WorldWideScience

Sample records for exercise intervention targeting

  1. Dropouts and Compliance in Exercise Interventions Targeting Bone Mineral Density in Adults: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Kelley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dropouts and compliance to exercise interventions targeting bone mineral density (BMD in adults are not well established. The purpose of this study was to address that gap. Methods. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled exercise intervention trials in adults ≥18 years of age. The primary outcomes were dropouts in the exercise and control groups as well as compliance to the exercise interventions. A random-effects model was used to pool results. Moderator analyses were conducted using mixed-effects ANOVA-like models and metaregression. Statistical significance was set at . Results. Thirty-six studies representing 3,297 participants (1,855 exercise, 1,442 control were included. Dropout rates in the exercise and control groups averaged 20.9% (95% CI 16.7%–25.9% and 15.9% (11.8%–21.1% while compliance to exercise was 76.3% (71.7%–80.3%. For both exercise and control groups, greater dropout rates were associated with studies conducted in the USA versus other countries, females versus males, premenopausal versus postmenopausal women, younger versus older participants, longer studies (controls only, and high- versus moderate-intensity training (exercisers only. Greater compliance to exercise was associated with being female, home- or facility-based exercise versus both, and shorter studies. Conclusion. These findings provide important information for researchers and practitioners with respect to exercise programs targeting BMD in adults.

  2. Virtual reality bringing a new reality to postthoracotomy lung cancer patients via a home-based exercise intervention targeting fatigue while undergoing adjuvant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Amy J; Brintnall, Ruth Ann; Brown, Jean K; von Eye, Alexander; Jones, Lee W; Alderink, Gordon; Ritz-Holland, Deborah; Enter, Mark; Patzelt, Lawrence H; VanOtteren, Glenn M

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about rehabilitation for postthoracotomy non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. This research uses a perceived self-efficacy-enhancing light-intensity exercise intervention targeting a priority symptom, cancer-related fatigue (CRF), for postthoracotomy NSCLC patients. This article reports on phase II of a 2-phase study. Phase I focused on initiation and tolerance of exercise during the 6 weeks immediately after thoracotomy, whereas phase II addressed maintenance of exercise for an additional 10 weeks including participants initiating and completing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an exercise intervention for postthoracotomy NSCLC patients to include those initiating and completing adjuvant therapy. A single-arm design composed of 7 participants postthoracotomy for NSCLC performed light-intensity exercises using an efficacy-enhancing virtual-reality approach using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus. Despite most participants undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, participants adhered to the intervention at a rate of 88% with no adverse events while giving the intervention high acceptability scores on conclusion. Likewise, participants' CRF scores improved from initiation through the conclusion of the intervention with perceived self-efficacy for walking at a light intensity continuously for 60 minutes, improving significantly upon conclusion over presurgery values. Postthoracotomy NSCLC patients maintained exercise for an additional 10 weeks while undergoing adjuvant therapy showing rehabilitation potential because the exercise intervention was feasible, safe, well tolerated, and highly acceptable showing positive changes in CRF self-management. A randomized controlled trial is needed to further investigate these relationships.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of an exercise intervention targeting cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors for prostate cancer patients from the RADAR trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph David

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen deprivation therapy leads to a number of adverse effects including deterioration of the musculoskeletal system and increased risk factors for cardiovascular and metabolic complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects, efficacy, retention and compliance of a physical exercise intervention in a large established cohort of prostate cancer patients from the Randomised Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy (RADAR study. Specifically, we aim to compare short- and long-term effects of a prostate cancer-specific supervised exercise program to a standard public health physical activity strategy utilizing printed resources on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. Our primary outcomes are cardiorespiratory capacity, abdominal obesity, and lipid and glycemic control, while secondary outcomes include self-reported physical activity, quality of life and psychological distress. Methods/Design Multi-site randomized controlled trial of 370 men from the RADAR study cohort undergoing treatment or previously treated for prostate cancer involving androgen deprivation therapy in the cities of Perth and Newcastle (Australia, and Wellington (New Zealand. Participants will be randomized to (1 supervised resistance/aerobic exercise or (2 printed material comprising general physical activity recommendations. Participants will then undergo progressive training for 6 months. Measurements for primary and secondary endpoints will take place at baseline, 6 months (end of intervention, and at 6 months follow-up. Discussion This study uses a large existent cohort of patients and will generate valuable information as to the continuing effects of exercise specifically targeting cardiovascular function and disease risk, insulin metabolism, abdominal obesity, physical function, quality of life and psychological distress. We expect dissemination of the knowledge gained from this project to reduce risk factors for the

  4. Cognitive Benefits of Exercise Intervention.

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    Archer, T; Ricci, S; Massoni, F; Ricci, L; Rapp-Ricciardi, M

    2016-01-01

    Exercise, as a potent epigenetic regulator, implies the potential to counteract pathophysiological processes and alterations in most cardiovascular/respiratory cells and tissues not withstanding a paucity of understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and doseresponse relationships. In the present account, the assets accruing from physical exercise and its influence upon executive functioning are examined. Under conditions of neuropsychiatric and neurologic ill-health, age-related deterioration of functional and biomarker indicators during healthy and disordered trajectories, neuroimmune and affective unbalance, and epigenetic pressures, exercise offers a large harvest of augmentations in health and well-being. Both animal models and human studies support the premise of manifest gains from regular exercise within several domains, besides cognitive function and mood, notably as the agency of a noninvasive, readily available therapeutic intervention.

  5. Targeting Inflammation and Downstream Protein Metabolism in Sarcopenia: A Brief Up-Dated Description of Concurrent Exercise and Leucine-Based Multimodal Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Xia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is defined as the progressive loss of muscle mass with age, and poses a serious threat to the physiological and psychological health of the elderly population with consequential economic and social burdens. Chronic low-grade inflammation plays a central role in the development of sarcopenia such that it alters cellular protein metabolism to favor proteolysis over synthesis, and thereby accelerates muscular atrophy. The purpose of this review is to highlight how exercise and nutrition intervention strategies can attenuate or treat sarcopenia. Resistance exercise increases not only muscle mass but also muscle strength, while aerobic exercise is able to ameliorate the age-related metabolic disorders. Concurrent exercise training integrates the advantages of both aerobic and resistance exercise, and may exert a significant synergistic effect in the aging organism. Higher protein intakes rich in the amino acid leucine appear to restore skeletal muscle protein metabolism balance by rescuing protein synthesis in older adults. There is good reason to believe that a multimodal treatment, a combination of exercise and increased leucine consumption in the diet, can combat some of the muscle loss associated with aging. Future research is needed to consolidate these findings to humans, and to further clarify to what extent and by which mechanisms protein metabolism might be directly involved in sarcopenia pathogenesis and the multimodal treatment responses.

  6. Preventing Australian football injuries with a targeted neuromuscular control exercise programme: comparative injury rates from a training intervention delivered in a clustered randomised controlled trial.

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    Finch, Caroline F; Twomey, Dara M; Fortington, Lauren V; Doyle, Tim L A; Elliott, Bruce C; Akram, Muhammad; Lloyd, David G

    2016-04-01

    Exercise-based training programmes are commonly used to prevent sports injuries but programme effectiveness within community men's team sport is largely unknown. To present the intention-to-treat analysis of injury outcomes from a clustered randomised controlled trial in community Australian football. Players from 18 male, non-elite, community Australian football clubs across two states were randomly allocated to either a neuromuscular control (NMC) (intervention n=679 players) or standard-practice (control n=885 players) exercise training programme delivered as part of regular team training sessions (2× weekly for 8-week preseason and 18-week regular-season). All game-related injuries and hours of game participation were recorded. Generalised estimating equations, adjusted for clustering (club unit), were used to compute injury incidence rates (IIRs) for all injuries, lower limb injuries (LLIs) and knee injuries sustained during games. The IIRs were compared across groups with cluster-adjusted Injury Rate Ratios (IRRs). Overall, 773 game injuries were recorded. The lower limb was the most frequent body region injured, accounting for 50% of injuries overall, 96 (12%) of which were knee injuries. The NMC players had a reduced LLI rate compared with control players (IRR: 0.78 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.08), p=0.14.) The knee IIR was also reduced for NMC compared with control players (IRR: 0.50 (95% CI 0.24 to 1.05), p=0.07). These intention-to-treat results indicate that positive outcomes can be achieved from targeted training programmes for reducing knee and LLI injury rates in men's community sport. While not statistically significant, reducing the knee injury rate by 50% and the LLI rate by 22% is still a clinically important outcome. Further injury reductions could be achieved with improved training attendance and participation in the programme. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  7. Exercise intervention may prevent depression.

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    He, S-B; Tang, W-G; Tang, W-J; Kao, X-L; Zhang, C-G; Wong, X-T

    2012-07-01

    Physical activity is an effective component of depression management. However, the mechanisms by which exercise affects behavioral disorders remain unclear. The present study was conducted to investigate mechanisms by which voluntary exercise ameliorates depression. Plasma cortisol levels and hippocampal monoamine neurotransmitters were measured. Chronic mild stress (CMS) was used to induce depression in a rat model. The rats were allowed to swim for 10 weeks as part of their exercise treatment. Depressive behavior was analyzed using an open-field test and a sucrose consumption test before and after exercise. Serum cortisol levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters in the hippocampus were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The CMS rats showed behavioral improvement after exercise. Compared with the control, serum cortisol levels were significantly increased by CMS. The serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine levels in the hippocampi were significantly increased by exercise. These findings indicate that exercise reverses and prevents the decrease in serotonin and noradrenaline, and restores dopamine in the CMS model. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Subgrouping and TargetEd Exercise pRogrammes for knee and hip OsteoArthritis (STEER OA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holden, Melanie A; Burke, Danielle L; Runhaar, Jos

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Therapeutic exercise is a recommended core treatment for people with knee and hip OA, however, the observed effect sizes for reducing pain and improving physical function are small to moderate. This may...... be due to insufficient targeting of exercise to subgroups of people who are most likely to respond and/or suboptimal content of exercise programmes. This study aims to identify: (1) subgroups of people with knee and hip OA that do/do not respond to therapeutic exercise and to different types of exercise...... and (2) mediators of the effect of therapeutic exercise for reducing pain and improving physical function. This will enable optimal targeting and refining the content of future exercise interventions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Systematic review and individual participant data meta-analyses. A previous...

  9. Exercise self-efficacy and control beliefs: effects on exercise behavior after an exercise intervention for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, Shevaun D; Lachman, Margie E; Whitbourne, Stacey B

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined exercise self-efficacy and exercise behavior during and after a strength-training intervention program with older adults. A model with cross-lagged and contemporaneous paths was tested with structural equations. Within testing occasions, higher physical resistance was related to greater beliefs in efficacy and control over exercise. At 3 months into the intervention, those who had higher physical resistance were less likely to show subsequent changes in beliefs. Those who had higher self-efficacy and control beliefs at 6 months were more likely to report that they were still exercising at 9 and 12 months after the intervention. Findings indicate that exercise self-efficacy and exercise behavior are associated with one another and that beliefs developed during an intervention are important for maintenance of an exercise regimen.

  10. Exposing college students to exercise: the training interventions and genetics of exercise response (TIGER) study

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    The Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) study is an exercise program designed to introduce sedentary college students to regular physical activity and to identify genetic factors that influence response to exercise. A multiracial/ethnic cohort (N = 1,567; 39% male), age ...

  11. Exposing College Students to Exercise: The Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study

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    Sailors, Mary H.; Jackson, Andrew S.; McFarlin, Brian K.; Turpin, Ian; Ellis, Kenneth J.; Foreyt, John P.; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Bray, Molly S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) study is an exercise program designed to introduce sedentary college students to regular physical activity and to identify genetic factors that influence response to exercise. Participants: A multiracial/ethnic cohort (N = 1,567; 39% male), age 18 to 35 years,…

  12. Motives for physical exercise participation as a basis for the development of patient-oriented exercise interventions in osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

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    Krauss, Inga; Katzmarek, Uwe; Rieger, Monika A; Sudeck, Gorden

    2017-08-01

    Physical exercises are effective in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). There is consensus that exercise interventions should take into account the patient's preferences and needs in order to improve compliance to exercise regimes. One important personal factor is the patient's motivation for physical exercise. Health improvement is a relevant motive for exercise participation. Accordingly, exercise interventions primarily focus on health related needs such as strengthening and pain reduction. However exercising provides further many-faceted incentives that may foster exercise adherence. The present study aimed to characterize target groups for person-tailored exercise interventions in OA according to the International Classification of Functioning and Disability and Health (ICF). Target groups should be classified by similar individual exercise participation motive profiles and further described by their disease-related symptoms, limitations and psychological determinants of exercise behavior. Observational study via self-administered questionnaires. Community. We enrolled 292 adults with hip/knee OA living independently of assistance. Participants completed the Bernese Motive and Goal Inventory in Leisure and Health Sports (BMZI), the Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire for Osteoarthritis, the WOMAC-Index (pain/stiffness), the General Self-efficacy Scale and a questionnaire on perceived barriers to exercise participation. The BMZI-scales served as active variables for cluster analysis (Ward's method), other scales were used as passive variables to further describe the identified clusters. Four clusters were defined using five exercise participation motives: health, body/appearance, esthetics, nature, and contact. Based on the identified motive profiles the target groups are labelled health-focused sports people; sporty, nature-oriented individualists; functionalists primarily motivated by maintaining or improving health through exercise; and nature

  13. Nutritional interventions to promote post-exercise muscle protein synthesis.

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    Koopman, René; Saris, Wim H M; Wagenmakers, Anton J M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2007-01-01

    Resistance exercise is a powerful stimulus to augment muscle protein anabolism, as it can improve the balance between muscle protein synthesis and breakdown. However, the intake of food during post-exercise recovery is necessary for hypertrophy to occur. Therefore, athletes need to ingest protein following exercise to attain a positive protein balance and maximise their skeletal muscle adaptive response. The interaction between exercise and nutrition is not only important for athletes, but is also of important clinical relevance in the elderly. Exercise interventions combined with specific nutritional modulation provide an effective strategy to counteract or reduce the loss of skeletal muscle mass with aging.

  14. Exercise Self-Efficacy and Control Beliefs Predict Exercise Behavior After an Exercise Intervention for Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Neupert, Shevaun D.; Lachman, Margie E.; Whitbourne, Stacey B.

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined exercise self-efficacy and exercise behavior during and after a strength training intervention program with older adults. A model with cross-lagged and contemporaneous paths was tested with structural equations. Within testing occasions, higher physical resistance was related to greater beliefs in efficacy and control over exercise. At 3 months into the intervention, those who had higher physical resistance were less likely to show subsequent changes in beliefs. Tho...

  15. Nutritional interventions and the IL-6 response to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennigar, Stephen R; McClung, James P; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2017-09-01

    IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine with a wide range of biologic effects. In response to prolonged exercise, IL-6 is synthesized by contracting skeletal muscle and released into circulation. Circulating IL-6 is thought to maintain energy status during exercise by acting as an energy sensor for contracting muscle and stimulating glucose production. If tissue damage occurs, immune cells infiltrate and secrete cytokines, including IL-6, to repair skeletal muscle damage. With adequate rest and nutrition, the IL-6 response to exercise is attenuated as skeletal muscle adapts to training. However, sustained elevations in IL-6 due to repeated bouts of unaccustomed activities or prolonged exercise with limited rest may result in untoward physiologic effects, such as accelerated muscle proteolysis and diminished nutrient absorption, and may impair normal adaptive responses to training. Recent intervention studies have explored the role of mixed meals or carbohydrate, protein, ω-3 fatty acid, or antioxidant supplementation in mitigating exercise-induced increases in IL-6. Emerging evidence suggests that sufficient energy intake before exercise is an important factor in attenuating exercise-induced IL-6 by maintaining muscle glycogen. We detail various nutritional interventions that may affect the IL-6 response to exercise in healthy human adults and provide recommendations for future research exploring the role of IL-6 in the adaptive response to exercise.-Hennigar, S. R., McClung, J. P., Pasiakos, S. M. Nutritional interventions and the IL-6 response to exercise. © FASEB.

  16. Muscle mass and physical recovery in ICU: innovations for targeting of nutrition and exercise.

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    Wischmeyer, Paul E; Puthucheary, Zudin; San Millán, Iñigo; Butz, Daniel; Grocott, Michael P W

    2017-08-01

    We have significantly improved hospital mortality from sepsis and critical illness in last 10 years; however, over this same period we have tripled the number of 'ICU survivors' going to rehabilitation. Furthermore, as up to half the deaths in the first year following ICU admission occur post-ICU discharge, it is unclear how many of these patients ever returned home or a meaningful quality of life. For those who do survive, recent data reveals many 'ICU survivors' will suffer significant functional impairment or post-ICU syndrome (PICS). Thus, new innovative metabolic and exercise interventions to address PICS are urgently needed. These should focus on optimal nutrition and lean body mass (LBM) assessment, targeted nutrition delivery, anabolic/anticatabolic strategies, and utilization of personalized exercise intervention techniques, such as utilized by elite athletes to optimize preparation and recovery from critical care. New data for novel LBM analysis technique such as computerized tomography scan and ultrasound analysis of LBM are available showing objective measures of LBM now becoming more practical for predicting metabolic reserve and effectiveness of nutrition/exercise interventions. 13C-Breath testing is a novel technique under study to predict infection earlier and predict over-feeding and under-feeding to target nutrition delivery. New technologies utilized routinely by athletes such as muscle glycogen ultrasound also show promise. Finally, the role of personalized cardiopulmonary exercise testing to target preoperative exercise optimization and post-ICU recovery are becoming reality. New innovative techniques are demonstrating promise to target recovery from PICS utilizing a combination of objective LBM and metabolic assessment, targeted nutrition interventions, personalized exercise interventions for prehabilitation and post-ICU recovery. These interventions should provide hope that we will soon begin to create more 'survivors' and fewer victim's post

  17. The effect of exercise and lifestyle interventions on heart rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of exercise and lifestyle interventions on heart rate variability in students at risk of cardiovascular disease –A pilot study. ... African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... Cardiovascular disease is a major public health concern and it can be modified by diet, exercise and health awareness. However ...

  18. Breast cancer survivors' preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions.

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    Phillips, Siobhan M; Conroy, David E; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Pellegrini, Christine A; Lloyd, Gillian R; Penedo, Frank J; Spring, Bonnie

    2017-05-03

    The purpose of this study was to explore breast cancer survivors' interest in and preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions. Post-treatment survivors [n = 279; M age = 60.7 (SD = 9.7)] completed a battery of online questionnaires in August 2015. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all data. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between survivors' interest in a technology-supported exercise interventions and demographic, disease, and behavioral factors. These same factors were examined in relation to perceived effectiveness of such interventions using multiple regression analyses. About half (53.4%) of survivors self-reported meeting public health recommendations for physical activity. Fewer than half reported using an exercise or diet mobile app (41.2%) or owning an activity tracker (40.5%). The majority were interested in receiving remotely delivered exercise counseling (84.6%), participating in a remotely delivered exercise intervention (79.5%), and using an exercise app or website (68%). Survivors reported that the most helpful technology-supported intervention components would be an activity tracker (89.5%), personalized feedback (81.2%), and feedback on how exercise is influencing mood, fatigue, etc. (73.6%). Components rated as least helpful were social networking integration (31.2%), group competitions (33.9%), and ability to see others' progress (35.1%). Preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions varied among breast cancer survivors. Nonetheless, data indicate that technology-supported interventions may be feasible and acceptable. Engaging stakeholders may be important in developing and testing potential intervention components.

  19. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Stage, M; Laursen, J

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer...... (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home...... exercise and relaxation intervention showed an adherence rate of 76%, whereas the patients failed to comply with the home-based exercise. The hospital-based intervention initiated at time of diagnosis encouraged former sedentary lung cancer patients to participation and was undertaken safely by cancer...

  20. Effect of an aerobic exercise intervention on cardiac autonomic regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallman, David M; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen

    2017-01-01

    =116) were randomized to an aerobic exercise group (n=59) or a reference group (n=57) with lectures. The intervention group received two 30-min sessions per week of supervised aerobic exercise over 4months. Diurnal measurements of heart rate variability (HRV) and physical activity (accelerometry) were...... obtained at baseline and at 4-month follow-up. Time and frequency domain indices of HRV were derived during work, leisure time and sleep to evaluate cardiac autonomic regulation. Linear mixed models were used to determine the effect of the intervention on HRV indices, with adjustment for age, gender...... tended to decrease in the exercise group compared with the reference group from baseline to follow-up, being significant for the HF spectral component (p=0.03). CONCLUSION: Among cleaners, a worksite aerobic exercise intervention improved cardiac autonomic regulation during work and leisure...

  1. Physiotherapy and rehabilitative interventions in patients with chronic respiratory diseases: exercise and non-exercise treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellessen, A; Hernandes, N A; Pitta, F

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this literature review was to describe and discuss the available evidence about different modalities of physical therapy treatment and pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) involving exercise training in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiectasis and interstitial lung disease (ILD). The search was performed by using the Cochrane Library and PubMed databases. We selected studies published between 2001 and 2012 which involved physiotherapy treatment and included patients with COPD, asthma, bronchiectasis or ILD, aged 18 years or more, in stable or unstable disease condition. PR involving exercise training was effective in improving exercise capacity, muscle force, quality of life and reducing symptoms in patients with COPD and asthma. Although there are few studies published about exercise training in patients with bronchiectasis, improvement in exercise capacity and quality of life in those patients was also observed. Patients with ILD also respond to exercise training; however, the response is less pronounced than in COPD and they lose the gains more quickly. Non-exercise-based interventions, such as bronchial hygiene techniques and inspiratory muscle training, also present positive results when applied to patients with COPD, asthma and bronchiectasis. In some cases it is recommended that these interventions are combined with exercise training. Studies about non-exercise based interventions applied to patients with ILD are still necessary.

  2. Searching for maintenance in exercise interventions for cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Catherine M; Ory, Marcia G; Friedman, Daniela B; Dwyer, Andrea; Birken, Sarah A; Risendal, Betsy

    2014-12-01

    Translating evidence-based exercise interventions into practice is important for expanding the capacity to support cancer survivors. Using the reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance (RE-AIM) framework and scoping study methodology, we addressed the research question, "What is known about the maintenance of exercise interventions for cancer survivors that would inform translation from research to practice and community settings?" Maintenance was investigated at the individual and setting level. Literature searches were performed in the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Sport Discus databases for articles published from January 2009 to June 2012. Abstracts were judged using a priori criteria for the survivor population, exercise intervention, and maintenance on the individual or setting level. We included completed and planned randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and other study designs. Publications meeting the criteria were reviewed and coded. Of the 211 abstracts meeting patient and exercise criteria, 24 (19 RCTs) met the maintenance criteria. Nine of the 12 completed RCTs demonstrated maintenance of intervention outcomes after 3 to 14 months of follow-up. The planned RCTs described interventions lasting 2 to 4.5 months and maintenance intervals lasting 3 to 12 months following the active intervention. Maintenance at the setting level was reported in one publication. On the individual level, intervention outcomes were maintained in most studies, in a variety of settings and survivor subpopulations. Maintenance on the setting level was scarcely addressed. This scoping study suggests several strategies that could be taken by agencies, clinicians, and researchers to develop more effective and sustainable exercise programs for cancer survivors. Many benefits of exercise training are maintained for months after cancer survivors complete controlled research studies but relatively little is

  3. Exercise-based smoking cessation interventions among women.

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    Linke, Sarah E; Ciccolo, Joseph T; Ussher, Michael; Marcus, Bess H

    2013-01-01

    Although smoking rates are lower among women than men, women are less likely to quit smoking in cessation trials. This is in part due to their tendency to smoke to help prevent or mitigate negative mood/affect, depression and/or postcessation weight gain. Exercise helps to alleviate women's fear of postcessation weight gain and reduces their cessation-related mood symptoms, making it a theoretically ideal smoking cessation intervention for women. In addition, short bouts of exercise decrease cigarette cravings and withdrawal symptoms among temporarily abstinent smokers. However, results from exercise-based smoking cessation interventions to date have been mostly nonsignificant. This paper describes the theoretical mechanisms (psychological, behavioral, physiological and neurobiological) and practical reasons underlying our belief that exercise-based smoking cessation interventions should not yet be abandoned despite their current paucity of supporting evidence. It also presents ideas for modifying future exercise-based smoking cessation interventions to increase adherence and, as a result, more accurately evaluate the effect of exercise on smoking cessation.

  4. Decrease in musculoskeletal pain after 4 and 12 months of an aerobic exercise intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Lidegaard, Mark

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain is high in jobs with high physical work demands. An aerobic exercise intervention targeting cardiovascular health was evaluated for its long term side effects on musculoskeletal pain. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to investigate if aerobic exercise...... in clusters to account for the cluster-based randomization. RESULTS: Clinically significant reductions (>30%, f (2) > 0.25) in the aerobic exercise group, compared to the reference group, in pain intensity in neck, shoulders, arms/wrists were found at 12-months follow-up, and a tendency ( p = 0.07, f( 2) = 0...... affects level of musculoskeletal pain from baseline to 4- and 12-months follow-up. METHODS: One-hundred-and-sixteen cleaners aged 18-65 years were cluster-randomized. The aerobic exercise group ( n = 57) received worksite aerobic exercise (30 min twice a week) and the reference group ( n = 59) lectures...

  5. Exercise and cognition in multiple sclerosis: The importance of acute exercise for developing better interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandroff, Brian M

    2015-12-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is highly prevalent, disabling, and poorly-managed in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Exercise training represents a promising approach for managing this clinical symptom of the disease. However, results from early randomized controlled trials of exercise on cognition in MS are equivocal, perhaps due to methodological concerns. This underscores the importance of considering the well-established literature in the general population that documents robust, beneficial effects of exercise training on cognition across the lifespan. The development of such successful interventions is based on examinations of fitness, physical activity, and acute exercise effects on cognition. Applying such an evidence-based approach in MS serves as a way of better informing exercise training interventions for improving cognition in this population. To that end, this paper provides a focused, updated review on the evidence describing exercise effects on cognition in MS, and develops a rationale and framework for examining acute exercise on cognitive outcomes in this population. This will provide keen insight for better developing exercise interventions for managing cognitive impairment in MS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Using memories to motivate future behaviour: an experimental exercise intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondolillo, Mathew J; Pillemer, David B

    2015-01-01

    This study tested a novel memory-based experimental intervention to increase exercise activity. Undergraduate students completed a two-part online survey ostensibly regarding college activity choices. At Time 1, they completed questionnaires that included assessments of exercise-related attitudes, motivation and self-reported behaviours. Next, they described a memory of a positive or negative experience that would increase their motivation to exercise; students in a control condition did not receive a memory prompt. Finally, they rated their intentions to exercise in the future. Eight days following Time 1, students received a Time 2 survey that included an assessment of their self-reported exercise during the prior week. Students in the positive memory condition reported higher levels of subsequent exercise than those in the control condition; students in the negative memory condition reported intermediate levels of exercise. Activating a positive motivational memory had a significant effect on students' self-reported exercise activity even after controlling for prior attitudes, motivation and exercise activity.

  7. Exercise as a poisoned elixir: inactivity, inequality and intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Oli; Gibson, Kass

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we theorise and explain Exercise is Medicine (EiM), as indicative of broader physical activity (PA) health promotion, from a sociological perspective through the lens of health equity. Data were collected through two independent ethnographic studies that bookend the EiM endeavour: the production of knowledge in the laboratory, and the creation and implementation of health policy and PA interventions. First, we demonstrate how conceptualising exercise as medicine assumes narro...

  8. Interventions for promoting habitual exercise in people living with and beyond cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Liam; Homer, Kate E; Thaha, Mohamed A; Steed, Liz; Rosario, Derek J; Robb, Karen A; Saxton, John M; Taylor, Stephanie J C

    2013-09-24

    cannot be safely excluded without assessment of the full text (e.g. when no abstract is available). All eligible papers were formally abstracted by at least two members of the review author team working independently (LB and KH) and using the data collection form. When possible, and if appropriate, we performed a fixed-effect meta-analysis of study outcomes. For continuous outcomes (e.g. cardiorespiratory fitness), we extracted the final value, the standard deviation of the outcome of interest and the number of participants assessed at follow-up in each treatment arm, to estimate standardised mean difference (SMD) between treatment arms. SMD was used, as investigators used heterogeneous methods to assess individual outcomes. If a meta-analysis was not possible or was not appropriate, we synthesised studies as a narrative. Fourteen trials were included in this review, involving a total of 648 participants. Only studies involving breast, prostate or colorectal cancer were identified as eligible. Just six trials incorporated a target level of exercise that could meet current recommendations. Only three trials were identified that attempted to objectively validate independent exercise behaviour with accelerometers or heart rate monitoring. Adherence to exercise interventions, which is crucial for understanding treatment dose, is often poorly reported. It is important to note that the fundamental metrics of exercise behaviour (i.e. frequency, intensity and duration, repetitions, sets and intensity of resistance training), although easy to devise and report, are seldom included in published clinical trials.None of the included trials reported that 75% or greater adherence (the stated primary outcome for this review) of the intervention group met current aerobic exercise recommendations at any given follow-up. Just two trials reported six weeks of resistance exercise behaviour that would meet the guideline recommendations. However, three trials reported adherence of 75% or

  9. The Effects of Exercise Education Intervention on the Exercise Behaviour, Depression, and Fatigue Status of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wang, Kuo-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design/methodology/approach: This was a pilot study using an exercise education program as an intervention for CKD patients. The authors used the…

  10. Effects and feasibility of an exercise intervention for individuals living with dementia in nursing homes: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Lindsey; Traynor, Victoria; Stapley, Paul; Meedya, Shahla

    2017-09-01

    Worldwide, there are an estimated 35.6 million individuals living with dementia. It is important that non-pharmacological therapies are utilized to help manage the symptoms of dementia, such as agitation, as they are the recommended first approach in best practice guidelines. This protocol outlines a randomized controlled trial with a qualitative component which evaluated the effects and feasibility of a physical therapist-led physical exercise intervention on agitation of individuals living with dementia in nursing homes. Physical performance levels were considered as a secondary outcome. This evidence-based protocol consisted of a range of adaptable physical exercises that targeted strength, balance, endurance, and flexibility. To help determine the optimum parameters for this population group, the study used two intervention groups: (a) physical exercise intervention for 45 minutes once a week; (b) physical exercise intervention for 15 minutes three times a week (total time also 45 minutes per week). Both intervention groups were compared to a control group, which continued to participate in usual care only (no specific physical exercise intervention), such as basic seated exercise class, carpet bowls, and "armchair" activities. The physical therapist-led physical exercise intervention detailed in this protocol could be integrated into dementia care in nursing homes or other similar settings to help reduce agitation and improve physical performance.

  11. Effect of exercise intervention on vestibular related impairments in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-07

    ... the efficacy of exercise interventions in the treatment of vestibular-related deficits in hearing-impaired children. Sources: Extensive search of computerized bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, CINHAL, EMBASE, SCOPUS, ISI of web science, Cochrane Library, and AMED) was performed from earliest to February 7, 2011.

  12. Molecular Targeted Intervention for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC remains one of the worst cancers, with almost uniform lethality. PC risk is associated with westernized diet, tobacco, alcohol, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, and family history of pancreatic cancer. New targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations have yet to provide adequate treatments for patients with advanced cancer. To design better preventive and/or treatment strategies against PC, knowledge of PC pathogenesis at the molecular level is vital. With the advent of genetically modified animals, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology and pathogenesis of PC. Currently, several clinical trials and preclinical evaluations are underway to investigate novel agents that target signaling defects in PC. An important consideration in evaluating novel drugs is determining whether an agent can reach the target in concentrations effective to treat the disease. Recently, we have reported evidence for chemoprevention of PC. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of current updates on molecularly targeted interventions, as well as dietary, phytochemical, immunoregulatory, and microenvironment-based approaches for the development of novel therapeutic and preventive regimens. Special attention is given to prevention and treatment in preclinical genetically engineered mouse studies and human clinical studies.

  13. Molecular Targeted Intervention for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Pant, Shubham; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the worst cancers, with almost uniform lethality. PC risk is associated with westernized diet, tobacco, alcohol, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, and family history of pancreatic cancer. New targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations have yet to provide adequate treatments for patients with advanced cancer. To design better preventive and/or treatment strategies against PC, knowledge of PC pathogenesis at the molecular level is vital. With the advent of genetically modified animals, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology and pathogenesis of PC. Currently, several clinical trials and preclinical evaluations are underway to investigate novel agents that target signaling defects in PC. An important consideration in evaluating novel drugs is determining whether an agent can reach the target in concentrations effective to treat the disease. Recently, we have reported evidence for chemoprevention of PC. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of current updates on molecularly targeted interventions, as well as dietary, phytochemical, immunoregulatory, and microenvironment-based approaches for the development of novel therapeutic and preventive regimens. Special attention is given to prevention and treatment in preclinical genetically engineered mouse studies and human clinical studies. PMID:26266422

  14. Factors affecting pain relief in response to physical exercise interventions among healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, M D; Sundstrup, E; Brandt, M; Andersen, L L

    2016-12-28

    The aim of this study is to identify factors associated with musculo-skeletal pain reduction during workplace-based or home-based physical exercise interventions among healthcare workers. Two hundred female healthcare workers (age: 42.0, BMI: 24.1, average pain intensity: 3.1 on a scale of 0-10) from three hospitals participated. Participants were randomly allocated at the cluster level (18 departments) to 10 weeks of (i) workplace physical exercise (WORK) performed in groups during working hours for 5 × 10 minutes per week and up to five group-based coaching sessions on motivation for regular physical exercise, or (ii) home-based physical exercise (HOME) performed alone during leisure-time for 5 × 10 minutes per week. Linear mixed models accounting for cluster identified factors affecting pain reduction. On average 2.2 (SD: 1.1) and 1.0 (SD: 1.2) training sessions were performed per week in WORK and HOME, respectively. The multi-adjusted analysis showed a significant effect on pain reduction of both training adherence (P=.04) and intervention group (P=.04) with participants in WORK experiencing greater reductions compared with HOME. Obesity at baseline was associated with better outcome. Leisure-time exercise, daily patient transfer, age, and chronic pain did not affect the changes in pain. In conclusion, even when adjusted for training adherence, performing physical exercise at the workplace is more effective than home-based exercise in reducing musculo-skeletal pain in healthcare workers. Noteworthy, obese individuals may especially benefit from physical exercise interventions targeting musculo-skeletal pain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Individual experiences following a 6-month exercise intervention: A qualitative study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ellen Staveborg Kerkelä; Linus Jonsson; Magnus Lindwall; Jennifer Strand

    2015-01-01

      Purpose: Dropout is a common problem in various exercise interventions. The individual's experience is believed to greatly impact dropout, yet little is known about the individual experiences of taking part in exercise interventions...

  16. High-intensity training versus traditional exercise interventions for promoting health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of brief intense interval training as exercise intervention for promoting health and to evaluate potential benefits about common interventions, that is, prolonged exercise and strength training.......The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of brief intense interval training as exercise intervention for promoting health and to evaluate potential benefits about common interventions, that is, prolonged exercise and strength training....

  17. Targeting communication interventions to decrease caregiver burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Rankin, Anna

    2012-11-01

    To describe family communication patterns that give shape to four types of family caregivers: Manager, Carrier, Partner, and Loner. Case studies of oncology family caregivers and hospice patients selected from data collected as part of a larger, randomized controlled trial aimed at assessing family participation in interdisciplinary team meetings. Each caregiver type demonstrates essential communication traits with nurses and team members; an ability to recognize these caregiver types will facilitate targeted interventions to decrease family oncology caregiver burden. By becoming familiar with caregiver types, oncology nurses will be better able to address family oncology caregiver burden and the conflicts arising from family communication challenges. With an understanding of family communication patterns and its impact on caregiver burden, nurses can aid the patient, family, and team to best optimize all quality-of-life domains for patient and family caregiver. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Combined diet and exercise interventions for preventing gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Emily; Gomersall, Judith C; Tieu, Joanna; Han, Shanshan; Crowther, Caroline A; Middleton, Philippa

    2017-11-13

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with a wide range of adverse health consequences for women and their infants in the short and long term. With an increasing prevalence of GDM worldwide, there is an urgent need to assess strategies for GDM prevention, such as combined diet and exercise interventions. This is an update of a Cochrane review that was first published in 2015. To assess the effects of diet interventions in combination with exercise interventions for pregnant women for preventing GDM, and associated adverse health consequences for the mother and her infant/child. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (27 November 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs, comparing combined diet and exercise interventions with no intervention (i.e. standard care), that reported on GDM diagnosis as an outcome. Quasi-RCTs were excluded. Cross-over trials were not eligible for inclusion. We planned to include RCTs comparing two or more different diet/exercise interventions, however none were identified. Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data, assessed the risk of bias of the included trials and assessed quality of evidence for selected maternal and infant/child outcomes using the GRADE approach. We checked data for accuracy. In this update, we included 23 RCTs (involving 8918 women and 8709 infants) that compared combined diet and exercise interventions with no intervention (standard care). The studies varied in the diet and exercise programs evaluated and health outcomes reported. None reported receiving funding from a drug manufacturer or agency with interests in the results. Overall risk of bias was judged to be unclear due to the lack of methodological detail reported. Most studies were undertaken in high-income countries.For our primary review outcomes, there was a possible reduced risk of GDM in the diet and

  19. Posture and Locomotion Coupling: A Target for Rehabilitation Interventions in Persons with Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Mille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of posture, balance, and gait are debilitating motor manifestations of advancing Parkinson's disease requiring rehabilitation intervention. These problems often reflect difficulties with coupling or sequencing posture and locomotion during complex whole body movements linked with falls. Considerable progress has been made with demonstrating the effectiveness of exercise interventions for individuals with Parkinson's disease. However, gaps remain in the evidence base for specific interventions and the optimal content of exercise interventions. Using a conceptual theoretical framework and experimental findings, this perspective and review advances the viewpoint that rehabilitation interventions focused on separate or isolated components of posture, balance, or gait may limit the effectiveness of current clinical practices. It is argued that treatment effectiveness may be improved by directly targeting posture and locomotion coupling problems as causal factors contributing to balance and gait dysfunction. This approach may help advance current clinical practice and improve outcomes in rehabilitation for persons with Parkinson's disease.

  20. Exercise interventions: defusing the world's osteoporosis time bomb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Ming Chan; Anderson, Mary; Lau, Edith M C

    2003-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health problem, affecting millions of people worldwide. The associated health care costs are growing in parallel with increases in elderly populations, and it is expected that the number of osteoporotic fractures will double over the next 50 years. The best way to address osteoporosis is prevention. Some interventions to maximize and preserve bone mass have multiple health benefits and are cost-effective. For example, modifications to diet and lifestyle can help to prevent osteoporosis, and could potentially lead to a significant decrease in fracture rates; and exercise is a valuable adjunct to programmes aimed at alleviating the risks and symptoms of osteoporosis. Practising exercise at a young age helps maximize the mineral density of bones while they are still growing and maturing, and continuing to excercise minimizes bone loss later in life. Not only does exercise improve bone health, it also increases muscle strength, coordination, balance, flexibility and leads to better overall health. Walking, aerobic exercise, and t'ai chi are the best forms of exercise to stimulate bone formation and strengthen the muscles that help support bones. Encouraging physical activity at all ages is therefore a top priority to prevent osteoporosis.

