diagnosis of asthma. We separately considered trials in which participants had received a diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (or exercise-induced asthma). Trials comparing vitamin C and E supplementation versus placebo were included. We included trials in which asthma management for treatment and control groups included similar background therapy. Short-term use of vitamins C and E at the time of exacerbation or for cold symptoms in people with asthma is outside the scope of this review. Two review authors independently screened the titles and abstracts of potential studies and subsequently screened full-text study reports for inclusion. We used standard methods as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. It was not possible to aggregate the five included studies (214 participants). Four studies (206 participants) addressed the question of whether

  15. Does chronic smoking affect induced-exercise catecholamine release?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan İpekoğlu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the acute effect of the submaximal aerobic exercise upon epinephrine and nor-epinephrine levels in chronic smokers and non-smoker.  The study was carried out upon 10 regular (15> cigarettes/day smoker untrained male along five years and 10 never smoker untrained male. Subjects performed an endurance exercise that continues 40 minutes at 70% maximal heart rate. There were 15cc venous blood samples extracted from the forearm pre-exercise (PRE, post-exercise (POST, post-exercise 2 hours (2h, post-exercise 24 hours (24h to measure of epinephrine and nor-epinephrine levels. The plasma level of each hormone increased after exercise and the tendency of rise was similar between groups as it seen in which 55,6% and 54,68% for epinephrine and 27,1% and 35,7% for norepinephrine. In this respect no group-time relationship has been found (p>0,05.  But in between-group analyses, basal and after exercise levels were different (p<0,05. The study revealed the fact that, smokers have higher plasma levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine before and after exercise. The results demonstrate that long-term smoking induces elevate baseline and post-aerobic submaximal exercise plasma epinephrine and nor-epinephrine levels.  The sympatho-adrenal activity appears to be disrupt with long-term smoking which effect the glycolytic and fat metabolism during exercise.

  16. Elevated pulmonary arterial and systemic plasma aldosterone levels associate with impaired cardiac reserve capacity during exercise in left ventricular systolic heart failure patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bradley A; Stephens, Thomas E; Farrell, Laurie A; Oldham, William M; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Lewis, Gregory D

    2016-03-01

    Elevated levels of aldosterone are a modifiable contributor to clinical worsening in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Endothelin-1 (ET-1), which is increased in HFrEF, induces pulmonary endothelial aldosterone synthesis in vitro. However, whether transpulmonary aldosterone release occurs in humans or aldosterone relates to functional capacity in HFrEF is not known. Therefore, we aimed to characterize ET-1 and transpulmonary aldosterone levels in HFrEF and determine if aldosterone levels relate to peak volume of oxygen uptake (pVO2). Data from 42 consecutive HFrEF patients and 18 controls referred for invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing were analyzed retrospectively. Radial ET-1 levels (median [interquartile range]) were higher in HFrEF patients compared with controls (17.5 [11.5-31.4] vs 11.5 [4.4-19.0] pg/ml, p = 0.04). A significant ET-1 transpulmonary gradient (pulmonary arterial [PA] - radial arterial levels) was present in HFrEF (p reserve capacity in HFrEF. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Short-term vascular hemodynamic responses to isometric exercise in young adults and in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, R. (Renee); D. Bolignano (Davide); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); Pucci, G. (Giacomo); F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Vascular aging is known to induce progressive stiffening of the large elastic arteries, altering vascular hemodynamics under both rest and stress conditions. In this study, we aimed to investigate changes in vascular hemodynamics in response to isometric handgrip exercise

  18. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H

    2012-01-01

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral...... arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P heart rate by up to 54 beats min(−1), cardiac output did not change in any of the three...... demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output....

  19. Influence of aerobic exercise training on post-exercise responses of aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiko eAkazawa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Central arterial blood pressure (BP is more predictive of future cardiovascular events than is brachial BP because it reflects the BP load imposed on the left ventricle with greater accuracy. However, little is known about the effects of exercise training on central hemodynamic response to acute exercise. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of an aerobic exercise regimen on the response of aortic BP after a single aerobic exercise in postmenopausal women. Nine healthy postmenopausal women (age: 61 ± 2 years participated in a 12-week aerobic exercise training regimen. Before and after the training, each subjects performed a single bout of cycling at ventilatory thresholds for 30 min. We evaluated the post-exercise aortic BP response, which was estimated via the general transfer function from applanation tonometry. After the initial pre-training aerobic exercise session, aortic BP did not change significantly: however, aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure were significantly attenuated after the single aerobic exercise session following the 12-week training regimen. The present study demonstrated that a regular aerobic exercise training regimen induced the post-exercise reduction of aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure. Regular aerobic exercise training may enhance post-exercise reduction in aortic BP.

  20. High Prevalence of Exercise-Induced Laryngeal Obstruction in Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsted Nielsen, Emil; Hull, James H; Backer, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Unexplained respiratory symptoms reported by athletes are often incorrectly considered secondary to exercise-induced asthma. We hypothesised that this may be related to exercise induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO). This study evaluates the prevalence of EILO in an unselected cohort......-one percent of athletes with EILO and negative bronchoprovocation and bronchodilator reversibility tests used regular asthma medication at referral. CONCLUSION: In athletes with unexplained respiratory symptoms, EILO is an important differential diagnosis not discerned from other aetiologies by clinical...... features. These findings have important implications for the assessment and management of athletes presenting with persistent respiratory symptoms despite asthma therapy....

  1. Can isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) prevent myocardial ischemia during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease; An assessment with radionuclide ventriculography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Tokuji; Koyama, Takao; Aoki, Toshikazu; Okamoto, Shinya; Setsuda, Morimichi; Futagami, Yasuo; Nakano, Takeshi (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    The effects of sublingual isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) on left ventricular function during exercise were evaluated in 8 patients with coronary artery disease. ECG gated multistage exercise radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was performed to assess the global and regional left ventricular function before and after sublingual ISND. Chest pain during exercise was observed in six patients (75%) during exercise but subsided negative ISDN. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) during stress did not show improved significant change during exercise (from 64.4 {plus minus} 8.7% to 64.6 {plus minus} 8.3%) but increased significantly from 66.0 {plus minus} 6.3% to 69.9 {plus minus} 8.6% after ISDN. Left ventricular end-systolic volume increased during exercise from 56.9 {plus minus} 19.6 ml to 68.0 {plus minus} 15.9 ml, but the increase was suppressed (from 49.1 {plus minus} 11.0 ml to 44.5 {plus minus} 15.5 ml) after ISDN. ISDN prevented not only cardiac symptoms nor ECG changes but also improved abnormal left ventricular function during exercise. (author).

  2. Chronic inhibition of nitric oxide synthase augments the ACTH response to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankord, Ryan; McAllister, Richard M; Ganjam, Venkataseshu K; Laughlin, M Harold

    2009-03-01

    Exercise can activate the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, and regular exercise training can impact how the HPA axis responds to stress. The mechanism by which acute exercise induces HPA activity is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that nitric oxide modulates the neuroendocrine component of the HPA axis during exercise. Female Yucatan miniature swine were treated with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to test the effect of chronic nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition on the ACTH response to exercise. In addition, we tested the effect of NOS inhibition on blood flow to tissues of the HPA axis and report the effects of handling and treadmill exercise on the plasma concentrations of ACTH and cortisol. Chronic NOS inhibition decreased plasma NO(x) levels by 44%, increased mean arterial blood pressure by 46%, and increased expression of neuronal NOS in carotid arteries. Vascular conductance was decreased in the frontal cortex, the hypothalamus, and the adrenal gland. Chronic NOS inhibition exaggerated the ACTH response to exercise. In contrast, chronic NOS inhibition decreased the ACTH response to restraint, suggesting that the role of NO in modulating HPA activity is stressor dependent. These results demonstrate that NOS activity modulates the response of the neuroendocrine component of the HPA axis during exercise stress.

  3. Experience affects exercise-induced changes in catecholamines, glucose, and FFA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, A.J.W.; Steffens, A.B.; Dreteler, G.H.; Benthem, L.; Bruntink, R.

    The interference of the experimental conditions on the exercise-induced alterations in plasma catecholamines, plasma free fatty acids, and glucose and insulin concentrations was investigated in rats. Exercise consisted of strenuous swimming against a countercurrent (0.22 m/s) for 15 min in a pool

  4. Survey the effect of aerobic exercise on aerobic capacity in patients with coronary artery disease (cad)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyani, M. N.; Ebadi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Increased aerobic exercise capacity appears to reduce both all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality. Physical exercise to improve maximal oxygen consumption (VO/sub 2max/) is thus strongly recommended, however evidence regarding the most efficient training intensity for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is still lacking. The purpose of this randomized study was to assess the effects of aerobic exercise for increasing VO/sub 2max/ in stable CAD-patients. Thirty stable CAD-patients were randomized to supervised walking 30 min three times a week for 10 weeks. Before and after training VO/sub 2max/ was predicted from Bruce treadmill test. Before training VO/sub 2max/ was 35.2+-4.32 ml/kg/min and after training the mean VO/sub 2max/ was 43.1+-3.4 ml/kg/min. This difference was significant (p<0.05). Aerobic exercise is effective for increasing VO/sub 2max/ in stable CAD-patients. As VO/sub 2max/ seems to reflect a continuum between health and cardiovascular disease and death, the present data may be useful in designing effective training programmes for improved health in the future. (author)

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of thallium-201 perfusion scintigrams under exercise in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verani, M.S.; Marcus, M.L.; Razzak, M.A.; Ehrhardt, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The specificity and sensitivity of thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), under exercise, in patients with suspected coronary-obstructive disease was compared with graded exercise ECG tests (GTX) in patients with angiographically normal (N = 34) and obstructed (N = 48) coronary arteries. Of the 34 patients with normal coronaries, only one had a perfusion defect on the MPI (specificity 97%). Of the 48 patients with coronary obstructive disease (>50% obstruction of at least one coronary vessel), MPI was positive in 38 (sensitivity 79%). In contrast, the GTX had a specificity of 62% and sensitivity of 88% if nondiagnostic GTX tests are excluded. When the MPI and the GTX were used in combination, however, the sensitivity of detecting patients with coronary obstructive disease was increased to 94% (p < 0.01). The MPI was particularly useful in the evaluation of the 26 patients with nondiagnostic GTX. In this group, 24 of the 26 patients were correctly identified by the MPI with respect to the presence or absence of coronary-obstructive disease. In the 14 patients with a history of classical angina but with normal coronaries, the MPI was negative in 13 and positive in one, thus suggesting that in the majority of these patients transient transmural myocardial ischemia probably does not occur during exercise. The presence or absence of angiographically demonstrable coronary collateral vessels did not seem to influence the exercise MPI in patients with coronary-obstructive disease. Thus, although the MPI does not correctly identify all patients with either coronary-obstructive disease or normal coronary arteries, it is helpful in patients who have a nondiagnostic GTX. Furthermore, when used in combination with the GTX, the MPI significantly increases the likelihood that significant coronary-obstructive disease is present when both tests are positive, and that coronary disease is absent when both tests are negative

  6. Effect of Submaximal Warm-up Exercise on Exercise-induced Asthma in African School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtshali, B F; Mokwena, K; Oguntibeju, O O

    2015-03-01

    Regular physical activity has long been regarded as an important component of a healthy lifestyle. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is one of the major problems interfering with the performance of exercise. A warm-up exercise programme has been cited as a non-pharmacologic means of reducing EIA, but its effect has not been fully elucidated. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of unrecognized EIA in Pretoria primary school children, determine the effect of a warm-up exercise programme on EIA and to establish the relationship between history of allergy, family history of asthma and EIA. A random sample of 640 school children was selected. The study was divided into three phases. In phase one, a descriptive cross-sectional study was done using the standardized European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) questionnaire. In phase two, non-asthmatic participants that returned a completed questionnaire were included in the field study. Pre-test and post-test experimental designs were used, where peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured at baseline and within ten minutes after exercise. A total of 340 subjects completed the Free Running Asthma Screening Test (FRAST); EIA was defined as a decrease in baseline PEFR ≥ 10% after exercise and 75 children (22%) had EIA. In phase three, 29 of the 75 subjects participated in the warm-up programme which was performed in the laboratory and subjects acted as their own controls. Predefined protocols for the study were followed. Seventy-five (22%) of the 340 participants had EIA. The mean age, height and weight were 10.51 years, 139.26 cm and 33.45 kg, respectively. Exercise-induced asthma symptoms were cough (25%), chest pain (16%), wheeze (12%) and chest tightness (12%). The history of allergy was 75%, family history of allergy 40% and positive history of allergy when near animals, feathers or in dusty areas 38%. Wheezing during or after exercise, wheezing when near animals, feathers or in dusty areas

  7. Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm and Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Caggiano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sport is an essential part of childhood, with precious and acknowledged positive health effects but the impact of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB significantly reduces participation in physical activity. It is important to recognize EIB, differentiating EIB with or without asthma if the transient narrowing of the airways after exercise is associated with asthmatic symptoms or not, in the way to select the most appropriate treatment among the many treatment options available today. Therapy is prescribed based on symptoms severity but diagnosis of EIB is established by changes in lung function provoked by exercise evaluating by direct and indirect tests. Sometimes, in younger children it is difficult to obtain the registration of difference between the preexercise forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 value and the lowest FEV1 value recorded within 30 min after exercise, defined as the gold standard, but interrupter resistance, in association with spirometry, has been showed to be a valid alternative in preschool age. Atopy is the main risk factor, as demonstrated by epidemiologic data showing that among the estimated pediatric population with EIB up to 40% of them have allergic rhinitis and 30% of these patients may develop adult asthma, according with atopic march. Adopting the right treatment and prevention, selecting sports with no marked hyperventilation and excessive cooling of the airways, children with EIB can be able to take part in physical activity like all others.

