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Sample records for exercise treadmill test

  1. The effect of menstrual cycle phase on exercise capacity measured by treadmill exercise test

    OpenAIRE

    YAZAR, Sadan; Yazici, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of the menstrual phases on exercise capacity parameters measured by a treadmill exercise test in sedentary premenaupausal women. Exercise capacity expressed in terms of metabolic equivalents (MET) and exercise duration was measured by performing treadmill exercise tests in 30 women (mean age: 29 ± 5.8 years) with regular menstrual cycles at two points during their menstrual cycles: the late-follicular (LF) phase and the mid-luteal (ML) phase. Th...

  2. Treadmill exercise tests in persons with Parkinson's disease: responses and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Mon S; Jackson, George R; Hou, Jyhgong Gabriel; Protas, Elizabeth J

    2016-10-01

    There is a paucity of information on cardiovascular responses with regard to the disease stage of Parkinson's disease (PD) when using an exercise test. Our purpose was to examine whether cardiovascular responses to the treadmill exercise test differed among persons with PD who have different disease severity. Forty-five subjects with PD were studied (34 men and 11 women). The subjects underwent a treadmill exercise test using a modified Bruce protocol. Resting heart rate (HR), resting blood pressure (BP), maximal HR, maximal BP, exercise duration, maximum percentage HR and METs achieved after the treadmill exercise test were studied. Seventeen subjects were in Hoehn and Yahr Staging Scale (HY) 2, 16 were in HY 2.5, and 12 were in HY 3. HR increased significantly in all three stages. Systolic BP increased significantly in the HY 2 and 2.5, but not the HY 3. Diastolic BP did not change in any stage. Resting HR was lower in the HY 2 compared to the HY 3 and resting systolic BP was higher in HY 2 compared to the HY 2.5. The three HY stages were not different in exercise duration, HR and BP responses, maximum percentage HR achieved, and METs achieved. Fatigue was a primary reason to discontinue the test. There were no fall incidents in any of the tests. Cardiovascular responses to the treadmill exercise test did not vary with disease severity. Treadmill exercise tests were safe to perform in persons with PD.

  3. Effect of treadmill testing and exercise training on self-efficacy in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Roberta K; DeMarco, Teresa; Haskell, William L

    2005-09-01

    Self-efficacy is a person's confidence in being able to successfully perform a specific activity or behavior. Self-efficacy has been shown to influence exercise capacity in patients post myocardial infarction, but has not been fully explored in patients with heart failure (HF). This study examined the impact of performance of a single treadmill exercise test and participation in a 3-month program of walking and resistance exercise on self-efficacy in HF patients. 24 patients were randomized to either a home-based walking and resistance exercise program or usual care for 3 months. Prior to enrollment into the exercise program all participants performed a single treadmill exercise test with respiratory gas analysis. Self-efficacy questionnaires were completed at 3 time points, 1) prior to performance of an exercise treadmill test; 2) immediately after completing an exercise test; and 3) at the end of a 3-month exercise program. Self-efficacy for walking (p=0.07), climbing (p=0.17), lifting (p=0.73) and general activity (p=0.15) did not improve after performance of a single treadmill exercise test and usual care. However, self-efficacy for walking increased after 3 months of a walking and resistance exercise program. (p=0.04). The findings from this study suggest that in patients with stable mild to moderate heart failure, self-efficacy is improved with participation in a home-based walking and endurance exercise program. Self-efficacy is not enhanced by performance of a single treadmill exercise test and usual care.

  4. "Giant R wave" electrocardiogram pattern during exercise treadmill test: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puebla-Rojo Victor

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The exercise treadmill test is widely used in the evaluation of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease. The typical ischemic response used to be ST-segment depression. Case presentation We describe a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian man with an unusual ischemic response during the exercise treadmill test: a "giant R wave" electrocardiogram pattern as a manifestation of hyperacute ischemia that resolved with sublingual nitroglycerin. Coronary catheterization showed a severe stenosis in a proximal dominant circumflex coronary artery. We hypothesize that, in this case, the "giant R wave" pattern was related to severe hyperacute ischemia due to coronary spasm superimposed on the atherosclerotic lesion, which probably caused complete occlusion of the artery. The patient was successfully treated with coronary percutaneous revascularization. Conclusions This is a dramatic and rare ischemic response during the exercise treadmill test, in which, a rapid administration of nitroglycerin can prevent life-threatening events.

  5. Utility of routine exercise treadmill testing early after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri Radha

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been few prospective studies examining the utility of routine exercise treadmill testing (ETT early after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of a routine ETT strategy early after PCI on follow-up cardiac events and procedures. Methods We examined 136 patients who underwent routine ETT at 6 weeks post-PCI in the ADORE trial. The ETT was classified as positive, indeterminate, or negative. The Duke Treadmill Score (DTS was calculated for all patients. Follow-up occurred at 9 months. Results ETT results at 6 weeks were: 32 (23.5% positive, 24 (17.6% indeterminate and 80 (58.8% negative. At 9 months, the composite event rate was 21.9% in those with a positive ETT, 20.8% in those with an indeterminate ETT and 12.5% in those with a negative ETT (p = 0.25 positive vs. negative ETT. The sensitivity of early ETT for predicting clinical events was 41.2%, the specificity was 73.3%, the positive predictive value was 21.9% and the negative predictive value was 87.5%. At 9 months, the cardiac procedure rate was 18.8% in those with a positive test, 13.0% in those with an indeterminate test, and 6.3% in those with a negative test (p = 0.07 positive vs. negative ETT. In a multivariate logistic regression model, coronary stenting during PCI and a ≥ 85% MPHR achieved were found to be inversely associated with clinical events. However, the DTS did not independently predict clinical events. Conclusion Although the statistical power of the study was limited by the small number of clinical events (particularly MI and death, the results of this study support the ACC/AHA guidelines that exercise treadmill testing should not be used routinely after PCI.

  6. The efficacy of a self-paced VO2max test during motorized treadmill exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, James; Mauger, Alexis R; Woolley, Brandon; Lambrick, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    To assess the utility of a self-paced maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) test (SPV) in eliciting an accurate measure of VO2max in comparison with a traditional graded exercise test (GXT) during motorized treadmill exercise. This was a cross-sectional experimental study whereby recreationally trained men (n = 13, 25.5 ± 4.6 y) completed 2 maximal exercise tests (SPV, GXT) separated by a 72-h recovery period. The GXT was continuous and incremental, with prescribed 1-km/h increases every 2 min until the attainment of VO2max. The SPV consisted of 5 × 2-min stages of incremental exercise, which were self-selected and adjusted according to 5 prescribed RPE levels (RPE 11, 13, 15, 17, and 20). Although no significant differences in VO2max were observed between the SPV and GXT (63.9 ± 3.3 cf 60.9 ± 4.6 mL · kg-1 · min-1, respectively, P > .05), the apparent 4.7% mean difference may be practically important. The 95% limits-of-agreement analysis was 3.03 ± 11.49 mL · kg-1 · min-1. Therefore, in the worst-case scenario, the GXT may underestimate measured VO2max as ascertained by the SPV by up to 19%. Conversely, the SPV could underestimate the GXT by 14%. The current study has shown that the SPV is an accurate measure of VO2max during exercise on a motorized treadmill and may provide a slightly higher VO2max value than that obtained from a traditional GXT. The higher VO2max during the SPV may be important when prescribing training or monitoring athlete progression.

  7. Transient left ventricular apical ballooning and exercise induced hypertension during treadmill exercise testing: is there a common hypersympathetic mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Jae K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To describe two cases of Takotsubo like myocardial contractile pattern during exercise stress test secondary to hypertensive response. Background Treadmill exercise testing is known to cause sympathetic stimulation, leading to increased levels of catecholamine, resulting in alteration in vascular tone. Hypertensive response during exercise testing can cause abnormal consequences, resulting in false positive results. Cases We present the cases of two patients experiencing apical and basal akinesis during exercise stress echocardiography, in whom normal wall motion response was observed on subsequent pharmacologic stress testing. The first patient developed transient left ventricular (LV apical akinesis during exercise stress echocardiography. Due to high suspicion that this abnormality might be secondary to hypertensive response, pharmacologic stress testing was performed after three days, which was completely normal and showed no such wall motion abnormality. Qualitative assessment of myocardial perfusion using contrast was also performed, which showed good myocardial blood flow, indicating low probability for significant obstructive coronary artery disease. The second patient developed LV basal akinesis as a result of hypertensive response during exercise testing. Coronary angiogram was not performed in either patient due to low suspicion for coronary artery disease, and subsequently negative stress studies. Results Transient stress induced cardiomyopathy can develop secondary to hypertensive response during exercise stress testing. Conclusion These cases provide supporting evidence to the hyper-sympathetic theory of left ventricular ballooning syndrome.

  8. Hemodynamic Changes After Static and Dynamic Exercises and Treadmill Stress Test; Different Patterns in Patients with Primary Benign Exertional Headache?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Rostami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of primary benign exertional headache (EH is not still clearly defined. Some researchers have suggested an impaired vascular response as the etiology of this disorder. In this study we investigated whether there are any differences in blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR of the subjects in course of the static and dynamic exercises and the treadmill stress test between those with and without EH. From university students, 22 patients with EH (mean age: 19.8 ± 2.10, Female to Male: 7:15 and 20 normal subjects (mean age: 19.3 ± 1.97, Female: Male: 8:12 were recruited. All the subjects performed the static and dynamic exercises at 30 and 20 percent of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC and Bruce treadmill stress test according to the standard protocols. HR and BP of all the cases at the baseline and during and immediately after each test were measured. No significant difference was found between the mean rise of HR, systolic and diastolic BP of the subjects with and without EH in static and dynamic exercises and also treadmill stress test. It seems that between those with and without EH, there is no significant difference in rise of HR and BP response to static and dynamic exercises and treadmill stress test. Further studies are required to find the pathophysiology and risk factors of EH.

  9. Performance profiling of Standardbred racehorses by means of Treadmill Exercise Testing

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    Luca Stucchi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Treadmill exercise testing can be performed on a horse to evaluate the level of fitness with the aim of predicting performance (Franklin and Allen, 2014. The speed at 2 mmol/L of blood lactate (VLA2, the speed at 4 mmol/L (VLA4 and the speed at 200 bpm of heart rate (V200 are indices that have been related to performance (Coroucé et al., 2002. Aim of the present work is to analyze these parameters in a population of high performance Standarbred racehorses. Six healthy and at the same level of training Standardbred racehorses (average age 3,3±2,0 y.o. underwent an incremental exercise test (Zucca et al., 2003 on a high speed treadmill (Sӓto I, SATO, Sweden. During the test heart rate (HR was monitored with a heart rate meter (Polar horsetrainer, Polar, Finland. Venous blood was collected with the aid of a 14G teflon venous catheter placed in the jugular vein. Plasma lactate was measured with enzymatic colorimetric method lactate dry-fast kit for automatic system (Cobas Mira Classic, Roche, Switzerland. Data were analyzed with a dedicated software (Lactate Express, Mesics, Germany and VLA2, VLA4 and V200 were calculated and statistically compared by T-student test for paired sample (Prism, GraphPad, USA. Statistical significance was set at p<0,05. Average VLA2 was 8.3±0.5 m/s, average VLA4 was 9.2±0.4 m/s, average V200 was 8.1±0.9. There was a significant difference between VLA4 and V200 (Fig. 1. No difference was observed between VLA2 and V200 V200 is often reported to be close to VLA4, and considered as correspondent to the onset of blood lactate accumulation (Coroucé et al, 2002. According to our results, it may be argued that V200 is a measure that does not fit with the lactate threshold. These data could be used as control for further studies on racehorses with poor performance syndrome.

  10. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels and treadmill exercise test responses in men and women without overt heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Rafael Amorim Belo; Araújo, Fernando; Correia, Gustavo F; da Silva, Gisela T; Mansur, Alfredo J

    2013-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of systemic inflammatory activity and may be modulated by physical fitness. Treadmill exercise testing is used to evaluate cardiovascular health through different variables including exercise capacity, heart rate and blood pressure responses. It was hypothesized that CRP levels are associated with these variables in men and women without overt heart disease. A total of 584 asymptomatic subjects (317 [54.3%] women and 267 [45.7%] men) were enrolled in the present study and underwent clinical evaluation. CRP levels in men and women were examined relative to clinical characteristics and to variables of treadmill exercise testing: peak heart rate, exercise systolic blood pressure, exercise time, chronotropic reserve and heart rate recovery at the first and second minutes after exercise. Multivariate analysis was performed using a log-linear regression model. In women, exercise time on the treadmill exercise test (P=0.009) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P=0.002) were inversely associated with CRP levels. Body mass index (Plevels (P=0.005) were positively associated with CRP levels. In men, exercise time on the treadmill exercise test was inversely associated with CRP levels (P=0.015). Body mass index (P=0.001) and leukocyte count (P=0.002) were positively associated with CRP levels. CRP levels were not associated with peak heart rate, chronotropic reserve, heart rate recovery at the first and second minutes, or exercise systolic blood pressure. These findings contribute to the evidence that CRP is lower in individuals with better exercise capacity and demonstrate that this relationship is also apparent in individuals without overt heart disease undergoing cardiovascular evaluation through the treadmill exercise test. Lowering inflammatory markers may be an additional reason to stimulate sedentary individuals with low exercise capacity in the treadmill exercise test to improve physical conditioning through regular

  11. Gender differences in the variables of exercise treadmill test in type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Exercise capacity, like some other variables of exercise stress test, is a strong predictor of cardiovascular and overall mortality. Many confounding factors, including gender, have been found to affect exercise capacity. This study evaluated whether exercise capacity differs in age-matched type 2 diabetic ...

  12. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing early after stroke using feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise: test-retest reliability and repeatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; de Bruin, Eling D; Schindelholz, Matthias; Schuster-Amft, Corina; de Bie, Rob A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2014-10-11

    Exercise capacity is seriously reduced after stroke. While cardiopulmonary assessment and intervention strategies have been validated for the mildly and moderately impaired populations post-stroke, there is a lack of effective concepts for stroke survivors suffering from severe motor limitations. This study investigated the test-retest reliability and repeatability of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) using feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (FC-RATE) in severely motor impaired individuals early after stroke. 20 subjects (age 44-84 years, testing (CLT) and incremental exercise testing (IET) within a powered exoskeleton, synchronised with a treadmill and a body weight support system. A manual human-in-the-loop feedback system was used to guide individual work rate levels. Outcome variables focussed on standard cardiopulmonary performance parameters. Relative and absolute test-retest reliability were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of the measurement (SEM), and minimal detectable change (MDC). Mean difference, limits of agreement, and coefficient of variation (CoV) were estimated to assess repeatability. Peak performance parameters during IET yielded good to excellent relative reliability: absolute peak oxygen uptake (ICC =0.82), relative peak oxygen uptake (ICC =0.72), peak work rate (ICC =0.91), peak heart rate (ICC =0.80), absolute gas exchange threshold (ICC =0.91), relative gas exchange threshold (ICC =0.88), oxygen cost of work (ICC =0.87), oxygen pulse at peak oxygen uptake (ICC =0.92), ventilation rate versus carbon dioxide output slope (ICC =0.78). For these variables, SEM was 4-13%, MDC 12-36%, and CoV 0.10-0.36. CLT revealed high mean differences and insufficient test-retest reliability for all variables studied. This study presents first evidence on reliability and repeatability for CPET in severely motor impaired individuals early after stroke using a feedback

  13. Assessment of heart rate response to exercise and recovery during treadmill testing in arsenic-exposed workers.

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    Karakulak, Ugur Nadir; Gunduzoz, Meside; Ayturk, Mehmet; Tek Ozturk, Mujgan; Tutkun, Engin; Yilmaz, Omer Hinc

    2017-09-01

    Arsenic exposure is associated with various cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess cardiac autonomic function via heart rate response to exercise and recovery period of treadmill testing in arsenic-exposed workers. Sixty-five (65) occupationally arsenic-exposed workers and 35 healthy controls were enrolled. Blood and urinary arsenic levels were analyzed and symptom limited maximal treadmill exercise test were performed. Chronotropic response to exercise including age-predicted maximal heart rate (APMHR), heart rate reserve (HRreserve ), age-predicted HRreserve (APHRreserve ) and adjusted HRreserve and 1st-, 2nd-and 3rd-min heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated. Baseline clinical and echocardiographic parameters, exercise test duration, resting and maximal heart rate, peak exercise capacity, HRreserve , APMHR, APHRreserve , and adjusted HRreserve were found to be similar between groups. HRR1 (22.0 ± 4.3 vs. 24.3 ± 3.1 bpm, p = .003) and HRR2 (43.2 ± 6.2 vs. 46.7 ± 6.4 bpm, p = .012) were significantly lower in arsenic-exposed workers compared to controls. Blood and urinary arsenic levels negatively correlated with HRR1 (r = -.477, p < .001 and r = -.438, p < .001, respectively) and HRR2 (r = -.507, p < .001 and r = -.412, p < .001 respectively). Arsenic-exposed workers had lower HRR indices than normal subjects but chronotropic response were similar. Cardiac autonomic dysregulation may be one of the cardiovascular consequences of arsenic exposure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Treadmill exercise testing of asymptomatic men and women without evidence of heart disease

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    W.A. Chalela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of differences in performance including differences in ST-T wave changes between healthy men and women submitted to an exercise stress test. Two hundred (45.4% men and 241 (54.6% women (mean age: 38.7 ± 11.0 years were submitted to an exercise stress test. Physiologic and electrocardiographic variables were compared by the Student t-test and the chi-square test. To test the hypothesis of differences in ST-segment changes, data were ranked with functional models based on weighted least squares. To evaluate the influence of gender and age on the diagnosis of ST-segment abnormality, a logistic model was adjusted; P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Rate-pressure product, duration of exercise and estimated functional capacity were higher in men (P < 0.05. Sixteen (6.7% women and 9 (4.5% men demonstrated ST-segment upslope ≥0.15 mV or downslope ≥0.10 mV; the difference was not statistically significant. Age increase of one year added 4% to the chance of upsloping of segment ST ≥0.15 mV or downsloping of segment ST ≥0.1 mV (P = 0.03; risk ratio = 1.040, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.002-1.080. Heart rate recovery was higher in women (P < 0.05. The chance of women showing an increase of systolic blood pressure ≤30 mmHg was 85% higher (P = 0.01; risk ratio = 1.85, 95%CI = 1.1-3.05. No significant difference in the frequency of ST-T wave changes was observed between men and women. Other differences may be related to different physical conditioning.

  15. Gender differences in the variables of exercise treadmill test in type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    output and skeletal muscle mass,[7,8] determining the most important parameters affecting exercise capacity in diabetic men and women is difficult because of the ..... hypertrophy with a preserved diastolic function[34] and elevated exercise SBP and exercise capacity in athletes.[35] However, this positive influence on.

  16. Transient giant R-wave, right axis deviation, and intraventricular conduction delay during exercise treadmill testing: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Man-Hong; Siu, Chung-Wah; Lee, Stephen Wai-Luen; Lam, Linda; Chan, Raymond Hon-Wah

    2004-01-01

    A 53 year old man complained of chest pain during an exercise treadmill test. Electrocardiogram revealed transient giant R-wave, right-axis deviation, intraventricular conduction delay, and ST-segment elevation in the inferolateral leads. Subsequent coronary angiography showed an 80% lesion in mid part of a nondominant left circumflex artery, whereas the other coronary arteries had mild atherosclerosis only. Percutaneous coronary intervention and stenting was performed on the left circumflex artery lesion. A follow-up exercise thallium scan 3 months later still showed an intermediate-sized, mild reversible perfusion defect in the inferior and lateral wall but the giant R-wave ECG pattern was not inducible anymore. Restudy coronary angiography showed no in-stent restenosis, but there was disease progression in the midpart of the right coronary artery. The initial electrocardiographic pattern is typical of the "giant R-wave syndrome." Severe coronary spasm superimposed on the underlying mild atherosclerotic lesion of the right coronary artery is hypothesized to be the cause of the initial event. Ad hoc direct stenting was performed on the right coronary artery lesion. The patient remained symptom-free with a normal thallium scan 9 months later.

  17. Peak Cardiorespiratory Responses of Patients with Subacute Stroke During Land and Aquatic Treadmill Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Ki; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the cardiorespiratory responses of patients with subacute stroke to exercise stress tests with aquatic and land treadmills. Twenty-one consecutive patients who presented with first-ever subacute stroke in 2013-2015. All subjects underwent symptom-limited incremental exercise testing with aquatic and land treadmills. Land treadmill speed started at 1.5 km/h and increased 0.5 km/h every 1 to 2 minutes until maximal tolerable speed was achieved. Thereafter, the grade was elevated by 2% every 2 minutes. In the aquatic treadmill test, subjects were submerged to the xiphoid in 28°C water. Treadmill speed started at 1.5 km/h and was increased 0.5 km/h every 2 minutes thereafter. Cardiorespiratory responses were recorded with aquatic and land treadmills. Compared to land treadmill exercise, aquatic treadmill exercise achieved significantly better peak VO2 (22.0 vs 20.0; P = 0.02), peak metabolic equivalents (6.3 vs 5.8; P = 0.02), and peak rating of perceived exertion (17.6 vs 18.4, P = 0.01). Heart rate and VO2 correlated significantly during both tests (land treadmill: r = 0.96, P aquatic treadmill: r = 0.99, P Aquatic treadmill exercise elicited significantly better peak cardiorespiratory responses than land treadmill exercise and may be as effective for early intensive aerobic training in subacute stroke patients.

  18. Cardiovascular responses to treadmill exercise in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for adverse cardiac outcomes in hypertensive patients. Objective: This study is designed to assess the cardiovascular responses to treadmill exercise among Nigerian hypertensives with echocardiographically proven LVH. Materials and Methods: ...

  19. Effects of pentoxifylline on hemorheologic alterations induced by incremental treadmill exercise in thoroughbreds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, D J; Geor, R J; Burger, K

    1996-09-01

    To determine whether pentoxifylline treatment altered hematologic, rheologic, electrolyte, or blood gas test results of Thoroughbreds during submaximal treadmill exercise. 5 healthy Thoroughbreds that had raced within the past year and had no history of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. Mixed venous blood samples were obtained before exercise, at treadmill speeds of 9 and 13 m/s, and 20 minutes after exercise; hematologic, rheologic, electrolyte, and blood gas test results were determined. Pentoxifylline treatment resulted in a 45% reduction in RBC filtration pressures for horses at rest. The improved RBC filterability persisted during treadmill exercise. Horses treated with pentoxifylline had a greater decrease in Po2 values and a lesser increase in plasma lactate concentration during treadmill exercise. Administration of pentoxifylline improved RBC deformability of horses at rest and during treadmill exercise. Improved RBC deformability resulting from pentoxifylline treatment may reduce exercise-associated shear stress in pulmonary capillaries, thereby attenuating exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage.

  20. Effect of Treadmill Exercise Using 80% Intensity of Six Minute Walk Test on Walking Distance and Quality of Life in Moderate Stage Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients

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    Farida Arisanti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle dysfunction poses as one of the systemic manifestation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in the impact of inactivity and deconditioning from early fatigue to the end of declining quality of life (QoL. Giving pulmonary rehabilitation program of treadmill exercise will overcome the problem, but standard method for moderate stage of COPD is not yet available. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of treadmill exercise using 80% intensity of six minute walk test on walking distance and QoL in moderate stage COPD in order to overcome muscle dysfunction. Samples were taken from Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Respirology subdivision of Internal Medicine outpatient clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, from March 2012–April 2013. Data analysis was tested using t-test for comparison of two independent mean data. Otherwise, non parametric test of Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon Match Pair test. Thirty three subjects of moderate stage COPD were divided into 2 groups (intervention and control. Intervention group received treadmill exercise with 80% intensity from preliminary 6MWT for 30–60 minutes/session, 3 session/week for 6 weeks. Significant increase on walking distance was found in intervention group (70.66 m compared to control group (7.43 m after 6 weeks (p≤0.05. QoL using St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ showed significant decrease in intervention group for all components in the end of 6 weeks (total p=0.0038, symptoms p=0.0162, activities p=0.0043 and impact p=0.0057, p≤0.05. Eighty percent intensity of 6MWT in treadmill exercise for 6 weeks was well tolerated and could overcome skeletal muscle dysfunction in moderate stage COPD. It also revealed higher values in aerobic capacity and QoL compared to previous studies. In conclusion, treadmill exercise using 80% intensity of 6MWT provides further walking distance and higher QoL compared to control in moderate stage COPD.

  1. Cerebral Blood Flow Responses to Aquatic Treadmill Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Rhodri; Hensman, Marianne Y; Lucas, Samuel J E

    2017-07-01

    Aquatic treadmills are used as a rehabilitation method for conditions such as spinal cord injury, osteoarthritis, and stroke, and can facilitate an earlier return to exercise training for athletes. However, their effect on cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses has not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that aquatic treadmill exercise would augment CBF and lower HR compared with land-based treadmill exercise. Eleven participants completed incremental exercise (crossover design) starting from walking pace (4 km·h, immersed to iliac crest [aquatic], 6 km·h [land]) and increasing 1 km·h every 2 min up to 10 km·h for aquatic (maximum belt speed) or 12 km·h for land. After this, participants completed two 2-min bouts of exercise immersed to midthigh and midchest at constant submaximal speed (aquatic), or were ramped to exhaustion (land; increased gradient 2° every min). Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv) and HR were measured throughout, and the initial 10 min of each protocol and responses at each immersion level were compared. Compared with land-based treadmill, MCAvmean increased more from baseline for aquatic exercise (21% vs 12%, P aquatic walking compared with land-based moderate intensity running (~10 cm·s, P = 0.56). Greater water immersion lowered HR (139 vs 178 bpm for midchest vs midthigh), whereas MCAvmean remained constant (P = 0.37). Findings illustrate the potential for aquatic treadmill exercise to enhance exercise-induced elevations in CBF and thus optimize shear stress-mediated adaptation of the cerebrovasculature.

  2. Metabolic and clinical comparative analysis of treadmill six-minute walking test and cardiopulmonary exercise testing in obese and eutrophic women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Di Thommazo-Luporini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired exercise tolerance is directly linked to decreased functional capacity as a consequence of obesity. OBJECTIVES: To analyze and compare the cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and perceptual responses during a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX and a treadmill six-minute walking test (tread6MWT in obese and eutrophic women. METHOD: Twenty-nine female participants, aged 20-45 years were included. Fourteen were allocated to the obese group and 15 to the eutrophic group. Anthropometric measurements and body composition assessment were performed. RESULTS: In both tests, obese women presented with significantly higher absolute oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure; they also presented with lower speed, distance walked, and oxygen uptake corrected by the weight compared to eutrophics. During the maximal exercise test, perceived dyspnea was greater and the respiratory exchange ratio was lower in obese subjects compared to eutrophics. During the submaximal test, carbon dioxide production, tidal volume, and heart rate were higher in obese subjects compared to eutrophic women. When analyzing possible correlations between the CPX and the tread6MWT at peak, there was a strong correlation for the variable heart rate and a moderate correlation for the variable oxygen uptake. The heart rate obtained in the submaximal test was able to predict the one obtained in the maximal test. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated the agreement between both tests to identify metabolic and physiological parameters at peak exercise. CONCLUSIONS: The six-minute walking test induced ventilatory, metabolic, and cardiovascular responses in agreement with the maximal testing. Thus, the six-minute walking test proves to be important for functional evaluation in the physical therapy routine.

  3. Motivators for treadmill exercise after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Michael, Kathleen; Shaughnessy, Marianne; Kopunek, Susan; Nahm, Eun Shim; Macko, Richard F

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore factors that motivated older adults with ischemic stroke to engage in a task-oriented treadmill aerobic exercise (T-AEX) intervention study. Participants included community-dwelling individuals post stroke with mild-to-moderate hemiparetic gait deficits who completed a 6-month T-AEX study. A total of 29 participants attended focus groups or individual telephone interviews. Thirty-nine codes were identified and were reduced to 8 themes: personal goals supported by 7 codes, psychological benefits supported by 8 codes, physical benefits supported by 10 codes, research-associated supervised treadmill exercise benefits supported by 5 codes, objective and verbal encouragement received supported by 4 codes, social support related to exercise supported by 2 codes, improvement in instrumental activities of daily living supported by 2 codes, and self-determination supported by 1 code. All themes reflected factors that influenced subjects' willingness to participate in the study and adhere to the exercise intervention. Of the themes identified, personal goals, physical benefits, and psychological benefits occurred most frequently. This qualitative study provides information that may be used to enhance motivation to exercise in individuals with stroke and promote carryover and integration of exercise behaviors into everyday life.

  4. Comparison of the cardiovascular effects of unoprostone 0.15%, timolol 0.5% and placebo in healthy adults during exercise using a treadmill test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, William C; Stewart, Jeanette A; Crockett, Steve; Kubilus, Christine; Brown, Alison; Shams, Naveed

    2002-06-01

    To compare the cardiovascular effects of unoprostone 0.15%, timolol 0.5% and placebo in healthy adults during exercise using a treadmill test. Thirty subjects aged 18-37 years (mean age = 24.1 years) were randomized to one of six treatment sequences in a three-treatment, three-period crossover study (William's design). Study medication was instilled b.i.d. for 5 days before visits 2, 3, and 4. Between treatments, study medication was washed out for 9-10 days. Each subject underwent a submaximal treadmill test at visits 2 through 4, 15 min after dosing. After 15 min of exercise, average heart rates were 143.1 +/- 21.2, 134.5 +/- 20.0 and 145.4 +/- 20.8 bpm for the unoprostone, timolol and placebo treatments, respectively. At no timepoint was there a statistically significant difference between the unoprostone and placebo treatments (p > 0.05). Beginning with the second minute of exercise, timolol produced a greater decrease in heart rate at all timepoints from placebo than unoprostone (p 0.05). Unlike timolol, unoprostone 0.15% does not reduce exercise-induced heart rate, indicating a lack of clinical effect on systemic beta-adrenergic receptors in young and healthy subjects.

  5. Prior treadmill exercise promotes resilience to vicarious trauma in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochi, Camila; Liu, Hesong; Zaidi, Safiyya; Atrooz, Fatin; Dantoin, Phoebe; Salim, Samina

    2017-07-03

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious psychological condition, which can develop both from physically experiencing and also from witnessing traumatic events. There is evidence that physical exercise can have a positive impact on the symptoms of PTSD. Relevant to this, in our previous pre-clinical work, beneficial effects of treadmill exercise were reported on PTSD-like behaviors in a social defeat paradigm, a rat model of direct physical trauma. However, the role of exercise on vicariously acquired PTSD-like phenotype was not examined. In this study, we utilized a rodent PTSD model, which mimics both the physical as well as the witness experience of trauma, and examined the impact of moderate treadmill exercise in mitigating vicariously acquired PTSD-like behaviors in rats. Our PTSD model is a modified social defeat paradigm, which involves aggressive encounters between a large Long-Evans male rat (resident) and a smaller Sprague-Dawley male rat (intruder), resulting in intruder social defeat. The cage mate of the intruder is positioned to witness intruder defeat. Rats were grouped as control (CON), social defeat (SD), exercise (EX), trauma witness (TW), and exercise prior to trauma witness (EX-TW). After acclimatization for 7days, the exercised groups were subjected to a daily 30-min treadmill exercise regimen for 14days. On day 21, the SD group was exposed for 7days of social defeat, while the TW groups witnessed social defeat. On days 28-34, behavioral and cognitive tests including short-term (STM) and long-term (LTM) memory function, anxiety- and depression-like behaviors were conducted. TW and SD rats demonstrated the highest levels of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, while EX-TW rats did not exhibit anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. TW and SD rats showed no impairments in STM. However, TW and SD rats showed impairments in LTM, and exercise rescued LTM impairments in EX-TW rats. This study demonstrates that rats subjected to direct

  6. Cardiorespiratory responses during aquatic treadmill exercise and land treadmill exercise in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Brandon R; Bolte, Janie; Biggerstaff, Kyle D; Nichols, David L; Castleberry, Todd J

    2017-07-05

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of aquatic treadmill exercise (ATM) to land treadmill exercise (LTM) in adults with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D). Five participants with T2D (4 females, 1 male; age = 51±3 years; height = 170±3 cm; weight = 96±11 kg; body fat = 32±1%) and five participants without T2D (4 females, 1 male; age = 51±3 years; height = 170±3 cm; weight = 71±15 kg; body fat = 27±2%) completed the study. Participants completed three, 5-minute stages of exercise at 3.2 km/h, 4.8 km/h and 6.4 km/h with 0% grade on land and aquatic treadmills. Heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), absolute and relative oxygen consumption (VO2), and energy expenditure were measured at rest and during steady-state exercise at each intensity. A 2x2x4 Mixed Factorial ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test with a significance level of 0.05 was used. All variables increased as speed increased (p aquatic and land exercise when comparing those with and without T2D, cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables are similar in both groups during locomotion on land and in an aquatic environment.

  7. Feasibility and safety of exercise stress testing using an anti-gravity treadmill with Tc-99m tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging: A pilot non-randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Patrick; Kayse, Regina; Rudick, Steven; Robbins, Nathan; Scheler, Jennifer; Harris, David; O'Donnell, Robert; Dwivedi, Alok K; Gerson, Myron C

    2017-08-31

    Exercise is the AHA/ACC guideline-recommended stress modality for myocardial perfusion imaging, but many patients are unable to exercise to target heart rate on a conventional treadmill. We examined the feasibility and safety of stress imaging using an anti-gravity treadmill in patients with perceived poor exercise capacity. 49 patients were recruited for stress testing by anti-gravity treadmill (n = 29) or to a regadenoson control group (n = 20). Seventeen anti-gravity test patients (59%) reached target heart rate obviating the need for a pharmacologic stress agent. Adverse effects of the anti-gravity treadmill were limited to minor muscle aches in 5 subjects. Stress myocardial perfusion image quality judged by 3 blinded readers on a 5-point scale was comparable for the anti-gravity treadmill (4.30 ± SD 0.87) vs pharmacologic stress (4.28 ± SD 0.66). Stress testing using an anti-gravity treadmill is feasible and may help some patients safely achieve target heart rate.

  8. Comparison of cardiorespiratory responses during aquatic and land treadmill exercise in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun Hwan; Kim, Bo Ryun; Joo, Seung Jae; Han, Eun Young; Kim, Song Yi; Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, So Young; Yoon, Ho Min

    2015-01-01

    To investigate cardiorespiratory responses during exercise stress tests using an aquatic treadmill and a land-based treadmill in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty-one stable CAD patients were enrolled. All patients participated in 2 symptom-limited incremental exercise tests, using both an aquatic and a land treadmill. For the aquatic treadmill protocol, patients were submerged to the upper waist in 28°C water. The treadmill speed started at 2.0 km/h and increased 0.5 km/h every minute thereafter. For the land treadmill protocol, the speed and gradient were started at 2.4 km/h and 1.5%, respectively. The speed was increased by 0.3 km/h and grade by 1% every minute thereafter. Oxygen consumption ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2), heart rate (HR), and respiratory exchange ratio were measured continuously and peak values recorded. Rating of perceived exertion, percentage of age-predicted maximal HR, and total exercise duration were also recorded. Peak cardiorespiratory responses during both protocols were compared. The peak (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2 and peak HR did not show any significant differences. The peak respiratory exchange ratio was significantly greater using the land treadmill than the aquatic treadmill protocol. Rating of perceived exertion, age-predicted maximal HR percentage, and total exercise duration were similar for both protocols. There was a significant linear relationship between HR and (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2 with both protocols. This study demonstrated that aquatic treadmill exercise elicits similar peak cardiorespiratory responses compared with land treadmill exercise, suggesting that aquatic treadmill exercise may be effective for CAD patients in cardiac rehabilitation.

  9. Treadmill training combined with water and land-based exercise programs: Effects on Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayan, Carlos; Varela, Silvia; Vila, M Helena; Seijo-Martinez, Manuel; Cancela, José M

    2016-06-30

    There is a need for studies about the effects of treadmill training (TT) on Parkinson's disease (PD) patients when combined with other exercise training modalities. To identify the effects of a multicomponent rehabilitation program on the illness impact, quality of life and fitness level in Parkinson's disease. Participants were assigned to two exercise groups: water and land-based exercise (WL) or water and land-based exercise plus treadmill training (TWL). The water and land-based exercise group performed one water-based exercise and one land-based exercise session per week for 15 weeks. Participants in the water and land-based exercise plus treadmill training added two sessions of treadmill training to this schedule. The Senior Fitness Test (SFT) was used to assess the sample's fitness level. Participants in the water and land-based exercise Group experienced significant benefits in the disease impact (UPDRS t = 3.083; p = 0.029) and quality of life (PDQ-39 t = 2.942; p = 0.036). The addition of treadmill training did not have any significant effect on these variables. Both programs showed similar effects on the fitness components evaluated. Adding treadmill training to a combination of water and land-based exercise programs may have limited effects on quality of life and the impact on the disease.

  10. Exercise treadmill testing using a modified exercise protocol in women with suspected myocardial ischemia: findings from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jannet F; McGorray, Susan; Lin, Lang; Pepine, Carl J; Chaitman, Bernard; Doyle, Mark; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Sharaf, Barry L; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2005-03-01

    Exercise testing, a major diagnostic modality in individuals with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), has in general demonstrated less overall diagnostic accuracy in women compared to men. As part of the WISE, a modified protocol was examined with the intention of improving reliability of exercise testing. Criteria for entry in the WISE study include clinically indicated coronary angiography. Exercise testing was performed using a protocol modified to be more appropriate for women. The study population consisted of 96 women, mean age of 55.8 y (range 34-77), who completed exercise treadmill test (ETT). Most (78%) were postmenopausal; 96% had >or =2 risk factors for CAD. By core laboratory angiography, 29/96 women had stenosis > or =50% in at least one coronary artery. Of these 29 women, 9 had abnormal ETT, yielding overall sensitivity of 31%. The remaining 20 women had normal (12/29, 41%) or nondiagnostic (8/29, 28%) studies. Among the 67 women with minimal or no coronary stenosis, 35 had no ischemic ST-segment changes during ETT, yielding overall specificity of 52%. Analysis with exclusion of women with nondiagnostic studies yielded sensitivity and specificity of 43% and 66%, respectively. The presence of coronary artery stenosis and inability to perform ETT, but not results of testing, predicted the outcomes of myocardial infarction, heart failure, and death. Exercise treadmill test appears to be of limited diagnostic value in women with suspected myocardial ischemia referred for coronary angiography. Sensitivity and specificity remain poor even with modified exercise protocol and core laboratory angiographic analysis. These findings merit consideration in view of current guidelines that recommend exercise testing in women with suspected CAD.

  11. Long-term moderate treadmill exercise promotes stress-coping strategies in male and female rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lalanza, Jaume F; Sanchez-Roige, Sandra; Cigarroa, Igor; Gagliano, Humberto; Fuentes, Silvia; Armario, Antonio; Capdevila, Lluís; Escorihuela, Rosa M

    2015-01-01

    ...) and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal response in rats. Sprague-Dawley male and female rats were exposed to 32-weeks of treadmill exercise and then tested for two-way active avoidance learning (shuttle-box...

  12. Effects of fluoxetine on memory under forced treadmill exercise conditions in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafary, Leila; Reisi, Parham; Naghsh, Nooshin

    2015-01-01

    Studies show inconsistent effects of forced exercise on cognitive processes. These differences are probably due to the stress of coercion in forced exercise. Because fluoxetine is used to treat complications caused by stress, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of fluoxetine on memory in rats under forced treadmill exercise. Experimental groups were the control, the control exercise, the fluoxetine, and the fluoxetine exercise. The exercise program was treadmill running at 22 m/min, 0° inclination for 50 min/day, 6 days/week, for 4 weeks. Fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) was injected 30 min before treadmill. Morris water maze and passive avoidance learning tests were used for evaluation of memory. Acquisition phase of both tests were performed before interventions and memory was evaluated 1-day and 1-week after the last session of exercise and treatments. Our data showed that forced exercise impaired performance in passive avoidance learning test (P exercise and treatments, respectively). Spatial memory was only impaired after 1-week in the exercise group. Fluoxetine improved spatial memory after 1-day in the control group. However, it had no significant effects on memory in the exercise group. The data correspond to the possibility that forced treadmill exercise can cause stress, and thereby cause damage to memory. The present results suggest that although fluoxetine may improve memory in intact rats but it cannot prevent damages that are caused by forced exercise.

  13. The prognostic value of CT coronary angiography in patients attending hospital with troponin-negative acute chest pain and inconclusive exercise treadmill tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordi, Ify; Tzemos, Nikolaos

    2016-05-01

    Once acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is excluded in patients presenting to hospital with acute chest pain, usual practice is to stratify future risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Commonly this is performed by pre-discharge exercise treadmill testing (ETT). Often however, patients are unable to perform the test for various reasons, or the final result is inconclusive. This potentially could lead to uncertainty and to unnecessary invasive coronary angiography. We wished to evaluate the potential prognostic significance of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with prior inconclusive ETTs. Two hundred and thirty-two consecutive patients underwent CTCA and calcium scoring following hospital attendance with acute chest pain and following exclusion of ACS. All patients were followed up for a combined primary outcome of death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and late revascularization. The mean follow-up period was 2.5 ± 0.9 years. The combined primary outcome occurred in 26 patients (11.2%). Calcium score (HR 1.16; 95% CI 1.02-1.31, P = 0.023 per 100 Agatston unit increase), the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) on CTCA (non-obstructive CAD, HR 4.52; 95% CI 1.30-15.73, P = 0.018; obstructive CAD, HR 17.00; 95% CI 4.60-62.85, P acute chest pain and could potentially be used as an alternative, non-invasive risk stratifier in patients with inconclusive exercise tests. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Treadmill walking exercise modulates bone mineral status and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treadmill walking exercise modulates bone mineral status and inflammatory cytokines in ... Methods: Eighty obese asthmatic patients of both sexes, their age ranged from 41 to 53 years. Subjects were divided into two equal groups: training group (group A) received aerobic exercise training on ... OTHER RESOURCES.

  15. Treadmill exercise alleviates nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2017-02-01

    Parkinson disease is one of the common brain diseases caused by dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fiber loss in the striatum. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on motor performance, dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers, and α-synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum were evaluated using rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. For the induction of Parkinson rats, 3-mg/kg rotenone was injected, once a day for 14 consecutive days. Treadmill running was conducted for 30 min once a day during 14 consecutive days. Rota-rod test for motor balance and coordination and immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and α-synuclein in the nigrostriatum were performed. In the present study, motor balance and coordination was disturbed by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated motor dysfunction in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers was occurred by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. α-Synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum was enhanced by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise suppressed α-synuclein expression in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Treadmill exercise improved motor function through preservation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and fibers and suppression of nigrostriatal formation of Lewy bodies in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats.

  16. Treadmill exercise alleviates depressive symptoms in rotenone-induced Parkinson disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Jae-Min; Sung, Yun-Hee; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2017-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by selective loss of the dopaminergic neurons. The symptoms of depression following PD are closely associated with reduced activity of the serotonergic system in the dorsal raphe. We explored the antidepressive effect of exercise and its possible mechanism using the rotenone-induced PD rats. PD rats were induced by subcutaneously injection with rotenone for 14 days. The rats in the exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day during 14 consecutive days. Forced swimming test, immunohistochemistry for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), and western blot for serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor were conducted. Injection of rotenone induced PD rats. PD rats showed depressive state and treadmill exercise ameliorated this depressive state. 5-HT, TPH, and 5-HT1A receptor expressions in the dorsal raphe were suppressed by rotenone injection and treadmill exercise increased the expressions of 5-HT, TPH, and 5-HT1A receptor in the rotenone-injected rats. The present results show that treadmill exercise ameliorated depressive symptoms in the rotenone-induced PD rats. The antidepressive effect of treadmill exercise might be ascribed to the enhancement of serotonergic function through upregulation of 5-HT1A expression in the dorsal raphe.

  17. Validity and Reproducibility of a New Treadmill Protocol: The Fitkids Treadmill Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elle M.W. Kotte; Tim Takken; Bart C. Bongers; Janke de Groot; Alexander M.F. Winkler

    2015-01-01

    Validity and Reproducibility of a New Treadmill Protocol: The Fitkids Treadmill Test. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 47, No. 10, pp. 2241–2247, 2015. Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the validity and reproducibility of a new treadmill protocol in healthy children and adolescents: the Fitkids

  18. Treadmill Exercise Induces Hippocampal Astroglial Alterations in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caren Bernardi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise effects on brain health and cognitive performance have been described. Synaptic remodeling in hippocampus induced by physical exercise has been described in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Changes in astrocytes, the glial cells involved in synaptic remodeling, need more characterization. We investigated the effect of moderate treadmill exercise (20 min/day for 4 weeks on some parameters of astrocytic activity in rat hippocampal slices, namely, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, glutamate uptake and glutamine synthetase (GS activities, glutathione content, and S100B protein content and secretion, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels and glucose uptake activity in this tissue. Results show that moderate treadmill exercise was able to induce a decrease in GFAP content (evaluated by ELISA and immunohistochemistry and an increase in GS activity. These changes could be mediated by corticosterone, whose levels were elevated in serum. BDNF, another putative mediator, was not altered in hippocampal tissue. Moreover, treadmill exercise caused a decrease in NO content. Our data indicate specific changes in astrocyte markers induced by physical exercise, the importance of studying astrocytes for understanding brain plasticity, as well as reinforce the relevance of physical exercise as a neuroprotective strategy.

  19. Treadmill exercise ameliorates social isolation-induced depression through neuronal generation in rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung-Wan; Jung, Sun-Young; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Sam-Jun; Seo, Tae-Beom; Kim, Young-Pyo; Kim, Dae-Young

    2017-12-01

    Social isolation is known to induce emotional and behavioral changes in animals and humans. The effect of treadmill exercise on depression was investigated using social isolated rat pups. The rat pups in the social isolation groups were housed individually. The rat pups in the exercise groups were forced to run on treadmill for 30 min once a day from postnatal day 21 to postnatal day 34. In order to evaluate depression state of rat pups, forced swimming test was performed. Newly generated cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were determined by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry. We examined the expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in the dorsal raphe using immunofluorescence. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) was detected by Western blot analysis. The present results demonstrated that social isolation increased resting time and decreased mobility time. Expression of 5-HT and TPH in the dorsal raphe and expression of BDNF and TrkB in the hippocampus were decreased by social isolation. The number of BrdU-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was suppressed by social isolation. Treadmill exercise decreased resting time and increased mobility in the social isolated rat pups. Expression of 5-HT, TPH, BDNF, and TrkB was increased by treadmill exercise. The present results suggested that treadmill exercise may ameliorates social isolation-induced depression through increasing neuronal generation.

  20. Metabolic Rate and Ground Reaction Force During Motorized and Non-Motorized Treadmill Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Meghan E.; Loehr, James A.; DeWitt, John K.; Laughlin, Mitzi; Lee, Stuart M. C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) and oxygen consumption (VO2) at several velocities during exercise using a ground-based version of the ISS treadmill in the M and NM modes. METHODS: Subjects (n = 20) walked or ran at 0.89, 1.34, 1.79, 2.24, 2.68, and 3.12 m/s while VO2 and vGRF data were collected. VO2 was measured using open-circuit spirometry (TrueOne 2400, Parvo-Medics). Data were averaged over the last 2 min of each 5-min stage. vGRF was measured in separate 15-s bouts at 125 Hz using custom-fitted pressure-sensing insoles (F-Scan Sport Sensors, Tekscan, Inc). A repeated-measures ANOVA was used to test for differences in VO2 and vGRF between M and NM and across speeds. Significance was set at P < 0.05. RESULTS: Most subjects were unable to exercise for 5 min at treadmill speeds above 1.79 m/s in the NM mode; however, vGRF data were obtained for all subjects at each speed in both modes. VO2 was approx.40% higher during NM than M exercise across treadmill speeds. vGRF increased with treadmill speed but was not different between modes. CONCLUSION: Higher VO2 with no change in vGRF suggests that the additional metabolic cost associated with NM treadmill exercise is accounted for in the horizontal forces required to move the treadmill belt. Although this may limit the exercise duration at faster speeds, high-intensity NM exercise activates the hamstrings and plantarflexors, which are not specifically targeted or well protected by other in-flight countermeasures.

  1. Treadmill exercise enhances spatial learning ability through suppressing hippocampal apoptosis in Huntington's disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, You-Mi; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Kijeong; Ha, Jonglin; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2015-06-01

    Huntington's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, and characterized as involuntary movement. Quinolinic acid has been used to produce an animal model of Huntington's disease. In the present study, the effect of treadmill exercise on spatial-learning ability and motor coordination focusing on the apoptosis in the hippocampus was investigated using quinolinic acid-induced Huntington's disease rats. Huntington's disease was induced by unilateral intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (2 μL of 100 nmol) using stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the treadmill exercise groups were subjected to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day during 14 days. Spatial learning ability and motor coordination were determined by radial 8-arm maze test and rota-rod test. Immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and western blot for Bax and Bcl-2 were also conducted for the detection of apoptosis. In the present results, spatial learning ability and motor coordination were deteriorated by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid. In contrast, treadmill exercise exerted ameliorating effect on quinolinic acid-induced deterioration of spatial learning ability and motor coordination. Bcl-2 expression in the hippocampus was de-creased and expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the hippocampus were increased in the quinolinic acid-induced Huntington's disease rats. Treadmill exercise increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the Huntington's disease rats. The present results showed that treadmill exercise might ameliorate quinolinic acid-induced loss of spatial learning ability and motor coordination by suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus.

  2. Effect of forced treadmill exercise and blocking of opioid receptors with naloxone on memory in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizi, Atefeh Asadi; Reisi, Parham; Naghsh, Nooshin

    2016-01-01

    The forced treadmill running can influence the opioid contents of the brain, through both effects of exercise and the effects of stress caused by coercion. Since opioids can cause negative effects on brain functions, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of forced treadmill exercise and blocking of opioid receptors with naloxone on memory in male rats. Experimental groups were the control, the exercise, the naloxone, and the naloxone exercise. The exercise program was treadmill running at 22 m/min at 0° inclination for 50 min/day, 6 days/week, for 4 weeks. Naloxone (1 mg/kg) was injected 5 min before the treadmill running. Morris water maze and passive avoidance learning tests were used for evaluation of memory. Acquisition phase of both tests was performed before interventions, and memory was evaluated 1-day and 1-week after the last session of exercise and treatments. Our data showed that forced exercise impaired performance in passive avoidance learning test (P exercise and treatments, respectively). Spatial memory was only impaired after 1-week in the exercise group. Naloxone had no significant effect on memory in the control group. However, it improved memory in the exercise group, as there was no significant difference between the control and the naloxone exercise in both tests. The data correspond to the possibility that opioidergic system may have mediatory roles in exercise-induced responses in forced exercise. These roles are likely harmful for memory.

  3. Cardiac Autonomic Function during Submaximal Treadmill Exercise in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Goncalo V.; Pereira, Fernando D.; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This study determined whether the cardiac autonomic function of adults with Down syndrome (DS) differs from that of nondisabled persons during submaximal dynamic exercise. Thirteen participants with DS and 12 nondisabled individuals performed maximal and submaximal treadmill tests with metabolic and heart rate (HR) measurements. Spectral analysis…

  4. The effect of a high-carbohydrate diet on the skill performance of midfield soccer players after intermittent treadmill exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, G; Zhou, S; Weatherby, R

    1998-12-01

    This study examined the effect of a high-carbohydrate diet on the performance of dribbling and shooting skills of recreational soccer players. Six male midfield soccer players first completed 60 minutes of intermittent treadmill exercise, followed either by a mixed or a high-carbohydrate diet for 48 hours. A modified Zelenka Functional Performance Test was then administered, followed by the intermittent treadmill exercise and another skills test. Subjects then repeated the protocol two weeks later under the alternative dietary regime. Blood samples were obtained pre exercise and after each procedure for Hematocrit and concentrations of hemoglobin, plasma glucose and lactate. Heart rate was recorded during and after each procedure. Repeated measures MANOVA revealed (1) the skill performance was not impaired by the intermittent treadmill exercise (p > 0.05); (2) the high-carbohydrate diet did not increase the ability of players to shoot or dribble (p > 0.05); (3) a significant increase in heart rate during the post treadmill exercise skill test compared with that during the pre treadmill exercise test (p tests (p > 0.05); and (6) a significant decrease in body mass from pre to post dietary regime within both conditions (p skills; (2) an alternative fatigue mechanism such as dehydration or increased lactate production may be causative factors in the reduction in skill performance; or (3) the treadmill protocol employed failed to induce a degree of glycogen depletion or fatigue large enough to cause a significant fall in skill performance.

  5. Validity and Reproducibility of a New Treadmill Protocol : The Fitkids Treadmill Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotte, Elles M W; De Groot, Janke F.; Bongers, Bart C.; Winkler, Alexander M F; Takken, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the validity and reproducibility of a new treadmill protocol in healthy children and adolescents: the Fitkids Treadmill Test (FTT). Methods Sixty-eight healthy children and adolescents (6-18 yr) were randomly divided into a validity group (14 boys and 20

  6. Treadmill Exercise with Increased Body Loading Enhances Post Flight Functional Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Batson, C. D.; Buxton, R. E.; Feiveson, A. H.; Kofman, I. S.; Laurie, S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Miller, C. A.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The goals of the Functional Task Test (FTT) study were to determine the effects of space flight on functional tests that are representative of high priority exploration mission tasks and to identify the key underlying physiological factors that contribute to decrements in performance. Ultimately this information will be used to assess performance risks and inform the design of countermeasures for exploration class missions. We have previously shown that for Shuttle, ISS and bed rest subjects functional tasks requiring a greater demand for dynamic control of postural equilibrium (i.e. fall recovery, seat egress/obstacle avoidance during walking, object translation, jump down) showed the greatest decrement in performance. Functional tests with reduced requirements for postural stability (i.e. hatch opening, ladder climb, manual manipulation of objects and tool use) showed little reduction in performance. These changes in functional performance were paralleled by similar decrements in sensorimotor tests designed to specifically assess postural equilibrium and dynamic gait control. The bed rest analog allows us to investigate the impact of axial body unloading in isolation on both functional tasks and on the underlying physiological factors that lead to decrements in performance and then compare them with the results obtained in our space flight study. These results indicate that body support unloading experienced during space flight plays a central role in postflight alteration of functional task performance. Given the importance of body-support loading we set out to determine if there is a relationship between the load experienced during inflight treadmill exercise (produced by a harness and bungee system) and postflight functional performance. ISS crewmembers (n=13) were tested using the FTT protocol before and after 6 months in space. Crewmembers were tested three times before flight, and on 1, 6, and 30 days after landing. To determine how differences in body

  7. Treadmill exercise attenuates 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced memory impairment through a decrease apoptosis in male rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharebaghi, Alireza; Amiri, Iraj; Salehi, Iraj; Shahidi, Siamak; Komaki, Alireza; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Moravej, Fahimeh Ghasemi; Asl, Sara Soleimani

    2017-12-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) leads to apoptosis in the hippocampus with consequent induction of learning and memory impairment. In this study, we have investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on memory in relation to apoptosis and oxidative stress in the hippocampi of MDMA-treated rats. Male Wistar rats received multiple intraperitoneal (IP) injections of MDMA (10 mg/kg) and exercised for one month on a treadmill (simultaneously or asynchronously with MDMA). We assessed memory function with the Morris water maze (MWM) test. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and expression of caspase 3, Bax, and Bcl-2 were examined by the thiobarbituric acid assay (TBA) and western blot, respectively. Our results showed that asynchronous treadmill exercise could significantly improve MDMA-induced memory impairment in the MWM test. Caspase 3 expression decreased in the exercise group compared to the MDMA group. Although MDMA treatment caused an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, the treadmill exercise reduced this ratio. Simultaneous exercise caused a reduction in lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. This data suggests that treadmill exercise can be a useful strategy for treating memory impairment in persons with neurodegenerative disease and stimulant drug users. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Anabolic responses to acute and chronic resistance exercise are enhanced when combined with aquatic treadmill exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Brad S; Shimkus, Kevin L; Fluckey, James D; Riechman, Steven E; Greene, Nicholas P; Cardin, Jessica M; Crouse, Stephen F

    2015-02-01

    Aquatic treadmill (ATM) running may simultaneously promote aerobic fitness and enhance muscle growth when combined with resistance training (RT) compared with land-treadmill (LTM) running. Therefore, we examined acute and chronic physiological responses to RT, concurrent RT-LTM, and concurrent RT-ATM. Forty-seven untrained volunteers (men: n = 23, 37 ± 11 yr, 29.6 ± 4.6 kg/m(2); women: n = 24, 38 ± 12 yr, 27.53 ± 6.4 kg/m(2)) from the general population were tested for V̇o2max, body composition, and strength before and after training. All groups performed 12 wk of RT (2 wk, 3 × 8-12 sets at 60 to approximately 80% 1-repetition maximum). The RT-LTM and RT-ATM groups also performed 12 wk of LTM or ATM training (2 wk immediately post-RT and 1 wk in isolation, 60-85% V̇o2max, 250-500 kcal/session). Additionally, 25 subjects volunteered for muscle biopsy prior to and 24 h post-acute exercise before and after training. Stable isotope labeling (70% (2)H2O, 3 ml/kg) was utilized to quantify 24 h post-exercise myofibrillar fractional synthesis rates (myoFSR). Mixed-model ANOVA revealed that RT-ATM but not RT-LTM training produced greater chronic increases in lean mass than RT alone (P exercise elicited higher 24-h myoFSRs compared with RT (+5.68%/day, P exercise and training elicit greater skeletal muscle anabolism than RT alone or RT-LTM. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Effects of treadmill exercise intensity on spatial working memory and long-term memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Gong-Wu

    2016-03-15

    Moderate exercise promotes learning and memory. Most studies mainly focused on memory exercise effects of in the ageing and patients. There is lack of quantitative research about effect of regular exercise intensity on different memory types in normal subjects. Present study investigated the effects of different intensities of treadmill exercise on working memory and long-term memory. Fifty female Wistar rats were trained by T-maze delayed spatial alternation (DSA) task with 3 delays (10s, 60s and 300s). Then they got a 30min treadmill exercise for 30days in 4 intensities (control, 0m/min; lower, 15m/min; middle, 20m/min, and higher, 30m/min). Then animals were tested in DSA, passive avoidance and Morris water maze tasks. 1. Exercise increased the neuronal density of hippocampal subregions (CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus) vs. naïve/control. 2. In DSA task, all groups have similar baseline, lower intensity improved 10s delay accuracy vs. baseline/control; middle and higher intensities improved 300s delay accuracy vs. baseline/control. 3. In water maze learning, all groups successfully found the platform, but middle intensity improved platform field crossing times vs. control in test phase. Present results suggested that treadmill exercise can improve long-term spatial memory and working memory; lower intensity benefits to short-term delayed working memory, and middle or higher intensity benefits to long-term delayed working memory. There was an inverted U dose-effect relationship between exercise intensity and memory performance, but exercise -working memory effect was impacted by delay duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comportamento da hiperinsuflação dinâmica em teste em esteira rolante em pacientes com DPOC moderada a grave Dynamic hyperinflation during treadmill exercise testing in patients with moderate to severe COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Kessar Cordoni

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar a presença, extensão e padrões de hiperinsuflação dinâmica (HD durante teste em esteira rolante em pacientes com DPOC moderada a grave. Métodos: Estudo transversal com 30 pacientes não hipoxêmicos (VEF1= 43 ± 14% do previsto submetidos a teste cardiopulmonar de exercício em esteira rolante em velocidade constante (70-80% da velocidade máxima até o limite da tolerância (Tlim. Manobras seriadas de capacidade inspiratória (CI foram utilizadas para avaliação da HD. RESULTADOS: Dos 30 pacientes estudados, 19 (63,3% apresentaram HD (grupo HD+, que apresentaram maior comprometimento funcional em repouso do que os pacientes sem HD (grupo HD-. Nenhuma das variáveis obtidas relacionou-se com a tolerância ao exercício no grupo HD-, enquanto Tlim, CI e percepção de dispneia ao esforço foram significativamente correlacionados no grupo HD+ (p OBJECTIVE: To characterize the presence, extent, and patterns of dynamic hyperinflation (DH during treadmill exercise testing in patients with moderate to severe COPD. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 30 non-hypoxemic patients (FEV1= 43 ± 14% of predicted who were submitted to a cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill at a constant speed (70-80% of maximum speed to the tolerance limit (Tlim. Serial inspiratory capacity (IC maneuvers were used in order to assess DH. RESULTS: Of the 30 patients studied, 19 (63.3% presented with DH (DH+ group, having greater pulmonary function impairment at rest than did those without DH (DH- group. None of the variables studied correlated with exercise tolerance in the DH- group, whereas Tlim, IC, and perception of dyspnea during exercise did so correlate in the DH+ group (p < 0.05. In the DH+ group, 7 and 12 patients, respectively, presented with a progressive and a stable pattern of DH (ΔIC Tlim,2min = -0.28 ± 0.11 L vs. 0.04 ± 0.10 L; p < 0.01. Patients with a progressive pattern of DH presented with higher

  11. Treadmill exercise alleviates impairment of spatial learning ability through enhancing cell proliferation in the streptozotocin-induced Alzheimer's disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Young-Je

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. This disease is a progressive and irreversible brain disorder accompanied with severe learning and memory impairment. Exercise increases cognitive ability, attenuates motor deficits, increases new neuron formation, and ameliorates neurological impairments in several neurodegenerative diseases. This study investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on spatial learning ability in relation with cell proliferation in the hippocampus. The rat model of Alzheimer's disease was induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of streptozotocin (STZ) using a stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill for once 30 min daily for 28 consecutive days starting at 3 days after the ICV injection of STZ. Radial 8-arm maze test was conducted for the spatial learning ability. New neuron formation in the hippocampus was detected by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions were examined by western blot analysis. The present results show that ICV injection of STZ impaired spatial learning ability. Decreased cell proliferation with decrement of BDNF and TrkB expressions in the hippocampus were observed in the STZ-induced Alzheimer's disease rats. However, treadmill exercise alleviated deficits of spatial learning ability. Treadmill exercise enhanced cell proliferation and increased BDNF and TrkB expressions in the rats with ICV injection of STZ. The present study suggests that treadmill exercise can be a useful strategy for treating memory impairment induced by several neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Treadmill exercise improves motor and memory functions in cerebral palsy rats through activation of PI3K-Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sun-Young; Kim, Dae-Young

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a chronic disorder characterized by physical disability and disruption of brain function. We evaluated the effects of treadmill exercise on motor and memory functions in relation with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway using CP rat model. Rota-rod test, step-down avoidance task, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry, and western blot for synapsin I, postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95), PI3K, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were performed. CP was induced by maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injection with sensorimotor restriction. Five weeks after birth, the rats in the exercise groups were made to run on the treadmill for 30 min per one day, 5 times a week, during 4 weeks. Motor and memory functions were impaired in the LPS-induced CP rats and tread-mill exercise increased motor and memory functions in the CP rats. Cell proliferation in the hippocampus was suppressed in the LPS-induced CP rats and treadmill exercise increased hippocampal cell proliferation in the CP rats. Expressions of synapsin I, PSD-95, phosphorylated (p)-PI3K, and p-Akt were decreased in the LPS-induced CP rats and treadmill exercise enhanced the expressions of synapsin I, PSD-95, p-PI3K, and p-Akt in the CP rats. GSK-3β expression was increased in the LPS-induced CP rats and treadmill exercise suppressed GSK-3β expression in the CP rats. The present results suggest that treadmill exercise might improve motor and memory functions through activation of PI3K-Akt pathway.

  13. Acute EPOC response in women to circuit training and treadmill exercise of matched oxygen consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, W A; Hawthorne, W E; Markofski, M M

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of circuit training (CT) and treadmill exercise performed at matched rates of oxygen consumption and exercise duration on elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in untrained women, while controlling for the menstrual cycle. Eight, untrained females (31.3 +/- 9.1 years; 2.04 +/- 0.26 l min(-1) estimated VO2max; BMI=24.6+/-3.9 kg/m2) volunteered to participate in the study. Testing was performed during the early follicular phase for each subject to minimize hormonal variability between tests. Subjects performed two exercise sessions approximately 28 days apart. Resting, supine energy expenditure was measured for 30 min preceding exercise and for 1 h after completion of exercise. Respiratory gas exchange data were collected continuously during rest and exercise periods via indirect calorimetry. CT consisted of three sets of eight common resistance exercises. Pre-exercise and exercise oxygen consumption was not different between testing days (P>0.05). Thus, exercise conditions were appropriately matched. Analysis of EPOC data revealed that CT resulted in a significantly higher (pEPOC period (pEPOC.