  1. Recruitment of pregnant women to an exercise-intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, R E; Emery, S J; Rassi, D; Uzun, O; Lewis, M J

    2016-01-01

    We share here our experience of recruiting pregnant women into an exercise intervention study. Recruitment challenges were anticipated owing to the study design, which required four hospital visits for cardiovascular assessment, a long-term (nine-month) commitment, and adherence to a 20-week exercise programme. Fifty-three women were assigned to one of three groups (no-exercise, land exercise or water exercise) using a 2 × 2 × 2 flexible randomisation design. Seven hundred forty-four women were screened at an antenatal clinic, of whom 501 were eligible to participate in the study. One hundred forty-five women were subsequently approached: 46 (32%) of whom agreed to participate, 42 (29%) were interested but then declined and 57 (39%) declined outright. Our study design helped recruit pregnant women as it allowed them some choice of group membership. We also noted that the participant-researcher relationship is important in reducing attrition. Our experience provides indications of likely recruitment and attrition rates for future randomised controlled trials of this type.

  2. Exercise and mobilisation interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Matthew J; O'Connor, Denise; Pitt, Veronica; Massy-Westropp, Nicola

    2012-06-13

    Non-surgical treatment, including exercises and mobilisation, has been offered to people experiencing mild to moderate symptoms arising from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, the effectiveness and duration of benefit from exercises and mobilisation for this condition remain unknown. To review the efficacy and safety of exercise and mobilisation interventions compared with no treatment, a placebo or another non-surgical intervention in people with CTS. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialised Register (10 January 2012), CENTRAL (2011, Issue 4), MEDLINE (January 1966 to December 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2012), CINAHL Plus (January 1937 to January 2012), and AMED (January 1985 to January 2012). Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing exercise or mobilisation interventions with no treatment, placebo or another non-surgical intervention in people with CTS. Two review authors independently assessed searches and selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of the included studies. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for primary and secondary outcomes of the review. We collected data on adverse events from included studies. Sixteen studies randomising 741 participants with CTS were included in the review. Two compared a mobilisation regimen to a no treatment control, three compared one mobilisation intervention (for example carpal bone mobilisation) to another (for example soft tissue mobilisation), nine compared nerve mobilisation delivered as part of a multi-component intervention to another non-surgical intervention (for example splint or therapeutic ultrasound), and three compared a mobilisation intervention other than nerve mobilisation (for example yoga or chiropractic treatment) to another non-surgical intervention. The risk of bias of the included studies was low in some studies and unclear or high in other studies, with

  3. Motivation for physical activity and exercise in severe mental illness: A systematic review of intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farholm, Anders; Sørensen, Marit

    2016-06-01

    There has been increasing interest for research on motivation for physical activity (PA) and exercise among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The aim of this systematic review is to summarize findings from all intervention studies on PA or exercise that either include empirical data on motivational constructs or apply motivational techniques/theories in their intervention. Systematic searches of seven databases were conducted from database inception to February 2015. Studies were eligible if they: (i) included participants with SMI, (ii) had PA as part of the intervention, and (iii) reported empirical data on motivational constructs related to PA or incorporated motivational techniques/theory in their intervention. Of the 79 studies that met the inclusion criteria only one had motivation for PA as its main outcome. Nine additional interventions reported empirical data on motivational constructs. Altogether these studies yielded mixed results with respect to change in motivational constructs. Only one of those examined the association between motivation and PA, but found none. Sixty-four studies reported using motivational techniques/theory in their intervention. Motivational interviewing and goal-setting were the most popular techniques. Due to the exploratory nature of most of these studies, findings from intervention studies do not so far give very clear directions for motivational work with the patients. There is an urgent need for a more systematic theory based approach when developing strategies that target to increase engagement in PA among people with SMI. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. Exercise Interventions in Children with Cancer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseng-Tien Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to summarize literature that describes the impact of exercise on health and physical function among children during and after treatment for cancer. Relevant studies were identified by entering the following search terms into Pubmed: aerobic training; resistance training; stretching; pediatric; children; AND cancer. Reference lists in retrieved manuscripts were also reviewed to identify additional trials. We include fifteen intervention trials published between 1993 and 2011 that included children younger than age 21 years with cancer diagnoses. Nine included children with an acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL diagnosis, and six children with mixed cancer diagnoses. Generally, interventions tested were either in-hospital supervised exercise training or home based programs designed to promote physical activity. Early evidence from small studies indicates that the effects of exercise include increased cardiopulmonary fitness, improved muscle strength and flexibility, reduced fatigue and improved physical function. Generalizations to the entire childhood cancer and childhood cancer survivor populations are difficult as most of the work has been done in children during treatment for and among survivors of ALL. Additional randomized studies are needed to confirm these benefits in larger populations of children with ALL, and in populations with cancer diagnoses other than ALL.

  5. Aerobic Exercise Intervention, Cognitive Performance, and Brain Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Lars S; Nyberg, Lars; Kramer, Arthur F

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that aerobic exercise has the potential to improve cognition and reduce brain atrophy in older adults. However, the literature is equivocal with regards to the specificity or generality of these effects. To this end, we report results on cognitive function and brain structure...... from a 6-month training intervention with 60 sedentary adults (64-78 years) randomized to either aerobic training or stretching and toning control training. Cognitive functions were assessed with a neuropsychological test battery in which cognitive constructs were measured using several different tests....... Freesurfer was used to estimate cortical thickness in frontal regions and hippocampus volume. Results showed that aerobic exercisers, compared to controls, exhibited a broad, rather than specific, improvement in cognition as indexed by a higher "Cognitive score," a composite including episodic memory...

  6. Lifestyle interventions targeting body weight changes during the menopause transition: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, Janet; Stacey, Dawn; Beach, Sarah; Dumas, Alex; Strychar, Irene; Ufholz, Lee-Anne; Prince, Stephanie; Abdulnour, Joseph; Prud'homme, Denis

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of exercise and/or nutrition interventions and to address body weight changes during the menopause transition. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using electronic databases, grey literature, and hand searching. Two independent researchers screened for studies using experimental designs to evaluate the impact of exercise and/or nutrition interventions on body weight and/or central weight gain performed during the menopausal transition. Studies were quality appraised using Cochrane risk of bias. Included studies were analyzed descriptively. Of 3,564 unique citations screened, 3 studies were eligible (2 randomized controlled trials, and 1 pre/post study). Study quality ranged from low to high risk of bias. One randomized controlled trial with lower risk of bias concluded that participation in an exercise program combined with dietary interventions might mitigate body adiposity increases, which is normally observed during the menopause transition. The other two studies with higher risk of bias suggested that exercise might attenuate weight loss or weight gain and change abdominal adiposity patterns. High quality studies evaluating the effectiveness of interventions targeting body weight changes in women during their menopause transition are needed. Evidence from one higher quality study indicates an effective multifaceted intervention for women to minimize changes in body adiposity.

  7. Feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week supervised exercise intervention for colorectal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellar, Christopher M; Bell, Gordon J; Haennel, Robert G; Au, Heather-Jane; Chua, Neil; Courneya, Kerry S

    2014-06-01

    Exercise training improves health-related physical fitness and patient-reported outcomes in cancer survivors, but few interventions have targeted colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors. This investigation aimed to determine the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week supervised exercise training program for CRC survivors. Feasibility was assessed by tracking participant recruitment, loss to follow-up, assessment completion rates, participant evaluation, and adherence to the intervention. Efficacy was determined by changes in health-related physical fitness. Over a 1-year period, 72 of 351 (21%) CRC survivors screened were eligible for the study and 29 of the 72 (40%) were enrolled. Two participants were lost to follow-up (7%) and the completion rate for all study assessments was ≥93%. Mean adherence to the exercise intervention was 91% (standard deviation = ±18%), with a median of 98%. Participants rated the intervention positively (all items ≥ 6.6/7) and burden of testing low (all tests ≤ 2.4/7). Compared with baseline, CRC survivors showed improvements in peak oxygen uptake (mean change (MC) = +0.24 L·min(-1), p < 0.001), upper (MC = +7.0 kg, p < 0.001) and lower (MC = +26.5 kg, p < 0.001) body strength, waist circumference (MC = -2.1 cm, p = 0.005), sum of skinfolds (MC = -7.9 mm, p = 0.006), and trunk forward flexion (MC = +2.5 cm, p = 0.019). Exercise training was found to be feasible and improved many aspects of health-related physical fitness in CRC survivors that may be associated with improved quality of life and survival in these individuals.

  8. Development of an exercise intervention to improve cognition in people with mild to moderate dementia: Dementia And Physical Activity (DAPA) Trial, registration ISRCTN32612072.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Deborah; Spanjers, Katie; Atherton, Nicky; Lowe, Janet; Stonehewer, Louisa; Bridle, Chris; Sheehan, Bart; Lamb, Sarah E

    2015-06-01

    More than 800000 people in the UK have dementia, and it is a government priority to improve dementia care. Drug treatment options are relatively limited. The Dementia And Physical Activity (DAPA) study is a randomised trial which targets cognition in people with dementia, using an exercise programme. There is evidence to suggest that both aerobic and resistance exercise may be useful in improving cognition. Hence the intervention comprises a supervised part of twice-weekly exercise classes of one hour duration for 4 months, including aerobic exercise at moderate intensity on static bicycles, and resistance (weight training) exercise using weight vests, weight belts and dumbbells. Thereafter participants progress to unsupervised, independent exercise. Aids to behaviour modification have been incorporated into the intervention. The DAPA intervention has been designed to maximise likelihood of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and for delivery in the UK National Health Service. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Causes and Results of Exchange Rate Intervention Under Inflation Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Suslu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Under inflation targeting, central banks exchange rate interventions are discussed frequently in the economic literature recently. Effectiveness of intervention in exchange rate under inflation targeting are examined from three perspectives. These are expectations of the actors and the impact on the variance, reserve accumulation and the cost of sterilization. Since 2003 the Central Bank of Turkey has intervened exchange rate with both direct and indirect methods. The purpose of this study is to examine the results of these three aspects of the CBRT and the foreign exchange interventions. We found that by logit analysis under the inflation targeting of CBRT as a result of the intervention of exchange rate is effect expectations of economic unit and reduce of exchange rate the variance; after thes intervention the variance of exchange rate and cost of sterilization are increased. In this respect, the effectiveness of the intervention of the Central Bank exchange rate market is only reserve accumulation

  10. [Smart phones based on the development of the software of exercise intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenjun; Yang, Bo; Wang, Baoqiang

    2012-07-01

    Developing an exercise management software based on a smart phone to intervene wearer's exercise amount. Using the Android system of mobile phone which contains acceleration sensor to detect the wearer's exercise amount, at the same time, the sensor send the information to the health management center. It can carry out behavior intervention by the health management center's information feedback indication, thus guide the wearer to take exercise scientifically and safely to reach the most effective and appropriate exercising result, which realizes the system function. The behavior intervention based on Smart phones can apply as a new clinical measure to treat patients.

  11. A standardised individual unsupervised water exercise intervention for healthy pregnant women. A qualitative feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backhausen, Mette G; Katballe, Malene; Hansson, Helena

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Low back pain during pregnancy is common and associated with sick leave. Studies suggest that exercise may reduce low back pain during pregnancy. Before carrying out a randomised controlled trail with individual water exercise as intervention a qualitative feasibility study was done...... was used. RESULTS: Four main categories emerged: motivation to participate, attitudes towards the exercise programme, perception of benefits, and acceptability of supportive components. The women had a desire to stay physically active during pregnancy and found water exercise a suitable, type of exercise....... OBJECTIVE: To explore women's views and experiences of the acceptability and benefits of and possible barriers to the standardised individual unsupervised water exercise intervention. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eleven women were interviewed after participating in a water exercise intervention. Content analysis...

  12. Intervention Targets for Youth with Disabilities in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwick, Robin; Tyre, Ashli; Beisse, Kay; Thomas, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    This article will focus on students with disabilities in foster care to help school psychologists identify effective school-based interventions for these students. We will report our findings from three independent studies and then apply the findings to suggest targeted interventions for these students that are intended to improve educational and…

  13. The feasibility of an exercise intervention in males at risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke M Winzer

    Full Text Available To investigate the feasibility and safety of a 24-week exercise intervention, compared to control, in males with Barrett's oesophagus, and to estimate the effect of the intervention, compared to control, on risk factors associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma development.A randomized controlled trial of an exercise intervention (60 minutes moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance exercise five days/week over 24 weeks; one supervised and four unsupervised sessions versus attention control (45 minutes stretching five days/week over 24 weeks; one supervised and four unsupervised sessions in inactive, overweight/obese (25.0-34.9 kg/m2 males with Barrett's oesophagus, aged 18-70 years. Primary outcomes were obesity-associated hormones relevant to oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk (circulating concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance [HOMA]. Secondary outcomes included waist circumference, body composition, fitness, strength and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms. Outcomes were measured at baseline and 24-weeks. Intervention effects were analysed using generalised linear models, adjusting for baseline value.Recruitment was difficult in this population with a total of 33 participants recruited (target sample size: n = 80; 97% retention at 24-weeks. Adherence to the exercise protocol was moderate. No serious adverse events were reported. A statistically significant intervention effect (exercise minus control was observed for waist circumference (-4.5 [95% CI -7.5, -1.4] cm; p < 0.01. Effects on primary outcomes were not statistically significant.This small, exploratory trial provides important information to inform future trial development including recruitment rates and estimates of effect sizes on outcomes related to oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk. Future trials should investigate a combined dietary and exercise intervention to achieve greater weight loss in this

  14. Does dose matter in reducing gestational weight gain in exercise interventions? A systematic review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Samantha M; Liu, Jihong; Wilcox, Sara; Lau, Erica Y; Archer, Edward

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between exercise dose and reductions in weight gain during pregnancy in exercise interventions. Systematic literature review. Four electronic research databases (PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Academic Search Premiere) were used to identify exercise interventions conducted with pregnant women. Eligible articles must have satisfied the following criteria: inclusion of a control condition, exercise as a major intervention component, weight gain measured and reported for each experimental condition, description of exercise dose (frequency, intensity and duration), and utilized an adequate number of control conditions to assess independent effects of exercise on weight gain. The literature search identified 4837 articles. Of these, 174 abstracts were screened and 21 intervention studies (18 exercise-only, 3 exercise/diet) were eligible for review. Only 38% of the interventions achieved statistically significant reductions in gestational weight gain. Successful interventions possessed higher adherence and lower attrition rates and were predominantly conducted among normal weight populations. No clear patterns or consistencies of exercise dose and reductions in weight gain were evident. An exercise dose associated with reductions in weight gain was unquantifiable among these interventions. Adherence and retention rates were strong contributors to the success of exercise interventions on gestational weight gain. It is strongly suggested that future researchers investigate methods to increase adherence and compliance, especially among overweight and obese women, and utilize objective measurement tools to accurately evaluate exercise dose performed by the participants and the impact on body composition and weight gain. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Feasibility and Effectiveness of Intervention Programmes Integrating Functional Exercise into Daily Life of Older Adults: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michaela; Belala, Nacera; Clemson, Lindy; Boulton, Elisabeth; Hawley-Hague, Helen; Becker, Clemens; Schwenk, Michael

    2017-09-15

    Traditionally, exercise programmes for improving functional performance and reducing falls are organised as structured sessions. An alternative approach of integrating functional exercises into everyday tasks has emerged in recent years. Summarising the current evidence for the feasibility and effectiveness of interventions integrating functional exercise into daily life. A systematic literature search was conducted including articles based on the following criteria: (1) individuals ≥60 years; (2) intervention studies of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised studies (NRS); (3) using a lifestyle-integrated approach; (4) using functional exercises to improve strength, balance, or physical functioning; and (5) reporting outcomes on feasibility and/or effectiveness. Methodological quality of RCTs was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Of 4,415 articles identified from 6 databases, 14 (6 RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. RCT quality was moderate to good. Intervention concepts included (1) the Lifestyle-integrated Functional Exercise (LiFE) programme integrating exercises into everyday activities and (2) combined programmes using integrated and structured training. Three RCTs evaluated LiFE in community dwellers and reported significantly improved balance, strength, and functional performance compared with controls receiving either no intervention, or low-intensity exercise, or structured exercise. Two of these RCTs reported a significant reduction in fall rate compared with controls receiving either no intervention or low-intensity exercise. Three RCTs compared combined programmes with usual care in institutionalised settings and reported improvements for some (balance, functional performance), but not all (strength, falls) outcomes. NRS showed behavioural change related to LiFE and feasibility in more impaired populations. One NRS comparing a combined home-based programme to a gym-based programme reported greater sustainability of effects in the

  16. Does Aerobic Exercise Influence Intrinsic Brain Activity? An Aerobic Exercise Intervention among Healthy Old Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Flodin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have indicated that aerobic exercise could reduce age related decline in cognition and brain functioning. Here we investigated the effects of aerobic exercise on intrinsic brain activity. Sixty sedentary healthy males and females (64–78 years were randomized into either an aerobic exercise group or an active control group. Both groups recieved supervised training, 3 days a week for 6 months. Multimodal brain imaging data was acquired before and after the intervention, including 10 min of resting state brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI and arterial spin labeling (ASL. Additionally, a comprehensive battery of cognitive tasks assessing, e.g., executive function and episodic memory was administered. Both the aerobic and the control group improved in aerobic capacity (VO2-peak over 6 months, but a significant group by time interaction confirmed that the aerobic group improved more. Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not observe any significant group by time interactions with regard to any measure of intrinsic activity. To further probe putative relationships between fitness and brain activity, we performed post hoc analyses disregarding group belongings. At baseline, VO2-peak was negativly related to BOLD-signal fluctuations (BOLDSTD in mid temporal areas. Over 6 months, improvements in aerobic capacity were associated with decreased connectivity between left hippocampus and contralateral precentral gyrus, and positively to connectivity between right mid-temporal areas and frontal and parietal regions. Independent component analysis identified a VO2-related increase in coupling between the default mode network and left orbitofrontal cortex, as well as a decreased connectivity between the sensorimotor network and thalamus. Extensive exploratory data analyses of global efficiency, connectome wide multivariate pattern analysis (connectome-MVPA, as well as ASL, did not reveal any relationships between aerobic fitness

  17. An evidence-based review of hip-focused neuromuscular exercise interventions to address dynamic lower extremity valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford KR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kevin R Ford,1 Anh-Dung Nguyen,2 Steven L Dischiavi,1 Eric J Hegedus,1 Emma F Zuk,2 Jeffrey B Taylor11Department of Physical Therapy, High Point University, High Point, NC, USA; 2Department of Athletic Training, School of Health Sciences, High Point University, High Point, NC, USAAbstract: Deficits in proximal hip strength or neuromuscular control may lead to dynamic lower extremity valgus. Measures of dynamic lower extremity valgus have been previously shown to relate to increased risk of several knee pathologies, specifically anterior cruciate ligament ruptures and patellofemoral pain. Therefore, hip-focused interventions have gained considerable attention and been successful in addressing these knee pathologies. The purpose of the review was to identify and discuss hip-focused exercise interventions that aim to address dynamic lower extremity valgus. Previous electromyography, kinematics, and kinetics research support the use of targeted hip exercises with non-weight-bearing, controlled weight-bearing, functional exercise, and, to a lesser extent, dynamic exercises in reducing dynamic lower extremity valgus. Further studies should be developed to identify and understand the mechanistic relationship between optimized biomechanics during sports and hip-focused neuromuscular exercise interventions.Keywords: dynamic lower extremity valgus, hip neuromuscular control, ACL injury rehabilitation, patellofemoral pain, hip muscular activation

  18. Current Trends in Exercise Intervention Research, Technology, and Behavioral Change Strategies for People With Disabilities: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Byron; Young, Hui-Ju; Bickel, C Scott; Motl, Robert W; Rimmer, James H

    2017-10-01

    This review synthesized physical activity and exercise intervention literature for the past 10 yrs for people with physical and cognitive disabilities including intervention characteristics, behavior change strategies, and types of technologies used to improve targeted outcomes. Systematic searches yielded 132 eligible studies. The major disability groups were multiple sclerosis (41%), stroke (15%), and spinal cord injury (12%). Research designs primarily involved randomized controlled trials (61%) versus quasi-experimental designs (39%). Approximately 20% of the interventions used some form of the following technology: information and communication technology (48%), interactive technology (37%), or electronic gauges (30%). Eighteen percent of studies used intervention strategies based on behavioral theory, which was typically combined with technology to promote activity and increase adherence in generally larger study samples. The three prevailing theories included social cognitive theory (58%), supportive accountability theory (21%), and transtheoretical model (21%). Upon completing the intervention, studies reported primarily significant outcomes (80%). Exercise research for PWD has grown in both quantity and quality, but several gaps remain. Study findings provide a roadmap for future exercise trials on understudied populations and highlight technology and behavior change theory as drivers of future intervention research.

  19. Adherence to an Exercise Intervention Among Older Women Post Hip Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Resnick, Barbara; D’Adamo, Christopher; Shardell, Michelle; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Hebel, J. Richard; Golden, Justine; Magaziner, Jay; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Yu-Yahiro, Janet

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence to home-based exercise interventions among older women post hip fracture that were randomized to one of three exercise intervention groups or a routine care group. A total of 157 female hip fracture patients provided data for the intervention analysis. Factors evaluated baseline, 2, 6, and 12 months post hip fracture included demographic variables, adherence to treatment visits, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, stage of change for exerci...

  20. Changes in motivational outcomes after a supervised resistance exercise training intervention in lung cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddle-McIntyre, Carolyn J; Bell, Gordon; Fenton, David; McCargar, Linda; Courneya, Kerry S

    2013-01-01

    Short-term supervised exercise interventions improve health-related fitness in lung cancer survivors; however, sustained exercise is required to maintain the health benefits. The impact of exercise interventions on motivational outcomes may be important for long-term exercise adoption. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a 10-week supervised progressive resistance exercise training program on lung cancer survivors' motivational outcomes based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Posttreatment lung cancer survivors were recruited to undergo a 10-week supervised resistance exercise training intervention. The 2-component model of the TPB was measured at baseline and after intervention. Fifteen participants completed assessments of TPB measures. Significant increases in self-efficacy (P = .022) and perceived controllability (P = .032) and a nonsignificant increase in affective attitude (P = .090) were observed after intervention. Intention was significantly lower at postintervention (P = .044). Significant correlates of postintervention intention were instrumental attitude (P = .001), self-efficacy (P = .004), perceived behavioral control (P = .009), and affective attitude (P = .044). At postintervention, self-efficacy was significantly correlated with planning (P resistance exercise training may improve some motivational outcomes for lung cancer survivors. Intentions appeared to be weakened after the intervention, but there are methodological explanations for this finding. Participation in short-term supervised resistance exercise may be an effective method to improve some motivational factors related to exercise in lung cancer survivors. More research is needed to examine the long-term effects of supervised resistance exercise on motivational outcomes in lung cancer survivors. Strategies to maintain motivational changes that occur following a supervised resistance exercise intervention need to be investigated.

  1. Sarcopenic obesity and complex interventions with nutrition and exercise in community-dwelling older persons – a narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goisser, Sabine; Kemmler, Wolfgang; Porzel, Simone; Volkert, Dorothee; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Bollheimer, Leo Cornelius; Freiberger, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    One of the many threats to independent life is the age-related loss of muscle mass and muscle function commonly referred to as sarcopenia. Another important health risk in old age leading to functional decline is obesity. Obesity prevalence in older persons is increasing, and like sarcopenia, severe obesity has been consistently associated with several negative health outcomes, disabilities, falls, and mobility limitations. Both sarcopenia and obesity pose a health risk for older persons per se, but in combination, they synergistically increase the risk for negative health outcomes and an earlier onset of disability. This combination of sarcopenia and obesity is commonly referred to as sarcopenic obesity. The present narrative review reports the current knowledge on the effects of complex interventions containing nutrition and exercise interventions in community-dwelling older persons with sarcopenic obesity. To date, several complex interventions with different outcomes have been conducted and have shown promise in counteracting either sarcopenia or obesity, but only a few studies have addressed the complex syndrome of sarcopenic obesity. Strong evidence exists on exercise interventions in sarcopenia, especially on strength training, and for obese older persons, strength exercise in combination with a dietary weight loss intervention demonstrated positive effects on muscle function and body fat. The differences in study protocols and target populations make it impossible at the moment to extract data for a meta-analysis or give state-of-the-art recommendations based on reliable evidence. A conclusion that can be drawn from this narrative review is that more exercise programs containing strength and aerobic exercise in combination with dietary interventions including a supervised weight loss program and/or protein supplements should be conducted in order to investigate possible positive effects on sarcopenic obesity. PMID:26346071

  2. Systematic review of universal and targeted workplace interventions for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Mohd Yunus, Wan Mohd Azam; Musiat, Peter; Brown, June S L

    2018-01-01

    Depression is increasingly being recognised as a significant mental health problem in the workplace contributing to productivity loss and economic burden to organisations. This paper reviews recently published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of universal and targeted interventions to reduce depression in the workplace. Studies were identified through searches of EMBASE, MEDLINE/PubMed, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES Full Text, and Global Health and Social Policy and Practice databases. Studies were included if they included an RCT of a workplace intervention for employees targeting depression as the primary outcome. Twenty-two published RCTs investigating interventions utilising various therapeutic approaches were identified. The cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) approach is the most frequently used in the workplace, while interventions that combine different therapeutic approaches showed the most promising results. A universal intervention in the workplace that combines CBT and coping flexibility recorded the highest effect size (d=1.45 at 4 months' follow-up). Most interventions were delivered in group format and showed low attrition rates compared with other delivery formats. Although all studies reviewed were RCTs, the quality of reporting is low. Interventions using different therapeutic approaches with different modes of delivery have been used. Most of these interventions were shown to reduce depression levels among employees in the workplace, particularly those that combine more than one therapeutic approaches. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Melanoma Perception in People of Color: A Targeted Educational Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lucy X; Patterson, Stavonnie S L; Rademaker, Alfred W; Liu, Dachao; Kundu, Roopal V

    2017-06-01

    Although melanoma is more common in non-Hispanic Whites, ethnic minorities face a greater risk of melanoma-related mortality, which may be partially attributed to presentation at atypical sites and a lack of awareness. Our objective was to assess the effectiveness of a melanoma educational intervention targeted towards people of color. Participants received one of two scripted melanoma educational interventions in the summer of 2015. They completed surveys before the intervention, immediately post-intervention, and 2 months post-intervention. Dermatology clinic at an academic hospital. A consecutive sample of 100 participants who self-identified as African American, Asian, or Hispanic were recruited following their dermatology visit. In total, 70 participants completed the 2-month follow-up questionnaire. The comparison intervention group received an educational intervention using a conventional pamphlet on the 'ABCDEs' (Asymmetry, Borders, Color, Diameter, Evolution) of melanoma. The targeted intervention group received a modified pamphlet that included a skin of color section, the nomenclature "melanoma skin cancer", and an image of an individual performing a skin self-examination with the help of a friend. Melanoma knowledge, perceived risk for developing melanoma, and skin self-examination practices were assessed through self-reported questionnaires. Among the 100 participants, 78% self-identified as African American, 11% as Asian, and 11% as Hispanic. Both groups experienced a similar increase in melanoma knowledge that was retained at 2 months. Perceived personal risk for developing melanoma increased more in the targeted intervention group immediately post-intervention (p = 0.015), but this difference no longer existed between the groups at the 2-month follow-up. The targeted intervention group also demonstrated a greater increase in skin self-examinations (p = 0.048) and knowledge of warning signs to look for when examining the skin (p = 0.002) at

  4. The Potential Role of Aerobic Exercise to Modulate Cardiotoxicity of Molecularly Targeted Cancer Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoski, Susan; Mackey, John R.; Douglas, Pamela S.; Haykowsky, Mark J.; Jones, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapeutics (MTT) are the future of cancer systemic therapy. They have already moved from palliative therapy for advanced solid malignancies into the setting of curative-intent treatment for early-stage disease. Cardiotoxicity is a frequent and potentially serious adverse complication of some targeted therapies, leading to a broad range of potentially life-threatening complications, therapy discontinuation, and poor quality of life. Low-cost pleiotropic interventions are therefore urgently required to effectively prevent and/or treat MTT-induced cardiotoxicity. Aerobic exercise therapy has the unique capacity to modulate, without toxicity, multiple gene expression pathways in several organ systems, including a plethora of cardiac-specific molecular and cell-signaling pathways implicated in MTT-induced cardiac toxicity. In this review, we examine the molecular signaling of antiangiogenic and HER2-directed therapies that may underpin cardiac toxicity and the hypothesized molecular mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective properties of aerobic exercise. It is hoped that this knowledge can be used to maximize the benefits of small molecule inhibitors, while minimizing cardiac damage in patients with solid malignancies. PMID:23335619

  5. The potential role of aerobic exercise to modulate cardiotoxicity of molecularly targeted cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jessica M; Lakoski, Susan; Mackey, John R; Douglas, Pamela S; Haykowsky, Mark J; Jones, Lee W

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapeutics (MTT) are the future of cancer systemic therapy. They have already moved from palliative therapy for advanced solid malignancies into the setting of curative-intent treatment for early-stage disease. Cardiotoxicity is a frequent and potentially serious adverse complication of some targeted therapies, leading to a broad range of potentially life-threatening complications, therapy discontinuation, and poor quality of life. Low-cost pleiotropic interventions are therefore urgently required to effectively prevent and/or treat MTT-induced cardiotoxicity. Aerobic exercise therapy has the unique capacity to modulate, without toxicity, multiple gene expression pathways in several organ systems, including a plethora of cardiac-specific molecular and cell-signaling pathways implicated in MTT-induced cardiac toxicity. In this review, we examine the molecular signaling of antiangiogenic and HER2-directed therapies that may underpin cardiac toxicity and the hypothesized molecular mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective properties of aerobic exercise. It is hoped that this knowledge can be used to maximize the benefits of small molecule inhibitors, while minimizing cardiac damage in patients with solid malignancies.

  6. Mobile Interventions Targeting Risky Drinking Among University Students: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Anne H Berman; Gajecki, Mikael; Sinadinovic, Kristina; Andersson, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Mobile interventions based on text messages, automated telephone programs (interactive voice response (IVR)), and smartphone apps offer a new approach targeting hazardous alcohol use in university students. This review covers seven recent studies involving college or university students that evaluated intervention efficacy in comparison to controls: four using text messages, one using IVR, and two smartphone apps. Only the study evaluating IVR reported positive results for the primary outcome...

  7. Lessons learned: feasibility and acceptability of a telehealth-delivered exercise intervention for rural-dwelling individuals with dementia and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina P M; O'Connell, Megan E; Morgan, Debra G; Crossley, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    questionnaire data were analyzed descriptively. Phase 1: Survey response rate was 50% (n=77). Patients (n=42) and caregivers (n=35) were equally likely to express interest in participating in the telehealth-based intervention. Willingness to participate in group exercise was the only significant predictor of willingness to participate in a telehealth-based intervention, accounting for 24.4% of the variance (F-statistic=16.14, p<0.001). Phase 2: Attendance rates were high for the telehealth-delivered exercise sessions. Engagement scale data indicated that the caregivers helped the patient participants during the intervention and that, overall, all participants were engaged in the target activity during the sessions. Ease of getting to the telehealth department, how well privacy was respected, ability to focus without distraction due to telehealth, ability to engage with group, and ability to engage with facilitator over telehealth were rated highly, as was the overall intervention experience. Telehealth voice and visual quality, ease of room set-up and conduciveness of the room to exercise were rated as good. Thematic analysis found that both dyads liked participating in the intervention together as a couple, and that participating in an exercise intervention with persons who were in a similar situations was deemed beneficial. Study results identified that although there are barriers to overcome, the development and evaluation of telehealth-delivered exercise interventions is a timely and important research activity that has the potential to facilitate improved healthcare services for individuals with dementia and their caregivers.

  8. Variability in Individual Response to Aerobic Exercise Interventions Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Mary O; Schorr, Erica N; Talley, Kristine M C; Lindquist, Ruth; Bronas, Ulf G; Treat-Jacobson, Diane

    2017-09-27

    Although a plethora of evidence supports the benefits of exercise among older adults, a majority of studies have emphasized group differences, while giving little, if any, attention to individual differences. Given the lack of data on variability in response, the present review examined how nonresponse to aerobic exercise has been defined in older adult populations and characteristics associated with nonresponse among older adults. The results of this review suggest that inter-individual variability in response of maximal oxygen consumption to aerobic exercise interventions is prevalent among older adults (1.4-63.4%); age, sex, race, and BMI may not be critical determinants of nonresponse; whereas health status, baseline fitness, and exercise dose appear important. Future intervention studies should evaluate and report the variability in individual response of older adults to exercise; investigators should develop programs that allow for modification of components to assist older adults in achieving optimal benefit from exercise programs.

  9. Exercise after You Eat: Hitting the Postprandial Glucose Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L. Erickson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a novel hypothesis: the effect size of postmeal exercise for attenuating postprandial glucose will be a function of the exercise bout vs. the size of the postprandial glucose response, specifically peak and duration of the postprandial glucose excursion.

  10. Exercise intervention for patients diagnosed with operable non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Missel, Malene; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose was to explore operable lung cancer patient experiences with an exercise intervention from a longitudinal perspective according to patient motivation and patient perceived benefits and barriers of exercise. METHODS: Nineteen patients enrolled in an exercise intervention 2 weeks...... by operable lung cancer patients initiated 2 weeks after surgery. The intervention put the patients on track to a healthier lifestyle regarding physical activity and smoking. The study indicates that exercise initiated early in the treatment trajectory is beneficial for operable lung cancer patients...... post-surgery participated in qualitative interviews at three time points. A criteria sampling strategy was applied. Ricoeur's phenomenological hermeneutical philosophy inspired the analysis. RESULTS: Patients initiated exercising median 15 days postoperative. Eight patients included in the interview...

  11. Developing Interventions for Children's Exercise (DICE): a pilot evaluation of school-based exercise interventions for primary school children aged 7 to 8 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, Karen; Torgerson, David; McKenna, Jim; Ashby, Rebecca; Daly-Smith, Andy; Truscott, John; MacKay, Heather; Jennings, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Developing Interventions for Children's Exercise (DICE) is an initiative aimed at determining effective school-based exercise programs. To assess feasibility, we conducted a pilot study of exercise sessions which varied in duration and frequency. Exercise interventions were delivered to Year 3 pupils (age 7-8 years; n = 73) in primary schools within Yorkshire, UK. Evaluations were conducted using focus group sessions, questionnaires and observations. The study revealed positive aspects of all interventions, including favorable effects on children's concentration during lessons and identified the value of incorporation of the DICE concept into curriculum lessons. Children appeared enthused and reported well-being and enjoyment. Areas requiring attention were the need for appropriate timetabling of sessions and ensuring the availability of space. The concept and sessions were well-accepted by teachers who confirmed their full support of any future implementation There appears to be potential for the encouragement and empowerment of teachers to support physical activity and healthy school environments, and to take an interest in the health of their pupils. Ultimately, these findings should assist in the design of successful exercise interventions in the school setting.

  12. A preliminary randomized controlled trial of a behavioral exercise intervention for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, Ana M; Bloom, Erika Litvin; Strong, David R; Riebe, Deborah; Marcus, Bess H; Desaulniers, Julie; Fokas, Kathryn; Brown, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    Previous exercise intervention studies for smoking cessation have been challenged by a number of methodological limitations that confound the potential efficacy of aerobic exercise for smoking cessation. The preliminary efficacy of a behavioral exercise intervention that incorporated features designed to address prior limitations was tested in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Sixty-one smokers (65.6% female, mean age = 47.3 years, smoked a mean of 19.7 cigarettes/day) were randomized to receive either a 12-week exercise intervention or a 12-week health education contact control. Participants in both conditions received an 8-week telephone-delivered, standard smoking cessation protocol (with the transdermal nicotine patch). Follow-ups were conducted at the end of treatment (EOT), 6- and 12-month timepoints. There were no differences between conditions with respect to the number of weekly exercise or health education sessions attended (9.3±2.8 vs. 9.3±3.0, respectively). While not statistically significant, participants in the exercise condition demonstrated higher verified abstinence rates (EOT: 40% vs. 22.6%, odds ratio [OR] = 2.28; 6- and 12-month follow-ups: 26.7% vs. 12.9%, OR = 2.46). Irrespective of treatment condition, higher levels of moderate-to-vigorous exercise were associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms during the intervention. The results of this small RCT point toward the benefit of a behavioral exercise intervention designed to address previous methodological limitations for smoking cessation. Given the potential public health impact of the demonstrated efficacy of exercise for smoking cessation, the continued development and optimization of exercise interventions for smokers through larger RCTs merits pursuit. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Group cohesion and social support in exercise classes: results from a danish intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Schmidt, Lone; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the formation of group cohesion and social support in exercise classes among former sedentary adults, participating in a Danish community-based intervention. Furthermore, the aim is to analyze the impact of this process on exercise activity among the participants. A multimethod...

  14. the Importance of an early exercise and nutrition intervention among RENAL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mahrova

    2012-06-01

    In conclusion, the combination of an exercise and nutrition intervention was the most effective and could give each patient an opportunity to achieve an optimal physical and psychological level almost equal to their original condition.

  15. A modified exercise protocol may promote continuance of exercise after the intervention in lung cancer patients—a pragmatic uncontrolled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Andreas H; Vinther, Anders; Poulsen, Lise-Lotte

    2013-01-01

    A previous study investigated the effects of a well-documented COPD exercise protocol in lung cancer patients. The study showed improvements in physical fitness, but poor adherence to continued exercise after intervention. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a modified...... exercise intervention on post-intervention adherence, and physical fitness in a broad group of lung cancer patients....