  8. Diffuse optical characterization of an exercising patient group with peripheral artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putt, Mary; Chandra, Malavika; Yu, Guoqiang; Xing, Xiaoman; Han, Sung Wan; Lech, Gwen; Shang, Yu; Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Yodh, Arjun G.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a common condition with high morbidity. While measurement of tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) has been demonstrated, this is the first study to assess both StO2 and relative blood flow (rBF) in the extremities of PAD patients. Diffuse optics is employed to measure hemodynamic response to treadmill and pedal exercises in 31 healthy controls and 26 patients. For StO2, mild and moderate/severe PAD groups show pronounced differences compared with controls. Pre-exercise mean StO2 is lower in PAD groups by 9.3% to 10.6% compared with means of 63.5% to 66.2% in controls. For pedal, relative rate of return of StO2 to baseline is more rapid in controls (p<0.05). Patterns of rBF also differ among groups. After both exercises, rBF tend to occur at depressed levels among severe PAD patients compared with healthy (p<0.05); post-treadmill, rBF tend to occur at elevated levels among healthy compared with severe PAD patients (p<0.05). Additionally, relative rate of return to baseline StO2 is more rapid among subjects with reduced levels of depression in rBF (p=0.041), even after adjustment for ankle brachial index. This suggests a physiologic connection between rBF and oxygenation that can be measured using diffuse optics, and potentially employed as an evaluative tool in further studies. PMID:23708193

  9. Stent-induced flow disturbances in the ipsilateral external carotid artery following internal carotid artery stenting: a temporary cause of jaw claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurgea, Georgiana-Aura; Haumer, Markus; Mlekusch, Irene; Sabeti-Sandor, Schila; Dick, Petra; Schillinger, Martin; Minar, Erich; Mlekusch, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    We hypothesize that stenting of the internal carotid artery can immediately impede blood flow to the external carotid artery by either plaque shift or stent coverage of the ostium, and thereby cause ischemic symptoms like ipsilateral jaw claudication. Thirty-three patients with high-grade asymptomatic stenosis of the internal carotid artery who underwent endovascular treatment were examined by ultrasound of the external carotid artery and performed an exercise test by chewing chewing gum synchronously to an electronic metronome for 3 min. Tests were performed before, the day after, and 1 week after the stenting procedure. Claudication time was defined as the timespan until occurrence of pain of the masseter muscle and/or chewing dyssynchrony to the metronome for more than 15 s. Ten patients with an isolated, atherosclerotic stenosis of the external carotid artery served as controls. A significantly reduced claudication time (in seconds) was recorded in patients who underwent carotid artery stenting compared to baseline values; median 89 (interquartile range, IQR, 57 to 124) vs. median 180 (IQR 153 to 180; p external carotid artery into faster or slower as 200 cm/sec, the effect was even accentuated. Stenting values showed improvement 1 week after but did not return to baseline levels. No respective changes were found in controls. Stenting of the internal carotid artery lead to ipsilateral flow deterioration at the external carotid artery resulting in temporary jaw claudication. This impairment attenuated over the time and was significantly reduced after 1 week.

  10. Favorable effect of aerobic exercise on arterial pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity during stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milatz, Florian; Ketelhut, Sascha; Ketelhut, Sascha; Ketelhut, Reinhard G

    2015-07-01

    Increased central pulse wave velocity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The favorable influence of exercise on arterial stiffness (AS) and blood pressure (BP) has been reported exclusively at rest. The present study investigated the influence of a single bout of acute cycling on AS and BP during recovery and, moreover, during cold pressor stress testing. 32 healthy men (33.7 ± 8 years, BMI 24 ± 2.5 kg/m²) performed a 60 minute endurance exercise on a bicycle ergometer (45 % VO2max). Before and after exercise aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) as well as central and peripheral BP were measured non-invasively at rest and at the end of a 2 minute cold pressor test (CPT). Even after 60 minutes of recovery aPWV (- 0.22 ± 0.3 m / sec) was significantly reduced (p Exercise decreased peripheral (- 8 ± 7 mmHg) and central (- 7 ± 8 mmHg) systolic BP as well as peripheral (- 3 ± 5 mmHg) and central (- 4 ± 7 mmHg) diastolic BP (p exercise, there was a significant reduction in aPWV (- 0.19 ± 0.3 m / sec), peripheral (- 6 ± 10 mmHg) and central (- 5 ± 8 mmHg) systolic BP as well as peripheral (- 3 ± 6 mmHg) and central (- 3 ± 6 mmHg) diastolic BP during CPT after exercise (p exercise leads not only to decreased BP but even more reduces aPWV as a measure of AS even after 60 minutes of recovery. In particular, the investigation provides evidence that acute moderate-intensity exercise has a favorable effect on BP and aPWV during stress testing.

  11. Quantitative thallium-201 myocardial exercise scintigraphy in normal subjects and patients with normal coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemeyer, M.G.; St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein; Laarman, G.J.; Lelbach, S.; Cramer, M.J.; Ascoop, C.A.P.L.; Verzijlbergen, J.F.; Wall, E.E. van der; Zwinderman, A.H.; Pauwels, E.K.J.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative thallium-201 myocardial exercise scintigraphy was tested in two patient populations representing alternative standards for cardiac normality: group I comprised 18 male uncatherized patients with a low likelihood of coronary artery disease (CAD); group II contained 41 patients with normal coronary arteriograms. Group I patients were younger, they achieved a higher rate-pressure product than group II patients; all had normal findings by phisical examination and electrocardiography at rest and exercise. Group II patients comprised 21 females, 11 patients showed abnormal electrocardiography at rest, and five patients showed ischemic ST depression during exercise. Twelve patients had sign of minimal CAD. Twelve patients revealed abnormal visual and quantitative thallium findings, three of these patients had minimal CAD. Profiles of uptake and washout of thallium-201 were derived from both patient groups, and compared with normal limits developed by Maddahi et al. Furthermore, low likelihood and angiographically normal patients may differ substantially, and both sets of normal patients should be considered when establishing criteria of abnormality in exercise thallium imaging. When commercial software containing normal limits for quantitative analysis of exercise thallium-201 imaging is used in clinical practice, it is mandatory to compare these with normal limits of uptake and washout of thallium-201, derived from the less heterogeneous group of low-likelihood subjects, which should be used in selecting a normal population to define normality. (author). 37 refs.; 3 figs; 1 tab

  12. Det hepatopulmonale syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eibye, Simone Bendix; Christensen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) - a complication of liver disease - seems to be underdiagnosed, probably because of decreased awareness. HPS consists of the triade liver disease, intrapulmonary vascular dilatation and as a consequence arterial hypoxaemia. No medical therapy has proven effectiv...... perhaps with the exception of garlic, which has been effective in one controlled clinical trial. However, liver transplantation seems to improve HPS in most cases. Liver patients with unexplained hypoxaemia should be investigated for HPS....

  13. Exercise training attenuates sympathetic activation and oxidative stress in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Liu, J-Y; Zhang, H-X; Li, Q; Zhang, S-W

    2015-01-01

    It is known that excessive sympathetic activity and oxidative stress are enhanced in obesity. This study aimed to clarify whether exercise training (ET) attenuates sympathetic activation and oxidative stress in obesity. The obesity was induced by high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four groups: regular diet (RD) plus sedentary (RD-S), RD plus ET (RD-ET), HFD plus sedentary (HFD-S), and HFD plus ET (HFD-ET). The rats in RD-ET and HFD-ET groups were trained on a motorized treadmill for 60 min/day, five days/week for 8 weeks. The sympathetic activity was evaluated by the plasma norepinephrine (NE) level. The superoxide anion, malondialdehyde and F2-isoprostanes levels in serum and muscles were measured to evaluate oxidative stress. The ET prevented the increases in the body weight, arterial pressure and white adipose tissue mass in HFD rats. The NE level in plasma and oxidative stress related parameters got lower in HFD-ET group compared with HFD-S group. We have found decreased mRNA and protein levels of toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and TLR-4 by ET in HFD rats. These findings suggest that ET may be effective for attenuating sympathetic activation and oxidative stress in diet-induced obesity.

  14. Respiratory muscle stretch gymnastics in patients with post coronary artery bypass grafting pain : Impact on respiratory muscle function, activity, mood and exercise capacity

    OpenAIRE

    會田, 信子; 渋谷, 優子; 吉野, 克樹; Komoda, Masaji; 井上, 智子

    2002-01-01

    A new rehabilitation (New-RH) program including respiratory muscle stretch gymnastics (RMSG) was developed to alleviate post-coronary artery bypass grafting pain (PCP). Effects on respiratory muscle function, pain, activities of daily living (ADL), mood and exercise capacity were investigated. Subjects were 16 consecutive patients undergoing median full sternotomy coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and were randomly divided into equal New-RH (S-group) and conventional therapy (C-group) g...

  15. Abnormal splenic artery diameter/hepatic artery diameter ratio in cirrhosis-induced portal hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Dao-Bing; Dai, Chuan-Zhou; Lu, Shi-Chun; He, Ning; Wang, Wei; Li, Hong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine an optimal cutoff value for abnormal splenic artery diameter/proper hepatic artery diameter (S/P) ratio in cirrhosis-induced portal hypertension. METHODS: Patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension (n = 770) and healthy volunteers (n = 31) underwent volumetric computed tomography three-dimensional vascular reconstruction to measure the internal diameters of the splenic artery and proper hepatic artery to calculate the S/P ratio. The cutoff value for abnormal S/P ratio was determined using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, and the prevalence of abnormal S/P ratio and associations between abnormal S/P ratio and major complications of portal hypertension were studied using logistic regression. RESULTS: The receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the cutoff points for abnormal splenic artery internal diameter and S/P ratio were > 5.19 mm and > 1.40, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 74.2%, 45.2%, 97.1%, and 6.6%, respectively. The prevalence of an abnormal S/P ratio in the patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension was 83.4%. Patients with a higher S/P ratio had a lower risk of developing ascites [odds ratio (OR) = 0.708, 95%CI: 0.508-0.986, P = 0.041] and a higher risk of developing esophageal and gastric varices (OR = 1.483, 95%CI: 1.010-2.175, P = 0.044) and forming collateral circulation (OR = 1.518, 95%CI: 1.033-2.230, P = 0.034). After splenectomy, the portal venous pressure and maximum and mean portal venous flow velocities were reduced, while the flow rate and maximum and minimum flow velocities of the hepatic artery were increased (P portal hypertension, and it can be used as an important marker of splanchnic hemodynamic disturbances. PMID:23483462

  16. The impact of menstrual phase on brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation during handgrip exercise in healthy premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urzo, Katrina A; King, Trevor J; Williams, Jennifer S; Silvester, Morgan D; Pyke, Kyra E