  14. Treadmill exercise slows cognitive deficits in aging rats by antioxidation and inhibition of amyloid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feng; Xu, Bo; Song, Chenghui; Ji, Liu; Zhang, Xianliang

    2013-04-17

    Chronic administration of D-galactose simulates the changes in natural senescence and accelerates aging in animal models and has been used in aging research. The present study was undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of exercise on learning and memory in rats with D-galactose-induced aging. The learning and memory performance in aging rats, either after exercise or without exercise, was assessed with the Morris water maze test. The effect of treadmill exercise on the expression of amyloid-β 42 and two key enzymes involved in processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein, a disintegrase and metalloprotease domain 17 and β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1, in the hippocampi of rats were monitored using real-time quantitative PCR. Moreover, oxidative stress-associated changes, including changes in superoxide dismutase activity and malondialdehyde content, in the hippocampi were assessed after exercise. Our results showed that treadmill exercise significantly improved learning and memory performance in aging rats. The behavioral changes were likely induced by repression of amyloid-β 42 protein levels, through the upregulation of a disintegrase and metalloprotease domain 17 mRNA and downregulation of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 mRNA, and a concomitant increase in superoxide dismutase activity and decrease in malondialdehyde content, in rat hippocampi. Our data suggest that exercise may be an effective therapy for alleviating learning and memory decline due to aging or the onset of neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Treadmill exercise induces selective changes in hippocampal histone acetylation during the aging process in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Bertoldi, Karine; Cechinel, Laura Reck; Schallenberger, Bruna Luisa; da Silva, Vanessa Kappel; Schröder, Nadja; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2016-11-10

    Physical exercise and the aging process have been shown to induce opposite effects on epigenetic marks, such as histone acetylation. The impact of exercise on hippocampal histone acetylation on specific lysine residues, especially during the aging process, is rarely studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of treadmill exercise (20min/day during 2 weeks) on H3K9, H4K5 and H4K12 acetylation levels in hippocampi of young adult and aged rats. Male Wistar rats aged 3 or 20-21 months were assigned to sedentary and exercise groups. Single-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance conditioning was employed as an aversive memory paradigm. Hippocampal H3K9, H4K5 and H4K12 acetylation was determined by Western blotting. The daily moderate exercise protocol improved the aversive memory performance and increased hipocampal H4K12 acetylation levels in both tested ages. Exercise was also able to increase H3K9 acetylation levels in aged rats. An age-related decline in memory performance was observed, without any effect of the aging process on histone acetylation state. Our data suggest that treadmill exercise can impact hippocampal the histone acetylation profile in an age- and lysine-dependent manner. In addition, higher hippocampal H4K12 acetylation levels at both ages may be related to improvement of aversive memory performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The reliability and minimal detectable change of the cardiovascular response and self-selected exercise intensity during forward and backward treadmill exercise in individuals with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Reid; Petersen, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    This study examined test-retest relative (intraclass correlation coefficient) and absolute (minimum detectable change) reliabilities for heart rate, blood pressure, rate of perceived exertion, and the cerebral oxygen response during both forward and backward treadmill walking in clients with Parkinson disease. In addition, the intensity of exercise based on the individual's heart rate response during forward and backward walking treadmill work was assessed. Test-retest reliability study. A total of 22 clients with Parkinson disease (Hoehn and Yahr stages 1-3). Outcome measures of heart rate, blood pressure, and cerebral oxygen response were assessed during forward and backward walking on a treadmill for a total of 20 minutes up to an intensity based on the clients' prior treadmill work and their rate of perceived exertion. Good to excellent 6-8 day test-retest findings for both forward (intraclass correlation coefficient (2,1) , 0.89-0.99) and backward (intraclass correlation coefficient (2,1) , 0.82-0.99) treadmill walking were found for heart rate, blood pressure, cerebral oxygen response, and the participants' rate of perceived exertion. Low minimum detectable change (MDC) 95 values were found for heart rate (4.9 and 4.8), rate of perceived exertion (1.0 and 1.6), and cerebral oxygen response (1.2 and 0.92), during forward and backward walking, respectively. All treadmill exercise heart rates attained by participants were within an intensity of 54%-87% of the client's predicted maximal heart rate. Treadmill exercise training can be included in Parkinson disease exercise programs with relative confidence in test-retest reliability of cardiovascular response. It was also demonstrated that individuals with Parkinson disease previously involved with exercise consistently self-select walking speeds which induce heart rates within recommended guidelines for positive cardiovascular adaptation.

  17. Cardiorespiratory responses during underwater and land treadmill exercise in college athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Peter; Ozemek, Cemal; Gonzalez, Alimer; Wiley, Stephen; Collins, Gregory

    2011-08-01

    Underwater treadmill (UTM) exercise is being used with increased frequency for rehabilitation of injured athletes, yet there has been little research conducted on this modality. To determine the cardiorespiratory responses of UTM vs land treadmill (LTM) exercise, particularly with respect to the relationship between heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2). This quantitative original research took place in sports medicine and athletic training facilities at Wake Forest University. 11 Wake Forest University student athletes (20.8 ± 0.6 y, 6 women and 5 men). All participants completed the UTM and LTM exercise-testing protocols in random order. After 5 min of standing rest, both UTM and LTM protocols had 4 stages of increasing belt speed (2.3, 4.9, 7.3, and 9.6 km/h) followed by 3 exercise stages at 9.6 km/h with increasing water-jet resistance (30%, 40%, and 50% of jet capacity) or inclines (1%, 2%, and 4% grade). A Cosmed K4b2 device with Polar monitor was used to collect HR, ventilation (Ve), tidal volume (TV), breathing frequency (Bf), and VO2 every minute. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were also obtained each minute. There was no significant difference between UTM and LTM for VO2 at rest or during any stage of exercise except stage 3. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between UTM and LTM for HR, Ve, Bf, and RPE on any exercise stage. Linear regression of HR vs VO2, across all stages of exercise, indicates a similar relationship in these variables during UTM (r = .94, y = .269x - 10.86) and LTM (r = .95, y = .291x - 12.98). These data indicate that UTM and LTM exercise elicits similar cardiorespiratory responses and that HR can be used to guide appropriate exercise intensity for college athletes during UTM.

  18. STS-44 crewmembers exercise using treadmill rowing device on OV-104's middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Pilot Terence T. Henricks (foreground) 'rows' on the modified treadmill device used by crewmembers for biomedical evaluations and for exercising. Earlier, the treadmill, located on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, had experienced an anomaly that affected its ability to support the subjects in 'running' mode. Mission Specialist (MS) Mario Runco, Jr (background), his torso bearing sensors, awaits his turn on the treadmill.

  19. Neuroprotective Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation in Combination With Treadmill Exercise Following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mal Soon; Park, Hun Kyung; Kim, Tae Woon; Ji, Eun Sang; Lee, Jae Min; Choi, Han Sung; Kim, Mi Ye; Kim, Young Pyo

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes cognitive impairments, motor deficits, and neuropsychiatric/behavioral deficits problems. Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) facilitates functional recovery from brain insults. Treadmill exercise increases neurogenesis and inhibits apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the effects of BMSC transplantation in combination with treadmill exercise on memory function, by evaluating its effect on neurogenesis and apoptosis in the hippocampus following TBI. TBI was induced using an electromagnetic-controlled cortical impact device. BMSCs were transplanted into both sides of traumatic scar region 1 week after TBI induction. One week after transplantation of BMSCs, the rats in the exercise groups were trained to run on a treadmill for 30 minutes once daily for 28 days. Step-down avoidance task and radial 8-arm maze test were conducted. Levels of 5-bromo-2ʹ-deoxyuridine and caspase-3 were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Western blot was used to evaluate the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine kinase B (TrkB), total-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (t-ERK1/2), phosphorylated-ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2), Bcl-2, and Bax. TBI deteriorated memory function, suppressed neurogenesis, and accelerated apoptosis in the hippocampus. Treadmill exercise and BMSC transplantation independently improved memory function by increasing neurogenesis with suppression of apoptosis through the BDNF-ERK pathway in the TBI-induced rats. Combination of BMSC transplantation with treadmill exercise showed additional enhancement of neurogenesis and suppression of apoptosis in the hippocampus. The present study shows that treadmill exercise may aid the therapeutic effect of BMSC transplantation on TBI in rats.

  20. Effects of fluoxetine on memory under forced treadmill exercise conditions in male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jafary, Leila; Reisi, Parham; Naghsh, Nooshin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies show inconsistent effects of forced exercise on cognitive processes. These differences are probably due to the stress of coercion in forced exercise. Because fluoxetine is used to treat complications caused by stress, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of fluoxetine on memory in rats under forced treadmill exercise. Materials and Methods: Experimental groups were the control, the control exercise, the fluoxetine, and the fluoxetine exercise. The exercise program was ...

  1. Effect of underwater treadmill exercise on postural sway in horses with experimentally induced carpal joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Melissa R; Haussler, Kevin K; Kawcak, Christopher E; McIlwraith, C Wayne; Reiser Ii, Raoul F

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of underwater treadmill exercise on static postural sway in horses with experimentally induced carpal joint osteoarthritis under various stance conditions. 16 horses. On day 0, osteoarthritis was induced arthroscopically in 1 randomly selected middle carpal joint of each horse. Beginning on day 15, horses were assigned to either underwater or overground (without water) treadmill exercise at the same speed, frequency, and duration. Two serial force platforms were used to collect postural sway data from each horse on study days -7, 14, 42, and 70. Horses were made to stand stationary on the force platforms under 3 stance conditions: normal square stance, base-narrow placement of the thoracic limbs, and removal of visual cues (blindfolded) during a normal square stance. The mean of 3 consecutive, 10-second trials in each condition was calculated and used for analysis. Displacement of the center of pressure differed significantly depending on the stance condition. Among horses exercised on the underwater treadmill, postural stability in both the base-narrow and blindfolded stance conditions improved, compared with findings for horses exercised on the overground treadmill. Horses exercised on the overground treadmill were only successful at maintaining a stable center of pressure during the normal square stance position. Variations in stance position had profound effects on the mechanics of standing balance in horses with experimentally induced carpal joint osteoarthritis. Underwater treadmill exercise significantly improved the horses' postural stability, which is fundamental in providing evidence-based support for equine aquatic exercise.

  2. Different protocols of treadmill exercise induce distinct neuroplastic effects in rat brain motor areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Caroline C; Garcia, Priscila C; Britto, Luiz R G; Pires, Raquel S

    2015-10-22

    A variety of exercise protocols have been used to promote experimental neuroplasticity. However, the plastic brain responses generated by several aspects of training (types, frequency, regimens, duration) remain undetermined. The aim of this study was to compare the plastic changes in the glutamatergic system and synaptic proteins in motor cortex, striatum and cerebellum promoted by two different treadmill exercise regimens. The present study analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting the expression of the subunits of AMPA receptors (GluA1 and GluA2/3) and synaptic proteins (synapsin I and synaptophysin) in adult male Wistar rat brains. The animals were divided into animals subjected to two different frequencies of aerobic exercise groups and sedentary animals. The exercise groups were: intermittent treadmill exercise (ITE) - animals that exercised 3 times a week (every other day) during four weeks, and continuous treadmill exercise (CTE) - animals that exercised every day during four weeks. Our results reveal that different protocols of treadmill exercise were able to promote distinct synaptic reorganization processes among the exercised groups. In general, the intermittent exercise regimen induced a higher expression of presynaptic proteins, whereas the continuous exercise regimen increased postsynaptic GluA1 and GluA2/3 receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative Effect of Treadmill Exercise on Mature BDNF Production in Control versus Stroke Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirié, Aurore; Hervieu, Marie; Garnier, Philippe; Demougeot, Céline; Mossiat, Claude; Bertrand, Nathalie; Martin, Alain; Marie, Christine; Prigent-Tessier, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise constitutes an innovative strategy to treat deficits associated with stroke through the promotion of BDNF-dependent neuroplasticity. However, there is no consensus on the optimal intensity/duration of exercise. In addition, whether previous stroke changes the effect of exercise on the brain is not known. Therefore, the present study compared the effects of a clinically-relevant form of exercise on cerebral BDNF levels and localization in control versus stroke rats. For this purpose, treadmill exercise (0.3 m/s, 30 min/day, for 7 consecutive days) was started in rats with a cortical ischemic stroke after complete maturation of the lesion or in control rats. Sedentary rats were run in parallel. Mature and proBDNF levels were measured on the day following the last boot of exercise using Western blotting analysis. Total BDNF levels were simultaneously measured using ELISA tests. As compared to the striatum and the hippocampus, the cortex was the most responsive region to exercise. In this region, exercise resulted in a comparable increase in the production of mature BDNF in intact and stroke rats but increased proBDNF levels only in intact rats. Importantly, levels of mature BDNF and synaptophysin were strongly correlated. These changes in BDNF metabolism coincided with the appearance of intense BDNF labeling in the endothelium of cortical vessels. Notably, ELISA tests failed to detect changes in BDNF forms. Our results suggest that control beings can be used to find conditions of exercise that will result in increased mBDNF levels in stroke beings. They also suggest cerebral endothelium as a potential source of BDNF after exercise and highlight the importance to specifically measure the mature form of BDNF to assess BDNF-dependent plasticity in relation with exercise. PMID:22962604

  4. Comparative effect of treadmill exercise on mature BDNF production in control versus stroke rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Quirié

    Full Text Available Physical exercise constitutes an innovative strategy to treat deficits associated with stroke through the promotion of BDNF-dependent neuroplasticity. However, there is no consensus on the optimal intensity/duration of exercise. In addition, whether previous stroke changes the effect of exercise on the brain is not known. Therefore, the present study compared the effects of a clinically-relevant form of exercise on cerebral BDNF levels and localization in control versus stroke rats. For this purpose, treadmill exercise (0.3 m/s, 30 min/day, for 7 consecutive days was started in rats with a cortical ischemic stroke after complete maturation of the lesion or in control rats. Sedentary rats were run in parallel. Mature and proBDNF levels were measured on the day following the last boot of exercise using Western blotting analysis. Total BDNF levels were simultaneously measured using ELISA tests. As compared to the striatum and the hippocampus, the cortex was the most responsive region to exercise. In this region, exercise resulted in a comparable increase in the production of mature BDNF in intact and stroke rats but increased proBDNF levels only in intact rats. Importantly, levels of mature BDNF and synaptophysin were strongly correlated. These changes in BDNF metabolism coincided with the appearance of intense BDNF labeling in the endothelium of cortical vessels. Notably, ELISA tests failed to detect changes in BDNF forms. Our results suggest that control beings can be used to find conditions of exercise that will result in increased mBDNF levels in stroke beings. They also suggest cerebral endothelium as a potential source of BDNF after exercise and highlight the importance to specifically measure the mature form of BDNF to assess BDNF-dependent plasticity in relation with exercise.

  5. Pilot safety and feasibility study of treadmill aerobic exercise in Parkinson disease with gait impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Frank M; Patterson, Shawnna L; Shulman, Lisa M; Sorkin, John D; Macko, Richard F

    2008-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the safety and feasibility of a 3-month progressive treadmill aerobic exercise (TM-AEX) program for persons with Parkinson disease with gait impairment. Eight subjects underwent a treadmill stress test to determine eligibility. Of these subjects, three were referred for further cardiac evaluation and five were enrolled. In 136 TM-AEX sessions, 11 falls or near falls and 9 episodes (8 asymptomatic) of systolic blood pressure drops >20 mmHg occurred. Harness supports prevented injury from falls. TM-AEX significantly improved the subjects' total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores and peak ambulatory workload capacities. This study suggests that an aerobic exercise program is feasible for persons who have Parkinson disease with gait impairment; however, precautions must be taken to prevent falls. Systolic blood pressure instability during exercise points to the need for autonomic dysfunction monitoring. Our data indicate that TM-AEX may reduce symptom severity and improve fitness. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the risks and benefits of TM-AEX in this population.

  6. Acute aquatic treadmill exercise improves gait and pain in people with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Jaimie A; Bressel, Eadric; Tillman, Mark D

    2013-03-01

    To examine the acute effects of aquatic and land treadmill exercise on gait kinematics as well as the level of disease-specific and movement-related pain for individuals with osteoarthritis. Quasi-experimental crossover design. Biomechanics laboratory. Participants (N=14; age, 43-64y) diagnosed with osteoarthritis at the knee (n=12), osteoarthritis at the knee and ankle (n=1), or osteoarthritis at the knee and hip (n=1). Participants performed 3 exercise sessions separated by at least 24 hours in 1 week for each mode of exercise (aquatic treadmill and land treadmill). Gait kinematics and pain were measured before and after each intervention. The angular velocity gain score during stance for left knee extension was improved by 38% after aquatic treadmill exercise (P=.004). Similarly, during swing, the gain scores for angular velocity were also greater for left knee internal rotation and extension by 65% and 20%, respectively (P=.004, P=.008, respectively). During stance, the joint angle gain score for left hip flexion was 7.23% greater after land exercise (P=.007). During swing, the angular velocity gain score for right hip extension was significantly greater for aquatic exercise by 28% (P=.01). Only the joint angle gain score for left ankle abduction during stance was significantly higher after land exercise (4.72%, P=.003). No other joint angle gain scores for either stance or swing were significantly different for either condition (P=.06-.96). Perceived pain was 100% greater after land than aquatic treadmill exercise (P=.02). Step rate and step length were not different between conditions (P=.31-.92). An acute training period on an aquatic treadmill positively influenced joint angular velocity and arthritis-related joint pain. Acute aquatic treadmill exercise may be useful as a conservative treatment to improve angular speed of the lower-extremity joints and pain related to osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published

  7. Forced treadmill exercise prevents oxidative stress and memory deficits following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechetti, Fernanda; Worm, Paulo Valdeci; Elsner, Viviane Rostirolla; Bertoldi, Karine; Sanches, Eduardo; Ben, Juliana; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity impacts functional recovery following stroke in humans, however its effects in experimental animals submitted to chronic cerebral hypoperfusion have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of exercise, as assessed by cognitive activity in the Morris water maze and the brain oxidative status, through measurement of macromolecules damage, TBARS levels and total cellular thiols, as well as antioxidant enzymes in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. Adult male Wistar rats were submitted to the modified permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (2VO) method, with right common carotid artery being first occluded, and tested 3 months after the ischemic event. The effects of three different exercise protocols were examined: pre-ischemia, post-ischemia and pre+post-ischemia. Physical exercise consisted of sessions of 20-min, 3 times per week during 12 weeks (moderate intensity). Rats were submitted to cognitive assessment, in both reference and working spatial memory and after the last testing session were sacrificed to have oxidative stress parameters determined. Hypoperfusion caused a significant cognitive deficit in both spatial water maze tasks and this effect was reversed in rats receiving exercise protocol post and pre+post the ischemic event. Moreover, forced regular treadmill exercise regulated oxidative damage and antioxidant enzyme activity in the hippocampus. These results suggest that physical exercise protects against cognitive and biochemical impairments caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiovascular responses in older adults with total knee arthroplasty at rest and with exercise on a positive pressure treadmill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Sandra C; Horvey, Karla J; Yurach Pikaluk, Madison T; Butcher, Scott J

    2014-03-01

    We investigated cardiovascular responses at rest and during submaximal exercise on a lower body positive pressure treadmill in older adults with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty-four adults (mean age 64.6 ± 7.9 SD) with unilateral TKA participated (median time since surgery 8.0 weeks). Heart rate and blood pressure responses were measured at rest standing on the positive pressure treadmill with 0, 10, 20, and 30 mmHg applied. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen consumption, minute ventilation, knee pain and perceived exertion were measured during submaximal exercise tests (0 and 40% body weight support) conducted 1 week apart. At rest there were no differences in blood pressure across different treadmill pressures, but heart rate was significantly lower when 30 mmHg was applied compared to ambient pressure conditions (P exercise test stages with 0% body weight support (maximum speed 2.5 mph, 0% incline) and 6.4 stages with 40% body weight support (maximum speed 3.0 mph, 10% incline). During exercise, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, oxygen consumption, and minute ventilation were lower when 40% body weight support was provided for a given test stage (P exercise test stages (P < 0.05). Provision of body weight support allowed TKA patients to walk at faster speeds and/or to tolerate greater incline with relatively lower levels of heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen consumption.

  9. A prognostic scoring system for arm exercise stress testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xie, Yan; Xian, Hong; Chandiramani, Pooja; Bainter, Emily; Wan, Leping; Martin, 3rd, Wade H

    2016-01-01

    ...% for patients unable to perform leg exercise. Thus, our objective was to develop an arm exercise ECG stress test scoring system, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, for predicting outcome in these individuals...

  10. Acute Exercise and Oxidative Stress: CrossFit™ vs. Treadmill Bout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliszczewicz, Brian; Quindry, C. John; Blessing, L. Daniel; Oliver, D. Gretchen; Esco, R. Michael; Taylor, J. Kyle

    2015-01-01

    CrossFit™, a popular high-intensity training modality, has been the subject of scrutiny, with concerns of elevated risk of injury and health. Despite these concerns empirical evidence regarding physiologic stresses including acute oxidative stress is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute redox response to a CrossFit™ bout. Furthermore, these findings were compared to a high-intensity treadmill bout as a point of reference. Ten males 26.4 ± 2.7 yrs having three or more months of CrossFit™ experience participated in the present study. Blood plasma was collected at four time points: Pre-exercise (PRE), immediately-post-exercise (IPE), 1 hr-post (1-HP) and 2 hr-post (2-HP), to examine oxidative damage and antioxidant capacity. Regarding plasma oxidative damage, CrossFit™ and Treadmill elicited a time-dependent increase of lipid peroxides 1-HP (CrossFit™=+143%, Treadmill=+115%) and 2-HP (CrossFit™=+256%, Treadmill+167%). Protein Carbonyls were increased IPE in CF only (+5%), while a time-dependent decrease occurred 1-HP (CrossFit™=−16%, Treadmill=−8%) and 2-HP (CF=−16%, TM=−1%) compared to IPE. Regarding antioxidant capacity, Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power also demonstrated a time-dependent increase within CrossFit™ and Treadmill: IPE (CrossFit™=+25%, Treadmill=+17%), 1-HP (CrossFit™=+26%, Treadmill=+4.8%), 2-HP (CrossFit™=+20%, Treadmill=+12%). Total Enzymatic Antioxidant Capacity showed a time-dependent decrease in IPE (CrossFit™=−10%, Treadmill=−12%), 1-HP (CrossFit™=−12%, Treadmill=−6%), 2-HP (CrossFit™=−7%, Treadmill=−11%). No trial-dependent differences were observed in any biomarker of oxidative stress. The CrossFit™ bout elicited an acute blood oxidative stress response comparable to a traditional bout of high-intensity treadmill running. Results also confirm that exercise intensity and the time course of exercise recovery influence oxidative responses. PMID:26557192

  11. Acute Exercise and Oxidative Stress: CrossFit™ vs. Treadmill Bout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kliszczewicz Brian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available CrossFit™, a popular high-intensity training modality, has been the subject of scrutiny, with concerns of elevated risk of injury and health. Despite these concerns empirical evidence regarding physiologic stresses including acute oxidative stress is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute redox response to a CrossFit™ bout. Furthermore, these findings were compared to a high-intensity treadmill bout as a point of reference. Ten males 26.4 ± 2.7 yrs having three or more months of CrossFit™ experience participated in the present study. Blood plasma was collected at four time points: Pre-exercise (PRE, immediately-post-exercise (IPE, 1 hr-post (1-HP and 2 hr-post (2-HP, to examine oxidative damage and antioxidant capacity. Regarding plasma oxidative damage, CrossFit™ and Treadmill elicited a time-dependent increase of lipid peroxides 1-HP (CrossFit™=+143%,Treadmill=+115% and 2-HP (CrossFit™=+256%,Treadmill+167%. Protein Carbonyls were increased IPE in CF only (+5%, while a time-dependent decrease occurred 1-HP (CrossFit™=−16%,Treadmill=−8% and 2-HP (CF=−16%,TM=−1% compared to IPE. Regarding antioxidant capacity, Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power also demonstrated a time-dependent increase within CrossFit™ and Treadmill: IPE (CrossFit™=+25%,Treadmill=+17%, 1-HP (CrossFit™=+26%,Treadmill=+4.8%, 2-HP (CrossFit™=+20%,Treadmill=+12%. Total Enzymatic Antioxidant Capacity showed a time-dependent decrease in IPE (CrossFit™= −10%,Treadmill=−12%, 1-HP (CrossFit™= −12%,Treadmill=−6%, 2-HP (CrossFit™= −7%,Treadmill=−11%. No trial-dependent differences were observed in any biomarker of oxidative stress. The CrossFit™ bout elicited an acute blood oxidative stress response comparable to a traditional bout of high-intensity treadmill running. Results also confirm that exercise intensity and the time course of exercise recovery influence oxidative responses.

  12. Acute Exercise and Oxidative Stress: CrossFit(™) vs. Treadmill Bout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliszczewicz, Brian; Quindry, C John; Blessing, L Daniel; Oliver, D Gretchen; Esco, R Michael; Taylor, J Kyle

    2015-09-29

    CrossFit(™), a popular high-intensity training modality, has been the subject of scrutiny, with concerns of elevated risk of injury and health. Despite these concerns empirical evidence regarding physiologic stresses including acute oxidative stress is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute redox response to a CrossFit(™) bout. Furthermore, these findings were compared to a high-intensity treadmill bout as a point of reference. Ten males 26.4 ± 2.7 yrs having three or more months of CrossFit(™) experience participated in the present study. Blood plasma was collected at four time points: Pre-exercise (PRE), immediately-post-exercise (IPE), 1 hr-post (1-HP) and 2 hr-post (2-HP), to examine oxidative damage and antioxidant capacity. Regarding plasma oxidative damage, CrossFit(™) and Treadmill elicited a time-dependent increase of lipid peroxides 1-HP (CrossFit(™)=+143%, Treadmill=+115%) and 2-HP (CrossFit(™)=+256%, Treadmill+167%). Protein Carbonyls were increased IPE in CF only (+5%), while a time-dependent decrease occurred 1-HP (CrossFit(™)=-16%, Treadmill=-8%) and 2-HP (CF=-16%, TM=-1%) compared to IPE. Regarding antioxidant capacity, Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power also demonstrated a time-dependent increase within CrossFit(™) and Treadmill: IPE (CrossFit(™)=+25%, Treadmill=+17%), 1-HP (CrossFit(™)=+26%, Treadmill=+4.8%), 2-HP (CrossFit(™)=+20%, Treadmill=+12%). Total Enzymatic Antioxidant Capacity showed a time-dependent decrease in IPE (CrossFit(™)=-10%, Treadmill=-12%), 1-HP (CrossFit(™)=-12%, Treadmill=-6%), 2-HP (CrossFit(™)=-7%, Treadmill=-11%). No trial-dependent differences were observed in any biomarker of oxidative stress. The CrossFit(™) bout elicited an acute blood oxidative stress response comparable to a traditional bout of high-intensity treadmill running. Results also confirm that exercise intensity and the time course of exercise recovery influence oxidative responses.

  13. A prospective comparison of pedal ergometry with conventional treadmill testing in the investigation of lower extremity pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manning, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Investigation of lower extremity pain is compromised by comorbid disorders that may interfere with conventional testing. AIMS: To compare pedal ergometry with conventional treadmill testing. METHODS: A prospective study was performed where patients presenting with a diagnosis of intermittent claudication were assessed by both methods of testing. RESULTS: Of 78 patients studied with both tests, no exercise-induced ankle pressure changes occurred in 26, two were unable to complete either test despite normal pressure measurements, while 24 had exercise-induced pressure drop detected by both tests. Of patients who completed pedal ergometry, 21 were unable to complete the treadmill test, 14 of whom had negative ergometry, while seven had a pressure drop detected by pedal ergometry. Three had pressure changes with pedal ergometry, but not with treadmill testing and two had pressure changes on the treadmill not reproduced by pedal ergometry. CONCLUSIONS: Pedal ergometer is more sensitive than treadmill testing in detecting arterial insufficiency, as indicated by a 20% or greater fall in ankle pressure, and more suitable in a subgroup of patients unable to tolerate conventional treadmill testing.

  14. Treadmill exercise training and estradiol differentially modulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortical responses to acute running and immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Welkley, J E; Bunnell, B N; Mougey, E H; Meyerhoff, J L; Dishman, R K

    1995-03-01

    It is generally believed that physical fitness promotes health by attenuating responsiveness to other stressors. The experimental evidence for this belief is limited and does not extend to interactions between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortical (HPA) and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes. We tested the hypothesis that treadmill exercise training would lead to an estrogen-dependent hyporesponsiveness of the HPA axis that would generalize to immobilization stress. Ovariectomized female Sprague-Dawley rats (N = 74) that had been treadmill trained (TT) or sedentary for 6 weeks received intramuscular injections of estradiol benzoate (Eb) or sesame oil on each of 3 days prior to 15 min of acute treadmill running or immobilization. Plasma (adrenocorticotrophin) (ACTH), (corticosterone) (B) and (prolactin) (PRL) were determined from trunk blood by radioimmunoassay and compared in a 2 group (TT vs. sedentary)-by-2 treatment (Eb vs. oil)-by-2 acute stressor (running vs. immobilization) design. Home-cage (HC) animals (N = 24) provided baseline hormone levels. ACTH and B levels were elevated after stressors in animals treated with either Eb or oil compared to HC, but increases in PRL after stressors were dependent on Eb. Treadmill exercise training led to an attenuation of ACTH and prolactin to running, but the attenuation did not generalize to immobilization. In contrast, treadmill exercise training led to a hyperresponsiveness of ACTH. Treadmill training did not modulate prolactin responses to immobilization. The modulating effects of the estradiol treatment are consistent with an interaction of the HPA and HPG axes in response to stress.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Different Intensities of Treadmill Running Exercise do Not Alter Melatonin Levels in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionara Rodrigues Siqueira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular and moderate exercise has been considered an interesting neuroprotective strategy. Our research group demonstrated that a protocol of moderate exercise on a treadmill reduced, while a protocol of high-intensity exercise increased in vitro ischemic cell damage in Wistar rats. The molecular mechanisms by which physical exercise exerts neuroprotective effects remain unclear. Accumulating evidence suggests that exercise may have short- and long-term effects on melatonin secretion in humans. Melatonin, the main product of the pineal gland, has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in models of brain and spinal cord injury and cerebral ischemia. A dual modulation of melatonin secretion by physical activity has also been demonstrated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of different exercise intensities, moderate- and high-intensity exercise, on serum melatonin levels in rats. Methods: Thirty-five adult male Wistar rats were divided into non-exercised (sedentary and exercised (20- or 60-min sessions groups. The exercise protocols consisted of two weeks of daily treadmill training. Blood samples were collected approximately 16 hours after the last training session (8:00-10:00 and melatonin levels were assayed by ELISA. Results: The exercise protocols, two weeks of 20 min/day or 60 min/day of treadmill running, did not affect serum melatonin levels. Conclusion: Our data demonstrated that melatonin levels may not be directly involved in the exercise-induced, intensity-dependent dual effect on in vitro ischemia.

  16. Transient activation of mTOR following forced treadmill exercise in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elfving, Betina; Christensen, Tina; Ratner, Cecilia Friis

    2013-01-01

    the effect of exercise on the expression of VEGF, cognate receptors, HIF1a, mTORC1, and mTORC2 in hippocampus and frontal cortex. To this end, we measured messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in rat brain using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time qPCR) after forced treadmill exercise for 1 day...

  17. Age-dependent effect of treadmill exercise on hemorrhage-induced neuronal cell death in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Yi, Eun-Surk; Baek, Soon Gi

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major cause of death and disability in the elderly. In the present study, we examined the age-dependence of the effect of treadmill exercise on the intrastriatal hemorrhage-induced neuronal cell death in rats. Young (8 weeks old) and old (64 weeks old) Sprague-Dawley male rats were used in the present study. Intrastriatal hemorrhage was induced by injection of 0.2 U collagenase (1 μL volume) into the striatum using a stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill for 30 min daily for 7 days. Lesion size was determined by Nissl staining. Apoptosis was assessed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. In the present results, induction of hemorrhage increased lesion size and enhanced apoptosis. Treadmill exercise decreased the lesion size with suppressing apoptosis. However, the size of lesion induced by hemorrhage and the number of apoptotic cells were not different between young and old rats. Treadmill exercise significantly reduced the ICH-induced lesion size and the number of apoptotic cells irrespective of age. The data suggest that treadmill exercise may provide therapeutic value against ICH by suppressing neuronal apoptosis regardless of age.

  18. THE EFFECT OF CAFFEINE SUPPLEMENTATION ON TRAINED INDIVIDUALS SUBJECTED TO MAXIMAL TREADMILL TEST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salicio, Viviane Martins Mana; Fett, Carlos Alexandre; Salicio, Marcos Adriano; Brandäo, Camila Fernanda Costa Cunha Moraes; Stoppiglia, Luiz Fabrizio; Fett, Waléria Christiane Rezende; Botelho, And Clovis

    2017-01-01

    Intense physical training increases oxidative stress and inflammation, resulting into muscle and cellular damage. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of caffeine supplementation on trained young individuals subjected to two treadmill maximal tests. It was a double-blind and crossover study comprising 24 active individuals within the age group 18-30 years. The comparisons were conducted: the effect of exercise (week 1 x 2) and caffeine intake (GC x GP) on thiobarbituric acid (TBARS), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) variables during pre-exercise time (30 min. after caffeine or placebo intake) and post-exercise (5 min after treadmill test). The comparison between weeks 1 and 2 showed increase in the first week, in the following items: TBARS, IL-6 and IL-10 in the GC and GP groups. The comparison within the same week showed that GC individuals presented lower post-exercise TBARS values in the first and second weeks; IL- 6 presented higher post-exercise values in the GC group in both weeks. The paired analysis comparing pre- and post-exercise, with and without caffeine showed that IL-6 presented higher post-exercise values in the GC group. Caffeine used by athletes can decrease oxidative stress. The increased IL-6 suggest that this ergogenic supplement may stimulate muscle hypertrophy, since IL-6 has myokine effect. However, the caffeine effect on IL-6 level and muscle hypertrophy increase should be better investigated in future studies.

  19. Treadmill Exercise Improves Motor Dysfunction and Hyperactivity of the Corticostriatal Glutamatergic Pathway in Rats with 6-OHDA-Induced Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperactivity in the corticostriatal glutamatergic pathway (CGP induces basal ganglia dysfunction, contributing to parkinsonian syndrome (PS. Physical exercise can improve PS. However, the effect of exercise on the CGP, and whether this pathway is involved in the improvement of PS, remains unclear. Parkinson’s disease (PD was induced in rats by 6-hydroxydopamine injection into the right medial forebrain bundle. Motor function was assessed using the cylinder test. Striatal neuron (SN spontaneous and evoked firing activity was recorded, and the expression levels of Cav1.3 and CaMKII in the striatum were measured after 4 weeks of treadmill exercise. The motor function in PD rats was improved by treadmill exercise. SN showed significantly enhanced excitability, and treadmill exercise reduced SN excitability in PD rats. In addition, firing activity was evoked in SNs by stimulation of the primary motor cortex, and SNs exhibited significantly decreased stimulus threshold, increased firing rates, and reduced latency. The expression of Cav1.3 and p-CaMKII (Thr286 in the striatum were enhanced in PD rats. However, these effects were reversed by treadmill exercise. These findings suggest that treadmill exercise inhibits CGP hyperactivity in PD rats, which may be related to improvement of PS.

  20. Inflight Treadmill Exercise Can Serve as Multi-Disciplinary Countermeasure System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Batson, C. D.; Buxton, R. E.; Feiveson, A. H.; Kofman, I. S.; Laurie, S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Miller, C. A.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The goals of the Functional Task Test (FTT) study were to determine the effects of space flight on functional tests that are representative of high priority exploration mission tasks and to identify the key underlying physiological factors that contribute to decrements in performance. Ultimately this information will be used to assess performance risks and inform the design of countermeasures for exploration class missions. We have previously shown that for Shuttle, ISS and bed rest subjects, functional tasks requiring a greater demand for dynamic control of postural equilibrium (i.e. fall recovery, seat egress/obstacle avoidance during walking, object translation, jump down) showed the greatest decrement in performance. Functional tests with reduced requirements for postural stability (i.e. hatch opening, ladder climb, manual manipulation of objects and tool use) showed little reduction in performance. These changes in functional performance were paralleled by similar decrements in sensorimotor tests designed to specifically assess postural equilibrium and dynamic gait control. The bed rest analog allows us to investigate the impact of axial body unloading in isolation on both functional tasks and on the underlying physiological factors that lead to decrements in performance and then compare them with the results obtained in our space flight study. These results indicate that body support unloading experienced during space flight plays a central role in postflight alteration of functional task performance. These data also support the concept that space flight may cause central adaptation of converging body-load somatosensory and vestibular input during gravitational transitions [1]. Therefore, we conclude that providing significant body-support loading during inflight treadmill along with balance training is necessary to mitigate decrements in critical mission tasks that require dynamic postural stability and mobility. Data obtained from space flight and bed rest

  1. Prognostic value of treadmill stress echocardiography at extremes of exercise performance: submaximal high exercise capacity ≥ 10 metabolic equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Siu-Sun; Agarwal, Vikram; Chaudhry, Farooq A

    2014-03-01

    Submaximal stress testing or achieving High exercise capacity (≥ 10 metabolic equivalents, METS) is a predictor of favorable prognosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of submaximal or high exercise capacity stress echocardiography. We evaluated 1781 patients (55 ± 13 years; 59% male) undergoing treadmill stress echocardiography divided into 811 patients with submaximal (high exercise capacity (≥ 10 METS). Resting left ventricular ejection fraction and regional wall motion were assessed. The left ventricle was divided into 16 segments and scored on 5-point scale of wall motion. Abnormal stress echocardiography was defined as stress-induced ischemia (wall-motion score of ≥ 1 grade). Follow-up (3.3 ± 1.5 years) for nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) (n = 40) and cardiac death (n = 52) were obtained. By univariate analysis, echocardiographic variables of ejection fraction, peak wall-motion score index (WMSI) and number of new ischemic wall-motion abnormalities were significant predictors of cardiac events. Cumulative survival was significantly worse in patients with abnormal (ischemic) versus normal (nonischemic) stress echocardiography in submaximal (4.4%/year vs. 1.3%/year, P high exercise capacity (1.5%/year vs. 0.2%/year, P high exercise capacity studies. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Assessment of maximal lactate steady state during treadmill exercise in SHR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Jeeser

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR are one of the main animal models used for studying the effects of exercise on hypertension. Therefore, the determination of adequate intensity has been essential for secure and optimized exercise prescriptions concerning hypertensive subjects. This study aimed to identify the MLSS in SHR by using a treadmill test to improve the protocols and further prescriptions of exercise intensity. Findings In order to carry out this determination, SHR (n = 10 animals (~17.5 weeks; 227.4 ± 29.3 g; 172.4 ± 8.1 mmHg systolic blood pressure were divided into two groups (G1 n = 5; G2 n = 5. Rats underwent a test with three different velocities to determine the MLSS. The MLSS was considered as the highest effort intensity where the blood lactate did not vary more than 1 mmol.L-1 from the 10th to the 25th minute. The MLSS was reached at a velocity of 20 m.min-1 with 3.8 ± 0.5 mmol.L-1 of lactate for G1. Additionally, the results were validated in G2. However, when the test was applied at 25 m.min-1, there was no stabilization of BLC in G1 and G2. Conclusions In this study it was possible to identify the MLSS in SHR rats, which is an excellent evaluation tool to control exercise intensity. These data are of considerable importance in studies using physical exercise as a means of research in hypertension and may lead to the intensity of exercise being prescribed more appropriately.

  3. EFFECT OF EXERCISE INTENSITY ON DIFFERENTIATED AND UNDIFFERENTIATED RATINGS OF PERCEIVED EXERTION DURING CYCLE AND TREADMILL EXERCISE IN RECREATIONALLY ACTIVE AND TRAINED WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda R. Bolgar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to examine the effect of aerobic exercise intensity on components of the differentiated perceived exertion model in young women performing weight bearing and non-weight bearing aerobic exercise. Subjects were 18-25 yr old women who were recreationally active (n = 19; VO2max = 33.40 ml·kg-1·min-1 and trained (N = 22; VO2max = 43.3 ml·kg-1·min-1. Subjects underwent two graded exercise tests (GXT on a treadmill and bike which were separated by 48 hours. RPE-Overall, -Legs, and -Chest, as well as oxygen uptake (VO2 and heart rate were recorded each minute. Individual regression analyses were used to identify RPE-Overall,-Legs, and -Chest at 40, 60, 80% VO2max/peak. Separate two factor (site (3 x intensity (3 ANOVAs with repeated measures on site and intensity were computed for each training status. Furthermore, RPE responses were also examined with a one factor (site (3 within subject ANOVA with repeated measure on site at the ventilatory breakpoint. For both the recreationally active and trained groups no significant differences were observed for RPE-Overall, -Legs, and -Chest during treadmill exercise. However, for cycling exercise results indicated that RPE-Legs was significantly greater at all exercise intensities than RPE-Overall and RPE-Chest for trained subjects while for recreationally active subjects RPE-Legs was only significantly higher at the highest exercise intensity. Responses at the ventilatory breakpoint during cycle exercise indicated that RPE-Legs was significantly greater than RPE-Chest and RPE-Overall for trained subjects but not for recreationally active subjects. Signal dominance was not observed at an intensity equivalent to the ventilatory breakpoint during treadmill exercise in either of the groups. In recreationally active and trained females signal dominance was demonstrated only during cycling exercise, but not during treadmill exercise. Signal integration could not be demonstrated during

  4. Role of adenosine in the regulation of coronary blood flow in swine at rest and during treadmill exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); R. Stubenitsky (René); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractA pivotal role for adenosine in the regulation of coronary blood flow is still controversial. Consequently, we investigated its role in the regulation of coronary vasomotor tone in swine at rest and during graded treadmill exercise. During exercise,

  5. The impact of cell phone use on the intensity and liking of a bout of treadmill exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rebold, Michael J; Lepp, Andrew; Sanders, Gabriel J; Barkley, Jacob E

    2015-01-01

    ... (texting, talking, listening to music) on planned exercise. Forty-four young adults (n = 33 females, 21.8 ± 1.3 years) each participated in four, separate, 30-minute exercise conditions on a treadmill in a random order...

  6. EFFECT OF EXERCISE INTENSITY ON DIFFERENTIATED AND UNDIFFERENTIATED RATINGS OF PERCEIVED EXERTION DURING CYCLE AND TREADMILL EXERCISE IN RECREATIONALLY ACTIVE AND TRAINED WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    Melinda R. Bolgar; Baker, Carol E.; GOSS, FREDRIC L.; Elizabeth Nagle; Robertson, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the effect of aerobic exercise intensity on components of the differentiated perceived exertion model in young women performing weight bearing and non-weight bearing aerobic exercise. Subjects were 18-25 yr old women who were recreationally active (n = 19; VO2max = 33.40 ml·kg-1·min-1) and trained (N = 22; VO2max = 43.3 ml·kg-1·min-1). Subjects underwent two graded exercise tests (GXT) on a treadmill and bike which were separated by 48 hours. RPE-Overall...

  7. Treadmill exercise and methylphenidate ameliorate symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder through enhancing dopamine synthesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in spontaneous hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong; Heo, Hong-Im; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ko, Il-Gyu; Lee, Su-Shin; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Jae-Deung; Shin, Mal-Soon; Choi, Young-Woong; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2011-10-17

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder of cognition. Behavioral symptoms of ADHD are inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. We investigated the effects of treadmill exercise and methylphenidate (MPH) on activity and spatial learning memory in relation to dopamine synthesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression using spontaneously hypertensive adult male rats. The rats in the MPH-treated group received 1mg/kg MPH orally once a day for 28days. The rats in the treadmill exercise group were made to run on a treadmill for 30min once a day, five times a week, for 28days. Activity was determined by an open-field test and spatial learning memory was evaluated by an 8-arm maze test. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were conducted to examine the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine, and BDNF. The rats in the ADHD group showed hyperactivity and spatial learning memory deficit. Reduction of TH in the striatum and substantia nigra and BDNF in the hippocampus was observed of the rats in the ADHD group. Treadmill exercise and MPH alleviated the ADHD-induced hyperactivity and spatial learning memory impairment. Expressions of TH and BDNF in the ADHD rats were also increased by both treadmill exercise and MPH. These findings provide a possibility that exercise may be used as an effective therapeutic intervention for ADHD patients as MPH treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of forced treadmill exercise and blocking of opioid receptors with naloxone on memory in male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Atefeh Asadi Rizi; Parham Reisi; Nooshin Naghsh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The forced treadmill running can influence the opioid contents of the brain, through both effects of exercise and the effects of stress caused by coercion. Since opioids can cause negative effects on brain functions, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of forced treadmill exercise and blocking of opioid receptors with naloxone on memory in male rats. Materials and Methods: Experimental groups were the control, the exercise, the naloxone, and the naloxone exercise. The exerc...

  9. Effects of treadmill exercise on hippocampal neurogenesis in an MPTP /probenecid-induced Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of treadmill exercise on non-motor function, specifically long-term memory, in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-induced Parkinson's disease mouse model. [Methods] A mouse model of Parkinson's disease was developed by injecting 20 mg/kg of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and 250 mg/kg of probenecid (P). We divided in into four groups: probenecid group, probenecid-exercise group, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group, and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group. Mice in the exercise groups ran on treadmill for 30 min/day, five times per week for 4 weeks. [Results] Latency in the passive avoidance test increased in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group compared with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group. In addition, the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/NeuN-positive cells and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/doublecortin-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was higher in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group than that in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group. These changes were associated with the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that treadmill exercise may improve long-term memory in Parkinson's disease mice by facilitating neurogenesis via increased expression of neurotrophic factors.

  10. Treadmill Exercise Attenuates Retinal Oxidative Stress in Naturally-Aged Mice: An Immunohistochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Sik; Park, Sok; Chun, Yoonseok; Song, Wook; Kim, Hee-Jae; Kim, Junghyun

    2015-09-02

    In the retina, a number of degenerative diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration, may occur as a result of aging. Oxidative damage is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of aging as well as to age-related retinal disease. Although physiological exercise has been shown to reduce oxidative stress in rats and mice, it is not known whether it has a similar effect in retinal tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate retinal oxidative stress in naturally-aged mice. In addition, we evaluated the effects of aerobic training on retinal oxidative stress by immunohistochemically evaluating oxidative stress markers. A group of twelve-week-old male mice were not exercised (young control). Two groups of twenty-two-month-old male mice were created: an old control group and a treadmill exercise group. The old control group mice were not exercised. The treadmill exercise group mice ran on a treadmill (5 to 12 m/min, 30 to 60 min/day, 3 days/week for 12 weeks). The retinal thickness and number of cells in the ganglion cell layer of the naturally-aged mice were reduced compared to those in the young control mice. However, treadmill exercise reversed these morphological changes in the retinas. We evaluated retinal expression of carboxymethyllysine (CML), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and nitrotyrosine. The retinas from the aged mice showed increased CML, 8-OHdG, and nitrotyrosine immunostaining intensities compared to young control mice. The exercise group exhibited significantly lower CML levels and nitro-oxidative stress than the old control group. These results suggest that regular exercise can reduce retinal oxidative stress and that physiological exercise may be distinctly advantageous in reducing retinal oxidative stress.

  11. Treadmill exercise and wheel exercise enhance expressions of neutrophic factors in the hippocampus of lipopolysaccharide-injected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Ko, Il-Gyu; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Jin, Byung-Kwan; Hong, Hoon-Pyo; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2013-03-22

    Brain inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We investigated the effects of treadmill exercise and wheel exercise on spatial learning ability in relation with long-term potentiation (LTP) using lipopolysaccharide-induced brain inflammation in the rats. Brain inflammation was induced by an injection of LPS into the cerebral ventricle. We found that brain inflammation impaired spatial learning ability and suppressed the induction of LTP in the hippocampus, as well as weakening expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tyrosine kinase B (Trk-B) with the phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (p-CREB). Both treadmill exercise and wheel exercise significantly improved spatial learning ability deteriorated by brain inflammation. These effects can be ascribed to the long-lasting effect of exercise on LTP through enhancement of the expressions regarding BDNF, TrkB, and p-CREB. Treadmill exercise and wheel exercise exerted similar effects on these factors. We infer that exercise may alleviate brain inflammation-induced learning impairment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Treadmill Exercise on Interleukin-15 Expression and Glucose Tolerance in Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jae Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInterleukin-15 (IL-15, a well-known myokine, is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and is involved in muscle-fat crosstalk. Recently, a role of skeletal muscle-derived IL-15 in the improvement of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity has been proposed. However, little is known regarding the influence of endurance training on IL-15 expression in type 2 diabetic skeletal muscles. We investigated the effect of endurance exercise training on glucose tolerance and IL-15 expression in skeletal muscles using type 2 diabetic animal models.MethodsMale Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF and ZDF lean control (ZLC rats were randomly divided into three groups: sedentary ZLC, sedentary ZDF (ZDF-Con, and exercised ZDF (ZDF-Ex. The ZDF-Ex rats were forced to run a motor-driven treadmill for 60 minutes once a day 5 times per week for 12 weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT was performed after 12 weeks. Expression of IL-15 was measured using ELISA in extracted soleus (SOL and gastrocnemius medial muscles.ResultsAfter 12 weeks of treadmill training, reduction of body weight was observed in ZDF-Ex compared to ZDF-Con rats. Glucose tolerance using IPGTT in diabetic rats was significantly improved in ZDF-Ex rats. Furthermore, the expression of IL-15 was significantly increased (P<0.01 only in the SOL of ZDF-Ex rats compared to ZDF-Con. Additionally, IL-15 expression in SOL muscles was negatively correlated with change of body weight (R=-0.424, P=0.04.ConclusionThe present study results suggest that 12 weeks of progressive endurance training significantly improved glucose tolerance with concomitant increase of IL-15 expression in SOL muscles of type 2 diabetic rats.

  13. Effects of treadmill exercise on the expression of netrin-1 and its receptors in rat brain after cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N; Huang, H; Lin, F; Chen, A; Zhang, Y; Chen, R; Du, H

    2011-10-27

    Recent evidence suggests that exercise improves functional outcome in animal models of cerebral ischemia. Since netrin-1 and its receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and uncoordinated gene 5B (Unc5B), act as important regulators in neural and vascular activities, we sought to determine whether netrin-1 and DCC and Unc5B are involved in the neuroprotective effects of exercise on rats with induced cerebral ischemia. A total of 108 rats were randomly distributed into three groups: sham-operated group (n = 12), middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) group (n = 48), MCAO+treadmill exercise group (n = 48). Behavioral testing indicated that treadmill exercise could significantly improve neurologic deficits of rats with cerebral ischemia at day 14 and 28 after MCAO (n = 12, Pexercise enhanced netrin-1 and DCC expression, while it suppressed Unc5B expression in rat peri-ischemic brain area, especially at day 14 and 28 after MCAO (n = 4, Pexercise-induced neural circuit remodeling in the peri-ischemic area, and exercise may promote survival of neurons in this area by regulating netrin-1-Unc5B signaling. Additionally, netrin-1 may also play a role in brain-blood barrier via DCC-immunoreactive peri-vascular astrocytes. In conclusion, we demonstrate that treadmill exercise has beneficial effects that may be attributed, at least in part, to the involvement of netrin-1 and its receptors DCC and Unc5B in the neuronal and vascular activities in brain-ischemic rats. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbohydrate mouth rinse enhances time to exhaustion during treadmill exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Cindy; Velasques, Bruna; Koch, Alexander J; Machado, Marco; Paulucio, Dailson; Ribeiro, Pedro; Pompeu, Fernando Augusto Monteiro Saboia

    2017-01-01

    Mouth rinsing with a CHO solution has been suggested to improve short (<1 h) endurance performance through central effect. We examined the effects of mouth rinsing with a CHO solution on running time to exhaustion on a treadmill. Six well-trained subjects ran to exhaustion at 85% VO2max , on three separate occasions. Subjects received either an 8% CHO solution or a placebo (PLA) every 15 min to mouth rinse (MR) or a 6% CHO solution to ingest (ING). Treatments were assigned in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion, with the mouth-rinsing treatments double-blinded. Blood samples were taken to assess glucose (Glu) and lactate (Lac), as well as the perceived exertion (RPE). Gas exchange and heart rate (HR) were collected during all trials. Subjects ran longer (P = 0·038) in both the MR (2583 ± 686 s) and ING (2625 ± 804 s) trials, compared to PLA (1935 ± 809 s), covering a greater distance (MR 9685 ± 3511·62 m; ING 9855 ± 4118·62; PLA 7295 ± 3727 m). RER was significantly higher in both ING and MR versus PLA. No difference among trials was observed for other metabolic or cardiovascular variables (VO2 , Lac, Glu, HR), nor for RPE. Endurance capacity, based on time to exhaustion on a treadmill, was improved when either mouth rinsing or ingesting a CHO solution, compared to PLA. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Treadmill exercise does not change gene expression of adrenal catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in chronically stressed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJUBICA GAVRILOVIC

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chronic isolation of adult animals represents a form of psychological stress that produces sympatho-adrenomedullar activation. Exercise training acts as an important modulator of sympatho-adrenomedullary system. This study aimed to investigate physical exercise-related changes in gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes (tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine-ß-hydroxylase and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding (CREB in the adrenal medulla, concentrations of catecholamines and corticosterone (CORT in the plasma and the weight of adrenal glands of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats exposed daily to 20 min treadmill running for 12 weeks. Also, we examined how additional acute immobilization stress changes the mentioned parameters. Treadmill running did not result in modulation of gene expression of catecholamine synthesizing enzymes and it decreased the level of CREB mRNA in the adrenal medulla of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats. The potentially negative physiological adaptations after treadmill running were recorded as increased concentrations of catecholamines and decreased morning CORT concentration in the plasma, as well as the adrenal gland hypertrophy of chronically psychosocially stressed rats. The additional acute immobilization stress increases gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in the adrenal medulla, as well as catecholamines and CORT levels in the plasma. Treadmill exercise does not change the activity of sympatho-adrenomedullary system of chronically psychosocially stressed rats.

  16. The effect of vigorous treadmill exercise on adipose tissue development in the Zucker rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelbach, J D; Etherton, T D; Kris-Etherton, P M

    1985-01-01

    Four-week-old male lean and obese Zucker rats were subjected to intense daily exercise for a 10-week period. The exercise regimen used (running 6 days/week for 90 min/day on a treadmill at 1.3 Km/h at an 8 per cent grade) was designed to maximize the amount of exercise performed. Lean and obese runners (LR and OR) gained significantly less weight than sedentary controls (LS and OS). Food intake was lower in LR and unchanged in OR compared with control animals. Exercise increased adrenal weight in runners of both phenotypes. Gastrocnemius muscle weight was significantly higher in OR compared to OS. Despite the intense exercise regimen, carcass fat of OR was reduced only 12 per cent versus OS. In contrast, exercise decreased carcass fat by 32 per cent in LR versus LS. This decrease in body fat of LR was due to smaller adipocytes. Exercise did not affect adipocyte size in obese rats. However, OR had fewer carcass adipocytes. These results indicate that exercise had substantially different effects on adipose tissue cellularity of lean and obese rats. The results of the present study indicate that a program of intense treadmill exercise initiated immediately post weaning only modestly reduced adipose tissue growth in obese Zucker rats. Furthermore, it did not normalize body composition.

  17. Effects of early postmyocardial infarction exercise testing on self-perception and subsequent physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, C K; Taylor, C B; Reese, L B; DeBusk, R F

    1983-04-01

    The effects of exercise testing 3 weeks after clinically uncomplicated myocardial infarction (MI) on subsequent physical activity were evaluated in 40 consecutive men with a mean age of 52 +/- 9 years. Patients' confidence in their ability to perform various physical activities was evaluated with self-efficacy scales which patients completed before and after a symptom-limited treadmill exercise test. Increases in confidence (self-efficacy) for activities similar to treadmill exercise (walking, stair climbing, and running) were greatest after treadmill exercise, whereas increases for dissimilar activities (sexual intercourse and lifting) were greatest after test results were explained by a physician and nurse. The intensity and duration of subsequent physical activity at home were more highly correlated with self-efficacy after treadmill exercise than with peak treadmill heart rate. Of the 8 patients whose treadmill tests were limited by angina pectoris, 7 had self-efficacy scores which remained low after treadmill testing or which decreased from initially high values after treadmill testing. These patients had lower peak heart rates and work loads than patients whose self-efficacy increased or remained high after treadmill testing. After MI, patients' perception of their capacity for physical activity and their actual patterns of subsequent physical activity are influenced by early treadmill testing in a manner which is congruent with these patients' treadmill performance.

  18. Effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises in treating a patient with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation: a clinical case report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ganiyu, Sokunbi Oluwaleke; Gujba, Kachalla Fatimah

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill 12-minute walking exercises in treating patients with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation...

  19. Anti-gravity treadmill can promote aerobic exercise for lower limb osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawae, Toshihiro; Mikami, Yukio; Fukuhara, Kouki; Kimura, Hiroaki; Adachi, Nobuo

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] The anti-gravity treadmill (Alter-G®) allows the load on the lower limbs to be adjusted, which is considered useful for patients with lower limb osteoarthritis. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of aerobic exercise using an anti-gravity treadmill in patients with lower limb osteoarthritis by using a cardiopulmonary exercise load monitoring system. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 patients with lower limb osteoarthritis. These subjects walked naturally for 8 minutes and then walked on the Alter-G for 8 minutes at their fastest speed at a load where lower limb pain was alleviated. [Results] Subjective and objective exercise intensity did not differ significantly between level ground walking and Alter-G walking neither before nor after walking. Pain before walking did not differ significantly between level ground walking and Alter-G walking, but pain after walking was significantly greater with level ground walking than with Alter-G walking. [Conclusion] Exercise therapy using an anti-gravity treadmill was useful for patients with lower limb osteoarthritis in terms of cardiopulmonary function, which suggested that this could become a new form of exercise therapy.

  20. Treadmill exercise induces age and protocol-dependent epigenetic changes in prefrontal cortex of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechinel, Laura Reck; Basso, Carla Giovana; Bertoldi, Karine; Schallenberger, Bruna; de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2016-10-15

    Some studies have linked age-related beneficial effects of exercise and epigenetic mechanisms. Although, the impact of treadmill exercise on histone acetylation, histone and DNA methylation marks in aged cortices yet remains poorly understood. Considering the role of frontal cortex on brain functions, we investigated the potential of different exercise protocols, single session and daily exercise, to modulate epigenetic marks, namely global H4 acetylation, histone methyltransferase activity (HMT H3K27) and levels of DNA methytransferase (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) in prefrontal cortices from 3 and 21-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two treadmill exercise protocols, single session (20min) or daily moderate (20min/day during 14days). The daily exercise protocol induced an increased in histone H4 acetylation levels in prefrontal cortices of 21-months-old rats, without any effects in young adult group. DNMT3b levels were increased in aged cortices of animals submitted to single session of exercise. These results indicate that prefrontal cortex is susceptible to epigenetic changes in a protocol dependent-manner and that H4 acetylation levels and DNMT3b content changes might be linked at least in part to exercise-induced effects on brain functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of different durations of treadmill training exercise on bone mineral density in growing rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ertem

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of different durations of treadmill training exercise (daily for 30 min and 60 min on bone mineral density (BMD in young growing rats. Training consisted of treadmill running at 5 days per week during a period of 13 weeks. The rats in 30 min and 60 min exercise groups began to training on day 63 of life and had maintained for at least a week, with a minimal progression as a guide to the rats’ training and adaptation to the treadmill. Running time was gradually increased from 15 min to 30 and 60 min per session for two exercise groups respectively. Control rats were kept in the cages at the same environmental conditions and daily inspected to control their health. At the end of 13 weeks, bone mineral densities of the bilateral tibia of all rats were measured .with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA (QDR 4500/W, Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA, USA and results were evaluated. There were significantly increases in BMD of right and left tibia of rats in 30 min exercise group at post-exercise period (p<0.01 for both sides when compared to the control group. BMD of right and left tibia of rats were also correlated with each other (r=0.556 and p=0.003. Otherwise, there is a positive correlation between pre- and post-exercise body weights of rats (r=0.588 and p=0.002. From our results, we concluded that subjects should perform moderate running exercise for development of bone mass and its protection during the lifelong. However, intensity and duration of performing exercise are required to put in order for every ages or actual physical conditions.

  2. The Effect of Treadmill Exercise on Antioxidant Status in the Hearts of the Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Salehi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder caused by low secretion or resistance to the insulin action. Oxidative stress, as a result of imbalance between the free radical production and antioxidant defense systems is strongly related to diabetes and its complications. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of experimental diabetes and forced treadmill exercise on oxidative stress indexes in heart tissue.Materials & Methods: 40 male wistar rats (20020g were divided into four groups(n=10: control, control with exercise, diabetic, diabetic with exercise. Diabetes was induced by a single dose injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/Kg-1, i.p. Treadmill was performed for 1 hour, 5 days in 8 weeks. At the end of the experiments, the rats were anesthetized by sodium pentobarbital (50 mg/Kg-1, i.p and left ventricle dissociate from heart and maintenance in -80 ºC. Supernatant from homogenization were used to determine the superoxide dismutase (SOD, gluthatione peroxidase (GPX, gluthatione reductase (GR and catalase (CAT activities as enzymatic antioxidant status. Also Maolnyldealdehyde (MDA level as index of lipid peroxidation and total glutathione (T.GSH of the heart tissue were measured.Results: Diabetes significantly reduced CAT and GR activities in diabetic rats compared with control rats. SOD and GPX activities weren't changed in the hearts of the diabetic rats. MDA level, as a lipid peroxidation index, increased in non exercised diabetic rats. In response to exercise, MDA level, CAT, GR and SOD activities showed a significant increase in exercise diabetic rats compared with non exercise diabetic rats.Conclusion: Forced treadmill with moderate severity has harmful effects on cardiovascular system in diabetes because it increases MDA level of heart tissue in exercised diabetic rats.

  3. Comparison of muscle activation during elliptical trainer, treadmill and bike exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Sözen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare muscle activation during elliptical trainer (ET, treadmill (TM and bike (B exercise. Twenty three voluntary and healthy male athletes (age, 20.65±1.65 years; weight, 74.21±7.21 kg; height, 180.69±5.31 cm; Body Mass Index, 22.4±1.5 participated in our study. Study protocol was decided for three days. Measures were taken by using elliptical trainer on the first day, treadmill on the second day and bicycle device on the third. Exercise devices were run with 65�0metabolic pulse for six minutes and at the end of the sixth minute, surface electrodes were placed on Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Pectoralis Major and Trapezius of upper extremity muscle and on Gastrocnemius, Vastus Lateralis, Rectus Femoris and Gluteus Maximus of lower extremity muscles and Electromyography (EMG activities were measured. According to the finding of the study, it has been found out that all of the measured upper extremity muscle were more activated by elliptical trainer compared to treadmill and bike exercise (p0.05. In conclusion, due to the advantage of more upper extremity muscle activation, it has been thought that elliptical trainer is a device to be able to be used in rehabilitation and exercise science.

  4. The effects of treadmill exercise training on hip bone density and tibial bone geometry in stroke survivors: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Marco Y C; Lau, Ricky W K

    2010-05-01

    Individuals with stroke often sustain bone loss on the hemiparetic side and are prone to fragility fractures. Exercise training may be a viable way to promote bone mineral density (BMD) and geometry in this population. This was a pilot study to evaluate the effects of a 6-month treadmill exercise program on hip BMD and tibial bone geometry in chronic stroke survivors. Twenty-one individuals with chronic stroke, with a mean age of 64.5 years and mean post-stroke duration of 8.3 years participated in the study. The treatment group underwent a treadmill gait exercise program (two 1-hour sessions per week for 6 months), whereas the control group participated in their usual self-selected activities in the community. The primary outcomes were hip BMD and bone geometry of the midshaft tibia on the paretic side, whereas the secondary outcomes were gait velocity, endurance, leg muscle strength, balance self-efficacy, and physical activity level. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the change in all outcome variables between the 2 groups after treatment. Significant between-group differences in change scores of tibial cortical thickness (P = .016), endurance ( P = .029), leg muscle strength on the paretic side (P exercise program induced a modest improvement in tibial bone geometry in individuals with chronic stroke. Further studies are required to explore the optimal training protocol for promoting favorable changes in bone parameters following stroke.

  5. Treadmill exercise facilitates synaptic plasticity on dopaminergic neurons and fibers in the mouse model with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Jeong, Ho-Young; An, Da-In; Lee, Hye-Yun; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2016-05-16

    Exercise for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) helps to alleviate clinical symptoms such as tremor, balance instability, gait dysfunction, and rigidity. However, molecular mechanism about effect of exercise is poorly unknown. In this study, we investigated effect of exercise in synapse and dendritic spine of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons on mice with PD. The C57BL/6J male mice (n=40) were divided by sham group, sham-exercise treated group, 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-l,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treated group, and MPTP-exercise treated group. For exercise treatment, the mice were put on the treadmill to run for 8m/min, 30min/day, and 5 times/week for 2 weeks. Coordination ability was checked by rota rod test. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), synaptophysin, and post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) was confirmed at substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) or striatum using western blotting, or immunohistochemistry. To check dendritic spine in striatum, we used Golgi staining. The results revealed that MPTP treated group displayed poor coordination ability compared with sham group. However, MPTP-exercise treated group showed good coordination ability compared with MPTP treated group. As well as, we also found that MPTP-exercise group increases expression of synaptophysin, PSD-95, TH, and dendritic spine in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and fibers than MPTP treated group (pexercise may give beneficial effects to patients with PD by facilitating synaptic plasticity and increasing dendritic spines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Monosodium glutamate and treadmill exercise: Anxiety-like behavior and spreading depression features in young adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitor-de-Lima, Suênia Marcele; Medeiros, Larissa de Brito; Benevides, Regina de Deus Lira; Dos Santos, Catarina Nicácio; Lima da Silva, Nahara Oliveira; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2017-11-10

    The route of administration is an important factor in determining the action of some drugs. We previously demonstrated that subcutaneous monosodium glutamate (MSG) accelerated cortical spreading depression (CSD) in the rat and that treadmill exercise attenuated this effect. This study evaluated whether other routes of administration exert the same action by testing orogastric (gavage) and topical cortical MSG administration in treadmill-exercised and sedentary rats. Additionally, in the orogastric treatment we tested anxiety-like behavior. Exercised and sedentary rats received per gavage water or MSG (1 or 2 g/kg) daily from postnatal (P) day 7 to 27. Behavioral tests (open field and elevated plus-maze) occurred at P53 ± 3. At P56 ± 3, we analyzed CSD parameters (velocity, amplitude, and duration of the negative potential change). Other three groups of rats received an MSG solution (25, 50 or 75 mg/ml) topically to the intact dura mater during CSD recording. MSG-gavage increased anxiety-like behavior and the CSD velocities compared with water-treated controls (P < 0.05). Exercise decelerated CSD. In contrast to gavage, which accelerated CSD, topical MSG dose-dependently and reversibly impaired CSD propagation, reduced CSD amplitude and increased CSD duration (P < 0.05). The exercise-dependent attenuation of the effects of MSG confirms our previous results in rats treated subcutaneously with MSG. CSD results suggest two distinct mechanisms for gavage and topical MSG administration. Additionally, data suggest that exercise can help protect the developing and adult brain against the deleterious actions of MSG.

  7. Treadmill exercise improves spatial learning ability by enhancing brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Hye Im; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Wook; Baek, Sang-Bin; Choi, Seung Wook

    2014-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients show learning difficulty and impulsiveness. Exercise is known to improve learning ability and memory function. In the present study, we investigated the duration-dependence of the effect of treadmill exercise on spatial learning ability in relation with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in ADHD rats. For this study, radial 8-arm maze test and western blot for BDNF and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) were performed. Spontaneou...