  16. Theory-Based Predictors of Follow-Up Exercise Behavior After A Supervised Exercise Intervention in Older Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Si, Qi; Bennett, Jill A.; Winters-Stone, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Supervised exercise interventions can elicit numerous positive health outcomes in older breast cancer survivors. However, to maintain these benefits, regular exercise needs to be maintained long after the supervised program. This may be difficult, as in this transitional period (i.e., time period immediately following a supervised exercise program), breast cancer survivors are in the absence of on-site direct supervision from a trained exercise specialist. The purpose of the present study was to identify key determinants of regular exercise participation during a 6-month follow-up period after a 12-month supervised exercise program among women aged 65+ years who had completed adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Methods At the conclusion of a supervised exercise program, and 6-months later, 69 breast cancer survivors completed surveys examining their exercise behavior and key constructs from the Transtheoretical Model. Results After adjusting for weight status and physical activity at the transition point, breast cancer survivors with higher self-efficacy at the point of transition were more likely to be active 6-months after leaving the supervised exercise program (OR [95% CI]: 1.10 [1.01–1.18]). Similarly, breast cancer survivors with higher behavioral processes of change use at the point of transition were more likely to be active (OR [95% CI]: 1.13 [1.02–1.26]). Conclusion These findings suggest that self-efficacy and the behavioral processes of change, in particular, play an important role in exercise participation during the transition from a supervised to a home-based program among older breast cancer survivors. PMID:22252545

  17. A Web-based self-management exercise and diet intervention for breast cancer survivors: pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Kyung; Yun, Young Ho; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Lee, Eun Sook; Jung, Kyung Hae; Noh, Dong-Young

    2014-12-01

    Regular exercise and dietary practices have been shown to affect the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and survival of breast cancer patients. The current study aimed to investigate whether the WSEDI was a feasible and primarily effective method for promoting exercise and dietary behaviours for breast cancer patients. A 12-week randomized, controlled trial. Oncology outpatient treatment clinics at 3 university hospitals and 1 National Cancer Center in South Korea. Fifty-nine breast cancer patients who had received curative surgery and completed primary cancer treatment within 12 months prior to the study and who had been diagnosed with stage 0-III cancers within 2 years prior to the study were recruited. Participants were randomly assigned to either the intervention group, which used a Web-based self-management exercise and diet intervention program incorporating transtheoretical model (TTM)-based strategies (n=29), or to the control group, which used a 50-page educational booklet on exercise and diet (n=28). The intervention efficacy was measured at the baseline and 12 weeks via a Web-based survey that addressed the promotion of exercise and consumption of 5 servings of fruits and vegetables (F&V) per day, dietary quality, HRQOL, anxiety, depression, fatigue, motivational readiness, and self-efficacy. The proportion of subjects who performed at least moderate-intensity aerobic exercise for at least 150 min per week; ate 5 servings of F&V per day; and had overall improvements in dietary quality, physical functioning and appetite loss (HRQOL), fatigue, and motivational readiness was greater in the intervention group than in the control group. The self-efficacy with respect to exercise and F&V consumption was greater in the intervention group than in the control group. A Web-based program that targets changes in exercise and dietary behaviours might be effective for breast cancer survivors if the TTM theory has been used to inform the program strategy, although

  18. Impairment-targeted exercises for older adults with knee pain: protocol for a proof-of-principle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise therapy for knee pain and osteoarthritis remains a key element of conservative treatment, recommended in clinical guidelines. Yet systematic reviews point to only modest benefits from exercise interventions. One reason for this might be that clinical trials tend to use a one-size-fits-all approach to exercise, effectively disregarding the details of their participants' clinical presentations. This uncontrolled before-after study (TargET-Knee-Pain aims to test the principle that exercises targeted at the specific physical impairments of older adults with knee pain may be able to significantly improve those impairments. It is a first step towards testing the effectiveness of this more individually-tailored approach. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 60 participants from an existing observational cohort of community-dwelling older adults with knee pain. Participants will all have at least one of the three physical impairments of weak quadriceps, a reduced range of knee flexion and poor standing balance. Each participant will be asked to undertake a programme of exercises, targeted at their particular combination and degree of impairment(s, over the course of twelve weeks. The exercises will be taught and progressed by an experienced physiotherapist, with reference to a "menu" of agreed exercises for each of the impairments, over the course of six fortnightly home visits, alternating with six fortnightly telephone calls. Primary outcome measures will be isometric quadriceps strength, knee flexion range of motion, timed single-leg standing balance and the "Four Balance Test Scale" at 12 weeks. Key secondary outcome measures will be self-reported levels of pain, stiffness and difficulties with day-to-day functional tasks (WOMAC. Outcome measures will be taken at three time-points (baseline, six weeks and twelve weeks by a study nurse blinded to the exercise status of the participants. Discussion This study (Targ

  19. Interventions targeting social isolation in older people: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greaves Colin J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting social isolation in older people is a growing public health concern. The proportion of older people in society has increased in recent decades, and it is estimated that approximately 25% of the population will be aged 60 or above within the next 20 to 40 years. Social isolation is prevalent amongst older people and evidence indicates the detrimental effect that it can have on health and wellbeing. The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of interventions designed to alleviate social isolation and loneliness in older people. Methods Relevant electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, ASSIA, IBSS, PsycINFO, PubMed, DARE, Social Care Online, the Cochrane Library and CINAHL were systematically searched using an extensive search strategy, for randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies published in English before May 2009. Additional articles were identified through citation tracking. Studies were included if they related to older people, if the intervention aimed to alleviate social isolation and loneliness, if intervention participants were compared against inactive controls and, if treatment effects were reported. Two independent reviewers extracted data using a standardised form. Narrative synthesis and vote-counting methods were used to summarise and interpret study data. Results Thirty two studies were included in the review. There was evidence of substantial heterogeneity in the interventions delivered and the overall quality of included studies indicated a medium to high risk of bias. Across the three domains of social, mental and physical health, 79% of group-based interventions and 55% of one-to-one interventions reported at least one improved participant outcome. Over 80% of participatory interventions produced beneficial effects across the same domains, compared with 44% of those categorised as non-participatory. Of interventions categorised as having a theoretical basis, 87

  20. Role of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Exercise in Breast Cancer Prevention: Identifying Common Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelmagid, Salma A.; MacKinnon, Jessica L.; Janssen, Sarah M.; Ma, David W.L.

    2016-01-01

    Diet and exercise are recognized as important lifestyle factors that significantly influence breast cancer risk. In particular, dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been shown to play an important role in breast cancer prevention. Growing evidence also demonstrates a role for exercise in cancer and chronic disease prevention. However, the potential synergistic effect of n-3 PUFA intake and exercise is yet to be determined. This review explores targets for breast cancer prevent...

  1. Case Series of a Knowledge Translation Intervention to Increase Upper Limb Exercise in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Louise A; McMahon, Naoimh E; Tyson, Sarah F; Watkins, Caroline L; Eng, Janice J

    2016-12-01

    Current approaches to upper limb rehabilitation are not sufficient to drive neural reorganization and maximize recovery after stroke. To address this evidence-practice gap, a knowledge translation intervention using the Behaviour Change Wheel was developed. The intervention involves collaboratively working with stroke therapy teams to change their practice and increase therapy intensity by therapists prescribing supplementary self-directed arm exercise. The purposes of this case series are: (1) to provide an illustrative example of how a research-informed process changed clinical practice and (2) to report on staff members' and patients' perceptions of the utility of the developed intervention. A participatory action research approach was used in 3 stroke rehabilitation units in the United Kingdom. The intervention aimed to change 4 therapist-level behaviors: (1) screening patients for suitability for supplementary self-directed arm exercise, (2) provision of exercises, (3) involving family and caregivers in assisting with exercises, and (4) monitoring and progressing exercises. Data on changes in practice were collected by therapy teams using a bespoke audit tool. Utility of the intervention was explored in qualitative interviews with patients and staff. Components of the intervention were successfully embedded in 2 of the 3 stroke units. At these sites, almost all admitted patients were screened for suitability for supplementary self-directed exercise. Exercises were provided to 77%, 70%, and 88% of suitable patients across the 3 sites. Involving family and caregivers and monitoring and progressing exercises were not performed consistently. This case series is an example of how a rigorous research-informed knowledge translation process resulted in practice change. Research is needed to demonstrate that these changes can translate into increased intensity of upper limb exercise and affect patient outcomes. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  2. Evaluation of implementing a community-based exercise intervention during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakstad, Lene A H; Sanda, Birgitte; Vistad, Ingvild; Sagedal, Linda Reme; Seiler, Hilde Lohne; Torstveit, Monica K

    2017-03-01

    to evaluate the implementation of a community-based exercise intervention (the Norwegian Fit for Delivery study) during pregnancy. descriptive, explorative. healthcare clinics in southern Norway, including urban and rural settings. healthy, nulliparous women with singleton pregnancy of ≤20 gestational weeks, age ≥18 years and body mass index ≥19kg/m2. women were randomised to either twice-weekly supervised exercise sessions combined with nutritional counselling (n=303) or standard prenatal care (n=303). The exercise program was based on ACOG guidelines, with the same low-impact workout for all participants, including 60minutes of moderate-intensity cardiovascular and strength training, performed in a group of maximum 25 women. The aim of the present secondary analysis was to report on the intervention group's experience with participating in an exercise program in the 2nd and 3rd trimester, including satisfaction, adherence, adverse effects, as well as motives and barriers for attending the classes. of 303 women randomised to exercise, 274 (92.6%) attended at least one class and 187 (68.2%) completed a questionnaire after completion of the trial assessing their experience with the group sessions. For 71.7%, self-reported exercise dosage was ≥75% of the twice-weekly exercise program and more than seven out of 10 reported to be satisfied or very satisfied with the exercise sessions. A total of 95.1% answered that they would recommend this type of exercise for pregnant friends. Reported motives and health benefits included better aerobic capacity, increased energy levels and exercise enjoyment. No harmful effects of the exercise intervention were noted in the mother or the fetus. results demonstrated that regular group exercise was feasible, safe, and well tolerated in pregnancy, which may encourage incorporating this program into a routine health care setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Meta-analysis of targeted small-group reading interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew S; Burns, Matthew K

    2018-02-01

    Small-group reading interventions are commonly used in schools but the components that make them effective are still debated or unknown. The current study meta-analyzed 26 small-group reading intervention studies that resulted in 27 effect sizes. Findings suggested a moderate overall effect for small-group reading interventions (weighted g=0.54). Interventions were more effective if they were targeted to a specific skill (g=0.65), then as part of a comprehensive intervention program that addressed multiple skills (g=0.35). There was a small correlation between intervention effects and group size (r=0.21) and duration (r=0.11). Small-group interventions led to a larger median effect size (g=0.64) for elementary-aged students than for those in middle or high school (g=0.20), but the two confidence intervals overlapped. Implications for research and practice are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Emerging support for a role of exercise in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder intervention planning.

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    Berwid, Olga G; Halperin, Jeffrey M

    2012-10-01

    Recent years have seen an expansion of interest in non-pharmacological interventions for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although considerable treatment development has focused on cognitive training programs, compelling evidence indicates that intense aerobic exercise enhances brain structure and function, and as such, might be beneficial to children with ADHD. This paper reviews evidence for a direct impact of exercise on neural functioning and preliminary evidence that exercise may have positive effects on children with ADHD. At present, data are promising and support the need for further study, but are insufficient to recommend widespread use of such interventions for children with ADHD.

  5. Clinically Relevant Physical Benefits of Exercise Interventions in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Amy A; Bland, Kelcey A; Sayyari, Sarah; Campbell, Kristin L; Davis, Margot K

    2016-02-01

    Evidence is currently limited for the effect of exercise on breast cancer clinical outcomes. However, several of the reported physical benefits of exercise, including peak oxygen consumption, functional capacity, muscle strength and lean mass, cardiovascular risk factors, and bone health, have established associations with disability, cardiovascular disease risk, morbidity, and mortality. This review will summarize the clinically relevant physical benefits of exercise interventions in breast cancer survivors and discuss recommendations for achieving these benefits. It will also describe potential differences in intervention delivery that may impact outcomes and, lastly, describe current physical activity guidelines for cancer survivors.

  6. Exploring Outcome Measures for Exercise Intervention in People with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. King

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is widely believed that exercise improves mobility in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, it is difficult to determine whether a specific type of exercise is the most effective. The purpose of this study was to determine which outcome measures were sensitive to exercise intervention and to explore the effects of two different exercise programs for improving mobility in patients with PD. Methods. Participants were randomized into either the Agility Boot Camp (ABC or treadmill training; 4x/week for 4 weeks. Outcome measures were grouped by the International Classification of Function/Disability (ICF. To determine the responsiveness to exercise, we calculated the standardized response means. t-tests were used to compare the relative benefits of each exercise program. Results. Four of five variables at the structure/function level changed after exercise: turn duration (P=0.03, stride velocity (P=0.001, peak arm speed (P=0.001, and horizontal trunk ROM during gait (P=0.02. Most measures improved similarly for both interventions. The only variable that detected a difference between groups was postural sway in ABC group (F=4.95; P=0.03. Conclusion. Outcome measures at ICF body structure/function level were most effective at detecting change after exercise and revealing differences in improvement between interventions.

  7. Predictors of depression outcomes among abstinent methamphetamine-dependent individuals exposed to an exercise intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Margaret; Ang, Alfonso; Mooney, Larissa; Gonzales, Rachel; Chudzynski, Joy; Cooper, Christopher B; Dolezal, Brett A; Gitlin, Michael; Rawson, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    This paper expands on a study investigating depression outcomes in response to an 8-week exercise intervention among methamphetamine (MA) dependent individuals in early recovery. A total of 135 MA-dependent individuals enrolled in residential treatment were randomly assigned to either a structured exercise intervention or a structured health education control group. Both groups were similar in format: 60-minute sessions, offered three times a week over an 8-week study period. Results showed that at the 8-week trial endpoint, participants randomized to the exercise intervention showed significantly greater reduction in depression symptom scores than participants randomized to the health education group, and that participants who attended the greatest number of exercise sessions derived the greatest benefit. This paper further analyzes study data to uncover individual predictors of depression response to exercise and finds that among participants randomized to exercise treatment, individuals with the most severe medical, psychiatric, and addiction disease burden at baseline showed the most significant improvement in depressive symptoms by study endpoint. Our findings suggest that exercise in moderate dose is effective at treating depressive symptoms in individuals in early recovery from addiction, and furthermore, that treatment with exercise appears to be particularly beneficial to individuals who suffer from severe medical, psychiatric, and addictive disorders. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  8. An Exercise Prescription Intervention Program with Periodic Ergometric Grading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, C. A.; Beard, E. F.

    1970-01-01

    A long term exercise prescription type of physical conditioning program has been available to executive personnel of the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center for the past two years. Periodic ergometric testing with a heart rate controlled, automatically programmed, bicycle ergometer is used to follow the individual's progress and appropriately alter his exercise prescription from time to time. Such a program appears feasible, and acceptance is excellent, dropout rates small and periodic testing participation good. Subjects training diligently can maintain satisfactory levels of conditioning.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of diet and exercise interventions to reduce overweight and obesity.

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    Forster, M; Veerman, J L; Barendregt, J J; Vos, T

    2011-08-01

    To analyze whether two dietary weight loss interventions--the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) program and a low-fat diet program--would be cost-effective in Australia, and to assess their potential to reduce the disease burden related to excess body weight. We constructed a multi-state life-table-based Markov model in which the distribution of body weight influences the incidence of stroke, ischemic heart disease, hypertensive heart disease, diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, post-menopausal breast cancer, colon cancer, endometrial cancer and kidney cancer. The target population was the overweight and obese adult population in Australia in 2003. We used a lifetime horizon for health effects and costs, and a health sector perspective for costs. We populated the model with data identified from Medline and Cochrane searches, Australian Bureau of Statistics published catalogues, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, and Department of Health and Ageing. Disability adjusted life years (DALYs) averted, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and proportions of disease burden avoided. ICERs under AUS$50,000 per DALY are considered cost-effective. The DASH and low-fat diet programs have ICERs of AUS$12,000 per DALY (95% uncertainty range: Cost-saving- 68,000) and AUS$13,000 per DALY (Cost-saving--130,000), respectively. Neither intervention reduced the body weight-related disease burden at population level by more than 0.1%. The sensitivity analysis showed that when participants' costs for time and travel are included, the ICERs increase to AUS$75,000 per DALY for DASH and AUS$49,000 per DALY for the low-fat diet. Modest weight loss during the interventions, post-intervention weight regain and low participation limit the health benefits. Diet and exercise interventions to reduce obesity are potentially cost-effective but have a negligible impact on the total body weight-related disease burden.

  10. Structured exercise interventions for type 2 diabetes mellitus: Strength of current evidence

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    Mohammed Ejas Hussain

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Exercise, along with medical nutrition therapy and pharmacological interventions, is an important component in the clinical management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D. Current clinical guidelines on type 2 diabetes provide no detailed information on the modalities of effective exercise intervention in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Both endurance and resistance types of exercise seem to be equally effective in improving metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Determining the best method of providing exercise is clinically relevant to this population. This paper reviews the epidemiology of diabetes and problems of physical function associated with type 2 diabetes and discuss the benefits of exercise therapy on the parameters of glycemic control and function in type 2 diabetes patients, with special reference to Asian Indians. Based on the currently available literature, it is concluded that type 2 diabetes patients should be encouraged to participate in specifically designed exercise intervention programs. Attention should be paid to the avoidance of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning. More clinical research is warranted to establish the efficacy of different dosages of exercise intervention in a holistic approach for type 2 diabetes subpopulations within different stages of the disease and various levels of co-morbidity.

  11. Sex differences in drug addiction and response to exercise intervention: From human to animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuehui; Zhao, Min; Zhou, Chenglin; Li, Rena

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated research supports the idea that exercise could be an option of potential prevention and treatment for drug addiction. During the past few years, there has been increased interest in investigating of sex differences in exercise and drug addiction. This demonstrates that sex-specific exercise intervention strategies may be important for preventing and treating drug addiction in men and women. However, little is known about how and why sex differences are found when doing exercise-induced interventions for drug addiction. In this review, we included both animal and human that pulled subjects from a varied age demographic, as well as neurobiological mechanisms that may highlight the sex-related differences in these potential to assess the impact of sex-specific roles in drug addiction and exercise therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sex differences in drug addiction and response to exercise intervention: from human to animal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuehui; Zhao, Min; Zhou, Chenglin; Li, Rena

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated research supports the idea that exercise could be an option of potential prevention and treatment for drug addiction. During the past few years, there has been increased interest in investigating of sex differences in exercise and drug addiction. This demonstrates that sex-specific exercise intervention strategies may be important for preventing and treating drug addiction in men and women. However, little is known about how and why sex differences are found when doing exercise-induced interventions for drug addiction. In this review, we included both animal and human that pulled subjects from a varied age demographic, as well as neurobiological mechanisms that may highlight the sex-related differences in these potential to assess the impact of sex-specific roles in drug addiction and exercise therapies. PMID:26182835

  13. Exercise-enhanced Neuroplasticity Targeting Motor and Cognitive Circuitry in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzinger, G. M.; Fisher, B. E.; McEwen, S.; Beeler, J. A.; Walsh, J. P.; Jakowec, M. W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the potential role of exercise in promoting neuroplasticity and repair in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Exercise interventions in individuals with PD incorporate goal-based motor skill training in order to engage cognitive circuitry important in motor learning. Using this exercise approach, physical therapy facilitates learning through instruction and feedback (reinforcement), and encouragement to perform beyond self-perceived capability. Individuals with PD become more cognitively engaged with the practice and learning of movements and skills that were previously automatic and unconscious. Studies that have incorporated both goal-based training and aerobic exercise have supported the potential for improving both cognitive and automatic components of motor control. Utilizing animal models, basic research is beginning to reveal exercise-induced effects on neuroplasticity. Since neuroplasticity occurs at the level of circuits and synaptic connections, we examine the effects of exercise from this perspective. PMID:23769598

  14. Responsiveness of Various Exercise-Testing Protocols to Therapeutic Interventions in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Borel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise intolerance is a key element in the pathophysiology and course of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. As such, evaluating exercise tolerance has become an important part of the management of COPD. A wide variety of exercise-testing protocols is currently available, each protocol having its own strengths and weaknesses relative to their discriminative, methodological, and evaluative characteristics. This paper aims to review the responsiveness of several exercise-testing protocols used to evaluate the efficacy of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to improve exercise tolerance in COPD. This will be done taking into account the minimally important difference, an important concept in the interpretation of the findings about responsiveness of exercise testing protocols. Among the currently available exercise-testing protocols (incremental, constant work rate, or self-paced, constant work rate exercise tests (cycle endurance test and endurance shuttle walking test emerge as the most responsive ones for detecting and quantifying changes in exercise capacity after an intervention in COPD.

  15. Exercise Intervention: Attrition, Compliance, Adherence, and Progression Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Tara; Erdmann, Ruby; Hacker, Eileen Danaher

    2018-02-01

    Exercise is widely touted as an effective intervention to optimize health and well-being after high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. 
. This article reports attrition, compliance, adherence, and progression from the strength training arm of the single-blind randomized, controlled trial Strength Training to Enhance Early Recovery (STEER). 
. 37 patients were randomized to the intervention and participated in a structured strength training program introduced during hospitalization and continued for six weeks after release. Research staff and patients maintained exercise logs to document compliance, adherence, and progression. 
. No patients left the study because of burden. Patients were compliant with completion of exercise sessions, and their adherence was high; they also progressed on their exercise prescription. Because STEER balances intervention effectiveness with patient burden, the findings support the likelihood of successful translation into clinical practice.

  16. Effects of Exercise Intervention on Preventing Letrozole-Exposed Rats From Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Si-Fan; Hu, Wen-Long; Wu, Min-Min; Jiang, Li-Yan

    2017-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a prevalent endocrinological disorder in reproductive-age women and is often associated with a metabolic syndrome. To investigate whether exercise intervention promotes PCOS prevention, a rat model was used. Polycystic ovary syndrome was induced by letrozole administration, and animals presented with obesity, sex hormone disorder, no ovulation, large cystic follicles, and increasing fasting insulin (FINS) and leptin levels. The intervention was set at 3 different intensities of swimming exercise: low (0.5 h/d), moderate (1 h/d), and high (2 h/d), and compared with a PCOS model group (letrozole administration without exercise intervention) and a control group. The exercise intervention in the low-intensity group did not produce changes in obesity, testosterone, progesterone (P), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels. Moderate-intensity exercise reduced body weight, retained ovulation, and P levels were increased but remained lower than those in the control group. The FSH levels were significantly higher, and FINS and leptin levels were lower than in the model group ( P < 0.05) but not in the control group. The high-intensity group demonstrated the greatest effect of PCOS prevention. Testosterone, luteinizing hormone, FINS, and leptin levels were significantly lower in the high-intensity group, and FSH and P levels were higher compared with the model group. These results suggest that high-intensity exercise intervention can effectively prevent PCOS development.

  17. BDNF mediates improvements in executive function following a 1-year exercise intervention

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    Regina Lynn Leckie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Executive function declines with age, but engaging in aerobic exercise may attenuate decline. One mechanism by which aerobic exercise may preserve executive function is through the up-regulation of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF, which also declines with age. The present study examined BDNF as a mediator of the effects of a 1-year walking intervention on executive function in 90 older adults (mean age = 66.82. Participants were randomized to a stretching and toning control group or a moderate intensity walking intervention group. BDNF serum levels and performance on a task-switching paradigm were collected at baseline and follow-up. We found that age moderated the effect of intervention group on changes in BDNF levels, with those in the highest age quartile showing the greatest increase in BDNF after 1-year of moderate intensity walking exercise (p = .036. The mediation analyses revealed that BDNF mediated the effect of the intervention on task-switch accuracy, but did so as a function of age, such that exercise-induced changes in BDNF mediated the effect of exercise on task-switch performance only for individuals over the age of 71. These results demonstrate that both age and BDNF serum levels are important factors to consider when investigating the mechanisms by which exercise interventions influence cognitive outcomes, particularly in elderly populations.

  18. Recovery of overall exercise ability, quality of life, and continence after 12-week combined exercise intervention in elderly patients who underwent radical prostatectomy: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Tae Nam; Nam, Jong-Kil; Ha, Hong Koo; Shin, Dong Gil; Lee, Wan; Kim, Mi-Sook; Chung, Moon Kee

    2012-08-01

    To examine the changes from a combined exercise intervention after radical prostatectomy (RP) in elderly patients with prostate cancer, because randomized controlled trials addressing exercise intervention after RP have been lacking. From May 2009 to May 2010, all patients who underwent laparoscopic RP were assessed for eligibility. A total of 66 patients were randomized to an exercise or a control group. The exercise group received a combined exercise intervention (resistance, flexibility, and Kegel exercises) twice a week for 12 weeks, and the control group received only Kegel exercises. The primary outcome was physical function, and the secondary outcomes were continence status and quality of life after the exercise intervention. A total of 49 patients completed follow-up to the end of study. After the 12-week exercise intervention, except for grip strength, all physical functions were better in the exercise group than in the control group. The 24-hour pad test results (12.2 g in the exercise group, 46.2 g in the control group) and continence rate (73.1% in exercise group, 43.5% in the control group) recovered more promptly in the exercise group. On a questionnaire study using the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey, only the exercise group showed improvement at the last follow-up visit. A 12-week combined exercise intervention after RP results in improvement of physical function, continence rate, and quality of life. These results could help with prompt recovery of daily activities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. EVALUATION OF WORK PLACE GROUP AND INTERNET BASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTIONS ON PSYCHOLOGICAL VARIABLES ASSOCIATED WITH EXERCISE BEHAVIOR CHANGE

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    Kimberley A. Dawson

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to compare group-based and internet-based physical activity interventions in terms of desirability, participant characteristics, exercise self-efficacy, and barrier self-efficacy. Pretest questionnaires were completed prior to voluntary enrollment into either of the ten-week physical activity interventions. Both interventions were based on Social Cognitive Theory and the Transtheoretical Model. Interventions were followed with posttest questionnaires. Results demonstrated that the internet intervention attracted more participants, but only the group-based participants showed significant increases in exercise and barrier self-efficacy. At pretest, participants who selected the internet intervention were significantly lower in life and job satisfaction than those who selected the group intervention. Results suggest that traditional group-based exercise interventions are helpful for improving cognitions associated with exercise behavior change (e.g., exercise self-efficacy and that the internet intervention may help employees who fall into an "unhappy employee" typology

  20. A Review of Exercise as Intervention for Sedentary Hazardous Drinking College Students: Rationale and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Jeremiah

    2010-01-01

    College students have high rates of alcohol problems despite a number of intervention initiatives designed to reduce alcohol use. Substance use, including heavy drinking, often occurs at the expense of other, substance-free, activities. This review examines the promotion of one specific substance-free activity--exercise--as an intervention for…

  1. Physical Activity, Exercise, and Nutrition Interventions for Weight Control in African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Matthew; Sharma, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the physical activity, exercise, and nutrition related weight control interventions done with African American women that were published between 2006 and 2010 and suggest ways of enhancing these interventions. A total of 13 studies met the inclusion criteria. The review found significant results with regard…

  2. Strategic targeting of advance care planning interventions: the Goldilocks phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, J Andrew; Bernacki, Rachelle

    2014-04-01

    Strategically selecting patients for discussions and documentation about limiting life-sustaining treatments-choosing the right time along the end-of-life trajectory for such an intervention and identifying patients at high risk of facing end-of-life decisions-can have a profound impact on the value of advance care planning (ACP) efforts. Timing is important because the completion of an advance directive (AD) too far from or too close to the time of death can lead to end-of-life decisions that do not optimally reflect the patient's values, goals, and preferences: a poorly chosen target patient population that is unlikely to need an AD in the near future may lead to patients making unrealistic, hypothetical choices, while assessing preferences in the emergency department or hospital in the face of a calamity is notoriously inadequate. Because much of the currently studied ACP efforts have led to a disappointingly small proportion of patients eventually benefitting from an AD, careful targeting of the intervention should also improve the efficacy of such projects. A key to optimal timing and strategic selection of target patients for an ACP program is prognostication, and we briefly highlight prognostication tools and studies that may point us toward high-value AD interventions.

  3. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 regulates muscle glucose uptake during exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Parker, Benjamin L; Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel

    2017-01-01

    Exercise increases glucose uptake into insulin-resistant muscle. Thus, elucidating the exercise signalling network in muscle may uncover new therapeutic targets. mTORC2, a regulator of insulin-controlled glucose uptake, has been reported to interact with Rac1, which plays a role in exercise......-induced glucose uptake in muscle. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that mTORC2 activity is necessary for muscle glucose uptake during treadmill exercise. We used mice that specifically lack mTORC2 signalling in muscle, by deletion of the obligatory mTORC2 component, Rictor (Ric mKO). Running capacity...... potential exercise-dependent mTORC2 substrates, including contractile proteins, kinases, transcriptional regulators, actin cytoskeleton regulators and ion-transport proteins. Our study suggests that mTORC2 is a component of the exercise signalling network that regulates muscle glucose uptake and we provide...

  4. Targeted spine strengthening exercise and posture training program to reduce hyperkyphosis in older adults: results from the study of hyperkyphosis, exercise, and function (SHEAF) randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, W B; Vittinghoff, E; Lin, F; Schafer, A; Long, R K; Wong, S; Gladin, A; Fan, B; Allaire, B; Kado, D M; Lane, N E

    2017-10-01

    A 6-month randomized controlled trial of spine-strengthening exercise and posture training reduced both radiographic and clinical measures of kyphosis. Participants receiving the intervention improved self-image and satisfaction with their appearance. Results suggest that spine-strengthening exercise and postural training may be an effective treatment option for older adults with hyperkyphosis. The purpose of the present study is to determine in a randomized controlled trial whether spine-strengthening exercises improve Cobb angle of kyphosis in community-dwelling older adults. We recruited adults ≥60 years with kyphosis ≥40° and enrolled 99 participants (71 women, 28 men), mean age 70.6 ± 0.6 years, range 60-88, with baseline Cobb angle 57.4 ± 12.5°. The intervention included group spine-strengthening exercise and postural training, delivered by a physical therapist, 1-h, three times weekly for 6 months. Controls received four group health education meetings. The primary outcome was change in the gold standard Cobb angle of kyphosis measured from standing lateral spine radiographs. Secondary outcomes included change in kyphometer-measured kyphosis, physical function (modified Physical Performance Test, gait speed, Timed Up and Go, Timed Loaded Standing, 6-Min Walk), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (PROMIS global health and physical function indexes, SRS-30 self-image domain). ANCOVA was used to assess treatment effects on change from baseline to 6 months in all outcomes. There was a -3.0° (95% CI -5.2, -0.8) between-group difference in change in Cobb angle, p = 0.009, favoring the intervention and approximating the magnitude of change from an incident vertebral fracture. Kyphometer-measured kyphosis (p = 0.03) and SRS-30 self-esteem (p  0.05. Spine-strengthening exercise and posture training over 6 months reduced kyphosis compared to control. Our randomized controlled trial results suggest that a targeted kyphosis

  5. Received social support and exercising: An intervention study to test the enabling hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackow, Pamela; Scholz, Urte; Hornung, Rainer

    2015-11-01

    Received social support is considered important for health-enhancing exercise participation. The enabling hypothesis of social support suggests an indirect association of social support and exercising via constructs of self-regulation, such as self-efficacy. This study aimed at examining an expanded enabling hypothesis by examining effects of different kinds of social support (i.e., emotional and instrumental) on exercising not only via self-efficacy but also via self-monitoring and action planning. An 8-week online study was conducted. Participants were randomly assigned to an intervention or a control group. The intervention comprised finding and then exercising regularly with a new exercise companion. Intervention and control group effects were compared by a manifest multigroup model. Received emotional social support predicted self-efficacy, self-monitoring, and action planning in the intervention group. Moreover, received emotional social support was indirectly connected with exercise via the examined mediators. The indirect effect from received emotional social support via self-efficacy mainly contributed to the total effect. No direct or indirect effect of received instrumental social support on exercise emerged. In the control group, neither emotional nor instrumental social support was associated with any of the self-regulation constructs nor with exercise. Actively looking for a new exercise companion and exercising together seems to be beneficial for the promotion of received emotional and instrumental social support. Emotional support in turn promotes exercise by enabling better self-regulation, in particular self-efficacy. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? With the 'enabling hypothesis', Benight and Bandura (2004, Behav. Res. Ther., 42, 1129) claimed that social support indirectly affects behaviour via self-efficacy. Research in the domain of physical exercise has provided evidence for this enabling hypothesis on a

  6. Acute Aerobic Exercise: An Intervention for the Selective Visual Attention and Reading Comprehension of Low-income Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eTine

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for feasible and research-based interventions that target the cognitive performance and academic achievement of low-income adolescents. In response, this study utilized a randomized experimental design and assessed the selective visual attention (SVA and reading comprehension abilities of low-income adolescents and, for comparison purposes, high-income adolescents after they engaged in 12-minutes of aerobic exercise. The results suggest that 12-minutes of aerobic exercise improved the SVA of low- and high-income adolescents and that the benefit lasted for 45-minutes for both groups. The SVA improvement among the low-income adolescents was particularly large. In fact, the SVA improvement among the low-income adolescents was substantial enough to eliminate a pre-existing income gap in SVA. The mean reading comprehension score of low-income adolescents who engaged in 12-minutes of aerobic exercise was higher than the mean reading comprehension score of low-income adolescents in the control group. However, there was no difference between the mean reading comprehension scores of the high-income adolescents who did and did not engage in 12-minutes of aerobic exercise. Based on the results, schools serving low-income adolescents should consider implementing brief sessions of aerobic exercise during the school day.

  7. Acute aerobic exercise: an intervention for the selective visual attention and reading comprehension of low-income adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tine, Michele

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for feasible and research-based interventions that target the cognitive performance and academic achievement of low-income adolescents. In response, this study utilized a randomized experimental design and assessed the selective visual attention (SVA) and reading comprehension abilities of low-income adolescents and, for comparison purposes, high-income adolescents after they engaged in 12-min of aerobic exercise. The results suggest that 12-min of aerobic exercise improved the SVA of low- and high-income adolescents and that the benefit lasted for 45-min for both groups. The SVA improvement among the low-income adolescents was particularly large. In fact, the SVA improvement among the low-income adolescents was substantial enough to eliminate a pre-existing income gap in SVA. The mean reading comprehension score of low-income adolescents who engaged in 12-min of aerobic exercise was higher than the mean reading comprehension score of low-income adolescents in the control group. However, there was no difference between the mean reading comprehension scores of the high-income adolescents who did and did not engage in 12-min of aerobic exercise. Based on the results, schools serving low-income adolescents should consider implementing brief sessions of aerobic exercise during the school day. PMID:24966846

  8. Response to an exercise intervention after endometrial cancer: differences between obese and non-obese survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basen-Engquist, K; Carmack, C; Brown, J; Jhingran, A; Baum, G; Song, J; Scruggs, S; Swartz, M C; Cox, M G; Lu, K H

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe baseline differences between obese and non-obese endometrial cancer survivor in anthropometrics, exercise behavior, fitness, heart rate and blood pressure, and quality of life, and to analyze whether the effect of a home-based exercise intervention on these outcomes differed for obese and non-obese participants. One hundred post-treatment Stage I-IIIa endometrial cancer survivors participated in a single arm 6month study in which they received a home-based exercise intervention. Cardiorespiratory fitness, anthropometrics, and exercise behavior were measured every two months, and quality of life (QOL) and psychological distress were measured at baseline and 6months. Adjusting for potential confounders, at baseline obese survivors had poorer cardiorespiratory fitness (p=.002), higher systolic blood pressure (p=.018), and lower physical functioning (pObese survivors had less improvement in exercise behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness than non-obese survivors, but there were no differences with regard to improvements in QOL and stress. Home based exercise interventions are beneficial to endometrial cancer survivors, including those whose BMI is in the obese range. While obese survivors have lower levels of physical activity and fitness, they experienced similar activity, fitness, quality of life and mental health benefits. Exercise should be encouraged in endometrial cancer survivors, including those who are obese. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cardiovascular exercise training extends influenza vaccine seroprotection in sedentary older adults: the immune function intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Jeffrey A; Keylock, K Todd; Lowder, Thomas; Vieira, Victoria J; Zelkovich, William; Dumich, Sara; Colantuano, Kim; Lyons, Kristin; Leifheit, Kurt; Cook, Marc; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; McAuley, Edward

    2009-12-01

    To determine whether cardiovascular exercise training resulted in improved antibody responses to influenza vaccination in sedentary elderly people who exhibited poor vaccine responses. Single-site randomized parallel-arm 10-month controlled trial. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. One hundred forty-four sedentary, healthy older (69.9 +/- 0.4) adults. Moderate (60-70% maximal oxygen uptake) cardiovascular exercise was compared with flexibility and balance training. The primary outcome was influenza vaccine response, as measured according to hemagglutination inhibition (HI) anti-influenza antibody titer and seroprotective responses (HI titer > or =40). Secondary measures included cardiovascular fitness and body composition. Of the 160 participants enrolled, 144 (90%) completed the 10-month intervention with excellent compliance ( approximately 83%). Cardiovascular, but not flexibility, exercise intervention resulted in improvements in indices of cardiovascular fitness, including maximal oxygen uptake. Although not affecting peak (e.g., 3 and 6 weeks) postvaccine anti-influenza HI titers, cardiovascular exercise resulted in a significant increase in seroprotection 24 weeks after vaccination (30-100% dependent on vaccine variant), whereas flexibility training did not. Participants randomized to cardiovascular exercise experienced improvements in influenza seroprotection throughout the entire influenza season, whereas those in the balance and flexibility intervention did not. Although there were no differences in reported respiratory tract infections, the exercise group exhibited reduced overall illness severity and sleep disturbance. These data support the hypothesis that regular endurance exercise improves influenza vaccine responses.