    2018-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? The aim of this study was to determine the influence of menstrual phase on flow-mediated dilatation in response to sustained, exercise-induced increases in shear stress. What is the main finding and its importance? We showed, for the first time, that in healthy, premenopausal women the flow-mediated dilatation stimulated by exercise-induced increases in shear stress did not fluctuate across two phases of the menstrual cycle, despite significant fluctuations in oestrogen. This suggests that endothelial function is not consistently augmented in the high-oestrogen phase. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in response to a sustained shear-stress stimulus (e.g. via handgrip exercise; HGEX) is emerging as a useful tool for assessing endothelial function; however, the impact of menstrual phase on HGEX-FMD is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HGEX-FMD fluctuates with cyclical changes in oestrogen concentrations over two discrete phases (low and high oestrogen) of the menstrual cycle. Brachial artery (BA) diameter and blood velocity were assessed with two-dimesional and Doppler ultrasound, respectively. Shear stress was estimated using shear rate (SR = BA blood velocity/BA diameter). Participants (12 healthy, regularly cycling women, 21 ± 2 years of age) completed two experimental visits: (i) low oestrogen (early follicular, EF); and (ii) high oestrogen (late follicular, LF). Reactive hyperaemia-stimulated FMD (RH-FMD) and HGEX-FMD (6 min of handgrip exercise) were assessed during each visit. Results are mean values ± SD. Oestrogen increased from the EF to LF phase (EF, 33 ± 9 pg ml -1 ; LF, 161 ± 113 pg ml -1 , P = 0.003). However, neither the SR stimuli (HGEX, P = 0.501; RH, P = 0.173) nor the FMD responses differed between phases (EF versus LF: HGEX-FMD, 4.8 ± 2.8 versus 4.6 ± 2.2%, P = 0.601; RH-FMD, 7.9 ± 4.3 versus 6.4 ± 3.1%, P = 0.071). These results extend

  17. Recirculation zone length in renal artery is affected by flow spirality and renal-to-aorta flow ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Fulker, David; Barber, Tracie

    2017-07-01

    Haemodynamic perturbations such as flow recirculation zones play a key role in progression and development of renal artery stenosis, which typically originate at the aorta-renal bifurcation. The spiral nature of aortic blood flow, division of aortic blood flow in renal artery as well as the exercise conditions have been shown to alter the haemodynamics in both positive and negative ways. This study focuses on the combinative effects of spiral component of blood flow, renal-to-aorta flow ratio and the exercise conditions on the size and distribution of recirculation zones in renal branches using computational fluid dynamics technique. Our findings show that the recirculation length was longest when the renal-to-aorta flow ratio was smallest. Spiral flow and exercise conditions were found to be effective in reducing the recirculation length in particular in small renal-to-aorta flow ratios. These results support the hypothesis that in renal arteries with small flow ratios where a stenosis is already developed an artificially induced spiral flow within the aorta may decelerate the progression of stenosis and thereby help preserve kidney function.

  18. Circulatory response evoked by a 3 s bout of dynamic leg exercise in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, W.; Harms, M. P.; ten Harkel, A. D.; van Lieshout, J. J.; Sprangers, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    1. The mechanisms underlying the pronounced transient fall in arterial blood pressure evoked by a 3 s bout of bicycle exercise were investigated in twenty healthy young adults and four patients with hypoadrenergic orthostatic hypotension. 2. In healthy subjects a 3 s bout of upright cycling induced

  19. Clinical Applications for Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David

    1989-01-01

    Patients with chronic conditions such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity might benefit from prescribed exercise. Although exercise does not reverse pathologic changes, it may play a role in disease management. (JD)

  20. Alternatives to the six-minute walk test in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainguy, Vincent; Malenfant, Simon; Neyron, Anne-Sophie; Saey, Didier; Maltais, François; Bonnet, Sébastien; Provencher, Steeve

    2014-01-01

    The physiological response during the endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT), the cycle endurance test (CET) and the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) remains unknown in PAH. We tested the hypothesis that endurance tests induce a near-maximal physiological demand comparable to incremental tests. We also hypothesized that differences in respiratory response during exercise would be related to the characteristics of the exercise tests. Within two weeks, twenty-one PAH patients (mean age: 54(15) years; mean pulmonary arterial pressure: 42(12) mmHg) completed two cycling exercise tests (incremental cardiopulmonary cycling exercise test (CPET) and CET) and three field tests (ISWT, ESWT and six-minute walk test (6MWT)). Physiological parameters were continuously monitored using the same portable telemetric device. Peak oxygen consumption (VO(2peak)) was similar amongst the five exercise tests (p = 0.90 by ANOVA). Walking distance correlated markedly with the VO(2peak) reached during field tests, especially when weight was taken into account. At 100% exercise, most physiological parameters were similar between incremental and endurance tests. However, the trends overtime differed. In the incremental tests, slopes for these parameters rose steadily over the entire duration of the tests, whereas in the endurance tests, slopes rose sharply from baseline to 25% of maximum exercise at which point they appeared far less steep until test end. Moreover, cycling exercise tests induced higher respiratory exchange ratio, ventilatory demand and enhanced leg fatigue measured subjectively and objectively. Endurance tests induce a maximal physiological demand in PAH. Differences in peak respiratory response during exercise are related to the modality (cycling vs. walking) rather than the progression (endurance vs. incremental) of the exercise tests.

  1. Coronary artery with aberrant origin malignant right

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozcan, E.; Bozlar, U.; Demirkol, S.; Saglam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries is a major cause of sudden death, especially in young patients. Objectives and tasks: In this study we aim to present a young patient with chest pain who had malignant right coronary artery (RCA) with aberrant origin. Materials and methods: 24-year-old man who applied cardiology clinic for chest pain and palpitations especially after exercise, was referred to our clinic for coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography to evaluate coronary artery anomalies. Results: In CT angiography; we detected aberrant RCA with origin of tubularly part of ascendant aorta with a malignant course between aorta and pulmonary artery. Left main coronary artery, left anterior descending and circumflex artery had normal origin and course. Conclusion: Coronary artery with malignant course may cause sudden death especially after exercise. Coronary CT angiography has an important role in diagnosis of congenital coronary artery anomalies, with high resolution multiplanner reformatted images

  2. Quantitative exercise technetium-99m tetrofosmin myocardial tomography for the identification and localization of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullo, P.; Cuocolo, A.; Nicolai, E.; Cardei, S.; Nappi, A.; Squame, F.; Covelli, E.M.; Pace, L.; Salvatore, M.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of quantitative 1-day exercise-rest technetium-99m tetrofosmin tomography in the identification of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and in the detection of individual stenosed coronary vessels. Sixty-one patients with suspected CAD who underwent coronary angiography and 13 normal volunteers were studied. All patients were submitted to two i.v. injections of 99m Tc-tetrofosmin, one at peak exercise (370 MBq) and the other (1110 MBq) at rest 3 h after exercise (images 15-30 min after injection for both studies). All patients with CAD (≥50% luminal stenosis) (n=50) had an abnormal 99m Tc-tetrofosmin tomogram. Only one patient without significant coronary narrowing showed abnormal findings. Overall senstivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy in the detection of individual stenosed vissels were 77%, 93% and 85%, respectively. Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy in the identification of individuals stenosed coronary vessels were significantly higher (P 75%). (orig.)

  3. Reverse 201Tl myocardial redistribution induced by coronary artery spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Dingcheng; Yin Jilin; Gong Zhihua; Xie Zhenhong; Zhang Jinhe; Wen Yanfei; Yi Shaodong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of reverse redistribution (RR) on dipyridamole 201 Tl myocardial perfusion studies in the patients with coronary artery spasm. Methods: Twenty-six patients with coronary artery spasm and presented as RR on dipyridamole 201 Tl myocardial perfusion studies were enlisted as RR group, while other 16 patients with no coronary artery stenosis nor RR were enlisted as control group. Dipyridamole test was repeated during coronary angiography. Corrected thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count (CTFC) and TIMI myocardial perfusion grade (TMPG) were measured at RR related and non-RR related coronary arteries before and after dipyridamole infusion respectively. All of the data were analyzed by Student's t-test or χ 2 -test and correlation analysis. Results: Coronary artery angiography showed slower blood flow and lower myocardial perfusion in RR related vessels when compared with non-RR related vessels in RR group, but there was no significant difference among the main coronary arteries in control group. The perfusion defects of RR area at rest were positively related to slower blood velocity at corresponding coronary arteries (r = 0.79, t =10.18, P 0.05). Conclusion: RR is related to the decreased blood flow and myocardial perfusion induced by coronary artery spasm at rest, which may be improved by stress test such as intravenous dipyridamole infusion. (authors)

  4. Acute exercise induces biphasic increase in respiratory mRNA in skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Kizaki, Takako; Haga, Shukoh; Ohno, Hideki; Takemasa, Tohru

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) promotes the expression of oxidative enzymes in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that activation of the p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in response to exercise was associated with exercise-induced PGC-1α and respiratory enzymes expression and aimed to demonstrate this under the physiological level. We subjected mice to a single bout of treadmill running and found that the exercise induced a biphasic increase in the expression of respiratory enzymes mRNA. The second phase of the increase was accompanied by an increase in PGC-1α protein, but the other was not. Administration of SB203580 (SB), an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suppressed the increase in PGC-1α expression and respiratory enzymes mRNA in both phases. These data suggest that p38 MAPK is associated with the exercise-induced expression of PGC-1α and biphasic increase in respiratory enzyme mRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle under physiological conditions

  5. Exercise electrocardiogram testing in two brothers with different outcome – a case study exercise testing in master cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüst CA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Christoph Alexander Rüst,1 Beat Knechtle,1,2 Thomas Rosemann11Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, SwitzerlandAbstract: The cases of two brothers training and competing as master cyclists and both preparing for a cycling tour are presented. The older brother aged 66 years went first to the primary care physician and presented with an asymptomatic depression in the exercise stress test of the ST segment in V5 and V6 during recovery after complete exhaustion. Coronary angiography revealed a multi vessel coronary artery disease and he underwent bypass surgery. One year later, he successfully completed his planned cycling tour of ~600 km in seven stages and covering ~12,000 m of total ascent. The younger brother aged 59 years went a few months later to the primary care physician and also performed asymptomatic exercise stress testing without changes in the ST segments. Unfortunately, 2 months later he suffered a cardiac arrest during his cycling tour and survived following immediate successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the road by his cycling colleagues. Immediate invasive coronary arteriography showed a complete stenosis of the trunk of arteria coronaria sinistra (left coronary artery, a 40%–50% stenosis of ramus circumflexus, and a 20% stenosis of arteria coronaria dextra (right coronary artery. The left coronary artery was dilated and he continued cycling 2 months later. In both brothers, familial hypercholesterolemia was the main cardiovascular risk factor for the multi vessel coronary artery disease. A negative exercise electrocardiogram in siblings with an increased risk for coronary artery disease seemed not to exclude an advanced multi vessel coronary artery disease. In master athletes with asymptomatic exercise electrocardiogram but a positive family history, further examinations should be performed in order to detect

  6. Strength training reduces arterial blood pressure but not sympathetic neural activity in young normotensive subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R.; Ray, Chester A.; Downs, Emily M.; Cooke, William H.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of resistance training on arterial blood pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) at rest have not been established. Although endurance training is commonly recommended to lower arterial blood pressure, it is not known whether similar adaptations occur with resistance training. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that whole body resistance training reduces arterial blood pressure at rest, with concomitant reductions in MSNA. Twelve young [21 +/- 0.3 (SE) yr] subjects underwent a program of whole body resistance training 3 days/wk for 8 wk. Resting arterial blood pressure (n = 12; automated sphygmomanometer) and MSNA (n = 8; peroneal nerve microneurography) were measured during a 5-min period of supine rest before and after exercise training. Thirteen additional young (21 +/- 0.8 yr) subjects served as controls. Resistance training significantly increased one-repetition maximum values in all trained muscle groups (P < 0.001), and it significantly decreased systolic (130 +/- 3 to 121 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.01), diastolic (69 +/- 3 to 61 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.04), and mean (89 +/- 2 to 81 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.01) arterial blood pressures at rest. Resistance training did not affect MSNA or heart rate. Arterial blood pressures and MSNA were unchanged, but heart rate increased after 8 wk of relative inactivity for subjects in the control group (61 +/- 2 to 67 +/- 3 beats/min; P = 0.01). These results indicate that whole body resistance exercise training might decrease the risk for development of cardiovascular disease by lowering arterial blood pressure but that reductions of pressure are not coupled to resistance exercise-induced decreases of sympathetic tone.