  8. Treadmill exercise improves motor and memory functions in cerebral palsy rats through activation of PI3K-Akt pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Sun-Young; Kim, Dae-Young

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a chronic disorder characterized by physical disability and disruption of brain function. We evaluated the effects of treadmill exercise on motor and memory functions in relation with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway using CP rat model. Rota-rod test, step-down avoidance task, 5-bromo-2?-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry, and western blot for synapsin I, postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95), PI3K, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3? (GSK-3?) were per...

  9. Effects of flunixin on cardiorespiratory, plasma lactate and stride length responses to intense treadmill exercise in Standardbred trotters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallings, P; Persson, S G B; Essén-Gustavsson, B

    2010-11-01

    Since nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as flunixin, on account of their anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, are used in both racing and equestrian sport horses, the question has been raised as to whether these drugs affect the physiological responses to exercise and thus performance potential. The aims of this investigation were to study the effects of flunixin on cardiorespiratory, metabolic and locomotor parameters in horses during intense treadmill exercise. Six Standardbred trotters underwent an incremental treadmill exercise test to fatigue, without drug and then after administration of flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg bwt i.m.). Heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake and stride length were measured and venous blood samples drawn repeatedly during the test. Heart rates were found to be significantly higher at submaximal speeds, while the velocity causing a HR of 200 beats/min was significantly decreased after treatment with flunixin. Maximal HR and plasma lactate concentration 5 min after exercise were unchanged after medication. Flunixin caused higher plasma lactate concentrations at all speeds and the lactate threshold was decreased, compared with baseline values. Oxygen uptake levelled off at the highest velocities and did not change after flunixin treatment. Stride length was increased after treatment, although not at the highest velocities. The increased HR and lactate responses to exercise after flunixin treatment indicate that it does influence physiological responses, but does not improve the performance potential of clinically healthy horses. However, the lengthened stride during submaximal exercise after medication could imply undetected subclinical lameness, masked in some of the horses, i.e. they have performed with a longer stride at the cost of a higher heart rate and an increased lactate concentration. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  10. The effect of vigorous treadmill exercise on plasma lipoproteins and hepatic lipoprotein production in Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelbach, J D; Kris-Etherton, P M

    1985-10-01

    Chronic exercise has been shown to alter plasma lipids in man and animals, but the mechanism(s) responsible for this phenomenon have not been clarified. In the present study we have examined the role of the liver in the production of lipoproteins following an intensive exercise regimen in lean and obese Zucker rats. Four-week-old lean and obese male Zucker rats were subjected to a vigorous exercise regimen of running on a motor-driven treadmill for 10 weeks. Hepatic lipoprotein cholesterol production was then assessed using liver perfusion techniques. Plasma cholesterol concentration was significantly lower in both lean and obese runners versus appropriate non-exercised controls. This decrease was due to a decline in both chylomicron and HDL cholesterol. Exercise had no affect on plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol concentrations. Hepatic VLDL cholesterol production was elevated in obese rats versus lean rats and was not affected by exercise in runners of either phenotype. Hepatic HDL cholesterol production was higher in lean runners but was unchanged in obese runners. Plasma triglyceride was reduced by 50% in exercised obese rats. In summary, intense exercise decreased plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol concentrations in lean and obese Zucker rats. Since hepatic HDL cholesterol production was increased and hepatic VLDL cholesterol production was unaffected by exercise, the changes in plasma lipid levels observed following exercise appear to be mediated by extrahepatic mechanisms.

  11. The effects of music tempo and loudness level on treadmill exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edworthy, Judy; Waring, Hannah

    2006-12-15

    This study examined the effects of loudness and tempo of background music on exercise performance. A total of 30 volunteers performed five 10-min exercise sessions on a treadmill. The music listened to whilst exercising was either fast/loud, fast/quiet, slow/loud, slow/quiet or absent. Measures of running speed, heart rate, perceived exertion and affect were taken. Significant effects and interactions were found for running speed and heart rate across the different music tempo and loudness levels. More positive affect was observed during the music condition in comparison to the 'no music' condition. No significant differences for perceived exertion were found across conditions. These results confirm that fast, loud music might be played to enhance optimal exercising, and show how loudness and tempo interact.

  12. Fish oil and treadmill exercise have age-dependent effects on episodic memory and oxidative state of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macêdo, Patrícia Fortes Cavalcanti de; de Melo, Janatar Stella Vasconcelos; Costa, Laís Alves Ribeiro; Braz, Glauber Rudá F; de Sousa, Shirley M; Lagranha, Cláudia J; Hornsby, Manuella Batista-de-Oliveira

    2017-05-01

    There is a growing interest to better understand how lifestyle choices can improve memory functions. Treadmill exercise and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids found in fish oil are able to stimulate hippocampal antioxidant defenses and improve memory. The aim was to test whether fish oil and exercise can improve rat's performance on memory tasks and optimize hippocampal antioxidant state in an age-dependent manner. Therefore, young and adult rats were exercised and received fish oil during 4 weeks. The exercise was performed for 30 min/day, with the speed gradually increasing from the first to the last week. Afterwards, episodic memory was measured by the recognition of object identity and spatial location. Hippocampal oxidative state was investigated with the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyls content, antioxidant enzymatic activity (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT)), and antioxidant nonenzymatic activity (reduced glutathione, sulfhydryl content). The adult rats treated with fish oil and exercise (FO&EX) were able to recognize object's shape and placement; however, FO&EX young rats had impaired spatial recognition (p < 0.05). The FO&EX young rats did not have reduced MDA or carbonyl content, though either fish oil or exercise reduced MDA (p < 0.05) and carbonyl levels (p < 0.01). Exercise increased SOD (p < 0.001) and CAT activities (p < 0.05), and fish oil enhanced SOD activity (p < 0.05) in young rats. At adulthood, exercise increased MDA levels (p < 0.05), and FO&EX reduced MDA (p < 0.001). Finally, exercise and fish oil improved nonenzymatic antioxidant defense (p < 0.05) only in adult rats. Results support age-dependent effects of fish oil and exercise on memory and oxidative state of the hippocampus during either neurodevelopment or adulthood.

  13. Metabolic and clinical comparative analysis of treadmill six-minute walking test and cardiopulmonary exercise testing in obese and eutrophic women Análise clínica e metabólica comparativa entre o teste de caminhada de seis minutos e o teste de exercício cardiopulmonar em mulheres obesas e eutróficas

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    Luciana Di Thommazo-Luporini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired exercise tolerance is directly linked to decreased functional capacity as a consequence of obesity. OBJECTIVES: To analyze and compare the cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and perceptual responses during a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX and a treadmill six-minute walking test (tread6MWT in obese and eutrophic women. METHOD: Twenty-nine female participants, aged 20-45 years were included. Fourteen were allocated to the obese group and 15 to the eutrophic group. Anthropometric measurements and body composition assessment were performed. RESULTS: In both tests, obese women presented with significantly higher absolute oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure; they also presented with lower speed, distance walked, and oxygen uptake corrected by the weight compared to eutrophics. During the maximal exercise test, perceived dyspnea was greater and the respiratory exchange ratio was lower in obese subjects compared to eutrophics. During the submaximal test, carbon dioxide production, tidal volume, and heart rate were higher in obese subjects compared to eutrophic women. When analyzing possible correlations between the CPX and the tread6MWT at peak, there was a strong correlation for the variable heart rate and a moderate correlation for the variable oxygen uptake. The heart rate obtained in the submaximal test was able to predict the one obtained in the maximal test. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated the agreement between both tests to identify metabolic and physiological parameters at peak exercise. CONCLUSIONS: The six-minute walking test induced ventilatory, metabolic, and cardiovascular responses in agreement with the maximal testing. Thus, the six-minute walking test proves to be important for functional evaluation in the physical therapy routine.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A reduzida tolerância ao exercício está relacionada à diminuída capacidade funcional consequente da obesidade. Objetivos

  14. Metabolic and clinical comparative analysis of treadmill six-minute walking test and cardiopulmonary exercise testing in obese and eutrophic women Análise clínica e metabólica comparativa entre o teste de caminhada de seis minutos e o teste de exercício cardiopulmonar em mulheres obesas e eutróficas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Di Thommazo-Luporini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired exercise tolerance is directly linked to decreased functional capacity as a consequence of obesity. OBJECTIVES: To analyze and compare the cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and perceptual responses during a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX and a treadmill six-minute walking test (tread6MWT in obese and eutrophic women. METHOD: Twenty-nine female participants, aged 20-45 years were included. Fourteen were allocated to the obese group and 15 to the eutrophic group. Anthropometric measurements and body composition assessment were performed. RESULTS: In both tests, obese women presented with significantly higher absolute oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure; they also presented with lower speed, distance walked, and oxygen uptake corrected by the weight compared to eutrophics. During the maximal exercise test, perceived dyspnea was greater and the respiratory exchange ratio was lower in obese subjects compared to eutrophics. During the submaximal test, carbon dioxide production, tidal volume, and heart rate were higher in obese subjects compared to eutrophic women. When analyzing possible correlations between the CPX and the tread6MWT at peak, there was a strong correlation for the variable heart rate and a moderate correlation for the variable oxygen uptake. The heart rate obtained in the submaximal test was able to predict the one obtained in the maximal test. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated the agreement between both tests to identify metabolic and physiological parameters at peak exercise. CONCLUSIONS: The six-minute walking test induced ventilatory, metabolic, and cardiovascular responses in agreement with the maximal testing. Thus, the six-minute walking test proves to be important for functional evaluation in the physical therapy routine.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A reduzida tolerância ao exercício está relacionada à diminuída capacidade funcional consequente da obesidade. Objetivos

  15. Novel mechanistic insights into treadmill exercise based rescue of social defeat-induced anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gaurav; Solanki, Naimesh; Atrooz, Fatin; Ansari, Amber; Allam, Farida; Jannise, Brittany; Maturi, Jaganmohan; Salim, Samina

    2014-05-10

    Social defeat (SD) induced stress causes physiological and behavioral deficits in rodents, including depression and anxiety-like behaviors, as well as memory impairment. Anxiolytic and mood elevating effects of physical exercise are also known. However, rescue effect of physical exercise in social defeat-induced anxiety, depression or memory impairment has not been addressed. The role of epigenetic mechanisms that potentially contribute to these rescue or protective effects is also not known. The present study investigated the effect of moderate treadmill exercise on anxiety-like behavior and memory function in rats subjected to SD using a modified version of the resident-intruder model for social stress (defeat). Changes in histone acetylation and histone-modifying enzymes were examined in hippocampus, amygdala and frontal cortex which are considered critical for anxiety, depression and cognition. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned in four groups; control, exercised, social defeat, social defeat and exercise. At the end of the SD or control exposure lasting 30 min daily for 7 days, one group of SD rats was subjected to treadmill exercise for 2 weeks, whereas the other SD group was handled without exercise. Anxiety-like behavior tests and radial arm water maze test suggested that moderate treadmill exercise rescued social defeat induced anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment. Moreover, exercise normalized SD-induced increase in oxidative stress, most likely by adjusting antioxidant response. Our data suggests involvement of epigenetic mechanisms including histone acetylation of H3 and modulation of methyl-CpG-binding in the hippocampus that might contribute to the rescue effects of exercise in SD-induced behavioral deficits in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of a Supported Speed Treadmill Training Exercise Program on Impairment and Function for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Therese E.; Watson, Kyle E.; Ross, Sandy A.; Gates, Philip E.; Gaughan, John P.; Lauer, Richard T.; Tucker, Carole A.; Engsberg, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To compare the effects of a supported speed treadmill training exercise program (SSTTEP) with exercise on spasticity, strength, motor control, gait spatiotemporal parameters, gross motor skills, and physical function. Method: Twenty-six children (14 males, 12 females; mean age 9y 6mo, SD 2y 2mo) with spastic cerebral palsy (CP; diplegia, n =…

  17. Biomechanical responses of the back of riding horses to water treadmill exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, M J W; Jans, W; den Heijer, G J L; de Pater, M; Back, W

    2013-12-01

    There is a lack of evidence for the presumed beneficial effects of water treadmills on the movement of the horse's back. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of water treadmill exercise on axial rotation (AR), lateral bending (LB) and pelvic flexion (PF) in horses. The back kinematics of a group of riding horses were studied at the walk in a water treadmill at different depths of water (hoof, fetlock, carpus, elbow and shoulder joint levels) over a period of 10 days. Skin markers were placed at anatomical locations on the back. AR, LB and PF were measured on days 1 and 10 using two high-speed video cameras. There was a significant increase in AR compared to baseline at the level of the carpus and at higher water levels, whereas LB was significantly lower than baseline values at water levels that reached the elbow and shoulder joints. PF was significantly higher than baseline values at each water depth other than hoof water depth. At increasing water depths, there were significant increases in flexion and rotation of the back. At the highest water levels, there was reduced bending of the back. After 10 days, horses exhibited more bending of the back. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pain-free treadmill exercise for patients with intermittent claudication: Are there gender differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipnarine, Krishna; Barak, Sharon; Martinez, Coleen A; Carmeli, Eliezer; Stopka, Christine B

    2016-06-01

    Intermittent claudication, a common symptom of peripheral arterial disease, results in insufficient blood flow and oxygen supply to lower extremity muscles. Compared to men, women with peripheral arterial disease have a higher rate of mobility loss with peripheral arterial disease due to poorer lower extremity functioning. This study evaluates the effect of supervised pain-free treadmill exercise on improving performance in women with intermittent claudication due to peripheral arterial disease in comparison to men. A total of 26 participants (women, n = 9, 34.62%; mean age = 67.58 ± 5.59 years; averaging 23.46 ± 3.91 visits and 10.46 ± 0.99 weeks in the program) diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease, with symptoms of intermittent claudication, partook in a 45 min treadmill walk, twice per week, below the participant's minimal pain threshold. Female participants' change scores showed 752%, 278% and 115% improvement in mean walking distance, duration and rate, respectively. Men improved 334%, 149% and 80%, respectively. Significant differences (p  0.80). Our results suggest that women reap similar benefits from this low-intensity treadmill program in comparison to men. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Age-dependent effect of treadmill exercise on hemorrhage-induced neuronal cell death in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Yi, Eun-Surk; Baek, Soon Gi

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major cause of death and disability in the elderly. In the present study, we examined the age-dependence of the effect of treadmill exercise on the intrastriatal hemorrhage-induced neuronal cell death in rats. Young (8 weeks old) and old (64 weeks old) Sprague-Dawley male rats were used in the present study. Intrastriatal hemorrhage was induced by injection of 0.2 U collagenase (1 μL volume) into the striatum using a stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the ...

  20. Effects of a 6-Week Aquatic Treadmill Exercise Program on Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Walking Endurance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A PILOT TRIAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Young; Im, Sang Hee

    2017-03-15

    To assess the feasibility and safety of a 6-week course of water walking performed using a motorized aquatic treadmill in individuals with subacute stroke for cardiorespiratory fitness, walking endurance, and activities of daily living. Twenty subacute stroke patents were randomly assigned to aquatic treadmill exercise (ATE) or land-based exercise (LBE). The ATE group (n = 10) performed water-based aerobic exercise on a motorized aquatic treadmill, and the LBE group (n = 10) performed land-based aerobic exercise on a cycle ergometer. Both groups performed aerobic exercise for 30 minutes, 5 times per week for 6 weeks. Primary outcome measures were 6-minute walk test for walking endurance and cardiopulmonary fitness parameters of a symptom-limited exercise tolerance test, and secondary measures were Korean version of the Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) for activities of daily living. All variables were assessed at baseline and at the end of the intervention. The ATE group showed significant improvements in 6-minute walk test (P = .005), peak oxygen uptake (V·o2peak; P = .005), peak heart rate (P = .007), exercise tolerance test duration (P = .005), and K-MBI (P = .008). The LBE group showed a significant improvement only in K-MBI (P = .012). In addition, improvement in V·o2peak was greater in the ATE than in the LBE group. This preliminary study showed that a 6-week ATE program improved peak aerobic capacity and walking endurance in patients with subacute stroke. The improvement in V·o2peak after an ATE exercise program was greater than that observed after an LBE program. Therefore, ATE effectively improves cardiopulmonary fitness in patients with subacute stroke.

  1. Evaluation of left ventricular outflow tract gradient during treadmill exercise and in recovery period in orthostatic position, in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

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    Cordeiro Pedro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an independent predictor of adverse outcome in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. The classical quantification of intraventricular obstruction is performed in resting conditions in supine position, but this assessment does not reflect what happens in HCM patients (pts in their daily activities, neither during effort nor during orthostatic recovery. Aim- To assess intraventricular gradients with echocardiography during treadmill exercise and in the recovery period in upright position, in HCM pts. Methods- We studied 17 HCM pts (9 males, mean age 53 ± 16 years, 11 with obstructive HCM. Each pt had 2 echocardiographic evaluations at rest (left lateral decubitus (LLD and orthostatic position. The pts then underwent a treadmill exercise test and intraventricular gradients were measured at peak exercise and during recovery in orthostatic position. Results- 3 pts with non-obstructive HCM at rest developed intraventricular gradients during exercise. 1 pt developed this gradient only during orthostatic recovery. The mean intraventricular gradient in LLD was 49 ± 24 mmHg; in orthostatic position was 62 ± 29 mmHg (p Conclusion- In HCM pts the intraventricular gradient increases in orthostatic position, increases significantly during treadmill exercise and continues increasing in the recovery period in orthostatic position. This type of evaluation can help us to better understand the physiopathology, the symptoms and the efficacy of different therapeutic modalities in this disease and should be routinely used in the assessment of HCM pts.

  2. Increased expression of neurotrophin 4 following focal cerebral ischemia in adult rat brain with treadmill exercise.

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    Jin-Young Chung

    Full Text Available Neurotrophin 4 (NT-4 belongs to the family of neurotrophic factors, and it interacts with the tyrosine kinase B (trkB receptor. NT-4 has neuroprotective effects following cerebral ischemia. Its role might be similar to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, because both interact with trkB. Exercise also improves neural function by increasing neurotrophic factors. However, expression profiles of NT-4 in the brain during exercise are unknown. Here, we assessed the expressions of NT-4 and its receptor, trkB, following cerebral ischemia and hypothesized that exercise changes the expressions of NT-4 and trkB. Results showed that in a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion rat model, ischemia decreased NT-4 and trkB expression. Immunohistochemistry showed their immunoreactivities around the region of the ischemic area. Treadmill exercise changed the expression of NT-4, which increased in the contralateral hemisphere in rats with ischemic injury. TrkB also showed similar patterns to its neurotophins. The change in NT-4 suggested that exercise might have primed NT4 production so that further injury causes slightly greater increases in NT4 compared with non-exercise controls.

  3. The Reliability of a 5km Run Test on a Motorized Treadmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driller, Matthew; Brophy-Williams, Ned; Walker, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the reliability of a 5km run test on a motorized treadmill. Over three consecutive weeks, 12 well-trained runners completed three 5km time trials on a treadmill following a standardized warm-up. Runners were partially-blinded to their running speed and distance covered. Total time to complete the…

  4. Treadmill exercise induces neutrophil recruitment into muscle tissue in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner. An intravital microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes-Silva, Albená; Bernardes, Priscila T T; Rezende, Bárbara M; Lopes, Fernando; Gomes, Elisa C; Marques, Pedro E; Lima, Paulo M A; Coimbra, Cândido C; Menezes, Gustavo B; Teixeira, Mauro M; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase) mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process.

  5. Treadmill exercise induces neutrophil recruitment into muscle tissue in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner. An intravital microscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albená Nunes-Silva

    Full Text Available Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process.

  6. Evaluation of respiratory dynamics by volumetric capnography during submaximal exercise protocol of six minutes on treadmill in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzi, Paloma L F; Marson, Fernando A L; Ribeiro, Maria A G O; Schivinski, Camila I S; Ribeiro, José D

    2017-11-29

    Volumetric capnography provides the standard CO2 elimination by the volume expired per respiratory cycle and is a measure to assess pulmonary involvement. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the respiratory dynamics of healthy control subjects and those with cystic fibrosis in a submaximal exercise protocol for six minutes on the treadmill, using volumetric capnography parameters (slope 3 [Slp3], Slp3/tidal volume [Slp3/TV], and slope 2 [Slp2]). This was a cross-sectional study with 128 subjects (cystic fibrosis, 64 subjects; controls, 64 subjects]. Participants underwent volumetric capnography before, during, and after six minutes on the treadmill. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman, Mann-Whitney, and Kruskal-Wallis tests, considering age and sex. An alpha=0.05 was considered. Six minutes on the treadmill evaluation: in cystic fibrosis, volumetric capnography parameters were different before, during, and after six minutes on the treadmill; the same was observed for the controls, except for Slp2. Regarding age, an Slp3 difference was observed in cystic fibrosis patients regardless of age, at all moments, and in controls for age≥12 years; a difference in Slp3/TV was observed in cystic fibrosis and controls, regardless of age; and an Slp2 difference in the cystic fibrosis, regardless of age. Regarding sex, Slp3 and Slp3/TV differences were observed in cystic fibrosis regardless of sex, and in controls in male participants; an Slp2 difference was observed in the cystic fibrosis and female participants. The analysis between groups (cystic fibrosis and controls) indicated that Slp3 and Slp3/TV has identified the CF, regardless of age and sex, while the Slp2 showed the CF considering age. Cystic fibrosis showed greater values of the parameters before, during, and after exercise, even when stratified by age and sex, which may indicate ventilation inhomogeneity in the peripheral pathways in the cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade

  7. Differential effects of targeted tongue exercise and treadmill running on aging tongue muscle structure and contractile properties

    OpenAIRE

    Kletzien, Heidi; Russell, John A; Leverson, Glen E.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2012-01-01

    Age-associated changes in tongue muscle structure and strength may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. Tongue exercise is a current treatment option. We hypothesized that targeted tongue exercise and nontargeted exercise that activates tongue muscles as a consequence of increased respiratory drive, such as treadmill running, are associated with different patterns of tongue muscle contraction and genioglossus (GG) muscle biochemistry. Thirty-one young adult, 34 middle-aged, and 37 old F...

  8. Postexercise heart rate variability following treadmill and cycle exercise: a comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esco, Michael R; Flatt, Andrew A; Williford, Henry N

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare postexercise heart rate variability (HRV) immediately following acute bouts of treadmill (T) and cycle (C) exercise at 65% of mode-specific maximal oxygen consumption reserve (65% VO2 R). Fourteen apparently healthy men participated in this study. On two separate and randomized days, each participant performed 30 min of exercise at 65% VO2 R on T and C. Supine HRV was evaluated as normalized and log-transformed (ln) high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) spectral power, as well as the LF:HF ratio in 5-min segments immediately before (PRE) and at 10-15 min (POST1) and 25-30 min (POST2) following each exercise bout. There were no significant differences in the HRV values at PRE between the modalities. Following each exercise bout, lnHF was significantly lower at POST2 following C compared to T. In addition, lnLF and LF:HF were significantly higher at POST1 and POST2 following C compared to T. All HRV metrics returned towards baseline 30 min following T but remained significantly different than PRE values after C. These results suggest that following exercise at 65% of mode-specific VO2 R, C is associated with a greater delay of postexercise HRV recovery than T in apparently healthy men. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Interaction of saddle girth construction and tension on respiratory mechanics and gas exchange during supramaximal treadmill exercise in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J; Slocombe, R F; Sides, R H; Bayly, W M; Kingston, J K

    2005-01-01

    To determine the effect of girth construction and tension on respiratory mechanics and gas exchange during supramaximal treadmill exercise in horses. Six healthy detrained Thoroughbred horses were exercised on a treadmill inclined at 10% at 110% VO2max. Horses were instrumented for respiratory mechanics and gas exchange studies, and data were recorded during incremental exercise tests. The animals were exercised for 2 min at 40% VO2max, and samples and measurements were collected at 1 min 45 sec. After 2 min, speed was increased to that estimated at 110% VO2max and data was collected at 45 sec, 90 sec and every 30 sec thereafter at this speed until the horses fatigued. Horses were run on three occasions with the same racing saddle and saddle packing but using two different girths, either an elastic girth (EG) or a standard canvas girth (SCG) which is nonelastic. A run with 5 kg tension applied to a standard canvas girth was the control for each horse, with additional runs at 15 kg using either the standard canvas girth or using the elastic girth. The runs were randomised and tensions applied were measured at end exhalation whilst at rest. Increasing girth tension was not associated with changes in respiratory mechanical or gas exchange properties. Although girths tightened to 15 kg tension had short run to fatigue times this was not found to be significantly different to girths set at 5 kg resting tension. Girth tensions declined at end exhalation in horses nearing fatigue. Loss in performance associated with high girth tensions is not due to alteration of respiratory mechanics. Loss in performance may be related to inspiratory muscles working at suboptimal lengths due to thoracic compression or compression of musculature around the chest. However, these changes are not reflected in altered respiratory mechanical or gas exchange properties measured during tidal breathing during supramaximal exercise. Other factors may hasten the onset of fatigue when horses

  10. Comparison of arbutamine stress and treadmill exercise thallium-201 SPECT: Hemodynamics, safety profile and diagnostic accuracy

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    Kiat, H.; Berman, D.S. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre, Los Angeles, California, LA (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Full text: Arbutamine (ARB), a new pharmacologic stress agent with enhanced chronotropic property compared to dobutamine, was compared with treadmill (TM) exercise testing (Ex) in a multicenter study using thallium-201 (Tl) SPECT. Of the total of 184 patients who underwent ARB, 69 also had TM stress and quantitative coronary angiography. Fifty-eight patients with a low pretest likelihood of CAD also underwent ARB study for evaluation of test specificity (normalcy rate). Tl scans were scored by a central laboratory using a 20 segment (seg)/scan visual analysis (5 point system: 0=normal, 4-absent uptake). Maximum heart rate (HR) by ARB and Ex was 122 vs 141 bpm (p<0.05). Mean %HR change from baseline was similar (79% vs 82%, respectively, p=ns). Maximum systolic BP for ARB and Ex was 173 vs 175 mmHg, and mean % change from baseline was 24% vs 28% (p=ns). Sensitivity for detecting CAD (270% stenosis) by ARB Tl was 94% and 97% by Ex Tl (p=ns). Stress Tl SPECT segmental agreement for presence of defect between ARB and Ex was 92% (kappa=0.8, p<0.001). Exact segmental stress Tl score (0-4 grading) agreement was 83 % (kappa=0.7, p<0.001). Among 346 segs with stress defects by both ARB and Ex defect reversibility agreement was 86% (kappa=0.7, p<0.001). The normalcy rate for ARB TI-SPECT among patients with a low likelihood of CAD was 90%. Adverse events were mostly mild (tremor: 23%, flushing: 10%, headache: 10%, paraesthesia: 8%, dizziness: 8%, hot flushes: 4%). Arrhythimia of clinical concern occurred in 8% (10/122) of ARB patients who had cardiac catheterisation and in 1.4% (1/69) of patients who had stress Tl. Of all 184 patients with ARB stress, ARB was discontinued due to arrhythmia in 7(5%) and 1 patient had IV Metoprolol for frequent ventricular couplets. Sustained arrhythmias were not observed

  11. Chronic treadmill exercise in rats delicately alters the Purkinje cell structure to improve motor performance and toxin resistance in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tung-Yi; Lin, Lung-Sheng; Cho, Keng-Chi; Chen, Shean-Jen; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yu, Lung; Wu, Fong-Sen; Chuang, Jih-Ing; Chen, Hsiun-Ing; Jen, Chauying J

    2012-09-01

    Although exercise usually improves motor performance, the underlying cellular changes in the cerebellum remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate whether and how chronic treadmill exercise in young rats induced Purkinje cell changes to improve motor performance and rendered the cerebellum less vulnerable to toxin insults. After 1-wk familiarization of treadmill running, 6-wk-old male Wistar rats were divided into exercise and sedentary groups. The exercise group was then subjected to 8 wk of exercise training at moderate intensity. The rotarod test was carried out to evaluate motor performance. Purkinje cells in cerebellar slices were visualized by lucifer yellow labeling in single neurons and by calbindin immunostaining in groups of neurons. Compared with sedentary control rats, exercised rats not only performed better in the rotarod task, but also showed finer Purkinje cell structure (higher dendritic volume and spine density with the same dendritic field). The exercise-improved cerebellar functions were further evaluated by monitoring the long-lasting effects of intraventricular application of OX7-saporin. In the sedentary group, OX7-saporin treatment retarded the rotarod performance and induced ∼60% Purkinje cell loss in 3 wk. As a comparison, the exercise group showed much milder injuries in the cerebellum by the same toxin treatment. In conclusion, exercise training in young rats increased the dendritic density of Purkinje cells, which might play an important role in improving the motor performance. Furthermore, as Purkinje cells in the exercise group were relatively toxin resistant, the exercised rats showed good motor performance, even under toxin-treated conditions.

  12. The effects of treadmill exercise on expression of UCP-2 of brown adipose tissue and TNF-α of soleus muscle in obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Kim, Won-Hee; Moon, Chae-Ryen

    2013-12-01

    Sorts of abnormal state, obesity and inflammation are involved in a number of serious disease occurring and both of them became important research topics among molecular biologists. UCP-2 and TNF-α respectively reflecting obese and inflammatory status have often been used to evaluate the effects of independent variable, such as exercise, on them. Because exercise has shown its potent control on obesity and inflammation, it is necessary to determine if exercise is working via same bioindices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different treadmill exercise intensities on UCP-2 of brown adipose tissue and TNF-α of soleus muscle during 8 weeks in Zucker rat. Zucker rats were divided into four groups (n = 7 in each group): control group, low intensity exercise group, moderate intensity exercise group and high intensity exercise group. Zucker rats of the exercise groups were made to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 minutes once a day during 8 weeks. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last bout of exercise. Blood glucose in Zucker rats were measured by Gluco-Card Ⅱ. Brown adipose tissue were extracted to analyze the level of UCP-2 and TNF-α, respectively. UCP-2 and TNF-α were analyzed using the Western Blotting technique. Statistical techniques for data analysis were repeated measure ANOVA and one way ANOVA to determine the difference between groups, and for post hoc test was Duncan' test. The 5% level of significance was utilized as the critical level for acceptance of hypotheses for the study. The following results were obtained from this study; UCP-2 protein expression of brown adipose tissue in Zucker rats were increased significantly following exercise of the low and moderate intensities compared to those of control group after 8 weeks. It was shown that TNF-α protein expression of soleus muscle in Zucker rats were decreased significantly following exercise of the low and moderate intensities compared to those of control group

  13. The Effect of Different Intensities of Treadmill Exercise on Cognitive Function Deficit Following a Severe Controlled Cortical Impact in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiafeng Shen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Exercise has been proposed for the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, the proper intensity of exercise in the early phase following a severe TBI is largely unknown. To compare two different treadmill exercise intensities on the cognitive function following a severe TBI in its early phase, rats experienced a controlled cortical impact (CCI and were forced to treadmill exercise for 14 days. The results revealed that the rats in the low intensity exercise group had a shorter latency to locate a platform and a significantly better improvement in spatial memory in the Morris water maze (MWM compared to the control group (p 0.05. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and p-CREB protein levels in the contralateral hippocampus were increased significantly in the low intensity exercise group. Our results suggest that 2 weeks of low intensity of treadmill exercise is beneficial for improving cognitive function and increasing hippocampal BDNF expression after a severe TBI in its early phase.

  14. Treadmill exercise enhances therapeutic potency of transplanted bone mesenchymal stem cells in cerebral ischemic rats via anti-apoptotic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Xian; Yuan, Ming-Zhou; Cheng, Lin; Lin, Long-Zai; Du, Hou-Wei; Chen, Rong-Hua; Liu, Nan

    2015-09-05

    The transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) has proved to ameliorate ischemic brain injury in animals, but most transplanted MSCs undergo apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra, greatly compromising the therapeutic value of this treatment. Meanwhile, cell apoptosis can be inhibited by post-ischemia exercise which has been demonstrated to improve the expression of related anti-apoptotic proteins. The present study investigated whether treadmill exercise enhances the neuroprotective effects of transplanted MSCs in a rat experimental stroke model. Rats were subjected to 2-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, they were assigned randomly to receive no MSCs treatment and no exercise (control group), intravenous transplantation of MSCs and treadmill exercise (MSCs + Ex group), MSCs transplantation only (MSCs group) and treadmill exercise only (Ex group). Neurological assessment, TUNEL staining and western blot were performed. Compared with the MSCs group and Ex group, the MSCs + Ex group reported markedly improved neurological function, significantly decreased apoptotic cells, and increased expressions of survivin and bcl-2 (p exercise significantly inhibited the apoptosis of transplanted MSCs. As a result, the number of engrafted MSCs in the MSCs + Ex group was significantly higher than that in the MSC group (p exercise enhances the therapeutic potency of MSCs by improving neurological function and possibly inhibiting the apoptosis of neuron cells and transplanted MSCs. These effects may involve an increased expression of survivin and bcl-2.

  15. Estimated V(O2)max from the rockport walk test on a nonmotorized curved treadmill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneli, Rhiannon M; Ebersole, Kyle T; OʼConnor, Kristian M; Snyder, Ann C

    2013-12-01

    The Rockport Walk Test (RWT) is a 1-mile walk used to estimate the maximal volume of oxygen uptake (V(O2)max). The purpose of this study was to validate the RWT on a nonmotorized curved treadmill (CT). Twenty-three healthy adults (10 females; 19-44 years old) participated. One trial of the RWT was performed on a measured indoor track (RWTO) and another on the CT (RWTC) on different days in randomized order. Heart rate (HR) and completion time were used to calculate V(O2)max using 6 different general and gender specific equations from previous research. Subjects also performed a treadmill graded exercise test (GXT), which was used as the criterion measure for V(O2)max. Completion times and HR between the 2 RWT were compared using dependent t-tests. Estimated V(O2)max values were compared between the RWTC, RWTO, and GXT through repeated measures analysis of variance, Pearson's correlations (r), and Bland-Altman's plots. There was no difference between completion times for the RWTO and RWTC but HRs were significantly higher with RWTC. When the same equation was applied to the RWTO and RWTC, there were no similar results. All V(O2)max estimations were different from observed V(O2)max except for the estimation from the relative general Kline et al. equation on the RWTO. Despite high correlations (r = 0.75-0.91), the RWTC underestimated V(O2)max. The RWTC underestimates V(O2)max but may be beneficial if a new equation were created specifically for the CT. With appropriate equations for the CT, the RWTC would provide an alternate form of V(O2)max testing.

  16. Treadmill exercise alleviates motor deficits and improves mitochondrial import machinery in an MPTP-induced mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jung-Hoon; Cho, Joon-Yong; Lee, Ung-Bae

    2017-03-01

    Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) accumulation is significantly correlated with motor deficits and mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the molecular mechanism underlying its pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on motor deficits and mitochondrial dysfunction in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mouse model of PD. Treadmill exercise inhibited dopaminergic neuron loss by promoting the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) and seemed to improve cell survival by reducing α-Syn expression. Most importantly, treadmill exercise increased expression of the mitochondrial import machinery proteins TOM-40, TOM-20, and TIM-23. This was associated with decreased α-Syn expression and subsequent upregulation of the mitochondrial proteins COX-I, COX-IV, and mtHSP70. Taken together, these results indicate that treadmill exercise may ameliorate motor deficits and improve mitochondrial dysfunction by reducing α-Syn expression in the MPTP-induced mouse model of PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring changes in body surface temperature associated with treadmill exercise in dogs by use of infrared methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Maria; Arfuso, Francesca; Alberghina, Daniela; Giudice, Elisabetta; Gianesella, Matteo; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of moderate treadmill exercise session on body surface and core temperature in dog measured by means of two infrared instruments. Ten Jack Russell Terrier/Miniature Pinscher mixed-breed dogs were subjected to 15min of walking, 10min of trotting and 10min of gallop. At every step, body surface temperature (Tsurface) was measured on seven regions (neck, shoulder, ribs, flank, back, internal thigh and eye) using two different methods, a digital infrared camera (ThermaCam P25) and a non-contact infrared thermometer (Infrared Thermometer THM010-VT001). Rectal temperature (Trectal) and blood samples were collected before (T0) and after exercise (T3). Blood samples were tested for red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin concentration (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct). A significant effect of exercise in all body surface regions was found, as measured by both infrared methods. The temperature obtained in the eye and the thigh area were higher with respect to the other studied regions throughout the experimental period (Pinfrared thermometer was found in neck, shoulder, ribs, flank, back regions respect to the values obtained by digital infrared camera (Pinfrared instruments used in this study have proven to be useful in detecting surface temperature variations of specific body regions, however factors including type and color of animal hair coat must be taken into account in the interpretation of data obtained by thermography methodology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Treadmill and wheel exercise alleviate lipopolysaccharide-induced short-term memory impairment by enhancing neuronal maturation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Ko, Il-Gyu; Park, Chang-Youl; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin derived from Gram‑negative bacteria, which induces brain inflammation. LPS‑induced brain inflammation deteriorates hippocampus‑dependent cognitive deficits. In the present study, we investigated the effects of forced treadmill exercise and voluntary wheel exercise on short‑term memory in relation to neuronal maturation in LPS‑induced brain inflammation of rats. Brain inflammation in rats was induced by an injection of LPS into the cerebral ventricle. Short‑term memory was evaluated using a step‑down avoidance task. Cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was determined by 5‑bromo‑2'‑deoxyuridine (BrdU), a marker of new cells, immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis for the determination of doublecortin (DCX), a marker of immature neurons and neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN), a marker of mature neurons, was performed. In the present study, LPS‑induced brain inflammation impaired short‑term memory by increasing DCX expression and suppressing NeuN expression. These results suggest that LPS‑induced brain inflammation disturbs neuronal maturation. The number of BrdU‑positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was increased by LPS injection. This increase in the number of BrdU‑positive cells can be ascribed to the increase in the number of of immature neurons following LPS injection. On the other hand, forced treadmill exercise and voluntary wheel exercise improved brain inflammation‑induced short‑term memory impairment by suppressing DCX expression and increasing NeuN expression, enhancing neuronal maturation. Forced treadmill exercise and voluntary wheel exercise showed similar efficacy. From these results, it can be inferred that forced treadmill exercise and voluntary wheel exercise may improve memory function deteriorated by brain inflammation.

  19. Monitoring changes in skin temperature associated with exercise in horses on a water treadmill by use of infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, Kelly; Fleming, Jennifer; Stratton, Tim D; Brassington, Rebecca

    2014-10-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) was used to assess surface temperature change as an indirect measure of muscle activity and exercise associated changes in blood flow in the working hind limb muscles of horses (n=7) undergoing water treadmill exercise. Three treatments were investigated including the treadmill ran dry (TD), water at the height of the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) and water at the height of the carpus (CP). Maximum skin surface temperature was recorded from the region of the semitendinosus muscle during exercise at each water height. There was a significant difference in surface hind limb temperature between exercise on the water treadmill ran dry and with water at the height of the PIP and CP (P<0.0001) with hotter temperatures recorded during the TD treatment. There was a greater increase in surface temperature of the hind limbs from pre exercise to maximum temperature during the PIP and CP treatments when compared to the TD treatment, however, this was not significant (P=0.58). There was no significant difference in surface hind limb temperature found between exercise in water at the height of the PIP and water at the height of the CP. The findings from this study suggest that IRT is able to non-invasively detect muscle activity and associated changes in blood flow whilst horses are exercised on a water treadmill. IRT could potentially be used as an alternative method to assess muscle activity and temperature change in an aquatic environment where existing methods present methodological challenges. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The impact of cell phone use on the intensity and liking of a bout of treadmill exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebold, Michael J; Lepp, Andrew; Sanders, Gabriel J; Barkley, Jacob E

    2015-01-01

    This study used a within-subjects design to assess the effect of three common cellular telephone (cell phone) functions (texting, talking, listening to music) on planned exercise. Forty-four young adults (n = 33 females, 21.8 ± 1.3 years) each participated in four, separate, 30-minute exercise conditions on a treadmill in a random order. During each condition, the treadmill speed display was covered and grade was fixed at zero. However, participants were able to alter treadmill speed as desired. Throughout the texting and talking conditions, research personnel used a pre-determined script to simulate cell phone conversations. During the music condition, participants used their cell phone to listen to music of their choice. Finally, participants completed a control condition with no cell phone access. For each condition, average treadmill speed, heart rate and liking (via visual analog scale) were assessed. Treadmill speed (3.4 ± 1.3 miles∙hour(-1)), heart rate (122.3 ± 24.3 beats∙min(-1)) and liking (7.5 ± 1.5 cm) in the music condition were significantly (p ≤ 0.014) greater than all other conditions. Treadmill speed in the control condition (3.1 ± 1.2 miles∙hour(-1)) was significantly (p = 0.04) greater than both texting and talking (2.8 ± 1.1 miles∙hour(-1) each). Heart rate during the control condition (115.4 ± 22.8 beats∙min(-1)) was significantly (p = 0.04) greater than texting (109.9 ± 16.4 beats∙min(-1)) but not talking (112.6 ± 16.1 beats∙min(-1)). Finally, liking during the talking condition (5.4 ± 2.2 cm) was greater (p = 0.05) than the control (4.3 ± 2.2 cm) but not the texting (5.1 ± 2.2 cm) conditions. In conclusion, using a cell phone for listening to music can increase the intensity (speed and heart rate) and liking of a bout of treadmill exercise. However, other common cell phone uses (texting and talking) can interfere with treadmill exercise and reduce intensity.

  1. The impact of cell phone use on the intensity and liking of a bout of treadmill exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Rebold

    Full Text Available This study used a within-subjects design to assess the effect of three common cellular telephone (cell phone functions (texting, talking, listening to music on planned exercise. Forty-four young adults (n = 33 females, 21.8 ± 1.3 years each participated in four, separate, 30-minute exercise conditions on a treadmill in a random order. During each condition, the treadmill speed display was covered and grade was fixed at zero. However, participants were able to alter treadmill speed as desired. Throughout the texting and talking conditions, research personnel used a pre-determined script to simulate cell phone conversations. During the music condition, participants used their cell phone to listen to music of their choice. Finally, participants completed a control condition with no cell phone access. For each condition, average treadmill speed, heart rate and liking (via visual analog scale were assessed. Treadmill speed (3.4 ± 1.3 miles∙hour(-1, heart rate (122.3 ± 24.3 beats∙min(-1 and liking (7.5 ± 1.5 cm in the music condition were significantly (p ≤ 0.014 greater than all other conditions. Treadmill speed in the control condition (3.1 ± 1.2 miles∙hour(-1 was significantly (p = 0.04 greater than both texting and talking (2.8 ± 1.1 miles∙hour(-1 each. Heart rate during the control condition (115.4 ± 22.8 beats∙min(-1 was significantly (p = 0.04 greater than texting (109.9 ± 16.4 beats∙min(-1 but not talking (112.6 ± 16.1 beats∙min(-1. Finally, liking during the talking condition (5.4 ± 2.2 cm was greater (p = 0.05 than the control (4.3 ± 2.2 cm but not the texting (5.1 ± 2.2 cm conditions. In conclusion, using a cell phone for listening to music can increase the intensity (speed and heart rate and liking of a bout of treadmill exercise. However, other common cell phone uses (texting and talking can interfere with treadmill exercise and reduce intensity.

  2. Cardiorespiratory performance of coronary artery disease patients on land versus underwater treadmill tests: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mauricio Koprowski; Rizzo, Limanara; Yazbek-Júnior, Paulo; Yutiyama, Daniela; Silva, Fabiola Jomar da; Matheus, Denise; Mastrocolla, Luiz Eduardo; Massad, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    To compare responses to a cardiopulmonary exercise test on land versus on an underwater treadmill, to assess the cardiorespiratory performance of coronary artery disease patients while immersed in warm water and to compare with the performance of healthy individuals. The sample population consisted of 40 subjects, which included 20 coronary artery disease patients aged 63.7±8.89 years old, functional class I and II, according to the New York Hearth Association, and 20 healthy subjects aged 64.7±7.09 years old. The statistical significances were calculated through an ANOVA test with a (1 - β) power of 0.861. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00989248 (22). Significant differences were uncovered in coronary artery disease group regarding the variables heart beats (HB), (p>0.01), oxygen consumption (VO2), (p>0.01) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) (pland for HB, VO2, VCO2 and oxygen for each heart beat (VO2/HB) all of than (ptest stages and environment. Additionally, there was a significant interaction between the etiology and the test stages for the variables HB, VO2 and VCO2 (ptest stages on land (ptest can be safely conducted in subjects in immersion and that the procedures, resources and equipment used yielded replicable and reliable data. Significant differences observed in water versus on land allow us to conclude that coronary artery disease patients are able to do physical exercise in water and that the physiological effects of immersion do not present any risk for such patients, as exercise was well tolerated by all subjects.

  3. Morphological and Microstructural Alterations of the Articular Cartilage and Bones during Treadmill Exercises with Different Additional Weight-Bearing Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazi Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological and microstructural alterations of the articular cartilage and bones during treadmill exercises with different exercise intensities. Sixty 5-week-old female rats were randomly divided into 10 groups: five additional weight-bearing groups (WBx and five additional weight-bearing with treadmill exercise groups (EBx, which were subjected to additional weight bearing of x% (x = 0, 5, 12, 19, and 26 of the corresponding body weight of each rat for 15 min/day. After 8 weeks of experiment, the rats were humanely sacrificed and their bilateral intact knee joints were harvested. Morphological analysis of the cartilages and microcomputed tomography evaluation of bones were subsequently performed. Results showed that increased additional weight bearing may lead to cartilage damage. No significant difference was observed among the subchondral cortical thicknesses of the groups. The microstructure of subchondral trabecular bone of 12% and 19% additional weight-bearing groups was significantly improved; however, the WB26 and EB26 groups showed low bone mineral density and bone volume fraction as well as high structure model index. In conclusion, effects of treadmill exercise on joints may be associated with different additional weight-bearing levels, and exercise intensities during joint growth and maturation should be selected reasonably.

  4. Moderate treadmill exercise rescues anxiety and depression-like behavior as well as memory impairment in a rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gaurav; Li, Lumeng; Allam, Farida; Solanki, Naimesh; Dao, An T; Alkadhi, Karim; Salim, Samina

    2014-05-10

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a condition which can develop from exposure to a severe traumatic event such as those occurring during wars or natural disasters. Benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered the gold standard for PTSD treatment, but their side effects pose a serious problem. While regular physical exercise is regarded as a mood elevator and known to enhance cognitive function, its direct role in rescuing core symptoms of PTSD including anxiety and depression-like behaviors and cognitive impairment is unclear. In the present study using the single-prolonged stress (SPS) rat model of PTSD (2h restrain, 20 min forced swimming, 15 min rest, and 1-2 min diethyl ether exposure), we examined the beneficial effect of moderate treadmill exercise on SPS-induced behavioral deficits including anxiety and depression-like behaviors and memory impairment. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into four groups: control (sedentary), exercised, SPS (no exercise), or SPS-exercised. Rats were exercised on a rodent treadmill for 14 consecutive days. Rats in all groups were tested for anxiety-like behaviors using open field (OF), light-dark and elevated-plus maze tests. All rats were tested for short-term and long-term memory in the radial arm water maze test. Rats were then sacrificed, blood was collected (for corticosterone levels), and individual organs (spleen, adrenals, and thymus) harvested. Results suggest that moderate physical exercise ameliorates SPS-induced behavioral deficits in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gender-Specific Neuroimmunoendocrine Response to Treadmill Exercise in 3xTg-AD Mice

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    Lydia Giménez-Llort

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3xTg-AD mouse develops a progressive Alzheimer's disease- (AD- like brain pathology that causes cognitive- and neuropsychiatric-like symptoms of dementia. Since its neuroimmunoendocrine axis is likewise impaired, this mouse is also useful for modelling complex age-related neurodegeneration. This study analyzed behavioral, physiological, neurochemical, pathological and immunoendocrine alterations in male and female 3xTg-AD mice and assayed the effects of a short therapy of forced physical exercise at the moderate pathology stage of 6 months of age. Gender effects were observed in most AD-related pathology and dysfunctions. Five weeks of treadmill training produced beneficial effects, such as the reduction of brain oxidative stress and GABA-A receptor dysfunction in males and improvement of sensorimotor function in females. In both sexes, exercise decreased the brain amyloid 42/40 ratio levels. The results highlight the importance of analyzing experimental therapies in both mouse model genders in order to improve our understanding of the disease and develop more appropriate therapies.

  6. Gender-Specific Neuroimmunoendocrine Response to Treadmill Exercise in 3xTg-AD Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Llort, Lydia; García, Yoelvis; Buccieri, Karla; Revilla, Susana; Suñol, Cristina; Cristofol, Rosa; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2010-10-12

    The 3xTg-AD mouse develops a progressive Alzheimer's disease- (AD-) like brain pathology that causes cognitive- and neuropsychiatric-like symptoms of dementia. Since its neuroimmunoendocrine axis is likewise impaired, this mouse is also useful for modelling complex age-related neurodegeneration. This study analyzed behavioral, physiological, neurochemical, pathological and immunoendocrine alterations in male and female 3xTg-AD mice and assayed the effects of a short therapy of forced physical exercise at the moderate pathology stage of 6 months of age. Gender effects were observed in most AD-related pathology and dysfunctions. Five weeks of treadmill training produced beneficial effects, such as the reduction of brain oxidative stress and GABA-A receptor dysfunction in males and improvement of sensorimotor function in females. In both sexes, exercise decreased the brain amyloid β 42/40 ratio levels. The results highlight the importance of analyzing experimental therapies in both mouse model genders in order to improve our understanding of the disease and develop more appropriate therapies.

  7. Comparison of the Predictive Value of Myelography, Computed Tomography and MRI on the Treadmill Test in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Eun-Su; Kim, Hak-Sun; Park, Jin-Oh; Shin, Dong-Eun; Ha, Jung-Won; Shim, Dong-Jun; Kwak, Yoon-Hae; Lee, Kwang-Il

    2005-01-01

    To date, there have been no prospective, objective studies comparing the accuracy of the MRI, myelo-CT and myelography. The purpose of this study is to compare the diagnostic and predictive values of MRIs, myelo-CTs, and myelographies. Myelographies with dynamic motion views, myelo-CTs, MRIs and exercise treadmill tests were performed in 35 cases. The narrowest AP diameter of the dural sac was measured by myelography. At the pathologic level, dural cross-sectional area (D-CSA) was calculated ...

  8. Reliability of the Three-minute All-out Test for Non-motorized Treadmill Tethered Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, M C T; Sousa, F A B; Dos Reis, I G M; Gobatto, C A

    2017-07-01

    The 3-min all-out test was developed and validated on a cycle ergometer using a modification of a linear mathematical equation (1/time vs. power) obtained from the original critical power model. The purpose of this development was to obtain, in a single test, the aerobic and anaerobic capacity parameters and identify the exercise transition moment from heavy to severe intensity. The aim of this study was to propose an adaptation of the all-out 3-min cycle ergometer to a non-motorized treadmill with tethered running. In addition, we tested the reproducibility of this adapted protocol, highlighting the need for mechanical power evaluation using a specific ergometer. Consequently, 10 physically active individuals visited the laboratory 4 times for testing and data collection. The results suggested that the protocol adaptation for the 3-min all-out test for non-motorized treadmill with tethered running was reproducible and feasible. It was also possible to show that the AO3 application in this ergometer ensures the specificity of the sports that involve the running exercise, from assessment of both aerobic and anaerobic parameters, accomplished in a single day of application. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Treadmill exercise training prevents myocardial mechanical dysfunction induced by androgenic-anabolic steroid treatment in rats.

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    Danilo S Bocalini

    Full Text Available Elevated concentrations of testosterone and its synthetic analogs may induce changes in cardiovascular function. However, the effects of the combination of anabolic/androgenic steroid (AAS treatment and exercise training on systolic and diastolic cardiac function are poorly understood. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of low-dose steroid treatment (stanozolol on cardiac contractile parameters when this steroid treatment was combined with exercise training in rats and the effects of chronic steroid treatment on the Frank-Starling (length-tension curves relationship. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: U (untrained, US (untrained and treated with stanozolol 5 mg/kg/week, T (trained, 16 m/min/1 h and TS (trained and treated with stanozolol 5 mg/kg/week. Continuous exercise training was conducted 5 days/week for 8 consecutive weeks. The speed of the treadmill was gradually increased to a final setting of 16 m/min/1 h. Experiments were divided into two independent series: 1 central hemodynamic analysis for mean arterial blood pressure (MAP and cardiac output (CO measurements and 2 isolated papillary muscle preparation in Krebs solution. Stanozolol treatment significantly increased the MAP and the heart size in untrained and trained rats (U 113±2; T 106±2; US 138±8 and TS 130±7 mmHg. Furthermore, stanozolol significantly decreased developed tension and dT/dt (maximal and minimal in U rats. However, the developed tension was completely restored by training. The Frank/Starling relationship was impaired in rats treated with stanozolol; however, again, training completely restored diastolic function. Taken together, the present data suggest that AAS treatment is able to decrease cardiac performance (systolic and diastolic functions. The combination of stanozolol and physical training improved cardiac performance, including diastolic and systolic functions, independent of changes in central

  10. Feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise to assess and influence aerobic capacity early after stroke: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; Schindelholz, Matthias; Bichsel, Lukas; Schuster, Corina; de Bie, Rob A; de Bruin, Eling D; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2014-07-01

    The majority of post-stroke individuals suffer from low exercise capacity as a secondary reaction to immobility. The aim of this study was to prove the concept of feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (RATE) to assess aerobic capacity and guide cardiovascular exercise in severely impaired individuals early after stroke. Subjects underwent constant load and incremental exercise testing using a human-in-the-loop feedback system within a robotics-assisted exoskeleton (Lokomat, Hocoma AG, CH). Inclusion criteria were: stroke onset ≤8 weeks, stable medical condition, non-ambulatory status, moderate motor control of the lower limbs and appropriate cognitive function. Outcome measures included oxygen uptake kinetics, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), gas exchange threshold (GET), peak heart rate (HRpeak), peak work rate (Ppeak) and accuracy of reaching target work rate (P-RMSE). Three subjects (18-42 d post-stroke) were included. Oxygen uptake kinetics during constant load ranged from 42.0 to 60.2 s. Incremental exercise testing showed: VO2peak range 19.7-28.8 ml/min/kg, GET range 11.6-12.7 ml/min/kg, and HRpeak range 115-161 bpm. Ppeak range was 55.2-110.9 W and P-RMSE range was 3.8-7.5 W. The concept of feedback-controlled RATE for assessment of aerobic capacity and guidance of cardiovascular exercise is feasible. Further research is warranted to validate the method on a larger scale. Aerobic capacity is seriously reduced in post-stroke individuals as a secondary reaction to immobility. Robotics-assisted walking devices may have substantial clinical relevance regarding assessment and improvement of aerobic capacity early after stroke. Feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise represents a new concept for cardiovascular assessment and intervention protocols for severely impaired individuals.

  11. Evaluation of left ventricular outflow tract gradient during treadmill exercise and in recovery period in orthostatic position, in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Rita; Cotrim, Carlos; Cardim, Nuno; Almeida, Sofia; Lopes, Luís; Loureiro, Maria José; Simões, Otília; Cordeiro, Pedro; Fazendas, Paula; João, Isabel; Carrageta, Manuel

    2008-05-15

    Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an independent predictor of adverse outcome in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The classical quantification of intraventricular obstruction is performed in resting conditions in supine position, but this assessment does not reflect what happens in HCM patients (pts) in their daily activities, neither during effort nor during orthostatic recovery. To assess intraventricular gradients with echocardiography during treadmill exercise and in the recovery period in upright position, in HCM pts. We studied 17 HCM pts (9 males, mean age 53 +/- 16 years, 11 with obstructive HCM). Each pt had 2 echocardiographic evaluations at rest (left lateral decubitus (LLD) and orthostatic position). The pts then underwent a treadmill exercise test and intraventricular gradients were measured at peak exercise and during recovery in orthostatic position. 3 pts with non-obstructive HCM at rest developed intraventricular gradients during exercise. 1 pt developed this gradient only during orthostatic recovery. The mean intraventricular gradient in LLD was 49 +/- 24 mmHg; in orthostatic position was 62 +/- 29 mmHg (p us to better understand the physiopathology, the symptoms and the efficacy of different therapeutic modalities in this disease and should be routinely used in the assessment of HCM pts.

  12. Effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises in treating a patient with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation: a clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganiyu, Sokunbi Oluwaleke; Gujba, Kachalla Fatimah

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill 12-minute walking exercises in treating patients with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation. A 34-year-old woman with a history lumbar disc prolapse who had undergone lumbar disc surgery on two different occasions was treated using acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises three times per week for 12 weeks. The outcome measures used in this study were pain intensity, spinal range of movement, and general health. After 12 weeks of treatment, the patient had made improvement in terms of pain, which was reduced from 9/10 to 1/10. In a similar vein, the patient's general health showed improvement of >100% after 12 weeks of treatment. Pre-treatment scores of spinal flexion and left-side flexion, which measured 20 cm and 12 cm, respectively, increased to 25 cm and 16 cm after 12 weeks of treatment. This study showed that acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises were useful in relieving pain, increasing spinal range of movement, and improving the health of a patient with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Aging-dependent brain electrophysiological effects in rats after distinct lactation conditions, and treadmill exercise: a spreading depression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista-de-Oliveira, Manuella; Lopes, Andréia Albuquerque Cunha; Mendes-da-Silva, Rosangela Figueiredo; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araujo

    2012-06-01

    Aging-related neurophysiological alterations are a matter of growing concern in gerontology. Physical exercise has been therapeutically employed to ameliorate aging-associated deleterious neurological changes. The aging process, as well as the effects of treadmill exercise on brain excitability, can be influenced by nutritional demands during lactation. In this study we investigated whether physical exercise, lactation conditions, and aging interact and modulate brain electrophysiology as indexed by the excitability-related phenomenon known as cortical spreading depression (CSD). Wistar male rats were suckled in litters of 12 or 6 pups (constituting two groups named L12 and L6), with different lactation conditions. Each group was subdivided into exercised (treadmill) and sedentary. CSD was recorded immediately after the exercise period for young, adult, and aged groups (respectively 45-60, 120-130, and 600-700 days old). In L6 groups, the mean CSD velocity (in mm/min) ranged from 2.57±0.24 in aged rats to 3.67±0.13 in young rats, indicating an aging-related CSD deceleration. The L12 condition accelerated CSD (velocities ranging from 3.11±0.21 to 4.35±0.16 in aged and young rats, respectively) while treadmill exercise decelerated it in both L6 groups (range: 3.02±0.19 to 2.57±0.24) and L12 groups (3.32±0.16 to 3.11±0.21), with an observed interaction between factors in the aged group. Furthermore, aging led to a significant failure of CSD propagation. These results contribute to the understanding of underlying mechanisms by which exercise and aging influence brain electrophysiological functioning, previously associated with distinct lactation conditions during the period of brain development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of treadmill exercise on brain insulin signaling and β-amyloid in intracerebroventricular streptozotocin induced-memory impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun Bum; Cho, Joon Yong

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore effect of 6 weeks treadmill exercise on brain insulin signaling and β-amyloid(Aβ). The rat model of Alzheimer's disease(AD) used in the present study was induced by the intracerebroventricular(ICV) streptozotocin(STZ). To produce the model of animal with AD, STZ(1.5mg/kg) was injected to a cerebral ventricle of both cerebrums of Sprague-Dawley rat(20 weeks). The experimental animals were divided into ICV-Sham(n=7), ICV-STZ CON(n=7), ICV-STZ EXE(n=7). Treadmill exercise was done for 30 min a day, 5 days a week for 6 weeks. Passive avoidance task was carried out before and after treadmill exercise. The results of this study show that treadmill exercise activated Protein kinase B(AKT)/ Glycogen synthase kinase 3α (GSK3α), possibly via activation of insulin receptor(IR) and insulin receptor substrate(IRS) and reduced Aβ in the brain of ICV-STZ rats. More interestingly, treadmill exercise improved cognitive function of ICV-STZ rats. Finally, physical exercise or physical activity gave positive influences on brain insulin signaling pathway. Therefore, treadmill exercise can be applied to improve AD as preventive and therapeutic method.

  15. Neuronal BDNF Signaling Is Necessary for the Effects of Treadmill Exercise on Synaptic Stripping of Axotomized Motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joey Krakowiak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The withdrawal of synaptic inputs from the somata and proximal dendrites of spinal motoneurons following peripheral nerve injury could contribute to poor functional recovery. Decreased availability of neurotrophins to afferent terminals on axotomized motoneurons has been implicated as one cause of the withdrawal. No reduction in contacts made by synaptic inputs immunoreactive to the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 is noted on axotomized motoneurons if modest treadmill exercise, which stimulates the production of neurotrophins by spinal motoneurons, is applied after nerve injury. In conditional, neuron-specific brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF knockout mice, a reduction in synaptic contacts onto motoneurons was noted in intact animals which was similar in magnitude to that observed after nerve transection in wild-type controls. No further reduction in coverage was found if nerves were cut in knockout mice. Two weeks of moderate daily treadmill exercise following nerve injury in these BDNF knockout mice did not affect synaptic inputs onto motoneurons. Treadmill exercise has a profound effect on synaptic inputs to motoneurons after peripheral nerve injury which requires BDNF production by those postsynaptic cells.

  16. Effects of skilled reach training with affected forelimb and treadmill exercise on the expression of neurotrophic factor following ischemia-induced brain injury in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Min-Sik; Kim, Seong-gil; Cheon, Song-Hee

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate effects of skilled reach training with affected forelimb and treadmill exercise on the expression of neurotrophic factor following ischemia-induced brain injury in rats. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups randomly: namely, the control sacrified 2 weeks after surgery, skilled reach training with forepaw contralateral to brain injury for 2 weeks, and treadmill exercise for 2 weeks. Transient...

  17. Effects of treadmill exercise-intensity on short-term memory in the rats born of the lipopolysaccharide-exposed maternal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kijeong; Sung, Yun-Hee; Seo, Jin-Hee; Lee, Sang-Won; Lim, Baek-Vin; Lee, Choong-Yeol; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2015-12-01

    Maternal infection is an important factor causing neonatal brain injury and later developmental disability. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise intensity on short-term memory, hippocampal neurogenesis, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) in the rats born of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-exposed maternal rats. The rats were divided into six groups: control group, mild-intensity exercise group, moderate-intensity exercise group, maternal LPS-exposed group, maternal LPS-exposed and mild-intensity exercise group, maternal LPS-exposed and moderate-intensity exercise group. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill for 30 min 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The exercise load consisted of running at the speed of 8 m/min for the mild-intensity exercise groups and 14 m/min for moderate-intensity exercise groups. The latency in the step-down avoidance task was deter-mined for the short-term memory. Immunohistochemistry for 5-bro-mo-2'-deoxyuridine was performed to determine hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Western blot analysis was performed for the detection of BDNF and TrkB expression. In the present study, tread-mill exercise improved short-term memory deteriorated by maternal LPS exposure. Treadmill exercise increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the rats born of the LPS-exposed maternal rats. Treadmill exercise increased BDNF and TrkB expression in the hippocampus of the rats born of the LPS-exposed maternal rats. These effects of treadmill exercise were similarly appeared at both mild-intensity and moderate-intensity.

  18. A prognostic scoring system for arm exercise stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yan; Xian, Hong; Chandiramani, Pooja; Bainter, Emily; Wan, Leping; Martin, Wade H

    2016-01-01

    Arm exercise stress testing may be an equivalent or better predictor of mortality outcome than pharmacological stress imaging for the ≥50% for patients unable to perform leg exercise. Thus, our objective was to develop an arm exercise ECG stress test scoring system, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, for predicting outcome in these individuals. In this retrospective observational cohort study, arm exercise ECG stress tests were performed in 443 consecutive veterans aged 64.1 (11.1) years. (mean (SD)) between 1997 and 2002. From multivariate Cox models, arm exercise scores were developed for prediction of 5-year and 12-year all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and 5-year cardiovascular mortality or myocardial infarction (MI). Arm exercise capacity in resting metabolic equivalents (METs), 1 min heart rate recovery (HRR) and ST segment depression ≥1 mm were the stress test variables independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality by step-wise Cox analysis (all pArm exercise scores for the other outcome end points yielded C-statistic values of 0.77-0.79 before and 0.82-0.86 after adjustment for significant covariates versus 0.64-0.72 for best fit pharmacological myocardial perfusion imaging models in a cohort of 1730 veterans who were evaluated over the same time period. Arm exercise scores, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, have good power for prediction of mortality or MI in patients who cannot perform leg exercise.