  10. The effects of exercise on the lipoprotein subclass profile: A meta-analysis of 10 interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzynski, Mark A; Burton, Jeffrey; Rankinen, Tuomo; Blair, Steven N; Church, Timothy S; Després, Jean-Pierre; Hagberg, James M; Landers-Ramos, Rian; Leon, Arthur S; Mikus, Catherine R; Rao, D C; Seip, Richard L; Skinner, James S; Slentz, Cris A; Thompson, Paul D; Wilund, Kenneth R; Kraus, William E; Bouchard, Claude

    2015-12-01

    The goal was to examine lipoprotein subclass responses to regular exercise as measured in 10 exercise interventions derived from six cohorts. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to quantify average particle size, total and subclass concentrations of very low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein particles (VLDL-P, LDL-P, and HDL-P, respectively) before and after an exercise intervention in 1555 adults from six studies, encompassing 10 distinct exercise programs: APOE (N = 106), DREW (N = 385), GERS (N = 79), HERITAGE (N = 715), STRRIDE I (N = 168) and II (N = 102). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed to evaluate the overall estimate of mean change across the unadjusted and adjusted mean change values from each exercise group. Meta-analysis of unadjusted data showed that regular exercise induced significant decreases in the concentration of large VLDL-P, small LDL-P, and medium HDL-P and mean VLDL-P size, with significant increases in the concentration of large LDL-P and large HDL-P and mean LDL-P size. These changes remained significant in meta-analysis with adjustment for age, sex, race, baseline body mass index, and baseline trait value. Despite differences in exercise programs and study populations, regular exercise produced putatively beneficial changes in the lipoprotein subclass profile across 10 exercise interventions. Further research is needed to examine how exercise-induced changes in lipoprotein subclasses may be associated with (concomitant changes in) cardiovascular disease risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of exercise on the lipoprotein subclass profile: a meta-analysis of 10 interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzynski, Mark A.; Burton, Jeffrey; Rankinen, Tuomo; Blair, Steven N.; Church, Timothy S.; Després, Jean-Pierre; Hagberg, James M.; Landers-Ramos, Rian; Leon, Arthur S.; Mikus, Catherine R.; Rao, D.C.; Seip, Richard L.; Skinner, James S.; Slentz, Cris A.; Thompson, Paul D.; Wilund, Kenneth R.; Kraus, William E.; Bouchard, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal was to examine lipoprotein subclass responses to regular exercise as measured in 10 exercise interventions derived from six cohorts. Methods Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to quantify average particle size, total and subclass concentrations of very low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein particles (VLDL-P, LDL-P, and HDL-P, respectively) before and after an exercise intervention in 1,555 adults from six studies, encompassing 10 distinct exercise programs: APOE (N=106), DREW (N=385), GERS (N=79), HERITAGE (N=715), STRRIDE I (N=168) and II (N=102). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed to evaluate the overall estimate of mean change across the unadjusted and adjusted mean change values from each exercise group. Results Meta-analysis of unadjusted data showed that regular exercise induced significant decreases in the concentration of large VLDL-P, small LDL-P, and medium HDL-P and mean VLDL-P size, with significant increases in the concentration of large LDL-P and large HDL-P and mean LDL-P size. These changes remained significant in meta-analysis with adjustment for age, sex, race, baseline body mass index, and baseline trait value. Conclusions Despite differences in exercise programs and study populations, regular exercise produced putatively beneficial changes in the lipoprotein subclass profile across 10 exercise interventions. Further research is needed to examine how exercise-induced changes in lipoprotein subclasses may be associated with (concomitant changes in) cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26520888

  12. The Effect of Structured Exercise Intervention on Intensity and Volume of Total Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Wasenius

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of a 12-week structured exercise intervention on total physical activity and its subcategories. Twenty-three overweight or obese middle aged men with impaired glucose regulation were randomized into a 12-week Nordic walking group, a power-type resistance training group, and a non-exercise control group. Physical activity was measured with questionnaires before the intervention (1–4 weeks and during the intervention (1–12 weeks and was expressed in metabolic equivalents of task. No significant change in the volume of total physical activity between or within the groups was observed (p > 0.050. The volume of total leisure-time physical activity (structured exercises + non-structured leisure-time physical activity increased significantly in the Nordic walking group (p 0.050 compared to the control group. In both exercise groups increase in the weekly volume of total leisure-time physical activity was inversely associated with the volume of non-leisure-time physical activities. In conclusion, structured exercise intervention did not increase the volume of total physical activity. Albeit, endurance training can increase the volume of high intensity physical activities, however it is associated with compensatory decrease in lower intensity physical activities. To achieve effective personalized exercise program, individuality in compensatory behavior should be recognised.

  13. A brief office intervention is associated with increased days per week of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostfeld, Robert Jonathan; Cheung, Yat Wa; Saal, Ilana; Janis, Gregory; Cabeza, Yolanda; Du, Yunling; Smoller, Sylvia; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2008-04-25

    We hypothesized that a cardiologist-initiated motivational discussion during a routine general cardiology clinic visit that included an exercise 'contract' signed by the patient, physician and a witness, would increase self-reported days per week of exercise. A short-term pilot intervention was provided to forty consecutive general cardiology clinic patients who were enrolled in 2005. They were asked to answer the question "How many days each week do you exercise" prior to the motivational discussion and at routine follow-up. Each participant signed an exercise 'contract' and agreed to exercise for at least 15 min everyday. Participants had an average follow-up of 3.2 (1.7) months. The initial visit mean days of exercise per week were 3.1 (1.9). At follow-up, mean days of exercise per week were 4.0 (1.8), (p=0.04). This simple rapid intervention was associated with increased self-reported days per week of exercise.

  14. Interventions targeting attention in young children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Elena; Watson, Linda R

    2011-02-01

    The ability to focus and sustain one's attention is critical for learning. Children with autism demonstrate unusual characteristics of attention from infancy. It is reasonable to assume that early anomalies in attention influence a child's developmental trajectories. Therapeutic interventions for autism often focus on core features of autism such as communication and socialization, while very few interventions specifically address attention. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians a description of attention characteristics in children with autism and discuss interventions thought to improve attention. Characteristics of attention in children with autism are presented. Intervention studies featuring measures of attention as an outcome variable for young children with autism are reviewed to present interventions that have empirical evidence for improvements in attention. Results are synthesized by strategy, specific feature of attention targeted, and results for both habilitative goals and accommodations for attention. Although research is not extensive, several strategies to support attention in young children with autism have been investigated. The empirical findings regarding these strategies can inform evidence-based practice.

  15. Dietary weight loss and exercise interventions effects on quality of life in overweight/obese postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ching-Yun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although lifestyle interventions targeting multiple lifestyle behaviors are more effective in preventing unhealthy weight gain and chronic diseases than intervening on a single behavior, few studies have compared individual and combined effects of diet and/or exercise interventions on health-related quality of life (HRQOL. In addition, the mechanisms of how these lifestyle interventions affect HRQOL are unknown. The primary aim of this study was to examine the individual and combined effects of dietary weight loss and/or exercise interventions on HRQOL and psychosocial factors (depression, anxiety, stress, social support. The secondary aim was to investigate predictors of changes in HRQOL. Methods This study was a randomized controlled trial. Overweight/obese postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to 12 months of dietary weight loss (n = 118, moderate-to-vigorous aerobic exercise (225 minutes/week, n = 117, combined diet and exercise (n = 117, or control (n = 87. Demographic, health and anthropometric information, aerobic fitness, HRQOL (SF-36, stress (Perceived Stress Scale, depression [Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18], anxiety (BSI-18 and social support (Medical Outcome Study Social Support Survey were assessed at baseline and 12 months. The 12-month changes in HRQOL and psychosocial factors were compared using analysis of covariance, adjusting for baseline scores. Multiple regression was used to assess predictors of changes in HRQOL. Results Twelve-month changes in HRQOL and psychosocial factors differed by intervention group. The combined diet + exercise group improved 4 aspects of HRQOL (physical functioning, role-physical, vitality, and mental health, and stress (p ≤ 0.01 vs. controls. The diet group increased vitality score (p Conclusions A combined diet and exercise intervention has positive effects on HRQOL and psychological health, which may be greater than that from exercise or diet alone. Improvements in

  16. Cancer survivors' uptake and adherence in diet and exercise intervention trials: an integrative data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rebecca N; Mosher, Catherine E; Blair, Cindy K; Snyder, Denise C; Sloane, Richard; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The health benefits of diet and exercise interventions for cancer survivors are well documented. However, little is known regarding demographic and medical predictors of survivors' willingness to participate in diet and exercise intervention trials, study enrollment, intervention adherence, and study completion. To assist in interpreting the generalizability of trial findings and to improve the design of future trials, this study examined predictors of these process measures. An integrative data analysis was performed on data from 3 of the largest home-based diet and exercise intervention trials for cancer survivors (n = 23,841). Demographic and medical factors (ie, sex, race, age, time since diagnosis, and cancer type) were examined as predictors of willingness to participate, study enrollment, intervention adherence, and study completion in the pooled sample. A 99% confidence interval was used to determine statistical significance. Across trials, 11.1% of contacted survivors were willing to participate, and 5.7% were eligible and enrolled. Among enrollees, 53.4% demonstrated ≥75% adherence to the intervention, and 91.1% completed the study. Race (Caucasian vs others), age, time since diagnosis, and cancer type predicted survivors' willingness to participate (P Cancer survivors' demographic and medical characteristics predicted their interest and participation in diet and exercise intervention trials. These findings have implications for the generalizability of results and can help to guide procedures used in future trials to enhance patient representation. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  17. Cancer Survivors’ Uptake and Adherence in Diet and Exercise Intervention Trials: An Integrative Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rebecca N.; Mosher, Catherine E.; Blair, Cindy K.; Snyder, Denise C.; Sloane, Richard; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The health benefits of diet and exercise interventions for cancer survivors are well documented. However, little is known regarding demographic and medical predictors of survivors’ willingness to participate in diet and exercise intervention trials, study enrollment, intervention adherence, and study completion. To assist in interpreting the generalizability of trial findings as well as to improve the design of future trials, we examined predictors of these process measures. METHODS An integrative data analysis was performed on data from three of the largest home-based diet and exercise intervention trials for cancer survivors (N=23,841). Demographic and medical factors (i.e., gender, race, age, time since diagnosis, and cancer type) were examined as predictors of willingness to participate, study enrollment, intervention adherence, and study completion in the pooled sample. A 99% confidence interval was used to determine statistical significance. RESULTS Across trials, 11.1% of contacted survivors were willing to participate and 5.7% were eligible and enrolled. Among enrollees, 53.4% demonstrated ≥75% adherence to the intervention and 91.1% completed the study. Race (Caucasian vs. others), age, time since diagnosis, and cancer type predicted survivors’ willingness to participate (p-valuesCancer survivors’ demographic and medical characteristics predicted their interest and participation in diet and exercise intervention trials. These findings have implications for the generalizability of results and can help guide procedures used in future trials to enhance patient representation. PMID:25155573

  18. Physical Therapy and Exercise Interventions in Huntington's Disease: A Mixed Methods Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Nora E; Rao, Ashwini K; Kegelmeyer, Deb; Kloos, Anne; Busse, Monica; Hartel, Lynda; Carrier, Judith; Quinn, Lori

    2017-01-01

    A number of studies evaluating physical therapy and exercise interventions in Huntington's disease have been conducted over the past 15 years. However, an assessment of the quality and strength of the evidence in support of these interventions is lacking. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effectiveness of physical therapy and exercise interventions in people with Huntington's disease, and to examine the perceptions of patients, families and caregivers of these interventions. This mixed-methods systematic review utilized the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) approach and extraction tools to evaluate the literature from January 2003 until May 2016. The review considered interventions that included exercise and physical therapy interventions, and included both quantitative and qualitative outcome measures. Twenty (20) studies met the inclusion criteria, including eighteen (18) that had quantitative outcome measures and two (2) that utilized qualitative methods. JBI Levels of evidence for the 18 quantitative studies were as follows: Eight studies were at evidence Level 1, seven were at Level 2, two were at Level 3, and one was at Level 4. Our review suggests that there is preliminary support for the benefits of exercise and physical activity in Huntington's disease in terms of motor function, gait speed, and balance, as well as a range of physical and social benefits identified through patient-reported outcomes. Variability in mode of intervention as well as outcome measures limits the interpretability of these studies, and high-quality studies that incorporate adaptive trial designs for this rare disease are needed.

  19. Social media interventions for diet and exercise behaviours: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gillian; Hamm, Michele P; Shulhan, Jocelyn; Vandermeer, Ben; Hartling, Lisa

    2014-02-12

    To conduct a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining the use of social media to promote healthy diet and exercise in the general population. MEDLINE, CENTRAL, ERIC, PubMed, CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Alt Health Watch, Health Source, Communication and Mass Media Complete, Web of Knowledge and ProQuest Dissertation and Thesis (2000-2013). RCTs of social media interventions promoting healthy diet and exercise behaviours in the general population were eligible. Interventions using social media, alone or as part of a complex intervention, were included. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. We describe the studies according to the target populations, objectives and nature of interventions, outcomes examined, and results and conclusions. We extracted data on the primary and secondary outcomes examined in each study. Where the same outcome was assessed in at least three studies, we combined data in a meta-analysis. 22 studies were included. Participants were typically middle-aged Caucasian women of mid-to-high socioeconomic status. There were a variety of interventions, comparison groups and outcomes. All studies showed a decrease in programme usage throughout the intervention period. Overall, no significant differences were found for primary outcomes which varied across studies. Meta-analysis showed no significant differences in changes in physical activity (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.13 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.30), 12 studies) and weight (SMD -0.00 (95% CI -0.19 to 0.19), 10 studies); however, pooled results from five studies showed a significant decrease in dietary fat consumption with social media (SMD -0.35 (95% CI -0.68 to -0.02)). Social media may provide certain advantages for public health interventions; however, studies of social media interventions to date relating to healthy lifestyles tend to show low levels of participation and do not show significant differences between groups in key outcomes.

  20. Preconception diet or exercise intervention in obese fathers normalizes sperm microRNA profile and metabolic syndrome in female offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Nicole O; Owens, Julie A; Fullston, Tod; Lane, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are increasingly prevalent across all demographics. Paternal obesity in humans and rodents can program obesity and impair insulin sensitivity in female offspring. It remains to be determined whether these perturbed offspring phenotypes can be improved through targeted lifestyle interventions in the obese father. Using a mouse model, we demonstrate that diet or exercise interventions for 8 wk (2 rounds of spermatogenesis) in obese founder males restores insulin sensitivity and normalized adiposity in female offspring. Founder diet and/or exercise also normalizes abundance of X-linked sperm microRNAs that target genes regulating cell cycle and apoptosis, pathways central to oocyte and early embryogenesis. Additionally, obesity-associated comorbidities, including inflammation, glucose intolerance, stress, and hypercholesterolemia, were good predictors for sperm microRNA abundance and offspring phenotypes. Interventions aimed at improving paternal metabolic health during specific windows prior to conception can partially normalize aberrant epigenetic signals in sperm and improve the metabolic health of female offspring. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Experiences of breast cancer survivors participating in a tailored exercise intervention -a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Minna-Liisa; Hakamies-Blomqvist, Liisa; Blomqvist, Carl; Nikander, Riku; Gustavsson-Lilius, Mila; Saarto, Tiina

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how tailored exercise is experienced by cancer survivors. Twenty-five breast cancer survivors who were recently treated with systemic adjuvant treatments attended tailored exercise classes as a part of a randomized controlled exercise intervention study (Breast Cancer and Exercise, BREX). Focus group discussions with a median of four (range 3-6) participants in each group were conducted to capture their individual experiences of their course of illness, taking part in the exercise trial, the personal meaning of tailored exercise classes and the group. Attending the intervention in which the focus of attention was on physical rehabilitation was highly valued, since the participants experienced both improved physical fitness and improved coping. Due to altered physical appearance and poor physical fitness, the participants felt that tailored exercise for patients with breast cancer reduced their barrier to start exercising. Peer support from the group was valued, especially that of sharing experiences, receiving psychological support and gaining a sense of normality. A sense of mastery over their disease through participating in the intervention, i.e. better psychological functioning and improved mood, was a consequence of better physical fitness and of meeting other breast cancer survivors. Also participating in the study per se increases a sense of comfort and security with extra medical examinations and follow-up. Participating in the tailored exercise group for breast cancer survivors helped patients gain a sense of mastery, restoring their self-esteem and constructing a meaning for their cancer experience and its impact on their lives.

  2. Effectiveness of a lifestyle physical activity versus a structured exercise intervention in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roie, Evelien; Delecluse, Christophe; Opdenacker, Joke; De Bock, Katrien; Kennis, Eva; Boen, Filip

    2010-07-01

    Two groups of sedentary older adults, participating in either a lifestyle physical activity intervention (LIFE, n = 60) or a structured exercise intervention (STRU, n = 60), were compared with a control group (CO, n = 66) in terms of physical fitness and cardiovascular risk factors. Participants in LIFE were stimulated to integrate physical activity into their daily routines and received an individualized home-based program. Participants in STRU completed 5 supervised training sessions every 2 wk in a fitness center. Both interventions lasted 11 months and focused on endurance, strength, flexibility, and postural/balance exercises. The results revealed that the interventions were equally effective in improving functional performance. STRU was more effective than LIFE in improving cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness. Limited effects emerged on cardiovascular risk, with STRU improving in total cholesterol and HDL. Consequently, interventions aiming at reducing cardiovascular risks among sedentary elderly should focus on long-term changes in physical activity behavior.

  3. Exercise based interventions for alcohol use disorder: A comment on motivational aspects of participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Kirsten K; Bramsen, Rikke Holm; Dervisevic, Ajla; Bilberg, Randi

    2017-02-01

    Exercise based treatment for alcohol use disorders have shown an impact on mental health (e.g., depression or anxiety), and alcohol outcomes (e.g., craving or abstinence). However, there is a lack of information on the role of motivational aspects of participation in the process of designing exercise interventions for alcohol use disorder. This study aims to examine: (1) whether motivational aspects are taken into account when the type and delivery method of exercise interventions are chosen; (2) whether motivational aspects are taken into account post intervention; and (3) whether there are different traditions regarding payment for participants. A systematic search was conducted to identify eligible studies in order to investigate the impact of motivational aspects including payment for participation. Twelve samples including ten to 620 participants were investigated. Participants were predominantly male and in their 40s, ranging from 20 to 69 years. Aerobic exercise (running, walking, fitness) either in a group or individual condition is the most frequently used exercise form. Two studies included ball games or cycling, while only one study offered the opportunity to choose between a wide range of sports. Motivational aspects are mentioned explicitly in half of the studies, mostly with regard to adherence to participation and social integration as the reason for using a group condition. Achievement is mentioned in two studies but not explicitly with regard to planning the intervention design. Five studies include payment for participation in exercise. Findings of the present study identify that motivational aspects for participation are rarely involved in the planning of an exercise intervention. With regard to the specific psychosocial vulnerability of an alcohol use disorder population, this should be an important aspect of further research studies. © 2016 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology published by Scandinavian Psychological Associations

  4. Exercise as an intervention for the age-related decline in brain metabolic support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda J Anderson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To identify interventions for brain aging, we must first identify the processes in which we hope to intervene. Brain aging is a period of decreasing functional capacity and increasing vulnerability, which reflect a reduction in morphological organization and perhaps degeneration. Since life is ultimately dependent upon the ability to maintain cellular organization through metabolism, this review explores evidence for a decline in neural metabolic support during aging, which includes a reduction in whole brain cerebral blood flow, and cellular metabolic capacity. Capillary density may also decrease with age, although the results are less clear. Exercise may be a highly effective intervention for brain aging, because it improves the cardiovascular system as a whole, and increases regional capillary density and neuronal metabolic capacity. Although the evidence is strongest for motor regions, more work may yield additional evidence for exercise-related improvement in metabolic support in non-motor regions. The protective effects of exercise may be specific to brain region and the type of insult. For example, exercise protects striatal cells from ischemia, but it produces mixed results after hippocampal seizures. Exercise can improve metabolic support and bioenergetic capacity in adult animals, but it remains to be determined whether it has similar effects in aging animals. What is clear is that exercise can influence the multiple levels of support necessary for maintaining optimal neuronal function, which is unique among proposed interventions for aging.

  5. High-intensity training vs. traditional exercise interventions for promoting health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE:: to determine the effectiveness of brief intense interval training as exercise intervention for promoting health and evaluate potential benefits with reference to common interventions; i.e. prolonged exercise and strength training. METHODS:: 36 untrained men were divided into groups...... that completed 12 weeks of intense interval running (INT; total training time 40 min a week), prolonged running ( approximately 150 min/week), strength training ( approximately 150 min/week) or continued their habitual life-style without participation in physical training. RESULTS:: The improvement...... in cardiorespiratory fitness was superior in INT (14+/-2% increase in VO2max) compared to the other two exercise interventions (7+/-2% and 3+/-2% increases). The blood glucose concentration 2 hours following oral ingestion of 75 g of glucose was lowered to a similar extent following training in the INT (from 6...

  6. Treating tendinopathy: perspective on anti-inflammatory intervention and therapeutic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Michael F; Denegar, Craig R

    2015-04-01

    Tendinopathy is a common and complex disorder. Once viewed as an inflammatory condition labeled tendinitis, it is now viewed along a continuum that can lead to tissue necrosis and risk of tendon rupture. Anti-inflammatory medications can alter symptoms but may also promote tissue degeneration. Loading of the tendon through exercise, especially exercise involving eccentric muscle contraction, has been shown to promote symptom resolution and functional recovery in many patients. This article reviews the pathoetiology of tendinopathy and the role anti-inflammatory interventions and therapeutic exercise in treatment of active patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multicomponent Exercise Intervention and Metacognition in Obese Preadolescents: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng-Tzu; Chen, Su-Ru; Chu, I-Hua; Liu, Jen-Hao; Chang, Yu-Kai

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the effect of a 12-week multicomponent exercise intervention on metacognition among preadolescents with obesity. Seventy-five preadolescents were randomly assigned to either a multicomponent exercise group or a reading control group. An exercise intervention consisting of a jumping rope was utilized to develop multifaceted fitness features, with each session lasting for 75 min and three sessions being conducted per week for 12 weeks. Results revealed significant interactions between group and time point for cardiovascular fitness, muscular endurance, flexibility, and power, as well as for Tower of London task measures, including total move score, total executive time, and total planning-solving time, with better postintervention performances achieved by the exercise group. Positive correlations between the physical fitness and metacognition measurements were also observed. These findings suggest that the multicomponent exercise benefits metacognition in obese preadolescents, with exercise-associated changes in multifaceted fitness features mediating the relationship between exercise and metacognition.

  8. The relevance of applying exercise training principles when designing therapeutic interventions for patients with inflammatory myopathies: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschung Pfister, Pierrette; de Bruin, Eling D; Tobler-Ammann, Bernadette C; Maurer, Britta; Knols, Ruud H

    2015-10-01

    Physical exercise seems to be a safe and effective intervention in patients with inflammatory myopathy (IM). However, the optimal training intervention is not clear. To achieve an optimum training effect, physical exercise training principles must be considered and to replicate research findings, FITT components (frequency, intensity, time, and type) of exercise training should be reported. This review aims to evaluate exercise interventions in studies with IM patients in relation to (1) the application of principles of exercise training, (2) the reporting of FITT components, (3) the adherence of participants to the intervention, and (4) to assess the methodological quality of the included studies. The literature was searched for exercise studies in IM patients. Data were extracted to evaluate the application of the training principles, the reporting of and the adherence to the exercise prescription. The Downs and Black checklist was used to assess methodological quality of the included studies. From the 14 included studies, four focused on resistance, two on endurance, and eight on combined training. In terms of principles of exercise training, 93 % reported specificity, 50 % progression and overload, and 79 % initial values. Reversibility and diminishing returns were never reported. Six articles reported all FITT components in the prescription of the training though no study described adherence to all of these components. Incomplete application of the exercise training principles and insufficient reporting of the exercise intervention prescribed and completed hamper the reproducibility of the intervention and the ability to determine the optimal dose of exercise.

  9. Hand exercise intervention in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regardt, Malin; Schult, Marie-Louise; Axelsson, Yvonne; Aldehag, Anna; Alexanderson, Helene; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a 12-week hand exercise intervention for patients with polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) and evaluate adherence, patients' opinions of the programme design and overall feasibility, and the effect on hand function and activity limitation after the intervention. A pilot hand exercise intervention was conducted on a convenience sample of 15 patients with reduced handgrip strength and established, inactive PM and DM. Acceptable adherence was set at 75%. The programme was evaluated based on patients' opinions regarding exertion, the movements involved and overall feasibility. Hand- and pinch-grip strength, grip ability, dexterity and activity limitation were assessed. Eleven of 15 patients completed the intervention, with acceptable adherence of 78-100%. Measures of handgrip strength, dexterity and activity limitation were reduced at baseline compared with normative data from the literature. Throughout the intervention, rates of perceived exertion were scored between 'moderate' and 'fairly strong'. Finger abduction and adduction were excluded from the hand exercise programme because they were not feasible to perform. Repetitions of the exercise increased gradually to a maximum of 30 per movement. Patients regarded this as too time-consuming and suggested ten repetitions daily or 10-20 repetitions 2-4 times per week. There were some individual, clinically meaningful improvements in hand function and activity limitation. A comparison between baseline and after the intervention showed that the three-jaw (tripod) pinch-grip strength (left hand) had increased (p hand exercise programme was found to be feasible to perform by patients with established PM or DM. The effect was limited, with few individual improvements in hand function and activity limitation, indicating a need to increase the resistance in the movements and to limit the duration of each exercise session. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The effect of regular physical activity on exercise tolerance: a school-based intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Reza Sohrabi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Sohrabi MR, Davoudi-Monfared E, Tayefi B, Hajihashemi Z, Sajjadi E. The effect of regular physical activity on exercise tolerance: a school-based intervention. Novel Biomed 2013;1(2:34-38.Objectives: The main purpose of this study was to assess the effects of daily physical activity on exercise tolerance ability using the six minute walk test in healthy female students.Methods: The participants in this field study were 252 healthy girls, 9-12 years old, studying in an elementary school in Tehran from March to June 2011. A three months daily physical activity protocol, with 15 minutes exercise per day, was designed as a curricular-based exercise intervention program. The six minute walk test was used as a tool to measure exercise tolerance ability before and after the intervention. Paired t-test, ANOVA and correlation tests were used when appropriate.Results: The participants, with mean age of 10.6 (SD = 1.1, formed different body mass index groups known as underweight, normal, at risk and overweight with 8.3, 60.7, 18.7, and 12.3% respectively. The mean of the distances moved along in a six minute walk test, before and after the intervention, increased from 833.4 meter to 923.3 meter , indicating 10% increase and the difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.001. However, analysis of mean differences of the walked distances, before and after the intervention, showed no statistically significant difference for the body mass index groups (P> 0.05.Conclusion: A 15-minutes daily physical activity could enhance the exercise tolerance of school-age girls; the activity, as an easy and inexpensive form of intervention, is recommended to students.

  11. An Exercise Intervention During Chemotherapy for Women With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, David; Broderick, Carolyn; Friedlander, Michael; Ryan, Mary; Harrison, Michelle; Pumpa, Kate; Naumann, Fiona

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of a combined supervised and home-based exercise intervention during chemotherapy for women with recurrent ovarian cancer. Secondary aims were to determine the impact of physical activity on physical and psychological outcomes and on chemotherapy completion rates. Women with recurrent ovarian cancer were recruited from 3 oncology outpatient clinics in Sydney and Canberra, Australia. All participants received an individualized exercise program that consisted of 90 minutes or more of low to moderate aerobic, resistance, core stability, and balance exercise per week, for 12 weeks. Feasibility was determined by recruitment rate, retention rate, intervention adherence, and adverse events. Aerobic capacity, muscular strength, fatigue, sleep quality, quality of life, depression, and chemotherapy completion rates were assessed at weeks 0, 12, and 24. Thirty participants were recruited (recruitment rate, 63%), with a retention rate of 70%. Participants averaged 196 ± 138 min · wk of low to moderate physical activity throughout the intervention, with adherence to the program at 81%. There were no adverse events resulting from the exercise intervention. Participants who completed the study displayed significant improvements in quality of life (P = 0.017), fatigue (P = 0.004), mental health (P = 0.007), muscular strength (P = 0.001), and balance (P = 0.003) after the intervention. Participants completing the intervention had a higher relative dose intensity than noncompleters (P = 0.03). A program consisting of low to moderate exercise of 90 min · wk was achieved by two-thirds of women with recurrent ovarian cancer in this study, with no adverse events reported. Randomized control studies are required to confirm the benefits of exercise reported in this study.

  12. Changes in sedentary time and physical activity in response to an exercise training and/or lifestyle intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozey-Keadle, Sarah; Staudenmayer, John; Libertine, Amanda; Mavilia, Marianna; Lyden, Kate; Braun, Barry; Freedson, Patty

    2014-09-01

    Individuals may compensate for exercise training by modifying nonexercise behavior (ie, increase sedentary time (ST) and decrease nonexercise physical activity [NEPA]). To compare ST and NEPA during a 12-week exercise training and/or lifestyle intervention. Fifty-seven overweight/obese participants (19 M/39 F) completed the study (mean ± SD; age 43.6 ± 9.9 y, BMI 35.1 ± 4.6 kg/m2). There were no between-group differences in activity levels at baseline. Four-arm quasi-experimental intervention study 1) EX: exercise 5 days per week at a moderate intensity (40% to 65% VO2peak) 2) rST: reduce ST and increase NEPA, 3) EX-rST: combination of EX and rST and 4) CON: maintain habitual behavior. For the EX group, ST did not decrease significantly (mean ((95% confidence interval) 0.48 (-2.2 to 3.1)% and there was no changes in NEPA at week-12 compared with baseline. The changes were variable, with approximately 50% of participants increasing ST and decreasing NEPA. The rST group decreased ST (-4.8 (0.8 to 7.9)% and increased NEPA. EX-rST significantly decreased ST (-5.1 (-2.2 to 7.9)% and increased time in NEPA at week-12 compared with baseline. The control group increased ST by 4.3 (0.8 to 7.9)%. Changes in nonexercise ST and NEPA are variable among participants in an exercise-training program, with nearly half decreasing NEPA compared with baseline. Interventions targeting multiple behaviors (ST and NEPA) may effectively reduce compensation and increase daily activity.

  13. Cognitive mediation of intervention effects on physical exercise: causal models for the adoption and maintenance stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Reinhard; Seelig, Harald; Göhner, Wiebke; Burton, Nicola W; Brown, Wendy J

    2012-01-01

    To investigate how the effects of a group-based intervention program (MoVo-LISA) on exercise behaviour were mediated by cognitive variables. Different causal models mapping the short-term (adoption) and long-term (maintenance) intervention effects were tested using path analyses. N = 220 in-patients of a rehabilitation clinic were assigned to an usual care or intervention group (quasi-experimental design). Questionnaire-based assessment was conducted at baseline; discharge; and at six weeks, six months and 12 months post discharge. The potential mediator variables were outcome expectations, self-efficacy, strength of goal intention (intention strength), self-concordance, action planning and barrier management. Observed intervention effects on exercise behaviour (p maintenance stages, by action planning only at the adoption, and by barrier management only at the maintenance stage. Self-efficacy and outcome expectations were only indirectly involved in these mediations by affecting intention strength and self-concordance. This is the first study to track the cognitive mediation processes of intervention effects on exercise behaviour over a long time-period by differentiating the adoption and maintenance stages of behaviour change. The findings emphasise the importance of deconstructing intervention effects (modifiability vs. predictive power of a mediator) to develop more effective interventions.

  14. Exercise intervention for the treatment of trismus in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Nina; Fagerberg-Mohlin, Bodil; Andréll, Paulin; Finizia, Caterina

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of structured exercise with jaw mobilizing devices on trismus and its effect on trismus symptomatology and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in head and neck (H&N) cancer patients. Fifty patients with H&N cancer and trismus, i.e. maximum interincisal opening (MIO) ≤ 35 mm participated in a structured intervention program with jaw exercise. The patients in the intervention group underwent a 10-week exercise program with regular follow-up. A control group comprising of 50 patients with trismus and H&N cancer were matched to the intervention group according to gender, tumor location, tumor stage, comorbidity and age. HRQL and trismus-related symptoms were assessed. The mean MIO improvement was 6.4 mm (4.8-8.0) and 0.7 (-0.3-1.7) mm in the intervention group and control group respectively, three months post-intervention commencement (p Trismus Questionnaire (GTQ) domains, i.e. jaw-related problems (p trismus (MIO) was also reflected in the patient-reported outcome questionnaires where the patients who underwent the structured exercise program after cancer treatment reported improvements in HRQL and less trismus-related symptoms compared to the control group.

  15. Green exercise as a workplace intervention to reduce job stress. Results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogiuri, Giovanna; Evensen, Katinka; Weydahl, Andi; Andersson, Kim; Patil, Grete; Ihlebæk, Camilla; Raanaas, Ruth K

    2015-01-01

    Stress and mental fatigue are major health threats to employees in office-based occupations. Physical activity is widely used as a stress-management intervention for employees. Moreover, experiences in contact with nature have been shown to provide stress-reduction and restoration from mental fatigue. In a pilot study designed as a randomized controlled trial we investigated the impact of a green-exercise intervention on psychological and physiological indicators of stress in municipality employees. Fourteen employees (7 females and 7 males, 49±8 yrs) volunteered in an exercise-based intervention in workplace either outdoors in a green/nature area or in an indoor exercise-setting. The intervention consisted of an information meeting and two exercise sessions, each including a biking bout and a circuit-strength sequence using elastic rubber bands (45-minutes, at about 55% of HR reserve, overall). Main outcomes were perceived environmental potential for restoration, affective state, blood pressure (BP) and cortisol awakening response (CAR AUC(G) and CAR AUC(I)) and cortisol levels in serum. Measurements were taken at baseline and in concomitance with the exercise sessions. Furthermore, affective state and self-reported physical activity levels were measured over a 10-weeks follow-up period. Compared with the indoor group, the nature group reported higher environmental potential for restoration (p nature group also reported higher ratings of Positive Affect at follow-up (p = 0.02). Differences at post-exercise were not found for any of the other components of affective state, systolic BP, CAR AUC(G) and cortisol levels measured in serum. Green-exercise at the workplace could be a profitable way to manage stress and induce restoration among employees. Further studies on larger samples are needed in order to improve the generalizability of the results.

  16. Exercise-Based Interventions for Injury Prevention in Tackle Collision Ball Sports: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewry, Nicola; Verhagen, Evert; Lambert, Mike; van Mechelen, Willem; Viljoen, Wayne; Readhead, Clint; Brown, James

    2017-09-01

    The injury burden in collision sports is relatively high compared to other team sports. Therefore, participants in these sports would benefit by having effective injury prevention programs. Exercise-based interventions have successfully reduced injuries in soccer, but evidence on exercise-based interventions in tackle collision sports is limited. The objective of this review is to systematically examine the evidence of exercise-based intervention programs reducing injuries in tackle collision sports. PubMed, EBSCOHost, and Web of Science were searched for articles published between January 1995 and December 2015. The methodological quality was assessed using an adapted Cochrane Bone Joint and Muscle Trauma Group quality assessment tool. The inclusion criteria were (1) (randomized) control trials and observational studies; (2) sporting codes: American, Australian and Gaelic Football, rugby union, and rugby league; (3) participants of any age or sex; (4) exercise-based, prehabilitative intervention; and (5) primary outcome was injury rate or incidence (injury risk). The exclusion criteria were (1) unavailability of full-text; and (2) article unavailable in English. Nine studies with a total of 3517 participants were included in this review. Seven of these studies showed a significant decrease in injury risk. These studies included three sporting codes and various age groups, making it difficult to make inferences. The two highest methodological quality studies found no effect of an exercise-based intervention on injury risk. There is evidence that exercise-based injury preventions can be beneficial in reducing injury risk in collision sports, but more studies of high methodological quality are required.

  17. Lessons learnt from a process evaluation of an exercise intervention in patients treated with autologous stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persoon, S.; Chinapaw, M. J. M.; Buffart, L. M.; Brug, J.; Kersten, M. J.; Nollet, F.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the process evaluation of an 18-week supervised exercise programme in 50 patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. The intervention included 30 exercise sessions with six resistance exercises and interval training. We

  18. A 3-arm randomized controlled trial on the effects of dance movement intervention and exercises on elderly with early dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rainbow Tin Hung; Cheung, Jacob Kai Ki; Chan, Wai Chi; Cheung, Irene Kit Man; Lam, Linda Chiu Wah

    2015-10-19

    Dementia is characterized by a progressive decline and deterioration of brain regions such as memory, spatial navigation and language, along with disturbances in daily functioning. Non-pharmacological interventions that offer a holistic approach by targeting cognitive functioning, prognosis and the psychological and social effects of dementia require rigorous investigation. The well-established benefits of physical activity for cognitive functioning and psychological support in dementia have been observed with dance-movement intervention. There is substantial evidence that dance-movement interventions provide emotional and social advantages. Thus, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) is planned to investigate the positive effects of a dance movement intervention, compared with mild physical exercise, on the physical and psychological well-being of elderly Chinese individuals with early dementia. A 3-arm RCT with waitlist control design will be used in this study. Two hundred and one elderly participants with very mild to mild dementia will be screened and randomized into the following groups: (i) dance movement based intervention, (ii) stretching and exercise intervention and (iii) no intervention waitlist-control group. The two intervention groups will receive a 1-h intervention, twice a week, for 12 weeks. The participants will be assessed four times over the course of 12 months: baseline before randomization, post-intervention (3 months), 6 months from baseline and 12 months from baseline. The primary outcomes will be compared between assessment points and between groups on neuropsychiatric symptoms, psychosocial well-being and cognitive and daily functioning. Secondary outcomes will assess the changes in salivary cortisol levels and their relationships with the primary outcome measures. This study will provide substantial evidence of the efficacy of a dance-movement-based intervention in slowing down dementia progression, due to its ability to act as a

  19. AMPK as Target for Intervention in Childhood and Adolescent Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselyn Rojas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity is a major worldwide health problem. Intervention programs to ameliorate the rate of obesity have been designed and implemented; yet the epidemic has no end near in sight. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has become one of the most important key elements in energy control, appetite regulation, myogenesis, adipocyte differentiation, and cellular stress management. Obesity is a multifactorial disease, which has a very strong genetic component, especially epigenetic factors. The intrauterine milieu has a determinant impact on adult life, since the measures taken for survival are kept throughout life thanks to epigenetic modification. Nutrigenomics studies the influence of certain food molecules on the metabolome profile, raising the question of an individualized obesity therapy according to metabolic (and probably genetic features. Metformin, an insulin sensitizing agent, its known to lower insulin resistance and enhance metabolic profile, with an additional weight reduction capacity, via activation of AMPK. Exercise is coadjutant for lifestyle modifications, which also activates AMPK in several ways contributing to glucose and fat oxidation. The following review examines AMPK's role in obesity, applying its use as a tool for childhood and adolescent obesity.

  20. Pharmacological targeting of exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle: Benefits and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihrauch, Martin; Handschin, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Exercise exerts significant effects on the prevention and treatment of many diseases. However, even though some of the key regulators of training adaptation in skeletal muscle have been identified, this biological program is still poorly understood. Accordingly, exercise-based pharmacological interventions for many muscle wasting diseases and also for pathologies that are triggered by a sedentary lifestyle remain scarce. The most efficacious compounds that induce muscle hypertrophy or endurance are hampered by severe side effects and are classified as doping. In contrast, dietary supplements with a higher safety margin exert milder outcomes. In recent years, the design of pharmacological agents that activate the training program, so-called "exercise mimetics", has been proposed, although the feasibility of such an approach is highly debated. In this review, the most recent insights into key regulatory factors and therapeutic approaches aimed at leveraging exercise adaptations are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of exercise intervention on vestibular related impairments in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venkadesan Rajendran

    2012-11-09

    Nov 9, 2012 ... overview of the effectiveness of physical therapy intervention on soft tissue neck injury following trauma. Physiother Can. 2000;52:111–30. 31. McNeely ML, Torrance G, Magee DJ. A systematic review of physiotherapy for spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. Man Ther. 2003;8:80–91. 32. Colle F, Rannou F, ...