  7. Sex differences in cardiac function after prolonged strenuous exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Anita T; Phillips, Aaron A; Foulds, Heather J; Charlesworth, Sarah A; Bredin, Shannon S D; Burr, Jamie F; Koehle, Michael S; Warburton, Darren E R

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate sex differences in left ventricular (LV) function after an ultramarathon, and the association of vascular and training indices with the magnitude of exercise-induced cardiac fatigue. Descriptive field study. Fat Dog 100 Ultramarathon Trail Race, Canada. Thirty-four (13 women) recreational runners (aged 28-56 years). A 100-km or 160-km mountain marathon. Baseline baroreceptor sensitivity, heart rate variability, and arterial compliance; Pre-exercise and postexercise echocardiographic evaluations of LV dimensions, volumes, Doppler flow velocities, tissue velocities, strain, and strain rate. Finishers represented 17 men (44.8 ± 6.6 years) and 8 women (45.9 ± 10.2 years; P = 0.758). After ultraendurance exercise, significant reductions (P training status/experience. These findings suggest that vascular health is an important contributor to the degree of cardiovascular strain incurred as the result of an acute bout of prolonged strenuous exercise.

  8. Fasting- and Exercise-Induced PDH Regulation in Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudiksen, Anders

    in selected mitochondrial proteins. Lastly, increased oxidative capacity leads to exercise-induced skeletal muscle PDH activation that is closely matched to the relative exercise intensity at submaximal exercise, while reaching a higher level at maximal exercise in trained individuals. These responses......Pyruvate dehydrogenase PDH constitutes the only mammalian pathway for irreversible conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA thus providing the vital link between glycolytic energy production, the TCA cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. Because the PDC controls the conversion of pyruvate it occupies...... a central position in relation to the control of mitochondrial energy production and cellular substrate metabolism. Suppression and activation of PDH becomes essential in situations where glucose availability and/or use changes with swift and appropriate regulation of the complex to maintain energy...

  9. One arm exercise induces significant interarm diastolic blood pressure difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Dezhi; Wang, Jiwei; Su, Hai; Xu, Jingsong; Liu, Yanna; Peng, Qiang; Wang, Lijuan

    2011-06-01

    This study is designed to investigate the inducing effect of one arm exercise on interarm difference (IAD) in the blood pressure (BP). Fifty healthy young participants were included in the study. Three-minute exercises of the right arm elbow flexion and extension were performed. The bilateral brachial BP was simultaneously measured with two automatic BP measurement devices before (basic) and immediately 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 min after exercise. The absolute difference in the systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) between the left and right BP of at least 10 mmHg was recognized as sIAD and dIAD. The baseline data of the SBP and DBP in left and right arms revealed no significant difference (SBP: 110 ± 10 vs. 111 ± 11 mmHg; DBP: 66 ± 8 vs. 66 ± 9 mmHg, both not significant). The prevalence of dIAD was 2% at the baseline. However, this prevalence increased to 80% at 0 min, as right arm exercise induced the right DBP decrease and left DBP increase, and then the prevalence decreased gradually within a 30-min recovery period. The prevalence of sIAD was zero at the baseline and the maximal prevalence was 8% during the 20-min postexercise period. One arm exercise can lead to a significant IAD in DBP. Any arm exercise should be avoided before BP measurement.

  10. Exercise thallium testing in ventricular preexcitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, S.; Gornick, C.; Grund, F.; Shafer, R.; Weir, E.K.

    1987-05-01

    Ventricular preexcitation, as seen in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, results in a high frequency of positive exercise electrocardiographic responses. Why this occurs is unknown but is not believed to reflect myocardial ischemia. Exercise thallium testing is often used for noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with conditions known to result in false-positive electrocardiographic responses. To assess the effects of ventricular preexcitation on exercise thallium testing, 8 men (aged 42 +/- 4 years) with this finding were studied. No subject had signs or symptoms of coronary artery disease. Subjects exercised on a bicycle ergometer to a double product of 26,000 +/- 2,000 (+/- standard error of mean). All but one of the subjects had at least 1 mm of ST-segment depression. Tests were terminated because of fatigue or dyspnea and no patient had chest pain. Thallium test results were abnormal in 5 patients, 2 of whom had stress defects as well as abnormally delayed thallium washout. One of these subjects had normal coronary arteries on angiography with a negative ergonovine challenge, and both had normal exercise radionuclide ventriculographic studies. Delayed thallium washout was noted in 3 of the subjects with ventricular preexcitation and normal stress images. This study suggests that exercise thallium testing is frequently abnormal in subjects with ventricular preexcitation. Ventricular preexcitation may cause dyssynergy of ventricular activation, which could alter myocardial thallium handling, much as occurs with left bundle branch block. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography may be a better test for noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with ventricular preexcitation.

  11. Exercise thallium testing in ventricular preexcitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, S.; Gornick, C.; Grund, F.; Shafer, R.; Weir, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    Ventricular preexcitation, as seen in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, results in a high frequency of positive exercise electrocardiographic responses. Why this occurs is unknown but is not believed to reflect myocardial ischemia. Exercise thallium testing is often used for noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with conditions known to result in false-positive electrocardiographic responses. To assess the effects of ventricular preexcitation on exercise thallium testing, 8 men (aged 42 +/- 4 years) with this finding were studied. No subject had signs or symptoms of coronary artery disease. Subjects exercised on a bicycle ergometer to a double product of 26,000 +/- 2,000 (+/- standard error of mean). All but one of the subjects had at least 1 mm of ST-segment depression. Tests were terminated because of fatigue or dyspnea and no patient had chest pain. Thallium test results were abnormal in 5 patients, 2 of whom had stress defects as well as abnormally delayed thallium washout. One of these subjects had normal coronary arteries on angiography with a negative ergonovine challenge, and both had normal exercise radionuclide ventriculographic studies. Delayed thallium washout was noted in 3 of the subjects with ventricular preexcitation and normal stress images. This study suggests that exercise thallium testing is frequently abnormal in subjects with ventricular preexcitation. Ventricular preexcitation may cause dyssynergy of ventricular activation, which could alter myocardial thallium handling, much as occurs with left bundle branch block. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography may be a better test for noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with ventricular preexcitation

  12. Hyperthyroidism enhances 5-HT-induced contraction of the rat pulmonary artery: role of calcium-activated chloride channel activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriowo, Mabayoje A; Oommen, Elsie; Khan, Islam

    2011-11-01

    Experimentally-induced hyperthyroidism in rodents is associated with signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of thyroxine-induced pulmonary hypertension on the contractile response of the pulmonary artery to 5-HT and the possible underlying signaling pathway. 5-HT concentration-dependently contracted artery segments from control and thyroxine-treated rats with pD(2) values of 5.04 ± 0.19 and 5.34 ± 0.14, respectively. The maximum response was significantly greater in artery segments from thyroxine-treated rats. Neither BW 723C86 (5-HT(2B)-receptor agonist) nor CP 93129 (5-HT(1B)-receptor agonist) contracted ring segments of the pulmonary artery from control and thyroxine-treated rats at concentrations up to 10(-4)M. There was no significant difference in the level of expression of 5-HT(2A)-receptor protein between the two groups. Ketanserin (3 × 10(-8)M) produced a rightward shift of the concentration-response curve to 5-HT in both groups with equal potency (-logK(B) values were 8.1 ± 0.2 and 7.9 ± 0.1 in control and thyroxine-treated rats, respectively). Nifedipine (10(-6)M) inhibited 5-HT-induced contractions in artery segments from control and thyroxine-treated rats and was more effective against 5-HT-induced contraction in artery segments for thyroxine-treated rats. The calcium-activated chloride channel blocker, niflumic acid (10(-4)M) also inhibited 5-HT-induced contractions in artery segments from control and thyroxine-treated rats and was more effective against 5-HT-induced contraction in artery segments for thyroxine-treated rats. It was concluded that hyperthyroidism enhanced 5-HT-induced contractions of the rat pulmonary artery by a mechanism involving increased activity of calcium-activated chloride channels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of naloxone opiate blockade on the immunomodulation induced by exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouix, O; elMezouini, M; Orsetti, A

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the possible involvement of the endogenous opiate system in the changes in immune competence induced by isolated exercise. Male untrained rats were subjected to a 2.5 hours swimming exercise bout. Animals were killed 15 min after the end of the exercise. The concentration of leukocytes, lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes and T4 (T-helper), T8 (T-suppressor/cytotoxic), interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) and transferrin receptor (TrfR) positive lymphocytes were determined both in peripheral blood and spleen by flow cytometric analysis. Exercise resulted in a significant decrease in 1) blood lymphocyte and splenic granulocyte number (p exercising rats induced a decrease in the concentration and proportion of T8 positive lymphocytes, thereby restoring a normal T4/T8 ratio both in peripheral blood and spleen. Naloxone had no effect in control animals. The concentration and proportion of IL-2R and TrfR positive lymphocytes were not affected by naloxone. The mechanisms of the immunomodulation induced by isolated intense exercise are unclear. These data suggest that endogenous opiates participate in the alteration of cell-mediated immunity associated with exercise by modulating the T8 (suppressor/cytotoxic)-cell activity.

  14. Hemodynamic and tissue oxygenation responses to exercise and beta-adrenergic blockade in patients with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monachini, Maristela C; Lage, Silvia G; Ran, Miguel A N; Cardoso, Rita H A; Medeiros, Caio; Caramelli, Bruno; Sposito, Andrei C; Ramires, José A F

    2004-07-01

    Exercise-induced dyspnea is a frequent feature in patients with hyperthyroidism. Data from clinical studies to elucidate the origin of this symptom are lacking. In the current study, we examined the hemodynamic and oxygenation responses to exercise and beta-adrenergic blockade in patients with hyperthyroidism and their relationship with dyspnea. Hemodynamic studies were performed under resting conditions and after isotonic exercise in 15 patients with hyperthyroidism and 11 control subjects. Exercise was applied using a bicycle ergometer, with progressive loads. In the hyperthyroid group, measurements were repeated at rest and during supine exercise after administering 15 mg of intravenous metoprolol. End-diastolic pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac index were higher in the hyperthyroid group than in controls (18.6 +/- 5.3 vs. 11.2 +/- 4.9 mmHg; p = 0.02, and 6.0 +/- 1.7 vs. 2.8 +/- 0.5 l/min/m2; p = 0.0001, respectively). After exercise, there was an increase in end-diastolic pulmonary artery pressure in the hyperthyroid group (18.6 +/- 5.3 to 25.5 +/- 9.9 mmHg; p = 0.02), revealing impaired cardiocirculatory reserve. Pulmonary arteriolar resistance increased significantly in parallel with end-diastolic pulmonary artery pressure after drug administration, suggesting an inadequate cardiovascular response after beta blockade in patients with hyperthyroidism. We observed that functional left ventricular reserve is impaired in patients with hyperthyroidism, suggesting an explanation for the frequent symptom of dyspnea and impaired exercise tolerance. Moreover, we also suggest that beta-adrenergic blockade may adversely affect cardiovascular function in patients with hyperthyroidism.

  15. AORTIC POST-RESISTANCE EXERCISE HYPOTENSION IN PATIENTS WITH PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia de Almeida Correia

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: A single session of resistance training decreases brachial blood pressure (BP in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD. However, it is not known whether similar responses occur in aortic BP, which is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk. Objective: This study aimed to analyze the effects of a single session of resistance training on aortic BP in PAD patients. Methods: This randomized, crossover, controlled trial involved 16 patients. All of them performed a session of resistance training (R - 3 x 10 reps in eight exercises, 5-7 on the OMNI Scale and a control session (C - resting for 50 min. Before and after each session, aortic BP was assessed by applanation tonometry technique. Results: There was an increase in systolic (P<0.002 and mean (P<0.001 aortic BP in both sessions; however, higher increases were observed in C session (P<0.001. Additionally, diastolic aortic BP only increased after C session (P=0.004. The hypotensive effect of the exercise on systolic, diastolic, and mean aortic BP were -12±2, -6±2, and -7±2 mmHg, respectively. Conclusion: A single session of resistance training promoted a hypotensive effect on aortic BP of patients with PAD, indicating an acute reduction in cardiovascular risk in this population. Level of Evidence I; Therapeutic studies - Investigating the results of treatment.