  19. Double product response and diastolic blood pressure in treadmill, stationary bicycle and muscular circuit exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Teixeira Paranhos Lopes

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Among the various causes for cardiovascular problems affecting the world population nowadays, the most relevant risk factors is sedentary lifestyle. Many studies have been carried out to analyse and elucidate main adaptations on the cardiovascular system stimulated by different sorts of exercises.In this way, this study had aimed at comparing the acute response of double product (DP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP after treadmill (TRM, stationary bicycle (BIC or muscle circuit training (MCT exercises. Nine individuals (6 women and 3 men exercised at 60% of heart rate reserve (HRR on the TRM and BIC and at 60% of one repetition maximum (1RM in MCT. The results showed that pre- and post-effort DP were significantly difference in all three exercises. However, DP did not differ among exercise types. The hypotensive DBP pos-effort response was greater in MCT. According to the results, it was concluded that there is no difference on the heart work demand rate estimated by DP among the three exercises and MCT at 60% 1RM provokes a greater hypotensive DBP post-effort response. . Resumo Entre as diversas causas de problemas cardiovasculares que afetam a população mundial, na atualidade, o sedentarismo é apontado como um dos fatores de risco mais relevantes. Vários estudos têm se preocupado em analisar e esclarecer as principais adaptações provocadas pelos diferentes tipos de exercícios sobre o sistema cardiovascular. Seguindo esta linha o presente trabalho teve como objetivo analisar e comparar a resposta aguda do duplo produto (DP e a pressão arterial diastólica (PAD em exercício de esteira, bicicleta estacionária e circuito na musculação. Foram avaliados nove indivíduos sendo seis mulheres e três homens, na esteira, a 60% da freqüência cardíaca de reserva (FCR, na bicicleta estacionária, a 60% FCR e circuito de musculação a 60% de 1 repetição máxima (1RM. Os resultados encontrados apresentaram diferença significativa do DP

  20. Double product response and diastolic blood pressure in treadmill, stationary bicycle and muscular circuit exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmiro Santos Resende

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the various causes for cardiovascular problems affecting the world population nowadays, the most relevant risk factors is sedentary lifestyle. Many studies have been carried out to analyse and elucidate main adaptations on the cardiovascular system stimulated by different sorts of exercises.In this way, this study had aimed at comparing the acute response of double product (DP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP after treadmill (TRM, stationary bicycle (BIC or muscle circuit training (MCT exercises. Nine individuals (6 women and 3 men exercised at 60% of heart rate reserve (HRR on the TRM and BIC and at 60% of one repetition maximum (1RM in MCT. The results showed that pre- and post-effort DP were significantly difference in all three exercises. However, DP did not differ among exercise types. The hypotensive DBP pos-effort response was greater in MCT. According to the results, it was concluded that there is no difference on the heart work demand rate estimated by DP among the three exercises and MCT at 60% 1RM provokes a greater hypotensive DBP post-effort response. RESUMO Entre as diversas causas de problemas cardiovasculares que afetam a população mundial, na atualidade, o sedentarismo é apontado como um dos fatores de risco mais relevantes. Vários estudos têm se preocupado em analisar e esclarecer as principais adaptações provocadas pelos diferentes tipos de exercícios sobre o sistema cardiovascular. Seguindo esta linha o presente trabalho teve como objetivo analisar e comparar a resposta aguda do duplo produto (DP e a pressão arterial diastólica (PAD em exercício de esteira, bicicleta estacionária e circuito na musculação. Foram avaliados nove indivíduos sendo seis mulheres e três homens, na esteira, a 60% da freqüência cardíaca de reserva (FCR, na bicicleta estacionária, a 60% FCR e circuito de musculação a 60% de 1 repetição máxima (1RM. Os resultados encontrados apresentaram diferença significativa do DP pr

  1. Treadmill exercise ameliorates ischemia-induced brain edema while suppressing Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Ryutaro; Sugimoto, Kana; Aono, Hitomi; Mise, Ayano; Choudhury, Mohammed E; Miyanishi, Kazuya; Islam, Afsana; Fujita, Takahiro; Takeda, Haruna; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Yano, Hajime; Tanaka, Junya

    2016-03-01

    Exercise may be one of the most effective and sound therapies for stroke; however, the mechanisms underlying the curative effects remain unclear. In this study, the effects of forced treadmill exercise with electric shock on ischemic brain edema were investigated. Wistar rats were subjected to transient (90 min) middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Eighty nine rats with substantially large ischemic lesions were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and were randomly assigned to exercise and non-exercise groups. The rats were forced to run at 4-6m/s for 10 min/day on days 2, 3 and 4. Brain edema was measured on day 5 by MRI, histochemical staining of brain sections and tissue water content determination (n=7, each experiment). Motor function in some rats was examined on day 30 (n=6). Exercise reduced brain edema (Peffects, but orally administered corticosterone mimicked the ameliorating effects of exercise. Exercise prevented the ischemia-induced expression of mRNA encoding aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHEs) (n=5 or 7, Prat brains and also in mixed glial cultures. Corticosterone at ~10nM reduced NHE1 and AQP4 expression in mixed glial and pure microglial cultures. Dexamethasone and aldosterone at 10nM did not significantly alter NHE1 and AQP4 expression. Exposure to a NHE inhibitor caused shrinkage of microglial cells. These results suggest that the stressful short-period and slow-paced treadmill exercise suppressed NHE1 and AQP4 expression resulting in the amelioration of brain edema at least partly via the moderate increase in plasma corticosterone levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Avaliação ergoespirométrica em atleta paraolímpico de esqui alpino: estudo de caso = Cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill for a paralympic alpine skiing athlete: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinagre, Nelson Alexandre Campos

    2012-01-01

    Conclusões: O esquiador pôde responder ao procedimento de diferentes cargas durante o teste. No teste aplicado o atleta tem que aprender a gerenciar sua resistência, força e capacidades coordenativas. A avaliação da capacidade aeróbica poderá ajudar o desempenho durante o treinamento e competições, visto que os atletas devem dividir sua atenção com uma gama de exigências que juntas são atendidas em grande parte pelo sistema aeróbio

  3. Safety profile and utility of treadmill exercise in patients with high-gradient hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Lars Lindholm; Liang, Hsin-Yueh; Pinheiro, Aurelio

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise echocardiography in the evaluation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) provides valuable information for risk stratification, selection of optimal treatment, and prognostication. However, HCM patients with left ventricular outflow tract gradients ≥30mm Hg are often excluded....... Patients were divided based on peak left ventricular outflow tract gradients using a 30-mm Hg threshold into the following: obstructive (n=152), labile-obstructive (n=178), and nonobstructive (n=169) groups. RESULTS: There were no deaths during exercise testing. We noted 20 complications (2.1% of tests......) including 3 serious ventricular arrhythmias (0.3% of tests). There was no difference in complication rate between groups. Patients with obstructive HCM had a higher frequency of abnormal blood pressure response (obstructive: 53% vs labile: obstructive: 41% and nonobstructive: 37%; P=.008). Obstructive...

  4. Treadmill exercise promotes neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia–reperfusion injury via downregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ying Zhang,1,* Richard Y Cao,2,* Xinling Jia,3,* Qing Li,1 Lei Qiao,1 Guofeng Yan,4 Jian Yang1 1Department of Rehabilitation, 2Laboratory of Immunology, Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai Clinical Research Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3School of Life sciences, Shanghai University, 4School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, which is associated with serious physical deficits that affect daily living and quality of life and produces immense public health and economic burdens. Both clinical and experimental data suggest that early physical training after ischemic brain injury may reduce the extent of motor dysfunction. However, the exact mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on neuroprotection and understand the underlying mechanisms.Materials and methods: Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO was conducted to establish a rat model of cerebral ischemia–reperfusion injury to mimic ischemic stroke. Experimental animals were divided into the following three groups: sham (n=34, MCAO (n=39, and MCAO plus treadmill exercise (n=28. The effects of aerobic exercise intervention on ischemic brain injury were evaluated using functional scoring, histological analysis, and Bio-Plex Protein Assays.Results: Early aerobic exercise intervention was found to improve motor function, prevent death of neuronal cells, and suppress the activation of microglial cells and astrocytes. Furthermore, it was observed that aerobic exercise downregulated the expression of the cytokine interleukin-1β and the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 after transient MCAO in experimental rats.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that treadmill exercise rehabilitation promotes neuroprotection against cerebral

  5. Effects of Treadmill Exercise on Spontaneous Firing Activities of Striatal Neurons in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kaixuan; Liu, Xiaoli; Qiao, Decai; Hou, Lijuan

    2017-01-01

    Exercise improves motor deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients but the underlying neuronal mechanism is poorly understood. Since the striatum is critical to motor function, we have investigated the potential effects of exercise on the spiking activity of the striatal neurons in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Twenty-four hours after injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the right medial forebrain bundle, rats in exercise groups were trained to exercise on a treadmill. Twenty-eight days after 6-OHDA lesion, apomorphine induced fewer rotations in the PD rats with exercise than in PD + Ex rats. Anatomical examination indicates that compared with the PD rats, PD + Ex rats had an attenuated loss of dopamine axonal fibers in the striatum and dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars. Equally important, the abnormal burst firing and firing rates in striatal neurons were lower in the PD + Ex rats than in the PD rats. Taken together, our results suggest that exercise has neuroprotective effects that can reduce the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system and minimize the abnormal neuronal spike firing in parkinsonian striatum, potentially contributing to exercise's motor-improving effects in PD.

  6. Interaction effects of time of day and sub-maximal treadmill exercise on the main determinants of blood fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizad, Sajad; Bassami, Minoo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of time of day on responses of the main determinants of blood rheology to acute endurance exercise. Ten healthy male subjects (age, 26.9 +/- 5.5 yr) performed two bouts of running at 65% of VO2peak for 45 min on a motorised treadmill in the morning (08:00 h) and evening (20:00 h), which were followed by 30 min recovery. The two exercise trials were performed in two separate days with 7 days intervening. Haemorheological variables were measured before, immediately after exercise and after recovery. Haematocrit, haemoglobin and RBC count were increased significantly (p evening trials and normalised following recovery, irrespective of time of day. Plasma viscosity increased significantly (F2,18 = 12.4, p exercise in both trials and returned to pre-exercise level at the end of recovery. Baseline values (p exercise were significantly affected by time of day. Neither a significant main effect of exercise nor a significant (p > 0.05) time-of-day effect was found for plasma proteins. It was concluded that sub-maximal running at 08:00 or 20:00 h does not induce different responses in the main determinant of blood rheology.

  7. Differential effect of treadmill exercise on histone deacetylase activity in rat striatum at different stages of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Basso, Carla; Bertoldi, Karine; de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Cechinel, Laura Reck; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2017-05-01

    The study described herein aimed to evaluate the impact of exercise on histone acetylation markers in striatum from Wistar rats at different stages of development. Male Wistar rats were submitted to two different exercise protocols: a single session of treadmill (running 20 min) or a moderate daily exercise protocol (running 20 min for 2 weeks). Striata of rats aged 39 days postnatal (adolescents), 3 months (young adults), and 20 months (aged) were used. The single exercise session induced persistent effects on global HDAC activity only in the adolescent group, given that exercised rats showed decreased HDAC activity 1 and 18 h after training, without effect on histone H4 acetylation levels. However, the moderate daily exercise did not alter any histone acetylation marker in adolescent and mature groups in any time point evaluated after training. In sum, our data suggest that exercise impacts striatal HDAC activity in an age- and protocol-dependent manner. Specifically, this response seems to be more evident during the adolescent period and might suffer a molecular adaptation in response to chronic training.

  8. Exercise Testing Reveals Everyday Physical Challenges of Bariatric Surgery Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, David B; Schuh, Leslie M; Newton, Robert L; Stote, Joseph J; Cacucci, Brenda M

    2017-10-12

    Few studies have quantified cardiorespiratory fitness among individuals seeking bariatric surgery. Treadmill testing allows researchers to determine exercise capacity through metabolic equivalents. These findings can assist clinicians in understanding patients' capabilities to carry out various activities of daily living. The purpose of this study was to determine exercise tolerance and the variables associated with fitness, among individuals seeking bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery candidates completed submaximal treadmill testing and provided ratings of perceived exertion. Each participant also completed questionnaires related to history of exercise, mood, and perceived barriers/benefits of exercise. Over half of participants reported that exercise was "hard to very hard" before reaching 70% of heart rate reserve, and one-third of participants reported that exercise was "moderately hard" at less than 3 metabolic equivalents (light activity). Body mass index and age accounted for the majority of the variance in exercise tolerance, but athletic history, employment status, and perceived health benefits also contributed. Perceived benefit scores were higher than barrier scores. Categories commonly used to describe moderate-intensity exercise (3-6 metabolic equivalents) do not coincide with perceptions of intensity among many bariatric surgery candidates, especially those with a body mass index of 50 or more.

  9. Treadmill Exercise Training Modulates Hepatic Cholesterol Metabolism and Circulating PCSK9 Concentration in High-Fat-Fed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Wen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9 is a novel biomarker of LDL clearance and a therapeutic target of cardiovascular disease. We examined the effects of aerobic exercise training in modulating PCSK9 abundance and hepatic sterol regulation in high-fat-fed C57BL/6 mice. Mice ( were assigned to a low-fat (LF, high-fat (HF, or an HF with exercise (HF + EX group for 8 weeks. The HF + EX group was progressively trained 5 days/week on a motorized treadmill. The HF + EX group was protected against body weight (BW gain and diet-induced dyslipidemia compared with the HF group. The HF + EX group demonstrated an increase in hepatic PCSK9 mRNA (1.9-fold of HF control, and a reduction in plasma PCSK9 (14% compared with the HF group. Compared with HF mice, HF + EX mice demonstrated reduced hepatic cholesterol (14% and increased ( nuclear SREBP2 protein (1.8-fold of HF group and LDLr mRNA (1.4-fold of HF group. Plasma PCSK9 concentrations correlated positively with plasma non-HDL-C (, . Results suggest that treadmill exercise reduces non-HDL cholesterol and differentially modulates hepatic and blood PCSK9 abundance in HF-fed C57BL/6 mice.

  10. A pilot study comparing two field tests with the treadmill run test in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Tan, Frankie H Y; Teh, Kong Chuan

    2005-06-01

    This study compares the performances obtained during soccer-specific field tests of the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MST) and the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (YIET), with the measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) obtained in both field tests as well as that obtained in the traditional test of running to exhaustion on a treadmill (TRT), in young trained soccer players. Twenty-one National-level youth players performed, in random order, the MST and YIET to determine the relationship between the two field tests. From these, eight randomly chosen players performed their field tests as well as a TRT, equipped with an ambulatory gas exchange measurement device. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed that the players' performance (i.e. distance covered) in the MST and YIET was correlated (r = 0.65, p 0.05). In contrast, significant correlations were observed between the players' performance in the MST with the measured VO2max obtained in the same MST and in the YIET (both p run test are valid measures of aerobic exertion in soccer playersMeasured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players' intermittent endurance performance.In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player's endurance performance.

  11. Recuperação da freqüência cardíaca após teste de esforço em esteira ergométrica e variabilidade da freqüência cardíaca em 24 horas em indivíduos sadios Heart rate recovery after treadmill electrocardiographic exercise stress test and 24-hour heart rate variability in healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Antelmi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A recuperação da freqüência cardíaca após o eletrocardiograma de esforço em esteira ergométrica é modulada pelo sistema nervoso autônomo. A análise da variabilidade da freqüência cardíaca (VFC pode fornecer informações valiosas sobre o controle do sistema nervoso autônomo sobre o sistema cardiovascular. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi testar a hipótese de associação entre a recuperação da freqüência cardíaca após teste de esforço em esteira ergométrica e a variabilidade da freqüência cardíaca. MÉTODOS: Foram estudamos 485 indivíduos sem evidência de cardiopatia com média de idade de 42± 12,1 (faixa etária de 15 a 82 anos, 281 (57.9% dos quais do sexo feminino, submetidos a um teste de esforço em esteira ergométrica e avaliação da VFC nos domínios do tempo (SDNN, SDANN, SDNNi, rMSSD e pNN50 e da freqüência (LF, HF, VLF e razão LF/HF durante monitoramento eletrocardiográfico ambulatorial de 24 horas. RESULTADOS: A recuperação da freqüência cardíaca foi de 30 ± 12 batimentos no 1º minuto e 52± 13 batimentos no 2º minuto após o exercício. Os indivíduos mais jovens de recuperaram mais rápido do 2º ao 5º minuto após o exercício (r = 0,19-0,35, P BACKGROUND: Heart rate recovery after treadmill electrocardiographic exercise stress test is modulated by the autonomic nervous system. Analysis of heart rate variability can provide useful information about autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis of association between heart recovery after treadmill electrocardiographic exercise test and heart rate variability. METHODS: We studied 485 healthy individuals aged 42± 12.1 (range 15-82 years, 281(57.9% women, submitted to treadmill electrocardiographic exercise stress tests and heart rate variability evaluations over time (SDNN, SDANN, SDNNi, rMSSD, pNN50 and frequency (LF, HF, VLF, LF/HF ratio domains in 24-hour

  12. The reliability and validity of a soccer-specific nonmotorised treadmill simulation (intermittent soccer performance test).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldous, Jeffrey W F; Akubat, Ibrahim; Chrismas, Bryna C R; Watkins, Samuel L; Mauger, Alexis R; Midgley, Adrian W; Abt, Grant; Taylor, Lee

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the reliability and validity of a novel nonmotorised treadmill (NMT)-based soccer simulation using a novel activity category called a "variable run" to quantify fatigue during high-speed running. Twelve male University soccer players completed 3 familiarization sessions and 1 peak speed assessment before completing the intermittent soccer performance test (iSPT) twice. The 2 iSPTs were separated by 6-10 days. The total distance, sprint distance, and high-speed running distance (HSD) were 8,968 ± 430 m, 980 ± 75 m and 2,122 ± 140 m, respectively. No significant difference (p > 0.05) was found between repeated trials of the iSPT for all physiological and performance variables. Reliability measures between iSPT1 and iSPT2 showed good agreement (coefficient of variation: 0.80). Furthermore, the variable run phase showed HSD significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.05) in the last 15 minutes (89 ± 6 m) compared with the first 15 minutes (85 ± 7 m), quantifying decrements in high-speed exercise compared with the previous literature. This study validates the iSPT as a NMT-based soccer simulation compared with the previous match-play data and is a reliable tool for assessing and monitoring physiological and performance variables in soccer players. The iSPT could be used in a number of ways including player rehabilitation, understanding the efficacy of nutritional interventions, and also the quantification of environmentally mediated decrements on soccer-specific performance.

  13. Effects of treadmill exercise on brain insulin signaling and ?-amyloid in intracerebroventricular streptozotocin induced-memory impairment in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Eun Bum; Cho, Joon Yong

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study is to explore effect of 6 weeks treadmill exercise on brain insulin signaling and ?-amyloid(A?). [Methods] The rat model of Alzheimer?s disease(AD) used in the present study was induced by the intracerebroventricular(ICV) streptozotocin(STZ). To produce the model of animal with AD, STZ(1.5mg/kg) was injected to a cerebral ventricle of both cerebrums of Sprague-Dawley rat(20 weeks). The experimental animals were divided into ICV-Sham(n=7), ICV-STZ CON(n=7), I...

  14. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  15. A PILOT STUDY COMPARING TWO FIELD TESTS WITH THE TREADMILL RUN TEST IN SOCCER PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rashid Aziz

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the performances obtained during soccer-specific field tests of the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MST and the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (YIET, with the measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max obtained in both field tests as well as that obtained in the traditional test of running to exhaustion on a treadmill (TRT, in young trained soccer players. Twenty-one National-level youth players performed, in random order, the MST and YIET to determine the relationship between the two field tests. From these, eight randomly chosen players performed their field tests as well as a TRT, equipped with an ambulatory gas exchange measurement device. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed that the players' performance (i.e. distance covered in the MST and YIET was correlated (r = 0.65, p 0.05. In contrast, significant correlations were observed between the players' performance in the MST with the measured VO2max obtained in the same MST and in the YIET (both p < 0.05; and attained almost statistical significance with the measured VO2max in the TRT (p = 0.06. The lack of association between distances covered in the YIET with all the measured VO2max values suggest that measured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players' intermittent endurance performance. In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player's endurance performance

  16. Effects of skilled reach training with affected forelimb and treadmill exercise on the expression of neurotrophic factor following ischemia-induced brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Min-Sik; Kim, Seong-Gil; Cheon, Song-Hee

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate effects of skilled reach training with affected forelimb and treadmill exercise on the expression of neurotrophic factor following ischemia-induced brain injury in rats. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups randomly: namely, the control sacrified 2 weeks after surgery, skilled reach training with forepaw contralateral to brain injury for 2 weeks, and treadmill exercise for 2 weeks. Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by intraluminal occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery. After that, skilled reach training and treadmill exercise were conducted. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate expressions of neurotrophic factors. [Results] There were significant differences in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor expression between the control group and the experimental group. There were no significant differences in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor expression between the skilled reach training group and the treadmill exercise group. [Conclusion] Skilled reach training and treadmill exercise can affect the expression of neurotrophic factors.

  17. Cardiovascular effects of the novel Ca2+-sensitiser EMD 57033 in pigs at rest and during treadmill exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenitsky, René; van der Weerd, Rick W P; Haitsma, David B; Verdouw, Pieter D; Duncker, Dirk J

    1997-01-01

    To date no study has described the cardiovascular effects of increased myofilament Ca2+ responsiveness in awake animals both under resting conditions and during treadmill exercise. In the present study we therefore investigated the systemic, pulmonary and coronary haemodynamic actions of the Ca2+ sensitizer EMD 57033 in 16 chronically instrumented awake pigs at rest and during treadmill exercise, and compared these to the haemodynamic actions of the Ca2+ sensitizer/phosphodiesterase inhibitor pimobendan.Under resting conditions EMD 57033 (0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg kg−1 min−1, i.v.) produced dose-dependent increases in LVdP/dtmax (up to 65±17% (mean ±s.e.mean), P⩽0.05) and stroke volume (up to 20±3%, P⩽0.05), with an increase in heart rate only after the highest dose (22±5%, P⩽0.05), while mean aortic blood pressure and LVdP/dtmin were not altered. EMD 57033 had also no effect on pulmonary vascular resistance, but produced dose-dependent decreases in systemic vascular resistance (32±4%, P⩽0.05), and coronary vascular resistance (44±2%, P⩽0.05). These effects were essentially unchanged when animals were pretreated with non-selective β-adrenoceptor blockade, indicating that phosphodiesterase inhibition did not contribute to the positive inotropic actions of EMD 57033.During exercise at 2, 3, and 4 km h−1, the positive inotropic actions of EMD 57033 gradually waned at higher levels of exercise. This may have been caused by the exercise-induced increase in β-adrenergic activity, because after pretreatment with propranolol the positive inotropic actions of EMD 57033 were preserved at all levels of exercise. In contrast, the positive inotropic and chronotropic effects of pimobendan were amplified during exercise, but were abolished (at rest) or markedly attenuated (during exercise) after pretreatment with propranolol.The responses to EMD 57033 during exercise after combined α- and β-adrenergic receptor blockade were not different from those

  18. Effort-limited treadmill walk test: reliability and validity in subjects with postpolio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Lois E; Venturini, Adriana; Mayo, Nancy E; Trojan, Daria A

    2004-08-01

    To determine the reliability and construct validity of an effort-limited treadmill walk test to measure functional ability in subjects with postpolio syndrome in an outpatient postpolio clinic. Functioning and distance walked on a treadmill to a Borg "hard" effort level were measured three times, a week apart, by two blinded raters in 15 subjects with postpolio syndrome, aged 37-67 yrs, with new weakness, fatigue, and pain but with no other cause of symptomatology or condition-limiting walking. One rater tested them twice. Fatigue activity level, mobility, and health-related quality of life (Medical Outcome Study Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]) defined functioning. Generalizability correlation coefficients determined intrarater, test-retest and interrater reliability. The correlations relating the distance walked and functioning determined construct validity. Reliability for generalizability correlation coefficients were: intrarater, 0.91; test-retest, 0.85; and interrater, 0.58. Interrater reliability improved to 0.91 with adherence to a standardized protocol. Validity was established with correlations between the distance walked and SF-36 physical component score (0.66), physical role (0.60), bodily pain (0.60), and vitality (0.55). The treadmill walk test provides a reproducible and valid measure of ability in persons with postpolio syndrome with a single rater, but a standardized protocol is essential for reliability.

  19. Within- and Between-Day Repeatability and Variability in Children's Physiological Responses during Submaximal Treadmill Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Paulo R. S.; Byrne, Nuala Mary; Hills, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify within- and between-day repeatability and variability in children's oxygen uptake (VO[subscript 2]), gross economy (GE; VO[subscript 2] divided by speed) and heart rate (HR) during treadmill walking based on self-selected speed (SS). Fourteen children (10.1 plus or minus 1.4 years) undertook three testing…

  20. Comparison of two-hand kettlebell exercise and graded treadmill walking: effectiveness as a stimulus for cardiorespiratory fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, James F; Larson, Kurtis L; Hollander, Daniel B; Kraemer, Robert R

    2014-04-01

    Prevailing interest in the use of kettlebell (KB) exercises for rehabilitation and improvement of muscular strength has led to several recent studies, some suggesting that KB exercise may be useful for improvement of cardiorespiratory fitness. The purpose of this study was to determine whether KB exercise would produce similar cardiovascular stress to that of walking and thus provide an additional exercise mode for the improvement of cardiorespiratory fitness. It was hypothesized that a moderate-intensity, continuous KB protocol, would produce similar metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses as a brisk bout of graded treadmill (TM) walking, but greater rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Ten novice volunteers (5 men, 5 women) completed a preliminary session to determine body composition and VO2max and to familiarize participants with standardized KB exercise technique. Subsequently, they completed a 30-minute KB session that included 3 continuous 10-minute sets of 10 KB swings followed by 10 sumo deadlifts, with 3-minute rests between 10-minute exercise periods. The third session was a 30-minute TM regimen that began at the walking speed and 4% grade that matched the VO2 from the KB session and included 3-minute rest intervals after 10-minute TM exercise periods. VO2, respiratory exchange ratio, kcal·min, and blood pressure were similar for KB and moderate-intensity TM exercise, but RPE and heart rate were greater during KB exercise. Data indicate that a KB routine consisting of 2-hand swings and sumo deadlifts with 3-minute rest periods produces similar metabolic responses to those of a moderate-intensity TM walking protocol designed for the improvement of aerobic fitness.

  1. Delayed heart rate recovery after adenosine stress testing with supplemental arm exercise predicts mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Yasushi; Gregory, Shawn A; Kardan, Arash; Zervos, Gerasimos D; Thomas, Gregory S; Gewirtz, Henry; Yasuda, Tsunehiro

    2009-01-01

    Delayed heart rate (HR) recovery after treadmill exercise testing predicts mortality. Patients with suspected ischemic heart disease who cannot perform adequate treadmill exercise are typically evaluated with pharmacological stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies, but little prognostic significance has been attributed to the hemodynamic response to vasodilator stress testing with low-level exercise. We hypothesized that a delay in HR recovery after adenosine stress testing with arm exercise is associated with increased mortality. Technetium 99m-Sestamibi MPI was performed in 1,455 consecutive patients (70 +/- 12 years, 50.2% men) with adenosine stress and supplemental arm exercise. HRs were recorded at rest, continuously during infusion, and then 5 minutes post-infusion. Delayed HR recovery was defined as a decline of mortality (16.5% vs 5.3% in those with normal HR recovery, P testing with arm exercise is a readily available and powerful predictor of all-cause mortality.

  2. Effects of Treadmill Exercise on the Recovery of Dopaminergic Neuron Loss and Muscle Atrophy in the 6-OHDA Lesioned Parkinson's Disease Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Myoung-Ae; Koo, Byung-Soo; An, Gyeong Ju; Jeon, Songhee

    2012-01-01

    This study was to determine the effect of exercise on the recovery of dopaminergic neuron loss and muscle atrophy in 6-OHDA-induced hemi Parkinson's disease model. Exercise was loaded twice per day for 30 minutes each time, at 5 days after 6-OHDA lesioning and continued for 16 days using a treadmill. Exercise significantly increased the number of tyrosine hydroxylase positive neuron in the lesioned substantia nigra and the expression level of tyrosine hydroxylase in the striatum compared with...

  3. (--EPICATECHIN COMBINED WITH 8 WEEKS OF TREADMILL EXERCISE IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED ANGIOGENIC AND MITOCHONDRIAL SIGNALING IN MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icksoo eLee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to conduct an 8 week endurance training program with and without (--epicatechin treatment and to determine whether there is a possible cumulative effect on protein markers of angiogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thirty-four 14 month old male mice (C57BL/6N were randomized into four groups: control (C; (--epicatechin only ((--Epi; control with endurance training (CE; and (--epicatechin with endurance training ((--Epi Ex. Mice in the training groups performed treadmill exercise for 8 weeks (5x/week for 60 min/session, whereas mice in the (--epicatechin group received 1.0 mg/kg of body mass twice daily during the training period. At 8 weeks, distance ran on the treadmill increased by 46%, 69%, and 84% in the (--Epi, CE, and (--Epi Ex groups, respectively compared to the control group (p < 0.001 for all comparisons. Furthermore, the ( Epi Ex group had significantly higher exercise capacity than the (--Epi and CE group. For angiogenic regulators, the (--Epi Ex group had significantly higher VEGF-R2 protein expression with a concomitant reduction in TSP-1 protein expression than the exercise group. Interestingly, FoxO1 protein expression was significantly reduced for all three experimental groups compared to the control group. Protein markers such as PGC-1beta and TFAM were significantly higher in the (--Epi Ex group compared to the three other groups. These findings suggest that (--epicatechin treatment combined with 8 weeks of endurance training provide a cumulative effect on a number of angiogenic and mitochondrial signaling which functionally translates to enhanced exercise tolerance.

  4. Postnatal treadmill exercise alleviates short-term memory impairment by enhancing cell proliferation and suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus of rat pups born to diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Hoon; Sung, Yun-Hee; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Bo-Kyun

    2014-08-01

    During pregnancy, diabetes mellitus exerts detrimental effects on the development of the fetus, especially the central nervous system. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of postnatal treadmill exercise on short-term memory in relation with cell proliferation and apoptosis in the hippocampus of rat pups born to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic maternal rats. Adult female rats were mated with male rats for 24 h. Two weeks after mating, the pregnant female rats were divided into two groups: control group and STZ injection group. The pregnant rats in the STZ injection group were administered 40 mg/kg of STZ intraperitoneally. After birth, the rat pups were divided into the following four groups: control group, control with postnatal exercise group, maternal STZ-injection group, and maternal STZ-injection with postnatal exercise group. The rat pups in the postnatal exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day, 5 times per week for 2 weeks beginning 4 weeks after birth. The rat pups born to diabetic rats were shown to have short-term memory impairment with suppressed cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Postnatal treadmill exercise alleviated short-term memory impairment by increased cell proliferation and suppressed apoptosis in the rat pups born to diabetic rats. These findings indicate that postnatal treadmill exercise may be used as a valuable strategy to ameliorate neurodevelopmental problems in children born to diabetics.

  5. Expression of Neurotrophin-3 and trkC following Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Adult Rat Brain with Treadmill Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Young Chung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 is a neurotrophic factor that mainly binds to the tyrosine kinase C (trkC receptor. NT-3 has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in focal cerebral ischemia. Exercise also has ability to induce functional recovery in focal cerebral ischemia. However, the relationship between NT-3, its receptor trkC, and exercise has not been revealed. In this study, we assessed the expressions of NT-3 and trkC in focal cerebral ischemia. We also assessed the expression of NT-3 and trkC with treadmill exercise in focal cerebral ischemia. The results showed that, in a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion rat model, exercise increased NT-3 and trkC expression. However, the patterns of expression of NT-3 and trkC at different time points varied. These results suggest that exercise-induced functional recovery in focal cerebral ischemia was related to NT-3 and trkC, but the role on times of NT-3 and trkC differed, although trkC is the receptor kinase for NT-3.

  6. The effect of bridge exercise method on the strength of rectus abdominis muscle and the muscle activity of paraspinal muscles while doing treadmill walking with high heels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Taewook; Lee, Jaeseok; Seo, Junghoon; Han, Dongwook

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of the method of bridge exercise on the change of rectus abdominis muscle and the muscle activity of paraspinal muscles while doing treadmill walking with high heels. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this research are healthy female students consisting of 10 persons performing bridge exercises in a supine group, 10 persons performing bridge exercises in a prone group, and 10 persons in a control group while in S university in Busan. Bridge exercise in supine position is performed in hook lying position. Bridge exercise in prone position is plank exercise in prostrate position. To measure the strength of rectus abdominis muscle, maintaining times of the posture was used. To measure the muscle activity of paraspinal muscles, EMG (4D-MT & EMD-11, Relive, Korea) was used. [Results] The strength of rectus abdominis muscle of both bridge exercises in the supine group and bridge exercises in the prone group increases significantly after exercise. The muscle activity of paraspinal muscle such as thoracic parts and lumbar parts in bridge exercises in the prone group decreases statistically while walking on a treadmill with high heels. Muscle activity of thoracic parts paraspinal muscle and bridge exercises in the supine group decreased significantly. [Conclusion] According to this study, we noticed that bridge exercise in a prone position is desirable for women who prefer wearing high heels as a back pain prevention exercise method.

  7. Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression Are Correlates of Angina Pectoris by Recent History and an Ischemia-Positive Treadmill Test in Patients with Documented Coronary Artery Disease in the Pimi Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Ketterer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We tested the association of specific psychological characteristics in patients having stable coronary disease with the reporting of anginal symptoms during daily activities, and positive exercise testing. Methods. One hundred and ninety-six patients with documented CAD enrolled in the Psychophysiological Investigations of Myocardial Ischemia (PIMI Study completed an anginal history questionnaire and a battery of psychometric tests. They also underwent standardized exercise treadmill tests. Results. Patients with a recent history of angina were more likely to be female, and had higher Beck Depression (P=.002, State Anxiety (P=.001, Trait Anxiety (P=.03, Harm Avoidance (P=.04 and Muscle Tension (P=.004 scores than patients who had no recent history of angina. Along with several treadmill variables indicating more severe disease state and reduced exercise tolerance, patients who developed angina on a positive treadmill test also displayed higher scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (P=.003 and State Anxiety (P=.004 scales. Conclusions. Several psychological characteristics, and most notably anxiety and depression, are strong correlates of recent angina and angina in the presence of ischemia provoked by treadmill testing.

  8. Genetic impairment of AMPK alpha 2 signaling does not reduce muscle glucose uptake during treadmill exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, S.J.; Jorgensen, S.B.; Rose, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    ) to correct for reduced exercise capacity of the AMPK-KD mouse. Muscle glucose clearance was measured using 2-deoxy-[H-3] glucose as tracer. In wild-type mice, glucose clearance was increased at 30 and 70% of maximal running speed by 40 and 350% in the quadriceps muscle and by 120 and 380% in gastrocnemius......Maarbjerg SJ, Jorgensen SB, Rose AJ, Jeppesen J, Jensen TE, Treebak JT, Birk JB, Schjerling P, Wojtaszewski JF, Richter EA. Genetic impairment of AMPK alpha 2 signaling does not reduce muscle glucose uptake during treadmill exercise in mice. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 297: E924-E934, 2009. First...... during in vivo exercise. We studied this in male and female mice overexpressing kinase-dead AMPK alpha 2 (AMPK-KD) in skeletal and heart muscles. Wild-type and AMPK-KD mice were exercised at the same absolute intensity and the same relative intensity (30 and 70% of individual maximal running speed...

  9. Exercise-ankle brachial pressure index with one-minute treadmill walking in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuki, Kazuo; Kohno, Kenji; Ebine, Kunio; Obara, Takehiro; Aoki, Toshiyuki; Muto, Atsuhiko; Ninomiya, Kenji; Kumagai, Kenta; Yokouchi, Itaru; Yazaki, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2013-01-01

    The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) is widely used as a standard screening method for arterial occlusive lesion above the knee. However, the sensitivity of ABI is low in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Exercise stress (Ex-ABI) may reduce the false negative results. After measuring resting ABI and toe-brachial pressure index (TBI), ankle pressure and ABI immediately after walking (Post-AP, Post-ABI) were measured using one-minute treadmill walking in 52 lower limbs of 26 HD patients. The definition of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAD) required an ABI value of less than 0.90, TBI value of less than 0.60, and decrease of more than 15% of the Post-ABI value and 20 mmHg of Post-AP in Ex-ABI. Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed in 32 lower limbs of 16 HD patients. PAD is defined as presence of stenosis of more than 75% in the case of lesions from an iliac artery to knee on CTA. The accuracy of Ex-ABI (Sensitivity, 85.7%; Specificity, 77.7%) was higher than those of ABI (Sensitivity, 42.9%; Specificity, 83.3%) or TBI (Sensitivity, 78.6%; Specificity, 61.1%). Ex-ABI with one-minute treadmill walking is the most useful tool for the screening of arterial occlusive lesions above the knee in maintenance HD patients.

  10. Evaluation of the American College of Sports Medicine submaximal treadmill running test for predicting VO2max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Clare E

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of the American College of Sports Medicine's (ACSM's) submaximal treadmill running test in predicting VO2max. Twenty-one moderately well-trained men aged 18-34 years performed 1 maximal treadmill test to determine maximal oxygen uptake (M VO2max) and 2 submaximal treadmill tests using 4 stages of continuous submaximal exercise. Estimated VO2max was predicted by extrapolation to age-predicted maximal heart rate (HRmax) and calculated in 2 ways: using data from all submaximal stages between 110 b·min(-1) and 85% HRmax (P VO2max-All), and using data from the last 2 stages only (P VO2max-2). The measured VO2max was overestimated by 3% on average for the group but was not significantly different to predicted VO2max (1-way analysis of variance [ANOVA] p = 0.695; M VO2max = 53.01 ± 5.38; P VO2max-All = 54.27 ± 7.16; P VO2max-2 = 54.99 ± 7.69 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)), although M VO2max was not overestimated in all the participants--it was underestimated in 30% of observations. Pearson's correlation, standard error of estimate (SEE), and total error (E) between measured and predicted VO2max were r = 0.646, 4.35, 4.08 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P VO2max-All) and r = 0.642, 4.21, 3.98 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P VO2max-2) indicating that the accuracy in prediction (error) was very similar whether using P VO2max-All or P VO2max-2, with up to 70% of the participants predicted scores within 1 SEE (∼4 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) of M VO2max. In conclusion, the ACSM equation provides a reasonably good estimation of VO2max with no difference in predictive accuracy between P VO2max-2 and P VO2max-All, and hence, either approach may be equally useful in tracking an individual's aerobic fitness over time. However, if a precise knowledge of VO2max is required, then it is recommended that this be measured directly.

  11. Adaptive Changes in the Sensitivity of the Dorsal Raphe and Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nuclei to Acute Exercise, and Hippocampal Neurogenesis May Contribute to the Antidepressant Effect of Regular Treadmill Running in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Nishii

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing clinical evidence suggests that regular physical exercise can prevent or reduce the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders including depressive symptoms. Antidepressant effect of regular exercise may be implicated in monoaminergic transmission including serotonergic transmission, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, and hippocampal neurogenesis, but few general concepts regarding the optimal exercise regimen for stimulating neural mechanisms involved in antidepressant properties have been developed. Here, we examined how 4 weeks of treadmill running at different intensities (0, 15, 25 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 times/week alters neuronal activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN, which is the major source of serotonin (5-HT neurons in the central nervous system, and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, in which corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF neurons initiate the activation of the HPA axis, during one session of acute treadmill running at different speeds (0, 15, 25 m/min, 30 min in male Wistar rats, using c-Fos immunohistochemistry. We also examined neurogenesis in the hippocampus using immunohistochemistry for doublecortin (DCX and assessed depressive-like behavior using the forced swim test after regular exercise for 4 weeks. In the pre-training period, acute treadmill running at low speed, but not at high speed, increased c-Fos positive nuclei in the DRN compared with the sedentary control. The number of c-Fos positive nuclei in the PVN during acute treadmill running was increased in a running speed-dependent manner. Regular exercise for 4 weeks, regardless of the training intensity, induced an enhancement of c-Fos expression in the DRN during not only low-speed but also high-speed acute running, and generally reduced c-Fos expression in the PVN during acute running compared with pre-training. Furthermore, regular treadmill running for 4 weeks enhanced DCX immunoreactivity in the

  12. Mini-Treadmill for Musculoskeletal Health Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZIN Technologies, Inc. proposes a novel Miniature Treadmill with resistive exercise capability for use in spaceflight exercise countermeasures and broad terrestrial...

  13. Mini-Treadmill for Musculoskeletal Health Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZIN Technologies, Inc. is developing a novel Miniature Treadmill with resistive exercise capability for use in spaceflight exercise countermeasures and broad...

  14. Long-term treadmill exercise improves spatial memory of male appswe/ps1de9 mice by regulation of BDNF expression and microglia activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JY Xiong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that physical activity could delay or attenuate the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. But the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. To investigate the effect of long-term treadmill exercise on the spatial memory of AD mice and the possible role of β-amyloid, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and microglia in the effect, male APPswe/PS1dE9 AD mice aged 4 months were subjected to treadmill exercise for 5 months with 6 sessions per week and gradually increased load. A Morris water maze was used to evaluate the spatial memory. Expression levels of β-amyloid, BDNF and Iba-1 (a microglia marker in brain tissue were detected by immunohistochemistry. Sedentary AD mice and wildtype C57BL/6J mice served as controls. The results showed that 5-month treadmill exercise significantly decreased the escape latencies (P 0.05. The study suggested that long-term treadmill exercise could improve the spatial memory of the male APPswe/PS1dE9 AD mice. The increase in BDNF-positive cells and decrease in activated microglia might underpin the beneficial effect.

  15. Determination of Fatigue Following Maximal Loaded Treadmill Exercise by Using Wavelet Packet Transform Analysis and MLPNN from MMG-EMG Data Combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Gürkan; Hindistan, I Ethem; Özkaya, Y Gül; Köklükaya, Etem; Polat, Övünç; Çolak, Ömer H

    2015-10-01

    The muscle fatigue can be expressed as decrease in maximal voluntary force generating capacity of the neuromuscular system as a result of peripheral changes at the level of the muscle, and also failure of the central nervous system to drive the motoneurons adequately. In this study, a muscle fatigue detection method based on frequency spectrum of electromyogram (EMG) and mechanomyogram (MMG) has been presented. The EMG and MMG data were obtained from 31 healthy, recreationally active men at the onset, and following exercise. All participants were performed a maximally exercise session in a motor-driven treadmill by using standard Bruce protocol which is the most widely used test to predict functional capacity. The method used in the present study consists of pre-processing, determination of the energy value based on wavelet packet transform, and classification phases. The results of the study demonstrated that changes in the MMG 176-234 Hz and EMG 254-313 Hz bands are critical to determine for muscle fatigue occurred following maximally exercise session. In conclusion, our study revealed that an algorithm with EMG and MMG combination based on frequency spectrum is more effective for the detection of muscle fatigue than EMG or MMG alone.

  16. Effects of virtual reality training using Nintendo Wii and treadmill walking exercise on balance and walking for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Yo-Soon; Son, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of virtual reality training using Nintendo Wii on balance and walking for stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Forty stroke patients with stroke were randomly divided into two exercise program groups: virtual reality training (n=20) and treadmill (n=20). The subjects underwent their 40-minute exercise program three times a week for eight weeks. Their balance and walking were measured before and after the complete program. We measured the left/right weight-bearing and the anterior/posterior weight-bearing for balance, as well as stance phase, swing phase, and cadence for walking. [Results] For balance, both groups showed significant differences in the left/right and anterior/posterior weight-bearing, with significant post-program differences between the groups. For walking, there were significant differences in the stance phase, swing phase, and cadence of the virtual reality training group. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that virtual reality training providing visual feedback may enable stroke patients to directly adjust their incorrect weight center and shift visually. Virtual reality training may be appropriate for patients who need improved balance and walking ability by inducing their interest for them to perform planned exercises on a consistent basis.

  17. Effects of treadmill exercise-intensity on short-term memory in the rats born of the lipopolysaccharide-exposed maternal rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kijeong; Sung, Yun-Hee; Seo, Jin-Hee; Lee, Sang-Won; Lim, Baek-Vin; Lee, Choong-Yeol; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2015-01-01

    Maternal infection is an important factor causing neonatal brain injury and later developmental disability. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise intensity on short-term memory, hippocampal neurogenesis, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) in the rats born of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-exposed maternal rats. The rats were divided into six groups: control group, mild-intensity exercise group, moderate...

  18. [Treadmills in rehabilitation medicine: technical characteristics and selection criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodaglio, P; Vercelli, S; Colombo, R; Capodaglio, E M; del Moro, V Mattai; Franchignoni, F

    2008-01-01

    The treadmill is a commonly used means of testing and training patients with cardiopulmonary diseases. There is growing interest in the use of the treadmill also for rehabilitation of patients with orthopaedic and neurological diseases. Commercially available treadmills show wide differences in terms of structure and function that have a direct impact on the specific rehabilitation protocols. The aims of this paper are: a) to briefly review the physiology and biomechanics of treadmill exercise as compared to overground walking; b) to point out the technical specifications of treadmills suitable for rehabilitation settings; c) to provide guidelines for treadmill selection in the different categories of rehabilitation patients. First, the different physiological and biomechanical characteristics of walking on a treadmill and overground are discussed. Uphill and downhill walking as well as backward walking are also presented together with the spin-offs for rehabilitation practice. Then, the technical features of treadmills (treadbelt, frame, bars, deck, rollers, shock absorption, elevation motor, drive motor, flywheel, display) are described and the specific requisites for the different patient categories undergoing rehabilitation are discussed in detail. Finally, guidelines and a flow-chart for identifying the main technical requisites for appropriate treadmill selection in the different disabilities are provided. A summary table of the technical specifications of the commercially available rehabilitation treadmills is also included.

  19. Evaluation of treadmill exercise effect on muscular lipid profiles of diabetic fatty rats by nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Cheol; Kim, Il Yong; Son, Yeri; Byeon, Seul Kee; Yoon, Dong Hyun; Son, Jun Seok; Song, Han Sol; Song, Wook; Seong, Je Kyung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-07-01

    We compare comprehensive quantitative profiling of lipids at the molecular level from skeletal muscle tissues (gastrocnemius and soleus) of Zucker diabetic fatty rats and Zucker lean control rats during treadmill exercise by nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Because type II diabetes is caused by decreased insulin sensitivity due to excess lipids accumulated in skeletal muscle tissue, lipidomic analysis of muscle tissues under treadmill exercise can help unveil the mechanism of lipid-associated insulin resistance. In total, 314 lipid species, including phospholipids, sphingolipids, ceramides, diacylglycerols (DAGs), and triacylglycerols (TAGs), were analyzed to examine diabetes-related lipid species and responses to treadmill exercise. Most lysophospholipid levels increased with diabetes. While DAG levels (10 from the gastrocnemius and 13 from the soleus) were >3-fold higher in diabetic rats, levels of most of these decreased after exercise in soleus but not in gastrocnemius. Levels of 5 highly abundant TAGs (52:1 and 54:3 in the gastrocnemius and 48:2, 50:2, and 52:4 in the soleus) displaying 2-fold increases in diabetic rats decreased after exercise in the soleus but not in the gastrocnemius in most cases. Thus, aerobic exercise has a stronger influence on lipid levels in the soleus than in the gastrocnemius in type 2 diabetic rats.

  20. The effect of exercise intensity on cognitive performance during short duration treadmill running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Mike

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of short duration, moderate and high-intensity exercise on a Go/NoGo task. Fifteen, habitually active (9 females and 6 males aged 28 ± 5 years agreed to participate in the study and cognitive performance was measured in three sessions lasting 10 min each, performed at three different exercise intensities: rest, moderate and high. Results indicated significant exercise intensity main effects for reaction time (RT (p = 0.01, the omission error rate (p = 0.027 and the decision error rate (p = 0.011, with significantly longer RTs during high intensity exercise compared to moderate intensity exercise (p = 0.039 and rest (p = 0.023. Mean ± SE of RT (ms was 395.8 ± 9.1, 396.3 ± 9.1 and 433.5 ± 16.1 for rest, moderate and high intensity exercise, respectively. This pattern was replicated for the error rate with a significantly higher omission error and decision error rate during high intensity exercise compared to moderate intensity exercise (p = 0.003 and rest (p = 0.001. Mean ± SE of omission errors (% was 0.88 ± 0.23, 0.8 ± 0.23 and 1.8 ± 0.46% for rest, moderate and high intensity exercise, respectively. Likewise, mean ± SE of decision errors (% was 0.73 ± 0.24, 0.73 ± 0.21 and 1.8 ± 0.31 for rest, moderate and high intensity exercise, respectively. The present study’s results suggest that 10 min workout at high intensity impairs RT performances in habitually active adults compared to rest or moderate intensity exercise.

  1. Exercise testing to enhance wives' confidence in their husbands' cardiac capability soon after clinically uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C B; Bandura, A; Ewart, C K; Miller, N H; DeBusk, R F

    1985-03-01

    The effects of wives' involvement in their husbands' performance of treadmill exercise testing 3 weeks after clinically uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction was compared in 10 wives who did not observe the test, 10 who observed the test, and 10 who observed and participated in the test themselves. In a counseling session after the treadmill test, couples were fully informed about the patient's capacity to perform various physical activities. Wives' final ratings of confidence (perceived efficacy) in their husbands' physical and cardiac capability were significantly (p less than 0.05) higher in those who also performed the test than in the other 2 groups. Only wives who walked on the treadmill increased their ratings of their husbands' physical and cardiac efficacy to a level equivalent to those of their husbands. Spouses' and patients' perceptions of patients' cardiac capability after treadmill testing and counseling at 3 weeks were significantly correlated with peak treadmill heart rate and workload at 11 and 26 weeks. Efficacy ratings at 3 weeks were slightly better than peak 3-week treadmill heart rate and workload as predictors of treadmill performance at 11 and 26 weeks. Participation in treadmill testing early after acute myocardial infarction is an effective means for reassuring spouses about the capacity of their partners to resume their customary physical activities with safety.

  2. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, Tim|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/184586674; Bongers, Bart C; van Brussel, Marco|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481962X; Haapala, Eero A; Hulzebos, Erik Hj|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818224

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic fitness is an important determinant of overall health. Higher aerobic fitness has been associated with many health benefits. Because myocardial ischemia is rare in children, indications for exercise testing differ in children compared to adults. Pediatric exercise testing is imperative to

  3. Utilidad de los puntajes clínicos para mejorar la predicción de enfermedad coronaria significativa después de una prueba de esfuerzo convencional Usefulness of clinical scores to improve prediction of significant coronary heart disease after conventional treadmill exercise testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A Guerrero

    2008-10-01

    mejoren aún más dicho desempeño.Background: in the last AHA/ACC expert consensus document, clinical scores to improve sensitivity (68% and specificity (77% of the exercise testing, diagnostic method considered a first line diagnostic method for coronary heart disease treatment (one of the main causes of mortality in Colombia and worldwide, are recommended. Nevertheless, few institutions in our country use them and they are difficult to apply in populations different to the ones for which they were developed. For this reason, a study to assess its performance in our environment, is needed. Materials and Methods: Morise and Duke treadmill scores were chosen to assess the reason for its validation in several populations, and were mentioned in the AHA/ACC consensus. The Morise and Duke scores classified patients in at low, middle and high risk for coronary heart disease. Primary objectives: validate the prediction scales for coronary heart disease and determine the best cutoff value for each score in a one year follow-up. Secondary objectives: determine the composite endpoint for acute myocardial infarction, cardiac death, angina requiring hospitalization, coronary obstruction >50% and/or angioplasty and stent implantation. Determine the best cutoff point through the ROC curves. Inclusion Criteria: patients >18 years old with suspected coronary heart disease. Exclusion Criteria: pregnant women with documented coronary heart disease, uninterpretable EKG, incapacity or contraindication for performing exercise stress test for any reason, ST depression 27,5: 18% (45 and diabetes mellitus: 16% (19. Morise score classified 36% (43 patients at low risk, 52% (61 at intermediate risk and 12% (14 at high risk. According to Duke the results were 53% (63, 41% (48 and 6% (7 respectively. When interpreting an isolated exercise testing, cardiologists classified patients: 81% (95 negative, 8% (10 suggestive and 11% (14 positive. The composite endpoint appeared in 11% (14 patients. When

  4. Energy cost of walking measurements in subjects with lower limb amputations: a comparison study between floor and treadmill test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traballesi, Marco; Porcacchia, Paolo; Averna, Tiziano; Brunelli, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Measuring the energy cost of walking (ECW) is a valid way of assessing the walking efficiency of subjects who were prosthetic users following lower limb amputation. The aim of this study was to determine whether, in these subjects, treadmill and floor ECW measurements are comparable. We tested 24 subjects who had undergone unilateral lower limb amputations for vascular diseases as they walked at a self-selected comfortable speed on the floor and on a treadmill. The tests were conducted at the end of rehabilitative treatment to fit prosthesis. Eight subjects underwent transtibial and 16 transfemoral amputation. The measurements were taken with a portable gas analyzer. The self-selected comfortable speed on the treadmill was significantly lower than that on the floor, where the patients adopted the aid they normally used for walking; oxygen consumption was the same in the two tests. Therefore, for both transtibial and transfemoral patients, ECW was greater during walking on the treadmill. Steady-state heart rate did not differ in the two tests. The data show that the ECW values of the amputated subjects obtained on the treadmill at the end of rehabilitation did not correspond with those they obtained on the floor. The floor test is the one that may better reflect walking with prostheses and aids in everyday life, in subjects with dysvascular lower limb amputation, using the prosthesis for a short time.

  5. Consistency of the counting talk test for exercise prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loose, Brant D; Christiansen, Ann M; Smolczyk, Jill E; Roberts, Kelsey L; Budziszewska, Anna; Hollatz, Crystal G; Norman, Joseph F

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the consistency of the counting talk test (CTT) method for estimating exercise intensity across various modes of exercise in healthy young adults. Thirty-six individuals completed the study, which required participation in 3 separate sessions within a 2-week time period. During the first session, the individuals completed a maximal effort treadmill test from which each individual's heart rate reserve (HRR) was calculated. During the second and third sessions, the subjects participated in 2 modes of exercise in each session for a total of 4 different modes of exercise. The individuals exercised at 40% HRR, 50% HRR, 60% HRR, 75% HRR, and 85% HRR. The heart rate (HR), CTT, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded at each workload. Based on the individual's resting CTT (CTT(rest)), the %CTT for each exercise stage was then calculated. Pearson correlations demonstrated moderate to good correlations between the CTT and HRR methods and the CTT and RPE methods for estimating exercise intensity. This study found that for the individuals with CTT(rest) exercise as recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine HRR guidelines could be achieved by exercising at a level of 40-50% CTT(rest). Individuals with a CTT(rest) ≥25, exercising at a level of 30-40% CTT(rest) would place them in the moderate to vigorous exercise intensity range. A high degree of reliability was demonstrated using the CTT method across the various modes of aerobic exercise. As such, independent of the exercise mode, the CTT was found to be an easy and consistent method for prescribing moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise intensity.

  6. Cognitive function during low-intensity walking: a test of the treadmill workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Brandon L; Olson, Ryan L; Mattina, Diana M

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of walking at self-selected speed on an active workstation on cognitive performance. Sixty-six participants (n = 27 males, 39 females; mean age = 21.06 ± 1.6 years) completed a treadmill-desk walking and a seated control condition, separated by 48 hours. During each condition, participants completed computerized versions of the Stroop test, a modified flanker task, and a test of reading comprehension. No significant differences in response speed or accuracy were found between walking and sitting conditions for any the cognitive tests. These findings reveal that performance on cognitive tasks, including executive control processes, are not impaired by walking on an active workstation. Implementing active workstations into offices and classrooms may help to decrease sedentariness without impairing task performance.

  7. Restoration of post-activation depression of the H-reflex by treadmill exercise in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of aging and chronic physical activity on the postactivation depression of the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex). The maximal amplitude H wave/maximal amplitude M wave ratio was measured, and the rate-sensitive depression of the H-reflex was assessed. Measurements were performed on sedentary rats aged of 3, 6, 12, and 20 months and on animals aged of 12 and 20 months performing an incremental treadmill exercise protocol during the last eight weeks preceding the recordings. At the end of the experiment, the muscle mass and/or body mass ratio was calculated. Results indicated that the H-reflex depression of the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were present until age of 6 and 12 months, respectively. For the tibialis anterior muscle, results also pointed out a decrease in the relative muscle mass with age and that the exercise allowed to restore the rate-sensitive depression of the H-reflex and to increase the relative muscle mass in comparison with sedentary animals. These findings clearly demonstrate that neural alteration of the spinal cord is prevented by activity in aged rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Treadmill exercise ameliorates symptoms of methimazole-induced hypothyroidism through enhancing neurogenesis and suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus of rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Soo; Lee, Shin-Ho; Hwang, Dong-Sup; Kim, Chang-Ju; Park, Jin-Kook; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2013-05-01

    Thyroid hormones play a crucial role in new neuron production and maturation during brain development. Physical exercise is known to promote cell survival and functional recovery after brain injuries. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on short-term memory, spatial learning ability, neurogenesis, and apoptosis in hypothyroidism rat pups. On the 14th perinatal day, the pregnant rats were divided into two groups: the maternal control group and the maternal methimazole (MMI)-treated group. For the induction of hypothyroidism in rat pups, MMI was added to the drinking water (0.02%, wt/vol), from the 14th prenatal day to the 49th postnatal day. After delivery, the male rat pups born from the maternal control group were assigned into the control group and the control and exercise group. The rat pups born from the maternal MMI-treated group were divided into the hypothyroidism-induction group and the hypothyroidism-induction and treadmill exercise group. The rat pups in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30min once a day, starting on the 22nd postnatal day for 4 weeks. Induction of hypothyroidism during the fetal and early postnatal period showed suppression of neurogenesis and enhancement of apoptosis in the hippocampus. Short-term memory and spatial learning ability were deteriorated in the hypothyroidism rat pups. Treadmill exercise during the postnatal period increased neurogenesis and inhibited apoptosis, and resulted in the improvement of short-term memory and spatial learning ability in the hypothyroidism rat pups. Copyright © 2013 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of voluntary and treadmill exercise on spontaneous withdrawal signs, cognitive deficits and alterations in apoptosis-associated proteins in morphine-dependent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari-Zaer, Amin; Ghodrati-Jaldbakhan, Shahrbanoo; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Akhavan, Maziar M; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Chronic exposure to morphine results in cognitive deficits and alterations of apoptotic proteins in favor of cell death in the hippocampus, a brain region critically involved in learning and memory. Physical activity has been shown to have beneficial effects on brain health. In the current work, we examined the effects of voluntary and treadmill exercise on spontaneous withdrawal signs, the associated cognitive defects, and changes of apoptotic proteins in morphine-dependent rats. Morphine dependence was induced through bi-daily administrations of morphine (10mg/kg) for 10 days. Then, the rats were trained under two different exercise protocols: mild treadmill exercise or voluntary wheel exercise for 10 days. After exercise training, their spatial learning and memory and aversive memory were examined by a water maze and by an inhibitory avoidance task, respectively. The expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in the hippocampus were determined by immunoblotting. We found that chronic exposure to morphine impaired spatial and aversive memory and remarkably suppressed the expression of Bcl-2, but Bax expression remained constant. Both voluntary and treadmill exercise alleviated memory impairment, increased the expression of Bcl-2 protein, and only the later suppressed the expression of Bax protein in morphine-dependent animals. Moreover, both exercise protocols diminished the occurrence of spontaneous morphine withdrawal signs. Our findings showed that exercise reduces the spontaneous morphine-withdrawal signs, blocks the associated impairment of cognitive performance, and overcomes morphine-induced alterations in apoptotic proteins in favor of cell death. Thus, exercise may be a useful therapeutic strategy for cognitive and behavioral deficits in addict individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Post-exercise hypotensive responses following an acute bout of aquatic and overground treadmill walking in people post-stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Byron; Jeng, Brenda; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos; Jung, Taeyou

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of a single-bout of aquatic treadmill walking (ATW) and overground treadmill walking (OTW) on the magnitude and duration of post-exercise ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in people post-stroke. Seven people post-stroke participated in a cross-sectional comparative study. BP was monitored for up to 9 hours after a 15-minute bout of ATW and OTW at approximately 70% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), performed on separate days. Mean systolic and diastolic BP values were compared between both exercise conditions and a day without exercise (control). Three hours after OTW, mean SBP increased by 9% from pre-exercise baseline compared to a 3% decrease during the control day (P exercise compared to a 1% DBP increase of the control day (P exercise (P exercise. Also, these data suggest that ATW can elicit clinically meaningful reductions in DBP and night-time SBP. Thus, it is recommended for clinicians to consider ATW as a non-pharmaceutical means to regulate DBP and promote nighttime dipping of SBP in people post-stroke. However, caution is advised during the immediate hours after exercise, a period of possible BP inflation.

  11. Pediatric Exercise Testing: Value and Implications of Peak Oxygen Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo T. Pianosi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peak oxygen uptake (peak V ˙ O 2 measured by clinical exercise testing is the benchmark for aerobic fitness. Aerobic fitness, estimated from maximal treadmill exercise, is a predictor of mortality in adults. Peak V ˙ O 2 was shown to predict longevity in patients aged 7–35 years with cystic fibrosis over 25 years ago. A surge of exercise studies in young adults with congenital heart disease over the past decade has revealed significant prognostic information. Three years ago, the first clinical trial in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension used peak V ˙ O 2 as an endpoint that likewise delivered clinically relevant data. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing provides clinicians with biomarkers and clinical outcomes, and researchers with novel insights into fundamental biological mechanisms reflecting an integrated physiological response hidden at rest. Momentum from these pioneering observations in multiple disease states should impel clinicians to employ similar methods in other patient populations; e.g., sickle cell disease. Advances in pediatric exercise science will elucidate new pathways that may identify novel biomarkers. Our initial aim of this essay is to highlight the clinical relevance of exercise testing to determine peak V ˙ O 2 , and thereby convince clinicians of its merit, stimulating future clinical investigators to broaden the application of exercise testing in pediatrics.

  12. Exercise stress testing. An overview of current guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, S A; Brozic, A; Myers, J N; Ignaszewski, A

    1999-05-01

    Exercise stress testing (ET) is an inexpensive noninvasive tool that provides valuable cardiopulmonary information in healthy and diseased populations. It is most commonly used for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD) and developing appropriate exercise prescriptions (EP). With its widespread use and application, it is imperative that safe and appropriate guidelines and procedures are used, as there are a number of risks associated with testing in a population with or suspected of having CAD. The focus should be on the patient's safety: personnel must be properly trained and aware of all emergency procedures, contra-indications for ET and indications for test termination must be strictly adhered to. Three main types of testing are prevalent: submaximal, maximal and maximal utilising gas exchange. The maximal test is most commonly used, and the submaximal is appropriate for hospitalised patients. Gas exchange data is essential when assessing congestive heart failure and timing for heart transplantation. ET is commonly performed using a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer. The treadmill provides a more familiar exercise modality and has been shown to have greater diagnostic sensitivity than the bicycle ergometer; it is, however, more expensive and requires more space in the testing room. The bicycle ergometer is more appropriate for those individuals who are severely obese or have problems with extended periods of walking. Regardless of the modality used, an appropriate exercise protocol should be used. In North America, the Bruce protocol is the most common. However, the Bruce protocol, and others that estimate exercise capacity based on equations, tend to overestimate exercise capacity. They may be too demanding for those with limited exercise capacity, and too long for those with high exercise capacity. For these people, an exercise protocol that reaches maximal capacity in 8 to 12 minutes using smaller increments in workload should be considered. Once completed

  13. Influence of exercise duration on cardiorespiratory responses, energy cost and tissue oxygenation within a 6 hour treadmill run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerhervé, Hugo A; McLean, Scott; Birkenhead, Karen; Parr, David; Solomon, Colin

    2017-01-01

    The physiological mechanisms for alterations in oxygen utilization ([Formula: see text]) and the energy cost of running ( C r ) during prolonged running are not completely understood, and could be linked with alterations in muscle and cerebral tissue oxygenation. Eight trained ultramarathon runners (three women; mean ± SD; age 37 ± 7 yr; maximum [Formula: see text] 60 ± 15 mL min -1  kg -1 ) completed a 6 hr treadmill run (6TR), which consisted of four modules, including periods of moderate (3 min at 10 km h -1 , 10-CR) and heavy exercise intensities (6 min at 70% of maximum [Formula: see text], HILL), separated by three, 100 min periods of self-paced running (SP). We measured [Formula: see text], minute ventilation ([Formula: see text]), ventilatory efficiency ([Formula: see text]), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), C r , muscle and cerebral tissue saturation index (TSI) during the modules, and heart rate (HR) and perceived exertion (RPE) during the modules and SP. Participants ran 58.3 ± 10.5 km during 6TR. Speed decreased and HR and RPE increased during SP. Across the modules, HR and [Formula: see text] increased (10-CR), and RER decreased (10-CR and HILL). There were no significant changes in [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], C r , TSI and RPE across the modules. In the context of positive pacing (decreasing speed), increased cardiac drift and perceived exertion over the 6TR, we observed increased RER and increased HR at moderate and heavy exercise intensity, increased [Formula: see text] at moderate intensity, and no effect of exercise duration on ventilatory efficiency, energy cost of running and tissue oxygenation.

  14. Low- and high-intensity treadmill exercise attenuates chronic morphine-induced anxiogenesis and memory impairment but not reductions in hippocampal BDNF in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrati-Jaldbakhan, Shahrbanoo; Ahmadalipour, Ali; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Alizadeh, Maryam

    2017-05-15

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that treadmill exercise alleviates the deficits in cognitive functions and anxiety behaviors induced by chronic exposure to morphine in male rats. In this study, we investigated the effects of low and high intensities of treadmill exercise on spatial memory, anxiety-like behaviors, and biochemical changes in the hippocampus and serum of morphine-treated female rats. The adult virgin female rats were injected with bi-daily doses (10mg/kg, at 12h intervals) of morphine over a period of 10days. Following these injections, the rats were exercised under low or high intensities for 30min per session on five days a week for four weeks. After exercise training, object location memory, anxiety profile, hippocampal BDNF, and serum corticosterone and BDNF were examined. Morphine-treated animals exhibited increased anxiety levels, impaired object location memory, and reduced hippocampal BDNF. Exercise alleviated these impairing effects on anxiety profile and memory but not hippocampal BDNF. The high-intensity exercise even further reduced the hippocampal BDNF. Additionally, both exercise regimens in the morphine group and the high exercise in the saline group reduced serum BDNF. Finally, the high-intensity exercise enhanced corticosterone serum. These findings indicate that the negative cognitive and behavioral effects of chronic exposure to morphine could be relieved by forced exercise in female rats. However, the exercise intensity is an important factor to be considered during exercise training. Finally, the correlation between changes of brain and serum BDNF and cognitive functions following morphine exposure needs further research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Prediction of VO2max in Children and Adolescents Using Exercise Testing and Physical Activity Questionnaire Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Nate E; Vehrs, Pat R; Fellingham, Gilbert W; George, James D; Hager, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a treadmill walk-jog-run exercise test previously validated in adults and physical activity questionnaire data to estimate maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) in boys (n = 62) and girls (n = 66) aged 12 to 17 years old. Data were collected from Physical Activity Rating (PA-R) and Perceived Functional Ability (PFA) questionnaires, a walk-jog-run submaximal treadmill exercise test, and a maximal graded exercise test. Regression analysis resulted in the development of 2 models to predict VO2max. Submaximal exercise test data were used to build the following model (R2 = .73; SEE = 4.59 mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)): VO2max (mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)) = 26.890+(5.877 × Gender; 0 = female; 1 = male) - (0.782 × Body Mass Index [BMI])+(0.438 × PFA Score) +(2.712 × Treadmill Speed; mph) +(0.746 × Age) +(0.449 × PA-R Score). Maximal exercise test data were used to build the following model (R2 = .83; SEE = 3.63 mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)): VO2max (mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)) = 10.716+(1.334 × Maximal Treadmill Grade) +(5.203 × Treadmill Speed; mph) +(3.494 × Gender; 0 = female; 1 = male) - (0.413 × BMI) +(0.249 × PFA). The results of this study demonstrate, for the first time, that regression equations that use both exercise data and physical activity questionnaire data can accurately predict VO2max in youth. The submaximal and maximal exercise tests that use self-selected treadmill speeds can be used to assess cardiorespiratory fitness of youth with a wide range of fitness levels.