  2. Physical exercise intervention in depressive disorders: meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, T; Lindwall, M; Archer, T

    2014-04-01

    Previous meta-analyses investigating the effect of exercise on depression have included trials where the control condition has been categorized as placebo despite the fact that this particular placebo intervention (e.g., meditation, relaxation) has been recognized as having an antidepressant effect. Because meditation and mindfulness-based interventions are associated with depression reduction, it is impossible to separate the effect of the physical exercise from the meditation-related parts. The present study determined the efficacy of exercise in reducing symptoms of depression compared with no treatment, placebo conditions or usual care among clinically defined depressed adults. Of 89 retrieved studies, 15 passed the inclusion criteria of which 13 studies presented sufficient information for calculating effect sizes. The main result showed a significant large overall effect favoring exercise intervention. The effect size was even larger when only trials that had used no treatment or placebo conditions were analyzed. Nevertheless, effect size was reduced to a moderate level when only studies with high methodological quality were included in the analysis. Exercise may be recommended for people with mild and moderate depression who are willing, motivated, and physically healthy enough to engage in such a program. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A MOTIVATIONAL MUSIC AND VIDEO INTERVENTION IMPROVES HIGH-INTENSITY EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Barwood

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Music and video are utilised by recreational gym users to enhance their exercise experience. Music and video have not been investigated for their combined ergogenic effect during high intensity exercise. To induce fatigue, this study was performed in warm (~26°C, moist conditions (~50%RH. Six, non-acclimated, male participants took part in the study. Each participant completed three 30-minute exercise bouts on a motorised treadmill under three counterbalanced conditions on separate days: control (CON, motivational music plus video intervention (M, non-motivational intervention (NM. They completed a warm-up (5 km·h-1 [5 minutes], 9km·h-1 [10 minutes] followed by a maximal effort run (15 minutes. Participants did not receive any feedback of time elapsed, distance run or speed. Measures: Distance covered (metres, heart rate, blood lactate accumulation (Blac and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE. Participants in the M condition ran significantly further than in the NM (M: 3524 [388]metres; NM: 3110 [561]metres; CON: 3273 [458]metres and CON conditions, accumulated more Blac, but did not increase their peak RPE rating (p < 0.05. The M intervention improved tolerance of high intensity exercise in warm conditions. It was proposed that a change in attentional processing from internal (physical sensations to external perspective (music and video may have facilitated this improvement. These findings have strong implications for improving health, fitness and engagement in gym-based exercise programs

  4. Effect of individualized worksite exercise training on aerobic capacity and muscle strength among construction workers - a randomized controlled intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Bibi; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen

    2012-01-01

    tailored exercise programs on their physical fitness and muscular capacity. METHOD: The study was a randomized controlled trial of male constructions workers allocated to either an exercise or control group. The intervention lasted 12 weeks, and the exercise group trained 3 x 20 minutes a week....... The participants completed health checks before and after the intervention period. Data from the first health check were used to tailor the exercise in the interventions. RESULTS: At baseline, participants had maximal oxygen consumption (VO (2max)) of 2.9 [standard deviation (SD) 0.7L/min] and body mass index (BMI...

  5. Exercise training intervention after coronary angioplasty: the ETICA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, R; Paolini, I; Cianci, G; Piva, R; Georgiou, D; Purcaro, A

    2001-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training (ET) on functional capacity and quality of life (QOL) in patients who received percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or coronary stenting (CS), the effects on the restenosis rate and the outcome. It is unknown whether ET induces beneficial effects after coronary angioplasty. We studied 118 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease (mean age 57+/-10 years) who underwent PTCA or CS on one (69%) or two (31%) native epicardial coronary arteries. Patients were randomized into two matched groups. Group T (n = 59) was exercised three times a week for six months at 60% of peak VO2. Group C (n = 59) was the control group. Only trained patients had significant improvements in peak VO2 (26%, p < 0.001) and quality of life (26.8%, p = 0.001 vs. C). The angiographic restenosis rate was unaffected by ET (T: 29%; C: 33%, P = NS) and was not significantly different after PTCA or CS. However, residual diameter stenosis was lower in trained patients (-29.7%, p = 0.045). In patients with angiographic restenosis, thallium uptake improved only in group T (19%; p < 0.001). During the follow-up (33+/-7 months) trained patients had a significantly lower event rate than controls (11.9 vs. 32.2%, RR: 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.60 to 0.91, p = 0.008) and a lower rate of hospital readmission (18.6 vs. 46%, RR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.55 to 0.93, p < 0.001). Moderate ET improves functional capacity and QOL after PTCA or CS. During the follow-up, trained patients had fewer events and a lower hospital readmission rate than controls, despite an unchanged restenosis rate.

  6. A Medically Supervised Pregnancy Exercise Intervention in Obese Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Niamh; Farren, Maria; McKeating, Aoife; OʼKelly, Ruth; Stapleton, Mary; Turner, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate whether an intensive, medically supervised exercise intervention improved maternal glycemia and gestational weight gain in obese pregnant women when compared with routine prenatal care. This randomized controlled trial compared a medically supervised exercise intervention with routine prenatal care. The primary outcome was a reduction in mean maternal fasting plasma glucose in the intervention group by 6.9 mg/dL at the time of a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test at 24-28 weeks of gestation. Secondary outcomes included excessive gestational weight gain. The intervention consisted of 50-60 minutes of exercise: warm-up, resistance or weights, aerobic exercises, and cool-down. All women received routine prenatal care. Power calculation determined that 24 women were required per group to detect a difference of 6.9 mg/dL in fasting plasma glucose between groups based on an independent-sample t test for statistical power of 80% at a type I error rate of 0.05. A sample size of 44 per group was planned to allow a dropout rate of 33%. From November 2013 through August 2015, 88 women were randomized: 44 each to the exercise and control groups. Eight women in the control group and 11 in the intervention group did not complete the trial at 6 weeks postpartum (P=.61), but 43 in each group attended the 24- to 28-week glucose screen. There were no baseline maternal differences between groups. Classes commenced at a mean of 13 4/7±1 2/7 weeks of gestation. In early pregnancy, 51.1% (n=45/88) had an elevated fasting plasma glucose (92-125 mg/dL). There was no difference in the mean fasting plasma glucose at 24-28 weeks of gestation: 90.0±9.0 mg/dL (n=43) compared with 93.6±7.2 mg/dL (n=43) (P=.13) or in the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus at 24-28 weeks of gestation: 48.8% (n=21/43) compared with 58.1% (n=25/43) (P=.51) in the control and exercise groups, respectively. At 36 weeks of gestation, excessive gestational weight gain greater than 9.1 kg was lower

  7. Long-term effects of a weight loss intervention with or without exercise component in postmenopausal women : A randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roon, Martijn; van Gemert, Willemijn A; Peeters, Petra H M; Schuit, Albertine J; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.

    The aim of this study was to determine the long-term effects of a weight loss intervention with or without an exercise component on body weight and physical activity. Women were randomized to diet (n = 97) or exercise (N = 98) for 16 weeks. During the intervention, both groups had achieved the set

  8. Long-term effects of a weight loss intervention with or without exercise component in postmenopausal women : A randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roon, Martijn; van Gemert, Willemijn A.; Peeters, Petra H.; Schuit, Albertine J.; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the long-term effects of a weight loss intervention with or without an exercise component on body weight and physical activity. Women were randomized to diet (n = 97) or exercise (N = 98) for 16 weeks. During the intervention, both groups had achieved the set

  9. Long-Term Effects of a Stage-Based Intervention for Changing Exercise Intentions and Behavior in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaney, Mary L.; Riebe, Deborah; Garber, Carol Ewing; Rossi, Joseph S.; Lees, Faith D.; Burbank, Patricia A.; Nigg, Claudio R.; Ferrone, Christine L.; Clark, Phillip G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the efficacy of an intervention tailored to the individual's stage of change for exercise adoption on exercise stage of change, physical activity, and physical function in community-dwelling older adults. Design and Methods: We randomized participants to a print and telephone intervention or a contact comparison group. Through…

  10. Prevention of gestational diabetes: feasibility issues for an exercise intervention in obese pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Leonie K; Colditz, Paul B; Byrne, Nuala M; Lingwood, Barbara E; Rowlands, Ingrid J; Foxcroft, Katie; McIntyre, H David

    2010-07-01

    To examine the feasibility of an individualized exercise program to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in obese pregnant women. The study was a pilot randomized controlled trial with obese pregnant women (intervention group, individualized exercise program [n = 25]; control group, usual care [n = 25]). Average weekly energy expenditure (MET hours per week and kilocalories per week) of exercise-specific activity was assessed during pregnancy using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Fasting glucose and insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were assessed at baseline and 20, 28, and 36 weeks' gestation. Of the women in the intervention group, 16 of 22 (73%) achieved more than 900 kcal/week of exercise-based activity at 28 weeks compared with 8 of 19 women in the control group (42%), P = 0.047. However, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) did not differ between the groups. This intervention was feasible and prompted a modest increase in physical activity. However, we are not confident that this intervention would be sufficient to prevent GDM.

  11. Exercise interventions: defusing the world's osteoporosis time bomb.

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, Ming Chan; Anderson, Mary; Lau, Edith M. C.

    2003-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health problem, affecting millions of people worldwide. The associated health care costs are growing in parallel with increases in elderly populations, and it is expected that the number of osteoporotic fractures will double over the next 50 years. The best way to address osteoporosis is prevention. Some interventions to maximize and preserve bone mass have multiple health benefits and are cost-effective. For example, modifications to diet and lifestyle can help...

  12. Resistance exercise interventions during and following cancer treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focht, Brian C; Clinton, Steven K; Devor, Steven T; Garver, Matthew J; Lucas, Alexander R; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Grainger, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    Findings from prior systematic reviews suggest that exercise results in meaningful improvements in many clinically relevant physiologic and quality of life (QOL) outcomes during and following cancer treatment. However, the majority of exercise-cancer studies have focused upon the benefits of aerobic exercise (AE) and knowledge of the efficacy of resistance exercise (RE) alone as a supportive care intervention for cancer patients and survivors remains limited. Consequently, the purpose of this review was to provide the first systematic evaluation of the effects of RE alone upon clinically relevant physiologic and QOL outcomes during and following cancer treatment. Literature searches were conducted to identify studies examining RE interventions in cancer patients and survivors. Data were extracted on physiologic (fitness, physical function, and body composition) and QOL (fatigue, psychological well-being, and cancer-specific and global QOL outcomes. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated for each outcome. A total of 15 studies (6 in samples undergoing active cancer treatment and 9 in samples having completed cancer treatment) involving 1,077 participants met the inclusion criteria. Findings revealed that, on average, RE resulted in large effect-size improvements in muscular strength (d = 0.86), moderate effect-size improvements in physical function (d = 0.66), and small effect-size improvements in body composition (d = 0.28) and QOL (d = 0.25) outcomes. The effect sizes observed following RE are comparable in magnitude to the effects of exercise interventions reported in prior comprehensive reviews of the exercise-cancer literature which primarily focused upon AE. Additionally, the methodologic quality of the studies was generally strong. Taken collectively, results of this systematic review suggest that RE is a promising supportive care intervention that results in meaningful improvements in clinically relevant physiologic and QOL outcomes during and following

  13. The Impact of a Multidimensional Exercise Intervention on Physical and Functional Capacity, Anxiety, and Depression in Patients With Advanced-Stage Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist, Morten; Adamsen, Lis; Rørth, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with advanced-stage lung cancer face poor survival and experience co-occurring chronic physical and psychosocial symptoms. Despite several years of research in exercise oncology, few exercise studies have targeted advanced lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The aim...... of the present study was to investigate the benefits of a 6-week supervised group exercise intervention and to outline the effect on aerobic capacity, strength, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety, and depression. METHODS: VO2peak was assessed using an incremental exercise test. Muscle strength...... was measured with one repetition maximum test (1RM). HRQoL, anxiety, and depression were assessed using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L) scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). RESULTS: One hundred and forthteen patients with advanced stage lung cancer were recruited...

  14. Meta-Analysis of Three Different Types of Fatigue Management Interventions for People with Multiple Sclerosis: Exercise, Education, and Medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Asano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS with negative impacts extending from general functioning to quality of life. Both the cause and consequences of MS fatigue are considered multidimensional and necessitate multidisciplinary treatment for successful symptom management. Clinical practice guidelines suggest medication and rehabilitation for managing fatigue. This review summarized available research literature about three types of fatigue management interventions (exercise, education, and medication to provide comprehensive perspective on treatment options and facilitate a comparison of their effectiveness. We researched PubMed, Embase, and CINAHL (August 2013. Search terms included multiple sclerosis, fatigue, energy conservation, Amantadine, Modafinil, and randomized controlled trial. The search identified 230 citations. After the full-text review, 18 rehabilitation and 7 pharmacological trials targeting fatigue were selected. Rehabilitation interventions appeared to have stronger and more significant effects on reducing the impact or severity of patient-reported fatigue compared to medication. Pharmacological agents, including fatigue medication, are important but often do not enable people with MS to cope with their existing disabilities. MS fatigue affects various components of one’s health and wellbeing. People with MS experiencing fatigue and their healthcare providers should consider a full spectrum of effective fatigue management interventions, from exercise to educational strategies in conjunction with medication.

  15. Effect of a supervised exercise and physiotherapy program on surgical interventions in children with thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis, Mario M; Suman, Oscar E; Huang, Ted T; Yen, Peter; Herndon, David N

    2003-01-01

    Continuous body growth and rigidity of scars in children are significant contributors to burn scar contractures (BSCs). BSCs decrease a patient's range of motion and their ability to perform activities of daily living. A benefit of exercise is an increase the patient's ability to perform and sustain activities of daily living. Therefore, we investigated whether patients who were involved in a supervised, hospital-based exercise program, in addition to physical and occupational therapy (PTEX), would have fewer surgical interventions than a nonexercise group receiving home-delivered physical and occupational therapy (PT) alone. We examined 53 patients at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months postburn. The PTEX group (n = 27) completed a 12-week supervised exercise program starting at 6 months postburn. Exercise sessions were held three times per week, with duration of 60 to 90 minutes per session. Resistance and aerobic exercises were performed at 70 to 85% of the patient's maximal effort. In contrast, the PT group (n = 26) received a home rehabilitation program with no supervised exercise. Patients were evaluated at 3-month intervals for scar formation, range of motion, and need for surgery. At 12, 18, 24 months postburn, the number of patients in the PTEX group needing release of BSC was significantly lower than the number of patients in the PT group. The results indicate that patients would receive a significant benefit if enrolled in a supervised exercise and physiotherapy program with the exercise portion consisting of an aerobic and resistance-training component. This type of program is beneficial in decreasing the number of surgical interventions and should be incorporated as part of a postburn outpatient rehabilitation.

  16. Physical Activity, Exercise, And Nutrition Interventions For Weight Control In African American Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Asare

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to review the physical activity, exercise, and nutritionrelated weight control interventions done with African American women that were publishedbetween 2006 and 2010 and suggest ways of enhancing these interventions. A total of 13 studiesmet the inclusion criteria. The review found significant results with regard to impact ofintervention. Twelve of those studies revealed significant increase in physical activity and weightreduction behavior. In terms of use of theory in designing the interventions only five interventionsused a theory. In three of those cases social cognitive theory was used. Appropriate sample sizewas found to be the major strength of most of the interventions. Six interventions usedrandomized controlled design. Recommendations for enhancing the effectiveness of physicalactivity interventions in African American women are presented.

  17. Developing cognitive-emotional training exercises as interventions for mood and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoviello, B M; Charney, D S

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for more effective treatments for mood and anxiety disorders. As our understanding of the cognitive and affective neuroscience underlying psychiatric disorders expands, so do opportunities to develop novel interventions that capitalize on the capacity for brain plasticity. Cognitive training is one such strategy. This paper provides the background and rationale for developing cognitive-emotional training exercises as an intervention strategy, and proposes guidelines for the development and evaluation of cognitive training interventions with a specific focus on major depressive disorder as an example. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Ventilatory function during exercise in multiple sclerosis and impact of training intervention: cross-sectional and randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D; Wens, I; Keytsman, C; Verboven, K; Dendale, P; Eijnde, B O

    2015-10-01

    Patients with MS (pwMS) often experience resting ventilatory anomalies. Ventilatory function during exercise and impact of long-term training intervention remains however uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine the ventilatory function during exercise and impact of a 6-month training intervention in pwMS. Combination of a cross-sectional (part 1) and randomized controlled trial (part 2). University rehabilitation facility. Caucasian patients with MS and healthy controls. In part 1, the ventilatory function during submaximal endurance exercise was compared between pwMS (N.=37) and healthy participants (N.=15). In part 2, pwMS were then randomly assigned to a 6-month training intervention (N.=16) or usual care (N.=11). Following training intervention, ventilatory function during exercise was re-evaluated. Despite comparable relative exercise testing intensities between groups in part 1, significantly elevated steady-state exercise dead space/tidal volume ratio, O2 uptake and CO2 output equivalent, end-tidal O2 pressure, ratings of perceived exertion and lowered end-tidal CO2 pressure and O2 pulse was observed in pwMS (Ptraining intervention, ventilatory dysfunction remained present during endurance exercise (P>0.05). Patients with MS experience a ventilatory dysfunction during endurance exercise, which is related to worse exercise tolerance. This ventilatory anomaly remains present after long-term training intervention. Patients with MS experience ventilatory dysfunction during exercise. This dysfunction is related to exercise tolerance and ratings of perceived exertion. Long-term exercise training did not remediate this ventilatory dysfunction. The systematic examination of the pulmonary/cardiovascular system at rest and during exercise is recommended in MS.

  19. Introducing a multifaceted exercise intervention particular to older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Corey A; Sanders, Gabriel J; Wilson, Kayla A; Fickes-Ryan, Emily J; Corbett, Duane B; von Carlowitz, Kyle-Patrick A; Ridgel, Angela L

    2014-08-01

    With a substantial increase in diagnosed Parkinson's disease, it is of great importance to examine tolerance and physical measures of evolving exercise interventions. Of particular importance, a multifaceted exercise intervention combining active-assisted cycling and resistance training to older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease is being assessed. Fourteen older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and ten healthy older adults (67.5 ± 7.9 years of age) engaged in an 8-week, 24-session, multifaceted exercise protocol. The protocol consisted of both active-assisted cycling and resistance training. Tolerance was measured, as well as multiple indicators of health-related physical fitness. These indicators examined improvements in cardiovascular performance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility. Twenty-two older adults and older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease tolerated the intervention by completing all 24 sessions. Repeated-measures analysis of variance demonstrated significant (P ≤ 0.003) improvements in cardiovascular performance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility for both groups of individuals. The multifaceted intervention is the first to combine both active-assisted cycling and resistance training. The older adult and the older adult diagnosed with Parkinson's disease exhibited both tolerance and health-related improvements in physical fitness following the intervention.

  20. The impact of an exercise intervention on C - reactive protein during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Marquis; Braun, Barry; Marcus, Bess H; Stanek, Edward; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-06-24

    C-reactive protein (CRP) during pregnancy has been associated with adverse maternal outcomes such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus. Randomized trials suggest that exercise programs may be associated with reductions in CRP in non-pregnant populations; however, such studies have not been conducted among pregnant women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an individually-tailored motivationally-matched exercise intervention on CRP in pregnant women. The Behaviors Affecting Baby and You study was a randomized controlled trial of prenatal physical activity to prevent the development of gestational diabetes mellitus in women at increased risk. Women were randomized to either a 12-week exercise intervention (n = 84) or a comparison health and wellness intervention (n = 87). High sensitivity CRP (mg/dL) was measured using a commercial immunoassay kit. Physical activity was measured using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to evaluate the impact of the intervention on change in CRP using an intent-to-treat approach. CRP decreased (-0.09 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.25, 0.07) from pre- to post-intervention in the exercise arm (p = 0.14) and increased (0.08 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.07, 0.24) (p = 0.64) in the health and wellness arm; however the between group difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.14). Findings did not differ according to ethnic group or pre-pregnancy body mass index. In a secondary analysis based on self-reported physical activity, women who decreased their time spent in sports/exercise experienced a mean increase in CRP (0.09 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.14, 0.33), whereas women who maintained or increased their sports/ exercise experienced a mean decrease in CRP (-0.08 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.23, 0.08) (p = 0.046). Findings from this randomized trial in an ethnically and socio-economically diverse population of pregnant women were consistent with a positive impact

  1. Effects of an exercise program during three years in obese boys: an intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Escalante

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a long-term exercise program (3 years on kinanthopometric and metabolic in obese children. The sample consisted of eight boys between 8 and 11 years, who conducted a aerobic multi-sport exercise program (three sessions, 90 minutes per week. Carried out an assessment kinanthropometric assessing the following parameters: height, weight, body mass index (BMI, zBMI, fat mass and fat free mass, and a metabolic assessing: total cholesterol (TC, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TG, insuline, glucose, Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR, ratio LDL/HDL and TC/HDL. Following the intervention, changes were observed on zBMI (ceasing to be obese after the intervention, total cholesterol, LDL, and ratio total cholesterol/HDL and glucose levels at the long term, showing that longitudinal interventions generate positive benefits on obese children mainly in the lipid profile.

  2. Effect of a Multimodal High Intensity Exercise Intervention in Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Quist, Morten; Andersen, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Objective To assess the effect of a multimodal group exercise intervention, as an adjunct to conventional care, on fatigue, physical capacity, general wellbeing, physical activity, and quality of life in patients with cancer who were undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment for adv...... chemotherapy or treatment for advanced disease. The intervention reduced fatigue and improved vitality, aerobic capacity, muscular strength, and physical and functional activity, and emotional wellbeing, but not quality of life.......Abstract: Objective To assess the effect of a multimodal group exercise intervention, as an adjunct to conventional care, on fatigue, physical capacity, general wellbeing, physical activity, and quality of life in patients with cancer who were undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment...... Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (MOS SF-36), Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire, muscular strength (one repetition maximum), maximum oxygen consumption (Vo2max). Statistical methods: The general linear...

  3. Effect of a multimodal high intensity exercise intervention in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Quist, Morten; Andersen, Christina

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a multimodal group exercise intervention, as an adjunct to conventional care, on fatigue, physical capacity, general wellbeing, physical activity, and quality of life in patients with cancer who were undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment for advanced dis...... disease. The intervention reduced fatigue and improved vitality, aerobic capacity, muscular strength, and physical and functional activity, and emotional wellbeing, but not quality of life. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled trials ISRCTN05322922.......OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a multimodal group exercise intervention, as an adjunct to conventional care, on fatigue, physical capacity, general wellbeing, physical activity, and quality of life in patients with cancer who were undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment for advanced...... and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (MOS SF-36), Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire, muscular strength (one repetition maximum), maximum oxygen consumption (Vo(2)max). Statistical methods The general linear model was used...

  4. Ankle proprioception is not targeted by exercises on an unstable surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, H.; Brumagne, S.; Dieen, J. van; Wees, P.J. van der; Vanhees, L.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory study using a repeated measures design. The aim of this study was to determine if ankle proprioception is targeted in exercises on unstable surfaces. Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) has recurrence rates over 70%, which are believed to be due to a reduced accuracy of proprioceptive signals from

  5. Effects of exercise intervention on the functional fitness of community elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Tsui-Er

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to discuss the effects of the 12-week exercise intervention on the functional fitness of community elderly. Total 25 community elderly aged above 65 are proceeded functional fitness tests. The data are analyzed with Descriptive Statistics. The results show that the male elderly significantly enhance the upper limb strength (musculus biceps brachii left arm curling, musculus biceps brachii right arm curling, static balance (open-eye single leg standing, and agility and dynamic balance (chair stand detour and the female elderly make remarkable progress on the upper limb strength (musculus biceps brachii left arm curling, musculus biceps brachii right arm curling, cardiorespiratory endurance (high knees in place, static balance (open-eye single leg standing, and agility and dynamic balance (chair stand detour after the 12-week regular exercise intervention. With functional fitness tests, the research findings reveal that regular exercise presents the effectiveness on distinct physical fitness of community elderly, while the aerobic endurance and upper/lower body flexibility still require improvement. Apparently, it is suggested to practice courses with stages and match fitness test results to adjust types of exercise and exercise intensity in order to achieve the effect.

  6. Effects of exercise and lifestyle intervention on cardiovascular function in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, Erin J; Leano, Rodel; Petchey, William; Coombes, Jeff S; Isbel, Nicole M; Marwick, Thomas H

    2013-09-01

    CKD is associated with poor cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). This predefined substudy determined the effect of exercise training and lifestyle intervention on CRF and explored the effect on cardiovascular risk factors and cardiac and vascular function. Between February 2008 and March 2010, 90 patients with stage 3-4 CKD were screened with an exercise stress echocardiogram before enrollment. Patients (n=83) were randomized to standard care (control) or lifestyle intervention. The lifestyle intervention included multidisciplinary care (CKD clinic), a lifestyle program, and aerobic and resistance exercise training for 12 months. CRF (peak Vo2), left ventricular function, arterial stiffness, anthropometric, and biochemical data were collected at baseline and 12 months. Ten percent of randomized patients had subclinical myocardial ischemia at screening and completed the study without incident. There was no baseline difference among 72 patients who completed follow-up (36 in the lifestyle intervention group and 36 in the control group). The intervention increased peak Vo2 (2.8±0.7 ml/kg per minute versus -0.3±0.9 ml/kg per minute; P=0.004). There was small weight loss (-1.8±4.2 kg versus 0.7±3.7 kg; P=0.02) but no change in BP or lipids. Diastolic function improved (increased e' of 0.75±1.16 cm/s versus -0.47±1.0 cm/s; P=0.001) but systolic function was well preserved and did not change. The change in arterial elastance was attenuated (0.11±0.76 mmHg/ml versus 0.76±0.96 mmHg/ml; P=0.01). Δ peak Vo2 was associated with group allocation and improved body composition. Exercise training and lifestyle intervention in patients with CKD produces improvements in CRF, body composition, and diastolic function.

  7. Effects of a long-term aerobic exercise intervention on institutionalized patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela, José M; Ayán, Carlos; Varela, Silvia; Seijo, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Long-term interventions aimed at analyzing the impact of physical exercise on important health markers in institutionalized individuals with dementia are relatively scarce. This longitudinal study intends to identify the effects of a physical exercise program on cognitive decline, memory, depression, functional dependence and neuropsychiatric disturbances in institutionalized individuals with dementia. Randomized controlled trial. Homecare residents with dementia were assigned to an exercise (EG) or to a control group (CG). Participants in the EG cycled for at least 15min daily during 15 months, while those in the CG performed alternative sedentary recreational activities. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MEC), the Timed "Up & Go" Test, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, the Katz Index, the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia and the Fuld Object Memory Evaluation were administered before and after the intervention. Sixty-three individuals in the CG and 51 individuals in the EG completed the intervention. A statistically significant decline in cognitive function was observed in individuals included in the CG (p=0.015), while a slight improvement was observed in those included in the EG. Significant improvement was observed in the neuropsychiatric symptoms (p=0.020), memory function (p=0.028) and functional mobility (p=0.043) among those who exercised. Exercise seemed to have a greater effect in those suffering from severe cognitive impairment. This study provides evidence that aerobic physical exercise has a significant impact on improving cognitive functioning, behavior, and functional mobility in institutionalized individuals with dementia. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exercise or Social Intervention for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: A Pilot Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souto Barreto, Philipe; Cesari, Matteo; Denormandie, Philippe; Armaingaud, Didier; Vellas, Bruno; Rolland, Yves

    2017-09-01

    To compare the effects of exercise with those of a structured nonphysical intervention on ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and physical and cognitive function of persons with dementia (PWDs) living in nursing homes (NH). Cluster-randomized pilot-controlled trial. Seven French NHs. PWDs living in NHs. NHs were randomized to an exercise group (4 NHs, n = 47) or structured social activity group (3 NHs, n = 50) for a 24-week intervention performed twice per week for 60 minutes per session. The main endpoint was ADL performance (Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Inventory for Severe Alzheimer's Disease Scale (ADCS-ADL-sev); range 0-54, higher is better); secondary endpoints were overall cognitive function (Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE)) and performance-based tests of physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), usual gait speed). Ninety-one participants with at least one postbaseline ADL assessment were included in efficacy analysis. Groups differed at baseline in terms of sex, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and nutritional status. Multilevel analysis adjusted for baseline differences between groups found no significant difference between effects of exercise and social activity (group-by-time interaction), with adjusted mean differences at 6 months of 1.9 points for ADCS-ADL-sev and 0.55 points for MMSE favoring social activity and 0.6 points for SPPB and 0.05 m/s favoring exercise. Adverse events did not differ between groups, except that the social activity group had more falls than the exercise group. A larger, longer trial is required to determine whether exercise has greater health benefits than nonphysical interventions for institutionalized PWDs. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. A motivational music and video intervention improves high-intensity exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwood, Martin J; Weston, Neil J V; Thelwell, Richard; Page, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Music and video are utilised by recreational gym users to enhance their exercise experience. Music and video have not been investigated for their combined ergogenic effect during high intensity exercise. To induce fatigue, this study was performed in warm (~26°C), moist conditions (~50%RH). Six, non-acclimated, male participants took part in the study. Each participant completed three 30-minute exercise bouts on a motorised treadmill under three counterbalanced conditions on separate days: control (CON), motivational music plus video intervention (M), non-motivational intervention (NM). They completed a warm-up (5 km·h(-1) [5 minutes], 9km·h(-1) [10 minutes]) followed by a maximal effort run (15 minutes). Participants did not receive any feedback of time elapsed, distance run or speed. Distance covered (metres), heart rate, blood lactate accumulation (B(lac)) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE). Participants in the M condition ran significantly further than in the NM (M: 3524 [388]metres; NM: 3110 [561]metres; CON: 3273 [458]metres) and CON conditions, accumulated more B(lac), but did not increase their peak RPE rating (p music and video) may have facilitated this improvement. These findings have strong implications for improving health, fitness and engagement in gym-based exercise programs. Key pointsThe study examined the ergogenic effect of a motivational (M) video and music intervention on high-intensity exercise performance in comparison to a non-motivational (NM) condition and a control (CON).PARTICIPANTS IN THE M CONDITION RAN SIGNIFICANTLY FURTHER THAN IN THE NM (M: 3524 [388]metres; NM: 3110 [561]metres; CON: 3273 [458]metres) and CON conditions, accumulated more B(lac), but did not increase their peak RPE rating (p music and video) may have facilitated this improvement.These findings have strong implications for improving health, fitness and engagement in gym-based exercise programs.

  10. Impact of an exercise intervention on methamphetamine use outcomes post-residential treatment care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Richard A; Chudzynski, Joy; Mooney, Larissa; Gonzales, Rachel; Ang, Alfonso; Dickerson, Daniel; Penate, Jose; Salem, Bilal A; Dolezal, Brett; Cooper, Christopher B

    2015-11-01

    We examined the efficacy of an 8-week exercise intervention on posttreatment methamphetamine (MA) use among MA-dependent individuals following residential treatment. 135 individuals newly enrolled in treatment were randomly assigned to a structured 8-week exercise intervention or health education control group. Approximately 1 week after completion of the intervention, participants were discharged to the community. Interview data and urine samples were collected at 1-, 3-, and 6-months post-residential care. Of the sample, 54.8% were classified as higher severity users (using MA more than 18 days in the month before admission) and 45.2% as lower severity users (using MA for up to 18 days in the month before admission). Group differences in MA use outcomes were examined over the 3 timepoints using mixed-multivariate modeling. While fewer exercise participants returned to MA use compared to education participants at 1-, 3- and 6-months post-discharge, differences were not statistically significant. A significant interaction for self-reported MA use and MA urine drug test results by condition and MA severity was found: lower severity users in the exercise group reported using MA significantly fewer days at the three post-discharge timepoints than lower severity users in the education group. Lower severity users in the exercise group also had a lower percentage of positive urine results at the three timepoints than lower severity users in the education group. These relationships were not present in the comparison of the higher severity conditions. Results support the value of exercise as a treatment component for individuals using MA 18 or fewer days/month. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Exercise Interventions for Preserving Physical Function Among Cancer Survivors in Middle to Late Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, C W; Cochrane, S K; Fitzgerald, J D; Johnson, L; Buford, T W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate randomized controlled trials aiming to preserve the functional status, i.e. physical capabilities, of middle-aged and older cancer survivors through a structured, physical exercise intervention. The study team performed a thorough search of the literature using six online databases. This literature search limited included studies to randomized controlled trials which implemented a structured physical activity intervention for middle- and older-aged adults diagnosed with cancer. Studies were also required include at least one objective measure of physical function as a dependent outcome. This literature search yielded thirty-eight studies. The majority of the literature reviewed was successful in improving several functional outcomes including time needed to rise from a chair or distance covered during the six-minute walk test. A large number of published trials also suggest that exercise is effective in decreasing fatigue. However, a lack of trials investigating outcomes in older populations (≥ 65 years) was noted in this review. The results of this review suggest that a structured exercise program may be physically beneficial for middle-aged to older cancer survivors. Particularly, such interventions could preserve the functional status of cancer patients and, consequently, improve their long-term health outcomes. Future implications include further investigation into strictly older cancer patient populations, as outcomes related to exercise might differ between older and middle-aged adults.

  12. Exercise Attenuates the Major Hallmarks of Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garatachea, Nuria; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Morán, María; Emanuele, Enzo; Joyner, Michael J.; Lucia, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Regular exercise has multi-system anti-aging effects. Here we summarize how exercise impacts the major hallmarks of aging. We propose that, besides searching for novel pharmaceutical targets of the aging process, more research efforts should be devoted to gaining insights into the molecular mediators of the benefits of exercise and to implement effective exercise interventions for elderly people. PMID:25431878

  13. Effects of exercise and diet interventions on obesity-related sleep disorders in men: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiao; Saarinen, Antti; Mikkola, Tuija M; Tenhunen, Jarkko; Martinmäki, Samu; Rahikainen, Aki; Cheng, Shumei; Eklund, Niklas; Pekkala, Satu; Wiklund, Petri; Munukka, Eveliina; Wen, Xinfei; Cong, Fengyu; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Yajun; Tarkka, Ina; Sun, Yining; Partinen, Markku; Alen, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2013-07-26

    Sleep is essential for normal and healthy living. Lack of good quality sleep affects physical, mental and emotional functions. Currently, the treatments of obesity-related sleep disorders focus more on suppressing sleep-related symptoms pharmaceutically and are often accompanied by side effects. Thus, there is urgent need for alternative ways to combat chronic sleep disorders. This study will investigate underlying mechanisms of the effects of exercise and diet intervention on obesity-related sleep disorders, the role of gut microbiota in relation to poor quality of sleep and day-time sleepiness, as well as the levels of hormones responsible for sleep-wake cycle regulation. Participants consist of 330 (target sample) Finnish men aged 30 to 65 years. Among them, we attempt to randomize 180 (target sample) with sleep disorders into exercise and diet intervention. After screening and physician examination, 101 men with sleep disorders are included and are randomly assigned into three groups: exercise (n = 33), diet (n = 35), and control (n = 33). In addition, we attempt to recruit a target number of 150 healthy men without sleep disorders as the reference group. The exercise group undergoes a six-month individualized progressive aerobic exercise program based on initial fitness level. The diet group follows a six month specific individualized diet program. The control group and reference group are asked to maintain their normal activity and diet during intervention. Measurements are taken before and after the intervention. Primary outcomes include objective sleep measurements by polysomnography and a home-based non-contact sleep monitoring system, and subjective sleep evaluation by questionnaires. Secondary outcome measures include anthropometry, body composition, fitness, sleep disorder-related lifestyle risk factors, composition of gut microbiota and adipose tissue metabolism, as well as specific hormone and neurotranmitter levels and inflammatory biomarkers from

  14. Hippocampal-Brainstem Connectivity Associated with Vagal Modulation after an Intense Exercise Intervention in Healthy Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Herbsleb, Marco; Schumann, Andy; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Gabriel, Holger W.; Wagner, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Regular physical exercise leads to increased vagal modulation of the cardiovascular system. A combination of peripheral and central processes has been proposed to underlie this adaptation. However, specific changes in the central autonomic network have not been described in human in more detail. We hypothesized that the anterior hippocampus known to be influenced by regular physical activity might be involved in the development of increased vagal modulation after a 6 weeks high intensity intervention in young healthy men (exercise group: n = 17, control group: n = 17). In addition to the determination of physical capacity before and after the intervention, we used resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and simultaneous heart rate variability assessment. We detected a significant increase of the power output at the anaerobic threshold of 11.4% (p exercise group (EG). Comparing baseline (T0) and post-exercise (T1) values of parasympathetic modulation of the exercise group, we observed a trend for a decrease in heart rate (p brain analysis, we found that the connectivity pattern of the right anterior hippocampus (aHC) was specifically altered to the ventromedial anterior cortex, the dorsal striatum and to the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) in the brainstem. Moreover, we observed a highly significant negative correlation between increased RMSSD after exercise and decreased functional connectivity from the right aHC to DVC (r = −0.69, p = 0.003). This indicates that increased vagal modulation was associated with functional connectivity between aHC and the DVC. In conclusion, our findings suggest that exercise associated changes in anterior hippocampal function might be involved in increased vagal modulation. PMID:27092046

  15. 12-mo intervention of physical exercise improved work ability, especially in subjects with low baseline work ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Oili; Vuorimaa, Timo; Vasankari, Tommi

    2014-04-04

    This study's objective was to assess the effects of a 12-month physical exercise intervention on work ability (WAI) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in healthy working adults. The study group had 371 participants, of which 338 (212 women and 126 men) were allocated in the exercise group and 33 (17 women and 16 men) in the control group. The exercise group underwent a 12-month exercise program followed by a 12-month follow-up. WAI and CRF were evaluated at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, and 24 study months, in both exercise and control groups. The exercise group was divided into subgroups according to baseline WAI classifications (poor/moderate, good, excellent). During the 12-month exercise intervention, the exercise group increased their leisure-time physical activity by 71% (p = 0.016) and improved the mean WAI by 3% and CRF by 7% (p group (ANCOVA using age, sex and BMI as covariates, for WAI, p = 0.013 and for CRF, p = 0.008). The changes in WAI and CRF between the exercise group and control group were significantly different during the intervention (baseline vs. 12-months, p = 0.028 and p = 0.007) and after the follow-up (p = 0.001 and p = 0.040), respectively. A light positive correlation between the changes in WAI and in CRF (r = 0.19, p exercise intervention may improve work ability.

  16. The effect of regular physical activity on exercise tolerance: a school-based intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad-Reza Sohrabi; Esmat Davoudi-Monfared; Batool Tayefi; Zahra Hajihashemi; Elaheh Sajjadi

    2013-01-01

    Please cite this article as: Sohrabi MR, Davoudi-Monfared E, Tayefi B, Hajihashemi Z, Sajjadi E. The effect of regular physical activity on exercise tolerance: a school-based intervention. Novel Biomed 2013;1(2):34-38.Objectives: The main purpose of this study was to assess the effects of daily physical activity on exercise tolerance ability using the six minute walk test in healthy female students.Methods: The participants in this field study were 252 healthy girls, 9-12 years old, studying ...