  16. Adaptation of exercise-induced stress in well-trained healthy young men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen Duijghuijsen, L.M.; Keijer, J.; Mensink, M.R.; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Ridder, L.O.; Nierkens, Stefan; Kartaram, Shirley; Verschuren, Martie C.M.; Pieters, Raymond; Bas, Richard; Witkamp, R.F.; Wichers, H.J.; Norren, van K.

    2017-01-01

    Strenuous exercise induces different stress-related physiological changes, potentially including changes in intestinal barrier function. In the Protégé Study (ISRCTN14236739; www.isrctn.com) we determined the test-retest repeatability in responses to exercise in well-trained individuals.
    Eleven

  17. Adaptation of exercise-induced stress in well-trained healthy young men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JanssenDuijghuijsen, Lonneke M; Keijer, Jaap; Mensink, Marco; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Ridder, Lars; Nierkens, Stefan; Kartaram, Shirley W; Verschuren, Martie C M; Pieters, Raymond H H; Bas, Richard; Witkamp, Renger F; Wichers, Harry J; van Norren, Klaske

    2017-01-01

    Strenuous exercise induces different stress-related physiological changes, potentially including changes in intestinal barrier function. In the Protégé Study (ISRCTN14236739; www.isrctn.com) we determined the test-retest repeatability in responses to exercise in well-trained individuals. Eleven

  18. Pharmacologic Strategies for Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm with a Focus on Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke; Mastronarde, John

    2018-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is the transient narrowing of the airways during and after exercise that occurs in response to increased ventilation in susceptible individuals. It occurs across the age spectrum in patients with underlying asthma and can occur in athletes without baseline...

  19. Resistance training controls arterial blood pressure in rats with L-NAME- induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Ayslan Jorge Santos de; Santos, Anne Carolline Veríssimo dos; Souza, Karine dos Santos; Aires, Marlúcia Bastos; Santana-Filho, Valter Joviniano; Fioretto, Emerson Ticona; Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2013-04-01

    Arterial hypertension is a multifactorial chronic condition caused by either congenital or acquired factors. To evaluate the effects of Resistance Training (RT) on arterial pressure, and on vascular reactivity and morphology, of L-NAME-treated hypertensive rats. Male Wistar rats (200 - 250 g) were allocated into Sedentary Normotensive (SN), Sedentary Hypertensive (SH) and Trained Hypertensive (TH) groups. Hypertension was induced by adding L-NAME (40 mg/Kg) to the drinking water for four weeks. Arterial pressure was evaluated before and after RT. RT was performed using 50% of 1RM, 3 sets of 10 repetitions, 3 times per week for four weeks. Vascular reactivity was measured in rat mesenteric artery rings by concentration-response curves to sodium nitroprusside (SNP); phenylephrine (PHE) was also used for histological and stereological analysis. Resistance training inhibited the increase in mean and diastolic arterial pressures. Significant reduction was observed in Rmax (maximal response) and pD2 (potency) of PHE between SH and TH groups. Arteries demonstrated normal intima, media and adventitia layers in all groups. Stereological analysis demonstrated no significant difference in luminal, tunica media, and total areas of arteries in the SH and TH groups when compared to the SN group. Wall-to-lumen ratio of SH arteries was significantly different compared to SN arteries (parteries. RT was able to prevent an increase in blood pressure under the conditions in this study. This appears to involve a vasoconstrictor regulation mechanism and maintenance of luminal diameter in L-NAME induced hypertensive rats.

  20. Colostrum supplementation protects against exercise - induced oxidative stress in skeletal muscle in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appukutty Mahenderan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined the effects of bovine colostrum on exerciseinduced modulation of antioxidant parameters in skeletal muscle in mice. Adult male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups (control, colostrum alone, exercise and exercise with colostrum and each group had three subgroups (day 0, 21 and 42. Colostrum groups of mice were given a daily oral supplement of 50 mg/kg body weight of bovine colostrum and the exercise group of mice were made to exercise on the treadmill for 30 minutes per day. Total antioxidants, lipid hydroperoxides, xanthine oxidase and super oxide dismutase level was assayed from the homogenate of hind limb skeletal muscle. Results Exercise—induced a significant oxidative stress in skeletal muscles as evidenced by the elevated lipid hydroperoxides and xanthine oxidase levels. There was a significant decrease in skeletal muscle total antioxidants and superoxide dismutase levels. Daily colostrum supplement significantly reduced the lipid hydroperoxides and xanthine oxidase enzyme level and increased the total antioxidant levels in the leg muscle. Conclusion Thus, the findings of this study showed that daily bovine colostrum supplementation was beneficial to skeletal muscle to reduce the oxidant-induced damage during muscular exercise.

  1. Predicting short and long-term exercise intentions and behaviour in patients with coronary artery disease: A test of protection motivation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulloch, Heather; Reida, Robert; D'Angeloa, Monika Slovinec; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Morrina, Louise; Beatona, Louise; Papadakisa, Sophia; Pipe, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of protection motivation theory (PMT) in the prediction of exercise intentions and behaviour in the year following hospitalisation for coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients with documented CAD (n = 787), recruited at hospital discharge, completed questionnaires measuring PMT's threat (i.e. perceived severity and vulnerability) and coping (i.e. self-efficacy, response efficacy) appraisal constructs at baseline, 2 and 6 months, and exercise behaviour at baseline, 6 and 12 months post-hospitalisation. Structural equation modelling showed that the PMT model of exercise at 6 months had a good fit with the empirical data. Self-efficacy, response efficacy, and perceived severity predicted exercise intentions, which, in turn predicted exercise behaviour. Overall, the PMT variables accounted for a moderate amount of variance in exercise intentions (23%) and behaviour (20%). In contrast, the PMT model was not reliable for predicting exercise behaviour at 12 months post-hospitalisation. The data provided support for PMT applied to short-term, but not long-term, exercise behaviour among patients with CAD. Health education should concentrate on providing positive coping messages to enhance patients' confidence regarding exercise and their belief that exercise provides health benefits, as well as realistic information about disease severity.

  2. Exercise increases circulating GDF15 in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is a stress-sensitive circulating factor that regulates systemic energy balance. Since exercise is a transient physiological stress that has pleiotropic effects on whole-body energy metabolism, we herein explored the effect of exercise on a......) circulating GDF15 levels and b) GDF15 release from skeletal muscle in humans. METHODS: Seven healthy males either rested or exercised at 67% of their VO2max for 1 h and blood was sampled from the femoral artery and femoral vein before, during, and after exercise. Plasma GDF15 concentrations were determined...... in these samples. RESULTS: Plasma GDF15 levels increased 34% with exercise (p exercise. There was no difference between the arterial and venous GDF15 concentration before, during, and after exercise. During...

  3. Angioplasty and stent placement in the treatment of radiation-induced arterial injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Pengcheng; Pierre, P.; Philippe, O.; Danial, C.; Jean-Paul, B.; Cyril, B.; Jean-Pierre, C.; Denis, K.; Helve, R.; Francis, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of therapeutic efficacy and longterm patency of angioplasty and stent for the treatment of radiation induced arterial disease. Methods: PTA was attempted in 18 arterial lesions following irradiation in 14 patients. Thirteen stents were placed in 8 patients to treat occlusion (n = 3), aneurysm (n = 1), residual stenosis (n =2), multiple stenoses (n = 1), and delayed restenosis after previous balloon angioplasty (n = 1). The stents were readily visualized and patency of the stent and the target artery determined with Doppler US and (or) CT in all patients. Results: Interventional procedure was successful in 14 patients of which 8 underwent stent placement for their arterial lesions. Eleven of these patients demonstrated primary patency with relief of clinical symptoms with a mean follow-up of 2 years (range, 8 months -60 months). Clinical improvement was noted for the other patients. Eleven patients underwent PTA once or twice. One patient had PTA four times and three stents were installed, two of which were in the area of the aortic bifurcation, and one in the celiac trunk. another patient also had PTA four times and two stents were placed in the superior mesenteric artery. A stent was implanted in one patient because of PTA induced dissection and occlusion, and the arterial lesion was considered to be cured clinically after a follow-up of 5 years. Conclusions: The results suggested that PTA with single or multiple techniques may be effective immediately in the treatment of arterial lesions caused by radiation and can be considered the first therapeutic option in these cases

  4. Use of 'ideal' alveolar air equations and corrected end-tidal PCO2 to estimate arterial PCO2 and physiological dead space during exercise in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Iterson, Erik H; Olson, Thomas P

    2018-01-01

    Arterial CO 2 tension (PaCO 2 ) and physiological dead space (V D ) are not routinely measured during clinical cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Abnormal changes in PaCO 2 accompanied by increased V D directly contribute to impaired exercise ventilatory function in heart failure (HF). Because arterial catheterization is not standard practice during CPET, this study tested the construct validity of PaCO 2 and V D prediction models using 'ideal' alveolar air equations and basic ventilation and gas-exchangegas exchange measurements during CPET in HF. Forty-seven NYHA class II/III HF (LVEF=21±7%; age=55±9years; male=89%; BMI=28±5kg/m 2 ) performed step-wise cycle ergometry CPET to volitional fatigue. Breath-by-breath ventilation and gas exchange were measured continuously. Steady-state PaCO 2 was measured at rest and peak exercise via radial arterial catheterization. Criterion V D was calculated via 'ideal' alveolar equations, whereas PaCO 2 or V D models were based on end-tidal CO 2 tension (P ET CO 2 ), tidal volume (V T ), and/or weight. Criterion measurements of PaCO 2 (38±5 vs. 33±5mmHg, Pgas exchange and ventilatory responses demonstrate acceptable agreement with criterion measurements at peak exercise in HF patients. Routine assessment of PaCO 2 and V D can be used to improve interpretability of exercise ventilatory responses in HF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Flavanol-rich cocoa consumption enhances exercise-induced executive function improvements in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Hayato; Suga, Tadashi; Ishibashi, Aya; Takenaka, Saki; Tanaka, Daichi; Hirano, Yoshitaka; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Goto, Kazushige; Ebi, Kumiko; Isaka, Tadao; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2018-02-01

    Aerobic exercise is known to acutely improve cognitive functions, such as executive function (EF) and memory function (MF). Additionally, consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa has been reported to acutely improve cognitive function. The aim of this study was to determine whether high cocoa flavanol (CF; HCF) consumption would enhance exercise-induced improvement in cognitive function. To test this hypothesis, we examined the combined effects of HCF consumption and moderate-intensity exercise on EF and MF during postexercise recovery. Ten healthy young men received either an HCF (563 mg of CF) or energy-matched low CF (LCF; 38 mg of CF) beverage 70 min before exercise in a single-blind counterbalanced manner. The men then performed moderate-intensity cycling exercise at 60% of peak oxygen uptake for 30 min. The participants performed a color-word Stroop task and face-name matching task to evaluate EF and MF, respectively, during six time periods throughout the experimental session. EF significantly improved immediately after exercise compared with before exercise in both conditions. However, EF was higher after HCF consumption than after LCF consumption during all time periods because HCF consumption improved EF before exercise. In contrast, HCF consumption and moderate-intensity exercise did not improve MF throughout the experiment. The present findings demonstrated that HCF consumption before moderate-intensity exercise could enhance exercise-induced improvement in EF, but not in MF. Therefore, we suggest that the combination of HCF consumption and aerobic exercise may be beneficial for improving EF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Exercise on Oxidative Stress in Rats Induced by Ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Martinez-Campos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS induced by acute exercise is reduced by chronic exercise. Ozone (O3 exposure produces OS. The aim of this study was to determine if aerobic exercise (AE reduced OS produced by O3. A pilot experiment was performed with male Wistar rats submitted to AE (trained to swim 90 min/day. Adaptation to exercise was demonstrated three weeks after training by means of changes in reduced nitrates (NOx in plasma. Therefore, two-week training was chosen for the following experiments. Six of twelve trained rats were exposed to O3 (0.5 ppm, 4 h/day, one hour before exercise. Two groups of sedentary animals (n=6 each were used as controls, one of which was exposed to O3. At the end of the experiments NOx, 8-isoprostane (8-IP, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, and carbonyls (CBs were measured in plasma. CBs did not change in any group. O3-induced OS was manifested by reduced NOx and SOD activity, as well as increased 8-IP and MDA. Exercise significantly blocked O3 effects although SOD was also decreased by exercise (a greater drop occurring in the O3 group. It is concluded that AE protects against OS produced by O3 and the effect is independent of SOD.