  16. Exercise training for intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Mary M

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to provide an overview of evidence regarding exercise therapies for patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD). This manuscript summarizes the content of a lecture delivered as part of the 2016 Crawford Critical Issues Symposium. Multiple randomized clinical trials demonstrate that supervised treadmill exercise significantly improves treadmill walking performance in people with PAD and intermittent claudication symptoms. A meta-analysis of 25 randomized trials demonstrated a 180-meter increase in treadmill walking distance in response to supervised exercise interventions compared with a nonexercising control group. Supervised treadmill exercise has been inaccessible to many patients with PAD because of lack of medical insurance coverage. However, in 2017, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued a decision memorandum to support health insurance coverage of 12 weeks of supervised treadmill exercise for patients with walking impairment due to PAD. Recent evidence also supports home-based walking exercise to improve walking performance in people with PAD. Effective home-exercise programs incorporate behavioral change interventions such as a remote coach, goal setting, and self-monitoring. Supervised treadmill exercise programs preferentially improve treadmill walking performance, whereas home-based walking exercise programs preferentially improve corridor walking, such as the 6-minute walk test. Clinical trial evidence also supports arm or leg ergometry exercise to improve walking endurance in people with PAD. Treadmill walking exercise appears superior to resistance training alone for improving walking endurance. Supervised treadmill exercise significantly improves treadmill walking performance in people with PAD by approximately 180 meters compared with no exercise. Recent evidence suggests that home-based exercise is also effective and preferentially improves over-ground walking performance, such as

  17. Effect of High-Intensity Treadmill Exercise on Motor Symptoms in Patients With De Novo Parkinson Disease: A Phase 2 Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkman, Margaret; Moore, Charity G; Kohrt, Wendy M; Hall, Deborah A; Delitto, Anthony; Comella, Cynthia L; Josbeno, Deborah A; Christiansen, Cory L; Berman, Brian D; Kluger, Benzi M; Melanson, Edward L; Jain, Samay; Robichaud, Julie A; Poon, Cynthia; Corcos, Daniel M

    2018-02-01

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurologic disorder. Limited evidence suggests endurance exercise modifies disease severity, particularly high-intensity exercise. To examine the feasibility and safety of high-intensity treadmill exercise in patients with de novo Parkinson disease who are not taking medication and whether the effect on motor symptoms warrants a phase 3 trial. The Study in Parkinson Disease of Exercise (SPARX) was a phase 2, multicenter randomized clinical trial with 3 groups and masked assessors. Individuals from outpatient and community-based clinics were enrolled from May 1, 2012, through November 30, 2015, with the primary end point at 6 months. Individuals with idiopathic Parkinson disease (Hoehn and Yahr stages 1 or 2) aged 40 to 80 years within 5 years of diagnosis who were not exercising at moderate intensity greater than 3 times per week and not expected to need dopaminergic medication within 6 months participated in this study. A total of 384 volunteers were screened by telephone; 128 were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups (high-intensity exercise, moderate-intensity exercise, or control). High-intensity treadmill exercise (4 days per week, 80%-85% maximum heart rate [n = 43]), moderate-intensity treadmill exercise (4 days per week, 60%-65% maximum heart rate [n = 45]), or wait-list control (n = 40) for 6 months. Feasibility measures were adherence to prescribed heart rate and exercise frequency of 3 days per week and safety. The clinical outcome was 6-month change in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor score. A total of 128 patients were included in the study (mean [SD] age, 64 [9] years; age range, 40-80 years; 73 [57.0%] male; and 108 [84.4%] non-Hispanic white). Exercise rates were 2.8 (95% CI, 2.4-3.2) days per week at 80.2% (95% CI, 78.8%-81.7%) maximum heart rate in the high-intensity group and 3.2 (95% CI, 2.8-3.6; P = .13) days per week at 65.9% (95% CI, 64.2%-67.7%) maximum heart rate in the

  18. ENERGY SYSTEM CONTRIBUTIONS DURING INCREMENTAL EXERCISE TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Bertuzzi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to determine the relative contributions of the aerobic and glycolytic systems during an incremental exercise test (IET. Ten male recreational long-distance runners performed an IET consisting of three-minute incremental stages on a treadmill. The fractions of the contributions of the aerobic and glycolytic systems were calculated for each stage based on the oxygen uptake and the oxygen energy equivalents derived by blood lactate accumulation, respectively. Total metabolic demand (WTOTAL was considered as the sum of these two energy systems. The aerobic (WAER and glycolytic (WGLYCOL system contributions were expressed as a percentage of the WTOTAL. The results indicated that WAER (86-95% was significantly higher than WGLYCOL (5-14% throughout the IET (p < 0.05. In addition, there was no evidence of the sudden increase in WGLYCOL that has been previously reported to support to the "anaerobic threshold" concept. These data suggest that the aerobic metabolism is predominant throughout the IET and that energy system contributions undergo a slow transition from low to high intensity

  19. Efficacy of Feedback-Controlled Robotics-Assisted Treadmill Exercise to Improve Cardiovascular Fitness Early After Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; de Bruin, Eling D; Schindelholz, Matthias; Schuster-Amft, Corina; de Bie, Rob A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular fitness is greatly reduced after stroke. Although individuals with mild to moderate impairments benefit from conventional cardiovascular exercise interventions, there is a lack of effective approaches for persons with severely impaired physical function. This randomized controlled pilot trial investigated efficacy and feasibility of feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (FC-RATE) for cardiovascular rehabilitation in persons with severe impairments early after stroke. Twenty individuals (age 61 ± 11 years; 52 ± 31 days poststroke) with severe motor limitations (Functional Ambulation Classification 0-2) were recruited for FC-RATE or conventional robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (RATE) (4 weeks, 3 × 30-minute sessions/wk). Outcome measures focused on peak cardiopulmonary performance parameters, training intensity, and feasibility, with examiners blinded to allocation. All 14 allocated participants (70% of recruited) completed the intervention (7/group, withdrawals unrelated to intervention), without serious adverse events occurring. Cardiovascular fitness increased significantly in both groups, with peak oxygen uptake increasing from 14.6 to 17.7 mL · kg · min (+17.8%) after 4 weeks (45.8%-55.7% of predicted maximal aerobic capacity; time effect P = 0.01; no group-time interaction). Training intensity (% heart rate reserve) was significantly higher for FC-RATE (40% ± 3%) than for conventional RATE (14% ± 2%) (P = 0.001). Substantive overall increases in the main cardiopulmonary performance parameters were observed, but there were no significant between-group differences when comparing FC-RATE and conventional RATE. Feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise significantly increased exercise intensity, but recommended intensity levels for cardiovascular training were not consistently achieved. Future research should focus on appropriate algorithms within advanced robotic systems to promote optimal cardiovascular

  20. Oxygen uptake of overweight and obese children at different stages of a progressive treadmill test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez-Ortega, Agustín; Lucy Davis, Catherine; Barbeau, Paule; Boyle, Colleen Ann

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) is associated with cardiovascular and metabolic risks but it is difficult to assess in obese children. The objective of this study was to develop an equation to estimate VO2 (mL/kg/min) and to check the % of tests that were maximal according to recommended criteria. Methods Stress tests were analyzed of 222 subjects (94 male and 128 female with a BMI above the 85 percentile for age and sex), and repeated 4 months later. Mean age was 9.4 ± 1.1 years and weighed 52.4 ± 13.3 kg. Body fat % (40.5 + 6.2) was determined by DXA (Hologic QDR 4500W). The protocol on the treadmill started with a warm up at 2.5 and 3 mph with a slope of 0% and 2%. The speed was kept at 3 mph for all the stages and the slope was increased 2% every 2 minutes. Statistical analysis (descriptive, t-test and ANOVAS 2×2×2) was done with SPSS 15.0. Results Only 35% of the tests were maximal. The equation calculates was Y = 2.6x + 22.3 (x = protocol stage). Data pre and post treatment were not statistically different Discussion Increments in VO2 were consistent despite subject diversity (sex, % body fat, physical fitness, treatment). Conclusion To be able to estimate VO2 at the different stages of the test without complex equipment or specialized staff, will facilitate the performance of stress tests on a daily basis. PMID:21218170

  1. Time at VO2max during intermittent treadmill running: test protocol dependent or methodological artefact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, A W; McNaughton, L R; Carroll, S

    2007-11-01

    Effects of methodological differences on the determination of time at VO (2max) (t (VO2max)) during intermittent treadmill running were investigated. Subjects performed three incremental tests to volitional exhaustion: a continuous protocol with 1-min stages (Cont-INC ([1-min])), and two discontinuous protocols of 2-min (Dis-INC ([2-min])) and 3-min (Dis-INC ([3-min])) stage durations. For each test, VO (2max) and the running velocity associated with V.O (2max) (vVO (2max)) were determined. On a fourth visit, subjects performed an intermittent test with 30-s work and relief intervals run at 105 % and 60 %, respectively, of the vV. (2max) determined during Cont-INC ((1-min)). The t (VO2max) during the intermittent test was determined using three different criteria: VO (2) data points > or = 100 % VO (2max) determined in Cont-INC ((1-min)) (t (VO2max[100 %])), > or = 95 % VO (2max) (t (VO2max[95 %])) and > or = VO (2max) minus 2.1 ml . kg (-1) . min (-1) (t (VO2max[- 2.1])). The V.O (2max) means (SD) for Cont-INC ((1-min)), Dis-INC ((2-min)) and Dis-INC ((3-min)) were 4093 (538), 4096 (516), and 3980 (488) mL . min (-1), respectively. The t (VO2max) means (SD) were: t (VO2max(100 %)) 163 (227) s, t (VO2max(95 %)) 418 (439) s, and t (VO2max(- 2.1)) 358 (395) s. All differences in t (V.O2max) were significantly different (p VO2max) due to using V.O (2max) values derived from using different V.O (2) time-averages were significantly different (p < 0.05). Methodological differences should be considered during interpretation of previous studies.

  2. An empirical evaluation of the ACSM guidelines for exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, H W; Gibbons, L W; Gordon, N F; Blair, S N

    1990-08-01

    The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) has published exercise guidelines identifying individuals who should have an exercise test prior to clearance for exercise participation and whether a physician should supervise the test. These age and health status criteria (apparently healthy, higher risk, and diseased) were developed using clinical judgement and opinion rather than empirical data. Thus, there is a need to validate the recommendations with actual data. We studied the results of 24,332 maximal treadmill tests in men (n = 18,076) and women (n = 5,626) as they associated with age and baseline health status. Commonly accepted criteria for abnormal exercise tests were used (i.e., 1 mm ST segment depression at 0.08 s, systolic blood pressure drop with exercise, complex ventricular ectopy, etc.). There were 895 and 183 abnormal exercise tests in men and women, respectively. Men and women who were apparently healthy had lower abnormality rates per 1,000 tests than those considered to be at higher risk for coronary heart disease and those who had preexisting disease. Further, when those who were at higher risk were considered, those men with only one risk factor had significantly lower abnormality rates than did men with more than one risk factor (95% confidence intervals (CI) per 1,000 tests: 1 risk factor = 36.1-46.4; greater than 1 risk factor = 47.5-62.5). Abnormality rates in women with 1 risk factor were also lower than those in their peers with greater than 1 risk factor, but not statistically so (95% CI per 1,000 tests: 1 risk factor = 24.9-43.0; greater than 1 risk factor = 25.3-54.4).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Reliability and minimal detectable change of a new treadmill-based progressive workload incremental test to measure cardiorespiratory fitness in manual wheelchair users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Cindy; Arel, Jasmine; Brosseau, Rachel; Hicks, Audrey L; Gagnon, Dany H

    2017-11-01

    Cardiorespiratory fitness training is commonly provided to manual wheelchair users (MWUs) in rehabilitation and physical activity programs, emphasizing the need for a reliable task-specific incremental wheelchair propulsion test. Quantifying test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change (MDC) of key cardiorespiratory fitness measures following performance of a newly developed continuous treadmill-based wheelchair propulsion test (WPTTreadmill). Twenty-five MWUs completed the WPTTreadmill on two separate occasions within one week. During these tests, participants continuously propelled their wheelchair on a motorized treadmill while the exercise intensity was gradually increased every minute until exhaustion by changing the slope and/or speed according to a standardized protocol. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak), carbon dioxide production (VCO2peak), respiratory exchange ratio (RERpeak), minute ventilation (VEpeak) and heart rate (HRpeak) were computed. Time to exhaustion (TTE) and number of increments completed were also measured. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to determine test-retest reliability. Standard error of measurement (SEM) and MDC90% values were calculated. Excellent test-retest reliability was reached for almost all outcome measures (ICC=0.91-0.76), except for RERpeak (ICC=0.58), which reached good reliability. TTE (ICC=0.89) and number of increments (ICC=0.91) also reached excellent test-retest reliability. For the main outcome measures (VO2peak and TTE), absolute SEM was 2.27 mL/kg/min and 0.76 minutes, respectively and absolute MDC90% was 5.30 mL/kg/min and 1.77 minutes, respectively. The WPTTreadmill is a reliable test to assess cardiorespiratory fitness among MWUs. TTE and number of increments could be used as reliable outcome measures when VO2 measurement is not possible.

  4. Spreading depression features and Iba1 immunoreactivity in the cerebral cortex of developing rats submitted to treadmill exercise after treatment with monosodium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Cássia Borges; Soares, Georgia de Sousa Ferreira; Vitor, Suênia Marcele; Andrade-da-Costa, Belmira Lara da Silveira; Castellano, Bernardo; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araujo

    2014-04-01

    Physical exercise and excessive consumption of monosodium glutamate (MSG) can affect the morphological and electrophysiological organization of the brain during development. However, the interaction of both factors remains unclear. We analyzed the effect of this interaction on the excitability-related phenomenon known as cortical spreading depression (CSD) and the microglial reaction expressed as Iba1-immunolabeled cells in the rat motor cortex. MSG (2g/kg or 4g/kg) was administered every other day during the first 14 postnatal days. Treadmill exercise started at 21-23 days of life and lasted 3 weeks, 5 days/week, for 30min/day. At 45-60 days, CSD was recorded for 4h at two cortical points and the CSD parameters (velocity, amplitude, and duration of the negative potential change) calculated. Confirming previous observations, exercised rats presented with lower CSD velocities (3.29±0.18mm/min) than the sedentary group (3.80±0.18mm/min; Pexercised rats compared to saline-treated and exercised animals in a dose-dependent manner (3.49±0.19, 4.05±0.18, and 3.27±0.26 for 2g/kg MSG, 4g/kg MSG, and saline, respectively; Pexercise and MSG treatment increased Iba1 immunolabeling. The results confirm that physical exercise decelerates CSD propagation. However, it does not impede the CSD-accelerating action of MSG. These effects were accompanied by a cortical microglia reaction. Therefore, the data suggest that treadmill exercise early in life can influence the development of cortical electrical activity. Copyright © 2013 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pre-Exercise Hyperhydration-Induced Bodyweight Gain Does Not Alter Prolonged Treadmill Running Time-Trial Performance in Warm Ambient Conditions

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    Eric D. B. Goulet

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the effect of pre-exercise hyperhydration (PEH and pre-exercise euhydration (PEE upon treadmill running time-trial (TT performance in the heat. Six highly trained runners or triathletes underwent two 18 km TT runs (~28 °C, 25%–30% RH on a motorized treadmill, in a randomized, crossover fashion, while being euhydrated or after hyperhydration with 26 mL/kg bodyweight (BW of a 130 mmol/L sodium solution. Subjects then ran four successive 4.5 km blocks alternating between 2.5 km at 1% and 2 km at 6% gradient, while drinking a total of 7 mL/kg BW of a 6% sports drink solution (Gatorade, USA. PEH increased BW by 1.00 ± 0.34 kg (P < 0.01 and, compared with PEE, reduced BW loss from 3.1% ± 0.3% (EUH to 1.4% ± 0.4% (HYP (P < 0.01 during exercise. Running TT time did not differ between groups (PEH: 85.6 ± 11.6 min; PEE: 85.3 ± 9.6 min, P = 0.82. Heart rate (5 ± 1 beats/min and rectal (0.3 ± 0.1 °C and body (0.2 ± 0.1 °C temperatures of PEE were higher than those of PEH (P < 0.05. There was no significant difference in abdominal discomfort and perceived exertion or heat stress between groups. Our results suggest that pre-exercise sodium-induced hyperhydration of a magnitude of 1 L does not alter 80–90 min running TT performance under warm conditions in highly-trained runners drinking ~500 mL sports drink during exercise.

  6. Comparison of Level and Graded Treadmill Tests to Evaluate Endurance Mountain Runners

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    Pascal Balducci, Michel Clémençon, Baptiste Morel, Géraud Quiniou, Damien Saboul, Christophe A. Hautier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mountain endurance running has increased in popularity in recent years. Thus the aim of the present study was to determine if maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max and energy cost of running (Cr measured during level and uphill running are associated. Ten high level male endurance mountain runners performed three maximal oxygen uptake tests at three slope conditions (0, 12.5 and 25%. Metabolic data, step frequency (SF and step length (SL were recorded. No significant differences were found in VO2max (63.29 (±3.84, 63.97 (±3.54 and 63.70 (±3.58 mlO2/kg-1/min-1 or associated metabolic data at 0, 12.5 and 25% slope respectively. High intra-individual correlations were found between metabolic data measured in the three conditions. The energy cost of running was significantly different between slopes (0.192 (±0.01, 0.350 (±0.029 and 0.516 (±0.035 mlO2/kg-1/min-1, p < 0.01, 0, 12.5 and 25% respectively. However, Cr0% was not correlated with either Cr25% or Cr12.5% (rs = 0.09 and rs = 0.10, in contrast, Cr25% and Cr12.5% were correlated (rs = 0.78. Step length was positively correlated with speed under the three slope conditions. Step frequency was significantly lower at 25 compared to 12.5 and 0% slope. We found that the maximum aerobic power did not differ between level and graded treadmill tests. However, the increase in Cr on the inclined versus level conditions varied between subjects. None of the measured anthropometric or kinematic variables could explain the higher increase in Cr of some subjects when running uphill. Thus, a short graded (5min at 12.5% running test should be performed at a submaximal velocity (around 40% of level vVO2max to enhance understanding of an endurance runner’s uphill capability.

  7. A Maximal Graded Exercise Test to Accurately Predict VO2max in 18-65-Year-Old Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, James D.; Bradshaw, Danielle I.; Hyde, Annette; Vehrs, Pat R.; Hager, Ronald L.; Yanowitz, Frank G.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an age-generalized regression model to predict maximal oxygen uptake (VO sub 2 max) based on a maximal treadmill graded exercise test (GXT; George, 1996). Participants (N = 100), ages 18-65 years, reached a maximal level of exertion (mean plus or minus standard deviation [SD]; maximal heart rate [HR sub…

  8. Beneficial effects of exercise training (treadmill on insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in high-fat fed C57BL/6 mice

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    C.M.M. Marques

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available C57BL/6 mice develop signs and symptoms comparable, in part, to the human metabolic syndrome. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of exercise training on carbohydrate metabolism, lipid profile, visceral adiposity, pancreatic islet alterations, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in C57BL/6 mice. Animals were fed one of two diets during an 8-week period: standard (SC, N = 12 or very high-fat (HF, N = 24 chow. An exercise training protocol (treadmill was then established and mice were divided into SC and HF sedentary (SC-Sed, HF-Sed, exercised groups (SC-Ex, HF-Ex, or switched from HF to SC (HF/SC-Sed and HF/SC-Ex. HF/HF-Sed mice had the greatest body mass (65% more than SC/SC-Sed; P < 0.0001, and exercise reduced it by 23% (P < 0.0001. Hepatic enzymes ALP (+80%, ALT (+100% and AST (+70% were higher in HF/HF mice than in matched SC/SC. Plasma insulin was higher in both the HF/HF-Sed and HF/SC-Sed groups than in the matched exercised groups (+85%; P < 0.001. Pancreatic islets, adipocytes and liver structure were greatly affected by HF, ultimately resulting in islet β-cell hypertrophy and severe liver steatosis. The HF group had larger islets than the SC/SC group (+220%; P < 0.0001, and exercise significantly reduced liver steatosis and islet size in HF. Exercise attenuated all the changes due to HF, and the effects were more pronounced in exercised mice switched from an HF to an SC diet. Exercise improved the lipid profile by reducing body weight gain, visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, islet alterations, and fatty liver, contributing to obesity and steatohepatitis control.

  9. [Control System Design and Test of Digital Comprehensive Training Treadmill for Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiulin; Ma, Guanpo; Zhao, Jun; Hu, Xiufang

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the design of a treadmill of comprehensive training experiment for rats. The treadmill is composed of six tracks and two of them were designed as conventional plane, two were designed to swing right and left, and two were designed to swing back and forth. The power was provided by six motors. The MSP430F149 is used as core to adjust the swing rate and the grade of electric shock. The IAR for MSP430 is used to design the software. The speed of the six tracks could be adjusted between 0 and 30 m/min. The swing tracks of back and forth can be swung for 3-25 times per minute and the swing tracks of right and left for 3-32 times. The electric shock can be divided into three levels, i. e. strong, middle, and weak level for each track. The digital comprehensive training treadmill can meet different training needs, and provide experimental data for mechanism research of some related diseases.

  10. Treadmill exercise suppressed stress-induced dendritic spine elimination in mouse barrel cortex and improved working memory via BDNF/TrkB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K; Zhang, L; Tan, M; Lai, C S W; Li, A; Ren, C; So, K-F

    2017-03-21

    Stress-related memory deficit is correlated with dendritic spine loss. Physical exercise improves memory function and promotes spinogenesis. However, no studies have been performed to directly observe exercise-related effects on spine dynamics, in association with memory function. This study utilized transcranial two-photon in vivo microscopy to investigate dendritic spine formation and elimination in barrel cortex of mice under physical constrain or naive conditions, followed by memory performance in a whisker-dependent novel texture discrimination task. We found that stressed mice had elevated spine elimination rate in mouse barrel cortex plus deficits in memory retrieval, both of which can be rescued by chronic exercise on treadmill. Exercise also elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in barrel cortex. The above-mentioned rescuing effects for both spinognesis and memory function were abolished after inhibiting BDNF/tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) pathway. In summary, this study demonstrated the improvement of stress-associated memory function by exercise via facilitating spine retention in a BDNF/TrkB-dependent manner.

  11. Randomized controlled trial assessing participation and quality of life in a supported speed treadmill training exercise program vs. a strengthening program for children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, P E; Banks, D; Johnston, T E; Campbell, S R; Gaughan, J P; Ross, S A; Engsberg, J R; Tucker, C

    2012-01-01

    A multi-site Randomized-Controlled Trial compared a home-based Supported Speed Treadmill Training Exercise Program (SSTTEP) with a strengthening exercise program in children with cerebral palsy (CP) on the following categories; Participation, quality of life (QOL), self-concept, goal attainment, and satisfaction. Twenty-six children with spastic cerebral palsy were assigned by site-based block randomization to the SSTTEP (n=14) or strengthening exercise (n=12) group. Both groups participated in a two week clinic-based induction period and continued the intervention at home for ten weeks. Data were collected at baseline, post-intervention (12 weeks), and follow-up (16 weeks). Assessments included the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment Scale, Pediatric Quality of Life Cerebral Palsy Module, and Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale. Evaluators were blinded to group assignment at two sites. Satisfaction and performance on individual goals, participation, and parent-reported QOL improved in both groups with improvement maintained for four weeks post intervention. The hypothesis that the SSTTEP group would have better outcomes than the exercise group was not supported. However, both groups showed that children with CP can make gains in participation, individual goals, and satisfaction following a 12-week intensive exercise intervention, and these findings persisted for four weeks post intervention.

  12. Better economy in field running than on the treadmill: evidence from high-level distance runners

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    M Mooses

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Given the ongoing interest in ways to improve the specificity of testing elite athletes in their natural environment, portable metabolic systems provide an opportunity to assess metabolic demand of exercise in sport-specific settings. Running economy (RE and maximal oxygen uptake ( ·VO 2 max were compared between track and treadmill (1% inclination conditions in competitive level European distance runners who were fully habituated to treadmill running (n = 13. All runners performed an exercise test on running track and on treadmill. While ·VO 2 max was similar on the track and on the treadmill (68.5 ± 5.3 vs. 71.4 ± 6.4 ml∙kg -1 ∙min -1 , p = 0.105, respectively, superior RE was found on the track compared to the treadmill (215.4 ± 12.4 vs. 236.8 ± 18.0 O2 ml∙kg -1 ∙km -1 , p < 0.001. RE on the track was strongly correlated with RE on the treadmill (r = 0.719, p = 0.006. The present findings indicate that high-level distance runners have significantly better RE but not ·VO2max on the track compared to treadmill. This difference may be due to biomechanical adjustments. As RE is strongly correlated between the two conditions, it would be reasonable to assume that interventions affecting RE on the treadmill will also affect RE on the track.

  13. Measured maximal oxygen uptake in a multi-stage shuttle test and treadmill-run test in trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, A R; Chia, M Y H; Teh, K C

    2005-09-01

    The aims of the study were: i) to compare the measured maximal oxygen uptake (MVO2max) during the 20 m multi-stage shuttle test (MST) with MVO2max during an incremental treadmill-run test (TRT), and ii) to establish the reliability of MVO2max during MST, in trained athletes. 8 well-trained endurance-athletes (END) and 8 athletes involved in team games (GAM) performed the MST twice (i.e. MST1 and MST2) and the TRT once, in 3 separate sessions. MVO2maxx attained in the MST and TRT was measured using a portable respiratory analyser (model K4 RQ, Cosmed). MVO2max attained in the MST and TRT were significantly different for the END athletes (4.1+/-0.28 vs 4.45+/-0.31 Lxmin-1, P0.05). The 95% limits of agreement for MVO2max in the MST in Lxmin-1 were -0.67 to 0.27. MVO2max in MST1 and MST2 were not significantly different for END athletes (4.18+/-0.39 vs 4.1+/-0.28 Lxmin-1, P>0.05) and GAM athletes (4.01+/-0.55 vs 4.01+/-0.51 Lxmin-1, P>0.05). Reliability indicators for MVO2max in Lxmin-1 for MST test-retest were: typical error (TE)=0.14, coefficient of variation (CV)=3.5 and intra-class correlation (ICC)=0.90. MVO2max in the MST was lower than that measured in the TRT for the END athletes but not for the GAM athletes. Sport-specificity was an important consideration, especially when testing END athletes for VO2max. MVO2max in the MST showed acceptable levels of reproducibility.

  14. Skeletal muscle metabolism after stroke: A comparative study using treadmill and overground walking test

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    Ana Paula C. Loureiro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The primary aim of this study was to investigate muscle metabolism in stroke survivors through measurements of the respiratory exchange ratio and rates of fat and carbohydrate oxidation in relation to total energy expenditure at preferred walking speed during treadmill and overground walking. The secondary objective was to investigate whether the energy source used during walking influences the daily physical activity pattern and fatigue of post-stroke individuals. Methods: The sample comprised 28 stroke participants and 10 non-disabled, healthy controls. Measurements of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were recorded. Participants wore a uniaxial accelerometer (activPAL™ over 4 days as an estimate of daily physical activity. Measurements of Human Activity Profile and Neurological Fatigue Index for stroke were documented. Results: Carbohydrate oxidation accounted for the majority of fuel oxidation at preferred walking speed in the stroke group (55.86% vs 47.29% during tread-mill walking and 66.13% vs 50.15% during overground walking. Stroke patients who had higher levels of carbohydrate oxidation reached a lower score in the Human Activity Profile survey, had fewer steps screened by activPAL data (4,422 vs 6,692 steps/day and higher fatigue index. Conclusion: Carbohydrate oxidation accounted for the majority of fuel oxidation at the preferred walking speed in post-stroke individuals. The increased carbohydrate utilization recorded at preferred walking speed may have influenced the physical activity profile.

  15. Skeletal muscle metabolism after stroke: A comparative study using treadmill and overground walking test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Ana Paula C; Langhammer, Birgitta; Gjøvaag, Terje; Ihle-Hansen, Hege; Guarita-Souza, Luiz César

    2017-07-07

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate muscle metabolism in stroke survivors through measurements of the respiratory exchange ratio and rates of fat and carbohydrate oxidation in relation to total energy expenditure at preferred walking speed during treadmill and overground walking. The secondary objective was to investigate whether the energy source used during walking influences the daily physical activity pattern and fatigue of post-stroke individuals. The sample comprised 28 stroke participants and 10 non-disabled, healthy controls. Measurements of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were recorded. Participants wore a uniaxial accelerometer (activPAL™) over 4 days as an estimate of daily physical activity. Measurements of Human Activity Profile and Neurological Fatigue Index for stroke were documented. Carbohydrate oxidation accounted for the majority of fuel oxidation at preferred walking speed in the stroke group (55.86% vs 47.29% during tread-mill walking and 66.13% vs 50.15% during overground walking). Stroke patients who had higher levels of carbohydrate oxidation reached a lower score in the Human Activity Profile survey, had fewer steps screened by activPAL data (4,422 vs 6,692 steps/day) and higher fatigue index. Carbohydrate oxidation accounted for the majority of fuel oxidation at the preferred walking speed in post-stroke individuals. The increased carbohydrate utilization recorded at preferred walking speed may have influenced the physical activity profile.

  16. Exercício em esteira não elevou a temperatura do casco de equinos Exercise on treadmill did not enhance the temperature of the equine hoof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Berkman

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar em equino a influência do exercício progressivo e intenso realizado em esteira de alta velocidade sobre a temperatura de regiões da pele, incluindo face, pescoço e quartela, e do casco, incluindo coroa, parede e sola. Utilizaram-se cinco equinos Puro Sangue Árabes, desferrados, com idade média de 8±0,7 anos, sendo duas fêmeas e três machos, com peso corpóreo médio de 420±10kg. A intensidade de esforço foi determinada por meio da quantificação do lactato sanguíneo. As temperaturas foram determinadas com o auxílio de termógrafo, antes, durante e após o exercício. Realizou-se análise de variância seguida pelo teste de Tukey, sendo P≤0,05. A lactacidemia aumentou, principalmente nas velocidades intensas. Houve redução das temperaturas das regiões da face, pescoço e quartela após o exercício e diminuição das temperaturas da parede, coroa e sola do casco durante o exercício, enquanto a temperatura da manta de rolamento da esteira não se alterou em nenhum momento. Constatou-se indiretamente que a perfusão sanguínea do casco diminuiu durante o teste de esforço tanto em sua fase aeróbia como na anaeróbia. Nenhuma das intensidades de esforço foi capaz de alterar a temperatura da manta de rolamento da esteira. A temperatura do casco diminuída como decorrência fisiológica do esforço físico imposto, retornou aos valores normais após o término do exercício.The objective of the study was to evaluate the influence of intense and progressive exercise performed on a high speed treadmill on the temperature of the skin of the face, neck, pastern, and hoof, including the crown, sole and wall. Five unshod Arabian horses were used, with a mean age of 8±0.7 years, two females and three males, average body weight of 420±10kg. The exercise intensity was determined by quantification of blood lactate concentrations. Temperatures were determined with thermography before, during and after exercise. The

  17. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in small abdominal aortic aneurysm: profile, safety, and mortality estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jonathan; Powell, Alyssa; Smith, Kimberly; Fonda, Holly; Dalman, Ronald L

    2011-06-01

    Few data are available regarding exercise testing in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate safety and to characterize the hemodynamic and cardiopulmonary (CPX) response to exercise in a large group of patients with AAA. Three hundred and six patients with AAA ≥3.0 to ≤5.0 cm (mean 72 ± 8 years) underwent CPX as part of a randomized trial of exercise training. CPX and hemodynamic responses, ischemic events, rhythm disturbances, and risk estimates based on treadmill scores were quantified and compared to an age-matched group of 2155 veterans referred for exercise testing for clinical reasons. Peak VO(2) was similar between patients with AAA and the referral group (20.0 ± 6 ml/kg/min; 77 percent of age-predicted and 20.3 ± 7 ml/kg/min; 80 percent of age-predicted, respectively). The incidence of exercise-induced hypotension and hypertension was higher in AAA patients versus the referral group (2.9 and 3.6 percent vs mortality, respectively, were similar between groups. Patients with AAA have a slightly higher incidence of hyper- and hypotensive responses to exercise than age-matched referrals, but no serious events related to CPX occurred. AAA patients can undergo maximal CPX safely and have risk scores based on treadmill test results that are similar to age-matched referral subjects. These findings extend recent studies using sub-maximal evaluations to stratify risk in patients considered for surgery, and support the routine use of exercise testing for risk evaluation and the functional assessment of patients with AAA.

  18. Effects of music on physiological and affective responses to graded treadmill exercise in trained and untrained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownley, K A; McMurray, R G; Hackney, A C

    1995-04-01

    The influence of music on physiological and affective exercise responses was studied in 8 trained and 8 untrained runners under three music conditions ("no", "sedative", and "fast") during low, moderate, and high intensity exercise. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed increased respiratory frequency (FR) during fast music as compared to the no music and sedative music conditions (p untrained subjects reported more positive affect compared to trained subjects while listening to fast music during low and high intensity exercise. Data collected at voluntary exhaustion revealed significantly more positive affect and higher skin temperature (p values untrained compared to trained subjects. Collectively, these results suggest listening to fast, upbeat music during exercise may be beneficial for untrained runners but counterproductive for trained runners.

  19. Prediction of mortality and major cardiac events by exercise echocardiography in patients with normal exercise electrocardiographic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzas-Mosquera, Alberto; Peteiro, Jesús; Alvarez-García, Nemesio; Broullón, Francisco J; Mosquera, Victor X; García-Bueno, Lourdes; Ferro, Luis; Castro-Beiras, Alfonso

    2009-05-26

    We sought to assess the value of exercise echocardiography (EE) for predicting outcome in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease and normal exercise electrocardiogram (ECG) testing. The prognostic value of EE in patients with normal exercise ECG testing has not been characterized. We studied 4,004 consecutive patients (2,358 men, mean age [+/- SD] 59.6 +/- 12.5 years) with interpretable ECG who underwent treadmill EE and did not develop chest pain or ischemic ECG abnormalities during the tests. Wall motion score index (WMSI) was evaluated at rest and with exercise, and the difference (DeltaWMSI) was calculated. Ischemia was defined as the development of new or worsening wall motion abnormalities with exercise. End points were all-cause mortality and major cardiac events (MACE). Overall, 669 patients (16.7%) developed ischemia with exercise. During a mean follow-up of 4.5 +/- 3.4 years, 313 patients died, and 183 patients had a MACE before any revascularization procedure. The 5-year mortality and MACE rates were 6.4% and 4.2% in patients without ischemia versus 12.1% and 10.1% in those with ischemia, respectively (p mortality (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.73, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.40 to 5.32, p = 0.003) and MACE (HR: 3.59, 95% CI: 1.42 to 9.07, p = 0.007). The addition of the EE results to the clinical, resting echocardiographic and exercise hemodynamic data significantly increased the global chi-square of the models for the prediction of mortality (p = 0.005) and MACE (p = 0.009). The use of EE provides significant prognostic information for predicting mortality and MACE in patients with interpretable ECG and normal exercise ECG testing.

  20. Amplitude and frequency changes in surface EMG of biceps femoris during five days Bruce Protocol treadmill test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaluddin, Fauzani N; Ahmad, Siti A; Noor, Samsul Bahari Mohd; Hassan, Wan Zuha Wan; Yaakob, Azhar; Adam, Yunus; Ali, Sawal H M

    2015-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) is one of the indirect tools in indexing fatigue. Fatigue can be detected when there are changes on amplitude and frequency. However, various outcomes from literature make researchers conclude that EMG is not a reliable tool to measure fatigue. This paper investigates EMG behavior of biceps femoris in median frequency and mean absolute value during five days of Bruce Protocol treadmill test. Before that, surface EMG signals are filtered using band pass filter cut-off at 20-500Hz and are de-noised using db45 1-decimated wavelet transform. Five participants achieved more than 85% of their maximal heart rate during the running activity. The authors also consider other markers of fatigue such as performance, muscle soreness and lethargy as indicators to adaptation and maladaptation conditions. Result shows that turning points of median frequency and mean absolute value are very significant in indexing fatigue and indicators to adaptation of resistive training.

  1. Effect of trotting speed on kinematic variables measured by use of extremity-mounted inertial measurement units in nonlame horses performing controlled treadmill exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Antonio M; Vidondo, Beatriz; Ramseyer, Alessandra A; Maninchedda, Ugo E

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess effects of speed on kinematic variables measured by use of extremity-mounted inertial measurement units (IMUs) in nonlame horses performing controlled exercise on a treadmill. ANIMALS 10 nonlame horses. PROCEDURES 6 IMUs were attached at predetermined locations on 10 nonlame Franches Montagnes horses. Data were collected in triplicate during trotting at 3.33 and 3.88 m/s on a high-speed treadmill. Thirty-three selected kinematic variables were analyzed. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used to assess the effect of speed. RESULTS Significant differences between the 2 speeds were detected for most temporal (11/14) and spatial (12/19) variables. The observed spatial and temporal changes would translate into a gait for the higher speed characterized by increased stride length, protraction and retraction, flexion and extension, mediolateral movement of the tibia, and symmetry, but with similar temporal variables and a reduction in stride duration. However, even though the tibia coronal range of motion was significantly different between speeds, the high degree of variability raised concerns about whether these changes were clinically relevant. For some variables, the lower trotting speed apparently was associated with more variability than was the higher trotting speed. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE At a higher trotting speed, horses moved in the same manner (eg, the temporal events investigated occurred at the same relative time within the stride). However, from a spatial perspective, horses moved with greater action of the segments evaluated. The detected changes in kinematic variables indicated that trotting speed should be controlled or kept constant during gait evaluation.

  2. [Silent myocardial ischemia and exercise-induced arrhythmia detected by the exercise test in the total health promotion plan (THP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwane, M; Shibe, Y; Itoh, K; Kinoshita, F; Kanagawa, Y; Kobayashi, M; Mugitani, K; Ohta, M; Ohata, H; Yoshikawa, A; Ikuta, Z; Nakamura, Y; Mohara, O

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence and characteristics of ischemic heart disease especially silent myocardial ischemia (SMI) and arrhythmia in need of careful observation in the exercise stress tests in the Total Health Promotion Plan (THP), which was conducted between 1994-96 for the purpose of measuring cardiopulmonary function. All workers (n = 4,918, 4,426 males) aged 18-60 yr old in an occupational field were studied. Exercise tests with an ergometer were performed by the LOPS protocol, in which the maximal workload was set up as a presumed 70-80% maximal oxygen intake, or STEP (original multistage protocol). ECG changes were evaluated with a CC5 lead. Two hundred and fifteen people refused the study because of a common cold, lumbago and so on. Of 4,703 subjects, 17 with abnormal rest ECG and 19 with probable anginal pain were excluded from the exercise tests. Of 4,667 who underwent the exercise test, 37 (0.79%) had ischemic ECG change, and 155 (3.32%) had striking arrhythmia. These 228 subjects then did a treadmill exercise test with Bruce protocol. Twenty-two (0.47% of 4,703) showed positive ECG change, 9 (0.19%) of 22 had abnormal findings on a 201Tl scan. 8 (0.17%) were diagnosed as SMI (Cohn I), in which the prevalence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoker and positive familial history of ischemic heart disease was greater than that of all subjects. In a 15-30 month follow up, none has developed cardiac accidents. Exercise-induced arrhythmia was detected in 11 (0.23%) subjects. Four were non-sustained ventricular tachycardia without any organic disease, 4 were ventricular arrhythmia based on cardiomyopathy detected by echocardiography, 2 were atrial fibrillation and another was WPW syndrome. It is therefore likely that the ergometer exercise test in THP was effective in preventing sudden death caused by ischemic heart disease or striking arrhythmia.

  3. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in healthy children and adolescents at moderately high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilarraza-Lomelí, Hermes; Castañeda-López, Javier; Myers, Jonathan; Miranda, Irma; Quiroga, Paula; Rius, María-Dolores; Lopez-de-la-Vega, César; Vallejo, Enrique; Calderón, Juan; Figueroa, Javier; Buendía, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is a tool that helps clinicians to establish diagnosis and calculate risk stratification in adults. However, the utility of this test among children with congenital heart disease has not been fully explored. The goal of this study was to describe reference values for cardiopulmonary performance of healthy children. This study included 103 apparently healthy children (aged from 4 to 18 years; 61 boys), who underwent cardiopulmonary test using a treadmill protocol. All tests took place at 2240m above sea level (Mexico City). Exercise time was 11±4min. There were no complications. Peak oxygen uptake correlated closely with height in both genders (girls r=0.84; boys r=0.84, p<0.001). A multivariable linear regression model showed that body surface area, exercise time, gender and heart rate reserve were significant predictors of peak oxygen uptake (R(2)=0.815, p<0.001). Peak oxygen uptake was strongly associated with age even among children younger than thirteen years (r=0.74, p<0.001). This study provides physiological values for the major cardiopulmonary variables obtained from exercise testing using a treadmill among healthy children. Cardiopulmonary exercise test can be safely and effectively performed in young children even as young as 4 years old. Variables including age, gender and height are strongly associated with exercise time, peak heart rate and peak oxygen uptake. Regression equations for predicting peak heart rate and peak oxygen uptake are presented as reference values that allow researchers to compare children with heart disease versus those who are healthy. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Estrogen Usage on Eccentric Exercise-Induced Damage in Rat Testes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Serpil; Selli, Jale; Buyuk, Basak; Aydin, Sergulen; Kocaaslan, Ramazan; Guvendi, Gulname Findik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent years, lots of scientific studies are focused on the possible mechanism of inflammatory response and oxidative stress which are the mechanism related with tissue damage and exercise fatigue. It is well-known that free oxygen radicals may be induced under invitro conditions as well as oxidative stress by exhaustive physical exercise. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of anabolic steroids in conjunction with exercise in the process of spermatogenesis in the testes, using histological and stereological methods. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided to six groups, including the control group, the eccentric exercise administered group, the estrogen applied group, the estrogen applied and dissected one hour after eccentric exercise group, the no estrogen applied and dissected 48 hours after eccentric exercise group and the estrogen applied and dissected 48 hours after eccentric exercise group. Eccentric exercise was performed on a motorized rodent treadmill and the estrogen applied groups received daily physiological doses by subcutaneous injections. Testicular tissues were examined using specific histopathological, immunohistochemical and stereological methods. Sections of the testes tissue were stained using the TUNEL method to identify apoptotic cells. Apoptosis was calculated as the percentage of positive cells, using stereological analysis. A statistical analysis of the data was carried out with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the data obtained from stereological analysis. Results: Conventional light microscopic results revealed that testes tissues of the eccentric exercise administered group and the estrogen supplemented group exhibited slight impairment. In groups that were both eccentrically exercised and estrogen supplemented, more deterioration was detected in testes tissues. Likewise, immunohistochemistry findings were also more prominent in the eccentrically exercised

  5. Exercise-Ankle Brachial Pressure Index with One-Minute Treadmill Walking in Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuyuki, Kazuo; Kohno, Kenji; Ebine, Kunio; Obara, Takehiro; Aoki, Toshiyuki; Muto, Atsuhiko; Ninomiya, Kenji; Kumagai, Kenta; Yokouchi, Itaru; Yazaki, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) is widely used as a standard screening method for arterial occlusive lesion above the knee. However, the sensitivity of ABI is low in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Exercise stress (Ex-ABI) may reduce the false negative results.

  6. Genetic impairment of AMPK{alpha}2 signaling does not reduce muscle glucose uptake during treadmill exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine Just; Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck; Rose, Adam John

    2009-01-01

    Some studies suggest that the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is important in regulating muscle glucose uptake in response to intense electrically stimulated contractions. However, it is unknown if AMPK regulates muscle glucose uptake during in vivo exercise. We studied this in male and fe...

  7. Accuracy of Heart Rate Measurement Using Smartphones During Treadmill Exercise in Male Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Sun; Lee, Jin Seok; Joo, Min Cheol; Kim, Ji Hee; Noh, Se Eung

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a smartphone application measuring heart rates (HRs), during an exercise and discussed clinical potential of the smartphone application for cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs. Patients with heart disease (14 with myocardial infarction, 2 with angina pectoris) were recruited. Exercise protocol was comprised of a resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and a recovery stage. To measure HR, subjects held smartphone in their hands and put the tip of their index finger on the built-in camera for 1 minute at each exercise stage such as resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and recovery stage. The smartphones recorded photoplethysmography signal and HR was calculated every heart beat. HR data obtained from the smartphone during the exercise protocol was compared with the HR data obtained from a Holter electrocardiography monitor (control). In each exercise protocol stage (resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and the recovery stage), the HR averages obtained from a Holter monitor were 76.40±12.73, 113.09±14.52, 115.64±15.15, and 81.53±13.08 bpm, respectively. The simultaneously measured HR averages obtained from a smartphone were 76.41±12.82, 112.38±15.06, 115.83±15.36, and 81.53±13 bpm, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient (95% confidence interval) was 1.00 (1.00-1.00), 0.99 (0.98-0.99), 0.94 (0.83-0.98), and 1.00 (0.99-1.00) in resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and recovery stage, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the HRs measured by either device at each stage (p>0.05). The accuracy of measured HR from a smartphone was almost overlapped with the measurement from the Holter monitor in resting stage and recovery stage. However, we observed that the measurement error increased as the exercise intensity increased.

  8. Cardiovascular responses to an exercise test in subjects with intermittent claudication. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n3p208

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Grizzo Cucato

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggest that patients with intermittent claudication (IC present abnormal cardiovascular responses during treadmill exercise. However, it remains unclear whether this response is influenced by the severity of the disease. The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of IC severity on cardiovascular responses to an exercise test in subjects with peripheral arterial obstructive disease. Forty-seven men and women with IC, with a mean age of 65±9 years, participated in the study. The subjects underwent an exercise test on a treadmill using a specific protocol for this population. The subjects were divided into three groups according to the distance walked in the test: 1st tertile, walked from 210 to 420 m; 2nd tertile, walked from 450 to 700 m, and 3rd tertile, walked from 740 to 1060 m. Systolic (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP, heart rate (HR and rate-pressure product (RPP were measured at rest, in the first stage of the treadmill test, and during peak exercise. SBP and DBP increased along the exercise test in the three tertiles. HR and RPP increased along the test in the three tertiles, and these increases were higher in the 1st tertile than in the other tertiles in the first stage. However, similar HR and RPP were observed for the three tertiles during peak exercise. In conclusion, the severity of IC did not affect blood pressure responses during treadmill exercise. However, HR and RPP were higher during submaximal exercise in subjects with more severe IC.

  9. The Relation of Arm Exercise Peak Heart Rate to Stress Test Results and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Hong; Liu, Weijian; Marshall, Cynthia; Chandiramani, Pooja; Bainter, Emily; Martin, Wade H

    2016-09-01

    Arm exercise is an alternative to pharmacologic stress testing for >50% of patients unable to perform treadmill exercise, but no data exist regarding the effect of attained peak arm exercise heart rate on test sensitivity. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to characterize the relationship of peak arm exercise heart rate responses to abnormal stress test findings, coronary revascularization, and mortality in patients unable to perform leg exercise. From 1997 until 2002, arm cycle ergometer stress tests were performed in 443 consecutive veterans age 64.1 yr (11.0 yr) (mean (SD)), of whom 253 also underwent myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Patients were categorized by frequency distributions of quartiles of percentage age-predicted peak heart rate (APPHR), heart rate reserve (HRR), and peak heart rate-systolic blood pressure product (PRPP). Exercise-induced ST-segment depression, abnormal MPI findings, coronary revascularization, and 12.0-yr (1.3 yr) Kaplan-Meier all-cause and cardiovascular mortality plots were then characterized by quartiles of APPHR, HRR, and PRPP. A reduced frequency of abnormal arm exercise ECG results was associated only with the lowest quartile of APPHR (≤69%) and HRR (≤43%), whereas higher frequency of abnormal MPI findings exhibited an inverse relationship trend with lower APPHR (P = 0.10) and HRR (P = 0.12). There was a strong inverse association of APPHR, HRR, and PRPP with all-cause (all P ≤ 0.01) and cardiovascular (P Arm exercise ECG stress test sensitivity is only reduced at ≤69% APPHR or ≤43% HRR, whereas arm exercise MPI sensitivity and referral for coronary revascularization after arm exercise stress testing are not adversely affected by even a severely blunted peak heart rate. However, both all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality are strongly and inversely related to APPHR and HRR.

  10. Systemic, pulmonary and coronary haemodynamic actions of the novel dopamine receptor agonist in awake pigs at rest and during treadmill exercise Z1046

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Dirk J; Haitsma, David B; van der Geest, Ingeborg E J; Stubenitsky, Rene; van Meegen, Jan R; Veld, Arie J Man in't; Verdouw, Pieter D

    1997-01-01

    In view of the potential therapeutic application of specific dopamine receptor agonists in the treatment of hypertension and left ventricular dysfunction, we investigated the cardiovascular actions of the novel mixed D1/D2 dopamine receptor agonist Z1046 in awake pigs at rest and during treadmill exercise.Thirteen swine were chronically instrumented under sterile conditions for measurement of systemic, pulmonary, and coronary haemodynamics. Regional blood flows were determined with the radioactive microsphere technique.Z1046 (1, 10, 100 μg kg−1, i.v.) produced dose-dependent reductions in central aortic blood pressure (up to 27±3%, P⩽0.05) in awake resting pigs which was accompanied by only minimal reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system. The hypotensive response was principally the result of peripheral vasodilatation (system vascular resistance decreased up to 35±4%, P⩽0.05), which was located in the cerebral, coronary, renal, mesenteric, adrenal, splenic and skeletal muscular vascular beds (vascular resistance decreased up to 30–40% after the highest dose in these beds). Only in the cerebral and mesenteric bed was the vasodilatation sufficiently large to overcome the decrease in blood pressure and result in an increased blood flow; the vasodilatation in the coronary bed was most likely due to autoregulation as neither coronary blood flow nor myocardial oxygen demand were changed significantly by Z1046. The systemic vasodilatation that was caused by the highest i.v. dose (100 μg kg−1) was accompanied by transient and minor increases in heart rate (15±5%, P⩽0.05) and cardiac output (15±5%, P⩽0.05) whereas after 10 μg kg−1, i.v., a slight decrease in cardiac output also contributed to the hypotension. Z1046 had no effect on pulmonary vascular resistance.The systemic vasodilator responses to Z1046 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.) were sustained during treadmill exercise (2–4 km h−1 which produced heart rates of up to

  11. Effect of three breakfast interventions on blood glucose during low-intensity exercise performed on a treadmill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Guedes Cocate

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate blood glucose (BG response during a low-intensity activity, preceded by the consumption of three different types of breakfast (BF. Fifteen Physical Education male students of mean age of 22.7 ± 2 years were evaluated. Three BF interventions were carried out on different days :fasting; BF1: cookie, juice, apple, cereal bar or BF2: 400 mL carbohydrate drink 60 minutes before jogging/walking for 1 hour at 50-60% of maximum calculated HR (heart rate. Measurements of BG were taken at 60 and 30 minutes prior to activity and every 20 minutes during exercise. Heart rate, blood pressure (BP and RPE were also monitored. Statistical analysis was by ANOVA with Tukey test and aimed to identify differences both in effect over time and between different BF interventions, to a signifi cance level of P RESUMO O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resposta da glicose sangüínea (GS ao longo de uma atividade de baixa intensidade, precedida pelo consumo de diferentes tipos de café da manhã (CM. Foram avaliados 15 estudantes Educação Física, do gênero masculino com idade média de 22,7 ± 2 anos. Os avaliados realizaram, em dias diferenciados, três ações de CM (CM0: jejum; CM1: biscoito, suco, maçã, barra de cereal; ou CM2: 400mL de bebida carboidratada 60 minutos antes de um trote/caminhada a 50 – 60% da FC máxima calculada com duração de uma hora. A mensuração da GS ocorreu 60 e 30 minutos antes da atividade e durante intervalos de 20 minutos no exercício. Foram também monitorizadas a FC, pressão arterial (PA e IPE. O tratamento estatístico correspondeu à ANOVA associada ao teste de Tukey, para determinar a existência de diferenças tanto no efeito tempo como entre as ações de CM, com nível de signifi cância de P < 0,05. Os resultados indicaram ausência de diferença na resposta da FC, PA e IPE entre os três procedimentos. A GS apresentou diferença estatística entre o CM1 e o CM2 no per

  12. VO2max Measured with a Self-selected Work Rate Protocol on an Automated Treadmill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheadler, Cory M; Devor, Steven T

    2015-10-01

    The use of graded maximal exercise tests for measuring maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) is common practice in both cardiopulmonary rehabilitation settings and in sports medicine research. Recent alterations of common testing protocols to allow for self-selected work rates (SPV) have elicited V˙O2max values similar to or higher than more traditional style protocols (TP). Research is lacking in the delivery of the SPV protocol using a treadmill modality. The purpose of the study was to examine the validity of an SPV using an automated treadmill for measuring cardiorespiratory fitness. Thirteen experienced endurance runners completed three maximal exercise tests on a treadmill. Oxygen consumption was measured using a computerized system and averaged more than 30-s time periods. SPV was completed using an automated treadmill that consisted of a sonar range finder, microcontroller, and customized computer software. Subject deviations from the middle of the treadmill belt resulted in rapid, graded increases or decreases in speed. TP was completed on the same treadmill without the use of the automated software. A verification phase protocol (VP) was used to verify if VO2 was maximal. Peak work rate achieved during SPV was significantly greater than that achieved during TP by 1.2 METs; P VO2max than TP despite higher work rates.

  13. Arm exercise testing with myocardial scintigraphy in asymptomatic patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, S; Rubler, S; Bryk, H; Sklar, B; Glasser, L

    1989-04-01

    Arm exercise with myocardial scintigraphy and oxygen consumption determinations was performed by 33 men with peripheral vascular disease, 40 to 74 years of age (group 2). None had evidence of coronary disease. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects (group 1) were also tested to determine the normal endurance and oxygen consumption during arm exercise in their age group and to compare the results with those obtained during a standard treadmill performance. The maximal heart rate, systolic blood pressure, pressure rate product, and oxygen consumption were all significantly lower for arm than for leg exercise. However, there was good correlation between all these parameters for both types of exertion. The maximal heart rate, work load and oxygen consumption were greater for group 1 subjects than in patients with peripheral vascular disease despite similar activity status. None of the group 1 subjects had abnormal arm exercise ECGs, while six members of group 2 had ST segment changes. Thallium-201 scintigraphy performed in the latter group demonstrated perfusion defects in 25 patients. After nine to 29 months of follow-up, three patients who had abnormal tests developed angina and one of them required coronary bypass surgery. Arm exercise with myocardial scintigraphy may be an effective method of detecting occult ischemia in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Those with good exercise tolerance and no electrocardiographic changes or 201T1 defects are probably at lower risk for the development of cardiac complications, while those who develop abnormalities at low exercise levels may be candidates for invasive studies.

  14. Benefits of low-intensity pain-free treadmill exercise on functional capacity of individuals presenting with intermittent claudication due to peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Sharon; Stopka, Christine Boyd; Archer Martinez, Coleen; Carmeli, Eli

    2009-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication due to peripheral arterial disease (PAD) experience muscle aching during walking secondary to ischemia. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of low-intensity pain-free exercise (LIPFE) on functional capacity of individuals with PAD. A total of 12 participants with PAD underwent training on treadmill for 6 weeks, twice a week, for about 45 minutes. Outcome measures included walking distance (WDI), walking duration (WDU), mean walking rate (WR), estimated oxygen consumption (EVO(2)), metabolic equivalent (MET), estimated total energy expenditure (ETEE), and estimated rate of energy expenditure (EREE). Mean improvement of WDI, WDU, and MWR were 104% (an addition of 1.0 km), 55% (an addition of 13.3 minutes), and 41% (0.9 km/h faster), respectively. Mean improvement of EVO(2), MET, ETEE, and EREE, were 20%, 20%, 80%, and 20%, respectively. In conclusion, it appears that LIPFE training is an effective intervention for individuals presenting with PAD.

  15. Effects of moderate treadmill exercise and fluoxetine on behavioural and cognitive deficits, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction and alternations in hippocampal BDNF and mRNA expression of apoptosis - related proteins in a rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafia, Sakineh; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Samaei, Seyed Afshin; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Rafiei, Alireza; Valadan, Reza; Hosseini-Khah, Zahra; Mohammadkhani, Raziyeh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a condition that develops after an individual has experienced a major trauma. Currently, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like fluoxetine are the first-line choice in PTSD drug treatment but their moderate response rates and side effects indicate an urgent need for the development of new treatment. Physical activity is known to improve symptoms of certain neuropsychiatric disorders. The present study investigated the effects of moderate treadmill exercise, the antidepressant fluoxetine and the combined treatment on behavioural deficits, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction. We also examined alternations in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and mRNA expression of apoptosis - related proteins in a rat model of PTSD: the single prolonged stress (SPS) model. Rats were exposed to SPS (restraint for 2h, forced swimming for 20min and ether anaesthesia) and were then kept undisturbed for 14days. After that, SPS rats were subjected to chronic treatment with fluoxetine (10mg/kg/day, for 4weeks), moderate treadmill running (4weeks, 5day per week) and the combined treatment (fluoxetine plus treadmill exercise), followed by behavioural, biochemical and apoptosis markers assessments. SPS rats exhibited increased anxiety levels in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box, impaired fear conditioning and extinction in inhibitory avoidance (IA) task, impaired spatial memory in a recognition location memory task and enhanced negative feedback on the HPA axis following a dexamethasone suppression test. SPS rats also showed reduced hippocampal BDNF and enhanced apoptosis. Moderate treadmill exercise, fluoxetine and the combined treatment alleviated the SPS-induced alterations in terms of anxiety levels, HPA axis inhibition, IA conditioning and extinction, hippocampal BDNF and apoptosis markers. Furthermore, the combined treatment was more effective than fluoxetine alone, but in most tests

  16. Assessment of Heart Rate Variability Thresholds from Incremental Treadmill Tests in Five Cross-Country Skiing Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibai Mendia-Iztueta

    Full Text Available The assessment of heart rate variability (HRV thresholds (HRVTs as an alternative of Ventilatory thresholds (VTs is a relatively new approach with increasing popularity which has not been conducted in cross-country (XC skiing yet. The main purpose of the present study was to assess HRVTs in the five main XC skiing-related techniques, double poling (DP, diagonal striding (DS, Nordic walking (NW, V1 skating (V1, and V2 skating (V2.Ten competitive skiers completed these incremental treadmill tests until exhaustion with a minimum of one to two recovery days in between each test. Ventilatory gases, HRV and poling frequencies were measured. The first HRV threshold (HRVT1 was assessed using two time-domain analysis methods, and the second HRV threshold (HRVT2 was assessed using two non-time varying frequency-domain analysis methods. HRVT1 was assessed by plotting the mean successive difference (MSD and standard deviation (SD of normalized R-R intervals to workload. HRVT1 was assessed by plotting high frequency power (HFP and the HFP relative to respiratory sinus arrhythmia (HFPRSA with workload. HRVTs were named after their methods (HRVT1-SD; HRVT1-MSD; HRVT2-HFP; HRVT2-HFP-RSA. The results showed that the only cases where the proposed HRVTs were good assessors of VTs were the HRVT1-SD of the DS test, the HRVT1-MSD of the DS and V2 tests, and the HRVT2-HFP-RSA of the NW test. The lack of a wider success of the assessment of HRVTs was reasoned to be mostly due to the high entrainment between the breathing and poling frequencies. As secondary finding, a novel Cardiolocomotor coupling mode was observed in the NW test. This new Cardiolocoomtor coupling mode corresponded to the whole bilateral poling cycle instead of corresponding to each poling action as it was reported to the date by the existing literature.

  17. Systolic Blood Pressure Response During Exercise Stress Testing: The Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Wesley T; Qureshi, Waqas T; Blaha, Michael J; Keteyian, Steven J; Brawner, Clinton A; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2015-05-07

    The prognostic significance of modest elevations in exercise systolic blood pressure response has not been extensively examined. We examined the association between systolic blood pressure response and all-cause death and incident myocardial infarction (MI) in 44 089 (mean age 53±13 years, 45% female, 26% black) patients who underwent exercise treadmill stress testing from the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) Project (1991-2010). Exercise systolic blood pressure response was examined as a categorical variable (>20 mm Hg: referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg, and ≤0 mm Hg) and per 1 SD decrease. Cox regression was used to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% CI for the association between systolic blood pressure response and all-cause death and incident MI. Over a median follow-up of 10 years, a total of 4782 (11%) deaths occurred and over 5.2 years, a total of 1188 (2.7%) MIs occurred. In a Cox regression analysis adjusted for demographics, physical fitness, and cardiovascular risk factors, an increased risk of death was observed with decreasing systolic blood pressure response (>20 mm Hg: HR=1.0, referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg: HR=1.13, 95% CI=1.05, 1.22; ≤0 mm Hg: HR=1.21, 95% CI=1.09, 1.34). A trend for increased MI risk was observed (>20 mm Hg: HR=1.0, referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg: HR=1.09, 95% CI=0.93, 1.27; ≤0 mm Hg: HR=1.19, 95% CI=0.95, 1.50). Decreases in systolic blood pressure response per 1 SD were associated with an increased risk for all-cause death (HR=1.08, 95% CI=1.05, 1.11) and incident MI (HR=1.09, 95% CI=1.03, 1.16). Our results suggest that modest increases in exercise systolic blood pressure response are associated with adverse outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  18. Sample size estimation in studies monitoring exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic children

    OpenAIRE

    Hofstra, W. B.; Sont, J. K.; Sterk, P. J.; Neijens, H J; Kuethe, M. C.; Duiverman, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The repeatability of the response to standardised treadmill exercise testing using dry air and monitoring of heart rate in asthmatic children suffering from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) has not been well established. METHODS: Twenty seven asthmatic children with known EIB performed standardised exercise testing twice within a period of three weeks. The tests were performed on a treadmill while breathing dry air. During both tests heart rate had to reach 90% of ...

  19. Relative Therapeutic Efficacy of the Treadmill and Step Bench in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    umar

    Summary. The aim of this research is to compare the efficacy of treadmill and step bench exercises in hemiparetic gait rehabilitation. Previous studies have supported the use of treadmill and step bench exercises in gait rehabilitation. Nineteen patients were recruited for an 8-week, 2-group quasi-experimental study which ...

  20. Relative Therapeutic Efficacy of the Treadmill and Step Bench in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this research is to compare the efficacy of treadmill and step bench exercises in hemiparetic gait rehabilitation. Previous studies have supported the use of treadmill and step bench exercises in gait rehabilitation. Nineteen patients were recruited for an 8-week, 2-group quasi-experimental study which was ...

  1. The effects of treadmill type on heart rate and pain threshold velocity in individuals with lower-extremity musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Brian J; Jones, Evan M; Cowan, James E; Hollingsworth, Danny J; Deyle, Gail D; Douglas, S Christie; Allison, Stephen C

    2003-09-01

    This study utilized a quasi-experimental design in which subjects served as their own controls. To determine whether heart rate, pain threshold velocity, and pain perception varied in patients running on a soft-belt treadmill versus a standard hard-belt treadmill. According to promotional literature, the relatively new Orbiter soft-belt tread produces a greater increase in heart rate at a given velocity as well as a higher velocity tolerance while walking or running. The manufacturer also asserts that decreased forces transmitted through the lower extremity should decrease pain levels while exercising on the soft-belt treadmill. Twenty-seven subjects walked or ran on each of 2 treadmills at incrementally increasing velocities until they experienced either the onset of pain or an increase in pain from baseline levels. Locomotion continued for 2 minutes after that, during which time heart rate and pain level on a visual analog scale (VAS) were recorded. Two univariate paired t tests and a Wilcoxon's signed rank test revealed a greater heart rate and pain threshold velocity when using the soft-belt treadmill with no statistical difference in the pain reported between the 2 treadmills. Our study revealed a 10% higher heart rate and a 14.5% higher pain threshold velocity with the soft-belt treadmill compared to a hard-belt treadmill. These differences are considered clinically meaningful.

  2. The relationship between gender and clinical management after exercise stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Stacie L; Peterson, Pamela N; Magid, David J; Ho, P Michael; Bondy, Jessica; Hokanson, John E; Ross, Colleen A; Rumsfeld, John S; Masoudi, Frederick A

    2008-08-01

    Controversy remains regarding whether gender differences exist in clinical management after exercise treadmill testing (ETT). We studied 7,506 patients (49.8% women) without documented coronary heart disease referred for ETT from July 2001 to June 2004 in a community-based setting. We assessed the relationship between gender and subsequent diagnostic testing (secondary stress testing or coronary angiography) within 6 months after ETT. Secondary outcomes included subsequent stress testing, coronary angiography, and new cardiology visits in the 6-month interval. Multivariable analyses assessed the relationship between gender and these outcomes adjusting for demographic, clinical, and stress test characteristics. In subsequent analyses, patients were stratified by Duke Treadmill Scores (Duke University, Durham, NC). Compared with men, women referred for ETT were older, had a higher prevalence of some cardiac risk factors, achieved lower peak workloads, and, more often, experienced chest pain or ST-segment changes. After accounting for differences in clinical and ETT parameters, gender was not associated with any subsequent diagnostic testing in the 6 months after ETT (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.85-1.18). In secondary analyses, women were less likely to undergo angiography (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.47-0.83) with a trend toward more subsequent stress testing. Stratified analyses revealed less subsequent testing in high-to-intermediate Duke Treadmill Score women compared with men (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.48-0.79). Women and men were equally likely to die (hazards ratio 0.93, 95% CI 0.61-1.44) in the adjusted survival analysis. Overall, women and men equally underwent subsequent diagnostic testing after ETT. Although women were less likely to undergo angiography and higher-risk women were less likely to undergo subsequent testing, adverse events were not higher in women. Given these findings, assumptions regarding gender disparities in clinical management after ETT should be reevaluated in

  3. Exercise performance, core temperature, and metabolism after prolonged restricted activity and retraining in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Pohoska, E.; Turlejska, E.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Kozlowski, S.