  17. Influence of the intervention of exercise on obese type II diabetes mellitus: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhichun; Cai, Wei; Cai, Min; Xiao, Mouyuan; Wang, Zhijie

    2016-06-01

    The study aimed to assess the effect of exercise intervention on the management of obese T2DM patients. The literature retrieval was conducted in relevant databases from their inception to 2015, with predefined searching strategy and selection criteria. The Cochrane Collaboration's tool was utilized to assess the quality of included studies. Weighted mean difference (WMD) with its corresponding 95% CI (confidence interval) was used as the effect size. A subset of 13 eligible studies was selected. Exercise significantly reduced the concentration of high sensitivity C reactive protein (4 months: WMD=-1.03, 95% CI: -1.77 to -0.29, PDiabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Perioperative physical exercise interventions for patients undergoing lung cancer surgery: What is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainini, Carlotta; Rebelo, Patrícia Fs; Bardelli, Roberta; Kopliku, Besa; Tenconi, Sara; Costi, Stefania; Tedeschi, Claudio; Fugazzaro, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection appears to be the most effective treatment for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Recent studies suggest that perioperative pulmonary rehabilitation improves functional capacity, reduces mortality and postoperative complications and enhances recovery and quality of life in operated patients. Our aim is to analyse and identify the most recent evidence-based physical exercise interventions, performed before or after surgery. We searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and PsycINFO. We included randomised controlled trials aimed at assessing efficacy of exercise-training programmes; physical therapy interventions had to be described in detail in order to be reproducible. Characteristics of studies and programmes, results and outcome data were extracted. Six studies were included, one describing preoperative rehabilitation and three assessing postoperative intervention. It seems that the best preoperative physical therapy training should include aerobic and strength training with a duration of 2-4 weeks. Although results showed improvement in exercise performance after preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation, it was not possible to identify the best preoperative intervention due to paucity of clinical trials in this area. Physical training programmes differed in every postoperative study with conflicting results, so comparison is difficult. Current literature shows inconsistent results regarding preoperative or postoperative physical exercise in patients undergoing lung resection. Even though few randomised trials were retrieved, treatment protocols were difficult to compare due to variability in design and implementation. Further studies with larger samples and better methodological quality are urgently needed to assess efficacy of both preoperative and postoperative exercise programmes.

  19. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT EXERCISE-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON FUNCTIONAL FITNESS OF OLDER ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Paravlić

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a multifactorial process associated with several irreversible functional and cognitive alterations of human body and determined by genetic and environmental factors. We aimed to investigate the effects of three physical activity interventions of 40 independently living older adults before and after a 3-month training period. Thirty female (69.6 ± 5.3 years and ten male (70.6 ± 5.4 years participants were randomly assigned into a physical exercise group (PEG; N = 9, a concurrent physical and cognitive exercise group (PEG + COG; N = 10, a physical exercise with additional 10 g of BCAA daily supplementation group (PEG+BCAA; N = 11, and a control group (CG; N = 10. All three groups performed the same physical exercise program for 12 weeks, three days a week for 45 − 60 minutes per session. Pre- and post-measurements were performed using a standardized functional fitness assessment tool for older adults i.e. Senior Fitness Test battery, upgraded with the Four Square Step Test (FSST and Grip Strength Test (GST. When intervention groups were pooled, we found moderate to low improvements in the Chair Stand Up, Timed Up and Go, FSST and Six-minute Walk Tests (all P; < .001. However, those improvements were intervention-specific with highest improvements found in the PEG for the FSST (P = .004 and Six-minute Walk Test (P = .004; in the PEG + COG for the Timed Up and Go Test (P < .001; and in the PEG+BCAA for body mass (P = .012 and the Chair Stand Up Test (P < .001. Although the sample size was low, our study provides further evidence of different interventional exercise-based programs that can benefit the population of independently living older adults.

  20. Perioperative physical exercise interventions for patients undergoing lung cancer surgery: What is the evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlotta Mainini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Surgical resection appears to be the most effective treatment for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Recent studies suggest that perioperative pulmonary rehabilitation improves functional capacity, reduces mortality and postoperative complications and enhances recovery and quality of life in operated patients. Our aim is to analyse and identify the most recent evidence-based physical exercise interventions, performed before or after surgery. We searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and PsycINFO. We included randomised controlled trials aimed at assessing efficacy of exercise-training programmes; physical therapy interventions had to be described in detail in order to be reproducible. Characteristics of studies and programmes, results and outcome data were extracted. Six studies were included, one describing preoperative rehabilitation and three assessing postoperative intervention. It seems that the best preoperative physical therapy training should include aerobic and strength training with a duration of 2–4 weeks. Although results showed improvement in exercise performance after preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation, it was not possible to identify the best preoperative intervention due to paucity of clinical trials in this area. Physical training programmes differed in every postoperative study with conflicting results, so comparison is difficult. Current literature shows inconsistent results regarding preoperative or postoperative physical exercise in patients undergoing lung resection. Even though few randomised trials were retrieved, treatment protocols were difficult to compare due to variability in design and implementation. Further studies with larger samples and better methodological quality are urgently needed to assess efficacy of both preoperative and postoperative exercise programmes.

  1. Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE - CTN 0037: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris David W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for novel approaches to the treatment of stimulant abuse and dependence. Clinical data examining the use of exercise as a treatment for the abuse of nicotine, alcohol, and other substances suggest that exercise may be a beneficial treatment for stimulant abuse, with direct effects on decreased use and craving. In addition, exercise has the potential to improve other health domains that may be adversely affected by stimulant use or its treatment, such as sleep disturbance, cognitive function, mood, weight gain, quality of life, and anhedonia, since it has been shown to improve many of these domains in a number of other clinical disorders. Furthermore, neurobiological evidence provides plausible mechanisms by which exercise could positively affect treatment outcomes. The current manuscript presents the rationale, design considerations, and study design of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA Clinical Trials Network (CTN CTN-0037 Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE study. Methods/Design STRIDE is a multisite randomized clinical trial that compares exercise to health education as potential treatments for stimulant abuse or dependence. This study will evaluate individuals diagnosed with stimulant abuse or dependence who are receiving treatment in a residential setting. Three hundred and thirty eligible and interested participants who provide informed consent will be randomized to one of two treatment arms: Vigorous Intensity High Dose Exercise Augmentation (DEI or Health Education Intervention Augmentation (HEI. Both groups will receive TAU (i.e., usual care. The treatment arms are structured such that the quantity of visits is similar to allow for equivalent contact between groups. In both arms, participants will begin with supervised sessions 3 times per week during the 12-week acute phase of the study. Supervised sessions will be conducted as one-on-one (i.e., individual sessions

  2. A longitudinal exploration of ‘Four Critical Moments’ during treatment trajectory in patients with operable lung cancer and the feasibility of an exercise intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Missel, Malene; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    and surgery. Sample III explored the patients' participation and the feasibility of an exercise intervention targeting patients with operable lung cancer. For all three samples, interviews will be performed: (1) 5 days following diagnosis; (2) the day after surgery; (3) 7 weeks; and (4) 4 months following...... the general lung cancer population and patients participating in an exercise intervention. This will provide a basis for optimizing and developing interventions for patients with lung cancer starting in the surgical context.......AIM: This article described a research protocol for a study exploring the lived experiences of patients with operable lung cancer in daily life at 'Four Critical Moments' during the disease and treatment trajectory. BACKGROUND: Patients with lung cancer may experience complex problems during...

  3. [Influence of an 8-week exercise intervention on body composition, physical fitness, and mental health in female nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Fumio; Yamada, Hisao; Morikawa, Sachiko

    2013-03-01

    To determine the effectiveness of habitual exercise on the health promotion of college students, we measured the body composition and physical fitness of female nursing students before (Pre) and after (Post) an 8-week low-intensity exercise intervention. We also conducted a questionnaire survey of their mental health condition before and at every 4 weeks during the intervention. The quantity of physical exercise increased (P exercise intervention did not alter the body weight, but decreased the body fat (Pre, 26.8 ± 0.5%; Post, 24.9 ± 0.5%, P health were significantly raised by the intervention. These results suggest that habitual exercise for 8 weeks was effective for the promotion of physical and mental health in female nursing students.

  4. Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercising. Count out loud as you do the exercises. View Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Home Techniques to ... Intimacy Importance of Being Together Body Changes with Age Communicating with Your Partner Exercise and Sexual Activity Less Strenuous Positions for Sexual ...

  5. Land- and water-based exercise intervention in women with fibromyalgia: the al-Andalus physical activity randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Aparicio, Virginia A; Ortega, Francisco B; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Alvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor; Camiletti-Moirón, Daniel; Romero, Alejandro; Estévez-López, Fernando; Samos, Blanca; Casimiro, Antonio J; Sierra, Ángela; Latorre, Pedro A; Pulido-Martos, Manuel; Femia, Pedro; Pérez-López, Isaac J; Chillón, Palma; Girela-Rejón, María J; Tercedor, Pablo; Lucía, Alejandro; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2012-02-15

    The al-Andalus physical activity intervention study is a randomised control trial to investigate the effectiveness of a land- and water-based exercise intervention for reducing the overall impact of fibromyalgia (primary outcome), and for improving tenderness and pain-related measures, body composition, functional capacity, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, fatigue, sleep quality, health-related quality of life, and cognitive function (secondary outcomes) in women with fibromyalgia. One hundred eighty women with fibromyalgia (age range: 35-65 years) will be recruited from local associations of fibromyalgia patients in Andalucía (Southern Spain). Patients will be randomly assigned to a usual care (control) group (n = 60), a water-based exercise intervention group (n = 60) or a land-based exercise intervention group (n = 60). Participants in the usual care group will receive general physical activity guidelines and participants allocated in the intervention groups will attend three non-consecutive training sessions (60 min each) per week during 24 weeks. Both exercise interventions will consist of aerobic, muscular strength and flexibility exercises. We will also study the effect of a detraining period (i.e., 12 weeks with no exercise intervention) on the studied variables. Our study attempts to reduce the impact of fibromyalgia and improve patients' health status by implementing two types of exercise interventions. Results from this study will help to assess the efficacy of exercise interventions for the treatment of fibromyalgia. If the interventions would be effective, this study will provide low-cost and feasible alternatives for health professionals in the management of fibromyalgia. Results from the al-Andalus physical activity intervention will help to better understand the potential of regular physical activity for improving the well-being of women with fibromyalgia. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01490281.

  6. Land- and water-based exercise intervention in women with fibromyalgia: the al-andalus physical activity randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbonell-Baeza Ana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The al-Andalus physical activity intervention study is a randomised control trial to investigate the effectiveness of a land- and water-based exercise intervention for reducing the overall impact of fibromyalgia (primary outcome, and for improving tenderness and pain-related measures, body composition, functional capacity, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, fatigue, sleep quality, health-related quality of life, and cognitive function (secondary outcomes in women with fibromyalgia. Methods/Design One hundred eighty women with fibromyalgia (age range: 35-65 years will be recruited from local associations of fibromyalgia patients in Andalucía (Southern Spain. Patients will be randomly assigned to a usual care (control group (n = 60, a water-based exercise intervention group (n = 60 or a land-based exercise intervention group (n = 60. Participants in the usual care group will receive general physical activity guidelines and participants allocated in the intervention groups will attend three non-consecutive training sessions (60 min each per week during 24 weeks. Both exercise interventions will consist of aerobic, muscular strength and flexibility exercises. We will also study the effect of a detraining period (i.e., 12 weeks with no exercise intervention on the studied variables. Discussion Our study attempts to reduce the impact of fibromyalgia and improve patients' health status by implementing two types of exercise interventions. Results from this study will help to assess the efficacy of exercise interventions for the treatment of fibromyalgia. If the interventions would be effective, this study will provide low-cost and feasible alternatives for health professionals in the management of fibromyalgia. Results from the al-Andalus physical activity intervention will help to better understand the potential of regular physical activity for improving the well-being of women with fibromyalgia. Trial registration Clinical

  7. Influence of exercise intervention on gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J; Wang, H; Ren, M

    2017-10-01

    Exercise intervention might be a promising approach to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the results remained controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the effect of exercise intervention on gestational diabetes mellitus. PubMed, EMbase, Web of science, EBSCO, and Cochrane library databases were systematically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of exercise intervention on gestational diabetes mellitus were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. The primary outcome was the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm birth, and gestational age at birth. Meta-analysis was performed using random-effect model. Five RCTs involving 1872 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control intervention, exercise intervention was found to significantly reduce the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (std. mean difference 0.62; 95% CI 0.43-0.89; P = 0.01), but demonstrated no influence on preterm birth (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.44-1.99; P = 0.86), gestational age at birth (std. mean difference -0.03; 95% CI -0.12 to 0.07; P = 0.60), glucose 2-h post-OGTT (std. mean difference -1.02; 95% CI -2.75 to 0.71; P = 0.25), birth weight (std. mean difference -0.10; 95% CI -0.25 to 0.04; P = 0.16), Apgar score less than 7 (OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.21-2.91; P = 0.71), and preeclampsia (OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.53-2.07; P = 0.88). Compared to control intervention, exercise intervention was found to significantly reduce the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus, but had no significant influence on preterm birth, gestational age at birth, glucose 2-h post-OGTT, birth weight, Apgar score less than 7, and preeclampsia.

  8. Exercise-enhanced neuroplasticity targeting motor and cognitive circuitry in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzinger, Giselle M; Fisher, Beth E; McEwen, Sarah; Beeler, Jeff A; Walsh, John P; Jakowec, Michael W

    2013-07-01

    Exercise interventions in individuals with Parkinson's disease incorporate goal-based motor skill training to engage cognitive circuitry important in motor learning. With this exercise approach, physical therapy helps with learning through instruction and feedback (reinforcement) and encouragement to perform beyond self-perceived capability. Individuals with Parkinson's disease become more cognitively engaged with the practice and learning of movements and skills that were previously automatic and unconscious. Aerobic exercise, regarded as important for improvement of blood flow and facilitation of neuroplasticity in elderly people, might also have a role in improvement of behavioural function in individuals with Parkinson's disease. Exercises that incorporate goal-based training and aerobic activity have the potential to improve both cognitive and automatic components of motor control in individuals with mild to moderate disease through experience-dependent neuroplasticity. Basic research in animal models of Parkinson's disease is beginning to show exercise-induced neuroplastic effects at the level of synaptic connections and circuits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Addition of motivational interventions to exercise and traditional physiotherapy: a review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, N; Galvin, R; Cusack, T; Stokes, E

    2015-03-01

    Incontestable epidemiological trends indicate that, for the foreseeable future, mortality and morbidity will be dominated by an escalation in chronic lifestyle-related diseases. International guidelines recommend the implementation of evidence-based approaches to bring about health behaviour changes. Motivational interventions to increase adherence and physical activity are not part of traditional physiotherapy for any condition. To evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of adding motivational interventions to traditional physiotherapy to increase physical activity and short- and long-term adherence to exercise prescriptions. A literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED and Allied Health Evidence database using keywords and subject headings. Only randomised controlled trials comparing two or more arms, with one arm focused on motivational interventions influencing exercise and one control arm, were included. The search identified 493 titles, of which 14 studies (comprising 1504 participants) were included. The principal investigator extracted data that were reviewed independently by another author. Methodological quality was assessed independently by two authors using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and the PEDro scale. Outcomes were measured at the level of impairment, activity limitation and participation restriction. The standardised mean difference between the control and intervention groups at follow-up time points was used as the mode of analysis. I2≤50% was used as the cut-off point for acceptable heterogeneity, above which a random effects model was applied. Exercise attendance was measured in six studies (n=378), and the results indicate that there was no significant difference in exercise attendance between the groups (Random effects model, standardised mean difference 0.33, 95% confidence interval -0.03 to 0.68, I2 62%). Perceived self-efficacy results were pooled from six studies (n=722), and a significant difference was

  10. Neural Regulation of Pancreatic Cancer: A Novel Target for Intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Aeson [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Kim-Fuchs, Corina [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Department of Visceral Surgery and Medicine, University Hospital Bern, Bern 3010 (Switzerland); Le, Caroline P. [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Hollande, Frédéric [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Sloan, Erica K., E-mail: erica.sloan@monash.edu [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Cousins Center for PNI, UCLA Semel Institute, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, and UCLA AIDS Institute, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Surgery, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia)

    2015-07-17

    The tumor microenvironment is known to play a pivotal role in driving cancer progression and governing response to therapy. This is of significance in pancreatic cancer where the unique pancreatic tumor microenvironment, characterized by its pronounced desmoplasia and fibrosis, drives early stages of tumor progression and dissemination, and contributes to its associated low survival rates. Several molecular factors that regulate interactions between pancreatic tumors and their surrounding stroma are beginning to be identified. Yet broader physiological factors that influence these interactions remain unclear. Here, we discuss a series of preclinical and mechanistic studies that highlight the important role chronic stress plays as a physiological regulator of neural-tumor interactions in driving the progression of pancreatic cancer. These studies propose several approaches to target stress signaling via the β-adrenergic signaling pathway in order to slow pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis. They also provide evidence to support the use of β-blockers as a novel therapeutic intervention to complement current clinical strategies to improve cancer outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  11. Targeting Metabolic Reprogramming by Influenza Infection for Therapeutic Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather S. Smallwood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a worldwide health and financial burden posing a significant risk to the immune-compromised, obese, diabetic, elderly, and pediatric populations. We identified increases in glucose metabolism in the lungs of pediatric patients infected with respiratory pathogens. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we found metabolic changes occurring after influenza infection in primary human respiratory cells and validated infection-associated increases in c-Myc, glycolysis, and glutaminolysis. We confirmed these findings with a metabolic drug screen that identified the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 as a regulator of infectious virus production. BEZ235 treatment ablated the transient induction of c-Myc, restored PI3K/mTOR pathway homeostasis measured by 4E-BP1 and p85 phosphorylation, and reversed infection-induced changes in metabolism. Importantly, BEZ235 reduced infectious progeny but had no effect on the early stages of viral replication. BEZ235 significantly increased survival in mice, while reducing viral titer. We show metabolic reprogramming of host cells by influenza virus exposes targets for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Targeting Metabolic Reprogramming by Influenza Infection for Therapeutic Intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Duan, Susu; Morfouace, Marie; Rezinciuc, Svetlana; Shulkin, Barry L.; Shelat, Anang; Zink, Erika E.; Milasta, Sandra; Bajracharya, Resha; Oluwaseum, Ajayi J.; Roussel, Martine F.; Green, Douglas R.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Thomas, Paul G.

    2017-05-01

    Influenza is a worldwide health and financial burden posing a significant risk to the immune-compromised, obese, diabetic, elderly, and pediatric populations. We identified increases in glucose metabolism in the lungs of pediatric patients infected with respiratory pathogens. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we found metabolic changes occurring after influenza infection in primary human respiratory cells and validated infection-associated increases in c-Myc, glycolysis, and glutaminolysis. We confirmed these findings with a metabolic drug screen that identified the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 as a regulator of infectious virus production. BEZ235 treatment ablated the transient induction of c-Myc, restored PI3K/mTOR pathway homeostasis measured by 4E-BP1 and p85 phosphorylation, and reversed infection-induced changes in metabolism. Importantly, BEZ235 reduced infectious progeny but had no effect on the early stages of viral replication. BEZ235 significantly increased survival in mice, while reducing viral titer. We show metabolic reprogramming of host cells by influenza virus exposes targets for therapeutic intervention.

  13. Social media interventions for diet and exercise behaviours: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gillian; Hamm, Michele P; Shulhan, Jocelyn; Vandermeer, Ben; Hartling, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining the use of social media to promote healthy diet and exercise in the general population. Data sources MEDLINE, CENTRAL, ERIC, PubMed, CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Alt Health Watch, Health Source, Communication and Mass Media Complete, Web of Knowledge and ProQuest Dissertation and Thesis (2000–2013). Study eligibility criteria RCTs of social media interventions promoting healthy diet and exercise behaviours in the general population were eligible. Interventions using social media, alone or as part of a complex intervention, were included. Study appraisal and synthesis Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. We describe the studies according to the target populations, objectives and nature of interventions, outcomes examined, and results and conclusions. We extracted data on the primary and secondary outcomes examined in each study. Where the same outcome was assessed in at least three studies, we combined data in a meta-analysis. Results 22 studies were included. Participants were typically middle-aged Caucasian women of mid-to-high socioeconomic status. There were a variety of interventions, comparison groups and outcomes. All studies showed a decrease in programme usage throughout the intervention period. Overall, no significant differences were found for primary outcomes which varied across studies. Meta-analysis showed no significant differences in changes in physical activity (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.13 (95% CI −0.04 to 0.30), 12 studies) and weight (SMD −0.00 (95% CI −0.19 to 0.19), 10 studies); however, pooled results from five studies showed a significant decrease in dietary fat consumption with social media (SMD −0.35 (95% CI −0.68 to −0.02)). Conclusions Social media may provide certain advantages for public health interventions; however, studies of social media interventions to date relating to healthy

  14. Educational intervention on water intake improves hydration status and enhances exercise performance in athletic youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavouras, S A; Arnaoutis, G; Makrillos, M; Garagouni, C; Nikolaou, E; Chira, O; Ellinikaki, E; Sidossis, L S

    2012-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate whether an intervention program emphasizing in increased fluid intake can improve exercise performance in children exercising in the heat. Ninety-two young athletes participated in the study (age: 13.8 ± 0.4 years, weight: 54.9 ± 1.5 kg). Thirty-one (boys: 13, girls: 18) children served as the control group (CON) and 61 (boys: 30, girls: 31) as the intervention (INT). Volunteers had free access to fluids. Hydration was assessed on the basis of first morning urine. A series of field tests were used to evaluate exercise performance. All tests occurred outdoors in the morning (mean ambient temperature=28°C). After baseline testing, INT attended a lecture on hydration, and urine color charts were mounted in all bathrooms. Additionally, water accessibility was facilitated in training, dining and resting areas. Hydration status was improved significantly in the INT [USG: pre=1.031 ± 0.09, post=1.023 ± 0.012, P0.05; urine osmolality (mOsm/kg water) 970 ± 38 vs 961 ± 38, P>0.05]. Performance in an endurance run was improved significantly only in INT (time for 600 m: pre=189 ± 5 s, post=167 ± 4 s, Phydration status by ad libitum consumption of water can enhance performance in young children exercising in the heat. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Aquatic aerobic exercise for children with cerebral palsy: a pilot intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A; Smith, Hilary J; Lombard, Kelly A; Barlow, Carrie; O'Neil, Margaret E

    2014-02-01

    The primary purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a14-week aquatic exercise program on gross motor function and walking endurance in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The secondary purpose was to evaluate changes in functional strength, aerobic capacity and balance. A prospective time series group design consisting of four measurement sessions (two baseline, one post intervention, and 1-month follow-up) was used. Eight ambulatory children ages 6-15 years with CP and classified at Gross Motor Function Classification System Level I or Level III participated in an aquatic aerobic exercise program. Significant improvements were observed for the primary outcomes of gross motor function and walking endurance. No significant differences between any of the secondary measures were observed, although all of the measures demonstrated trends of improvement after intervention. Ambulatory children with CP may improve their gross motor skills and walking endurance after an aquatic exercise program held twice per week for 14 weeks, utilizing moderate-to-vigorous exercise intensity and consisting of functional activities.

  16. Process evaluation of workplace interventions with physical exercise to reduce musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L.; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

    2014-01-01

    Process evaluation is important to explain success or failure of workplace interventions. This study performs a summative process evaluation of workplace interventions with physical exercise. As part of a randomized controlled trial 132 office workers with neck and shoulder pain were to participate...... were too much, and 29% would rather have trained a completely different kind of exercise. In conclusion, resistance training at the workplace is generally well received among office workers with neck-shoulder pain, but a one-size-fits-all approach is not feasible for all employees...... at baseline (100% dose delivered and 100% dose received), and 59 and 57 participants, respectively, replied to the process evaluation questionnaire at 10-week follow-up. Results showed that in the 2 and 12 min groups, respectively, 82% and 81% of the participants completed more than 30 training sessions...

  17. Evaluating a nationwide recreational football intervention: Recruitment, attendance, adherence, exercise intensity, and health effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløtum, Liljan av; Ottesen, Laila; Krustrup, Peter

    2016-01-01

    . A preintervention test battery including resting heart rate (RHR), blood pressure, and body mass measurements along with performance tests (Yo-Yo Intermittent Endurance level 1 (Yo-Yo IE1), the Arrowhead Agility Test, and the Flamingo Balance Test) were performed (푛 = 502). Training attendance (푛 = 310) was 1.6 ± 0......The present study evaluated a nationwide exercise intervention with Football Fitness in a small-scale society. In all, 741 adult participants (20–72 yrs) were successfully recruited for Football Fitness training in local football clubs, corresponding to 2.1% of the adult population......-promoting nationwide training intervention for adult participants with an extraordinary recruitment, a high attendance rate, moderate adherence, high exercise intensity, and marked benefits in cardiovascular health profile and fitness....

  18. Effect of Nurses Living Fit™ exercise and nutrition intervention on body mass index in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speroni, Karen Gabel; Earley, Cynthia; Seibert, Dorothy; Kassem, Mary; Shorter, Gail; Ware, Catherine C; Kosak, Erin; Atherton, Martin

    2012-04-01

    The hospital-based Nurses Living Fit (NLF) intervention was implemented by nurses to determine its effect on decreasing body mass index (BMI) in nurse participants. Although there are limited data on obesity rates of nurses working in the United States, more than half are estimated to be overweight or obese. The NLF intervention included exercise (12 weekly sessions), yoga and nutrition (4 monthly sessions), and diary completion (exercise/yoga, food/water consumption, and sleep), addressing healthy lifestyle principles. NLF participants experienced a greater mean reduction in BMI and waist circumference inches. Ninety-three percent of NLF participants recommended the NLF program. Provision of an evidence-based program such as NLF facilitates nurse education on healthy lifestyle principles.

  19. Process evaluation of a multicomponent dyadic intervention study with exercise and support for people with dementia and their family caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Pot; Dr. J. de Lange; M.A. van 't Leven; A.E. Prick

    2014-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of a multicomponent dyadic intervention (a translated and adapted version of an intervention that has been shown to be effective for people with dementia in the USA) was performed. The exercise and support intervention was intended to reduce depressive symptoms of

  20. Exercise Intervention Improves the Metabolic Profile and Body Composition of Southwestern American Indian Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Colip, Leslie; Burge, Mark R.; Sandy, Phillip; Ghahate, Donica; Bobelu, Jeanette; Faber, Thomas; Shah, Vallabh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose The Southwestern American Indian population carries a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity, placing this group at higher risk than the general population for developing early type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, likely impacting overall lifespan. This study aims to evaluate the impact of early lifestyle interventions which promote healthy eating and regular exercise on risk factors contributing to the development of the metabolic syndrome among the ado...

  1. Effect of a multimodal high intensity exercise intervention in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Adamsen, Lis; Quist, Morten; Andersen, Christina; M?ller, Tom; Herrstedt, J?rn; Kronborg, Dorte; Baadsgaard, Marie T; Vistisen, Kirsten; Midtgaard, Julie; Christiansen, Birgitte; Stage, Maria; Kronborg, Morten T; R?rth, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of a multimodal group exercise intervention, as an adjunct to conventional care, on fatigue, physical capacity, general wellbeing, physical activity, and quality of life in patients with cancer who were undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment for advanced disease. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Two university hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants 269 patients with cancer; 73 men, 196 women, mean age 47 years (range 20-65) representing...

  2. Exercise interventions in polypathological aging patients that coexist with diabetes mellitus: improving functional status and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-06-01

    In elderly populations, diabetes is associated with reduced muscle strength, poor muscle quality, and accelerated loss of muscle mass. In addition, diabetes mellitus increases risk for accelerated aging and for the development of frailty syndrome. This disease is also associated with a polypathological condition, and its complications progressively affect quality of life and survival. Exercise interventions, including resistance training, represent the cornerstones of diabetes management, especially in patients at severe functional decline. This review manuscript aimed to describe the beneficial effects of different exercise interventions on the functional capacity of elderly diabetics, including those at polypathological condition. The SciELO, Science Citation Index, MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and ScienceDirect databases were searched from 1980 to 2015 for articles published from original scientific investigations. In addition to the beneficial effects of exercise interventions on glycemic control, and on the cardiovascular risk factors associated with diabetes, physical exercise is an effective intervention to improve muscle strength, power output, and aerobic power and functional capacity in elderly diabetic patients. Thus, a combination of resistance and endurance training is the most effective exercise intervention to promote overall physical fitness in these patients. In addition, in diabetic patients with frailty and severe functional decline, a multicomponent exercise program including strength and power training, balance exercises, and gait retraining may be an effective intervention to reduce falls and improve functional capacity and quality of life in these patients.

  3. Value associated with mindfulness meditation and moderate exercise intervention in acute respiratory infection: the MEPARI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakel, David; Mundt, Marlon; Ewers, Tola; Fortney, Luke; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Gassman, Michele; Barrett, Bruce

    2013-08-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is among the most common, debilitating and expensive human illnesses. The purpose of this study was to assess ARI-related costs and determine if mindfulness meditation or exercise can add value. One hundred and fifty-four adults ≥50 years from Madison, WI for the 2009-10 cold/flu season were randomized to (i) wait-list control (ii) meditation or (iii) moderate intensity exercise. ARI-related costs were assessed through self-reported medication use, number of missed work days and medical visits. Costs per subject were based on cost of generic medications, missed work days ($126.20) and clinic visits ($78.70). Monte Carlo bootstrap methods evaluated reduced costs of ARI episodes. The total cost per subject for the control group was $214 (95% CI: $105-$358), exercise $136 (95% CI: $64-$232) and meditation $65 (95% CI: $34-$104). The majority of cost savings was through a reduction in missed days of work. Exercise had the highest medication costs at $16.60 compared with $5.90 for meditation (P = 0.004) and $7.20 for control (P = 0.046). Combining these cost benefits with the improved outcomes in incidence, duration and severity seen with the Meditation or Exercise for Preventing Acute Respiratory Infection study, meditation and exercise add value for ARI. Compared with control, meditation had the greatest cost benefit. This savings is offset by the cost of the intervention ($450/subject) that would negate the short-term but perhaps not long-term savings. Meditation and exercise add value to ARI-associated health-related costs with improved outcomes. Further research is needed to confirm results and inform policies on adding value to medical spending.

  4. Tai chi chuan: mind-body practice or exercise intervention? Studying the benefit for cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansky, Patrick; Sannes, Tim; Wallerstedt, Dawn; Ge, Adeline; Ryan, Mary; Johnson, Laura Lee; Chesney, Margaret; Gerber, Lynn

    2006-09-01

    Tai chi chuan (TCC) has been used as a mind-body practice in Asian culture for centuries to improve wellness and reduce stress and has recently received attention by researchers as an exercise intervention. A review of the English literature on research in TCC published from 1989 to 2006 identified 20 prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trials in a number of populations, including elderly participants (7 studies), patients with cardiovascular complications (3 studies), patients with chronic disease (6 studies), and patients who might gain psychological benefit from TCC practice (2 studies). However, only the studies of TCC in the elderly and 2 studies of TCC for cardiovascular disease had adequate designs and size to allow conclusions about the efficacy of TCC. Most (11 studies) were small and provided limited information on the benefit of TCC in the settings tested. There is growing awareness that cancer survivors represent a population with multiple needs related to physical deconditioning, cardiovascular disease risk, and psychological stress. TCC as an intervention may provide benefit to cancer survivors in these multiple areas of need based on its characteristics of combining aspects of meditation and aerobic exercise. However, little research has been conducted to date to determine the benefit of TCC in this population. We propose a model to study the unique characteristics of TCC compared to physical exercise that may highlight characteristic features of this mind-body intervention in cancer survivors.

  5. Human muscle fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets by exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Dorte Enggaard; Albers, Peter Hjorth; Prats, Clara

    2015-01-01

    are expressed in a fibre type-dependent manner and that fibre type-specific activation of AMPK and downstream targets is dependent on exercise intensity. Pools of type I and II fibres were prepared from biopsies of m. vastus lateralis from healthy men before and after two exercise trials; A) continuous cycling......AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a regulator of energy homeostasis during exercise. Studies suggest muscle fibre type-specific AMPK expression. However, fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets during exercise has not been proven. We hypothesized that AMPK subunits...... (CON) 30 min at 69 ± 1% VO2peak or B) interval cycling (INT) 30 min with 6 × 1.5 min high-intense bouts peaking at 95 ± 2% VO2peak . In type I vs. II fibres a higher β1 AMPK (+215%) and lower γ3 AMPK expression (-71%) was found. α1 , α2 , β2 and γ1 AMPK expression was similar between fibre types...

  6. Two exercise interventions for the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Morales-Cabezas, Matilde; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to evaluate the impact of a 4-month comprehensive protocol of strengthening and flexibility exercises developed by our research group versus conventional exercises for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) on functional and mobility outcomes. Randomized controlled trial. Forty-five patients diagnosed with AS according to the modified criteria of New York were allocated to control or experimental groups using a random numbers table. The control group was treated with a conventional protocol of physical therapy in AS, whereas the experimental group was treated with the protocol suggested by our research group. The conventional intervention consisted of 20 exercises: motion and flexibility exercises of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine; stretching of the shortened muscles; and chest expansion exercises. The experimental protocol is based on the postural affectation of the AS and the treatment of the shortened muscle chains in these patients according to the Global Posture Reeducation (GPR) method. This intervention employs specific strengthening and flexibility exercises in which the shortened muscle chains are stretched and strengthened. The study lasted 4 mos. During this period, patients received a weekly group session managed by an experienced physiotherapist. Each session lasted an hour, and there were 15 total sessions. Changes in activity, mobility, and functional capacity were evaluated by an assessor blinded to the intervention, using the following previously validated scores from the Bath group: BASMI (tragus to wall distance, modified Schober test, cervical rotation, lumbar side flexion, and intermalleolar distance), BASDAI (The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index), and BASFI (The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index). Both groups showed an improvement (prepost scores) in all the outcome measures, mobility measures of the BASMI index, as well as in BASFI and BASDAI indexes. In the

  7. Pubertal assessment: targeted educational intervention for pediatric trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Aditi; Nagarajan, Sairaman; Ravichandran, Yagnaram; Perez-Colon, Sheila

    2017-08-18

    Background Timely and periodic pubertal assessment in children is vital to identify puberty related disorders. Pediatricians need to have working knowledge of puberty time and tempo. Pediatric residency is an important platform to acquire physical examination skills including pubertal assessment. Objective An educational intervention for teaching pubertal assessment was piloted on pediatric residents at our institution. Methods The intervention comprised of interactive lecture series, ID badge size Tanner stage cards and Tanner posters placed in residents' continuity clinics. Pre-intervention, post-intervention and 3 months post-intervention surveys for participating trainees were administered to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. Attitudes, practices, knowledge scores, and barriers to Tanner staging conduct were analyzed. Results Forty-three residents participated in the intervention. Knowledge scores of PGY1 (5.95 ± 1.6 vs. 7.47 ± 1.4, p intervention, as did self-reported clinical practices of all trainees 3 months post- intervention with regards to conducting external genital examination and performing pubertal assessment. Confidence levels of pediatric trainees in conducting pubertal assessment and comfort levels in assessing the need for endocrine referral based on abnormal Tanner staging improved after the intervention, although the effect was not statistically significant. Conclusion Our intervention is a worthwhile technique for teaching pubertal assessment to residents as it is simple to conduct, easily reproducible, provides baseline knowledge needed for recognition of normal pubertal development and puberty related conditions, and instills confidence in residents.

  8. Updated evidence in support of diet and exercise interventions in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekmezi, Dorothy W; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2011-02-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that diet and exercise behaviors and body weight status influence health-related outcomes after a cancer diagnosis. This review synthesizes the recent progress in lifestyle interventions in light of current guidelines put forth by the American Cancer Society (ACS), the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). The PubMed database was searched for terms of cancer survivor(s) or neoplasms/survivor, cross-referenced with MeSH terms of lifestyle, health behavior, physical activity, exercise, body weight, obesity, weight loss, diet, nutrition, and intervention studies and limited to randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that had retention rates exceeding 75%. There has been an increase in the number and methodological rigor of the studies in this area, with 21 RCTs identified in the past three years. Results suggest that physical activity interventions are safe for cancer survivors and produce improvements in fitness, strength, physical function, and cancer-related psychosocial variables, whereas dietary interventions improve diet quality, nutrition-related biomarkers and body weight. Preliminary evidence also suggests that diet and exercise may positively influence biomarkers associated with progressive disease and overall survival (e.g., insulin levels, oxidative DNA damage, tumor proliferation rates). The evidence base regarding health-related benefits of increased physical activity, an improved diet, and weight control continues to expand. Due to the large (and increasing) number of cancer survivors, more research is needed that tests the impact of lifestyle change on health-related outcomes in this population, especially research that focuses on high-reach, sustainable interventions that recruit diverse, representative samples to help increase the generalizability of findings to the population at large. Concurrent research also needs to address

  9. Exercise intervention for patients surgically treated for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Katy; Maguire, Roma; Campbell, Anna; Kearney, Nora

    2014-03-01

    Surgery remains the best curative option for appropriately selected patients with lung cancer. Evidence suggests that improving cardiovascular fitness and functional capacity can accelerate post-surgery recovery and reduce mortality. However, the effect of exercise intervention for patients surgically treated for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer [NCSLC] has not been fully examined. This review examines the literature regarding exercise intervention for patients who are surgically treated for NSCLC focussing on three key areas: methodological quality, intervention design (e.g. duration, frequency, type) and outcomes measured. A search of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsychINFO was undertaken. Randomised Controlled Trials [RCTs] and non-RCTs including exercise training pre or post lung cancer resection were included. Descriptive characteristics were extracted and methodological quality assessed using Downs and Black appraisal checklist. Twenty studies (eight RCT's) were included: nine pre-surgical, nine post-surgical and two pre to post-surgical. The quality of evidence is questionable with many limitations (e.g. small samples, inadequate allocation concealment and a lack of clear reporting on timing, adverse events and follow-up). Regarding design of exercise intervention and outcomes measured, there was much variation between studies producing a disparate set of data. An optimal programme is still to be determined; however, suggestions are made relating to type of exercise (i.e. mixing aerobic, resistance and breathing exercises). Preliminary work from this review suggests that exercise intervention compared with usual care both pre and post-surgery is associated with improved cardiopulmonary exercise capacity, increased muscle strength and reduced fatigue, post-operative complications and hospital length of stay. Results concerning pulmonary function, quality of life, and blood gas analysis were variable and inconsistent. In order to implement exercise intervention

  10. Lifestyle intervention improves heart rate recovery from exercise in adults with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Look AHEAD study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary aims of this paper were (1) to evaluate the influence of intensive lifestyle weight loss and exercise intervention (ILI) compared with diabetes support and education (DSE) upon Heart Rate Recovery (HRR) from graded exercise testing (GXT), and (2) to determine the independent and combined...

  11. The effects of two self-regulation interventions to increase self-efficacy and group exercise behavior in fitness clubs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkamp, P.J.C.; Rooijen, M. van; Wolfhagen, P.; Steenbergen, B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the adoption and maintenance of group exercise behavior are scarce. The objective of this study is to test two self-efficacy based interventions to increase barrier self-efficacy and group exercise behavior. In total 122 participants (Mage 42.02 yr.; SD 12.29; 67% females) were recruited

  12. The Effects of Two Self-Regulation Interventions to Increase Self-Efficacy and Group Exercise Behavior in Fitness Clubs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkamp, J.; van Rooijen, M.; Wolfhagen, P.; Steenbergen, B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the adoption and maintenance of group exercise behavior are scarce. The objective of this study is to test two self-efficacy based interventions to increase barrier self-efficacy and group exercise behavior. In total 122 participants (Mage 42.02 yr.; SD 12.29; 67% females) were recruited

  13. Getting the balance right: a randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy and Exercise Interventions for ambulatory people with multiple sclerosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coote, Susan; Garrett, Maria; Hogan, Neasa; Larkin, Aidan; Saunders, Jean

    2009-01-01

    People with Multiple Sclerosis have a life long need for physiotherapy and exercise interventions due to the progressive nature of the disease and their greater risk of the complications of inactivity...