  7. The Role of Episodic Postprandial Peptides in Exercise-Induced Compensatory Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Catherine; Blundell, John E; Caudwell, Phillipa; Webb, Dominic-Luc; Hellström, Per M; Näslund, Erik; Finlayson, Graham

    2017-11-01

    Prolonged physical activity gives rise to variable degrees of body weight and fat loss, and is associated with variability in appetite control. Whether these effects are modulated by postprandial, peptides is unclear. We examined the role of postprandial peptide response in compensatory eating during 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and in response to high-fat, low-carbohydrate (HFLC) and low-fat, high-carbohydrate (LFHC) meals. Of the 32 overweight/obese individuals, 16 completed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and 16 nonexercising control subjects were matched for age and body mass index. Exercisers were classified as responders or nonresponders depending on net energy balance from observed compared with expected body composition changes from measured energy expenditure. Plasma samples were collected before and after meals to compare profiles of total and acylated ghrelin, insulin, cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and total peptide YY (PYY) between HFLC and LFHC meals, pre- and postexercise, and between groups. No differences between pre- and postintervention peptide release. Responders had greater suppression of acylated ghrelin (P exercise. Responders to exercise-induced weight loss showed greater suppression of acylated ghrelin and greater release of GLP-1 and total PYY at baseline. Therefore, episodic postprandial peptide profiles appear to form part of the pre-existing physiology of exercise responders and suggest differences in satiety potential may underlie exercise-induced compensatory eating. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  8. Montelukast prevents vascular endothelial dysfunction from internal combustion exhaust inhalation during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, Kenneth W; Steigerwald, Michelle D; Fisk, Michelle Z

    2010-08-01

    Associations between high particulate matter (PM) pollution and increased morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease have been identified. This study assessed leukotriene (LT) participation in PM-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction. Ten healthy males exercised 4 times for 30 min in both high PM (550,286 +/- 42,004 particles x cm(-3)) and low PM (4571 +/- 1922 particles x cm(-3)) after ingesting placebo (PL) or 10 mg montelukast (MK; half-life 3-6 h), a leukotriene receptor antagonist. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured pre- and 30 min, 4 h, 24 h post-exercise. No basal brachial artery vascoconstriction was evident from high PM exercise. High PM blunted FMD, whereas high PM MK, low PM PL, and low PM MK demonstrated normal FMD (p < .003). Change in FMD (pre- to post-exercise) for high PM PL was different than for high PM MK, low PM PL, and low PM MK at 30 min post-exercise (p < .007). At 4 h, high PM MK FMD blunting increased (p = .1). At 24 h, high PM FMD blunting persisted (p < .05); no difference was observed between high PM PL or MK treatment, but was different that low PM PL/MK treatments (p < .05). MK blocked high PM post-exercise FMD blunting and maintained normal response, suggesting that leukotrienes are involved in PM-initiated vascular endothelial dysfunction.

  9. Coronary microvascular function, insulin sensitivity and body composition in predicting exercise capacity in overweight patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürs, Anders; Pedersen, Lene Rørholm; Olsen, Rasmus Huan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a negative impact on exercise capacity. The aim of this study was to determine how coronary microvascular function, glucose metabolism and body composition contribute to exercise capacity in overweight patients with CAD and without diabetes. METHODS...... by a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Body composition was determined by whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and magnetic resonance imaging. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography was used as a measure of microvascular function. RESULTS: Median BMI was 31.3 and 72...... metabolism and body composition. CFR, EDV and LVEF remained independent predictors of VO2peak in multivariable regression analysis. CONCLUSION: The study established CFR, EDV and LVEF as independent predictors of VO2peak in overweight CAD patients with no or only mild functional symptoms and a LVEF > 35...

  10. Nonpharmacologic Strategies to Manage Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, John; Amirav, Israel; Hostrup, Morten

    2018-05-01

    Pharmacologic management of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is the mainstay of preventative therapy. There are some nonpharmacologic interventions, however, that may assist the management of EIB. This review discusses these nonpharmacologic interventions and how they may be applied to patients and athletes with EIB. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Body position and late postoperative nocturnal hypoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Stausholm, K; Edvardsen, L

    1997-01-01

    Thirteen patients were monitored for nocturnal body position (supine vs. side) and arterial oxygen saturation pre-operatively and on the second postoperative night after major abdominal surgery. The number of positional changes were significantly decreased after operation (p ... position than on the side (p movements....... towards more time spent in the supine position (p = 0.1). Individual mean arterial oxygen saturation decreased postoperatively (p positions (p = 0.9). Pre-operatively, episodic desaturations were significantly more frequent in the supine...

  12. Alternatives to the six-minute walk test in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Mainguy

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The physiological response during the endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT, the cycle endurance test (CET and the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT remains unknown in PAH. We tested the hypothesis that endurance tests induce a near-maximal physiological demand comparable to incremental tests. We also hypothesized that differences in respiratory response during exercise would be related to the characteristics of the exercise tests. METHODS: Within two weeks, twenty-one PAH patients (mean age: 54(15 years; mean pulmonary arterial pressure: 42(12 mmHg completed two cycling exercise tests (incremental cardiopulmonary cycling exercise test (CPET and CET and three field tests (ISWT, ESWT and six-minute walk test (6MWT. Physiological parameters were continuously monitored using the same portable telemetric device. RESULTS: Peak oxygen consumption (VO(2peak was similar amongst the five exercise tests (p = 0.90 by ANOVA. Walking distance correlated markedly with the VO(2peak reached during field tests, especially when weight was taken into account. At 100% exercise, most physiological parameters were similar between incremental and endurance tests. However, the trends overtime differed. In the incremental tests, slopes for these parameters rose steadily over the entire duration of the tests, whereas in the endurance tests, slopes rose sharply from baseline to 25% of maximum exercise at which point they appeared far less steep until test end. Moreover, cycling exercise tests induced higher respiratory exchange ratio, ventilatory demand and enhanced leg fatigue measured subjectively and objectively. CONCLUSION: Endurance tests induce a maximal physiological demand in PAH. Differences in peak respiratory response during exercise are related to the modality (cycling vs. walking rather than the progression (endurance vs. incremental of the exercise tests.

  13. Contribution to the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to large arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidar, Nina; Ferluga, Dusan; Hvala, Asta; Popovic, Mara; Soba, Erika

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of a 35-year-old man who died of a brain infarct 20 months after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the tonsil with metastases to the cervical lymph nodes. Histology revealed mild atherosclerosis, necrotizing vasculitis, and occlusive thrombosis of the internal carotid artery. Significant changes were observed in the vasa vasorum; swelling and detachment of the endothelium, subendothelial oedema, hyaline change, fibrinoid necrosis of the vessel walls with mononuclear cellular infiltration, accompanied by focal haemorrhages and chronic inflammation in the periadventitial soft tissue. We believe that these changes of the vasa vasorum and necrotizing vasculitis are causally related and that vasculitis represents focal ischaemic necroses with inflammatory reaction. Our findings support the hypothesis, based on experimental studies, that injury to the vasa vasorum is an important mechanism in the development of radiation-induced vasculopathy of large arteries. They also suggest an evolution of the injury to the vasa vasorum and periadventitial tissue from the early lesions described in our patient, to late stages resulting in dense periadventitial fibrosis as reported previously. We suggest that injury to the vasa vasorum and the consequent ischaemic lesions of the arterial wall are morphological features distinguishing radiation-induced arterial injury from spontaneous atherosclerosis. (author)

  14. Exercise-induced cognitive plasticity, implications for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip P. Foster

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Lifestyle factors such as intellectual stimulation, cognitive and social engagement, nutrition, and various types of exercise appear to reduce the risk for common age-associated disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and vascular dementia. In fact, many studies have suggested that promoting physical activity can have a protective effect against cognitive deterioration later in life. Slowing or a deterioration of walking speed is associated with a poor performance in tests assessing psychomotor speed and verbal fluency in elderly individuals. Fitness training influences a wide range of cognitive processes, and the largest positive impact observed is for executive (a.k.a. frontal lobe functions. Studies show that exercise improves additional cognitive functions such as tasks mediated by the hippocampus, and result in major changes in plasticity in the hippocampus. Interestingly, this exercise-induced plasticity is also pronounced in APOE ε4 carriers who express a risk factor for late-onset AD that may modulate the effect of treatments. Based on AD staging by Braak et al., we propose that the effects of exercise occur in two temporo-spatial continua of events. The inward continuum from isocortex (neocortex to entorhinal cortex/hippocampus for amyloidosis and a reciprocal outward continuum for neurofibrillary alterations. The exercise-induced hypertrophy of the hippocampus at the core of these continua is evaluated in terms of potential for prevention to stave off neuronal degeneration. Exercise-induced production of growth factors such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been shown to enhance neurogenesis and to play a key role in positive cognitive effects. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 may mediate the exercise-induced response to exercise on BDNF, neurogenesis and cognitive performance. It is also postulated to regulate brain amyloid β (Aβ levels by increased clearance via the choroid plexus. Growth factors

  15. Exercise-induced prostacyclin release positively correlates with VO(2max) in young healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, J A; Majerczak, J; Duda, K; Chłopicki, S

    2009-01-01

    In this study we have evaluated the effect of maximal incremental cycling exercise (IE) on the systemic release of prostacyclin (PGI(2)), assessed as plasma 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) concentration in young healthy men. Eleven physically active - untrained men (mean +/- S.D.) aged 22.7 +/- 2.1 years; body mass 76.3 +/- 9.1 kg; BMI 23.30 +/- 2.18 kg . m(-2); maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) 46.5 +/- 3.9 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1), performed an IE test until exhaustion. Plasma concentrations of 6-keto-PGF(1alpha), lactate, and cytokines were measured in venous blood samples taken prior to the exercise and at the exhaustion. The net exercise-induced increase in 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) concentration, expressed as the difference between the end-exercise minus pre-exercise concentration positively correlated with VO(2max) (r=0.78, p=0.004) as well as with the net VO(2) increase at exhaustion (r=0.81, p=0.003), but not with other respiratory, cardiac, metabolic or inflammatory parameters of the exercise (minute ventilation, heart rate, plasma lactate, IL-6 or TNF-alpha concentrations). The exercise-induced increase in 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) concentration?? was significantly higher (p=0.008) in a group of subjects (n=5) with the highest VO(2max) when compared to the group of subjects with the lowest VO(2max), in which no increase in 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) concentration was found. In conclusion, we demonstrated, to our knowledge for the first time, that exercise-induced release of PGI(2) in young healthy men correlates with VO(2max), suggesting that vascular capacity to release PGI(2) in response to physical exercise represents an important factor characterizing exercise tolerance. Moreover, we postulate that the impairment of exercise-induced release of PGI(2) leads to the increased cardiovascular hazard of vigorous exercise.

  16. Evidence for a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from the brain during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Brassard, Patrice; Adser, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has an important role in regulating maintenance, growth and survival of neurons. However, the main source of circulating BDNF in response to exercise is unknown. To identify whether the brain is a source of BDNF during exercise, eight volunteers rowed for 4...... h while simultaneous blood samples were obtained from the radial artery and the internal jugular vein. To further identify putative cerebral region(s) responsible for BDNF release, mouse brains were dissected and analysed for BDNF mRNA expression following treadmill exercise. In humans, a BDNF...... release from the brain was observed at rest (P BDNF, while that contribution decreased following 1 h of recovery. In mice, exercise induced a three...