    1992-01-01

    Physiological effects of restricted activity (RA) and subsequent retraining have been studied. Ten male mongrel dogs performed a submaximal exercise endurance test on a treadmill during kennel control, after 8 weeks of cage confinement and after eight weeks of retraining using the same treadmill protocol 1 h/d for 6 d/week. Data obtained show that RA reduces exercise endurance, the effectiveness of exercise thermoregulation, muscle glycogen stores, and the lipolytic response to exercise and to noradrenaline stimulation.

  4. Characterization of the heart rate curve during a maximum incremental test on a treadmill. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n4p285

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Marcel Fernandes Nascimento

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the heart rate (HR profile plotted against incremental workloads (IWL during a treadmill test using three mathematical models [linear, linear with 2 segments (Lin2, and sigmoidal], and to determine the best model for the identification of the HR threshold that could be used as a predictor of ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2. Twenty-two men underwent a treadmill incremental test (retest group: n=12 at an initial speed of 5.5 km.h-1, with increments of 0.5 km.h-1 at 1-min intervals until exhaustion. HR and gas exchange were continuously measured and subsequently converted to 5-s and 20-s averages, respectively. The best model was chosen based on residual sum of squares and mean square error. The HR/IWL ratio was better fitted with the Lin2 model in the test and retest groups (p0.05. During a treadmill incremental test, the HR/IWL ratio seems to be better fitted with a Lin2 model, which permits to determine the HR threshold that coincides with VT1.

  5. Characterization of the heart rate curve during a maximum incremental test on a treadmill. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n4p285

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Marcel Fernandes Nascimento

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the heart rate (HR profile plotted against incremental workloads (IWL during a treadmill test using three mathematical models [linear, linear with 2 segments (Lin2, and sigmoidal], and to determine the best model for the identification of the HR threshold that could be used as a predictor of ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2. Twenty-two men underwent a treadmill incremental test (retest group: n=12 at an initial speed of 5.5 km.h-1, with increments of 0.5 km.h-1 at 1-min intervals until exhaustion. HR and gas exchange were continuously measured and subsequently converted to 5-s and 20-s averages, respectively. The best model was chosen based on residual sum of squares and mean square error. The HR/IWL ratio was better fitted with the Lin2 model in the test and retest groups (p0.05. During a treadmill incremental test, the HR/IWL ratio seems to be better fitted with a Lin2 model, which permits to determine the HR threshold that coincides with VT1.

  6. Assessing cardiorespiratory fitness without performing exercise testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurca, R.; Jackson, A.S.; LaMonte, M.J.; Morrow, J.R.; Blair, S.N.; Wareham, N.J.; Haskell, W.L.; van Mechelen, W.; Church, T.S.; Jakicic, J.M.; Laukkanen, R.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is associated with increased risk of chronic diseases and mortality; however, CRF assessment is usually not performed in many healthcare settings. The purpose of this study is to extend previous work on a non-exercise test model to predict CRF from

  7. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test: Background, Applicability and Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Haddad Herdy

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET has been gaining importance as a method of functional assessment in Brazil and worldwide. In its most frequent applications, CPET consists in applying a gradually increasing intensity exercise until exhaustion or until the appearance of limiting symptoms and/or signs. The following parameters are measured: ventilation; oxygen consumption (VO2; carbon dioxide production (VCO2; and the other variables of conventional exercise testing. In addition, in specific situations, pulse oximetry and flow-volume loops during and after exertion are measured. The CPET provides joint data analysis that allows complete assessment of the cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular and metabolic systems during exertion, being considered gold standard for cardiorespiratory functional assessment.1-6 The CPET allows defining mechanisms related to low functional capacity that can cause symptoms, such as dyspnea, and correlate them with changes in the cardiovascular, pulmonary and skeletal muscle systems. Furthermore, it can be used to provide the prognostic assessment of patients with heart or lung diseases, and in the preoperative period, in addition to aiding in a more careful exercise prescription to healthy subjects, athletes and patients with heart or lung diseases. Similarly to CPET clinical use, its research also increases, with the publication of several scientific contributions from Brazilian researchers in high-impact journals. Therefore, this study aimed at providing a comprehensive review on the applicability of CPET to different clinical situations, in addition to serving as a practical guide for the interpretation of that test.

  8. Development and validation of a one-mile treadmill walk test to predict peak oxygen uptake in healthy adults ages 40 to 79 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pober, David M; Freedson, Patty S; Kline, Gregory M; McInnis, Kyle J; Rippe, James M

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the Rockport one-mile walk test equation to predict maximal oxygen uptake was valid for application to treadmill walking. When the Rockport model was found to be inappropriate, a new regression model was developed for predicting peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) from a one-mile treadmill walk. 304 healthy volunteers ages 40 to 79 years (mean age = 57.6 years, 154 men and 150 women) completed a VO2peak test and a one-mile treadmill walk. Stepwise regression was used to build a model for the relationship between VO2peak and a variety of predictor variables in a sub-sample development group (n = 154). This new model was then applied to a sub-sample validation group (n = 150). The new equation produced a correlation of 0.87, SEE = 4.7 ml x kg (-1) x min (-1) with a mean residual of 0.96 ml x kg (-1) x min (-1). The equation for predicting VO2peak developed in this investigation provides a means of assessing VO2peak that is easy to administer, allows for careful supervision of subjects, and can be completed at a low financial and temporal cost.

  9. Fitness, Fatness, and Mortality: The FIT (Henry Ford Exercise Testing) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Paul A; Blaha, Michael J; Keteyian, Steven J; Brawner, Clinton A; Al Rifai, Mahmoud; Dardari, Zeina A; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2016-09-01

    The combined influence of fitness and fatness on mortality risk in diverse populations has not been adequately explored. Our aim was to assess the relative impact of exercise capacity and body mass index (BMI) on all-cause mortality. We included 29,257 men and women (mean age 53 years; 27% African American) from The Henry Ford Exercise Testing (FIT) Project without cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus at baseline. All patients completed a symptom-limited maximal treadmill stress test between 1991 and 2009. Patients were grouped for analysis by exercise capacity (≥10 metabolic equivalents of task [METs] and mortality were assessed using Cox proportional hazard models. During a mean follow-up of 10.8 years, 1898 patients (6.5%) died. We observed a strong inverse association between exercise capacity (per 1 MET unit) and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 0.86 [0.85-0.88]). Body mass index (per 1 BMI unit) was inversely related to mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 0.98 [0.97-0.99]). In joint analysis, the highest mortality risk was in the mortality in this racially diverse population. Given the comparatively limited impact of BMI, more emphasis should be placed on measuring exercise capacity and developing strategies for its improvement in cardiovascular disease prevention programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Oral quercetin supplementation hampers skeletal muscle adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casuso, R A; Martínez-López, E J; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to test exercise-induced adaptations on skeletal muscle when quercetin is supplemented. Four groups of rats were tested: quercetin sedentary, quercetin exercised, placebo sedentary, and placebo exercised. Treadmill exercise training took place 5 days a week for 6 weeks. Quercetin groups ...

  11. The Hoff circuit test is more specific than an incremental treadmill test to assess endurance with the ball in youth soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, A M; Papoti, M; Da Silva, Asr; Barbieri, R A; Campos, E Z; Ferreira, E C; Loures, J P; Chamari, K

    2016-09-01

    The assessment of aerobic endurance is important for training prescription in soccer, and is usually measured by straight running without the ball on a track or treadmill. Due to the ball control and technical demands during a specific soccer test, the running speeds are likely to be lower compared to a continuous incremental test. The aim of the present study was to compare the heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and speeds corresponding to 2.0 mmol∙L(-1), 3.5 mmol∙L(-1), lactate threshold (Dmax method) and peak lactate determined in the laboratory and in the Hoff circuit soccer-specific test. Sixteen soccer players (16±1 years) underwent two incremental tests (laboratory and Hoff circuit tests). The speeds were significantly higher in the treadmill test than on the Hoff circuit (2.0 mmol∙L(-1): 9.5±1.2 and 8.1±1.0 km∙h(-1); 3.5 mmol∙L(-1): 12.0±1.2 and 10.2±1.1 km∙h(-1); Dmax: 11.4±1.4 and 9.3±0.4 km∙h(-1); peak lactate: 14.9±1.6 and 10.9±0.8 km∙h(-1)). The HR corresponding to 3.5 mmol∙L-1 was significantly higher on the Hoff circuit compared to the laboratory test (187.5±18.0 and 178.2±17.6 bpm, respectively; P <0.001), while the RPE at the last incremental stage was lower on the Hoff circuit (P < 0.01). The speeds during the Hoff specific soccer test and the HR corresponding to 2.0 mmol∙L(-1), 3.5 mmol∙L(-1) and Dmax/threshold were different compared with the laboratory test. The present study shows that it is possible to assess submaximal endurance related variables specifically in soccer players.

  12. Diagnostic Value of Electrocardiogram in Predicting Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Stress Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Ali; Ebdali, Reyhaneh Takalloo; Sajjadi, Seyed Sajed; Golnezhad, Reza

    2016-08-01

    It is believed that an exaggerated blood pressure response (EBPR) to exercise stress test is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events. It is also assumed that QT dispersion (QT-d), which was originally proposed to measure the spatial dispersion of ventricular recovery times, may have a relationship to cardiovascular events. The objective of this study was to examine the difference of changes in QT-d, Maxi-QT, Mini-QT, and QT-c (corrected QT interval) of the electrocardiogram in two groups of patients with exaggerated blood pressure responses (EBPR group) and normal responses (control group) to exercise testing. Also, the diagnostic value of each of these criteria in the prediction of EBPR was studied. This cross-sectional study was conducted from May 2015 to February 2016 on patients suspected of coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing exercise testing who had been referred to Ghaem and Imam Reza hospitals in Mashhad (Iran). All patients underwent a treadmill exercise test with the 12-lead ECG, which was optically scanned and digitized for analysis of QT-d, QT max, and QT min. Patients were divided into two groups of normal and EBPR to exercise testing. QT changes of ECG were compared between the two groups, and the diagnostic accuracy of QT variables for prediction of EBPR to exercise testing was studied. A multiple linear regression analysis (MLR), Pearson Chi-qquare, independent samples t-test, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used as statistical methods in IBM SPSS version 19. Sixty patients (55% male) with a mean age of 50.48 ± 10.89 years were studied in two groups of normal (n=30) and exaggerated blood pressure response (n=30) to exercise testing. Maximum QT and QT dispersion were statistically different in individuals' exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise stress test (p exercise testing. Also, a significant difference in maxi-QT and QT-d was observed between two groups of patients with normal and EBPR during

  13. Effects of acute caffeinated coffee consumption on energy utilization related to glucose and lipid oxidation from short submaximal treadmill exercise in sedentary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelarungrayub, Donrawee; Sallepan, Maliwan; Charoenwattana, Sukanya

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the short term effect of coffee drinking on energy utilization in sedentary men. This study was performed in healthy sedentary men, who were randomized into three groups, control (n = 6), decaffeinated (n = 10), and caffeine (n = 10). The caffeine dose in coffee was rechecked and calculated for individual volunteers at 5 mg/kg. Baseline before drinking, complete blood count (CBC), glucose, antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxide, and caffeine in blood was evaluated. After drinking coffee for 1 hr, the submaximal exercise test with a modified Bruce protocol was carried out, and the VO2 and RER were analyzed individually at 80% maximal heart rate, then the blood was repeat evaluated. Three groups showed a nonsignificant difference in CBC results and physical characteristics. The caffeine group showed significant changes in all parameters; higher VO2 levels, (P = 0.037) and lower RER (P = 0.047), when compared to the baseline. Furthermore, the glucose level after exercise test increased significantly (P = 0.033) as well as lipid peroxide levels (P = 0.005), whereas antioxidant capacity did not change significantly (P = 0.759), when compared to the before exercise testing. In addition, the blood caffeine level also increased only in the caffeine group (P = 0.008). Short consumption of caffeinated coffee (5 mg/kg of caffeine), improves energy utilization and relates to glucose derivation and lipid oxidation.

  14. Reference Standards for Cardiorespiratory Fitness Measured With Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing Using Cycle Ergometry: Data From the Fitness Registry and the Importance of Exercise National Database (FRIEND) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Leonard A; Imboden, Mary T; Arena, Ross; Myers, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    The importance of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is well established. This report provides newly developed standards for CRF reference values derived from cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) using cycle ergometry in the United States. Ten laboratories in the United States experienced in CPX administration with established quality control procedures contributed to the "Fitness Registry and the Importance of Exercise: A National Database" (FRIEND) Registry from April 2014 through May 2016. Data from 4494 maximal (respiratory exchange ratio, ≥1.1) cycle ergometer tests from men and women (20-79 years) from 27 states, without cardiovascular disease, were used to develop these references values. Percentiles of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) for men and women were determined for each decade from age 20 years through age 79 years. Comparisons of VO2max were made to reference data established with CPX data from treadmill data in the FRIEND Registry and previously published reports. As expected, there were significant differences between sex and age groups for VO2max (Pstandard differences from treadmill testing reference values. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. All rights reserved.

  15. Does treadmill training improve lower-extremity tasks in Parkinson disease? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtais, Yesim; Kutlay, Sehim; Tur, Birkan Sonel; Gok, Haydar; Akbostanci, Cenk

    2008-05-01

    To investigate whether gait training with treadmill improves functional tasks of lower extremities in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Randomized controlled trial including two groups, the treadmill training group and the nonintervention group. University hospital. Thirty consecutive patients diagnosed with idiopathic PD, who were on stable regimens of antiparkinsonian medication, able to walk independently, and had not participated in a rehabilitation program in the previous 3 months. Patients with severe cognitive impairments or severe musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, neurologic, or other systemic disorders were excluded. Twenty-four patients completed the study. Group I attended a training program on a treadmill for 6 weeks, and group II served as the control group. Both groups were instructed in home mobility exercises. The primary study outcome measures were timed functional lower-extremity tasks (walking at a corridor, U-turn, turning around a chair, stairs, standing on one foot, standing from a chair), and secondary outcome measures were exercise test and patient's global assessment. Assessments were performed at baseline and at the end of the study. There were significant improvements in functional lower-extremity tests, exercise test parameters, and patients' global assessment in group I, whereas no significant improvements were observed in group II. Even though long-term effects remain unknown and the study sample was small, it was concluded that treadmill training in PD patients led to improvements in lower-extremity tasks, thus improving patients' physical well-being in daily life.

  16. Relation of Risk of Atrial Fibrillation With Systolic Blood Pressure Response During Exercise Stress Testing (from the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Wesley T; Qureshi, Waqas T; Blaha, Michael J; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Brawner, Clinton A; Nasir, Khurram; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2015-12-15

    Decreases in systolic blood pressure during exercise may predispose to arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) because of underlying abnormal autonomic tone. We examined the association between systolic blood pressure response and incident AF in 57,442 (mean age 54 ± 13 years, 47% women, and 29% black) patients free of baseline AF who underwent exercise treadmill stress testing from the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing project. Exercise systolic blood pressure response was examined as a categorical variable across clinically relevant categories (>20 mm Hg: referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg, and ≤0 mm Hg) and per 1-SD decrease. Cox regression, adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, medications, history of coronary heart disease, history of heart failure, and metabolic equivalent of task achieved, was used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between systolic blood pressure response and incident AF. Over a median follow-up of 5.0 years, a total of 3,381 cases (5.9%) of AF were identified. An increased risk of AF was observed with decreasing systolic blood pressure response (>20 mm Hg: HR 1.0, referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg: HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.99, 1.20; ≤0 mm Hg: HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.40). Similar results were obtained per 1-SD decrease in systolic blood pressure response (HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.12). The results were consistent when stratified by age, sex, race, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. In conclusion, our results suggest that a decreased systolic blood pressure response during exercise may identify subjects who are at risk for developing AF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Validation of the step test and exercise prescription tool for adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Emily; Stuckey, Melanie I; Petrella, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of diabetes highlight the value of physical activity for improving clinical markers and risk factors for diabetes. The use of tools like the Step Test and Exercise Prescription (STEP) in clinical practice facilitates chronic disease management and prevention through the promotion of healthy physical activity. The validity and reliability of STEP has been established previously for use with adults 65 to 85 years of age. The purpose of this study was to test the validity of the prediction equation for VO₂max from the STEP tool for use with adults older than 65 years. Forty participants completed both the predictive self-paced VO₂max stepping protocol from the STEP tool, and a maximal graded exercise treadmill test with breath-by-breath analysis of expired gases. Tests were completed in random order, and participants rested between tests until blood pressure returned to baseline. The average age of the sample was 43±14 years. There was a strong relationship between predicted VO₂max from STEP and direct measures of VO₂max from the maximal treadmill test in the present study (r=.78, pexercise prescription tool appropriate for use by various health professionals in clinical practice. The prediction equation for VO₂max from the STEP tool is valid for use with adults 18 to 85 years of age. However, more research is warranted to explore age corrections to the prediction algorithm among younger adults. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Software for interpreting cardiopulmonary exercise tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corry David B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET has become an important modality for the evaluation and management of patients with a diverse array of medical problems. However, interpreting these tests is often difficult and time consuming, requiring significant expertise. Methods We created a computer software program (XINT that assists in CPET interpretation. The program uses an integrative approach as recommended in the Official Statement of the American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians (ATS/ACCP on Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing. In this paper we discuss the principles behind the software. We also provide the detailed logic in an accompanying file (Additional File 1. The actual program and the open source code are also available free over the Internet at http://www.xint.org. For convenience, the required download files can also be accessed from this article. Additional file 1 XINTlogic. This file provides the detailed logic used by the XINT program. The variable names are described in Table 1. The actual source code may also be read directly simply by opening the source code with a text editor. Click here for file Results To test the clinical usefulness of XINT, we present the computer generated interpretations of the case studies discussed in the ATS/ACCP document in another accompanying file (Additional File 2. We believe the interpretations are consistent with the document's criteria and the interpretations given by the expert panel. Additional file 2 XINTinterpretations. These are the XINT generated reports based on the five examples provided in the ATS/ACCP statement on cardiopulmonary exercise testing 1. Click here for file Conclusion Computers have become an integral part of modern life. Peer-reviewed scientific journals are now able to present not just medical concepts and experimental studies, but actual functioning medical interpretive software. This has enormous potential to improve medical

  19. Incremental exercise test performance with and without a respiratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Despite their widespread use in exercise testing, few data are available on the effect of wearing respiratory gas collection (RGC) systems on exercise test performance. Industrial- type mask wear is thought to impair exercise performance through increased respiratory dead space, flow resistance and/or discomfort ...

  20. Lessons from regadenoson and low-level treadmill/regadenoson myocardial perfusion imaging: initial clinical experience in 1263 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Deborah H; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Young, Ron; Houghtaling, Penny; Lieber, Elizabeth; Menon, Venu; Brunken, Richard C; Jaber, Wael A

    2010-10-01

    Regadenoson is a pharmacologic stress agent, which was recently approved for stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Aside from the initial protocol-driven studies, clinical experience with this stress agent is limited. Furthermore, low-level treadmill testing in a large population with regadenoson has not previously been evaluated. We describe our experience in the first 6 months of routine inpatient and outpatient clinical use. Between 7/1/08 and 12/04/08, 1263 patients underwent regadenoson stress testing (596 with low-level treadmill, 667 supine). Past medical history, clinical symptoms during stress, and changes in systolic blood pressure were prospectively recorded. Low-level treadmill testing was well tolerated in our patient population. Shortness of breath, dizziness, palpitations, transient heart block, and nausea were less frequent when patients were able to exercise. In our population, 51% experienced a drop in systolic blood pressure greater than 10 mmHg, with 9% experiencing a decrease in more than 30 mmHg. This decrease in blood pressure was more common in patients who underwent low-level treadmill testing vs those that were supine (56% vs 47%, P-value Regadenoson MPI was well tolerated. There were no procedural deaths. Regadenoson and Regadenoson combined with low level exercise MPI appear to be safe and well tolerated. An asymptomatic fall in systolic blood pressure seems to be more common in patients who undergo low-level treadmill testing.

  1. Test retest reliability and minimal detectable change of a novel submaximal graded exercise test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James D; Bandy, William D; Whittemore, Joe D

    2011-05-01

    Measurement of graded exercise test duration is clinically important and can be assessed by maximal graded exercise testing. Yet, limitations of maximal graded exercise testing exist. An alternative to maximal graded exercise testing is submaximal graded exercise testing. However, no studies have investigated the reliability of a submaximal graded exercise test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration. The purpose of this study was to determine the test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change (MDC) of a novel submaximal graded exercise test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration. Fifteen people (4 men, 11 women) with a mean age of 26.20 years (SD = 9.04) participated in this study. A novel submaximal graded exercise test was used to measure graded exercise test duration for each participant. Endpoints of the test were either 85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate or voluntarily stopping the test, whichever endpoint occurred first. Heart rate and graded exercise test duration were constantly measured throughout the test. Graded exercise test duration was defined as the total duration (minutes) of the test. For all participants, the submaximal graded exercise test was conducted at baseline and 48-72 hours thereafter. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the test-retest reliability of the test in determining graded exercise test duration was 0.94 (95% CI = 0.83-0.98). The MDC of the test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration was 0.86 minutes. The results suggest that clinicians can use this novel submaximal graded exercise test to reliably measure graded exercise test duration with a measurement error, as expressed by the MDC, of 0.86 minutes.

  2. Translation of submaximal exercise test responses to exercise prescription using the Talk Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Carl; Porcari, John P; Gibson, Mark; Wright, Glenn; Greany, John; Talati, Neepa; Recalde, Pedro

    2009-12-01

    The exercise intensity at the Talk Test (TT) has been shown to be highly correlated with objective physiological markers, a useful outcome marker in patients with heart disease, a useful tool for avoiding exertional ischemia, and responsive to both positive and negative changes in exercise capacity. This randomized observational study evaluated the ability of the intensity at the TT during exercise testing to define absolute training workloads. Sedentary adults (n = 14) performed an incremental Balke type exercise test (3.0-3.5 mph at 0% grade, +2% grade every 2 minutes). Heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and TT were evaluated at each stage. Subsequently, the subjects performed 3 x 20-minute exercise bouts with the workload over the last 10 minutes of each bout equal to the absolute intensity at the stage preceding the LP (LP-1), at the last positive stage of the TT (LP), and at the first equivocal stage of the TT (EQ). During LP-1, LP, and EQ, HR was 140 +/- 23, 151 +/- 20, and 160 +/- 21 bpm, or 73 +/- 11, 79 +/- 9, and 82 +/- 9 % HRmax; RPE (CR scale) was 3.6 +/- 1.5, 4.4 +/- 1.8, and 6.3 +/- 2.2. The TT Score-ranked as 1 = comfortable speech, 2 = slightly uncomfortable speech, and 3 = speech not comfortable-was 1.4 +/- 0.5, 1.8 +/- 0.4, and 2.6 +/- 0.5 LP-1, LP, and at EQ, LP, respectively. The results suggest that to prescribe absolute training intensity from the TT and to get appropriate HR, RPE, and TT responses in sedentary individuals during training, the workload needs to be based on the intensity approximately 1 stage (approximately 1.0-1.2 metabolic equivalents) below the LP stage observed during an incremental test.

  3. Ergometric performance during exercise training in men with intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figoni, Stephen F; Kunkel, Charles F; Scremin, A M Erika; Scremin, Oscar U; Cohen, Babak

    2010-06-01

    To determine and describe changes in weekly work, power, exercise times, and recovery times during an exercise training intervention in men with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and intermittent calf claudication. Tracking of weekly exercise training parameters involved repeated measures over time in one group of participants. Other outcomes of this pilot study used a one-group, pretest-posttest design. Tertiary-care medical center. Fifteen male veterans (mean age, 69 years) with Fontaine stage IIa PAD and classic intermittent calf claudication. Participants completed graded treadmill exercise tests before and after intervention from which maximal walking power was calculated. Work, power, and exercise and recovery times for each exercise training session were computed and averaged for each week. The intervention consisted of an intensive 3-month exercise training program involving walking and calf muscle exercises: 3 sessions per week at the clinic (treadmill walking and calf ergometry) and 2 sessions per week at home (free walking and standing heel raises). After training, participants increased treadmill maximal walking power from 220 to 414 W (by 87%). Treadmill and calf exercise work, power, and exercise time per session increased linearly during 13 weeks of training, whereas recovery time per session of treadmill exercise decreased. During the same period, treadmill and calf exercise training power outputs increased by averages of 227% and 92%, respectively. Calculation of work and power during exercise training can be used to track progress quantitatively at short intervals. Weekly linear increases in training work and power per exercise session suggest that optimal intervention duration may be longer than 3 months for men with PAD and intermittent calf claudication. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Monitoring Training Progress During Exercise Training in Cancer Survivors : A Submaximal Exercise Test as an Alternative for a Maximal Exercise Test?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, Anne M.; van Weert, Ellen; Korstjens, Irene; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E.; van der Schans, Cees P.; Zonderland, Maria L.; Mesters, Ilse; van den Borne, Bart; Ros, Wynand J.

    May AM, van Weert E, Korstjens 1, Hoekstra-Weebers JE, van der Schans CP, Zonderland ML, Mesters 1, van den Borne B, Ros WJ. Monitoring training progress during exercise training in cancer survivors: a submaximal exercise test as an alternative for a maximal exercise test? Arch Phys Med Rehabil

  5. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Risk of Incident Atrial Fibrillation: Results From the Henry Ford Exercise Testing (FIT) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Waqas T; Alirhayim, Zaid; Blaha, Michael J; Juraschek, Stephen P; Keteyian, Steven J; Brawner, Clinton A; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2015-05-26

    Poor cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the relationship between CRF and atrial fibrillation (AF) is less clear. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the association between CRF and incident AF in a large, multiracial cohort that underwent graded exercise treadmill testing. From 1991 to 2009, a total of 64 561 adults (mean age, 54.5±12.7 years; 46% female; 64% white) without AF underwent exercise treadmill testing at a tertiary care center. Baseline demographic and clinical variables were collected. Incident AF was ascertained by use of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code 427.31 and confirmed by linkage to medical claim files. Nested, multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the independent association of CRF with incident AF. During a median follow-up of 5.4 years (interquartile range, 3-9 years), 4616 new cases of AF were diagnosed. After adjustment for potential confounders, 1 higher metabolic equivalent achieved during treadmill testing was associated with a 7% lower risk of incident AF (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.94; P<0.001). This relationship remained significant after adjustment for incident coronary artery disease (hazard ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-0.93; P<0.001). The magnitude of the inverse association between CRF and incident AF was greater among obese compared with nonobese individuals (P for interaction=0.02). There is a graded, inverse relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness and incident AF, especially among obese patients. Future studies should examine whether changes in fitness increase or decrease risk of atrial fibrillation. This association was stronger for obese compared with nonobese, especially among obese patients. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Home-based treadmill training improved seminal quality in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosety-Rodriguez, M; Rosety, J M; Fornieles, G; Rosety, M A; Diaz, A J; Rosety, I; Rodríguez-Pareja, A; Rosety, M; Ordonez, F J; Elosegui, S

    2014-11-01

    This was the first study conducted to determine the influence of home-based treadmill training on seminal quality in adults with type 2 diabetes. Sixty sedentary adults with type 2 diabetes volunteered for the current study. Thirty were randomly allocated to the intervention group and performed a a 14-week, home-based, treadmill training program, 3 sessions per week, consisting of a warm-up (10-15min), 40min treadmill exercise at a work intensity of 55-70% of peak heart rate (increasing by 2.5% each two weeks) measured during a maximal treadmill test, and cooling-down (5-10min). The control group included 30, age and BMI matched adults with type 2 diabetes who did not take part in any training program. Seminal quality analysis included semen volume, sperm concentration, motility and normal morphologic features. Furthermore, total antioxidant status (TAS) as well as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity were assessed in seminal plasma. This protocol was approved by an Institutional Ethics Committee. The home-based treadmill training significantly increased sperm concentration as well as percentages of total sperm motility and normal spermatozoa. Furthermore, TAS and GPX activity were increased after the completion of the training program. No significant changes in any of the measured variables were found in the control group. Home-based treadmill training improved seminal quality in adults with type 2 diabetes. A secondary finding was that seminal antioxidant defense system was significantly increased after being exercised. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Physiological responses of young thoroughbred horses to intermittent high-intensity treadmill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Hajime; Matsui, Akira; Hada, Tetsuro; Jones, James H

    2013-08-17

    Training of young Thoroughbred horses must balance development of cardiopulmonary function and aerobic capacity with loading of the musculoskeletal system that can potentially cause structural damage and/or lameness. High-speed equine treadmills are sometimes used to supplement exercise on a track in the training of young Thoroughbreds because the horse can run at high speeds but without the added weight of a rider. We tested the hypothesis that intermittent high-intensity exercise on a treadmill of young Thoroughbred horses entering training can enhance development of aerobic capacity (VO2max) and running performance more than conventional training under saddle, and do so without causing lameness. Twelve yearling Thoroughbreds trained for 8 months with conventional riding (C) only, conventional riding plus a short (2 month, S) interval of once-per-week high-intensity treadmill exercise, or a long (8 month, L) interval of once-per-week high-intensity treadmill exercise. Three treadmill exercise tests evaluated VO2max, oxygen transport and running performance variables in June of the yearling year (only for L), October of the yearling year and April of the 2-year-old year. No horses experienced lameness during the study. Aerobic capacity increased in all groups after training. In both October and April, VO2max in L was higher than in C, but did not differ between L and S or S and C. Running speeds eliciting VO2max also increased in all groups after training, with S (809±3 m/s) and L (804±9 m/s) higher than C (764±27 m/s). Maximum heart rate decreased for all groups after training. Hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration increased for L throughout training. Young Thoroughbred horses can increase aerobic capacity and running performance more than by strictly using track training under saddle with the addition of intermittent high-intensity treadmill exercise, and they can do so without experiencing lameness. This finding suggests that young racehorses might be able

  8. A new proposal to guide velocity and inclination in the ramp protocol for the treadmill ergometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Odwaldo Barbosa e

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To suggest criteria to guide protocol prescription in ramp treadmill testing, according to sex and age, based on velocity, inclination, and max VO2 reached by the population studied. METHODS: Prospective study describing heart rate (HR, time, velocity, inclination, and VO2 estimated at maximum effort of 1840 individuals from 4 to 79 years old, who performed a treadmill test (TT according to the ramp protocol. A paired Student t test was used to assess the difference between predicted and reached max VO2, calculated according to the formulas of the "American College of Sports Medicine". RESULTS: Submaximal HR was surpassed in 90.1% of the examinations, with a mean time of 10.0±2.0 minute. Initial and peak inclination velocity of the exercise and max VO2 were inversely proportional to age and were greater in male patients. Predicted Max VO2 was significantly lower than that reached in all patients, except for female children and adolescents (age < 20 years old. CONCLUSION: Use of velocity, inclination, and maximum VO2 actually reached, as a criterion in prescribing the ramp protocol may help in the performance of exercise in treadmill testing. The ramp protocol was well accepted in all age groups and sexes with exercise time within the programmed 8 to 12 minutes.

  9. Characteristic findings of exercise ECG test, perfusion SPECT and coronary angiography in patients with exercise induced myocardial stunning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Seo, Ji Hyoung; Bae, Jin Ho; Jeong, Shin Young; Park, Hun Sik; Lee, Jae Tae; Chae, Shung Chull; Lee, Kyu Bo [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-01

    Transient wall motion abnormality and contractile dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV) can be observed in patients with coronary artery disease due to post-stress myocardial stunning. To understand clinical characteristics of stress induced LV dysfunction, we have compared the findings of exercise stress test, myocardial perfusion SPECT and coronary angiography between subjects with and without post-stress LV dysfunction. Among subjects who underwent exercise stress test, myocardial perfusion SPECT and coronary angiography within a month of interval, we enrolled 36 patients with post-stress LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was {>=}5% lower than rest (stunning group) and 16 patients with difference of post-stress and rest LVEF was lesser than 1% (non-stunning group) for this study. Treadmill exercise stress gated myocardial perfusion SPECT was performed with dual head SPECT camera using 740 MBq Tc-99m MIBI and coronary angiography was also performed by conventional Judkins method. Stunning group had a significantly higher incidence of hypercholesterolemia than non-stunning group(45.5 vs 7.1%, p=0.01). Stunning group also had higher incidence of diabetes mellitus and lower incidence of hypertension, but these were not statistically significant. Stunning group had larger and more severe perfusion defect in stress perfusion myocardial SPECT than non-stunning group(extent 18.2 vs 9.2%, p=0.029; severity 13.5 vs 6.9, p=0.040). Stunning group also had higher degree of reversibility of perfusion defect, higher incidence of positive exercise stress test and higher incidence of having severe stenosis(80{approx}99%) in coronary angiography than non-stunning group, but these were not statistically significant. In stunning group, all of 4 patients without perfusion defect had significant coronary artery stenosis and had received revascularization treatment. Patients with post-stress LV dysfunction had larger and more severe perfusion defect and severe coronary artery stenosis than

  10. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test: Background, Applicability and Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdy, Artur Haddad; Ritt, Luiz Eduardo Fonteles; Stein, Ricardo; Araújo, Claudio Gil Soares de; Milani, Mauricio; Meneghelo, Romeu Sérgio; Ferraz, Almir Sérgio; Hossri, Carlos; Almeida, Antonio Eduardo Monteiro de; Fernandes-Silva, Miguel Morita; Serra, Salvador Manoel

    2016-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) has been gaining importance as a method of functional assessment in Brazil and worldwide. In its most frequent applications, CPET consists in applying a gradually increasing intensity exercise until exhaustion or until the appearance of limiting symptoms and/or signs. The following parameters are measured: ventilation; oxygen consumption (VO2); carbon dioxide production (VCO2); and the other variables of conventional exercise testing. In addition, in specific situations, pulse oximetry and flow-volume loops during and after exertion are measured. The CPET provides joint data analysis that allows complete assessment of the cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular and metabolic systems during exertion, being considered gold standard for cardiorespiratory functional assessment.1-6 The CPET allows defining mechanisms related to low functional capacity that can cause symptoms, such as dyspnea, and correlate them with changes in the cardiovascular, pulmonary and skeletal muscle systems. Furthermore, it can be used to provide the prognostic assessment of patients with heart or lung diseases, and in the preoperative period, in addition to aiding in a more careful exercise prescription to healthy subjects, athletes and patients with heart or lung diseases. Similarly to CPET clinical use, its research also increases, with the publication of several scientific contributions from Brazilian researchers in high-impact journals. Therefore, this study aimed at providing a comprehensive review on the applicability of CPET to different clinical situations, in addition to serving as a practical guide for the interpretation of that test. Resumo O teste cardiopulmonar de exercício (TCPE) vem ganhando importância crescente como método de avaliação funcional tanto no Brasil quanto no Mundo. Nas suas aplicações mais frequentes, o teste consiste em submeter o indivíduo a um exercício de intensidade gradativamente crescente até a exaustão ou o

  11. ST-Segment Depression in Hyperventilation Indicates a False Positive Exercise Test in Patients with Mitral Valve Prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas P. Michaelides

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Mitral valve prolapse (MVP is a known cause for false positive exercise test (ET. The purpose of this study was to establish additional electrocardiographic criteria to distinguish the false positive exercise results in patients with MVP. Methods. We studied 218 consecutive patients ( years, 103 males with MVP (according to echocardiographic study, and positive treadmill ET was performed due to multiple cardiovascular risk factors or angina-like symptoms. A coronary angiography was performed to detect coronary artery disease (CAD. Results. From 218 patients, 90 (group A presented with normal coronary arteries according to the angiography (false positive ET while the rest 128 (group B presented with CAD. ST-segment depression in hyperventilation phase was present in 54 patients of group A (60% while only in 14 patients of group B (11%, . Conclusions. Presence of ST-segment depression in hyperventilation phase favors a false positive ET in patients with MVP.

  12. Normal values for cardiopulmonary exercise testing in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Harkel, A.D.J.; Takken, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/184586674; van Osch-Gevers, M.; Helbing, W.A.

    BACKGROUND: A reference set of data of normal values of newly developed cardiopulmonary parameters of exercise testing in an 8-18-year-old population is lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed in 175 healthy school children (8-18 years old). Continuous

  13. Chronotropic Incompetence and Risk of Atrial Fibrillation: The Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Wesley T; Qureshi, Waqas T; Blaha, Michael J; Dardari, Zeina A; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Brawner, Clinton A; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2016-11-01

    To examine the association between chronotropic incompetence and incident atrial fibrillation (AF). Patients with inadequate heart rate response during exercise may have abnormalities in sinus node function or autonomic tone that predispose to the development of AF. We examined the association between heart rate response and incident AF in 57,402 (mean age=54±13 years, 47% female, 64% white) patients free of baseline AF who underwent exercise-treadmill stress testing from the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) Project. Age-predicted maximum heart rate (pMHR) values <85% and chronotropic index values <80% were used to define chronotropic incompetence. Cox regression, adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, medications, coronary heart disease, heart failure, and metabolic equivalent of task achieved, was used to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between chronotropic incompetence and incident AF. Over a median follow-up of 5.0 years (25th-75th percentiles=2.6, 7.8), a total of 3,395 (5.9%) participants developed AF. pMHR values <85% were associated with an increased risk for AF development (HR=1.33, 95%CI=1.22, 1.44). Chronotropic index values <80% also were associated with an increased risk of AF (HR=1.28, 95%CI=1.19, 1.38). The associations of pMHR and chronotropic index with AF remained significant with varying cut-off points to define chronotropic incompetence. Our analysis suggests that patients with inadequate heart rate response during exercise have an increased risk for developing AF.

  14. Exercise testing in hypertensive patients taking different angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angela M. Q. Carreira

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare blood pressure response to dynamic exercise in hypertensive patients taking trandolapril or captopril. METHODS: We carried out a prospective, randomized, blinded study with 40 patients with primary hypertension and no other associated disease. The patients were divided into 2 groups (n=20, paired by age, sex, race, and body mass index, and underwent 2 symptom-limited exercise tests on a treadmill before and after 30 days of treatment with captopril (75 to 150 mg/day or trandolapril (2 to 4 mg/day. RESULTS: The groups were similar prior to treatment (p<0.05, and both drugs reduced blood pressure at rest (p<0.001. During treatment, trandolapril caused a greater increase in functional capacity (+31% than captopril (+17%; p=0.01 did, and provided better blood pressure control during exercise, observed as a reduction in the variation of systolic blood pressure/MET (trandolapril: 10.7±1.9 mmHg/U vs 7.4±1.2 mmHg/U, p=0.02; captopril: 9.1±1.4 mmHg/U vs 11.4±2.5 mmHg/U, p=0.35, a reduction in peak diastolic blood pressure (trandolapril: 116.8±3.1 mmHg vs 108.1±2.5 mmHg, p=0.003; captopril: 118.2±3.1 mmHg vs 115.8±3.3 mmHg, p=0.35, and a reduction in the interruption of the tests due to excessive elevation in blood pressure (trandolapril: 50% vs 15%, p=0.009; captopril: 50% vs 45%, p=0.32. CONCLUSION: Monotherapy with trandolapril is more effective than that with captopril to control blood pressure during exercise in hypertensive patients.

  15. Graded Maximal Exercise Testing to Assess Mouse Cardio-Metabolic Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosino, Jennifer M; Heiss, Valerie J; Maurya, Santosh K; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Periasamy, Muthu; LaFountain, Richard A; Wilson, Jacob M; Simonetti, Orlando P; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2016-01-01

    Functional assessments of cardiovascular fitness (CVF) are needed to establish animal models of dysfunction, test the effects of novel therapeutics, and establish the cardio-metabolic phenotype of mice. In humans, the graded maximal exercise test (GXT) is a standardized diagnostic for assessing CVF and mortality risk. These tests, which consist of concurrent staged increases in running speed and inclination, provide diagnostic cardio-metabolic parameters, such as, VO2max, anaerobic threshold, and metabolic crossover. Unlike the human-GXT, published mouse treadmill tests have set, not staged, increases in inclination as speed progress until exhaustion (PXT). Additionally, they often lack multiple cardio-metabolic parameters. Here, we developed a mouse-GXT with the intent of improving mouse-exercise testing sensitivity and developing translatable parameters to assess CVF in healthy and dysfunctional mice. The mouse-GXT, like the human-GXT, incorporated staged increases in inclination, speed, and intensity; and, was designed by considering imitations of the PXT and differences between human and mouse physiology. The mouse-GXT and PXTs were both tested in healthy mice (C57BL/6J, FVBN/J) to determine their ability to identify cardio-metabolic parameters (anaerobic threshold, VO2max, metabolic crossover) observed in human-GXTs. Next, theses assays were tested on established diet-induced (obese-C57BL/6J) and genetic (cardiac isoform Casq2-/-) models of cardiovascular dysfunction. Results showed that both tests reported VO2max and provided reproducible data about performance. Only the mouse-GXT reproducibly identified anaerobic threshold, metabolic crossover, and detected impaired CVF in dysfunctional models. Our findings demonstrated that the mouse-GXT is a sensitive, non-invasive, and cost-effective method for assessing CVF in mice. This new test can be used as a functional assessment to determine the cardio-metabolic phenotype of various animal models or the effects of

  16. Novel mechanistic insights into treadmill exercise based rescue of social defeat-induced anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Patki, Gaurav; Solanki, Naimesh; Atrooz, Fatin; Ansari, Amber; Allam, Farida; Jannise, Brittany; Maturi, Jaganmohan; Salim, Samina

    2014-01-01

    Social defeat (SD) induced stress causes physiological and behavioral deficits in rodents, including depression and anxiety-like behaviors, as well as memory impairment. Anxiolytic and mood elevating effects of physical exercise are also known. However, rescue effect of physical exercise in social defeat-induced anxiety, depression or memory impairment has not been addressed. Role of epigenetic mechanisms that potentially contribute to these rescue or protective effects are also not known. Pr...

  17. Treadmill exercise improves short-term memory by enhancing hippocampal cell proliferation in quinolinic acid-induced Huntington?s disease rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, You-Mi; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ko, Il-Gyu; Jin, Jun-Jang; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Tae-Wook; Kim, Dong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Huntington?s disease (HD) is an inherited genetic disorder, characterized by cognitive dysfunction and abnormal body movements called chorea. Quinolinic acid (QA) is an endogenous metabolite of tryptophan in the kynurenine pathway. QA-induced alterations are similar to the symptoms of HD patients. Physical exercise has beneficial effects on the brain functions. Exercise increases production of neurotrophic factors in the brain and improves learning ability and memory function. In the present ...

  18. Metabolic cost of running is greater on a treadmill with a stiffer running platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A H; McKerrow, Alexander D; Kohn, Tertius A

    2017-08-01

    Exercise testing on motorised treadmills provides valuable information about running performance and metabolism; however, the impact of treadmill type on these tests has not been investigated. This study compared the energy demand of running on two laboratory treadmills: an HP Cosmos (C) and a Quinton (Q) model, with the latter having a 4.5 times stiffer running platform. Twelve experienced runners ran identical bouts on these treadmills at a range of four submaximal velocities (reported data is for the velocity that approximated 75-81% VO 2max ). The stiffer treadmill elicited higher oxygen consumption (C: 46.7 ± 3.8; Q: 50.1 ± 4.3 ml·kg -1 · min -1 ), energy expenditure (C: 16.0 ± 2.5; Q: 17.7 ± 2.9 kcal · min -1 ), carbohydrate oxidation (C: 9.6 ± 3.1; Q: 13.0 ± 3.9 kcal · min -1 ), heart rate (C: 155 ± 16; Q: 163 ± 16 beats · min -1 ) and rating of perceived exertion (C: 13.8 ± 1.2; Q: 14.7 ± 1.2), but lower fat oxidation (C: 6.4 ± 2.3; Q: 4.6 ± 2.5 kcal · min -1 ) (all analysis of variance treadmill comparisons P running depending on the running platform stiffness.

  19. Treadmill exercise improves fitness and reduces craving and use of cocaine in individuals with concurrent cocaine and tobacco-use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Garza, Richard; Yoon, Jin H; Thompson-Lake, Daisy G Y; Haile, Colin N; Eisenhofer, Joel D; Newton, Thomas F; Mahoney, James J

    2016-11-30

    Exercise may be a useful treatment for substance use disorders. Participants (N=24) included treatment-seeking individuals with concurrent cocaine and tobacco-use disorder (cigarette smokers). Participants were randomized to either running or walking (30min per session, 3 times per week) or sitting (control condition) for 4 consecutive weeks. Several metrics indicated significant differences among runners, walkers, and sitters during sessions, including mean distance covered and calories burned. In addition, remote physiological monitoring showed that the groups differed significantly according to mean maximum heart rate (HR), respiration, and locomotor activity. Across the 4-week study, exercise improved fitness measures including significantly decreasing resting HR. Though not statistically significant, exercise improved abstinence from cocaine and increased self-reports of no cocaine use in last 24h. In general, reductions in tobacco use and craving were not as robust. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the effects of a multi-week exercise program in individuals with concurrent cocaine and tobacco-use disorder. The data clearly show significant improvements in basic fitness measures and several indices reveal that exercise improved both self-report and biochemically verified reports of cocaine abstinence. Taken together, the data from this study provide preliminary evidence for the efficacy of exercise for improving fitness and reducing cocaine use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Physiological responses to a tap dance choreography: comparisons with graded exercise test and prescription recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Samantha M L; Simões, Herbert G; Moreira, Sergio R; Lima, Ricardo M; Almeida, Jeeser A; Ribeiro, Fabiana M R; Puga, Guilherme M; Campbell, Carmen S G

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the physiological responses to a tap dance choreography and to compare with those observed during a maximal treadmill exercise test, in tap dancers. Eight women (19.6 +/- 2.4 years; 162.3 +/- 4.4 cm; 54.0 +/- 2.3 kg; 20.5 +/- 1.4 kg.m; and 5.1 +/- 2.6 years of tap dance training) were submitted to the following procedures: (a) graded exercise test (GXT) on a treadmill until volitional exhaustion with 0.8 km.h of increment at each 3 and 1 minute of interval between stages and (b) tap dance choreography (TAP)-"The Shim Sham Shimmy"-consisting of 9 stages of 3 minutes with 1-minute rest between stages. Expired gas analyses were performed in all experimental sessions, providing breath-by-breath values for respiratory exchange rate (RER), oxygen uptake (VO(2)), and carbon dioxide production (CO2). Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were also measured. During the rest period between stages, blood samples (25 microl) were collected from the ear lobe for lactate threshold (LT) determination. It was observed that at the end of the TAP, subjects achieved an average of 83.8 +/- 6.2% of the HRmax and 68.9 +/- 11.3% of the VO(2)max, both previously identified in the GXT. The choreography demanded 204.7 +/- 31.3 kcal, an average RER of 0.88 +/- 0.05 and mean RPE of 13 +/- 2. The VO(2), HR, and RPE values did not significantly differ from those at the LT intensity identified during the GTX. Based on the present results, it was concluded that the TAP performance in the "The Shim Sham Shimmy" choreography elicited acute physiologic responses similar to those observed at the LT intensity, thus suggesting that Tap Dance constitutes a useful exercise modality for aerobic fitness and cardiovascular health improvements.

  1. Relações cineantropométricas e fisiológicas durante exercício incremental em esteira rolante Kineanthropometric and physiological relations during incremental treadmill exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Souza-Castelo Oliveira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Testes incrementais em esteira rolante são muito utilizados para prescrição de treinamentos, havendo alterações fisiológicas e cinemáticas devido à natureza de incremento da intensidade do exercício. Contudo, a antropometria é um fator que não apresenta consenso na literatura. Neste sentido, os objetivos do presente estudo foram verificar o efeito de exercício incremental na concentração de lactato sanguíneo ([LAC], e glicose ([GLI], como também na frequência (FP e amplitude de passadas (AP. Além disso, correlacionar valores de dados antropométricos (massa, altura, % de gordura com as alterações existentes das [LAC] e [GLI]. Treze voluntários saudáveis realizaram teste incremental em esteira rolante (início a 8km/h, com incrementos de 1km/h a cada 3min até a exaustão. Antes e 3min após a realização do teste incremental foram registrados os valores de [LAC] e [GLI]. Durante cada intensidade do teste incremental foram realizadas avaliações da AP e FP por meio de filmagens no plano sagital. Como resultados, verificou-se que a [LAC] e [GLI] antes do teste incremental (1,94 ± 0,4mmol/L e 94,3 ± 7mg/dL, respectivamente foram significantemente menores que os valores encontrados após o teste incremental (9,51 ± 2,7mmol/L e 126 ± 16mg/dL, respectivamente. Além disso, verificou-se aumento significante e gradativo da AP e FP ao longo do teste incremental. Correlações inversas e significantes (p Incremental treadmill tests are widely used for prescription of aerobic and anaerobic training. Physiological and kinematics parameters are changed by the progressive nature of this activity. However, there is no consensus on how anthropometric characteristics may affect the incremental test performance. Therefore, the aims of this study were (1 to verify the effects of the incremental treadmill test on the blood lactate concentration ([LAC], glucose concentration ([GLU], step frequency (SF and step length (SL, and (2 to

  2. Clinical experience of a new reference material for exercise capacity in exercise stress testing in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindow, Thomas; Mosén, Henrik; Engblom, Henrik

    2017-09-21

    In 2014, the Swedish Association of Clinical Physiology recommended the use of a new reference material for exercise capacity in bicycle exercise stress testing, 'the Kalmar material'. Compared to the formerly used reference material, 'the Kristianstad material', an increase in the amount of patients being classified as having decreased exercise capacity was expected, but the extent of this in clinical practice is not known. Results of exercise capacity from 1449 bicycle exercise tests, in patients aged ≥20 years (656 women, 793 men) performed at two departments of Clinical Physiology before and after change of reference materials, were collected. Maximal workload was related to the predicted values of both reference materials. If made, recommendations for supplemental nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging study by the attending physician were noted. Using the new reference material, 31% of all patients were classified as having a decreased exercise capacity, compared to 17% using the formerly used reference material. The difference between the two reference materials was largest in the older age groups. In one of the departments, an increase in recommendations of supplemental myocardial perfusion studies was seen after introduction of the new reference material, whereas the opposite was seen at the other department. A large amount of patients are being classified as having decreased exercise capacity and very few as having good exercise capacity using the new reference material for exercise capacity. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Bicycle ergometer versus treadmill on balance and gait parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group A received a designed physical therapy program and aerobic exercise training by bicycle ergometer. While group B received the same physical therapy program in addition to aerobic exercise training by the treadmill. Both groups received treatment sessions three times per week for three successive months. Stability ...

  4. Rationale and design of the Henry Ford Exercise Testing Project (the FIT project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Keteyian, Steven J; Brawner, Clinton A; Whelton, Seamus; Blaha, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Although physical fitness is a powerful prognostic marker in clinical medicine, most cardiovascular population-based studies do not have a direct measurement of cardiorespiratory fitness. In line with the call from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute for innovative, low-cost, epidemiologic studies leveraging electronic medical record (EMR) data, we describe the rationale and design of the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing Project (The FIT Project). The FIT Project is unique in its combined use of directly measured clinical exercise data retrospective collection of medical history and medication treatment data at the time of the stress test, retrospective supplementation of supporting clinical data using the EMR and administrative databases and epidemiologic follow-up for cardiovascular events and total mortality via linkage with claims files and the death registry. The FIT Project population consists of 69 885 consecutive physician-referred patients (mean age, 54 ± 10 years; 54% males) who underwent Bruce protocol treadmill stress testing at Henry Ford Affiliated Hospitals between 1991 and 2009. Patients were followed for the primary outcomes of death, myocardial infarction, and need for coronary revascularization. The median estimated peak metabolic equivalent (MET) level was 10, with 17% of the patients having a severely reduced fitness level (METs < 6). At the end of the follow-up duration, 15.9%, 5.6%, and 6.7% of the patients suffered all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, or revascularization procedures, respectively. The FIT Project is the largest study of physical fitness to date. With its use of modern electronic clinical epidemiologic techniques, it is poised to answer many clinically relevant questions related to exercise capacity and prognosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Isokinetic test and exercises in knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Gokcen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis and knee is the most frequently affected joint. Several risk factors including age, gender, body mass index and quadriceps muscle strength may contribute to knee osteoarthritis. Quadriceps muscle is the dynamic stabilizer of the knee. Besides the studies arguing that quadriceps muscle weakness might lead to knee osteoarthritis, there are also studies suggesting that muscle weakness might occur due to knee osteoarthritis. Authors, arguing that quadriceps muscle weakness has a deteriorating affect on knee osteoarthritis, also come to a conclusion that strengthening this muscle has a beneficial effect on knee osteoarthritis. Isometric, isotonic and isokinetic exercises are used in order to strengthen this muscle. Quantitative measurement of the muscle strength, as well as isokinetic exercises can be performed with the help of isokinetic devices. Isokinetic evaluation and isokinetic exercises in knee osteoarthritis are overviewed in this review. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(2.000: 228-238

  6. Selection of patients from myocardial perfusion scintigraphy based on fuzzy sets theory applied to clinical-epidemiological data and treadmill test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, P.S. [Fleury - Centro de Medicina Diagnostica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Medicina Nuclear]. E-mail: paulo.duarte@fleury.com.br; Mastrocolla, L.E.; Farsky, P.S.; Sampaio, C.R.E.P.S. [Fleury - Centro de Medicina Diagnostica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Cardiologia; Tonelli, P.A. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Matematica e Estatistica; Barros, L.C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas , SP (Brazil). Inst. de Matematica, Estatistica e Computacao Cientifica; Ortega, N.R. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Informatica Medica; Pereira, J.C.R. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Saude Publica. Dept. de Epidemiologia

    2006-01-15

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a worldwide leading cause of death. The standard method for evaluating critical partial occlusions is coronary arteriography, a catheterization technique which is invasive, time consuming, and costly. There are noninvasive approaches for the early detection of CAD. The basis for the noninvasive diagnosis of CAD has been laid in a sequential analysis of the risk factors, and the results of the treadmill test and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). Many investigators have demonstrated that the diagnostic applications of MPS are appropriate for patients who have an intermediate likelihood of disease. Although this information is useful, it is only partially utilized in clinical practice due to the difficulty to properly classify the patients. Since the seminal work of Lotfi Zadeh, fuzzy logic has been applied in numerous areas. In the present study, we proposed and tested a model to select patients for MPS based on fuzzy sets theory. A group of 1053 patients was used to develop the model and another group of 1045 patients was used to test it. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the performance of the fuzzy model against expert physician opinions, and showed that the performance of the fuzzy model was equal or superior to that of the physicians. Therefore, we conclude that the fuzzy model could be a useful tool to assist the general practitioner in the selection of patients for MPS. (author)

  7. Preventive and therapeutic effect of treadmill running on chronic stress-induced memory deficit in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2015-04-01

    Previous results indicated that stress impairs learning and memory. In this research, the effects of preventive, therapeutic and regular continually running activity on chronic stress-induced memory deficit in rats were investigated. 70 male rats were randomly divided into seven groups as follows: Control, Sham, Stress-Rest, Rest-Stress, Stress-Exercise, Exercise-Stress and Exercise-Stress & Exercise groups. Chronic restraint stress was applied 6 h/day for 21days and treadmill running 1 h/day. Memory function was evaluated by the passive avoidance test. The results revealed that running activities had therapeutic effect on mid and long-term memory deficit and preventive effects on short and mid-term memory deficit in stressed rats. Regular continually running activity improved mid and long-term memory compared to Exercise-Stress group. The beneficial effects of exercise were time-dependent in stress conditions. Finally, data corresponded to the possibility that treadmill running had a more important role on treatment rather than on prevention on memory impairment induced by stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Test-retest reliabilty of exercise-induced hypoalgesia after aerobic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Dørge, Daniel Bandholtz; Schmidt, Kristian Sonne

    2018-01-01

    on PPTs after an incremental bicycling exercise compared with quiet rest and to investigate the relative and absolute test-retest reliability of the test stimulus (PPT) and the absolute and relative EIH response in exercising and nonexercising muscles. Setting: Laboratory. Methods: In two sessions, PPTs...... in the quadriceps and trapezius muscles were assessed before and after 15 minutes of quiet rest and 15 minutes of bicycling in 34 healthy subjects. Habitual physical activity was assessed by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Results: Bicycling increased PPTs in exercising and nonexercising...... score and PPTs were found (quadriceps: r = 0.44, P = 0.009; trapezius: r = 0.31, P = 0.07) before exercise. No significant association was found between IPAQ and EIH. Conclusions: Incremental bicycling exercise increased PPTs with fair relative and absolute reliability of the EIH response. These data...

  9. On-Orbit Evaluation of a New Treadmill Harness for Improved Crewmember Comfort and Load Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perusek, G. P.; Sheehan, C. C.; Savina, M. C.; Owings, T. M.; Davis, B. L.; Ryder, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The current design of the International Space Station (ISS) Treadmill Harness has been reported to cause pain and discomfort to crewmembers during exercise. The Harness Station Development Test Objective (SDTO) provided participating crewmembers (n = 6) with a new harness design, the "Glenn Harness," to evaluate for comfort and loading as compared to the current Treadmill Harness. A novel suite of load-sensing instrumentation was developed to noninvasively measure load distribution and provided a first-ever quantification of actual dynamic loads during treadmill exercise. In addition, crew debriefs provided feedback on harness preference and overall impressions. Conclusions: Post-flight analysis in returned Glenn Harnesses (n = 3) showed minimal wear and tear. Four of the six subjects found the Glenn Harness to be more comfortable in this on-orbit, side-by-side comparison as measured by the crew comfort questionnaire and crew debriefs. Specific areas for improvement have been identified, and forward recommendations will be provided to the Human Research Program. The protocol developed for the SDTO provided valuable insight into crew comfort issues, design improvements, and loading preferences for exercise harnessing, which lays the groundwork for better harnessing systems and training protocols.

  10. Effects of water ingestion throughout exercise and recovery on cardiac autonomic modulation during and after exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Isadora Lessa Moreno; Luiz Carlos Marques Vanderlei; Franciele Marques Vanderlei; Carlos Marcelo Pastre; Luiz Carlos de Abreu; Celso Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To analyze the effects of water intake on heart rate variability (HRV) during and after exercise. Methods: Thirty-one young males performed three different procedures: I) a maximal exercise test to determine the load for the protocols; II) the control protocol (CP); III) the experimental protocol (EP). The protocols comprised 10 minutes at rest, 90 minutes of treadmill exercise (60% of VO2 peak), and 60 minutes of recovery. No rehydration beverage consumption was allowed dur...

  11. Exercise testing and training in people with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, H; Collett, J; Debono, K; Quinn, L; Jones, K; Kelson, M J; Simpson, S A; Playle, R; Backx, K; Wasley, D; Nemeth, A H; Rosser, A; Izardi, H; Busse, M

    2015-02-01

    To explore exercise response in people with Huntington's disease (HD). Experimental observational study with a randomly allocated subgroup before/after interventional study. Community. People with HD (n=30) and a healthy comparator group (n=20). Thirteen people from the HD group were randomly allocated to an exercise training program. Heart rate (HR) and perceived exertion on the Borg-CR10 scale (RPE) during a submaximal cycle ergometer exercise test (three minute unloaded and nine minute 65%-75%HRmaximum phase). Expired air and lactate measures were available for 8 people with HD during the exercise. A 12 week gym and home walking exercise programme (n=13). People with HD achieved a lower work rate at nine minutes (82±42(0-195) v 107±35(50 -185) Watts (phealthy group and did not achieve a steady state HR during unloaded cycling. People with HD also demonstrated higher than expected lactate at three 2.5±2.5(1.1-8)mmo.L-1 and nine 3.8±1.9(1.2-6.6)mmo.L-1 minutes and respiratory exchange ratio at three 0.78±0.03 (0.74-0.81) and nine minutes 0.94±0.11(0.81-1.15). After exercise training there were no changes observed in HR or RPE responses during the exercise test. There was a large variability in the observed metabolic and physiological responses to exercise in people with HD. The observed exercise responses suggest that altered exercise prescription parameters may be required for people with HD and that exercise response and factors' affecting this requires further investigation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Strategies for cardiopulmonary exercise testing of pectus excavatum patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh H. Malek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide strategies for cardiopulmonary exercise testing of pectus excavatum patients. Currently, there are no standardized methods for assessing cardiovascular and pulmonary responses in this population; therefore, making comparisons across studies is difficult if not impossible. These strategies are intended for physicians, pulmonary technicians, exercise physiologists, and other healthcare professionals who conduct cardiopulmonary exercise testing on pectus excavatum patients. By using the strategies outlined in this report, comparisons across studies can be made, and the effects of pectus excavatum on cardiopulmonary function can be assessed with greater detail.

  13. The value of exercise tests after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F E; Nielsen, S L; Knudsen, F

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to relate the clinical course in patients after a first acute myocardial infarction with the response to exercise-tests performed one month after discharge. 90 consecutive patients who suffered an acute myocardial infarction for the first time were followed-up after...... (W) were predictive with respect to mortality, heart failure, and angina pectoris requiring drug treatment. Exercise tests following acute myocardial infarction could not predict the chances of returning to work....

  14. Submaximal cardiopulmonary thresholds on a robotics-assisted tilt table, a cycle and a treadmill: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengsuwan, Jittima; Nef, Tobias; Laubacher, Marco; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2015-11-10

    The robotics-assisted tilt table (RATT), including actuators for tilting and cyclical leg movement, is used for rehabilitation of severely disabled neurological patients. Following further engineering development of the system, i.e. the addition of force sensors and visual bio-feedback, patients can actively participate in exercise testing and training on the device. Peak cardiopulmonary performance parameters were previously investigated, but it also important to compare submaximal parameters with standard devices. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the RATT for estimation of submaximal exercise thresholds by comparison with a cycle ergometer and a treadmill. 17 healthy subjects randomly performed six maximal individualized incremental exercise tests, with two tests on each of the three exercise modalities. The ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) and respiratory compensation point (RCP) were determined from breath-by-breath data. VAT and RCP on the RATT were lower than the cycle ergometer and the treadmill: oxygen uptake (V'O2) at VAT was [mean (SD)] 1.2 (0.3), 1.5 (0.4) and 1.6 (0.5) L/min, respectively (p < 0.001); V'O2 at RCP was 1.7 (0.4), 2.3 (0.8) and 2.6 (0.9) L/min, respectively (p = 0.001). High correlations for VAT and RCP were found between the RATT vs the cycle ergometer and RATT vs the treadmill (R on the range 0.69-0.80). VAT and RCP demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability for all three devices (ICC from 0.81 to 0.98). Mean differences between the test and retest values on each device were close to zero. The ventilatory equivalent for O2 at VAT for the RATT and cycle ergometer were similar and both were higher than the treadmill. The ventilatory equivalent for CO2 at RCP was similar for all devices. Ventilatory equivalent parameters demonstrated fair-to-excellent reliability and repeatability. It is feasible to use the RATT for estimation of submaximal exercise thresholds: VAT and RCP on the RATT were lower than the

  15. Graded Exercise Testing Versus Simulated Competition Exercise in Trained Older Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaard, Stephan; Rougoor, Guus; van Kasteel, Paul Y; Greany, John; de Koning, Jos J; Hill, Ethan; Porcari, John P; Allen, Brian; Foster, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-based rehabilitation is a standard therapy for patients with heart disease. Despite examples of patients who have extended normal rehabilitation exercise into competitive participation, there are no clear-cut guidelines for patients whether they should participate in competitive-level exercise. This study investigated the occurrence of complications, physiologic responses, and exercise patterns during simulated competitive exercise in active, older nonathletes (most with a history of cardiovascular disease) and compared these with responses during maximal incremental exercise. Fourteen trained older males, 7 with stable cardiovascular disease, performed an incremental exercise test and time trial of 55 kJ (equivalent to running ∼1 mile) on a semirecumbent stepping ergometer. Variables of gas exchange, hemodynamics, perception, and power output were measured in both tests. Subjects attained a remarkably high physiologic and psychologic strain (respiratory exchange ratio >1.0; average peak rating of perceived exertion >8) in both tests, with no evidence of symptomatic, hemodynamic, or electrocardiographic abnormalities. Peak physiologic responses were not significantly different between simulated competition and incremental exercise. The fixed-work time trial was finished in 8.97 ± 1.85 minutes, mean power output of 100 ± 26 W. Results showed a distinct pacing pattern in the relative power output, consisting of a conservative start, an even-paced middle portion, and an end spurt. Results suggest that in trained individuals with normal incremental exercise test results, competitive-level efforts may be undertaken with no apparent side effects. This may provide a strategy whereby physicians can advise patients concerning their decision to perform in competitive events.

  16. Moderate treadmill exercise rescues anxiety and depression-like behavior as well as memory impairment in a rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Patki, Gaurav; Li, Lumeng; Allam, Farida; Solanki, Naimesh; Dao, An T.; Alkadhi, Karim; Salim, Samina

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a condition which can develop from exposure to a severe traumatic event such as those occurring during wars or natural disasters. Benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered the gold standard for PTSD treatment, but their side effects pose a serious problem. While regular physical exercise is regarded as a mood elevator and known to enhance cognitive function, its direct role in rescuing core symptoms of PTSD incl...

  17. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the assessment of exertional dyspnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debapriya Datta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyspnea on exertion is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. It is usually investigated by resting tests such as pulmonary function tests and echocardiogram, which may at times can be non-diagnostic. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET measures physiologic parameters during exercise which can enable accurate identification of the cause of dyspnea. Though CPET has been around for decades and provides valuable and pertinent physiologic information on the integrated cardiopulmonary responses to exercise, it remains underutilized. The objective of this review is to provide a comprehensible overview of the underlying principles of exercise physiology, indications and contraindications of CPET, methodology and interpretative strategies involved and thereby increase the understanding of the insights that can be gained from the use of CPET.