  14. Evaluation of work place group and internet based physical activity interventions on psychological variables associated with exercise behavior change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dawson, Kimberley A; Tracey, Jill; Berry, Tanya

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare group-based and internet-based physical activity interventions in terms of desirability, participant characteristics, exercise self-efficacy, and barrier self-efficacy...

  15. A comparison of pain level and entropy changes following core stability exercise intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taero; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Sung, Paul S

    2011-07-01

    As reported in our previous studies, the complexity of physiologic time series is a sensitive measure of muscle fatigability. This study compared the differences between 2 different analyses following 4 weeks of core stability exercises (CSE) in subjects with and without chronic low back pain (LBP). We examined whether the observed Shannon (information) entropy, as compared with median frequency (MF), was able to differentiate fatigability of the thoracic and lumbar parts of the erector spinae (ES) muscles following the intervention. In total, 32 subjects participated in this study. There were 13 subjects in the CSE intervention group (average age 50.4 ± 9.1 years) and 19 subjects in the control group (average age 46.6 ± 9.1 years). The CSE group performed the specific exercise intervention, but the control group was asked to maintain their current activity and/or exercise levels. The endurance of the back muscles was determined by using a modified version of the isometric fatigue test as originally introduced by Sorensen. Pain level decreased significantly for all subjects (F=25.29, p=0.001), but there was no difference between groups (F=0.42, p=0.52). The MF was not different between groups following treatment (F=0.81, p=0.37). Although there was no entropy level changes following treatment (F=0.01, p=0.93), the interactions between muscles and groups following treatment were significant (F=7.25, p=0.01). The entropy level decreased in both thoracic ES muscles following intervention in the exercise group, while remaining the same in the control group. Although the change in pain level was not different between groups, the Shannon entropy measure more sensitively differentiated the exercise intervention than did MF. In addition, the results also suggested that complexity is related to muscle fatigue, which corresponds to the values of entropy between groups. Further studies are needed to investigate the effectiveness of nonlinear time series of EMG data for

  16. Dose-Response Effects of Tai Chi and Physical Therapy Exercise Interventions in Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Augustine C; Harvey, William F; Price, Lori Lyn; Han, Xingyi; Driban, Jeffrey B; Iversen, Maura D; Desai, Sima A; Knopp, Hans E; Wang, Chenchen

    2018-01-30

    Therapeutic exercise is a currently recommended non-pharmacological treatment for knee osteoarthritis (KOA). The optimal treatment dose (frequency or duration) has not been determined. To examine dose-response relationships, minimal effective dose, and baseline factors associated with the timing of response from two exercise interventions in KOA. Secondary analysis of a single-blind, randomized trial comparing 12-week Tai Chi and Physical Therapy exercise programs (Trial Registry #NCT01258985). Urban tertiary care academic hospital PARTICIPANTS: 182 participants with symptomatic KOA (mean age 61 years; BMI 32kg/m2, 70% female; 55% white). We defined dose as cumulative attendance-weeks of intervention, and treatment response as ≥20% and ≥50% improvement in pain and function. Using log-rank tests, we compared time-to-response between interventions; and used Cox regression to examine baseline factors associated with timing of response, including physical and psychosocial health, physical performance, outcome expectations, self-efficacy, and biomechanical factors. Weekly Western Ontario and McMasters Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain (0 to 500) and function (0 to 1700) scores. Both interventions had an approximately linear dose-response effect resulting in a 9 to 11-point reduction in WOMAC pain and a 32 to 41-point improvement in function per attendance-week. There was no significant difference in overall time-to-response for pain and function between treatment groups. Median time-to-response for ≥20% improvement in pain and function was 2 attendance-weeks and 4 to 5 attendance-weeks for ≥50% improvement. On multivariable models, outcome expectations were independently associated with incident function response (Hazard Ratio: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.004 to 2.14). Both interventions have approximately linear dose-dependent effects on pain and function, their minimum effective doses range from 2-5 weeks, and patient perceived benefits of exercise influence the timing of

  17. Human muscle fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets by exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Dorte E; Albers, Peter H; Prats, Clara; Baba, Otto; Birk, Jesper B; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a regulator of energy homeostasis during exercise. Studies suggest muscle fibre type-specific AMPK expression. However, fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets during exercise has not been demonstrated. We hypothesized that AMPK subunits are expressed in a fibre type-dependent manner and that fibre type-specific activation of AMPK and downstream targets is dependent on exercise intensity. Pools of type I and II fibres were prepared from biopsies of vastus lateralis muscle from healthy men before and after two exercise trials: (1) continuous cycling (CON) for 30 min at 69 ± 1% peak rate of O2 consumption () or (2) interval cycling (INT) for 30 min with 6 × 1.5 min high-intensity bouts peaking at 95 ± 2% . In type I vs. II fibres a higher β1 AMPK (+215%) and lower γ3 AMPK expression (−71%) was found. α1, α2, β2 and γ1 AMPK expression was similar between fibre types. In type I vs. II fibres phosphoregulation after CON was similar (AMPKThr172, ACCSer221, TBC1D1Ser231 and GS2+2a) or lower (TBC1D4Ser704). Following INT, phosphoregulation in type I vs. II fibres was lower (AMPKThr172, TBC1D1Ser231, TBC1D4Ser704 and ACCSer221) or higher (GS2+2a). Exercise-induced glycogen degradation in type I vs. II fibres was similar (CON) or lower (INT). In conclusion, a differentiated response to exercise of metabolic signalling/effector proteins in human type I and II fibres was evident during interval exercise. This could be important for exercise type-specific adaptations, i.e. insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial density, and highlights the potential for new discoveries when investigating fibre type-specific signalling. PMID:25640469

  18. Exercise despite pain – breast cancer patient experiences of muscle and joint pain during adjuvant chemotherapy and concurrent participation in an exercise intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christina; Rørth, M; Ejlertsen, B

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-related pain is a well-known side effect in cancer patient receiving chemotherapy. However, limited knowledge exists describing whether exercise exacerbates existing pain. Aim of the research was to explore muscle and joint pain experienced by women with breast cancer receiving......-immediate exacerbation of pain and summarised into the essence of chemotherapy related muscle and joint pain in exercise breast cancer patients; exercise despite pain. Findings indicate that the patients' perception of sudden onset of chemotherapy-related muscle and joint pain was not aggravated by training. Pain...... adjuvant chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by docetaxel and factor support and concurrently participating in an exercise intervention. The study used individual semi-structured interviews (pre- and post-intervention). Fifteen women were interviewed. The multimodal group...

  19. Counseling and exercise intervention for smoking reduction in patients with schizophrenia: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Paquito Philippe Noel; Esseul, Elodie Christine; Raymond, Laurent; Dandonneau, Loic; Xambo, Jean-Jacques; Carayol, Marion Sara; Ninot, Gregory Jean-Marie Guilyn

    2013-02-01

    Smoking cessation is possible for individuals with schizophrenia but the relapse rate is high. It is necessary to develop more flexible approaches to help these patients. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of an intervention approach that integrates counseling and exercise for participants with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. A single group prospective design was used in this study. A sample of inpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder participated in a program called "oxygen group", a program combining five sessions of smoking reduction counseling and three sessions of moderate intensity exercise over an 8-week period. Tobacco consumption, motivation, carbon monoxide level, anxiety and depression, smoking self-efficacy, nicotine dependence and waist circumference were measured pre- and post-intervention. Participants reported their satisfaction with the study characteristics after completion of the intervention. Smoking consumption and CO level were assessed at 6-week post-intervention follow-up. Twelve individuals (mean age 45.7±10.8years) were recruited. Participant attendance was 81.3%. There were no dropouts. Significant decreases were found for tobacco consumption (P=.04) and CO rate (P=.003) at the end of the intervention and were maintained at 6-week follow-up. Compared to baseline levels, there were no changes in depression and anxiety. Smoking cessation motivation increased significantly. This intervention appears feasible and acceptable to patients with schizophrenia and there were promising findings regarding smoking reduction. Larger trials to test the intervention are warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mindfulness Is Associated With Treatment Response From Nonpharmacologic Exercise Interventions in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Augustine C; Harvey, William F; Price, Lori Lyn; Han, Xingyi; Driban, Jeffrey B; Wong, John B; Chung, Mei; McAlindon, Timothy E; Wang, Chenchen

    2017-11-01

    To examine the association between baseline mindfulness and response from exercise interventions in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Cohort study; responder analysis of a clinical trial subset. Urban tertiary care academic hospital. Participants with symptomatic, radiographic knee OA (N=86; mean age, 60y; 74% female; 48% white). Twelve weeks (twice per week) of Tai Chi or physical therapy exercise. Treatment response was defined using Osteoarthritis Research Society International criteria indicating meaningful improvements in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, WOMAC function, or Patient Global Assessment scores. At baseline, participants completed the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (mean total score, 142±17) and were grouped into 3 categories of total mindfulness: higher, medium, or lower. Relative risk (RR) ratios were used to compare treatment response across groups. Participants with higher total mindfulness were 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.83) more likely to meet responder criteria than those with lower mindfulness. We found no significant difference between medium and lower mindfulness groups (RR=1.0; 95% CI, 0.69-1.44). Among the 5 mindfulness facets, medium acting-with-awareness was 46% (95% CI, 1.09-1.96) more likely to respond than lower acting-with-awareness, and higher acting-with-awareness was 34% more likely to respond, but this did not reach significance (95% CI, 0.97-1.86). In this study, higher mindfulness, primarily driven by its acting-with-awareness facet, was significantly associated with a greater likelihood of response to nonpharmacologic exercise interventions in knee OA. This suggests that mindfulness-cultivating interventions may increase the likelihood of response from exercise. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of a six-week supervised multimodal exercise intervention during chemotherapy on cancer-related fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christina; Rørth, Mikael; Ejlertsen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    Cancer related fatigue (CRF) is a common problem for cancer patients across diagnoses during chemotherapy and is associated with physical inactivity, lower functional level and lack of energy. Few RCT exercise intervention studies have included cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The objective...... of this study is to evaluate whether a six-week supervised multimodal exercise intervention, adjunct to chemotherapy and standard care, can reduce the patient's CRF level....

  2. Feasibility of a Facebook Intervention for Exercise Motivation and Cardiac Rehabilitation Adherence: Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Lee Anne; Ahmed, Haitham M; Crawford, Michael Todd; Bena, James Frank

    2017-08-18

    While cardiac rehabilitation has been shown to be effective at improving coronary heart disease (CHD), participation is generally poor. Attempts to increase uptake and adherence often fail. Use of a Facebook intervention for this population may be a unique opportunity to support self-determined motivation and affect adherence. To evaluate the impact of a Facebook intervention on motivation for exercise and adherence to cardiac rehabilitation in patients with CHD during a 12-week, Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. A prospective, randomized controlled pilot study, grounded in Self-Determination Theory, will be conducted. Participants will be recruited from inpatient, or the intake visit to outpatient, cardiac rehabilitation, and then randomly assigned to the intervention or comparison group. Participants in the intervention group will take part in a private Facebook group. Weekly posts will be designed to support self-determined motivation, measured at baseline and postcardiac rehabilitation by the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-3 (BREQ-3). The Psychological Need Satisfaction for Exercise (PNSE) scale will measure fulfillment of needs that affect motivation. Participants in the comparison group will be given the same materials, but these will be supplied via handouts and email. The number of sessions attended will be tallied and analyzed using t tests. Overall motivation will be evaluated using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) models. Multivariate analysis of variance models will be used to evaluate differences in the change across motivation subtypes. If significant, ANCOVA models for each subtype will be fit. ANCOVA models will be used to compare changes in needs satisfaction, overall and separately among the three subscales, between groups. Engagement in the Facebook group will be measured by number of "likes" and self-report of weekly visits to the group. This project was funded in July 2017 and recruitment is currently underway. The

  3. Differential effects of targeted tongue exercise and treadmill running on aging tongue muscle structure and contractile properties

    OpenAIRE

    Kletzien, Heidi; Russell, John A; Leverson, Glen E.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2012-01-01

    Age-associated changes in tongue muscle structure and strength may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. Tongue exercise is a current treatment option. We hypothesized that targeted tongue exercise and nontargeted exercise that activates tongue muscles as a consequence of increased respiratory drive, such as treadmill running, are associated with different patterns of tongue muscle contraction and genioglossus (GG) muscle biochemistry. Thirty-one young adult, 34 middle-aged, and 37 old F...

  4. Hippocampal - brainstem connectivity associated with vagal modulation after an intense exercise intervention in healthy men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Juergen Bär

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractRegular physical exercise leads increased vagal modulation of the cardiovascular system. A combination of peripheral and central processes has been proposed to underlie this adaptation. However, specific changes in the central autonomic network have not been described in human in more detail. We hypothesized that the anterior hippocampus known to be influenced by regular physical activity might be involved in the development of increased vagal modulation after a 6 weeks high intensity intervention in young healthy men (exercise group: n=17, control group: n=17. In addition to the determination of physical capacity before and after the intervention, we used resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and synchronic heart rate variability assessment.We detected a significant increase of the power output at the anaerobic threshold of 11.4% (p<0.001, the maximum power output Pmax of 11.2% (p<0.001, and VO2max adjusted for body weight of 4.7% (p<0.001 in the exercise group (EG. Comparing baseline (T0 and post-exercise (T1 values of parasympathetic modulation of the exercise group, we observed a trend for a decrease in heart rate (p<0.06 and a significant increase of vagal modulation as indicated by RMSSD (p<0.026 during resting state. In the whole brain analysis, we found that the connectivity pattern of the right anterior hippocampus (aHC was specifically altered to the ventromedial anterior cortex, the dorsal striatum and to the dorsal vagal complex (DVC in the brainstem. Moreover, we only observed a highly significant negative correlation between increased RMSSD after exercise and decreased functional connectivity from the right aHC to DVC (r=-0.69, p=0.003. This indicates that increased vagal modulation was associated with functional connectivity between aHC and the dorsal vagal complex.In conclusion, our findings suggest that exercise associated changes in anterior hippocampal function might be involved in increased vagal

  5. Targeting Adolescent Mothers with Depressive Symptoms for Early Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffant; Pickens, Jeffrey; Prodromidis, Margarita; Malphurs, Julie; Fox, Nathan, Bendell, Debra; Yando, Regina; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia

    2000-01-01

    Infants with depressed mother are more likely to experience developmental delays if the mother remains depressed after 6 months. Discusses two studies that examined depressive symptoms in mothers of infants. Depressed mothers underwent a three-month intervention. Although the mothers who received the intervention continued to have depressive…

  6. A mHealth cardiac rehabilitation exercise intervention: findings from content development studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfaeffli Leila

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Involving stakeholders and consumers throughout the content and study design ensures interventions are engaging and relevant for end-users. The aim of this paper is to present the content development process for a mHealth (mobile phone and internet-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR exercise intervention. Methods An innovative mHealth intervention was developed with patient input using the following steps: conceptualization, formative research, pre-testing, and pilot testing. Conceptualization, including theoretical and technical aspects, was undertaken by experts. For the formative component, focus groups and interviews with cardiac patients were conducted to discuss their perceptions of a mHealth CR program. A general inductive thematic approach identified common themes. A preliminary library of text and video messages were then developed. Participants were recruited from CR education sessions to pre-test and provide feedback on the content using an online survey. Common responses were extracted and compiled. An iterative process was used to refine content prior to pilot testing and conduct of a randomized controlled trial. Results 38 CR patients and 3 CR nurses participated in the formative research and 20 CR patients participated in the content pre-testing. Participants perceived the mHealth program as an effective approach to inform and motivate patients to exercise. For the qualitative study, 100% (n = 41 of participants thought it to be a good idea, and 11% of participants felt it might not be useful for them, but would be for others. Of the 20 participants who completed the online survey, 17 out of 20 (85% stated they would sign up to a program where they could receive information by video messages on a website, and 12 out of 20 (60% showed interest in a texting program. Some older CR patients viewed technology as a potential barrier as they were unfamiliar with text messaging or did not have mobile phones. Steps to

  7. A mHealth cardiac rehabilitation exercise intervention: findings from content development studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaeffli, Leila; Maddison, Ralph; Whittaker, Robyn; Stewart, Ralph; Kerr, Andrew; Jiang, Yannan; Kira, Geoff; Carter, Karen; Dalleck, Lance

    2012-05-30

    Involving stakeholders and consumers throughout the content and study design ensures interventions are engaging and relevant for end-users. The aim of this paper is to present the content development process for a mHealth (mobile phone and internet-based) cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise intervention. An innovative mHealth intervention was developed with patient input using the following steps: conceptualization, formative research, pre-testing, and pilot testing. Conceptualization, including theoretical and technical aspects, was undertaken by experts. For the formative component, focus groups and interviews with cardiac patients were conducted to discuss their perceptions of a mHealth CR program. A general inductive thematic approach identified common themes. A preliminary library of text and video messages were then developed. Participants were recruited from CR education sessions to pre-test and provide feedback on the content using an online survey. Common responses were extracted and compiled. An iterative process was used to refine content prior to pilot testing and conduct of a randomized controlled trial. 38 CR patients and 3 CR nurses participated in the formative research and 20 CR patients participated in the content pre-testing. Participants perceived the mHealth program as an effective approach to inform and motivate patients to exercise. For the qualitative study, 100% (n = 41) of participants thought it to be a good idea, and 11% of participants felt it might not be useful for them, but would be for others. Of the 20 participants who completed the online survey, 17 out of 20 (85%) stated they would sign up to a program where they could receive information by video messages on a website, and 12 out of 20 (60%) showed interest in a texting program. Some older CR patients viewed technology as a potential barrier as they were unfamiliar with text messaging or did not have mobile phones. Steps to instruct participants to receive texts and view the

  8. Effects of Exercise Interventions and Physical Activity Behavior on Cancer Related Cognitive Impairments: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Zimmer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review analyzes current data on effects of exercise interventions and physical activity behavior on objective and subjective cancer related cognitive impairments (CRCI. Out of the 19 studies which met all inclusion criteria, five RCTs investigated rodents, whereas the other 14 trials explored humans and these included six RCTs, one controlled trial, two prospective noncontrolled trials, one case series, one observational study, and three cross-sectional studies. The results from animal models revealed positive effects of exercise during and after chemotherapy or radiation on structural alterations of the central nervous system, physiological as well as neuropsychological outcomes. The overall study quality in patient studies was poor. The current data on intervention studies showed preliminary positive effects of Asian-influenced movement programs (e.g., Yoga with benefits on self-perceived cognitive functions as well as a reduction of chronic inflammation for breast cancer patients in the aftercare. Exercise potentially contributes to the prevention and rehabilitation of CRCI. Additional RCTs with standardized neuropsychological assessments and controlling for potential confounders are needed to confirm and expand preliminary findings.

  9. Periostin: a promising target of therapeutical intervention for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Weihong

    2011-06-01

    RNA-Periostin LNCap cells growed slowly in vitro and in vivo. The tissues of xenografts as PCa were verificated by HE staining. Additionally, the weak positive Periostin expressed tumor cells could be seen in the tissues of 6 xenografts from the group of down-regulated Periostin LNCap cells which had a significant decrease of the amount of Periostin compared to the other two group. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that sliencing Periostin could inhibit migration of LNCap cells in vitro. Conclusions Our data indicates that Periostin as an up-regulated protein in PCa may be a promising target of therapeutical intervention for PCa in future.

  10. How can we increase physical activity and exercise among youth experiencing first-episode psychosis? A systematic review of intervention variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Simon; Lederman, Oscar; Stubbs, Brendon; Vancampfort, Davy; Stanton, Robert; Ward, Philip B

    2016-10-01

    To review intervention variables and outcomes of studies designed to increase physical activity or exercise participation among people experiencing first-episode psychosis. A systematic review of electronic databases was conducted from inception to November 2014. Eleven eligible studies describing 12 interventions were included (n = 351; 14-35 years) incorporating health coaching (n = 5), exercise prescriptions based on physiological parameters (e.g. heart rate) (n = 3), supervised, individually tailored programmes (n = 2), an Internet-delivered intervention and a yoga intervention. The majority of the interventions were delivered over 12 weeks (n = 6) and in community settings (n = 11). Five studies assessed aerobic capacity (VO2 max or VO2 peak) and three studies assessed self-reported physical activity levels. Considerable heterogeneity in the design, implementation and assessment of interventions was found. There is an urgent need to better understand how physical activity can be increased in line with the internationally endorsed HeaL (Healthy Active Lives) Declaration 5-year physical activity target. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Effect of Targeted Strength, Endurance, and Coordination Exercise on Neck and Shoulder Pain Among Fighter Pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Britt; Toft, Palle; Myburgh, Corrie

    2013-01-01

    : To explore in Danish F-16 pilots: (1) the effect on neck and shoulder pain of a 24-week training intervention including targeted training of the deep neck muscles; (2) selected clinical signs and symptoms at baseline; (3) the prevalence and intensity of neck and shoulder pain.......: To explore in Danish F-16 pilots: (1) the effect on neck and shoulder pain of a 24-week training intervention including targeted training of the deep neck muscles; (2) selected clinical signs and symptoms at baseline; (3) the prevalence and intensity of neck and shoulder pain....

  12. Health service interventions targeting relatives of heart patients: a review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Nina Konstantin; Madsen, Mette; Olsen Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2008-01-01

    services to support relatives and to enable them to handle the situation. This study systematically reviewed the literature on the latest health service interventions targeting relatives of heart patients. METHODS: The literature about interventions targeting relatives of heart patients has been...

  13. Exercise interventions on health-related quality of life for cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shiraz I; Scherer, Roberta W; Geigle, Paula M; Berlanstein, Debra R; Topaloglu, Ozlem; Gotay, Carolyn C; Snyder, Claire

    2012-08-15

    Cancer survivors experience numerous disease and treatment-related adverse outcomes and poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Exercise interventions are hypothesized to alleviate these adverse outcomes. HRQoL and its domains are important measures for cancer survivorship. To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise on overall HRQoL and HRQoL domains among adult post-treatment cancer survivors. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PEDRO, LILACS, SIGLE, SportDiscus, OTSeeker, and Sociological Abstracts from inception to October 2011 with no language or date restrictions. We also searched citations through Web of Science and Scopus, PubMed's related article feature, and several websites. We reviewed reference lists of included trials and other reviews in the field. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing exercise interventions with usual care or other nonexercise intervention to assess overall HRQoL or at least one HRQoL domain in adults. Included trials tested exercise interventions that were initiated after completion of active cancer treatment. We excluded trials including people who were terminally ill, or receiving hospice care, or both, and where the majority of trial participants were undergoing active treatment for either the primary or recurrent cancer. Five paired review authors independently extracted information on characteristics of included trials, data on effects of the intervention, and assessed risk of bias based on predefined criteria. Where possible, meta-analyses results were performed for HRQoL and HRQoL domains for the reported difference between baseline values and follow-up values using standardized mean differences (SMD) and a random-effects model by length of follow-up. We also reported the SMDs between mean follow-up values of exercise and control group. Because investigators used many different

  14. Exercise induced dehydration status and skinfold compressibility in athletes: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Daniela; Teixeira, Vitor Hugo; Carvalho, Pedro; Amaral, Teresa F

    2018-01-01

    Skinfold thickness assessment is a widely recognized technique for the estimation of body adiposity and fat free mass. This method assumes that skinfolds' compressibility is constant but there are some factors that could influence its compressibility. This study aims to evaluate whether the skinfolds' compressibility is influenced by hydration status. An intervention study was conducted in a sample of 22 adult male amateur soccer players, who took part in a 90min simulated soccer match. Before and after the intervention skinfolds thicknesses were measured in eight anatomical sites. An electronic caliper, Lipotool, was used to collect and record 120 values during 2s of evaluation. To analyze skinfolds' compressibility, two methods were used: identification of lowest skinfold thickness measurement (SL) and SH = 110% x SL, and the parameter TAU (τ) determination. Baseline hydration status was evaluated by total body water (TBW) through multifrequency bioimpedance analysis. Dehydration was assessed by the difference of body weight before and after the intervention. The intervention resulted in a loss of 2.11% of participants' baseline weight. The skinfolds thicknesses, assessed by SL and SH, were significantly higher after exercise for all skinfolds except for skinfolds at iliac crest and abdominal. This intervention did not affect skinfolds' compressibility when assessed by τ. However, an association between dehydration and medial-calf skinfold' compressibility was found (r=0.48, p=0.042). Although an increase in the skinfolds thickness after the intervention was found, skinfolds' compressibility did not change.

  15. Changes in Physical Activity Behaviour and Health Risk Factors Following a Randomised Controlled Pilot Workplace Exercise Intervention

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    Naomi Burn

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Declining physical activity (PA and associated health risk factors are well established. Workplace strategies to increase PA may be beneficial to ameliorate extensive sedentary behavior. This study assessed the effectiveness of two PA interventions in workplace settings. Methods: Interventions were conducted over 40 days targeting insufficiently active (<150 min/wk PA and/or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 adults; participants were randomly allocated to instructor-led exercise sessions either after-work (n = 25 or in-work (n = 23 with a 60 minPA/day common goal, or a wait-listed control group (n = 23. The programme commenced with low-moderate physical activities and progressed to high intensity game style activities by week six. Adherence and compliance were determined using both objective measures of daily PA time from HR monitors and self-report responses to PA questionnaires. Cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors were measured pre- and post-intervention. Changes across the study were analysed using Chi square and repeat-measures ANOVA. Results: Adherence rates (completed pre and post-testing were not different between groups (76.0 vs 65.2%. Compliance for the instructor-led sessions was higher for the after-work group (70.4% vs 26.4%, respectively. Increased total PA and aerobic fitness, and decreased weight in both intervention groups were found relative to controls. The after-work group undertook more vigorous PA, and had greater weight loss and fasting blood glucose improvement, relative to in-work participants and controls. Conclusions: These workplace interventions resulted in rapid and dramatic increases in PA behaviour and important health benefits. Short, in-work PA sessions were less efficacious than longer after-work sessions.

  16. High-intensity exercise interventions in cancer survivors: a systematic review exploring the impact on health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Kellie; Pumpa, Kate; McKune, Andrew; Cooke, Julie; Semple, Stuart

    2018-01-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence underpinning high-intensity exercise as an effective and time-efficient intervention for improving health in cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to, (1) evaluate the efficacy and (2) the safety of high-intensity exercise interventions in improving selected health outcomes in cancer survivors. Design Systematic review. Data sources Google Scholar and EBSCO, CINAHL Plus, Computers and Applied Sciences Complete, Health Source-Consumer Edition, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, MEDLINE, Web of Science and SPORTDiscuss from inception up until August 2017. Eligibility criteria Randomized controlled trials of high-intensity exercise interventions in cancer survivors (all cancer types) with health-related outcome measures. The guidelines adopted for this review were the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA). The search returned 447 articles, of which nine articles (n = 531 participants mean, age 58 ± 9.5 years) met the eligibility criteria. Exercise interventions of between 4 and 18 weeks consisting of high-intensity interval bouts of up to 4-min were compared with a continuous moderate intensity (CMIT) intervention or a control group. High-intensity exercise interventions elicited significant improvements in VO 2 max, strength, body mass, body fat and hip and waist circumference compared with CMIT and/or control groups. The studies reviewed showed low risk in participating in supervised high-intensity exercise interventions. Mixed mode high-intensity interventions which included both aerobic and resistance exercises were most effective improving the aerobic fitness levels of cancer survivors by 12.45-21.35%, from baseline to post-intervention. High-intensity exercise interventions improved physical and physiological health-related outcome measures such as cardiovascular fitness and strength in cancer survivors. Given that high-intensity exercise sessions require a

  17. Effects of exercise intervention in breast cancer survivors: a meta-analysis of 33 randomized controlled trails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Guoqing Zhu,1 Xiao Zhang,1 Yulan Wang,1 Huizi Xiong,2 Yinghui Zhao,1 Fenyong Sun1 1Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Exercise is associated with favorable outcomes in cancer survivors. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to comprehensively summarize the effects of exercise intervention in breast cancer survivors.Methods: A systematic search of PubMed, Elsevier, and Google scholar was conducted up to March 2015. References from relevant meta-analyses and reviews were also checked.Results: Thirty-three randomized controlled trials were included in this meta-analysis, including 2,659 breast cancer survivors. Compared with the control group, quality of life was significantly improved in exercise intervention group, especially in mental health and general health subscales of short form 36 questionnaire, as well as emotion well-being and social well-being subscales of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy. Besides, exercise alleviated the symptoms of depression and anxiety in the exercise group. Furthermore, exercise was also associated with positive outcomes in body mass index, lean mass, and muscle strength. In addition, the serum concentration of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-II, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 was significantly reduced in exercise intervention group. However, based on the current data of this meta-analysis, there were no significant differences in sleep dysfunction or fatigue between groups.Conclusion: Our study suggested that exercise intervention was beneficial to breast cancer survivors. Therefore, exercise should be recommended to this patient group. Keywords: exercise, quality of life, depression, BMI, insulin

  18. Encouraging bigger-picture thinking in an intervention to target multiple obesogenic health behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Laura J; Uskul, Ayse K

    2017-11-01

    Research has shown that use of the third-person perspective to visualise a behaviour results in increased motivation to engage in the behaviour relative to the first-person perspective. This effect is claimed to operate in part because the third-person perspective leads the individual to "see the bigger picture", linking the visualised behaviour to broader goals and identities. Reasoning that this effect could be harnessed to encourage engaging in multiple behaviours that serve the same broader goal, the present study manipulated the visual perspective participants used to imagine themselves exercising, and assessed effects on cognitions and behaviour related to both exercising and healthy eating. Baseline exercise levels were measured and explored as a moderation effect. As predicted, it was found that for participants who engaged in more exercise at baseline, visualising exercise using the third-person perspective resulted in them reporting stronger intentions to exercise and taking more leaflets showing local exercise classes. For those who engaged in less exercise at baseline, there was no effect of perspective. In terms of eating, there was a main effect of perspective, such that participants who imagined themselves exercising using the third-person perspective ate significantly less chocolate than those who used the first-person perspective, irrespective of baseline exercise levels. These results suggest that use of third-person perspective visualisation can be used to encourage engagement in multiple behaviours that serve the same broad goal, which may serve as an intervention technique that will be especially helpful for health outcomes with multiple contributing behaviours, such as obesity and overweight. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluating a Nationwide Recreational Football Intervention: Recruitment, Attendance, Adherence, Exercise Intensity, and Health Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fløtum, Liljan av; Ottesen, Laila S.; Krustrup, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated a nationwide exercise intervention with Football Fitness in a small-scale society. In all, 741 adult participants (20–72 yrs) were successfully recruited for Football Fitness training in local football clubs, corresponding to 2.1% of the adult population. A preintervention test battery including resting heart rate (RHR), blood pressure, and body mass measurements along with performance tests (Yo-Yo Intermittent Endurance level 1 (Yo-Yo IE1), the Arrowhead Agility Test, and the Flamingo Balance Test) were performed (n = 502). Training attendance (n = 310) was 1.6 ± 0.2 sessions per week (range: 0.6–2.9), corresponding to 28.8 ± 1.0 sessions during the 18 wk intervention period. After 18 wks mean arterial pressure (MAP) was −2.7 ± 0.7 mmHg lower (P 99 mmHg (−5.6 ± 1.5 mmHg; n = 50). RHR was lowered (P Football Fitness was shown to be a successful health-promoting nationwide training intervention for adult participants with an extraordinary recruitment, a high attendance rate, moderate adherence, high exercise intensity, and marked benefits in cardiovascular health profile and fitness. PMID:27437401

  20. Alterations in energy balance from an exercise intervention with ad libitum food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Katarina; Renaud, Anne; Zurbuchen, Stefanie; Tschopp, Céline; Lehmann, Jan; Malatesta, Davide; Ruch, Nicole; Schutz, Yves; Kayser, Bengt; Mäder, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Better understanding is needed regarding the effects of exercise alone, without any imposed dietary regimens, as a single tool for body-weight regulation. Thus, we evaluated the effects of an 8-week increase in activity energy expenditure (AEE) on ad libitum energy intake (EI), body mass and composition in healthy participants with baseline physical activity levels (PAL) in line with international recommendations. Forty-six male adults (BMI = 19·7-29·3 kg/m(2)) participated in an intervention group, and ten (BMI = 21·0-28·4 kg/m(2)) in a control group. Anthropometric measures, cardiorespiratory fitness, EI, AEE and exercise intensity were recorded at baseline and during the 1st, 5th and 8th intervention weeks, and movement was recorded throughout. Body composition was measured at the beginning and at the end of the study, and resting energy expenditure was measured after the study. The intervention group increased PAL from 1·74 (se 0·03) to 1·93 (se 0·03) (P energy balance. Replication using a longer period (and/or more intense increase in PAL) is needed to investigate if and at what body composition the increase in AEE is met by an equivalent increase in EI.

  1. Evaluating a Nationwide Recreational Football Intervention: Recruitment, Attendance, Adherence, Exercise Intensity, and Health Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fløtum, Liljan Av; Ottesen, Laila S; Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated a nationwide exercise intervention with Football Fitness in a small-scale society. In all, 741 adult participants (20-72 yrs) were successfully recruited for Football Fitness training in local football clubs, corresponding to 2.1% of the adult population. A preintervention test battery including resting heart rate (RHR), blood pressure, and body mass measurements along with performance tests (Yo-Yo Intermittent Endurance level 1 (Yo-Yo IE1), the Arrowhead Agility Test, and the Flamingo Balance Test) were performed (n = 502). Training attendance (n = 310) was 1.6 ± 0.2 sessions per week (range: 0.6-2.9), corresponding to 28.8 ± 1.0 sessions during the 18 wk intervention period. After 18 wks mean arterial pressure (MAP) was -2.7 ± 0.7 mmHg lower (P 99 mmHg (-5.6 ± 1.5 mmHg; n = 50). RHR was lowered (P health-promoting nationwide training intervention for adult participants with an extraordinary recruitment, a high attendance rate, moderate adherence, high exercise intensity, and marked benefits in cardiovascular health profile and fitness.

  2. Screen Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH: process evaluation of a randomised controlled trial intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Foley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Screen Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH trial tested a family intervention to reduce screen-based sedentary behaviour in overweight children. The trial found no significant effect of the intervention on children’s screen-based sedentary behaviour. To explore these null findings, we conducted a pre-planned process evaluation, focussing on intervention delivery and uptake. Methods SWITCH was a randomised controlled trial of a 6-month family intervention to reduce screen time in overweight children aged 9–12 years (n = 251. Community workers met with each child’s primary caregiver to deliver the intervention content. Community workers underwent standard training and were monitored once by a member of the research team to assess intervention delivery. The primary caregiver implemented the intervention with their child, and self-reported intervention use at 3 and 6 months. An exploratory analysis determined whether child outcomes at 6 months varied by primary caregiver use of the intervention. Results Monitoring indicated that community workers delivered all core intervention components to primary caregivers. However, two thirds of primary caregivers reported using any intervention component “sometimes” or less frequently at both time points, suggesting that intervention uptake was poor. Additionally, analyses indicated no effect of primary caregiver intervention use on child outcomes at 6 months, suggesting the intervention itself lacked efficacy. Conclusions Poor uptake, and the efficacy of the intervention itself, may have played a role in the null findings of the SWITCH trial on health behaviour and body composition. Trial registration The trial was registered in the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (no. ACTRN12611000164998 ; registration date: 10/02/2011.

  3. Efficacy of Exercise Interventions in Patients with Acute Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhou

    Full Text Available Decreased physical performance and impaired physiological and psychological fitness have been reported in patients with acute leukemia (AL. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of exercise in patients with AL.In this meta-analysis, the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL and PEDro were searched through November 2015. Three authors participated in the study selection, data extraction and quality assessment. The instrument used for quality assessment was derived from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Analyses were performed according to the recommendations of The Cochrane Collaboration using Review Manager 5.3.Nine trials (8 randomized controlled trials and 1 quasi-experimental design trial with 314 AL participants were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled standardized mean differences between the exercise and control groups were 0.45 (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.09 to 0.80, P value = 0.01, P for heterogeneity = 0.23, I2 = 28% for cardiorespiratory fitness and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.28 to 1.06, P value = 0.0007, P for heterogeneity = 0.14, I2 = 43% for muscle strength. Based on the data for fatigue, anxiety, and depression, there were no significant differences in these parameters between the exercise and control groups.Exercise has beneficial effects on cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength and functional mobility; however, no significant improvements in fatigue, anxiety, depression or quality of life were observed. Further large-scale randomized trials are needed to assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of exercise programs for AL patients.

  4. The characterization of obese polycystic ovary syndrome rat model suitable for exercise intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuyan Wu

    Full Text Available To develop a new polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS rat model suitable for exercise intervention.Thirty six rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups: PCOS rats with high-fat diet (PF, n = 24, PCOS rats with ordinary diet (PO, n = 6, and control rats with ordinary diet (CO, n = 6. Two kinds of PCOS rat model were made by adjustment diet structure and testosterone injection for 28 days. After a successful animal model, PF model rats were randomly assigned to three groups: exercise with a continuation of high-fat diet (PF-EF, n = 6, sedentary with a continuation of high-fat diet (PF-SF, n = 6, exercise with an ordinary diet (PF-EO, n = 6. Fasting blood glucose (FBG and insulin (FINS, estrogen (E2, progesterone (P, and testosterone (T in serum were determined by RIA, and ovarian morphology was evaluated by Image-Pro plus 6.0.Body weight, Lee index, FINS increased significantly in PF rat model. Serum levels of E2 and T were significantly higher in PF and PO than in CO. Ovary organ index and ovarian areas were significant lower in PF than in CO. After intervention for 2 weeks, the levels of 1 h postprandial blood glucose (PBG1, 2 h postprandial blood glucose (PBG2, FINS and the serum levels of T decreased significantly in PF-EF rats and PF-EO rats. The ratio of FBG/FINS was significant higher in PF-EO rats than in PF-SF rats. Ovarian morphology showed that the numbers of preantral follicles and atretic follicles decreased significantly, and the numbers of antral follicles and corpora lutea increased significantly in the rats of PF-EF and PF-EO.By combination of high-fat diet and testosterone injection, the obese PCOS rat model is conformable with the lifestyle habits of fatty foods and insufficient exercise, and has metabolic and reproductive characteristics of human PCOS. This model can be applied to study exercise intervention.