  17. Physical exercise ameliorates mood disorder-like behavior on high fat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sang; Lee, Jae-Min; Cho, Han-Sam; Park, Sang-Seo; Kim, Tae-Woon

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is associated with mood disorders such as depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate whether treadmill exercise had any benefits on mood disorder by high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity. Mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, control and exercise, high fat diet (HFD), and HFD and exercise. Obesity was induced by a 20-week HFD (60%). In the exercise groups, exercise was performed 6 times a week for 12 weeks, with the exercise duration and intensity gradually increasing at 4-week intervals. Mice were tested in tail suspension and elevated plus maze tasks in order to verify the mood disorder like behavior such as depression and anxiety on obesity. In the present study, the number of 5-HT- and TPH-positive cells, and expression of 5-HT 1A and 5-HTT protein decreased in dorsal raphe, and depression and anxiety like behavior increased in HFD group compared with the CON group. In contrast, treadmill exercise ameliorated mood disorder like behavior by HFD induced obesity and enhanced expression of the serotonergic system in the dorsal raphe. We concluded that exercise increases the capacity of the serotonergic system in the dorsal raphe, which improves the mood disorders associated with HFD-induced obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of inhaled nitric oxide on gas exchange during normoxic and hypoxic exercise in highly trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel, A W; Edwards, M R; Hunte, G S; McKenzie, D C

    2001-03-01

    This study tested the effects of inhaled nitric oxide [NO; 20 parts per million (ppm)] during normoxic and hypoxic (fraction of inspired O(2) = 14%) exercise on gas exchange in athletes with exercise-induced hypoxemia. Trained male cyclists (n = 7) performed two cycle tests to exhaustion to determine maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)) and arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (Sa(O(2)), Ohmeda Biox ear oximeter) under normoxic (VO(2 max) = 4.88 +/- 0.43 l/min and Sa(O(2)) = 90.2 +/- 0.9, means +/- SD) and hypoxic (VO(2 max) = 4.24 +/- 0.49 l/min and Sa(O(2)) = 75.5 +/- 4.5) conditions. On a third occasion, subjects performed four 5-min cycle tests, each separated by 1 h at their respective VO(2 max), under randomly assigned conditions: normoxia (N), normoxia + NO (N/NO), hypoxia (H), and hypoxia + NO (H/NO). Gas exchange, heart rate, and metabolic parameters were determined during each condition. Arterial blood was drawn at rest and at each minute of the 5-min test. Arterial PO(2) (Pa(O(2))), arterial PCO(2), and Sa(O(2)) were determined, and the alveolar-arterial difference for PO(2) (A-aDO(2)) was calculated. Measurements of Pa(O(2)) and Sa(O(2)) were significantly lower and A-aDO(2) was widened during exercise compared with rest for all conditions (P 0.05). We conclude that inhalation of 20 ppm NO during normoxic and hypoxic exercise has no effect on gas exchange in highly trained cyclists.

  19. Study of sympathetic nervous function under effort induced ischemia in patients with angina pectoris with I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Aizawa, Tadanori; Kato, Kazuzo; Ogasawara, Ken; Sakuma, Toru; Kirigaya, Hajime; Hirosaka, Akira; Igarashi, Masaki

    1990-01-01

    I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is a norepinephrine analog, which can be used to study the sympathetic nervous function of the heart. With MIBG myocardial SPECT images sympathetic nervous function under effort induced ischemia were studied in 18 patients with significant coronary artery lesions. In 5 patients with effort induced ischemic region in stress Tl-201 myocardial images rest MIBG images were collected and then exercise stress test was performed. Patients continued exercising for 3 minutes after onset of symptom. Post-stress MIBG images were collected. Definite ischemic region was noted in stress Tl-201 myocardial images, however no differences were noted between rest and post-stress MIBG images. These results suggested that exercise induced ischemia did not enhance release of uptaken MIBG. In 13 patients with significant coronary artery lesions symptom-limited exercise stress test was performed MIBG and Tl-201 were simultaneously injected at onset of symptom and patients continued exercising for an additional one minute. In 6 cases (46%, 6/13) MIBG defects with Tl-201 uptake were noted. These results showed that exercise induced ischemia depressed net MIBG uptake and that sympathetic nervous function (MIBG images) may be more sensitive to ischemic damage than muscle (Tl-201 images). It is suggested that exercise induced ischemia depressed reuptake of norepinephrine at sympathetic nervous endings. MIBG myocardial SPECT images may be useful for evaluating sympathetic nervous function under ischemia. (author)

  20. Short-term supervised inpatient physiotherapy exercise protocol improves cardiac autonomic function after coronary artery bypass graft surgery--a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Renata Gonçalves; Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; De Souza Melo Costa, Fernando; Pantoni, Camila Bianca Falasco; Di Thommazo, Luciana; Luzzi, Sérgio; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is accompanied by severe impairment of cardiac autonomous regulation (CAR). This study aimed to determine whether a short-term physiotherapy exercise protocol post-CABG, during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR), might improve CAR. Seventy-four patients eligible for CABG were recruited and randomised into physiotherapy exercise group (EG) or physiotherapy usual care group (UCG). EG patients underwent a short-term supervised inpatient physiotherapy exercise protocol consisting of an early mobilisation with progressive exercises plus usual care (respiratory exercises). UCG only received respiratory exercises. Forty-seven patients (24 EG and 23 UGC) completed the study. Outcome measures of CAR included linear and non-linear measures of heart rate variability (HRV) assessed before discharge. By hospital discharge, EG presented significantly higher parasympathetic HRV values [rMSSD, high frequency (HF), SD1)], global power (STD RR, SD2), non-linear HRV indexes [detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA)alpha1, DFAalpha2, approximate entropy (ApEn)] and mean RR compared to UCG (pexercise protocol during inpatient CR improves CAR at the time of discharge. Thus, exercise-based inpatient CR might be an effective non-pharmacological tool to improve autonomic cardiac tone in patient's post-CABG.

  1. Effect of exercise position during stress testing on cardiac and pulmonary thallium kinetics and accuracy in evaluating coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    We compared the effects of symptom-limited upright and supine exercise on 201Tl distribution and kinetics in the heart and lungs of 100 consecutive patients. Our analysis was based on data obtained with a digital gamma camera in the 45 degrees left anterior oblique position at 5, 40, 240, and 275 min postadministration of [201Tl]chloride. We found significant differences in the results at the 5- and 40-min intervals; viz, higher cardiac and lower pulmonary thallium activity after upright exercise in 94 subjects at both intervals, and greater variability in total and regional cardiac thallium kinetics after supine exercise. With supine exercise, the relatively low initial cardiac activity, relatively high lung activity, and the greater variability in thallium kinetics combined to make interpretation of quantitative data and cardiac images difficult and less accurate with respect to detection of coronary artery disease. These observations have important implications for the interpreting physician when thallium stress tests are performed in the supine position

  2. The effect of purinergic P2 receptor blockade on skeletal muscle exercise hyperemia in miniature swine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan Peter; McAllister, R M; Yang, H T

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: ATP could play an important role in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation by inducing vasodilation via purinergic P2 receptors. This study investigated the role of P2 receptors in exercise hyperemia in miniature swine. METHODS: We measured regional blood flow with radiolabeled......-microsphere technique and systemic hemodynamics before and after arterial infusion of the P2 receptor antagonist reactive blue 2 during treadmill exercise (5.2 km/h, ~60 % VO2max) and arterial ATP infusion in female Yucatan miniature swine (~29 kg). RESULTS: Mean blood flow during exercise from the 16 sampled skeletal...... muscle tissues was 138 ± 18 mL/min/100 g (mean ± SEM), and it was reduced in 11 (~25 %) of the 16 sampled skeletal muscles after RB2 was infused. RB2 also lowered diaphragm blood flow and kidney blood flow, whereas lung tissue blood flow was increased (all P

  3. Treatment strategies for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: potential role of exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Y. Wonders

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN is a common, dose-limiting effect of cancer therapy that often has negative implications on a patient’s quality of life. The pain associated with CIPN has long been recognized as one of the most difficult types of pain to treat. Historically, much effort has been made to explore pharmacological therapies aimed at reducing symptoms of CIPN. While many of these agents provide a modest relief in the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, many have been shown to have additional negative side effects for cancer patients. Therefore, the authors suggest exercise rehabilitation as one lifestyle modification that may positively impact the lives of patients with CIPN. To our knowledge, there are currently no published clinical trials examining the role of exercise in preserving neurological function following chemotherapy. However, investigations using low-to-moderate intensity exercise as an intervention in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies have produced promising results. Given that cancer patients appear to tolerate exercise, it seems plausible that exercise rehabilitation could be used as an effective strategy to minimize CIPN-induced detriments to quality of life.

  4. Relationship between regional myocardial blood flow and thallium-201 distribution in the presence of coronary artery stenosis and dipyridamole-induced vasodilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, A.E. Jr.; Cobb, F.R.

    1984-01-01

    This study assesses the relationship between the distribution of thallium-201 and myocardial blood flow during coronary vasodilation induced by intravenous dipyridamole in canine models of partial and complete coronary artery stenosis. 10 dogs were chronically instrumented with catheters in the left atrium and aorta and with a balloon occluder and electromagnetic flow probe on the proximal left circumflex coronary artery. Regional myocardial blood flow was measured during control conditions with radioisotope-labeled microspheres, and the phasic reactive hyperemic response to a 20-s transient occlusion was then recorded. Dipyridamole was then infused intravenously until phasic coronary blood flow increased to match peak hyperemic values. The left circumflex coronary artery was either partially occluded to reduce phasic blood flow to control values (group 1) or it was completely occluded (group 2), and thallium-201 and a second microsphere label were injected. 5 min later, the animals were sacrificed, the left ventricle was sectioned into 1-2-g samples, and thallium-201 activity and regional myocardial blood flow were measured. Curvilinear regression analyses between thallium-201 localization and myocardial blood flow during dipyridamole infusion demonstrated a slightly better fit to a second- as compared with a first-order model, indicating a slight roll-off of thallium activity as myocardial blood flow increases. During the dipyridamole infusion, the increases in phasic blood flow, the distributions of regional myocardial blood flow, and the relationships between thallium-201 localization and regional blood flow were comparable to values previously observed in exercising dogs with similar occlusions. These data provide basic validation that supports the use of intravenous dipyridamole and thallium-201 as an alternative to exercise stress and thallium-201 for evaluating the effects of coronary occlusive lesions on the distribution of regional myocardial blood flow

  5. Exercise-induced amenorrhea and bone health in the adolescent athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Michelle P; Chua, Abigail T

    2008-01-01

    Female participation in high school athletics has increased 800% in the last 30 years. The problem of exercise-induced amenorrhea was initially thought to be analogous to hypoestrogenism, but recent studies suggest that nutritional issues underlie most of the pathophysiology and that the mechanism is different from that seen in the primary hypogonadal state. Exercise-induced amenorrhea can be an indicator of an energy drain, and the presence of the other components of the female athlete triad-bone density loss and eating disorders-must be determined as well. Addressing skeletal problems related to nutritional and hormonal deficiencies in this population is of very high priority.

  6. Prognostic value of abnormal exercise myocardial perfusion imaging and its types in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mei; Pan Zhongyun; Lin JInghui; Zhang Chunli; Nie Tao; Wang Yanfu

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of abnormal exercise myocardial perfusion imaging and its types in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: 69 patients with CAD underwent exercise myocardial perfusing imaging and exercise ECG test. The images of all of them were abnormal. 45 patients were angiographically proved CAD. Follow-up period ranged from 6∼110 months and even longer than 12 months for patients with no cardiac events (CE). Results: CE occurred in 15 patients during the follow-up period. The CE incidence was 8.7% per year. Cox regression analysis revealed that there was a good correlation between the number of myocardial segments with reversible defects and future CE. Comparing the results of 13 patients with small extent irreversible defects with the data obtained from normal subjects reported previously, there was no significant difference between two no-CE rates (x 2 = 0.09, P>0.05). Conclusions: Normal myocardial images and irreversible defects involving rather small areas predicted an excellent prognosis. The better predictor of future CE is the quantity of myocardial segments with reversible defect

  7. Drug-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension: a recent outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérald Simonneau

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a rare disorder characterised by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly to appetite suppressant intake drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used, but are considered possible risk factors, for PAH. Dasatinib, dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, potentially in part reversible after dasatinib withdrawal. Recently, several studies have raised the issue of potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and a few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility, and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drug-induced PAH.