  18. Can primary care doctors prescribe exercise to improve fitness? The Step Test Exercise Prescription (STEP) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, Robert J; Koval, John J; Cunningham, David A; Paterson, Donald H

    2003-05-01

    Sedentary lifestyle is associated with adverse health outcomes. Available evidence suggests that, despite positive attitudes toward regular exercise in promoting a healthy lifestyle, few physicians actually prescribe exercise for their patients. Barriers include lack of skills and standard office instruments. Because primary care physicians have regular contact with a large proportion of the population, the impact of preventive health interventions may be great. To determine the effect of an exercise prescription instrument (i.e., Step Test Exercise Prescription [STEP]), compared to usual-care exercise counseling delivered by primary care doctors on fitness and exercise self-efficacy among elderly community-dwelling patients. Randomized controlled trial; baseline assessment and intervention delivery with postintervention follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months. Four large (>5000 active patient files) academic, primary care practices: three in urban settings and one in a rural setting, each with four primary care physicians; two clinics provided the STEP intervention and two provided usual care control. A total of 284 healthy community-dwelling patients (72 per clinic) aged >65 years were recruited in 1998-1999. STEP included exercise counseling and prescription of an exercise training heart rate. The primary outcome measure was aerobic fitness (VO(2max)). Secondary outcomes included predicted VO(2max) from the STEP test, exercise self-efficacy (ESE), and clinical anthropometric parameters. A total of 241 subjects (131 intervention, 110 control) completed the trial. VO(2max) was significantly increased in the STEP intervention group (11%; 21.3 to 24ml/kg/min) compared to the control group (4%; 22 to 23ml/kg/min) over 6 months (p Exercise counseling time was significantly (p or =80% of available exercise opportunities in the STEP group. Primary care physicians can improve fitness and exercise confidence of their elderly patients using a tailored exercise prescription (e

  19. Blunted heart rate recovery is associated with exaggerated blood pressure response during exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Umuttan; Duzenli, Mehmet Akif; Ozdemir, Kurtulus; Gok, Hasan

    2013-11-01

    Increased sympathetic activity and endothelial dysfunction are the proposed mechanisms underlying exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise (EBPR). However, data regarding heart rate behavior in patients with EBPR are lacking. We hypothesized that heart rate recovery (HRR) could be impaired in patients with EBPR. A total of 75 normotensive subjects who were referred for exercise treadmill test examination and experienced EBPR were included to this cross-sectional case-control study. The control group consisted of 75 age- and gender-matched normotensive subjects without EBPR. EBPR was defined as a peak exercise systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥210 mmHg in men and ≥190 mmHg in women. HRR was defined as the difference in HR from peak exercise to 1 min in recovery; abnormal HRR was defined as ≤12 beats/min. These parameters were compared with respect to occurrence of EBPR. Mean values of systolic and diastolic BP at baseline, peak exercise, and the first minute of the recovery were significantly higher in the subjects with EBPR. Mean HRR values were significantly lower (P < 0.001) in subjects with EBPR when compared with those without. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between the decrease in systolic BP during the recovery and degree of HRR in individuals without EBPR (r = 0.42, P < 0.001). Such a correlation was not observed in subjects with EBPR (r = 0.11, P = 0.34). The percentage of abnormal HRR indicating impaired parasympathetic reactivation was higher in subjects with EBPR (29 % vs 13 %, P = 0.02). In logistic regression analyses, HRR and resting systolic BP were the only determinants associated with the occurrence of EBPR (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Decreased HRR was observed in normotensive individuals with EBPR. In subjects with normal BP response to exercise, a linear correlation existed between the degree of HRR and decrease in systolic BP during the recovery period. However, such a correlation

  20. Increased intrinsic stiffness and mineralization in femurs of adult rats after high intensity treadmill running training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzini, Clarisa; Viscor, Ginés; Kristjánsson, Juan C Ríos; Picasso, Emilio; Champin, Graciela; Alippi, Rosa M; Bozzini, Carlos E

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity plays a tremendous role in determining bone mechanical behavior, which is superimposed to gravidity. Compare the geometric and material responses of the rat femur to a high intensity treadmill running training of a relatively short duration, as assessed by 3-point mechanical test. Mature male rats (180.0 ± 30 g) were assigned (7 rats/group) to no exercise (NE) or treadmill exercise (EX). After a preconditioning period, the running speed was set at 45 cm.seg-1 during 2 wks, frequency 5 d/wk, 2-hour sessions/day. Body weight and weight of the crural quadriceps were registered at euthanasia. The right femur was mechanically tested through 3-point bending. The left femur was ashed to estimate bone mineral content. Geometric and material bone properties were estimated directly or calculated by appropriate equations. 1) Final body weight was 14% reduced in EX rats, while the crural quadriceps was 47% increased. Yield and fracture loads, and structural stiffness were significantly higher in the EX rats, as were the apparent elastic modulus, the bone mineral content and the degree of mineralization. Geometric properties were not affected. High intensity treadmill running training increases bone strength and stiffness by increasing material stiffness and mineralization, without affecting geometric bone parameters.

  1. The effects of acute post exercise consumption of two cocoa-based beverages with varying flavanol content on indices of muscle recovery following downhill treadmill running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschek, Katelyn; Pritchett, Robert; Bergman, Ethan; Pritchett, Kelly

    2013-12-20

    Dietary flavanols have been associated with reduced oxidative stress, however their efficacy in promoting recovery after exercise induced muscle damage is unclear. This study examined the effectiveness of acute consumption of cocoa-flavanols on indices of muscle recovery including: subsequent exercise performance, creatine kinase, muscle tenderness, force, and self-perceived muscle soreness. Eight endurance-trained athletes (VO2max 64.4±7.6 mL/kg/min) completed a downhill running protocol to induce muscle soreness, and 48-h later completed a 5-K (kilometer) time trial. Muscle recovery measurements were taken at PRE, 24 h-POST, 48 h-POST, and POST-5K. Participants consumed 1.0 g of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight of a randomly assigned beverage (CHOC: 0 mg flavanols vs. CocoaCHOC: 350 mg flavanols per serving) immediately after the downhill run and again 2 h later. The same protocol was repeated three weeks later with the other beverage. An ANOVA revealed no significant difference (p=0.97) between trials for 5 K completion time (CHOC 1198.3±160.6 s, CocoaCHOC 1195.5±148.8 s). No significant difference was found for creatine kinase (CK) levels (p=0.31), or muscle soreness (p=0.21) between groups over time. These findings suggest that the acute addition of cocoa flavanols to low-fat chocolate milk offer no additional recovery benefits.

  2. The Effects of Acute Post Exercise Consumption of Two Cocoa-Based Beverages with Varying Flavanol Content on Indices of Muscle Recovery Following Downhill Treadmill Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katelyn Peschek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dietary flavanols have been associated with reduced oxidative stress, however their efficacy in promoting recovery after exercise induced muscle damage is unclear. This study examined the effectiveness of acute consumption of cocoa-flavanols on indices of muscle recovery including: subsequent exercise performance, creatine kinase, muscle tenderness, force, and self-perceived muscle soreness. Eight endurance-trained athletes (VO2max 64.4 ± 7.6 mL/kg/min completed a downhill running protocol to induce muscle soreness, and 48-h later completed a 5-K (kilometer time trial. Muscle recovery measurements were taken at PRE, 24 h-POST, 48 h-POST, and POST-5K. Participants consumed 1.0 g of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight of a randomly assigned beverage (CHOC: 0 mg flavanols vs. CocoaCHOC: 350 mg flavanols per serving immediately after the downhill run and again 2 h later. The same protocol was repeated three weeks later with the other beverage. An ANOVA revealed no significant difference (p = 0.97 between trials for 5 K completion time (CHOC 1198.3 ± 160.6 s, CocoaCHOC 1195.5 ± 148.8 s. No significant difference was found for creatine kinase (CK levels (p = 0.31, or muscle soreness (p = 0.21 between groups over time. These findings suggest that the acute addition of cocoa flavanols to low-fat chocolate milk offer no additional recovery benefits.

  3. Assessment of Cardiopulmonary Responses to Treadmill Walking Following Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Matthew G; Franco, Robert L; Herrick, Jeffrey E; Arrowood, James A; Evans, Ronald K

    2017-01-01

    Studies that have evaluated cardiopulmonary responses to exercise within the first few months of bariatric surgery have utilized cycle ergometry. However, walking is the most commonly reported mode of both pre- and post-operative PA. The divergent cardiopulmonary responses and metabolic costs of weight-bearing (walking) and non-weight-bearing (cycling) exercises warrant examination of the effects of bariatric surgery on cardiopulmonary responses during walking. Nine women completed a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill 2 weeks before and 3 months after gastric bypass surgery (GBS). Heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), oxygen pulse (O2-p), and time to fatigue were compared before and after surgery and between the GBS group and a comparison group of 12 normal-weight (NW) women who completed the same exercise testing protocol. Time to fatigue increased by ~140 s following GBS (p = 0.018). No other parameter improved during maximal exercise from pre- to post-surgery. Body weight- and fat-free mass-corrected VO2 and O2-p at peak exercise differed between the GBS and NW groups before surgery, while only weight-corrected values were different following surgery. These differences disappeared after controlling for body fat percentage. We have demonstrated that weight loss alone was not sufficient to improve select cardiopulmonary fitness measures during treadmill walking in obese females 3 months after GBS. However, we did observe a significant overall improvement in exercise capacity as the GBS group was able to exercise longer, presumably due to significant reductions in body mass and a subsequent reduced metabolic cost of walking.

  4. Biomechanical Analysis of Treadmill Locomotion on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witt, J. K.; Fincke, R. S.; Guilliams, M. E.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2011-01-01

    Treadmill locomotion exercise is an important aspect of ISS exercise countermeasures. It is widely believed that an optimized treadmill exercise protocol could offer benefits to cardiovascular and bone health. If training heart rate is high enough, treadmill exercise is expected to lead to improvements in aerobic fitness. If impact or bone loading forces are high enough, treadmill exercise may be expected to contribute to improved bone outcomes. Ground-based research suggests that joint loads increase with increased running speed. However, it is unknown if increases in locomotion speed results in similar increases in joint loads in microgravity. Although data exist regarding the biomechanics of running and walking in microgravity, a majority were collected during parabolic flight or during investigations utilizing a microgravity analog. The Second Generation Treadmill (T2) has been in use on the International Space Station (ISS) and records the ground reaction forces (GRF) produced by crewmembers during exercise. Biomechanical analyses will aid in understanding potential differences in typical gait motion and allow for modeling of the human body to determine joint and muscle forces during exercise. By understanding these mechanisms, more appropriate exercise prescriptions can be developed that address deficiencies. The objective of this evaluation is to collect biomechanical data from crewmembers during treadmill exercise prior to and during flight. The goal is to determine if locomotive biomechanics differ between normal and microgravity environments and to determine how combinations of subject load and speed influence joint loading during in-flight treadmill exercise. Further, the data will be used to characterize any differences in specific bone and muscle loading during locomotion in these two gravitational conditions. This project maps to the HRP Integrated Research Plan risks including Risk of Bone Fracture (Gap B15), Risk of Early Onset Osteoporosis Due to

  5. High Exercise Capacity Attenuates the Risk of Early Mortality After a First Myocardial Infarction: The Henry Ford Exercise Testing (FIT) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaya, Gabriel E; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Hung, Rupert K; Nasir, Khurram; Blumenthal, Roger S; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Keteyian, Steven J; Brawner, Clinton A; Qureshi, Waqas T; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    To examine the effect of objectively measured exercise capacity (EC) on early mortality (EM) after a first myocardial infarction (MI). This retrospective cohort study included 2061 patients without a history of MI (mean age, 62±12 years; 38% [n=790] women; 56% [n=1153] white) who underwent clinical treadmill stress testing in the Henry Ford Health System from January 1, 1991, through May 31, 2009, and suffered MI during follow-up (MI event proportion, 3.4%; mean time from the exercise test to MI, 6.1±4.3 years). Exercise capacity was categorized on the basis of peak metabolic equivalents (METs) achieved: less than 6, 6 to 9, 10 to 11, and 12 or more METs. Early mortality was defined as all-cause mortality within 28, 90, or 365 days of MI. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of EC on the risk of mortality at each time point post-MI adjusting for baseline demographic characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, medication use, indication for stress testing, and year of MI. The 28-day EM rate was 10.6% overall, and 13.9%, 10.7%, 6.9%, and 6.0% in the less than 6, 6 to 9, 10 to 11, and 12 or more METs categories, respectively (Pmortality across all time points (28 days: odds ratio [OR], 0.92; 95% CI, 0.87-0.98; P=.006; 90 days: OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.86-0.95; P<.001; 365 days: OR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.87-0.94; P<.001). Higher baseline EC was independently associated with a lower risk of early death after a first MI. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An Exercise for Illustrating the Logic of Hypothesis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Hypothesis testing is one of the more difficult concepts for students to master in a basic, undergraduate statistics course. Students often are puzzled as to why statisticians simply don't calculate the probability that a hypothesis is true. This article presents an exercise that forces students to lay out on their own a procedure for testing a…

  7. Incremental exercise test performance with and without a respiratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-08

    Nov 8, 2008 ... generally worn for the full duration of clinical or athletic exercise tests, these are mostly progressive in nature and of short duration. Dyspnoea, or indeed any mechanism leading to fatigue supposedly due to mask wear, would only need to be tolerated for the final portion of the progressive test,19 potentially ...

  8. Anti-gravity treadmills are effective in reducing knee forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Bugbee, William D; Goldberg, Timothy; Colwell, Clifford W; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2013-05-01

    Lower body positive pressure (LBPP) treadmills permit significant unweighting of patients and have the potential to enhance recovery following lower limb surgery. We determined the efficacy of an LBPP treadmill in reducing knee forces in vivo. Subjects, implanted with custom electronic tibial prostheses to measure forces in the knee, were tested on a treadmill housed within a LBPP chamber. Tibiofemoral forces were monitored at treadmill speeds from 1.5 mph (0.67 m/s) to 4.5 mph (2.01 m/s), treadmill incline from -10° to +10°, and four treadmill chamber pressure settings adjusted to decrease net treadmill reaction force from 100% to 25% of the subject's body weight (BW). The peak axial tibiofemoral force ranged from 5.1 times BW at a treadmill speed of 4.5 mph (2.01 m/s) and a pressure setting of 100% BW to 0.8 times BW at 1.5 mph (0.67 m/s) and a pressure setting of 25% BW. Peak knee forces were significantly correlated with walking speed and treadmill reaction force (R(2)  = 0.77, p = 0.04). The LBPP treadmill might be an effective tool in the rehabilitation of patients following lower-extremity surgery. The strong correlation between tibiofemoral force and walking speed and treadmill reaction forces allows for more precisely achieving the target knee forces desired during early rehabilitation. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  9. Proposing a standardized method for evaluating patient report of the intensity of dyspnea during exercise testing in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hareendran A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Asha Hareendran,1 Nancy K Leidy,2 Brigitta U Monz,3 Randall Winnette,1 Karin Becker,3 Donald A Mahler41United BioSource Corporation, London, UK; 2United BioSource Corporation, Bethesda, MD, USA; 3Boehringer Ingelheim, Ingelheim, Germany; 4Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, USABackground: Measuring dyspnea intensity associated with exercise provides insights into dyspnea-limited exercise capacity, and has been used to evaluate treatment outcomes for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Three patient-reported outcome scales commonly cited for rating dyspnea during exercise are the modified Borg scale (MBS, numerical rating scale for dyspnea (NRS-D, and visual analogue scale for dyspnea (VAS-D. Various versions of each scale were found. Our objective was to evaluate the content validity of scales commonly used in COPD studies, to explore their ability to capture patients' experiences of dyspnea during exercise, and to evaluate a standardized version of the MBS.Methods: A two-stage procedure was used, with each stage involving one-on-one interviews with COPD patients who had recently completed a clinic-based exercise event on a treadmill or cycle ergometer. An open-ended elicitation interview technique was used to understand patients' experiences of exercise-induced dyspnea, followed by patients completing the three scales. The cognitive interviewing component of the study involved specific questions to evaluate the patients' perspectives of the content and format of the scales. Results from Stage 1 were used to develop a standardized version of the MBS, which was then subjected to further content validity assessment during Stage 2.Results: Thirteen patients participated in the two-stage process (n = 6; n = 7. Mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 percent predicted was 40%, mean age 57 years, and 54% were male. Participants used a variety of terms to describe the intensity and variability of exercise-induced dyspnea. Subjects

  10. Teste ergométrico em crianças e adolescentes: maior tolerância ao esforço com o protocolo em rampa Treadmill stress test in children and adolescents: higher tolerance on exertion with ramp protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odwaldo Barbosa e Silva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a tolerância ao exercício de crianças e adolescentes submetidos a teste ergométrico (TE em esteira com os protocolos de Bruce ou em rampa, e descrever a velocidade e a inclinação alcançadas com o protocolo em rampa, para auxiliar na orientação do exercício com esse protocolo. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional, tipo série de casos, com controle histórico, de 1.006 crianças e adolescentes entre 4 e 17 anos submetidos a TE entre outubro de 1986 e fevereiro de 2003, que concluíram um dos dois protocolos. Foram excluídos os que tiveram o TE interrompido por outras causas que não cansaço físico, os que estavam em uso de medicações que interferiam na freqüência cardíaca (FC e aqueles com limitações físicas à realização do exercício. Na análise estatística dos dados foi adotado nível de significância para p OBJECTIVE: Compare exercise tolerance by children and adolescents submitted to treadmill stress test (TST following Bruce Protocol (BP or Ramp Protocol (RP, as well as describe velocity and inclination reached with ramp protocol to help set protocol exercise standards. METHODS: Observational, case-based study, with history control of 1,006 children and adolescents in the 4 to 17-year-old range who were submitted to TST between October, 1986 and February, 2003, and who concluded one of the two protocols. Those who interrupted their ET for other reasons rather than physical exhaustion, those on medication that interfered in HR and those with physical constraints to exercise were excluded. Statistical analysis of data considered p<0.05 as significance level; with confidence interval at 95%. RESULTS: Exercise time close to 10 minutes in RP was significantly higher than in BP. HR max reached was higher than 180 bpm in both protocols. Inclination showed to be slightly higher in younger girls in Bruce Protocol. Velocity and VO2 max showed to be higher for all age ranges for those in the Ramp Protocol

  11. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Children and Adolescents With Dystrophinopathies : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Bart|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413634973; Takken, Tim|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/184586674; Blank, A. Christian|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304821578; van Moorsel, Huib; van der Pol, W. Ludo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203721721; de Groot, Janke F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine exercise response during cardiopulmonary exercise testing in children and adolescents with dystrophinopathies. Methods: Exercise response on the cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) was compared with a standard care test protocol. Results: Nine boys (aged 10.8 +/- 4.7 years)

  12. [From interpretation of cardiopulmonary exercise testing to medical decision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilaniu, B; Wallaert, B

    2013-06-01

    Exercise is a situation that involves cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic responses simultaneously. Thus, interpretating the results of the cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) requires an integrated understanding of the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance which may result from lung, heart, pulmonary or peripheral circulation, muscles disturbances, or a combination of these functional disorders. In this paper, we offer a systematic method to assist clinicians in developing a pathophysiological reasoning from the functional competency of each component measured during incremental exercise. We propose to go through four steps: descriptive analysis, prioritization of the functional disorders, mechanistic proposals and diagnostic and/or therapeutic suggestions. The descriptive analysis step should answer seven key physiological questions, the prioritization step is based on the magnitude of the functional disorders and their relevance to the primary symptoms causing exercise intolerance, the mechanistic proposals step aims at suggesting different mechanisms and etiologies compatible with the scale of observed functional abnormalities, which will finally be tested by exploring specific diagnostic or therapeutic suggestions. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Negative Exercise Stress Test: Does it Mean Anything? Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan A. Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its low sensitivity and specificity (67% and 72%, respectively, exercise testing has remained one of the most widely used noninvasive tests to determine the prognosis in patients with suspected or established coronary disease.As a screening test for coronary artery disease, the exercise stress test is useful in that it is relatively simple and inexpensive. It has been considered particularly helpful in patients with chest pain syndromes who have moderate probability for coronary artery disease, and in whom the resting electrocardiogram (ECG is normal. The following case presentation and discussion will question the predictive value of a negative stress testing in patients with moderate probability for coronary artery disease.

  14. Exercise testing in Warmblood sport horses under field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munsters, Carolien C B M; van Iwaarden, Alexandra; van Weeren, René; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M

    2014-01-01

    Regular exercise testing in Warmblood sport horses may, as in racing, potentially help to characterise fitness indices in different disciplines and at various competition levels and assist in understanding when a horse is 'fit to compete'. In this review an overview is given of the current state of

  15. Importance of heart rate analysis in exercise tolerance test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Haddad Herdy

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available After many years away from the limelights, at the beginning of this century, exercise tolerance testing has earned back an important position in international medical journals. The different sorts of information derived from a variety of studies based on it have shown us that this propedeutic method has a highly valuable prognostic impact. Because of its low cost and easy applicability, the exercise testing reinforces its position in the clinical practice of the cardiologist. In the early 70's, research relating the influence of the autonomic nervous system in heart rate behavior in all phases of an exercise tolerance testing began. Ever since, a number of hypotheses tried to clarify which would be the mechanisms related to the chronotropic response during effort and its performance in the recovery period. In this updating article the authors deal with an important data referring to the chronotropic deficit and the abnormal heart rate recovery, commenting on the prognostic implication of keeping the focus on the potential of its clinical impact. In other words, approaches that can be used whenever there is someone performing a monitored exercise tolerance testing.

  16. Rapid determination of the hypoxanthine increase in ischemic exercise tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, P. A.; Zwart, R.; Bär, P. R.; de Visser, M.; van der Helm, H. J.

    1988-01-01

    After ischemic exercise tests, performed to detect glycogenoses or myoadenylate deaminase (EC 3.5.4.6) deficiency, the increases in serum lactate and ammonia usually are measured. Determination of hypoxanthine instead of ammonia can also be used to show myoadenylate deaminase deficiency, but HPLC of

  17. The role of cardiopulmonary exercise test for individualized exercise training recommendation in young obese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hoble

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is affecting a growing segment of the population and should be considered a serious health problem which will lead to medical complications and decreased life span. Lifestyle changes by adopting healthy food and increase energy consumption through physical activity is the most important treatment for obesity. Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET is considered the gold standard for exercise capacity assessment. Purpose: This study is aiming to demonstrate that individualized exercise training programs, designed using CPET results, leads to increase of physical fitness, aerobic capacity, ventilatory and cardiac exercise performance in young obese subjects.Material and method:We performed a prospective research study of 6 months. 43 sedentary subjects without contraindications to exercise, 21.3±3.1 years old, 93% female were included in the study. Assessments were made at baseline and after six months of intervention and consists of cardiopulmonary exercise test on bicycle ergometer. After we recorded oxygen uptake at aerobic threshold (AT, anaerobic threshold (in the range of respiratory compensation point – RCP and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max we designed the training program according to these parameters and individualized heart rate training zones of each subject. Exercise training (60 minutes/session, 3 sessions/week was performed taking in consideration the training zones and using a circuit on cardio devices. Each subject was supervised by a physiotherapist and using heart rate monitors. The number of subjects evaluated at the end of the study was 27 (dropout rate 37%.Results:After six months of intervention we noticed an improvement of maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max (from 22.7±3.69 to 27.44±5.55, aerobic threshold (VO2_AT (from 15.48±2.66 to 20.07±4.64 ml/min/kg, p<0.0001 and anaerobic threshold (VO2_RCP (from 20.3±3.66 to 25.11±5.84 ml/min/kg, p<0.0001, cardiac performance during exercise evaluated trough maximal oxygen

  18. Comparison of two treadmill training programs on walking ability and endothelial function in intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Piotr; Konik, Anita; Januszek, Rafal; Petriczek, Tomasz; Mika, Anna; Nowobilski, Roman; Nizankowski, Rafal; Szczeklik, Andrzej

    2013-09-30

    In this randomized trial we compared two treadmill trainings, based on exercises performed to moderate claudication pain vs pain-free training, with respect to their effects on walking ability and endothelial function. A total of sixty patients with stable intermittent claudication were randomized to the pain-free treadmill training (repetitive intervals to onset of claudication pain) or moderate treadmill training (repetitive intervals to moderate claudication pain). In both groups exercises were performed 3 times a week for 3 months. Changes in flow mediated dilatation (FMD) and treadmill walking performance as well as plasma levels of C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and fibrinogen were assessed before and after the program. Fifty-two patients completed the training program. Post-training maximal walking time was prolonged by 100% (ptraining group as compared to the pain-free training group, respectively. FMD increased by 56% (ptraining group and by 36% (ptraining group. No significant changes in the levels of hs-CRP and fibrinogen were seen after treadmill program in either group. Both pain-free treadmill training and the moderate treadmill training have similar efficacy on walking ability in patients with claudication. The improvement of post-training FMD indicates systemic effect of both treadmill programs on endothelial function. Both programs appear to be safe therapeutic modes, since none of them escalates the inflammation. Pain-free treadmill training seems useful and effective therapeutic option for patients with claudication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Exercise testing parameters associated with post lung transplant mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Hilary F; Garber, Carol Ewing; Bartels, Matthew N

    2012-04-30

    Exercise performance during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is a predictor of all-cause mortality in the general population and in patients with coronary heart disease. Mortality beyond one-year after lung transplantation (LTx) is due to multiple causes, is difficult to predict, and has not been fully evaluated in LTx recipients. We hypothesized that, similar to other populations, exercise performance after LTx may be associated with mortality. A retrospective review of all LTx recipients who underwent CPET between 2001 and 2009 was conducted. Chosen endpoint was re-transplantation or death. Survival analysis was performed using Cox proportional-hazard models in 183 patients. After adjusting for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) score, for every 10% increment in percent-predicted peak watts or percent-predicted peak oxygen uptake patients were approximately 23% less likely to experience an endpoint. We conclude that after adjusting for BOS score, lower exercise capacity one-year post LTx is independently associated with mortality. This may imply a protective role of exercise capacity in the LTx population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Exercise capacity and mortality - a follow-up study of 3033 subjects referred to clinical exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpelainen, Raija; Lämsä, Jenni; Kaikkonen, Kaisu M; Korpelainen, Juha; Laukkanen, Jari; Palatsi, Ilkka; Takala, Timo E; Ikäheimo, Tiina M; Hautala, Arto J

    2016-08-01

    Exercise stress testing is used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool. We determined the prognostic significance of exercise test findings for cardiovascular (CVD) and all-cause mortality in men and women. 3033 subjects underwent a symptom-limited bicycle exercise test. Exercise capacity was defined as the mean of last four minutes of exercise workload. During an average follow-up of 19 years, 186 (11.6%) CVD and 370 (20.6%) all-cause deaths in men and 57 (5.0%) CVD and 155 (12.5%) all-cause deaths in women occurred. Among exercise test variables (workload, ECG, BP, HR), exercise capacity was the strongest predictor of mortality. Low exercise capacity (1st quartile) was associated with a hazard ratio of 4.2 (95% CI: 1.7, 10.8) for CVD and 4.0 (95% CI: 2.5, 6.4) for all-cause mortality compared with high exercise capacity (4th quartile) among men and in women with a 5.4-fold (95% CI: 1.2, 24.0) risk for CVD and 2.3-fold (95% CI: 1.2, 4.3) risk for all-cause mortality, respectively. The relationship between other exercise test variables and mortality was much weaker. Among exercise test variables exercise capacity was the strongest predictor of CVD and all-cause mortality in both genders, and especially CVD deaths in women. Key Messages Exercise capacity was the most powerful predictor of CVD and all-cause mortality in both men and women. Low exercise capacity is a strong predictor of CVD death, especially among women.

  1. The efficacy of a discontinuous graded exercise test in measuring peak oxygen uptake in children aged 8 to 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Lambrick

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As children’s natural activity patterns are highly intermittent in nature, and characterised by rapid changes from rest to vigorous physical activity, discontinuous exercise tests may be considered ecologically valid for this population group. This study compared the peak physiological responses from a discontinuous and continuous graded exercise test (GXT_D, GXT_C, respectively during treadmill exercise in children. Twenty-one healthy children (9.6 ± 0.6 y completed GXT_D and GXT_C in a randomised order, separated by 72-hours. Following each GXT, and after a 15-minute recovery, participants completed a verification test at 105% of the velocity attained at peak oxygen consumption (VO 2 peak. There were no differences in VO 2 peak (55.3 ± 8.2 cf. 54.4 ± 7.6 mL•kg-1•min-1 or maximal heart rate (202 ± 10 cf. 204 ± 8 b•min-1 between GXT_C and GXT_D, respectively (P>.05. Peak running speed (10.7 ± 0.9 cf. 12.1 ± 1.3 km•h-1 and respiratory exchange ratio (1.04 ± 0.05 cf. 0.92 ± 0.05 were however different between tests (P .05, VO 2 peak (53.3 ± 7.3 mL•kg-1•min-1 and heart rate (197 ± 13 b•min-1 were significantly lower in the GXT_D verification test (P<.05. In conclusion, a discontinuous GXT is an accurate measure of VO 2 peak in children aged 8 to 10 years and may be a valid alternative to a continuous GXT, despite its longer duration.

  2. Relation of Exercise Capacity to Risk of Development of Diabetes in Patients on Statin Therapy (the Henry Ford Exercise Testing Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaya, Gabriel E; Juraschek, Stephen P; Feldman, David I; Brawner, Clinton A; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Keteyian, Steven J; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Blaha, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    High exercise capacity (EC) has been associated with a lower risk of incident diabetes, whereas statin therapy has been associated with a higher risk. We sought to investigate whether the association between EC and diabetes risk is modified by statin therapy. This retrospective cohort study included 47,337 patients without diabetes or coronary artery disease at baseline (age 53 ± 13 years, 48% women, 66% white) who underwent clinical treadmill stress testing within the Henry Ford Health System from January 1, 1991, to May 31, 2009. The patients were stratified by baseline statin use and estimated peak METs achieved during exercise testing. Hazard ratios for incident diabetes were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for demographic characteristics, co-morbidities, pertinent medications, and stress test indication. We observed 6,921 new diabetes cases (14.6%) over a median follow-up period of 5.1 years (interquartile interval of 2.6 to 8.2 years). Compared with the statin group, the no-statin group achieved higher mean METs (8.9 ± 2.7 vs 9.6 ± 3.0, respectively; p <0.001). After adjustment for covariates, a higher EC was associated with a lower risk of incident diabetes, irrespective of statin use (p-interaction = 0.15). Each 1-MET increment was associated with an 8%, 8%, and 6% relative risk reduction in the total cohort, the no-statin, and the statin groups, respectively (95% confidence interval, 0.91 to 0.93, 0.91 to 0.93, and 0.91 to 0.96, respectively; p <0.001 for all). We conclude that a higher EC is associated with a lower risk of incident diabetes regardless of statin use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inflight exercise affects stand test responses after space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. M.; Moore, A. D. Jr; Fritsch-Yelle, J. M.; Greenisen, M. C.; Schneider, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise performed by Space Shuttle crew members during short-duration space flights (9-16 d) affects the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to standing within 2-4 h of landing. METHODS: Thirty crew members performed self-selected inflight exercise and maintained exercise logs to monitor their exercise intensity and duration. Two subjects participated in this investigation during two different flights. A 10-min stand test, preceded by at least 6 min of quiet supine rest, was completed 10-15 d before launch (PRE) and within 4 h of landing (POST). Based upon their inflight exercise records, subjects were grouped as either high (HIex: > or = 3 times/week, HR > or = 70% HRmax, > or = 20 min/session, N = 11), medium (MEDex: > or = 3 times/week, HR or = 20 min/session, N = 10), or low (LOex: PRE differences between the groups in supine or standing HR and BP. Although POST supine HR was similar to PRE, all groups had an increased standing HR compared with PRE. The increase in HR upon standing was significantly greater after flight in the LOex group (36 +/- 5 bpm) compared with HIex or MEDex groups (25 +/- 1 bpm; 22 +/- 2 bpm). Similarly, the decrease in pulse pressure (PP) from supine to standing was unchanged after space flight in the MEDex and HIex groups but was significantly greater in the LOex group (PRE: -9 +/- 3; POST: -19 +/- 4 mm Hg). CONCLUSIONS: Thus, moderate to high levels of inflight exercise attenuated HR and PP responses to standing after space flight.

  4. The effect of exercise modality on exercise-induced hypoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, T P; Stager, J M

    1999-05-03

    To investigate the effect of exercise mode on arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2), 13 healthy, actively training men who displayed exercise-induced hypoxemia (EIH) performed two incremental maximal exercise tests: uphill treadmill running and cycle ergometry. At maximum, treadmill running resulted in a lower SaO2 (88.6+/-2% versus 92.6+/-2.0%) a lower ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide (VE/VCO2; 28.8+/-0.6 versus 31.2+/-0.9), and a higher maximal oxygen consumption (VO2, MAX; 4.83+/-0.11 l x min(-1) versus 4.61+/-0.14 l x min(-1) when compared to cycle ergometry. When data were combined from maximal running and cycling. SaO2 was correlated to VE/VCO2 (r = 0.54). However, there was no relationship between the differences in SaO2 and ventilation between exercise modes. This suggests that ventilation is important in the maintenance of SaO2, but that the difference observed in SaO2 between treadmill running and cycle ergometry cannot be explained by differences in ventilation and must be due to differences in diffusion limitation or ventilation-perfusion inequality.

  5. VALIDITY OF THE EATING ATTITUDE TEST AMONG EXERCISERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Matheson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Theory testing and construct measurement are inextricably linked. To date, no published research has looked at the factorial validity of an existing eating attitude inventory for use with exercisers. The Eating Attitude Test (EAT is a 26-item measure that yields a single index of disordered eating attitudes. The original factor analysis showed three interrelated factors: Dieting behavior (13-items, oral control (7-items, and bulimia nervosa-food preoccupation (6-items. The primary purpose of the study was to examine the factorial validity of the EAT among a sample of exercisers. The second purpose was to investigate relationships between eating attitudes scores and selected psychological constructs. In stage one, 598 regular exercisers completed the EAT. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was used to test the single-factor, a three-factor model, and a four-factor model, which distinguished bulimia from food pre-occupation. CFA of the single-factor model (RCFI = 0.66, RMSEA = 0.10, the three-factor-model (RCFI = 0.74; RMSEA = 0.09 showed poor model fit. There was marginal fit for the 4-factor model (RCFI = 0.91, RMSEA = 0.06. Results indicated five-items showed poor factor loadings. After these 5-items were discarded, the three models were re-analyzed. CFA results indicated that the single-factor model (RCFI = 0.76, RMSEA = 0.10 and three-factor model (RCFI = 0.82, RMSEA = 0.08 showed poor fit. CFA results for the four-factor model showed acceptable fit indices (RCFI = 0.98, RMSEA = 0.06. Stage two explored relationships between EAT scores, mood, self-esteem, and motivational indices toward exercise in terms of self-determination, enjoyment and competence. Correlation results indicated that depressed mood scores positively correlated with bulimia and dieting scores. Further, dieting was inversely related with self-determination toward exercising. Collectively, findings suggest that a 21-item four-factor model shows promising validity coefficients

  6. Cardiorespiratory fitness and incident diabetes: the FIT (Henry Ford ExercIse Testing) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraschek, Stephen P; Blaha, Michael J; Blumenthal, Roger S; Brawner, Clinton; Qureshi, Waqas; Keteyian, Steven J; Schairer, John; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2015-06-01

    Prior evidence has linked higher cardiorespiratory fitness with a lower risk of diabetes in ambulatory populations. Using a demographically diverse study sample, we examined the association of fitness with incident diabetes in 46,979 patients from The Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) Project without diabetes at baseline. Fitness was measured during a clinician-referred treadmill stress test performed between 1991 and 2009. Incident diabetes was defined as a new diagnosis of diabetes on three separate consecutive encounters derived from electronic medical records or administrative claims files. Analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazards models and were adjusted for diabetes risk factors. The mean age was 53 years with 48% women and 27% black patients. Mean metabolic equivalents (METs) achieved was 9.5 (SD 3.0). During a median follow-up period of 5.2 years (interquartile range 2.6-8.3 years), there were 6,851 new diabetes cases (14.6%). After adjustment, patients achieving ≥12 METs had a 54% lower risk of incident diabetes compared with patients achieving <6 METs (hazard ratio 0.46 [95% CI 0.41, 0.51]; P-trend < 0.001). This relationship was preserved across strata of age, sex, race, obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. These data demonstrate that higher fitness is associated with a lower risk of incident diabetes regardless of demographic characteristics and baseline risk factors. Future studies should examine the association between change in fitness over time and incident diabetes. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  7. Exercise electrocardiogram testing in two brothers with different outcome – a case study exercise testing in master cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüst CA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Christoph Alexander Rüst,1 Beat Knechtle,1,2 Thomas Rosemann11Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, SwitzerlandAbstract: The cases of two brothers training and competing as master cyclists and both preparing for a cycling tour are presented. The older brother aged 66 years went first to the primary care physician and presented with an asymptomatic depression in the exercise stress test of the ST segment in V5 and V6 during recovery after complete exhaustion. Coronary angiography revealed a multi vessel coronary artery disease and he underwent bypass surgery. One year later, he successfully completed his planned cycling tour of ~600 km in seven stages and covering ~12,000 m of total ascent. The younger brother aged 59 years went a few months later to the primary care physician and also performed asymptomatic exercise stress testing without changes in the ST segments. Unfortunately, 2 months later he suffered a cardiac arrest during his cycling tour and survived following immediate successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the road by his cycling colleagues. Immediate invasive coronary arteriography showed a complete stenosis of the trunk of arteria coronaria sinistra (left coronary artery, a 40%–50% stenosis of ramus circumflexus, and a 20% stenosis of arteria coronaria dextra (right coronary artery. The left coronary artery was dilated and he continued cycling 2 months later. In both brothers, familial hypercholesterolemia was the main cardiovascular risk factor for the multi vessel coronary artery disease. A negative exercise electrocardiogram in siblings with an increased risk for coronary artery disease seemed not to exclude an advanced multi vessel coronary artery disease. In master athletes with asymptomatic exercise electrocardiogram but a positive family history, further examinations should be performed in order to detect

  8. The effects of early exercise on brain damage and recovery after focal cerebral infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, F; Sakakima, H; Yoshida, Y

    2011-02-01

    Exercise can be used to enhance neuroplasticity and facilitate motor recovery after a stroke in rats. We investigated whether treadmill running could reduce brain damage and enhance the expression of midkine (MK) and nerve growth factor (NGF), increase angiogenesis and decrease the expression of caspase-3. Seventy-seven Wistar rats were split into three experimental groups (ischaemia-control: 36, ischaemia-exercise: 36, sham-exercise: 5). Stroke was induced by 90-min left middle cerebral artery occlusion using an intraluminal filament. Beginning on the following day, the rats were made to run on a treadmill for 20 min once a day for a maximum of 28 consecutive days. Functional recovery after ischaemia was assessed using the beamwalking test and a neurological evaluation scale in all rats. Infarct volume, and the expression of MK, NGF, anti-platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1), and caspase-3 were evaluated at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 28 days after the induction of ischaemia. Over time motor coordination and neurological deficits improved more in the exercised group than in the non-exercised group. The infarct volume in the exercised group (12.4 ± 0.8%) subjected to treadmill running for 28 days was significantly decreased compared with that in the control group (19.8 ± 4.2%, P exercised rats. Our findings show that treadmill exercise improves motor behaviour and reduces neurological deficits and infarct volume, suggesting that it may aid recovery from central nervous system injury.

  9. The association of clinical indication for exercise stress testing with all-cause mortality: the FIT Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonseok; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Juraschek, Stephen P; Brawner, Clinton; Keteyian, Steve J; Nasir, Khurram; Dardari, Zeina A; Blumenthal, Roger S; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that the indication for stress testing provided by the referring physician would be an independent predictor of all-cause mortality. We studied 48,914 patients from The Henry Ford Exercise Testing Project (The FIT Project) without known congestive heart failure who were referred for a clinical treadmill stress test and followed for 11 ±4.7 years. The reason for stress test referral was abstracted from the clinical test order, and should be considered the primary concerning symptom or indication as stated by the ordering clinician. Hierarchical multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was performed, after controlling for potential confounders including demographics, risk factors, and medication use as well as additional adjustment for exercise capacity in the final model. A total of 67% of the patients were referred for chest pain, 12% for shortness of breath (SOB), 4% for palpitations, 3% for pre-operative evaluation, 6% for abnormal prior testing, and 7% for risk factors only. There were 6,211 total deaths during follow-up. Compared to chest pain, those referred for palpitations (HR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.60-0.86) and risk factors only (HR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.63-0.82) had a lower risk of all-cause mortality, whereas those referred for SOB (HR = 1.15, 95% CI: 1.07-1.23) and pre-operative evaluation (HR = 2.11, 95% CI: 1.94-2.30) had an increased risk. In subgroup analysis, referral for palpitations was protective only in those without coronary artery disease (CAD) (HR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.62-0.90), while SOB increased mortality risk only in those with established CAD (HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10-1.44). The indication for stress testing is an independent predictor of mortality, showing an interaction with CAD status. Importantly, SOB may be associated with higher mortality risk than chest pain, particularly in patients with CAD.

  10. Cardiorespiratory fitness and incident heart failure: The Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupsky, Daniel F; Ahmed, Amjad M; Sakr, Sherif; Qureshi, Waqas T; Brawner, Clinton A; Blaha, Michael J; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Keteyian, Steven J; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2017-03-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) to be a strong marker of cardiovascular health. However, there are limited data investigating the association between CRF and risk of progression to heart failure (HF). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between CRF and incident HF. We included 66,329 patients (53.8% men, mean age 55 years) free of HF who underwent exercise treadmill stress testing at Henry Ford Health Systems between 1991 and 2009. Incident HF was determined using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes from electronic medical records or administrative claim files. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to determine the association between CRF and incident HF. A total of 4,652 patients developed HF after a median follow-up duration of 6.8 (±3) years. Patients with incident HF were older (63 vs 54 years, P<.001) and had higher prevalence of known coronary artery disease (42.3% vs 11%, P<.001). Peak metabolic equivalents (METs) of task were 6.3 (±2.9) and 9.1 (±3) in the HF and non-HF groups, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients able to achieve ≥12 METs had an 81% lower risk of incident HF compared with those achieving <6 METs (hazard ratio 0.19 [95% CI 0.14-0.29], P for trend < .001). Each 1 MET achieved was associated with a 16% lower risk (hazard ratio 0.84 [95% CI 0.82-0.86], P<.001) of incident HF. Our analysis demonstrates that higher level of fitness is associated with a lower incidence of HF independent of HF risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. T-wave reversion in pediatric patients during exercise stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Walter J; Ardoin, Kipp B; Cannon, Bryan C; Snyder, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    T-wave inversion in lateral electrocardiogram (ECG) leads (II, III, aVF, V4 -V6 ) is suspicious of cardiac pathology in pediatric patients, though many are found to have structurally normal hearts. The purpose of this study is to evaluate T-wave response during exercise stress testing (EST) in pediatric patients with structurally normal hearts and lateral-lead T-wave inversion on resting ECG. An IRB-approved, retrospective review of EST databases at two centers identified patients with lateral-lead T-wave inversion on resting ECG. Inclusion criteria were normal exam and echocardiogram, absence of anginal chest pain, and age <18 years. All patients underwent treadmill or cycle ergometer EST. Data recorded included demographics, echocardiogram results, baseline ECG, EST method, peak heart rate and metabolic equivalents (METs), and heart rate and METs at T-wave reversion. T-wave reversion was considered complete if T-waves reverted in all leads, partial if reversion occurred in only some leads, and none if no reversion occurred. The search identified 14 patients: nine females and five males (10 Caucasians and four African Americans) and an average age of 16 (range 12-18) years. Complete T-wave reversion occurred in 11 (79%) patients, partial in two (14%), and none in one (7%). Reversion occurred in both genders, ethnicities, and EST methods. No complications occurred during EST; no adverse outcomes occurred during 2-year follow-up. EST in pediatric patients with lateral-lead T-wave inversion on resting ECG and structurally and functionally normal hearts resulted in either complete or partial T-wave reversion in the vast majority of patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Older age is associated with greater central aortic blood pressure following the exercise stress test in subjects with similar brachial systolic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masatake; Oshima, Kazutaka; Iwasaki, Yoichi; Kumai, Yuto; Avolio, Alberto; Yamashina, Akira; Takazawa, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Brachial systolic pressure (BSP) is often monitored during exercise by the stress test; however, central systolic pressure (CSP) is thought to be a more direct measure of cardiovascular events. Although some studies reported that exercise and aging may play roles in changes of both BSP and CSP, the relationship between BSP and CSP with age following the exercise stress test remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of age on the relationship between BSP and CSP measured after exercise. Ninety-six subjects underwent the diagnostic treadmill exercise stress test, and we retrospectively divided them into the following 3 groups by age: the younger age group (43 ± 4 years), middle age group (58 ± 4 years), and older age group (70 ± 4 years). Subjects exercised according to the Bruce protocol, to achieve 85 % of their age-predicted maximum heart rate or until the appearance of exercise-associated symptoms. BSP, CSP, and pulse rate (PR) were measured using a HEM-9000AI (Omron Healthcare, Japan) at rest and after exercise. BSP, CSP, and PR at rest were not significantly different among the 3 groups (p = 0.92, 0.21, and 0.99, respectively). BSP and PR immediately after exercise were not significantly different among the groups (p = 0.70 and 0.38, respectively). However, CSP immediately after exercise was 144 ± 18 mmHg (younger age), 149 ± 17 mmHg (middle age), and 158 ± 19 mmHg (older age). CSP in the older age group was significantly higher than that in the younger age group (p age groups after exercise, CSP was higher in the older age group. Therefore, older subjects have a higher CSP after exercise, which is not readily assessed by conventional measurements of BSP.

  13. Effect of the treadmill training factors on the locomotor ability after space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysova, Nataliya; Fomina, Elena

    Training on the treadmill constitutes the central component of the Russian system of countermeasures against the negative effects of microgravity. Effectiveness of the treadmill training is influenced by three main factors. Namely, these are intensity (velocity and regularity), axial loading with the use of elastic bungee cords and percentage of time for training on the non-motorized treadmill within the overall training program. Previously we have demonstrated the significance of each factor separately: intensity (Kozlovskaya I.B. et al., 2011), passive mode (Fomina E.V. et al., 2012) and axial loading (Fomina E.V. et al., 2013). The Russian system of in-flight countermeasures gives preference to interval training sessions in which walking alternates with short episodes of intensive running. Locomotion on the non-motorized treadmill should make approx. 30% of the total time of locomotor training. The ISS RS treadmill can be utilized with the motor in motion (active mode) or out of motion so that the cosmonaut has to push the belt with his feet (passive mode). Axial loading of the cosmonaut must be 60-70% of his body weight. However, there is a huge variety of strategies cosmonauts choose of when they exercise on the treadmill in the course of long-duration ISS missions. Purpose of the investigation was comparative analysis of different locomotion training regimens from the standpoint of their effectiveness in microgravity. Criteria of effectiveness evaluation were the results of the locomotion test that includes walking along the fixed support at the preset rate of 90 steps/min. Peak amplitude on the m. soleus electromyogram was analyzed. The experiment was performed with participation of 18 Russian members of extended ISS missions. Each locomotion training factors was rated using the score scale from 0 to 10: Intensity (0 to 10), Percentage of passive mode training (recommended 30% was taken as 10 and could go down to 0 if the passive mode was not applied) and

  14. A Dual Track Treadmill in a Virtual Reality Environment as a Countermeasure for Neurovestibular Adaptations in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAndrea, Susan E.; Kahelin, Michael W.; Horowitz, Jay G.; OConnor, Philip A.

    2004-01-01

    While the neurovestibular system is capable of adapting to altered environments such as microgravity, the adaptive state achieved in space in inadequate for 1G. This leads to giant and postural instabilities when returning to a gravity environment and may create serious problems in future mission to Mars. New methods are needed to improve the understanding of the adaptive capabilities of the human neurovestibular system and to develop more effective countermeasures. The concept behind the current study is that by challenging the neurovestibular system while walking or running a treadmill can help to read just the relationship between the visual, vestibular and proprioceptive signals that are altered in a microgravity environment. As a countermeasure, this device could also benefit the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems and at the same time decrease the overall time spent exercising. The overall goal of this research is to design, develop, build and test a dual track treadmill, which utilizes virtual reality, VR, displays.

  15. A Dual Track Treadmill in a Virtual Reality Environment as a Countermeasure for Neurovestibular Adaptations in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAndrea, Susan E.; Kahelin, Michael W.; Horowitz, Jay G.; OConnor, Philip A.

    2004-01-01

    While the neurovestibular system is capable of adapting to altered environments such as microgravity, the adaptive state achieved in space in inadequate for 1G. This leads to gait and postural instabilities when returning to a gravity environment and may create serious problems in future missions to Mars. New methods are needed to improve the understanding of the adaptive capabilities of the human neurovestibular system and to develop more effective countermeasures. The concept behind the current study is that by challenging the neurovestibular system while walking or running, a treadmill can help to readjust the relationship between the visual, vestibular and proprioceptive signals that are altered in a microgravity environment. As a countermeasure, this device could also benefit the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems and at the same time decrease the overall time spent exercising. The overall goal of this research is to design, develop, build and test a dual track treadmill, which utilizes virtual reality,

  16. Ground reaction forces during treadmill running in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witt, John K; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L

    2014-07-18

    Astronauts perform treadmill exercise during long-duration space missions to counter the harmful effects of microgravity exposure upon bone, muscle, and cardiopulmonary health. When exercising in microgravity, astronauts wear a harness and bungee system that provides forces that maintain attachment to the treadmill. Typical applied forces are less than body weight. The decreased gravity-replacement force could result in differences in ground-reaction force at a given running speed when compared to those achieved in normal gravity, which could influence the adaptive response to the performed exercise. Seven astronauts (6 m/1 f) who completed approximately 6-month missions on the International Space Station (ISS) completed a preflight (1G) and multiple in-flight (0G) data collection sessions. Ground-reaction forces were measured during running at speeds of 8.0 kph and greater on an instrumented treadmill in the lab and on the ISS. Ground-reaction forces in 0G were less than in 1G for a given speed depending upon the gravity-replacement force, but did increase with increased speed and gravity-replacement force. Ground-reaction forces attained in 1G during slower running could be attained by increasing running speed and/or increasing gravity-replacement forces in 0G. Loading rates in 1G, however, could not be replicated in 0G. While current gravity-replacement force devices are limited in load delivery magnitude, we recommend increasing running speeds to increase the mechanical loads applied to the musculoskeletal system during 0G treadmill exercise, and to potentially increase exercise session efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Humanized animal exercise model for clinical implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dae Yun; Lee, Sung Ryul; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2014-09-01

    Exercise and physical activity function as a patho-physiological process that can prevent, manage, and regulate numerous chronic conditions, including metabolic syndrome and age-related sarcopenia. Because of research ethics and technical difficulties in humans, exercise models using animals are requisite for the future development of exercise mimetics to treat such abnormalities. Moreover, the beneficial or adverse outcomes of a new regime or exercise intervention in the treatment of a specific condition should be tested prior to implementation in a clinical setting. In rodents, treadmill running (or swimming) and ladder climbing are widely used as aerobic and anaerobic exercise models, respectively. However, exercise models are not limited to these types. Indeed, there are no golden standard exercise modes or protocols for managing or improving health status since the types (aerobic vs. anaerobic), time (morning vs. evening), and duration (continuous vs. acute bouts) of exercise are the critical determinants for achieving expected beneficial effects. To provide insight into the understanding of exercise and exercise physiology, we have summarized current animal exercise models largely based on aerobic and anaerobic criteria. Additionally, specialized exercise models that have been developed for testing the effect of exercise on specific physiological conditions are presented. Finally, we provide suggestions and/or considerations for developing a new regime for an exercise model.

  18. Determinant factors of peak treadmill speed in physically active men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Pasqua, Leonardo; Damasceno, Mayara V; Bueno, Salomão; Zagatto, Alessandro M; DE Araújo, Gustavo G; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Bertuzzi, Rômulo

    2016-11-30

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether physiological factors and maximal dynamic strength are able to determine the peak treadmill speed (PTS) in physically active individuals. One hundred and fifty physically active healthy males voluntarily visit the laboratory on three separate occasions and underwent the following activities: first visit: IPAQ (short version), anthropometric measurements, and a maximal incremental test performed for physiological variables (maximal oxygen uptake ( ) and respiratory compensation point (RCP); second visit: constant speed test for running economy (RE) measurement, and familiarization with the maximum dynamic strength (1RM) test in the leg press exercise; third visit: 1RM test. The stepwise multiple regression model selected four independent variables to predict PTS (RCP, , RE, and 1RM). RCP explained 59% (p < 0.001) of variance in PTS, whereas , RE and 1RM accounted for additional 8% (p < 0.001), 4% (p < 0.001), and 1.4% (p = 0.038), respectively. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrate that PTS, an important predictor of endurance performance, is determined by both physiological (i.e., RCP, and RE) and muscular (1RM) parameters in healthy active individuals. These results demonstrate that, during a physical evaluation, PTS is able to represent physiological and muscular parameters of physically active individuals. This has the advantage during aerobic fitness evaluations of not requiring expensive equipment and specialized software.

  19. Exercise electrocardiogram testing in two brothers with different outcome - a case study exercise testing in master cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Rosemann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The cases of two brothers training and competing as master cyclists and both preparing for a cycling tour are presented. The older brother aged 66 years went first to the primary care physician and presented with an asymptomatic depression in the exercise stress test of the ST segment in V5 and V6 during recovery after complete exhaustion. Coronary angiography revealed a multi vessel coronary artery disease and he underwent bypass surgery. One year later, he successfully completed his planned cycling tour of ~600 km in seven stages and covering ~12,000 m of total ascent. The younger brother aged 59 years went a few months later to the primary care physician and also performed asymptomatic exercise stress testing without changes in the ST segments. Unfortunately, 2 months later he suffered a cardiac arrest during his cycling tour and survived following immediate successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the road by his cycling colleagues. Immediate invasive coronary arteriography showed a complete stenosis of the trunk of arteria coronaria sinistra (left coronary artery), a 40%-50% stenosis of ramus circumflexus, and a 20% stenosis of arteria coronaria dextra (right coronary artery). The left coronary artery was dilated and he continued cycling 2 months later. In both brothers, familial hypercholesterolemia was the main cardiovascular risk factor for the multi vessel coronary artery disease. A negative exercise electrocardiogram in siblings with an increased risk for coronary artery disease seemed not to exclude an advanced multi vessel coronary artery disease. In master athletes with asymptomatic exercise electrocardiogram but a positive family history, further examinations should be performed in order to detect relevant stenosis in coronary arteries.

  20. The effects of arm crank ergometry, cycle ergometry and treadmill walking on postural sway in healthy older females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M W; Oxford, S W; Duncan, M J; Price, M J

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are increasingly being encouraged to exercise but this may lead to muscle fatigue, which can adversely affect postural stability. Few studies have investigated the effects of upper body exercise on postural sway in groups at risk of falling, such as the elderly. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects arm crank ergometry (ACE), cycle ergometry (CE) and treadmill walking (TM) on postural sway in healthy older females. In addition, this study sought to determine the time necessary to recover postural control after exercise. A total of nine healthy older females participated in this study. Participants stood on a force platform to assess postural sway which was measured by displacement of the centre of pressure before and after six separate exercise trials. Each participant completed three incremental exercise tests to 85% of individual's theoretical maximal heart rate (HRMAX) for ACE, CE and TM. Subsequent tests involved 20-min of ACE, CE and TM exercise at a relative workload corresponding to 50% of each individual's predetermined heart rate reserve (HRE). Post fatigue effects and postural control recovery were measured at different times after exercise (1, 3, 5, 10, 15 and 30-min). None of the participants exhibited impaired postural stability after ACE. In contrast, CE and TM elicited significant post exercise balance impairments, which lasted for ∼ 10 min post exercise. We provide evidence of an exercise mode which does not elicit post exercise balance impairments. Older adults should exercise caution immediately following exercise engaging the lower limbs to avoid fall risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Testing the effects of message framing, kernel state, and exercise guideline adherence on exercise intentions and resolve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, G.J.; Out, K.; Rhodes, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To study the effects of framed messages on exercise intention and resolve. Design Two (type of frame: gain or loss) × 2 (type of kernel state: desirable or undesirable outcome) post-test study. Methods Participants were recruited online and questioned about their previous exercise

  2. Red blood cell deformability in patients with claudication after pain-free treadmill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Piotr; Spodaryk, Krzysztof; Cencora, Andrzej; Mika, Anna

    2006-07-01

    To assess the effect of pain-free treadmill training on red blood cell deformability and walking distance in patients with claudication. Randomized-controlled trial of exercise training. Patients were recruited from the primary care, vascular outpatient clinic. A total of 60 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (stage II according to Leriche-Fontaine) were randomized into the treadmill program or a control group. Fifty-five patients completed the study (27 in the exercising group and 28 in the control group). Patients in the exercising group were walking on the treadmill 3 times a week for 3 months. Each session consisted of 1 hour repetitive walking [performed to 85% of the pain-free walking time (PFWT)] was supervised by a qualified physiotherapist. Changes in erythrocyte deformability and treadmill walking performance (PFWT, maximal walking time) were assessed in both groups before the study and after 3 months. After 3 months of treadmill training, red blood cell deformability in the exercising group significantly increased (Ppain-free treadmill training is associated with a significant increase in red cell deformability in patients with claudication.

  3. Exercise testing, limitation and training in patients with cystic fibrosis. A personalized approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkman, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise testing and training are cornerstones in regular CF care. However, no consensus exists in literature about which exercise test protocol should be used for individual patients. Furthermore, divergence exists in insights about both the dominant exercise limiting mechanisms and the

  4. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing – Its application in cardiology and occupational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kurpesa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is a method used to assess the exercise capacity. It is used in cardiology to define the diagnostic and prognostic information, the treatment and its effectiveness. This method is also useful in sport medicine and in occupational medicine. The cardiopulmonary exercise test involves measuring of gas exchange during exercise testing. The article presents the main parameters assessed during the test and the indications and contraindications for conducting the test. It also reveals the results of recently published clinical trials on the use of cardiopulmonary exercise test in patients with cardiovascular disease and in the working population. The study included variability of respiratory parameters during the cardiopulmonary exercise test and after its completion, as well as their impact on the prognostic value. In addition, the results of a study involving an optimal choice of interval training on the basis of oxygen consumption at peak exercise are summarized. Med Pr 2014;65(5:665–674

  5. Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercising. Count out loud as you do the exercises. View Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Home Techniques to ... Intimacy Importance of Being Together Body Changes with Age Communicating with Your Partner Exercise and Sexual Activity Less Strenuous Positions for Sexual ...

  6. Baseline Systolic Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Stress Test Can Predict Exercise Indices following Cardiac Rehabilitation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Sardari

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systolic blood pressure recovery (rSBP is of prognostic value for predicting the survival and co-morbidity rate in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. This study investigated the association between rSBP and exercise indices after complete cardiac rehabilitation program (CR in a population-based sample of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG.Methods: The sample population consisted of 352 patients who underwent pure CABG. The patients underwent standard symptom-limited exercise testing immediately before and also after the completion of the CR sessions. rSBP was defined as the ratio of the systolic blood pressure at 3 minutes in recovery to the systolic blood pressure at peak exercise.Results: An abnormal baseline rSBP after exercise was a strong predictor of exercise parameters in the last session, including metabolic equivalents (β = -0.617, SE = 0.127, p value < 0.001 and peak O2 consumption (β = -1.950, SE = 0.363, p value < 0.001 measured in the last session adjusted for baseline exercise characteristics, demographics, function class, and left ventricular ejection fraction.Conclusion: The current study strongly emphasizes the predictive role of baseline rSBP after exercise in evaluating exercise parameters following CR. This baseline index can predict abnormal METs value, peak O2 consumption, post-exercise heart rate, and heart rate recovery after a 24-session CR program.

  7. Running economy assessment within cardiopulmonary exercise testing for recreational runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeroff, Tobias; Bernardi, Andreas; Vogt, Lutz; Banzer, Winfried

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of running economy (RE) on running performance within recreational runners of different maximal aerobic capacity, and the feasibility of RE assessment within routine cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Sixty-eight recreational runners (m: 49, f: 19; age: 21-54) completed a graded exercise test (GXT) until exhaustion. Maximal oxygen uptake and respiratory compensation point were obtained via CPET. RE was calculated as relative oxygen uptake per covered distance (mL/kg/km) one step below respiratory compensation point (RCP). Subjects were grouped for RE via median split and categorized into one of six fitness levels (Very Poor, Poor, Fair, Good, Excellent, Superior) (ACSM 2010). Irrespective of fitness levels, recreational runners with a more energy efficient movement (RErunners within VO2max categories Good and Superior differed significantly (Precreational distance runners within a broad range of maximal aerobic capacity. Complementing routine CPET with RE assessment at physiological threshold intensities and ACSM based categorization seems feasible to delineate the impact of movement efficiency and aerobic fitness on performance in recreational runners.

  8. Predicting utility of exercise tests based on history/holter in patients with premature ventricular contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Brad; Xie, Li; Temple, Joel; Octavio, Jenna; Srayyih, Maytham; Thacker, Deepika; Kharouf, Rami; Davies, Ryan; Gidding, Samuel S

    2015-01-01

    Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) are considered benign in patients with structurally normal hearts, particularly if they suppress with exercise. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) requires exercise testing to unmask the malignant phenotype. We studied risk factors and Holter monitor variables to help predict the necessity of exercise testing in patients with PVCs. We retrospectively reviewed 81 patients with PVCs that suppressed at peak exercise and structurally normal hearts referred to the exercise laboratory in 2011. We reviewed 11 patients from 2003 to 2012 whose PVCs were augmented at peak exercise (mean age 13 ± 4 years; 52 % male, 180 exercise studies). We recorded clinical risk factors and comorbidities (family history of arrhythmia or sudden unexpected death [SUD], presence of syncope) and Holter testing parameters. Family history of VT or SUD (P = 0.011) and presence of VT on Holter (P = 0.011) were significant in predicting failure of PVCs to suppress at peak heart rate on exercise testing. Syncope was not statistically significant in predicting suppression (P = 0.18); however, CPVT was diagnosed in four patients with syncope during exercise. Quantity of PVCs, Lown grade, couplets on Holter, monomorphism, and PVC elimination at peak heart rate on Holter were not predictors of PVC suppression on exercise testing. Patients with syncope during exercise, family history of arrhythmia or SUD, or a Holter monitor showing VT warrant exercise testing to assess for CPVT.

  9. Testing the effects of message framing, kernel state, and exercise guideline adherence on exercise intentions and resolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Gert-Jan; Out, Kim; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2014-11-01

    To study the effects of framed messages on exercise intention and resolve. Two (type of frame: gain or loss) × 2 (type of kernel state: desirable or undesirable outcome) post-test study. Participants were recruited online and questioned about their previous exercise behaviour and their exercise risk perception. After this, they were randomly allocated to one of four messages that were different in terms of positive or negative outcomes (type of frame) and in terms of attained or avoided outcomes (type of kernel state). After reading the message, participants indicated their intention and resolve to engage in sufficient exercise. No effects were found for intention. For resolve, there was a significant interaction between type of frame, type of kernel state, and exercise adherence. Those who did not adhere to the exercise guideline and read the loss-framed message with attained outcomes reported significantly higher resolve than all other participants. This study indicates the relevance of including attained outcomes in message framing exercise interventions as well as a focus on exercise resolve. What is already known on this subject? Message framing is commonly used to increase exercise intentions and behaviour. Meta-analyses do not provide consistent support for this theory. Very little attention has been paid to resolve and message factors on framing effects. What does this study add? Framed messages have an effect on exercise resolve, but not on intention. Loss-framed messages with attained outcomes are most persuasive for those who do not adhere to exercise guidelines. Exercise framing studies should include behavioural resolve next to intention. . © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Arctigenin efficiently enhanced sedentary mice treadmill endurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuan; Zhuang, Jingjing; Chen, Jing; Yu, Liang; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2011-01-01

    Physical inactivity is considered as one of the potential risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes and other metabolic diseases, while endurance exercise training could enhance fat oxidation that is associated with insulin sensitivity improvement in obesity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as an energy sensor plays pivotal roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis, and its activation could improve glucose uptake, promote mitochondrial biogenesis and increase glycolysis. Recent research has even suggested that AMPK activation contributed to endurance enhancement without exercise. Here we report that the natural product arctigenin from the traditional herb Arctium lappa L. (Compositae) strongly increased AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently up-regulated its downstream pathway in both H9C2 and C2C12 cells. It was discovered that arctigenin phosphorylated AMPK via calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) and serine/threonine kinase 11(LKB1)-dependent pathways. Mice treadmill based in vivo assay further indicated that administration of arctigenin improved efficiently mice endurance as reflected by the increased fatigue time and distance, and potently enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) related genes expression in muscle tissues. Our results thus suggested that arctigenin might be used as a potential lead compound for the discovery of the agents with mimic exercise training effects to treat metabolic diseases.

  11. Arctigenin efficiently enhanced sedentary mice treadmill endurance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Tang

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is considered as one of the potential risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes and other metabolic diseases, while endurance exercise training could enhance fat oxidation that is associated with insulin sensitivity improvement in obesity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK as an energy sensor plays pivotal roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis, and its activation could improve glucose uptake, promote mitochondrial biogenesis and increase glycolysis. Recent research has even suggested that AMPK activation contributed to endurance enhancement without exercise. Here we report that the natural product arctigenin from the traditional herb Arctium lappa L. (Compositae strongly increased AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently up-regulated its downstream pathway in both H9C2 and C2C12 cells. It was discovered that arctigenin phosphorylated AMPK via calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK and serine/threonine kinase 11(LKB1-dependent pathways. Mice treadmill based in vivo assay further indicated that administration of arctigenin improved efficiently mice endurance as reflected by the increased fatigue time and distance, and potently enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation (FAO related genes expression in muscle tissues. Our results thus suggested that arctigenin might be used as a potential lead compound for the discovery of the agents with mimic exercise training effects to treat metabolic diseases.

  12. Arctigenin Efficiently Enhanced Sedentary Mice Treadmill Endurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Yu, Liang; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2011-01-01

    Physical inactivity is considered as one of the potential risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes and other metabolic diseases, while endurance exercise training could enhance fat oxidation that is associated with insulin sensitivity improvement in obesity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as an energy sensor plays pivotal roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis, and its activation could improve glucose uptake, promote mitochondrial biogenesis and increase glycolysis. Recent research has even suggested that AMPK activation contributed to endurance enhancement without exercise. Here we report that the natural product arctigenin from the traditional herb Arctium lappa L. (Compositae) strongly increased AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently up-regulated its downstream pathway in both H9C2 and C2C12 cells. It was discovered that arctigenin phosphorylated AMPK via calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) and serine/threonine kinase 11(LKB1)-dependent pathways. Mice treadmill based in vivo assay further indicated that administration of arctigenin improved efficiently mice endurance as reflected by the increased fatigue time and distance, and potently enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) related genes expression in muscle tissues. Our results thus suggested that arctigenin might be used as a potential lead compound for the discovery of the agents with mimic exercise training effects to treat metabolic diseases. PMID:21887385

  13. Prediction of Maximum Oxygen Uptake Using Both Exercise and Non-Exercise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, James D.; Paul, Samantha L.; Hyde, Annette; Bradshaw, Danielle I.; Vehrs, Pat R.; Hager, Ronald L.; Yanowitz, Frank G.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to develop a regression model to predict maximal oxygen uptake (VO[subscript 2max]) based on submaximal treadmill exercise (EX) and non-exercise (N-EX) data involving 116 participants, ages 18-65 years. The EX data included the participants' self-selected treadmill speed (at a level grade) when exercise heart rate first reached…

  14. Performance during cardiopulmonary exercise test and quality of life of long-distance elderly runners and of non-exerciser elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, A; Greve, J M D; Santos-Silva, P R; Leon Arrabal, F F; De Paula Santos, U

    2014-06-01

    Regular physical exercises are associated to decreased morbidity and mortality, but their relationship with quality of life perception is still not well established. The aim of this paper was to compare cardiopulmonary exercise indicators of functional performance and quality of life (QOL) between a group of untrained elderly (GUE) and a group of trained elderly (GTE) in long-distance running. GUE was made up of 19 individuals with mean age of 73.5±6.4 years and GTE by 27 trained elderly with mean age of 73.1±4.3 years. All were submitted to cardiopulmonary and metabolic evaluation by expired gases analysis. Maximum physical capacity was determined on a motor-driven treadmill with continuous graded protocol and fixed slope of 1%. Quality of Life was evaluated in four domains (physical, psychological, social relations and environment) by Whoqol-Bref questionnaire (WHO) and quantified by total score for each domain. At maximal oxygen intake, GUE and GTE presented: VO2max: 27.0±5.4 vs. 38.1±4.5 mL/[kg.min] (P<0.001); O2 pulse: 11.7±3.0 vs. 15.5±2.4 mL/bpm (P<0.001); running speed: 9.7±2.5 vs. 13.8±1.7 km/h (P<0.001) and tolerance time: 9.6±2.9 vs.14.8±4.4 min (P<0.001). QOL measured by Whoqol-Bref questionnaire in four domains for GUE and GTE was respectively: physical: 75.6±13.6 vs. 80.6 ±14.2 (P=0.210), psychological: 79.2±11.3 vs. 79.2±13.8 (P=0.893), social relations: 74.6±14.3 vs. 74.7±19.1 (P=0.726), environment: 61.4±15.9 vs. 69.0±15.5 (P=0.131). GTE cardiopulmonary performance was better as compared to GUE, and QOL of the elderly from both groups was not associated to cardiopulmonary exercise test performance.

  15. A Possible Alternative Exercise Test for Youths with Cystic Fibrosis : The Steep Ramp Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Bart C.; Werkman, Maarten S.; Arets, H. G. M.; Takken, Tim; Hulzebos, H. J.

    Purpose: The steep ramp test (SRT) can be used to provide an indication of exercise capacity when gas exchange measurements are not possible. This study evaluated the clinical usefulness of the SRT in adolescents with cystic fibrosis (CF) and compared the physiological responses of the SRT with the

  16. Exercise Testing and Stress Imaging in Mitral Valve Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voilliot, Damien; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2017-03-01

    Mitral valve disease represented by mitral stenosis and mitral regurgitation is the second most frequent valvulopathy. Mitral stenosis leads to an increased left atrial pressure whereas mitral regurgitation leads to an increased left atrial pressure associated with a volume overload. Secondary to an upstream transmission of this overpressure, both mitral stenosis and regurgitation lead to pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure. In addition, mitral regurgitation also leads to left ventricular dilatation and dysfunction with left heart failure. Depending on the anatomy of the valvular and subvalvular apparatus, valve repair (percutaneous mitral commissurotomy for mitral stenosis and valvuloplasty for mitral regurgitation) might be possible. If the anatomy is not favorable, valve replacement by mechanical or biological prosthesis is indicated. Most of the intervention indications are based on clinical symptoms and resting transthoracic echocardiography. Outcomes of patients operated based upon resting echo abnormalities might however not be optimal. Therefore early intervention might be beneficial based upon abnormal exercise testing, which has been demonstrated to more sensitive to identify high-risk patients. In this last decade, especially exercise echocardiography has been found to be a crucial tool in the management of patients with mitral valve disease.

  17. Safety and feasibility of adjunctive regadenoson injection at peak exercise during exercise myocardial perfusion imaging: The Both Exercise and Regadenoson Stress Test (BERST) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M I; Wu, E; Wilkins, J T; Gupta, D; Shen, S; Aulwes, D; Montero, K; Holly, T A

    2013-04-01

    The data existing in the literature regarding the safety of using regadenoson with symptom-limited exercise are limited, which motivated the authors to undertake this randomized study. We offered patients scheduled to undergo vasodilator stress nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging the opportunity to exercise instead. Patients who failed to reach target heart rate (THR) were randomized to (1) receive regadenoson at peak exercise or (2) stop exercise and receive regadenoson at rest. Patients who reached THR received a standard Tc-99m sestamibi injection with no regadenoson. 200 patients were included (66% male, mean age 52.5 ± 13.6). 125 patients (62%) reached THR with exercise alone. All stress protocols were well tolerated, and there were no significant adverse events. There were no statistically significant differences in the extent of perfusion abnormalities, image quality, or rate of referral to cardiac catheterization within 60 days between the groups. In fully adjusted logistic regression models, beta-blocker use and diabetes remained significant univariate predictors of failure to reach THR (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.1-0.5, P regadenoson at peak exercise in patients unable to reach THR with exercise is feasible, well-tolerated, and yields comparable imaging results to a standard regadenoson injection at rest. In addition, pharmacologic stress testing may be over-ordered in current clinical practice, as patients referred for such testing were often able to exercise.

  18. O teste ergométrico é factível, eficaz e custo-efetivo na predição de eventos cardiovasculares no paciente muito idoso, quando comparado à cintilografia de perfusão miocárdica In comparison to the myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, a treadmill stress test is a viable, efficient and cost effective option to predict cardiovascular events in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Janussi Vacanti

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Definir o valor prognóstico e a custo-efetividade do teste ergométrico (TE em comparação à cintilografia de perfusão miocárdica com dipiridamol (DIP em indivíduos com > 75 anos de idade. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados, consecutiva e prospectivamente, 66 pacientes (40% homens, com média de idade de 81 ± 5 anos. Desses pacientes, 57% eram hipertensos, 38% eram dislipidêmicos e 28%, diabéticos. O protocolo de Bruce para rampa foi adaptado, obtendo-se o valor prognóstico do TE pelo escore de Duke. RESULTADOS: A duração do TE, o porcentual da freqüência cardíaca máxima preconizada e o duplo produto no pico do exercício foram, respectivamente, de 7 ± 3 minutos, 95 ± 9% e 24.946 ± 4.576 (bpm x mmHg. O TE e a DIP apresentaram resultados positivos para isquemia miocárdica similares (21% vs 15%, respectivamente. A concordância entre os testes foi de 88% (Kappa 0,63, p OBJECTIVE: To define the prognostic value and cost-effectiveness of the treadmill stress test (TST in comparison to the dipyridamole myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (DIP, in individuals >75 years of age. METHODS: Consecutive and prospective assessment of 66 patients (40% male aged 81 ± 5 years of which 57% were hypertensive, 38% had dyslipidemia and 28% were diabetics. The Bruce protocol was adapted for a tilt treadmill and the TST prognostic value was obtained using the Duke treadmill score. RESULTS: The TST duration, recommended maximum heart rate percentage and double product at peak exercise were respectively: 7 ± 3 minutes, 95 ± 9% and 24,946 ± 4,576 (bpm x mmHg. The TST and DIP presented similar positive results for myocardial ischemia (21% vs 15%, respectively. The correlation between the tests was 88% (Kappa 0.63, p<0.01. During 685 ± 120 days of follow-up, nine major events occurred: 6 deaths, 2 acute coronary syndromes and 1 myocardial revascularization. The variables associated with the major events were: age (83 ± 6 vs 80 ± 4 years; p=0

  19. Effect of blocked vision treadmill training on knee joint proprioception of patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung-Jun; Kim, Yong-Wook

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of treadmill training with the eyes closed and eyes open on the joint position sense of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty patients with chronic stroke participated in this study. Patients performed the timed up and go test and were assigned to one of two treadmill training groups with and without visual deprivation. The treadmill gait training for each group lasted 40 minutes, and sessions were held 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The knee joint proprioception was measured using the Biodex System Pro 3 before and after the intervention. [Results] The knee joint proprioception of the treadmill training with blocked vision group showed more significant improvement after the treadmill training sessions than that of the eyes open group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that treadmill training with blocked vision may be useful for the proprioceptive sensory rehabilitation of patients with chronic stroke.

  20. IL-6 regulates exercise and training-induced adaptations in subcutaneous adipose tissue in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Claus; Jakobsen, Anne Hviid; Hassing, Helle Adser

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that IL-6 regulates exercise-induced gene responses in subcutaneous adipose tissue in mice. Methods: Four months old male IL-6 whole body knockout (KO) mice and C57B wild-type (WT) mice performed 1h of treadmill exercise, where subcutaneous...... adipose tissue (AT) was removed either immediately after, 4h or 10h after exercise as well as from mice not running acutely. Moreover, AT was sampled at resting conditions after 5 weeks of exercise training. Results: AT leptin mRNA decreased immediately after a single running exercise bout in both...

  1. Physiological effects of bioceramic material: harvard step, resting metabolic rate and treadmill running assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Lee, Chi-Ming; Kan, Nai-Wen; Hou, Chien-Wen

    2013-12-31

    Previous biomolecular and animal studies have shown that a room-temperature far-infrared-rayemitting ceramic material (bioceramic) demonstrates physical-biological effects, including the normalization of psychologically induced stress-conditioned elevated heart rate in animals. In this clinical study, the Harvard step test, the resting metabolic rate (RMR) assessment and the treadmill running test were conducted to evaluate possible physiological effects of the bioceramic material in human patients. The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) during the Harvard step test indicated that the bioceramic material significantly increased the high-frequency (HF) power spectrum. In addition, the results of RMR analysis suggest that the bioceramic material reduced oxygen consumption (VO2). Our results demonstrate that the bioceramic material has the tendency to stimulate parasympathetic responses, which may reduce resting energy expenditure and improve cardiorespiratory recovery following exercise.

  2. Oxidative stress increases in overweight individuals following an exercise test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Anne M; Kantor, Mark A

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) causes oxidative stress and evaluate the impact of dietary antioxidant intake, fitness level, and body composition on changes in oxidative stress. Forty-seven overweight subjects were asked to perform an APFT. Creatine kinase (CK), C-reactive protein (CRP), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured before, immediately after, and 24 hr postexercise. CK significantly increased immediately postexercise and at 24 hr postexercise. CRP and GPX significantly increased immediately postexercise, whereas SOD did not change significantly. Antioxidant intake, fitness level, and body composition were found to significantly influence changes in CK, GPX, and SOD after exercise. In conclusion, the APFT causes oxidative stress in overweight subjects. The associations between dietary antioxidants, fitness level, and body composition seen with each of the biomarkers provide support for future research in this area.

  3. Atrial adaptive rate pacing in sick sinus syndrome: effects on exercise capacity and arrhythmias.

    OpenAIRE

    Haywood, G.A.; Katritsis, D; Ward, J; Leigh-Jones, M; Ward, D. E.; Camm, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypotheses that adaptive rate atrial (AAIR) pacing: significantly increases maximal exercise capacity, and results in significant suppression of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmia compared with fixed rate atrial (AAI) pacing. DESIGN--Prospective, randomised, single blind, crossover study with maximal treadmill exercise testing and 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring in AAIR and AAI modes. SETTING--Regional pacing centre. PATIENTS--30 consecutive ...

  4. Exercise Equipment Usability Assessment for a Deep Space Concept Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Brooke M.; Reynolds, David W.

    2015-01-01

    stationary bicycle. With the most current treadmill aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Combined Operational Load-Bearing External Resistance Treadmill (COLBERT), being located in an International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR), the bottom of the conceptual treadmill features a height of 38in. Making the treadmill flush with the floor would be impossible in this rack configuration, as the distance from the outer wall of the spacecraft to the bottom floor would be too shallow. From preliminary sizing, the 38in required for the bottom of the treadmill combined with a 78in operational envelope for a 95th percentile may not be accommodated in the exercise area in a vertical orientation. Figure 2 demonstrates the volume required (in maroon) for an ISPR-bound treadmill in the concept demonstrator. Early indications as seen in this figure indicate that the crew members would contact the ceiling in such an arrangement. An assessment will be conducted to evaluate various orientations of exercise equipment in the concept demonstrator. Orientations to be tested include putting the bottom of the treadmill on the wall, having the treadmill at an angle in the floor both horizontally and vertically, and having a shorter (non-rack bound) treadmill in a vertical orientation on the floor. This assessment will yield findings regarding sizing of the area and how well participants feel they could exercise in such an environment. Due to the restrictions of assessing a microgravity vehicle in a normal-gravity environment, simulations in MSFC's Virtual Environments Lab (VEL) may be necessary. Final deliverables will include recommendations regarding the location and size of possible exercise equipment aboard the SLS-Derived DSH.

  5. Application of exercise testing in the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes Sánchez, Darío

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent developments have added exercise testing and training as part of the clinical practice in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of diseased populations. Exercise testing has been used widely in cardiovascular disease and in some circumstances in pulmonary disease. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing has been used in the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension patients. However, no many studies have tried to evaluate functional capacity, explore prediction of cardio...

  6. Left atrial mechanics strongly predict functional capacity assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing in subjects without structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Luís; Mendes, Sofia Lázaro; Baptista, Rui; Teixeira, Rogério; Oliveira-Santos, Manuel; Ribeiro, Nelson; Coutinho, Rosa; Monteiro, Victor; Martins, Rui; Castro, Graça; Ferreira, Maria João; Pego, Mariano

    2017-05-01

    Left atrium function is essential for cardiovascular performance and is evaluable by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (2D-STE). Our aim was to determine how echocardiographic parameters interrelate with exercise capacity and ventilatory efficiency in subjects with no structural heart disease. Asymptomatic volunteers, in sinus rhythm and with normal biventricular size and function, were recruited from a community-based population. Individuals with moderate-to-severe valvular disease, pulmonary hypertension, and history of cardiac disease were excluded. We performed a transthoracic echocardiogram and assessed left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) mechanics via 2D-STE. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing by treadmill took place immediately thereafter. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2) served as measure of functional capacity and ventilation/carbon dioxide output (VE/VCO2) slope as surrogate of ventilation/perfusion mismatch. 20 subjects were included (age 51 ± 14 years, male gender 65%). Peak VO2 strongly correlated with age (r = -0.83; P mechanics, particularly with LA conduit strain rate (SR) (r = -0.82; P mechanics. A similar pattern of associations was identified for VE/VCO2 slope. In multivariate analysis, LA conduit SR (β = -0.69; P = 0.02) emerged as sole independent correlate of peak VO2, adjusted for age and for E/e' ratio (adjusted r 2  = 0.76; P mechanics displayed strong associations with peak VO2 and VE/VCO2 slope. LA conduit-phase SR seems best suited as echocardiographic marker of functional capacity in subjects with no structural heart disease.

  7. New Exercise-Dipyridamole Combined Test for Nuclear Cardiology in Insufficient Effort: Appropriate Diagnostic Sensitivity Keeping Exercise Prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortinas, Inés Vidal, E-mail: invi@montevideo.com.uy; Beretta, Mario; Alonso, Omar; Mut, Fernando [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear do Hospital ‘Asociación Española’, Br. Artigas 1515, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2015-08-15

    Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients not reaching 85% of the maximum predicted heart rate (MPHR) has reduced sensitivity. In an attempt to maintain diagnostic sensitivity without losing functional exercise data, a new exercise and dipyridamole combined protocol (EDCP) was developed. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of this protocol and to compare its diagnostic sensitivity against standard exercise and dipyridamole protocols. In patients not reaching a sufficient exercise (SE) test and with no contraindications, 0.56 mg/kg of dipyridamole were IV administered over 1 minute simultaneously with exercise, followed by 99mTc-MIBI injection. Of 155 patients, 41 had MPS with EDCP, 47 had a SE test (≥ 85% MPHR) and 67 underwent the dipyridamole alone test (DIP). They all underwent coronary angiography within 3 months. The three stress methods for diagnosis of coronary lesions had their sensitivity compared. For stenosis ≥ 70%, EDCP yielded 97% sensitivity, SE 90% and DIP 95% (p = 0.43). For lesions ≥ 50%, the sensitivities were 94%, 88% and 95%, respectively (p = 0.35). Side effects of EDCP were present in only 12% of the patients, significantly less than with DIP (p < 0.001). The proposed combined protocol is a valid and safe method that yields adequate diagnostic sensitivity, keeping exercise prognostic information in patients unable to reach target heart rate, with fewer side effects than the DIP.

  8. Prevalence of Exercise-Induced Arterial Hypoxemia in Distance Runners at Sea Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantini, Keren; Tanner, David A; Gavin, Timothy P; Harms, Craig A; Stager, Joel M; Chapman, Robert F

    2017-05-01

    It has been reported that ~50% of endurance-trained men demonstrate exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia (EIAH) during heavy exercise. However, this often-cited prevalence rate comes from a single study using a cohort of 25 highly trained men who completed maximal cycle ergometry. As arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2) during maximal exercise is reported to be significantly lower during treadmill versus cycle ergometry in the same subjects, we hypothesized that the prevalence of EIAH would be greater than previously reported (and commonly referenced) in a larger cohort of highly endurance-trained men during maximal treadmill running. Data from 124 highly trained male distance runners (V˙O2max range = 60.3-84.7 mL·kg·min) were retrospectively examined from previously published studies completed in the Indiana University Human Performance Laboratory. Subjects completed a constant speed, progressive-grade treadmill exercise test to volitional exhaustion, and arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2ear) in all subjects was estimated using the same oximeter (Hewlett Packard 47201A). Using similar inclusion criteria as previously published for highly trained (V˙O2max > 68 mL·kg·min) and for EIAH (SaO2ear ≤ 91%), 55 of 79 subjects (70%) exhibited exercise-induced arterial desaturation. Across all 124 subjects, 104 (84%) demonstrated at least moderate EIAH (SaO2ear ≤ 93%) during maximal treadmill exercise. SaO2ear was significantly yet weakly correlated with V˙E/V˙O2 (P < 0.01, r = 0.28) and V˙E/V˙CO2 (P < 0.001, r = 0.33) but not with V˙O2max. These results indicate that the prevalence of EIAH in highly trained men during maximal treadmill exercise at sea level is greater compared with previously suggested data, with exercise mode perhaps playing a factor in the number of athletes who experience EIAH.

  9. Exercise training in intermittent claudication: effects on antioxidant genes, inflammatory mediators and proangiogenic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Witold N; Mika, Piotr; Nowobilski, Roman; Kusinska, Katarzyna; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Nizankowski, Rafal; Józkowicz, Alicja; Szczeklik, Andrzej; Dulak, Jozef

    2012-11-01

    Exercise training remains a therapy of choice in intermittent claudication (IC). However, too exhaustive exercise may cause ischaemic injury and inflammatory response. We tested the impact of three-month treadmill training and single treadmill exercise on antioxidant gene expressions, cytokine concentrations and number of marrow-derived proangiogenic progenitor cells (PPC) in the blood of IC patients. Blood samples of 12 patients were collected before and after training, before and 1, 3 and 6 hours after the single exercise. PPCs were analysed with flow cytometry, cytokine concentrations were checked with Milliplex MAP, while expression of mRNAs and miRNAs was evaluated with qRT-PCR. Treadmill training improved pain-free walking time (from 144 ± 44 seconds [s] to 311 ± 134 s, p=0.02) and maximum walking time (from 578 ± 293 s to 859 ± 423 s, p=0.01) in IC patients. Before, but not after training, the single treadmill exercise increased the number of circulating CD45dimCD34+CD133-KDR+ PPCs (p=0.048), decreased expression of HMOX1 (p=0.04) in circulating leukocytes, reduced tumour necrosis factor-α (p=0.03) and tended to elevate myeloperoxidase (p=0.06) concentrations in plasma. In contrast, total plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 was decreased by single exercise only after, but not before training (p=0.02). Both before and after training the single exercise decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (p=0.006 and p=0.03) concentration and increased SOD1 (p=0.001 and p=0.01) expression. Patients after training had also less interleukin-6 (p=0.03), but more MCP-1 (p=0.04) in the blood. In conclusion, treadmill training improves walking performance of IC patients, attenuates the single exercise-induced changes in gene expressions or PPC mobilisation, but may also lead to higher production of some proinflammatory cytokines.

  10. Effectiveness of Treadmill Training on Balance Control in Elderly People: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Pirouzi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise would improve postural stability, which is an essential factor in preventing accidental fall among the elderly population. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of treadmill walking on balance improvement among the elderly people. A total of 30 community dwelling older adults with a Berg Balance Scale score of 36-48 and the ability to walk without aid were considered and divided into control (n=15 and experimental (n=15 groups. Individuals in the experimental group participated in 30 minutes of forward and backward treadmill training based on three times a week interval for a period of four weeks. Individuals in the control group were instructed to continue with their daily routine activity. Before and after training, gait speed was measured by six-minute walk test and balance ability was evaluated by Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale (FABS and Berg Balance Scale (BBS tests. Postural sway items such as the Center of Pressure (COP, average displacement and velocity were evaluated by using a force platform system. Data were collected in quiet standing, tandem position and standing on foam pads before and after intervention. After intervention, balance variables in the experimental group indicated a significant improvement in quiet standing on firm and foam surfaces, but no considerable improvement was shown in tandem position. A between-group comparison showed a significant reduction in COP velocity in the sagittal plane (P=0.030 during quiet standing and in the frontal plane (P=0.001 during standing on foam, whereas no significant reduction in COP parameters during tandem position was found. It is recommended that twelve sessions of forward and backward treadmill walk are effective in balance improvement in elderly people. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201209199440N2

  11. Commercial Motion Sensor Based Low-Cost and Convenient Interactive Treadmill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghyun Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Interactive treadmills were developed to improve the simulation of overground walking when compared to conventional treadmills. However, currently available interactive treadmills are expensive and inconvenient, which limits their use. We propose a low-cost and convenient version of the interactive treadmill that does not require expensive equipment and a complicated setup. As a substitute for high-cost sensors, such as motion capture systems, a low-cost motion sensor was used to recognize the subject’s intention for speed changing. Moreover, the sensor enables the subject to make a convenient and safe stop using gesture recognition. For further cost reduction, the novel interactive treadmill was based on an inexpensive treadmill platform and a novel high-level speed control scheme was applied to maximize performance for simulating overground walking. Pilot tests with ten healthy subjects were conducted and results demonstrated that the proposed treadmill achieves similar performance to a typical, costly, interactive treadmill that contains a motion capture system and an instrumented treadmill, while providing a convenient and safe method for stopping.

  12. A Comparison of Exercise and Meditation in Reducing Physiological Response to Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Wesley E.

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effects of brief treadmill exercise and meditation with a placebo-control treatment for reduction in several physiological and psychological measures of stress, anxiety, and tension before and after a written final examination in 48 high-test anxiety subjects. The subjects, 24 men and 24 women,…

  13. Cardiopulmonary Response to Exercise Testing in People with Chronic Stroke: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A. Billinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. This study investigated the cardiopulmonary response and safety of exercise testing at peak effort in people during the chronic stage of stroke recovery. Methods. This retrospective study examined data from 62 individuals with chronic stroke (males: 32; mean (SD; age: (12.0 yr participating in an exercise test. Results. Both males and females had low cardiorespiratory fitness levels. No significant differences were found between gender for peak HR (=0.27, or VO2 peak (=0.29. Males demonstrated higher values for minute ventilation, tidal volume, and respiratory exchange ratio. No major adverse events were observed in the exercise tests conducted. Discussion and Conclusion. There are differences between gender that may play a role in exercise testing performance and should be considered when developing exercise programs. The low VO2 peak of this cohort of chronic stroke survivors suggests the need for participation in exercise interventions.

  14. The effects of exergaming and treadmill training on gait, balance, and cognition in a person with Parkinson's disease: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhajosula, Srikant; McMillion, Amy K; Freund, Jane E

    2017-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly impairs posture, gait, and cognition. Exercise in the form of aerobic activity as well as exergaming may improve motor ability and cognition in persons with PD. Exergaming and treadmill training can be a practical form of exercise within the home; however, there is minimal research on this combined multimodal intervention for persons with PD. We investigated the effects of this combined intervention on cognition, balance, and gait in a person with PD through supervised lab sessions augmented by home-based sessions. This case study utilized an ABA single subject experimental design with 4 weeks of pre-intervention, followed by 8 weeks of intervention, and 4 weeks of post-intervention. The intervention consisted of treadmill walking and Xbox Kinect exergaming, 30 minutes each, performed unsupervised at home and at supervised lab sessions. The two standard deviation band method was used to determine significance. MiniBEST test, 2-minute walk distance, sway area, endurance test, and a few parameters of gait initiation and gait improved significantly throughout the intervention period. Only a few measures sustained the improvement 4 weeks after completion of intervention. Eight weeks of treadmill and exergaming intervention with a person with PD improved static and dynamic postural control measures, but not gait, cognition, endurance, and clinical measures of balance. Longer and more intense multimodal intervention may be warranted.

  15. Treadmill running prevents age-related memory deficit and alters neurotrophic factors and oxidative damage in the hippocampus of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzella, Cláudia; Neves, Juliana Dalibor; Vizuete, Adriana Fernanda; Aristimunha, Dirceu; Kolling, Janaína; Longoni, Aline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva; Wyse, Angela T S; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2017-09-15

    Clinical and pre-clinical studies indicate that exercise is beneficial to many aspects of brain function especially during aging. The present study investigated the effects of a treadmill running protocol in young (3month-old) and aged (22month-old) male Wistar rats, on: I) cognitive function, as assessed by spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze; II) oxidative stress parameters and the expression of neurotrophic factors BDNF, NT-3, IGF-1 and VEGF in the hippocampus. Animals of both ages were assigned to sedentary (non-exercised) and exercised (20min of daily running sessions, 3 times per week for 4weeks) groups. Cognition was assessed by a reference memory task run in the Morris water maze; twenty four hours after last session of behavioral testing hippocampi were collected for biochemical analysis. Results demonstrate that the moderate treadmill running exercise: I) prevented age-related deficits in reference memory in the Morris water maze; II) prevented the age-related increase of reactive oxygen species levels and lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus; III) caused an increase of BDNF, NT-3 and IGF-1 expression in the hippocampus of aged rats. Taken together, results suggest that both exercise molecular effects, namely the reduction of oxidative stress and the increase of neurotrophic factors expression in the hippocampus, might be related to its positive effect on memory performance in aged rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Responsiveness of Various Exercise-Testing Protocols to Therapeutic Interventions in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Borel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise intolerance is a key element in the pathophysiology and course of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. As such, evaluating exercise tolerance has become an important part of the management of COPD. A wide variety of exercise-testing protocols is currently available, each protocol having its own strengths and weaknesses relative to their discriminative, methodological, and evaluative characteristics. This paper aims to review the responsiveness of several exercise-testing protocols used to evaluate the efficacy of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to improve exercise tolerance in COPD. This will be done taking into account the minimally important difference, an important concept in the interpretation of the findings about responsiveness of exercise testing protocols. Among the currently available exercise-testing protocols (incremental, constant work rate, or self-paced, constant work rate exercise tests (cycle endurance test and endurance shuttle walking test emerge as the most responsive ones for detecting and quantifying changes in exercise capacity after an intervention in COPD.

  17. The talk test: a useful tool for prescribing and monitoring exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jennifer L; Pipe, Andrew L

    2014-09-01

    This review focuses on recent literature examining the validity and reliability of the talk test for prescribing and monitoring exercise intensity. The utility of the talk test for high-intensity interval training and recently proposed exercise training guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation is also examined. In healthy adults and patients with cardiovascular disease, comfortable speech is likely possible (equivocal or last positive talk test stage) when exercise intensity is below the ventilatory or lactate threshold, and not likely possible (negative talk test stage) when exercise intensity exceeds the ventilatory or lactate threshold. The talk test can be used to produce exercise intensities (moderate-to-vigorous intensity, 40-80% (Equation is included in full-text article.)) within accepted Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation and American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for exercise training, to monitor exercise training for patients with atrial fibrillation, and help avoid exertional ischemia. The talk test has been shown to be consistent across various modes of exercise (i.e., walking, jogging, cycling, elliptical trainer and stair stepper). It may not be practical for high-intensity interval training. The talk test is a valid, reliable, practical and inexpensive tool for prescribing and monitoring exercise intensity in competitive athletes, healthy active adults and patients with cardiovascular disease. Healthcare professionals should feel comfortable in advocating its use in a variety of clinical and health-promotion settings.

  18. Benefits, Consequences, and Uncertainties of Conventional (Exercise) Countermeasure Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will review the pros, cons, and uncertainties of using exercise countermeasures in hypothetical long duration exploration missions. The use of artificial gravity and exercise will be briefly discussed. One benefit to continued use of exercise is related to our extensive experience with spaceflight exercise hardware and programming. Exercise has been a part of each space mission dating back to the 1960's when simple isometric and bungee exercises were performed in the Gemini capsule. Over the next 50 years, exercise hardware improved cumulating in today's ISS suite of exercise equipment: Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization System (CEVIS), Treadmill (T2) and Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED). Today's exercise equipment is the most robust ever to be flown in space and allows the variety and intensity of exercise that might reasonably be expected to maintain muscle mass and function, bone density and cardiovascular fitness. A second benefit is related to the large body of research literature on exercise training. There is a considerable body of supporting research literature including >40,000 peer reviewed research articles on exercise training in humans. A third benefit of exercise is its effectiveness. With the addition of T2 and ARED to our ISS exercise suite, crew member outcomes on standard medical tests have improved. Additionally exercise has other positive side effects such as stress relief, possible improvement of immune function, improved sleep, etc. Exercise is not without its consequences. The major cons to performance of in-flight exercise are the time and equipment required. Currently crew are scheduled 2.5 hrs/day for exercise and there is considerable cost to develop, fly and maintain exercise hardware. While no major injuries have been reported on ISS, there is always some risk of injury with any form of exercise There are several uncertainties going forward; these relate mostly to the development of

  19. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis with negative allergy testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Jacob; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe

    2014-02-06

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is a disorder where exercise following allergen ingestion triggers anaphylaxis although exercise and allergen exposure are independently tolerated. The diagnosis of FDEIA is based on a characteristic clinical history. The culprit allergen is usually confirmed through the use of skin prick testing (SPT) serum-specific IgE levels and a food-exercise challenge. We present a case of FDEIA suggested by clinical history and open food-exercise challenge with negative specific IgE levels and SPT that highlights the challenges involved in diagnosing and managing this rare disorder.

  20. The relevance of performing exercise test before starting supervised physical exercise in asymptomatic cardiovascular patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemz, Bárbara Nascimento de Carvalho; Reis-Neto, Edgard Torres Dos; Jennings, Fábio; Siqueira, Usmary Sardinha; Klemz, Fábio Kadratz; Pinheiro, Helder Henrique Costa; Sato, Emília Inoue; Natour, Jamil; Szejnfeld, Vera Lúcia; Pinheiro, Marcelo de Medeiros

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the impact and risk factors associated with an abnormal exercise test (ET) in systemic inflammatory rheumatic disease (SIRD) patients before commencing supervised physical exercise. A total of 235 SIRD patients were enrolled in three controlled clinical trials, including 103 RA, 42 SLE and 57 AS patients. The control group consisted of 231 healthy, sedentary subjects matched for age, gender and BMI. All performed an ET, according to Bruce's or Ellestad's protocol. Cardiovascular disease risk factors, medications, comorbidities and details of each SIRD were assessed. SIRD patients had a higher percentage of abnormal ETs compared with the control group, especially exercise hypertensive behaviour, higher oxygen consumption, higher resting heart rate and heart rate at the first minute of recovery, and chronotropic incompetence (C-Inc) (P exercise. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Reliability and validity of an agility-like incremental exercise test with multidirectional change-of-direction movements in response to a visual stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Dennis-Peter; Kunz, Philipp; Sperlich, Billy

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables, that is, peak oxygen uptake (V'O2peak) and heart rate (HRpeak), obtained from an agility-like incremental exercise test for team sport athletes. To investigate the test-retest reliability, 25 team sport athletes (age: 22 ± 3 years, body mass: 75 ± 7 kg, height: 182 ± 6 cm) performed an agility-like incremental exercise test on the SpeedCourt (SC) system incorporating multidirectional change-of-direction (COD) movements twice. For each step of the incremental SC test, the athletes covered a 40-m distance interspersed with a 10-sec rest period. Each 40 m distance was split into short sprints (2.25-6.36 m) separated by multidirectional COD movements (0°-180°), which were performed in response to an external visual stimulus. All performance and physiological data were validated with variables obtained from a ramp-like treadmill and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 2 test (Yo-Yo IR2). The incremental SC test revealed high test-retest reliability for the time to exhaustion (ICC = 0.85, typical error [TE] = 0.44, and CV% = 3.88), V'O2peak, HRpeak, ventilation, and breathing frequency (ICC = 0.84, 0.72, 0.89, 0.77, respectively). The time to exhaustion (r = 0.50, 0.74) of the incremental SC test as well as the peak values for V'O2 (r = 0.59, 0.52), HR (r = 0.75, 0.78), ventilation (r = 0.57, 0.57), and breathing frequency (r = 0.68, 0.68) were significantly correlated (P ≤ 0.01) with the ramp-like treadmill test and the Yo-Yo IR2, respectively. The incremental SC test represents a reliable and valid method to assess peak values for V'O2 and HR with respect to the specific demand of team sport match play by incorporating multidirectional COD movements, decision making, and cognitive components. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the

  2. Effects of treadmill running and fatigue on impact acceleration in distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, José Antonio; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana Belloch, Salvador; Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    The effects of treadmill running on impact acceleration were examined together with the interaction between running surface and runner's fatigue state. Twenty recreational runners (11 men and 9 women) ran overground and on a treadmill (at 4.0 m/s) before and after a fatigue protocol consisting of a 30-minute run at 85% of individual maximal aerobic speed. Impact accelerations were analysed using two lightweight capacitive uniaxial accelerometers. A two-way repeated-measure analysis of variance showed that, in the pre-fatigue condition, the treadmill running decreased head and tibial peak impact accelerations and impact rates (the rate of change of acceleration), but no significant difference was observed between the two surfaces in shock attenuation. There was no significant difference in acceleration parameters between the two surfaces in the post-fatigue condition. There was a significant interaction between surface (treadmill and overground) and fatigue state (pre-fatigue and post-fatigue). In particular, fatigue when running overground decreased impact acceleration severity, but it had no such effect when running on the treadmill. The effects of treadmill running and the interaction need to be taken into account when interpreting the results of studies that use a treadmill in their experimental protocols, and when prescribing physical exercise.

  3. Prolonged exercise testing in two children with a mild Multiple Acyl-CoA-Dehydrogenase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helders PJM

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Acyl-CoA-Dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by impaired oxidation of fatty acids and some amino acids. Methods We were interested whether children with MADD could tolerate a prolonged low-intensity exercise test and if this test could have any additional diagnostic value. Therefore, we performed a maximal exercise test and a low-intensity prolonged exercise test in 2 patients with MADD and in 5 control subjects. During a prolonged exercise test the subjects exercised on a cycle ergometer at a constant workload of 30% of their maximum for 90 minutes and heart rate, oxygen uptake, fuel utilization and changes in relevant blood and urinary parameters were monitored. Results The tests were tolerated well. During the prolonged exercise test the fatty acid oxidation (FAO was quite low compared to 5 control subjects, while characteristic metabolites of MADD appeared in plasma and urine. Conclusion We suggest that the prolonged exercise test could be of diagnostic importance and might replace the fasting test as a diagnostic procedure in some cases, particularly in patients with anamnestic signs of intolerance for prolonged exercise.

  4. Bungee force level, stiffness, and variation during treadmill locomotion in simulated microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witt, John K; Schaffner, Grant; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L

    2014-04-01

    Crewmembers performing treadmill exercise on the International Space Station must wear a harness with an external gravity replacement force that is created by elastomer bungees. The quantification of the total external force, displacement, stiffness, and force variation is important for understanding the forces applied to the crewmember during typical exercise. Data were collected during static trials in the laboratory from a single subject and four subjects were tested while walking at 1.34 m x s(-1) and running at 2.24 m x s(-1) and 3.13 m x s(-1) on a treadmill during simulated microgravity in parabolic flight. The external force was provided by bungees and carabiner clips in configurations commonly used by crewmembers. Total external force, displacement, and force variation in the bungee system were measured, from which stiffness was computed. Mean external force ranged from 431 to 804 N (54-131% bodyweight) across subjects and conditions. Mean displacement was 4 to 8 cm depending upon gait speed. Mean stiffness was affected by bungee configuration and ranged from 1.73 to 29.20 N x cm(-1). Force variation for single bungee configurations was 2.61-4.48% of total external force and between 4.30-57.5% total external force for two-bungee configurations. The external force supplied to crewmembers by elastomer bungees provided a range of loading levels with variations that occur throughout the gait cycle. The quantification of bungee-loading characteristics is important to better define the system currently used by crewmembers during exercise.

  5. The diagnostic accuracy of exercise electrocardiography - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. L.; Bungo, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    The cardiovascular 'stress test', and particularly the graded treadmill exercist test, has gained wide acceptance as a diagnostic aid in searching for ischemic heart disease and as a prognostic indicator for those with known coronary artery disease. Controversies still exist, however, in its use in mass screening and in interpreting equivocal tests. A review of the use and value of electrocardiographic exercise testing is presented. Topics such as its use in asymptomatic individuals, the adjuvant use of clinical examination, and the examination of ancillary treadmill parameters are presented. No attempt is made to detail the very significant contributions of radionuclide scanning. The positive exercise electrocardiogram in the asymptomatic subject is discussed and guidelines for clinical management are offered.

  6. Effect of forced exercise and exercise withdrawal on memory, serum and hippocampal corticosterone levels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that there are positive effects of exercise on learning and memory. Moreover, some studies have demonstrated that forced exercise plays the role of a stressor. This study was aimed at investigating the effects of different timing of exercise and exercise withdrawal on memory, and serum and hippocampal corticosterone (CORT) levels. Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: control, sham, exercise-rest (exercise withdrawal), rest-exercise (exercised group), and exercise-exercise (continuous exercise). Rats were forced to run on a treadmill for 1 h/day at a speed 20-21-m/min. Memory function was evaluated by the passive avoidance test in different intervals (1, 7 and 21 days) after foot shock. Findings showed that after the exercise withdrawal, short-term and mid-term memories, had significant enhancement compared to the control group, while the long-term memory did not present this result. In addition, the serum and hippocampal CORT levels were at the basal levels after the rest period in the exercise-rest group. In the rest-exercise group, exercise improved mid- and long-term memories, whereas continuous exercise improved all types short-, mid- and long-term memories, particularly the mid-term memory. Twenty-one and forty-two days of exercise significantly decreased the serum and hippocampal CORT levels. It seems that exercise for at least 21 days with no rest could affect biochemical factors in the brain. Also, regular continuous exercise plays an important role in memory function. Hence, the duration and withdraw of exercise are important factors for the neurobiological aspects of the memory responses.

  7. Reliability Of Kraus-Weber Exercise Test As An Evaluation Tool In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine strength and flexibility of the spinal and hamstring muscles among University of Ibadan students and the reliability of Kraus-Weber (K-W) exercise test. The Kraus-Weber test, involves a series of exercises that measure minimum strength and flexibility of the back, abdominal, psoas ...

  8. Qualified Fitness and Exercise as Professionals and Exercise Prescription: Evolution of the PAR-Q and Canadian Aerobic Fitness Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Roy J

    2015-04-01

    Traditional approaches to exercise prescription have included a preliminary medical screening followed by exercise tests of varying sophistication. To maximize population involvement, qualified fitness and exercise professionals (QFEPs) have used a self-administered screening questionnaire (the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire, PAR-Q) and a simple measure of aerobic performance (the Canadian Aerobic Fitness Test, CAFT). However, problems have arisen in applying the original protocol to those with chronic disease. Recent developments have addressed these issues. Evolution of the PAR-Q and CAFT protocol is reviewed from their origins in 1974 to the current electronic decision tree model of exercise screening and prescription. About a fifth of apparently healthy adults responded positively to the original PAR-Q instrument, thus requiring an often unwarranted referral to a physician. Minor changes of wording did not overcome this problem. However, a consensus process has now developed an electronic decision tree for stratification of exercise risk not only for healthy individuals, but also for those with various types of chronic disease. The new approach to clearance greatly reduces physician referrals and extends the role of QFEPs. The availability of effective screening and simple fitness testing should contribute to the goal of maximizing physical activity in the entire population.

  9. Comparative determination of ventilatory efficiency from constant load and incremental exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algul, S; Ugur, F A; Ayar, A; Ozcelik, O

    2017-08-15

    The analysis of the relationships between minute ventilation (VE) to CO2 output (VCO2), referred to as ventilatory efficiency, in response to incremental exercise testing, is considered a useful index for assessing the presence and severity of cardiopulmonary and metabolic diseases. The effects of constant load exercise testing performed at work intensity associated with anaerobic threshold (AT) and respiratory compensation points (RCP), on the accurate measurements of ventilatory efficiency are not well known. The aim of this present study was to investigate the reliability of the VE/VCO2 ratio obtained from constant load exercise tests performed with two important metabolic rates (at the AT and RCP) and compare it to that of those of incremental exercise tests. A total of 20 young male (20.8±0.4 yr) subjects initially performed an incremental exercise test and then two constant load exercise tests, on different days. Respiratory and pulmonary gas exchange variables were used to estimate AT and RCP. A paired t-test was used to analyse data. AT and RCP (average) occurred the at 60% and at 71% of peak O2 uptake, respectively. The lowest VE/VCO2 ratio recorded within the first 2 minutes of constant load exercise tests with a work load of AT (26.4±0.3) and RCP (26.7±0.5) was not statistically different from the lowest ratio obtained from the incremental exercise tests (26.0±0.7). In the constant load exercise test, despite the different metabolic rates, the increase in ventilation corresponded closely with the increase in CO2 production, reflecting an optimal ventilation and perfusion ratio. Clinicians should consider the constant load exercise test work load associated with AT and RCP as it provides a meaningful lowest value for ventilatory efficiency.

  10. Six-minute stepper test: a valid clinical exercise tolerance test for COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosbois JM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available JM Grosbois,1,2 C Riquier,3 B Chehere,4 J Coquart,5 H Béhal,6 F Bart,2 B Wallaert,2,3 C Chenivesse3 1FormAction Santé, Pérenchies, France; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Germon et Gauthier, Béthune, France; 3Department of Respiratory Medicine Immunology and Allergy, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille, Competence Center for rare lung diseases, University Lille 2, Lille, France; 4EA 7369, URePSSS, Multidisciplinary Research Unit in Sport Health Society, University Lille 2, Lille, France; 5Faculty of Sport Sciences, Sports and Physical Activity, Center for Ecology and Transformation, University of Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan, France; 6Department of Statistical Methods and Biostatistics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille, University of Lille Nord, Lille, France Introduction: Exercise tolerance testing is an integral part of the pulmonary rehabilitation (PR management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The 6-minute stepper test (6MST is a new, well-tolerated, reproducible exercise test, which can be performed without any spatial constraints.Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the results of the 6MST to those obtained during a 6-minute walk test (6MWT and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET in a cohort of COPD patients.Methods: Ninety-one COPD patients managed by outpatient PR and assessed by 6MST, 6MWT, and CPET were retrospectively included in this study. Correlations between the number of steps on the 6MST, the distance covered on the 6MWT, oxygen consumption, and power at the ventilatory threshold and at maximum effort during CPET were analyzed before starting PR, and the improvement on the 6MST and 6MWT was compared after PR.Results: The number of steps on the 6MST was significantly correlated with the distance covered on the 6MWT (r=0.56; P<0.0001, the power at maximum effort (r=0.46; P<0.0001, and oxygen consumption at maximum effort (r=0.39; P<0

  11. Prognostic value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinagra, Gianfranco; Iorio, Annamaria; Merlo, Marco; Cannatà, Antonio; Stolfo, Davide; Zambon, Elena; Di Nora, Concetta; Paolillo, Stefania; Barbati, Giulia; Berton, Emanuela; Carriere, Cosimo; Magrì, Damiano; Cattadori, Gaia; Confalonieri, Marco; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2016-11-15

    Although cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is considered as an important tool in risk stratification of patients with heart failure (HF), prognostic data in the specific setting of Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy (iDCM) are still undetermined. The aim of the study was to test the prognostic value of CPET in a large cohort of iDCM patients. We analyzed 381 iDCM patients who consecutively performed CPET. The study end-point was a composite of cardiovascular death/urgent heart transplantation (CVD/HTx). In the overall population the average values of peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2/kg) and percent-predicted peak VO2 (peak VO2%) were 17.1±5.1ml/kg/min and 59±15%, respectively. Mean VE/VCO2 slope was 29.8±6.1. During a median follow-up of 47months (interquartile range 23-84), 83 patients experienced CVD/HTx. Peak VO2% (Area Under the Curve [AUC] 0.74; 95% CI 0.71-0.85, p29 for VE/VCO2 slope. At multivariable analysis peak VO2% and VE/VCO2 slope were the strongest predictors of CVD/HTx, either as continuous and categorical variables, whereas peak VO2/kg was not independently related with prognosis. In a large population of iDCM patients peak VO2% and VE/VCO2 slope emerged as the strongest prognostic CPET variables. Prospective studies will be necessary to confirm these data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of Breathing Conditions During Exercise Testing on Training Prescription in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neunhäuserer, Daniel; Steidle-Kloc, Eva; Bergamin, Marco; Weiss, Gertraud; Ermolao, Andrea; Lamprecht, Bernd; Studnicka, Michael; Niebauer, Josef

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated whether different breathing conditions during exercise testing will influence measures of exercise capacity commonly used for training prescription in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Twenty-seven patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec = 45.6 [9.4]%) performed three maximal exercise tests within 8 days, but at least 48 hrs apart. Subjects were thereby breathing either room air through a tightly fitting face mask like during any cardiopulmonary exercise test (MASK), room air without mask (No-MASK), or 10 l/min of oxygen via nasal cannula (No-MASK + O2). Cycling protocols were identical for all tests (start = 20 watts, increment = 10 males/5 females watts/min). Maximal work rate (90.4 [33.8], 100.3 [34.8], 107.4 [35.9] watts, P exercise testing resulted in an 18.8% difference in maximal work rate, likely causing underdosing or overdosing of exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Face masks reduced whereas supplemental oxygen increased patients' exercise capacity. For accurate prescription of exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, breathing conditions during testing should closely match training conditions.

  13. The effect of inhibition of acyl coenzyme A-cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) on exercise performance in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, William R; Klepack, Ellen; Nehler, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G; Blue, John; Imus, James; Criqui, Michael H

    2004-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that avasimibe, an inhibitor of acyl coenzyme A-cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), would improve treadmill exercise performance in patients with claudication secondary to peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Four hundred and forty-two patients with PAD (ankle-brachial index in the index leg of or =20% reduction post-exercise) were enrolled from 39 centers in the USA. Patients were randomized to receive oral avasimibe 50 mg, 250 mg, 750 mg or placebo for a treatment period of 12 months. Changes from baseline in peak walking time (PWT) using a graded treadmill protocol were compared among groups after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Individual group comparisons were considered statistically significant if p ACAT inhibitor avasimibe did not show clear evidence of benefit on treadmill exercise performance in patients with PAD, the results add to our knowledge of the impact of treatments directed at atherosclerosis on functional endpoints.

  14. Sex Differences in Cardiorespiratory Fitness and All-Cause Mortality: The Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Juraschek, Stephen P; Whelton, Seamus; Dardari, Zeina A; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Michos, Erin D; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram; Qureshi, Waqas T; Brawner, Clinton A; Keteyian, Steven J; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    To determine whether sex modifies the relationship between fitness and mortality. We included 57,284 patients without coronary artery disease or heart failure who completed a routine treadmill exercise test between 1991 and 2009. We determined metabolic equivalent tasks (METs) and linked patient records with mortality data via the Social Security Death Index. Multivariable Cox regression was used to determine the association between sex, fitness, and all-cause mortality. There were 29,470 men (51.4%) and 27,814 women (48.6%) with mean ages of 53 and 54 years, respectively. Overall, men achieved 1.7 METs higher than women (Pmortality rate for men in each MET group was similar to that for women, who achieved an average of 2.6 METs lower (P=.004). Fitness was inversely associated with mortality in both men (hazard ratio [HR], 0.84 per 1 MET; 95% CI, 0.83-0.85) and women (HR, 0.83 per 1 MET; 95% CI, 0.81-0.84). This relationship did not plateau at high or low MET values. Although men demonstrated 1.7 METs higher than women, their survival was equivalent to that of women demonstrating 2.6 METs lower. Furthermore, higher MET values were associated with lower mortality for both men and women across the range of MET values. These findings are useful for tailoring prognostic information and lifestyle guidance to men and women undergoing stress testing. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Predicting diabetes mellitus using SMOTE and ensemble machine learning approach: The Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Alghamdi

    Full Text Available Machine learning is becoming a popular and important approach in the field of medical research. In this study, we investigate the relative performance of various machine learning methods such as Decision Tree, Naïve Bayes, Logistic Regression, Logistic Model Tree and Random Forests for predicting incident diabetes using medical records of cardiorespiratory fitness. In addition, we apply different techniques to uncover potential predictors of diabetes. This FIT project study used data of 32,555 patients who are free of any known coronary artery disease or heart failure who underwent clinician-referred exercise treadmill stress testing at Henry Ford Health Systems between 1991 and 2009 and had a complete 5-year follow-up. At the completion of the fifth year, 5,099 of those patients have developed diabetes. The dataset contained 62 attributes classified into four categories: demographic characteristics, disease history, medication use history, and stress test vital signs. We developed an Ensembling-based predictive model using 13 attributes that were selected based on their clinical importance, Multiple Linear Regression, and Information Gain Ranking methods. The negative effect of the imbalance class of the constructed model was handled by Synthetic Minority Oversampling Technique (SMOTE. The overall performance of the predictive model classifier was improved by the Ensemble machine learning approach using the Vote method with three Decision Trees (Naïve Bayes Tree, Random Forest, and Logistic Model Tree and achieved high accuracy of prediction (AUC = 0.92. The study shows the potential of ensembling and SMOTE approaches for predicting incident diabetes using cardiorespiratory fitness data.

  16. Predicting diabetes mellitus using SMOTE and ensemble machine learning approach: The Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Manal; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Keteyian, Steven; Brawner, Clinton; Ehrman, Jonathan; Sakr, Sherif

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning is becoming a popular and important approach in the field of medical research. In this study, we investigate the relative performance of various machine learning methods such as Decision Tree, Naïve Bayes, Logistic Regression, Logistic Model Tree and Random Forests for predicting incident diabetes using medical records of cardiorespiratory fitness. In addition, we apply different techniques to uncover potential predictors of diabetes. This FIT project study used data of 32,555 patients who are free of any known coronary artery disease or heart failure who underwent clinician-referred exercise treadmill stress testing at Henry Ford Health Systems between 1991 and 2009 and had a complete 5-year follow-up. At the completion of the fifth year, 5,099 of those patients have developed diabetes. The dataset contained 62 attributes classified into four categories: demographic characteristics, disease history, medication use history, and stress test vital signs. We developed an Ensembling-based predictive model using 13 attributes that were selected based on their clinical importance, Multiple Linear Regression, and Information Gain Ranking methods. The negative effect of the imbalance class of the constructed model was handled by Synthetic Minority Oversampling Technique (SMOTE). The overall performance of the predictive model classifier was improved by the Ensemble machine learning approach using the Vote method with three Decision Trees (Naïve Bayes Tree, Random Forest, and Logistic Model Tree) and achieved high accuracy of prediction (AUC = 0.92). The study shows the potential of ensembling and SMOTE approaches for predicting incident diabetes using cardiorespiratory fitness data.

  17. Effects of acute treadmill running at different intensities on activities of serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor neurons, and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tomomi; Nishii, Ayu; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kubota, Natsuko; Nishijima, Takeshi; Kita, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that physical exercise can reduce and prevent the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety. Activation of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is implicated in antidepressant/anxiolytic properties. In addition, the incidence and symptoms of these disorders may involve dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is initiated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Thus, it is possible that physical exercise produces its antidepressant/anxiolytic effects by affecting these neuronal activities. However, the effects of acute physical exercise at different intensities on these neuronal activation and behavioral changes are still unclear. Here, we examined the activities of 5-HT neurons in the DRN and CRF neurons in the PVN during 30 min of treadmill running at different speeds (high speed, 25 m/min; low speed, 15m/min; control, only sitting on the treadmill) in male Wistar rats, using c-Fos/5-HT or CRF immunohistochemistry. We also performed the elevated plus maze test and the forced swim test to assess anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, respectively. Acute treadmill running at low speed, but not high speed, significantly increased c-Fos expression in 5-HT neurons in the DRN compared to the control, whereas high-speed running significantly enhanced c-Fos expression in CRF neurons in the PVN compared with the control and low-speed running. Furthermore, low-speed running resulted in decreased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors compared with high-speed running. These results suggest that acute physical exercise with mild and low stress can efficiently induce optimal neuronal activation that is involved in the antidepressant/anxiolytic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modes of exercise training for intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauret, Gert Jan; Fakhry, Farzin; Fokkenrood, Hugo J P; Hunink, M G Myriam; Teijink, Joep A W; Spronk, Sandra

    2014-07-04

    According to international guidelines and literature, all patients with intermittent claudication should receive an initial treatment of cardiovascular risk modification, lifestyle coaching, and supervised exercise therapy. In most studies, supervised exercise therapy consists of treadmill or track walking. However, alternative modes of exercise therapy have been described and yielded similar results to walking. Therefore, the following question remains: Which exercise mode gives the most beneficial results? To assess the effects of different modes of supervised exercise therapy on the maximum walking distance (MWD) of patients with intermittent claudication. To assess the effects of different modes of supervised exercise therapy on pain-free walking distance (PFWD) and health-related quality of life scores (HR-QoL) of patients with intermittent claudication. The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Specialised Register (July 2013); CENTRAL (2013, Issue 6), in The Cochrane Lib rary; and clinical trials databases. The authors searched the MEDLINE (1946 to July 2013) and Embase (1973 to July 2013) databases and reviewed the reference lists of identified articles to detect other relevant citations. Randomised controlled trials of studies comparing alternative modes of exercise training or combinations of exercise modes with a control group of supervised walking exercise in patients with clinically determined intermittent claudication. The supervised walking programme needed to be supervised at least twice a week for a consecutive six weeks of training. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias for each study. Because of different treadmill test protocols to assess the maximum or pain-free walking distance, we converted all distances or walking times to total metabolic equivalents (METs) using the American College of Sports Medicine

  19. Anaerobic exercise testing in rehabilitation: A systematic review of available tests and protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krops, Leonie A; Albada, Trijntje; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Hijmans, Juha M; Dekker, Rienk

    2017-04-06

    Anaerobic capacity assessment in rehabilitation has received increasing scientific attention in recent years. However, anaerobic capacity is not tested consistently in clinical rehabilitation practice. This study reviews tests and protocols for anaerobic capacity in adults with various disabilities (spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, cerebral vascular accident, lower-limb amputation(s)) and (able-bodied) wheelchair users. PubMed, CINAHL and Web of Science. Papers were screened by 2 independent assessors, and were included when anaerobic exercise tests were performed on the above-selected subject groups. Included articles were checked for methodological quality. A total of 57 papers was included. Upper-body testing [56 protocols] was conducted with arm crank [16] and wheelchair tests [40]. With a few [2] exceptions, modified Wingate (Wingate) protocols and wheelchair sprint tests dominated upper-body anaerobic testing. In lower-body anaerobic work [11], bicycle [3] and recumbent [1], and overground tests [7] were used, in which Wingate, sprint or jump protocols were employed. When equipment is available a Wingate protocol is advised for assessment of anaerobic capacity in rehabilitation. When equipment is not avail-able a 20-45 s sprint test is a good alternative. Future research should focus on standardized tests and protocols specific to different disability groups.

  20. Evaluation of a New Shirt-Based Electrocardiogram Device for Cardiac Screening in Soccer Players: Comparative Study With Treadmill Ergospirometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat-Andres, Oscar; Munoz-Macho, Adolfo; Adell-Beltran, Guillermo; Ibanez-Catala, Xavier; Macia, Agustin; Facila, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevention of cardiac events during competitive sports is fundamental. New technologies with remote monitoring systems integrated into clothing could facilitate the screening of heart disease. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of Nuubo system during a field stress test performed by soccer players, comparing results with treadmill ergospirometry as test reference. Methods Nineteen male professional soccer players (19.2 ± 1.6 years) were studied. Wireless electrocardiographic monitoring during a Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 in soccer field and subsequent analysis of arrhythmias were firstly performed. Subsequently, in a period no longer than 4 weeks, each player underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing in hospital. Results During Yo-Yo test, electrocardiogram (ECG) signal was interpretable in 16 players (84.2%). In the other three players, ECG artifacts did not allow a proper analysis. Estimation of maximum oxygen consumption was comparable between two exercise tests (VO2 max 53.3 ± 2.4 vs. 53.7 ± 3.0 mL/kg/min for Yo-Yo test and ergometry respectively; intra-class correlation coefficient 0.84 (0.63 - 0.93), P < 0.001). No arrhythmias were detected in any player during both tests. Conclusions The use of Nuubo’s technology allows an accurate single-lead electrocardiographic recording and estimation of reliable performance variables during exercise testing in field, and provides a new perspective to cardiac remote monitoring in collective sports. PMID:28348705

  1. Influence of short breathing stop on the cardiovascular system during exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poderienė, Kristina; Trinkūnas, Eugenijus; Poderys, Jonas; Grūnovas, Albinas

    2011-01-01

    Breathing is both a voluntary and an involuntary action, and the changes in breathing intensity or breathing stops has an influence on vegetative functions of the body during exercise. The aim of this study was to determine the possible changes in cardiovascular parameters when patients shortly stopped to breath at the beginning of exercise testing. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Two series of investigation were performed. During the first investigation, the psychomotor tonus was assessed, and the breathing frequency during exercising was monitored in the cohort of 27 healthy adult males who were recruited for the first time to be participants of exercise testing. All the participants performed the Roufier exercise test (30 squats per 45 s). A 12-lead electrocardiogram was continuously recorded during exercise and first two minutes of recovery, and arterial blood pressure was measured at each minute of experiment. During the second investigation, the influence of short breathing stop for 15 s on the changes in cardiovascular functional parameters during exercise test was evaluated. RESULTS. The results obtained during the study showed that patients who had increased psychomotor tonus stopped the breathing involuntary more frequently at the beginning of exercise testing. An involuntary or voluntary breathing stop at the beginning of exercising had an influence on the dynamics of cardiovascular parameters during exercise and recovery: heart rate increased more slowly; lesser changes in the JT interval of electrocardiogram, a trend toward an increase in the arterial blood pressure, and a significantly slower recovery of cardiovascular parameters were documented. CONCLUSION. An involuntary breathing stop caused the changes in cardiovascular parameters during exercise and recovery; therefore, functional status might be assessed not so accurately.

  2. DIMENSIONS OF COMPULSIVE EXERCISE ACROSS EATING DISORDER DIAGNOSTIC SUBTYPES AND THE VALIDATION OF THE SPANISH VERSION OF THE COMPULSIVE EXERCISE TEST.

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Sauchelli; Jon Arcelus; Roser Granero; Susana Jiménez-Murcia; Zaida Aguera; Amparo Del Pino-Gutiérrez; Fernando Fernandez-Aranda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Compulsive exercise in eating disorders has been traditionally considered as a behavior that serves the purpose of weight/shape control. More recently, it has been postulated that there may be other factors that drive the compulsive need to exercise. This has led to the development of the Compulsive Exercise Test (CET); a self-reported questionnaire that aims to explore the cognitive-behavioral underpinnings of compulsive exercise from a multi-faceted perspective. The objectives o...

  3. Effect of continuous and interval exercise training on the PETCO2 response during a graded exercise test in patients with coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Enéas A. Rocco; Prado, Danilo M L; Silva, Alexandre G.; Lazzari, Jaqueline M. A.; Bortz, Pedro C; Rocco,Débora F. M.; Carla G. Rosa; Valter Furlan

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the following: 1) the effects of continuous exercise training and interval exercise training on the end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure (PETCO2) response during a graded exercise test in patients with coronary artery disease; and 2) the effects of exercise training modalities on the association between PETCO2 at the ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) and indicators of ventilatory efficiency and cardiorespiratory fitness in patients with co...

  4. Criterion-related validity of the short International Physical Activity Questionnaire against exercise capacity in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, George; Georgoudis, George; Georgakopoulos, Dimitris; Katsouras, Christos; Kalfakakou, Vasiliki; Evangelou, Angelos

    2010-08-01

    Self-reported physical activity (PA) is well associated with cardiorespiratory fitness and exercise capacity. The short International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ-short) is a frequently used instrument for cross-national assessments of PA in adults. The purpose of this study was to validate IPAQ-short against exercise capacity in Greek young adults. One hundred and thirteen men and 105 women, aged 20-29 years, were randomly selected from a larger population of young health-science students. A Greek version of IPAQ-short (IPAQ-Gr) was administered to all participants before their exercise capacity evaluation with a maximal Bruce treadmill test. Multiple regression and correlation analyses were used to examine the associations between all IPAQ-Gr outcomes with exercise capacity based on maximal treadmill time. Spearman's correlations for total and vigorous PA against maximal treadmill time were significant in all groups examined, ranging from 0.35 to 0.43. Moderate and walking PA correlations were poor and nonsignificant, ranging from near-zero values to 0.19. In multiple linear regression analysis, only sex, smoking, and vigorous PA from all personal and log-transformed IPAQ-Gr data were significantly associated with maximal treadmill time. Partial correlation analysis for the overall population, adjusted for sex and smoking, showed that total PA (r=0.37) and vigorous PA (r=0.47) were significantly associated with exercise capacity. IPAQ-Gr was tested against exercise capacity and showed acceptable validity properties in Greek young adults. Total and vigorous weekly PA expenditure were well associated with exercise capacity, presenting significant validity correlations against maximal treadmill time.

  5. The clinical importance of cardiopulmonary exercise testing and aerobic training in patients with heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Arena,R; Myers,J; Guazzi,M

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The appropriate physiological response to an acute bout of progressive aerobic exercise requires proper functioning of the pulmonary, cardiovascular and skeletal muscle systems. Unfortunately, these systems are all negatively impacted in patients with heart failure (HF), resulting in significantly diminished aerobic capacity compared with apparently healthy individuals. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) is a noninvasive assessment technique that provides valuable insight in...

  6. Exercise testing of leg amputees and the result of prosthetic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Alsté, J A; Cruts, H E; Huisman, K; de Vries, J

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients undergoing rehabilitation following leg amputation were examined to determine cardiac status, which included clinical examination and a graded exercise ECG test, using an arm ergometer. Results were compared to final walking ability. It was found that the cardiac status of these patients was generally poor and that the exercise ECG results did co-relate to walking ability.

  7. Diagnostic power of the non-ischaemic forearm exercise test in detecting glycogenosis type V

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogrel, J.Y.; Bogaart, F. van den; Ledoux, I.; Ollivier, G.; Petit, F.; Koujah, N.; Behin, A.; Stojkovic, T.; Eymard, B.; Voermans, N.C.; Laforet, P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This was a retrospective study to assess the diagnostic value of the non-ischaemic forearm exercise test in detecting McArdle's disease. METHODS: The study is a retrospective diagnostic study over 15 years (1999-2013) on a referred sample of patients suffering from exercise

  8. The diagnostic value of hyperammonaemia induced by the non-ischaemic forearm exercise test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogrel, J.Y.; Janssen, J.B.E.; Ledoux, I.; Ollivier, G.; Behin, A.; Stojkovic, T.; Eymard, B.; Voermans, N.C.; Laforet, P.

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The non-ischaemic forearm exercise test (NIFET) is used as a diagnostic tool for the screening of patients with exercise intolerance and for the diagnosis of various metabolic muscle disorders. The production of lactate and ammonia are generally analysed to guide the diagnosis. The aim of this

  9. The effect of high and low exercise intensity periods on a simple memory recognition test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Rattray

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Changes in cognitive performance with variations in exercise intensity are likely to have implications for sport and occupational settings. The timing of cognitive tests to exercise intensity changes as well as use of short cognitive assessments will be important for future work.

  10. Flow for Exercise Adherence: Testing an Intrinsic Model of Health Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosa, R. Lingyak; Holtz, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health behavior theory generally does not include intrinsic motivation as a determinate of health practices. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the flow theory of exercise adherence. Flow theory posits that exercise can be intrinsically rewarding if the experiences of self/time transcendence and control/mastery are achieved…

  11. Impact of a maximal exercise test on symptoms and activity in chronic fatigue syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazelmans, E.; Bleijenberg, G.; Voeten, M.J.M.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the effects of exercise on symptoms and activity in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). METHODS: Twenty CFS patients and 20 neighborhood controls performed an incremental exercise test until exhaustion. Fatigue, muscle pain, minutes spent resting, and the level