  8. Partial Portal Vein Arterialization Attenuates Acute Bile Duct Injury Induced by Hepatic Dearterialization in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Wei, Jishu; Wu, Junli; Gao, Wentao; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic infarcts or abscesses occur after hepatic artery interruption. We explored the mechanisms of hepatic deprivation-induced acute liver injury and determine whether partial portal vein arterialization attenuated this injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either complete hepatic arterial deprivation or partial portal vein arterialization, or both. Hepatic ischemia was evaluated using biochemical analysis, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Hepatic ATP levels, the expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and the expression of bile transporter genes were assessed. Complete dearterialization of the liver induced acute liver injury, as evidenced by the histological changes, significantly increased serum biochemical markers, decreased ATP content, increased expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and decreased expression of bile transporter genes. These detrimental changes were extenuated but not fully reversed by partial portal vein arterialization, which also attenuated ductular reaction and fibrosis in completely dearterialized rat livers. Collectively, complete hepatic deprivation causes severe liver injury, including bile infarcts and biloma formation. Partial portal vein arterialization seems to protect against acute ischemia-hypoxia-induced liver injury.

  9. Partial Portal Vein Arterialization Attenuates Acute Bile Duct Injury Induced by Hepatic Dearterialization in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic infarcts or abscesses occur after hepatic artery interruption. We explored the mechanisms of hepatic deprivation-induced acute liver injury and determine whether partial portal vein arterialization attenuated this injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either complete hepatic arterial deprivation or partial portal vein arterialization, or both. Hepatic ischemia was evaluated using biochemical analysis, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Hepatic ATP levels, the expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and the expression of bile transporter genes were assessed. Complete dearterialization of the liver induced acute liver injury, as evidenced by the histological changes, significantly increased serum biochemical markers, decreased ATP content, increased expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and decreased expression of bile transporter genes. These detrimental changes were extenuated but not fully reversed by partial portal vein arterialization, which also attenuated ductular reaction and fibrosis in completely dearterialized rat livers. Collectively, complete hepatic deprivation causes severe liver injury, including bile infarcts and biloma formation. Partial portal vein arterialization seems to protect against acute ischemia-hypoxia-induced liver injury.

  10. EXERCISE-INDUCED PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE AFTER RUNNING A MARATHON

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report on a healthy 26-year-old male who had an exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) within 24 hours of running a marathon. There were no symptoms, abnormalities on exam, or radiographic infiltrates. He routinely participated in bronchoscopy research and the EIPH was e...

  11. Interleukin-6 production in contracting human skeletal muscle is influenced by pre-exercise muscle glycogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensberg, A; Febbraio, M A; Osada, T

    2001-01-01

    1. Prolonged exercise results in a progressive decline in glycogen content and a concomitant increase in the release of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) from contracting muscle. This study tests the hypothesis that the exercise-induced IL-6 release from contracting muscle is linked to the intram......1. Prolonged exercise results in a progressive decline in glycogen content and a concomitant increase in the release of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) from contracting muscle. This study tests the hypothesis that the exercise-induced IL-6 release from contracting muscle is linked...... to the intramuscular glycogen availability. 2. Seven men performed 5 h of a two-legged knee-extensor exercise, with one leg with normal, and one leg with reduced, muscle glycogen content. Muscle biopsies were obtained before (pre-ex), immediately after (end-ex) and 3 h into recovery (3 h rec) from exercise in both...... legs. In addition, catheters were placed in one femoral artery and both femoral veins and blood was sampled from these catheters prior to exercise and at 1 h intervals during exercise and into recovery. 3. Pre-exercise glycogen content was lower in the glycogen-depleted leg compared with the control...

  12. Adrenaline but not noradrenaline is a determinant of exercise-induced lipid mobilization in human subcutaneous adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glisezinski, I. de; Larrouy, D.; Bajzova, M.

    2009-01-01

    The relative contribution of noradrenaline (norepinephrine) and adrenaline (epinephrine) in the control of lipid mobilization in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) during exercise was evaluated in men treated with a somatostatin analogue, octreotide. Eight lean and eight obese young men matched...... of octreotide suppressed plasma insulin and growth hormone levels at rest and during exercise. It blocked the exercise-induced increase in plasma adrenaline while that of noradrenaline was unchanged. Plasma natriuretic peptides (NPs) level was higher at rest and during exercise under octreotide infusion in lean...... individuals. In conclusion, blockade of beta-adrenergic receptors during exercise performed during infusion of octreotide (blocking the exercise-induced rise in adrenaline but not that of noradrenaline) does not alter the exercise-induced lipolysis. This suggests that adrenaline is the main adrenergic agent...

  13. Effect of programmed ventricular stimulation on myocardial lactate extraction in patients with and without coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morady, F.; DiCarlo, L.A. Jr.; Krol, R.B.; de Buitleir, M.; Nicklas, J.M.; Annesley, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    The arterial-coronary sinus lactate difference was measured in 17 patients after each step of a programmed ventricular stimulation protocol consisting of single, double, and triple extrastimuli, first at a basic drive cycle length of 600 msec, then at 400 msec, with an inter-train interval of 4 seconds. Four patients had no structural heart disease, four had an idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, and nine had coronary artery disease with a significant stenosis in at least one branch of the left coronary artery. Net myocardial lactate production during programmed ventricular stimulation was observed in three patients with coronary artery disease, but not in any patient without coronary artery disease. Among the patients who had coronary artery disease, net myocardial lactate production generally occurred in the patients who had more severe coronary artery disease. Exercise-induced ischemia, as demonstrated by a stress thallium-201 test, did not correlate with myocardial lactate production during programmed ventricular stimulation. Programmed ventricular stimulation, with a stimulation protocol typically used in many electrophysiology laboratories, is capable of inducing myocardial ischemia in at least some patients who have coronary artery disease. This finding suggests that myocardial ischemia may potentially influence the results of programmed ventricular stimulation in some patients with coronary artery disease

  14. A general rehabilitation inpatient with exercise-induced vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Dan; Rydberg, Leslie

    2013-10-01

    While on our general inpatient rehabilitation floor, a 58-year-old man with no hematologic or dermatologic history developed an erythematous patch on his medial ankle that turned more purpuric, with a slight orange tint, and was associated with mild pruritus. The diagnosis of exercise-induced vasculitis was made after initially being mistaken for cellulitis. This common exanthem is often misdiagnosed. Due to its association with exercise, the physiatrist should be aware of its presence in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exercise Ameliorates High Fat Diet Induced Cardiac Dysfunction by Increasing Interleukin 10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun eKesherwani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that a sedentary lifestyle and a high fat diet (HFD leads to cardiomyopathy. Moderate exercise ameliorates cardiac dysfunction, however underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Increased inflammation due to induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and attenuation of anti-inflammatory cytokine such as interleukin10 (IL-10 contributes to cardiac dysfunction in obese and diabetics. We hypothesized that exercise training ameliorates HFD- induced cardiac dysfunction by mitigating obesity and inflammation through upregulation of IL-10 and downregulation of TNF-α. To test this hypothesis, eight week old, female C57BL/6J mice were fed with HFD and exercised (swimming 1hr/day for 5 days/week for eight weeks. The four treatment groups: normal diet (ND, HFD, HFD + exercise (HFD + Ex and ND + Ex were analyzed for mean body weight, blood glucose level, TNF-α, IL-10, cardiac fibrosis by Masson Trichrome, and cardiac dysfunction by echocardiography. Mean body weights were increased in HFD but comparatively less in HFD + Ex. The level of TNF-α was elevated and IL-10 was downregulated in HFD but ameliorated in HFD + Ex. Cardiac fibrosis increased in HFD and was attenuated by exercise in the HFD + Ex group. The percentage ejection fraction and fractional shortening were decreased in HFD but comparatively increased in HFD + Ex. There was no difference between ND and ND + Ex for the above parameters except an increase in IL-10 level following exercise. Based on these results, we conclude that exercise mitigates HFD- induced cardiomyopathy by decreasing obesity, inducing IL-10, and reducing TNF-α in mice.

  16. Exercise facilitates early recognition of cardiac and vascular remodeling in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Kelly; van Duin, Richard W B; Uitterdijk, André; Cai, Zongye; Duncker, Dirk J; Merkus, Daphne

    2018-03-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) develops in 4% of patients after pulmonary embolism and is accompanied by an impaired exercise tolerance, which is ascribed to the increased right ventricular (RV) afterload in combination with a ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch in the lungs. The present study aimed to investigate changes in arterial Po 2 and hemodynamics in response to graded treadmill exercise during development and progression of CTEPH in a novel swine model. Swine were chronically instrumented and received multiple pulmonary embolisms by 1) microsphere infusion (Spheres) over 5 wk, 2) endothelial dysfunction by administration of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N ω -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) for 7 wk, 3) combined pulmonary embolisms and endothelial dysfunction (L-NAME + Spheres), or 4) served as sham-operated controls (sham). After a 9 wk followup, embolization combined with endothelial dysfunction resulted in CTEPH, as evidenced by mean pulmonary artery pressures of 39.5 ± 5.1 vs. 19.1 ± 1.5 mmHg (Spheres, P swine to result in an exercise-induced increase in cardiac index. In conclusion, embolization in combination with endothelial dysfunction results in CTEPH in swine. Exercise increased RV afterload, exacerbated the V/Q mismatch, and unmasked RV dysfunction. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Here, we present the first double-hit chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension swine model. We show that embolization as well as endothelial dysfunction is required to induce sustained pulmonary hypertension, which is accompanied by altered exercise hemodynamics and an exacerbated ventilation/perfusion mismatch during exercise.

  17. Screening adolescent athletes for exercise-induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, R A; LaRussa, J; Wang-Dohlman, A; Bartolucci, A A

    1996-04-01

    To pilot test an exercise-induced asthma (EIA) screening program using a submaximal step-test and pulmonary function test (PFT) to identify athletes with EIA and to determine if a physical examination or self-reported history could be used to predict the existence of EIA. Screening and diagnostic testing using a convenience sample. Birmingham, Alabama, during athletic preparticipation examination (PPE). Fifty-two African-American, male football players aged 14-18 years being evaluated for participation in scholastic athletics. No athlete refused participation. Four were excluded because of need for further evaluation unrelated to any pulmonary condition. Each athlete completed a medical history, allergy history, physical examination, preexercise pulmonary function test (PFT), submaximal step-test, and a series of postexercise PFTs. Major outcome measurements were changes in forced expiration volume in 1s (FEV1) or peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) after completing an exercise challenge. Seventeen of 48 athletes had a > or = 15% decrease in PEFR after exercise. Nine of 48 athletes had a > or = 15% decrease in FEV1 after exercise. The only self-reported item that differentiated subjects with normal and abnormal PFTs was a personal history of asthma (p < 0.05). Many athletes can be identified as having abnormal PFTs by use of a submaximal step-test as an exercise challenge. Self-reporting questionnaires and PPEs do not appear to be sensitive enough to identify athletes with this condition. If validated by future studies, this protocol could be used for the diagnosis of EIA.

  18. Relationship between segmental thallium-201 uptake and regional myocardial blood flow in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.B.; Weiss, M.B.; Sciacca, R.R.; Cannon, P.J.; Blood, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between the spatial distribution of thallium-201 in myocardial perfusion scintigrams and the distribution of left ventricular regional myocardial blood flow was examined in 25 patients undergoing coronary arteriography. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigrams were obtained after symptom-limited exercise and after a 4 hr delay. Regional myocardial blood flow was measured by the xenon-133 clearance method in patients at rest and during rapid atrial pacing to a double product comparable with that achieved during exercise stress testing. Patterns of regional thallium-201 activity and regional myocardial blood flow, recorded in similar left anterior oblique projections, were compared for left ventricular segments supplied by the left anterior descending (LAD) and left circumflex (CIRC) arteries. In 11 patients without significant lesions of the left coronary artery (group 1), thallium-201 was homogeneously distributed in the LAD and CIRC distributions in scintigrams taken during peak exercise; these scintigrams correspond to homogeneous regional myocardial blood flow in the LAD and CIRC regions during pacing-induced stress. In 14 patients with significant lesions of the left coronary artery (group 2), ratios of regional thallium-201 activity in the LAD and CIRC distributions of exercise scintigrams correlated well (r . .84) with ratios of regional myocardial blood flow measured during rapid pacing. Background subtraction altered the relationship between relative thallium-201 uptake and regional myocardial blood flow, causing overestimation of the magnitude of flow reduction on exercise scintigrams

  19. Exercise-induced shear stress is associated with changes in plasma von Willebrand factor in older humans

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzales, Joaquin U.; Thistlethwaite, John R.; Thompson, Benjamin C.; Scheuermann, Barry W.

    2009-01-01