  5. Physical exercise training interventions for children and young adults during and after treatment for childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braam, Katja I; van der Torre, Patrick; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Kaspers, Gertjan J L

    2016-03-31

    A decreased physical fitness has been reported in patients and survivors of childhood cancer. This is influenced by the negative effects of the disease and the treatment of childhood cancer. Exercise training for adult cancer patients has frequently been reported to improve physical fitness. In recent years, literature on this subject has also become available for children and young adults with cancer, both during and after treatment. This is an update of the original review that was performed in 2011. To evaluate the effect of a physical exercise training intervention on the physical fitness (i.e. aerobic capacity, muscle strength, or functional performance) of children with cancer within the first five years from their diagnosis (performed either during or after cancer treatment), compared to a control group of children with cancer who did not receive an exercise intervention.To determine whether physical exercise within the first five years of diagnosis has an effect on fatigue, anxiety, depression, self efficacy, and HRQoL and to determine whether there are any adverse effects of the intervention. We searched the electronic databases of Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PEDro; ongoing trial registries and conference proceedings on 6 September 2011 and 11 November 2014. In addition, we performed a handsearch of reference lists. The review included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and clinical controlled trials (CCTs) that compared the effects of physical exercise training with no training, in people who were within the first five years of their diagnosis of childhood cancer. Two review authors independently identified studies meeting the inclusion criteria, performed the data extraction, and assessed the risk of bias using standardized forms. Study quality was rated by the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Apart from the five studies in the original review, this

  6. Development and validation of exercise target heart rate zones for overweight and obese pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Margie H; Charlesworth, Sarah; Vanderspank, Dana; Sopper, Maggie M; Mottola, Michelle F

    2008-10-01

    Validated target heart rate (THR) zones for exercise prescription for overweight and obese pregnant women have not been developed. The purposes of this study were to determine if heart rate reserve (HRreserve) is best described by aerobic capacity at peak exercise or by aerobic capacity reserve (VO2 reserve) and to develop and validate THR zones for light-intensity exercise (20%-39%VO2 reserve) in sedentary overweight and obese pregnant women. One hundred six women between 16 and 20 weeks gestation with medical clearance performed a progressive treadmill test to volitional fatigue (peak). Data from every 4th subject were used for cross-validation. Two linear regression equations were performed for each subject, then pooled to obtain mean group values (+/- SD): %HRreserve vs. %VO2 peak and %HRreserve vs. %VO2 reserve. THR zones equivalent to 20%-39%VO2 reserve were developed and validated based on the strongest relationship. %HRreserve had a stronger linear relationship with %VO2 reserve (y = 1.046x -7.561; R2 = 0.741) than %VO2 peak (y = 1.259x -28.795; R2 = 0.604). Validated THR ranges for sedentary overweight and obese pregnant women are 102-124 beats.min-1 (20-29 years of age) and 101-120 beats.min-1 (30-39 years of age), representing an exercise intensity of 20%-39%VO2 reserve as recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine for previously sedentary pregnant women. Overweight and obese women who are medically prescreened can exercise during pregnancy within our validated THR zones. The relationship between HR and VO2 remains strong, but the two are not equivalent in this population group.

  7. Interventions targeting mental health self-stigma: A review and comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanos, Philip T; Lucksted, Alicia; Drapalski, Amy L; Roe, David; Lysaker, Paul

    2015-06-01

    With growing awareness of the impact of mental illness self-stigma, interest has arisen in the development of interventions to combat it. The present article briefly reviews and compares interventions targeting self-stigma to clarify the similarities and important differences between the interventions. We conducted a narrative review of published literature on interventions targeting self-stigma. Six intervention approaches (Healthy Self-Concept, Self-Stigma Reduction Program, Ending Self-Stigma, Narrative Enhancement and Cognitive Therapy, Coming Out Proud, and Anti-Stigma Photo-Voice Intervention) were identified and are discussed, and data is reviewed on format, group-leader backgrounds, languages, number of sessions, primary mechanisms of action, and the current state of data on their efficacy. We conclude with a discussion of common elements and important distinctions between the interventions and a consideration of which interventions might be best suited to particular populations or settings. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Interventions Targeting Mental Health Self-Stigma: A Review and Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanos, Philip T.; Lucksted, Alicia; Drapalski, Amy L.; Roe, David; Lysaker, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective With growing awareness of the impact of mental illness self-stigma, interest has arisen in the development of interventions to combat it. The present article briefly reviews and compares interventions targeting self-stigma to clarify the similarities and important differences between the interventions. Methods We conducted a narrative review of published literature on interventions targeting self-stigma. Results Six intervention approaches (Healthy Self-Concept, Self-Stigma Reduction Program, Ending Self-Stigma, Narrative Enhancement and Cognitive Therapy, Coming Out Proud, and Anti-Stigma Photo-Voice Intervention) were identified and are discussed, and data is reviewed on format, group-leader backgrounds, languages, number of sessions, primary mechanisms of action, and the current state of data on their efficacy. Conclusions and Implications for Practice We conclude with a discussion of common elements and important distinctions between the interventions and a consideration of which interventions might be best suited to particular populations or settings. PMID:25313530

  9. Non-Speech Oro-Motor Exercises in Post-Stroke Dysarthria Intervention: A Randomized Feasibility Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, C.; Muir, M.; Allen, C.; Jensen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been little robust evaluation of the outcome of speech and language therapy (SLT) intervention for post-stroke dysarthria. Non-speech oro-motor exercises (NSOMExs) are a common component of dysarthria intervention. A feasibility study was designed and executed, with participants randomized into two groups, in one of which…

  10. The use of exercise interventions to overcome adverse effects of androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergren, Peter Busch; Kistorp, Caroline; Bennedbæk, Finn Noe

    2016-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) induces severe hypogonadism and is associated with several adverse effects that negatively affect health and quality of life in patients with prostate cancer. ADT changes body composition characterized by an increase in fat mass and a reduction in muscle mass...... existing cardiovascular disease. In this initial phase of ADT, metabolic changes are also most prominent. In addition, ADT increases the rate of bone loss and fracture risk. Currently available evidence supports the use of exercise interventions to improve physical function and mitigate ADT-induced fatigue...

  11. Conservative interventions for treating exercise-related musculotendinous, ligamentous and osseous groin pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Matheus O; Silva, Brenda N G; Andriolo, Régis B; Atallah, Alvaro N; Peccin, Maria S

    2013-06-06

    Musculoskeletal, ligamentous and osseous groin injuries are common in athletes and may result in a delay of several months to resume sports. Even then, this may not be at the former level of sport activity. The treatment of exercise-related groin pain is mainly conservative (non-surgical), using interventions such as exercises, electrotherapy, manual therapy and steroid injections. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of conservative interventions for treating exercise-related musculotendinous, ligamentous and osseous groin pain. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (December 2011); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4); MEDLINE (1948 to November week 3 2011); EMBASE (1980 to Week 49 2011); CINAHL (1982 to December 2011); LILACS (1982 to December 2011); PEDro (1929 to December 2011), SPORTDiscus (1985 to December 2011), OTseeker (to December 2011), reference lists of papers and conference proceedings (2000 to 2011). Randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials evaluating conservative interventions for treating exercise-related musculotendinous, ligamentous and osseous groin pain were included. Studies comparing conservative with surgical treatments were excluded. Two review authors independently extracted data and conducted risk of bias assessments. There was no pooling of data. Two studies, involving a total of 122 participants who had experienced adductor-related groin pain for at least two months, were included in this review. All but one of the participants were male athletes aged between 18 and 50 years old. Both studies were assessed as 'high risk of bias' for at least one source of bias domain. The 'successful treatment' outcome reported in both studies was based primarily on pain measures.One study, based on an intention-to-treat analysis, found a significant difference favouring exercise therapy (strengthening with an

  12. Exercise for people with hip or knee osteoarthritis: a comparison of land-based and aquatic interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E Rahmann

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ann E RahmannDivision of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Expert opinion considers the referral of people with osteoarthritis (OA for physiotherapy to be a core component of managing the functional disability and pain of the disease. Clinical guidelines for the physiotherapy management of people with OA focus on three main areas: exercise, pain relief, and specific manual therapy techniques. Land-based group and individual physiotherapy exercise programs, as well as manual therapy, have demonstrated a distinct benefit in favor of physiotherapy intervention. Similarly, both general and specific aquatic physiotherapy exercise programs have shown positive outcomes for people with OA. This review will focus primarily on therapeutic exercise to improve strength and fitness and reduce pain in people with hip or knee OA. An overview of the principles of hydrodynamics relevant to aquatic exercise is also included to facilitate an understanding of effective aquatic exercise programs. The issue of compliance with exercise programs will also be discussed. Clinicians will, therefore, gain an understanding of the benefits of land-based and aquatic exercise for people with OA.Keywords: exercise, physical therapy, aquatic therapy, hip and knee osteoarthritis, strength, pain, aerobic exercise

  13. Narita target heart rate equation underestimates the predicted adequate exercise level in sedentary young boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahkouhian, Marefat; Khodadadi, Davar

    2013-09-01

    Optimal training intensity and the adequate exercise level for physical fitness is one of the most important interests of coaches and sports physiologists. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of the Narita et al target heart rate equation for the adequate exercise training level in sedentary young boys. Forty two sedentary young boys (19.07±1.16 years) undertook a blood lactate transition threshold maximal treadmill test to volitional exhaustion with continuous respiratory gas measurements according to the Craig method. The anaerobic threshold (AT) of the participants then was calculated using the Narita target heart rate equation. Hopkin's spreadsheet to obtain confidence limit and the chance of the true difference between gas measurements and Narita target heart rate equation revealed that the Narita equation most likely underestimates the measured anaerobic threshold in sedentary young boys (168.76±15 vs. 130.08±14.36) (Difference ±90% confidence limit: 38.1±18). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed a poor agreement between the criterion method and Narita equation (ICC= 0.03). According to the results, the Narita equation underestimates the measured AT. It seems that the Narita equation is a good predictor of aerobic not AT which can be investigated in the future studies.

  14. Effects of Short-Term Exercise Interventions on Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms in Patients with Dementia: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleiner, Tim; Leucht, Stefan; Förstl, Hans; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Haussermann, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Observational and interventional studies indicate a direct link between the patients' physical activity and the extent of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). At present, there are no evidence-based recommendations for physical exercise in the acute dementia care settings. Hence, this systematic review investigates the effects of short-term exercise trials on BPSD. Trials with a length up to three months investigating the effects of structured exercise interventions on BPSD in acute dementia care settings were included. Five trials, referring to a total of N = 206 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The trial durations ranged from three up to twelve weeks. All trials conducted three sessions per week of 30 to 45 minutes. Three trials reported significant reductions of BPSD and differences in comparison to the pre-test and control groups. Out of the three trials investigating the effects of exercise interventions on depressive symptoms, one reported significant reduction and two reported no differences in pre-post analysis. Exercise represents a potentially worthwhile approach for the treatment of patients suffering from BPSD. Given the scarcity of available studies, more randomized controlled short-term exercise trials in acute dementia care settings are needed to define appropriate exercise recommendations for clinicians treating these patients.

  15. The effect of an exercise intervention on aerobic fitness, strength and quality of life in children with haemophilia (ACTRN012605000224628

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    Latimer Jane

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with haemophilia have lower levels of fitness and strength than their healthy peers. We present the protocol of a study designed to determine whether an exercise intervention improves quality of life, aerobic fitness and strength in children with haemophilia. Methods/Design The study will be a randomised, assessor-blinded, controlled trial of exercise treatment. Seventy children aged between 6 and 18 years with haemophilia or von Willebrand disease will be recruited from two paediatric haemophilia clinics in NSW. Each participant will be allocated to an exercise group or a control group using a concealed allocation procedure. The control group will receive usual medical care while the intervention group will receive usual medical care plus an exercise program for 12 weeks. Outcomes (VO2peak, knee extensor strength and quality of life will be measured at baseline and on completion of the exercise program by a blinded assessor. The primary analysis will be conducted on an intention to treat basis. The effects of the exercise intervention on each of the three primary outcomes will be estimated from between-group differences in the mean outcome adjusted for baseline scores. Discussion This study will be the first randomised controlled trial to examine the effects of a structured exercise program on fitness and quality of life in children with haemophilia.

  16. Integrative exercise and lifestyle intervention increases leisure-time activity in breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casla, Soraya; Hojman, Pernille; Cubedo, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity has been demonstrated to increase survival in breast cancer patients, but few breast cancer patients meet the general recommendations for physical activity. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate if a supervised integrated counseling and group-based exercise...... with breast cancer who were undergoing or had recently completed anticancer treatment completed the study. Leisure-time physical activity, grip strength, functional capacity, quality of life (QoL), and depression were assessed at baseline, after intervention, and at the 12-week follow-up after intervention....... RESULTS: The breast cancer patients increased their leisure-time physical activity (P = .004), global strength (P = .004), functional capacity (P = .001), and QoL (P = .009), and their depression score (P = .004) significantly decreased. These improvements were independent of whether the patients were...

  17. Effect of a multimodal high intensity exercise intervention in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Quist, Morten; Andersen, Christina

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a multimodal group exercise intervention, as an adjunct to conventional care, on fatigue, physical capacity, general wellbeing, physical activity, and quality of life in patients with cancer who were undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment for advanced...... outcome, fatigue, of -6.6 points (95% confidence interval -12.3 to -0.9, P=0.02; effect size=0.33, 0.04 to 0.61). Significant effects were seen on vitality (effect size 0.55, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.82), physical functioning (0.37, 0.09 to 0.65), role physical (0.37, 0.10 to 0.64), role emotional (0.32, 0...... disease. The intervention reduced fatigue and improved vitality, aerobic capacity, muscular strength, and physical and functional activity, and emotional wellbeing, but not quality of life. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled trials ISRCTN05322922....

  18. Cost-effectiveness of a pragmatic exercise intervention for women with breast cancer: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Louisa G; DiSipio, Tracey; Battistutta, Diana; Yates, Patsy; Bashford, John; Pyke, Chris; Eakin, Elizabeth; Hayes, Sandra C

    2017-05-01

    To report on the cost-effectiveness of the Exercise for Health trial, comparing an exercise intervention with usual care during and following treatment for women with breast cancer. Women with breast cancer were randomized to an 8-month exercise intervention (involving regular contact with an exercise physiologist over the phone, n = 67, or home delivered face to face, n = 67) or usual care (n = 60) group and were assessed pre-intervention (5 weeks post-surgery), mid-intervention (6 months post-surgery), and 10 weeks post-intervention (12 months post-surgery). The benefit measures were "number of improvers" in quality of life (FACT-B+4) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Data on provider, patient, and government costs were used to consider 2 cost scenarios: (1) a service provider model and (2) a private model. There were 69 improvers in the intervention group compared with 21 in the usual care group (odds ratio 2.09, 95% confidence interval 1.08, 4.01; P = .033). The incremental cost per improver was A$2282 to A$2644. Quality-adjusted life years gain for the intervention group versus the usual care group was 0.009, with incremental cost per QALY gain for models 1 and 2 being A$105 231 and A$90 842, respectively. However, sensitivity analyses indicate that incremental cost per QALY gained was volatile to EuroQol-5D-3L weights. Findings suggest that a pragmatic exercise intervention yields more women with markedly improved quality of life after breast cancer than usual care and may be cost-effective. The results are less certain in terms of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life years; however, this may be an inappropriate measure for reflecting exercise benefit for women with breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Exercise intervention to prevent falls and enhance mobility in community dwellers after stroke: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker Ruth N

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the most common disabling neurological condition in adults. Falls and poor mobility are major contributors to stroke-related disability. Falls are more frequent and more likely to result in injury among stroke survivors than among the general older population. Currently there is good evidence that exercise can enhance mobility after stroke, yet ongoing exercise programs for general community-based stroke survivors are not routinely available. This randomised controlled trial will investigate whether exercise can reduce fall rates and increase mobility and physical activity levels in stroke survivors. Methods and design Three hundred and fifty community dwelling stroke survivors will be recruited. Participants will have no medical contradictions to exercise and be cognitively and physically able to complete the assessments and exercise program. After the completion of the pre-test assessment, participants will be randomly allocated to one of two intervention groups. Both intervention groups will participate in weekly group-based exercises and a home program for twelve months. In the lower limb intervention group, individualised programs of weight-bearing balance and strengthening exercises will be prescribed. The upper limb/cognition group will receive exercises aimed at management and improvement of function of the affected upper limb and cognition carried out in the seated position. The primary outcome measures will be falls (measured with 12 month calendars and mobility. Secondary outcome measures will be risk of falling, physical activity levels, community participation, quality of life, health service utilisation, upper limb function and cognition. Discussion This study aims to establish and evaluate community-based sustainable exercise programs for stroke survivors. We will determine the effects of the exercise programs in preventing falls and enhancing mobility among people following stroke. This program, if

  20. [Effects of exercise intervention on physical fitness and health-relalted quality of life in hemodialysis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eun-Joung; Kim, Hee-Seung

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of stretching, muscle strengthening, and walking exercise on the cardiopulmonary function and health-related quality of life in hemodialysis patients. Twenty-one patients in the intervention and the control group participated in the exercise respectively on maintenance hemodialysis at four university hospitals. The exercise was composed of 20 to 60 min per session, 3 sessions a week for 12 weeks. The effect of exercise was assessed by cardiopulmonary function (peak oxygen uptake, peak ventilation, peak respiration rate, maximal heart rate, and exercise duration) using a cycle ergometer. Grip strength was measured by dynamometer, and flexibility was measured by sit and reach measuring instrument. Health-related quality of life was measured using Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36. Peak oxygen uptake, peak ventilation, peak respiration rate, exercise duration, grip strength, flexibility, and physical component scale were significantly improved in the intervention group after 12 week's exercise compared to the control group. These findings indicate the exercise can improve cardiopulmonary function, grip strength, flexibility, and physical component scale of health-related quality of life in hemodialysis patients.

  1. Effects of a Short Physical Exercise Intervention on Patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Kerling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this prospective randomized controlled trial was to investigate if a short-term endurance or combined endurance/resistance exercise program was sufficient to improve aerobic capacity and maximum force in adult patients (18–65 years with multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods: All patients performed a three-month exercise program consisting of two training sessions per week, lasting 40 min each, with moderate intensity. All patients had a maximum value of 6 (low to moderate disability on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS. One group (combined workout group (CWG; 15 females, 4 males completed a combined endurance/resistance workout (20 min on a bicycle ergometer, followed by 20 min of resistance training, while the other group (endurance workout group (EWG; 13 females, 5 males completed a 40 min endurance training program. Aerobic capacity was assessed as peak oxygen uptake, ventilatory anaerobic threshold, and workload expressed as Watts. Maximum force of knee and shoulder extensors and flexors was measured using isokinetic testing. Quality of life was assessed with the SF-36 questionnaire, and fatigue was measured using the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale. Results: Both training groups increased in aerobic capacity and maximum force. EWG, as well as CWG, showed improvement in several subscales of the SF-36 questionnaire and decrease of their fatigue. Conclusion: A short exercise intervention increased both aerobic capacity and maximum force independent of whether endurance or combined endurance/resistance workouts were performed.

  2. Evaluating a Nationwide Recreational Football Intervention: Recruitment, Attendance, Adherence, Exercise Intensity, and Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liljan av Fløtum

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated a nationwide exercise intervention with Football Fitness in a small-scale society. In all, 741 adult participants (20–72 yrs were successfully recruited for Football Fitness training in local football clubs, corresponding to 2.1% of the adult population. A preintervention test battery including resting heart rate (RHR, blood pressure, and body mass measurements along with performance tests (Yo-Yo Intermittent Endurance level 1 (Yo-Yo IE1, the Arrowhead Agility Test, and the Flamingo Balance Test were performed (n=502. Training attendance (n=310 was 1.6 ± 0.2 sessions per week (range: 0.6–2.9, corresponding to 28.8 ± 1.0 sessions during the 18 wk intervention period. After 18 wks mean arterial pressure (MAP was −2.7 ± 0.7 mmHg lower (P99 mmHg (−5.6 ± 1.5 mmHg; n=50. RHR was lowered (P<0.05 by 6 bpm after intervention (77 ± 1 to 71 ± 1 bpm. Yo-Yo IE1 performance increased by 41% (540 ± 27 to 752 ± 45 m, while agility and postural balance were improved (P<0.05 by ~6 and ~45%, respectively. In conclusion, Football Fitness was shown to be a successful health-promoting nationwide training intervention for adult participants with an extraordinary recruitment, a high attendance rate, moderate adherence, high exercise intensity, and marked benefits in cardiovascular health profile and fitness.

  3. An Intervention Study Targeting Nutritional Intake in Worksite Cafeterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Michael R.; Tappe, Karyn A.; Butryn, Meghan L.; Annunziato, Rachel A.; Coletta, Maria C.; Ochner, Christopher N.; Rolls, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Modifying the food environment is a promising strategy for promoting healthier eating behavior. This study aimed to evaluate nutritional and weight changes in a program that used worksite cafeterias to reduce employees’ calorie content of purchased foods and improve their macronutrient intake. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: 1) only environmental change (i.e., the introduction of 10 new low-energy-density (ED) foods and provision of labels for all foods sold at lunch, which listed ED, calories, and macronutrient content) or 2) the environmental change plus pricing incentives for purchasing low-ED foods and education about low-ED eating delivered in four, 1-hour group sessions. Participant lunch choices were monitored electronically at the point of purchase for 3 months before the intervention was instituted (i.e., the baseline period) and for 3 months afterward (i.e., intervention period). Participants were adults (n = 96, BMI = 29.7 ± 6.0 kg/m2) who regularly ate lunch at their workplace cafeteria. There was no difference between groups in total energy intake over the study period. Across groups, energy and percent of energy from fat decreased and percent of energy from carbohydrate increased from baseline to the intervention period (all p <. 01). Follow-up analyses, conducted by averaging Baseline Months 1 and 2 and comparing them to Intervention Month 3 as a conservative estimate of overall impact of the intervention, indicated that change in energy, carbohydrate, and fat intake remained significant (p < .001). Providing nutrition labels and reducing the ED of selected foods was associated with improved dietary intake. PMID:20434060

  4. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Kent, Peter; Mjøsund, Hanne L; Petersen, Ditte HD

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted) treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in o...

  5. Attitudes of older adults in a group-based exercise program towards a blended intervention; a focus-group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Mehra

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is associated with a decline in daily functioning and mobility. A physically active life and physical exercise can minimize the decline of daily functioning and improve the physical-, psychological- and social functioning of older adults. Despite several advantages of group-based exercise programs, older adults participating in such interventions often do not meet the frequency, intensity or duration of exercises needed to gain health benefits. An exercise program that combines the advantages of group-based exercises led by an instructor with tailored home-based exercises can increase the effectiveness. Technology can assist in delivering a personalized program. The aim of the study was to determine the susceptibility of older adults currently participating in a nationwide group-based exercise program to such a blended exercise program. Eight focus-groups were held with adults of 55 years of age or older. Two researchers coded independently the remarks of the 30 participants that were included in the analysis according to the three key concepts of the Self Determination Theory: autonomy, competence and relatedness. The results show that maintaining self-reliance and keeping in touch with others were the main motives to participate in the weekly group-based exercises. Participants recognized benefits of doing additional home-based exercises, but had concerns regarding guidance, safety and motivation. Furthermore, some participants strongly rejected the idea to use technology to support them in doing exercises at home, but the majority was open to it. Insights are discussed how these findings can help design novel interventions that can increase the wellbeing of older adults and preserve an independent living.

  6. Using targeted active-learning exercises and diagnostic question clusters to improve students' understanding of carbon cycling in ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskiewicz, April Cordero; Griscom, Heather Peckham; Welch, Nicole Turrill

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used targeted active-learning activities to help students improve their ways of reasoning about carbon flow in ecosystems. The results of a validated ecology conceptual inventory (diagnostic question clusters [DQCs]) provided us with information about students' understanding of and reasoning about transformation of inorganic and organic carbon-containing compounds in biological systems. These results helped us identify specific active-learning exercises that would be responsive to students' existing knowledge. The effects of the active-learning interventions were then examined through analysis of students' pre- and postinstruction responses on the DQCs. The biology and non-biology majors participating in this study attended a range of institutions and the instructors varied in their use of active learning; one lecture-only comparison class was included. Changes in pre- to postinstruction scores on the DQCs showed that an instructor's teaching method had a highly significant effect on student reasoning following course instruction, especially for questions pertaining to cellular-level, carbon-transforming processes. We conclude that using targeted in-class activities had a beneficial effect on student learning regardless of major or class size, and argue that using diagnostic questions to identify effective learning activities is a valuable strategy for promoting learning, as gains from lecture-only classes were minimal.

  7. Examining a Stage-Based Intervention and Predictors of Exercise Behavior among Iranian Sedentary Adolescents

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    Zeinab Ghiami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of an intervention based on Transtheoretical Model on exercise behavior and examined TTM constructs as predictors of stages of change among Iranian adolescents. Fifty-six sedentary adolescents completed an assessment at baseline, 2 months, and 4 months. Repeated measures ANOVA and logistic regression were used to analyze the data. The analysis showed a statistically significant difference in the mean scores on stages of change for the experimental group. Thus, students in the experiment group significantly improved their stages compared to the baseline. Furthermore, stages of change were found to correlate with TTM constructs, and self-efficacy was shown to be a strong predictor of stages of change. This study indicated that a stage-based intervention using TTM constructs could effectively improve adolescents’ intention to engage in physical activity. Moreover, the level of physical activity in adolescent can be improved by increasing their self-efficacy to exercise. Keywords: Physical Activity; Stage of Change; Processes of Change; Decisional Balance; Self-efficacy; Transtheoretical Model

  8. Revisiting rose: comparing the benefits and costs of population-wide and targeted interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Jennifer; Jones, Matthew R; Bakshis, Erin; Galea, Sandro

    2008-12-01

    Geoffrey Rose's two principal approaches to public health intervention are (1) targeted strategies focusing on individuals at a personal increased risk of disease and (2) population-wide approaches focusing on the whole population. Beyond his discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches, there is no empiric work examining the conditions under which one of these approaches may be better than the other. This article uses mathematical simulations to model the benefits and costs of the two approaches, varying the cut points for treatment, effect magnitudes, and costs of the interventions. These techniques then were applied to the specific example of an intervention on blood pressure to reduce cardiovascular disease. In the general simulation (using an inverse logit risk curve), lower costs of intervention, treating people with risk factor values at or above where the slope on the risk curve is at its steepest (for targeted interventions), and interventions with larger effects on reducing the risk factor (for population-wide interventions) provided benefit/cost advantages. In the specific blood pressure intervention example, lower-cost population-wide interventions had better benefit/cost ratios, but some targeted treatments with lower cutoffs prevented more absolute cases of disease. These simulations empirically evaluate some of Rose's original arguments. They can be replicated for particular interventions being considered and may be useful in helping public health decision makers assess potential intervention strategies.

  9. Active exercise interventions improve gross motor function of ambulant/semi-ambulant children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutterbuck, Georgina; Auld, Megan; Johnston, Leanne

    2018-01-05

    Evaluate effectiveness of active exercise interventions for improving gross motor activity/participation of school-aged, ambulant/semi-ambulant children with cerebral palsy (CP). A systematic review was conducted following PRISMA guidelines. Five databases were searched for papers including school-aged children with CP, participating in active, exercise interventions with gross motor outcomes measured at the Activity/Participation level. Interventions with previous systematic reviews were excluded (e.g. hippotherapy). Evidence Level and conduct were examined by two raters. Seven interventions (34 studies) met criteria. All studies reported on gross motor function, however, a limited number investigated participation outcomes. Strong positive evidence was available for Gross Motor Activity Training (n= 6, Evidence Level II-IV), and Gross Motor Activity Training with progressive resistance exercise plus additional physiotherapy (n = 3, all Evidence Level II). Moderate positive evidence exists for Gross Motor Activity Training plus additional physiotherapy (n = 2, all Evidence Level II) and Physical Fitness Training (n = 4, Evidence Level II-V). Weak positive evidence was available for Modified Sport (n = 3, Evidence Level IV-V) and Non-Immersive Virtual Reality (n = 12, Evidence Level II-V). There was strong evidence against Gross Motor Activity Training plus progressive resistance exercise without additional physiotherapy (n = 4, all Evidence Level II). Active, performance-focused exercise with variable practice opportunities improves gross motor function in ambulant/semi-ambulant children with CP. Implications for rehabilitation Active exercise interventions improve gross motor function of ambulant/semi-ambulant children with cerebral palsy. Gross Motor Activity Training is the most common and effective intervention. Practice variability is essential to improve gross motor function. Participation was rarely measured and requires further

  10. Development of an exercise intervention as part of rehabilitation in a glioblastoma multiforme survivor during irradiation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders; Søgaard, Karen; Minet, Lisbeth Rosenbek

    2018-01-01

    completed a supervised six-week exercise intervention during irradiation treatment beginning 42 d after resection. Exercise modalities of cardiorespiratory, resistance, and balance training were designed on generic recommendations of various cancer populations and literature review. RESULTS: Our case......INTRODUCTION: This case report describes the rationale and development of an exercise intervention in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM ) and discusses potential relations of observed effects in functional performance and quality of life (QOL). METHODS: A 54-year-old GBM survivor...... attended all possible sessions without experiencing adverse effects, and improved in aerobe power (24%), muscle strength (0-38%), standing balance (71%), walking ability (9%), and QOL domains of "Global Health Status/QoL" and "Physical functioning." CONCLUSIONS: Based on this single case, exercise...

  11. Effect of exercise interventions on perceived fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis: synthesis of meta-analytic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Reza; Van der Linden, Marietta L; Mercer, Tom H

    2017-06-01

    Although exercise training has been advocated as a nonpharmacological treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) related fatigue, no consensus exists regarding its effectiveness. To address this, we collated meta-analytic reviews that explored the effectiveness of exercise training for the treatment of MS-related fatigue. We searched five online databases for relevant reviews, published since 2005, and identified 172 records. Five reviews were retained for systematic extraction of information and evidence quality analysis. Although our review synthesis indicated that exercise training interventions have a moderate effect on fatigue reduction in people with MS, no clear insight was obtained regarding the relative effectiveness of specific types or modes of exercise intervention. Moreover, Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation revealed that the overall quality of evidence emanating from these five reviews was 'very low'.

  12. Effect of “add-on” interventions on exercise training in individuals with COPD: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Camillo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to identify the effectiveness of therapies added on to conventional exercise training to maximise exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Electronic databases were searched, identifying trials comparing exercise training with exercise training plus “add-on” therapy. Outcomes included peak oxygen uptake (V′O2peak, work rate and incremental/endurance cycle and field walking tests. Individual trial effects on exercise capacity were extracted and collated into eight subgroups and pooled for meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to explore the stability of effect estimates across studies employing patient-centred designs and those deemed to be of “high” quality (PEDro score >5 out of 10. 74 studies (2506 subjects met review inclusion criteria. Interventions spanned a broad scope of clinical practice and were most commonly evaluated via the 6-min walking distance and V′O2peak. Meta-analysis revealed few clinically relevant and statistically significant benefits of “add-on” therapies on exercise performance compared with exercise training. Benefits favouring “add-on” therapies were observed across six different interventions (additional exercise training, noninvasive ventilation, bronchodilator therapy, growth hormone, vitamin D and nutritional supplementation. The sensitivity analyses included considerably fewer studies, but revealed minimal differences to the primary analysis. The lack of systematic benefits of “add-on” interventions is a probable reflection of methodological limitations, such as “one size fits all” eligibility criteria, that are inherent in many of the included studies of “add-on” therapies. Future clarification regarding the exact value of such therapies may only arise from adequately powered, multicentre clinical trials of tailored interventions for carefully selected COPD patient subgroups defined according to distinct

  13. Testing the effectiveness of a self-efficacy based exercise intervention for inactive people with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijden, Marion M P; Pouwer, Francois; Romeijnders, Arnold C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sufficient exercise is important for people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), as it can prevent future health problems. Despite, it is estimated that only 30-40% of people with T2DM are sufficiently active. One of the psychosocial constructs that is believed to influence physical...... activity behaviour, is exercise self-efficacy. The goal of this study is to evaluate a patient-tailored exercise intervention for people with T2DM that takes exercise self-efficacy into account. METHODS/DESIGN: This study is conducted as a non-randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients are eligible...... when they are diagnosed with T2DM, exercise less than advised in the ADA guideline of 150 min/week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity, have an BMI >25 and are between 18 and 80 years old. Recruitment takes place at a Primary care organization of general practitioners and practice nurses...

  14. High-intensity interval training (HIT) for effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Matthew; Weston, Kathryn L; Prentis, James M; Snowden, Chris P

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of perioperative medicine is leading to greater diversity in development of pre-surgical interventions, implemented to reduce patient surgical risk and enhance post-surgical recovery. Of these interventions, the prescription of pre-operative exercise training is gathering momentum as a realistic means for enhancing patient surgical outcome. Indeed, the general benefits of exercise training have the potential to pre-operatively optimise several pre-surgical risks factors, including cardiorespiratory function, frailty and cognitive function. Any exercise programme incorporated into the pre-operative pathway of care needs to be effective and time efficient in that any fitness gains are achievable in the limited period between the decision for surgery and operation (e.g. 4 weeks). Fortunately, there is a large volume of research describing effective and time-efficient exercise training programmes within the discipline of sports science. Accordingly, the objective of our commentary is to synthesise contemporary exercise training research, both from non-clinical and clinical populations, with the overarching aim of informing the development of effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise training programmes. The development of such exercise training programmes requires the careful consideration of several key principles, namely frequency, intensity, time, type and progression of exercise. Therefore, in light of more recent evidence demonstrating the effectiveness and time efficiency of high-intensity interval training-which involves brief bouts of intense exercise interspersed with longer recovery periods-the principles of exercise training programme design will be discussed mainly in the context of such high-intensity interval training programmes. Other issues pertinent to the development, implementation and evaluation of pre-operative exercise training programmes, such as individual exercise prescription, training session monitoring and potential

  15. Screening and brief intervention targeting risky drinkers in Danish general practice - a pragmatic controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beich, A.; Gannik, D.; Saelan, H.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Recommendations for routine alcohol screening and brief counselling intervention in primary health care rest on results from intervention efficacy studies. By conducting a pragmatic controlled trial (PCT), we aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of the WHO recommendations for screening......-14 months. Outcome measures focused on patients' acceptance of screening and intervention and their self-reported alcohol consumption. RESULTS: Patient acceptance of screening and intervention -10.3% (N = 794) of the target population (N = 7, 691) explicitly refused screening. All intervention group...

  16. A TARGET FOR INTERVENTION IN PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM INFECTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKENZIE, F. ELLIS; BOSSERT, WILLIAM H.

    2008-01-01

    We present a set of simple mathematical models to investigate interactions between malaria parasites and the human immune system and the differentiation of parasites from asexual, pathogenic into sexual, transmissible blood stages. Each model represents a different combination of empirically based hypotheses, and salient behaviors of each fit criteria developed from clinical data. In all models, however, higher gametocyte conversion rates result in lower peak asexual-form densities. Therefore, to the extent that asexual-form densities are associated with disease symptoms, interventions that stimulate gametocytogenesis should produce unexpected clinical benefits. PMID:9660460

  17. Intervention Integrity in the Low Countries: Interventions Targeting Social-Emotional Behaviors in the School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, Margot; Ekels, Elles; van der Valk, Cindel; van der Molen, Maurits

    2017-01-01

    The current study presents a review of intervention studies conducted in the Low Countries (i.e., The Netherlands and Flanders) focusing on social-emotional behaviors in the school. The primary purpose of this review was to assess whether studies included an operational definition of the intervention under study and reported data on the…

  18. Why do individuals not lose more weight from an exercise intervention at a defined dose? An energy balance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D M; Bouchard, C; Church, T; Slentz, C; Kraus, W E; Redman, L M; Martin, C K; Silva, A M; Vossen, M; Westerterp, K; Heymsfield, S B

    2012-10-01

    Weight loss resulting from an exercise intervention tends to be lower than predicted. Modest weight loss can arise from an increase in energy intake, physiological reductions in resting energy expenditure, an increase in lean tissue or a decrease in non-exercise activity. Lower than expected, weight loss could also arise from weak and invalidated assumptions within predictive models. To investigate these causes, we systematically reviewed studies that monitored compliance to exercise prescriptions and measured exercise-induced change in body composition. Changed body energy stores were calculated to determine the deficit between total daily energy intake and energy expenditures. This information combined with available measurements was used to critically evaluate explanations for low exercise-induced weight loss. We conclude that the small magnitude of weight loss observed from the majority of evaluated exercise interventions is primarily due to low doses of prescribed exercise energy expenditures compounded by a concomitant increase in caloric intake. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  19. Exercise interventions to reduce fall-related fractures and their risk factors in individuals with low bone density: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kam, D; Smulders, E; Weerdesteyn, V; Smits-Engelsman, B C M

    2009-12-01

    Exercise can reduce falls and fall-related fractures in healthy individuals; however, evidence for individuals with low BMD is limited. The results from this systematic review indicate that exercise interventions for individuals with low BMD to reduce falls and fractures should include balance, muscle strengthening, and weight-bearing exercises. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate which exercise interventions are effective in individuals with low bone mineral density (BMD; osteopenia or osteoporosis) in reducing (1) falls and fractures and (2) risk factors for falls and fractures. Databases were searched for relevant studies between 1996 and June 2008. Methodological quality was assessed with the Jadad score and the PEDro scale. Of the 1,369 publications found, 23 met the inclusion criteria. Five additional articles were included after checking reference lists and searching author's names and related articles. Interventions with balance exercises reduced falls or fall-related fractures and improved balance in the majority of the studies. Muscle strengthening exercises were effective in improving lower extremity strength and back extensor strength; however, not all RCT's reported positive effects. Bone strength was improved by weight-bearing aerobic exercise with or without muscle strengthening exercise when the duration of the intervention was at least a year. Exercise can reduce falls, fall-related fractures, and several risk factors for falls in individuals with low BMD. Exercise interventions for patients with osteoporosis should include weight-bearing activities, balance exercise, and strengthening exercises to reduce fall and fracture risk.

  20. Technology strategy for cost-effective drilling and intervention; Technology Target Areas; TTA4 - Cost effective drilling and intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-07-01

    The main goals of the OG21 initiative are to (1) develop new technology and knowledge to increase the value creation of Norwegian oil and gas resources and (2) enhance the export of Norwegian oil and gas technology. The OG21 Cost-effective Drilling and Intervention (CEDI) Technology Target Area (TTA) has identified some key strategic drilling and well intervention needs to help meet the goals of OG21. These key strategic drilling and well intervention needs are based on a review of present and anticipated future offshore-Norway drilling and well intervention conditions and the Norwegian drilling and well intervention industry. A gap analysis has been performed to assess the extent to which current drilling and well intervention research and development and other activities will meet the key strategic needs. Based on the identified strategic drilling and well intervention needs and the current industry res each and development and other activities, the most important technology areas for meeting the OG21 goals are: environment-friendly and low-cost exploration wells; low-cost methods for well intervention/sidetracks; faster and extended-reach drilling; deep water drilling, completion and intervention; offshore automated drilling; subsea and sub-ice drilling; drilling through basalt and tight carbonates; drilling and completion in salt formation. More specific goals for each area: reduce cost of exploration wells by 50%; reduce cost for well intervention/sidetracks by 50%; increase drilling efficiency by 40%; reduce drilling cost in deep water by 40 %; enable offshore automated drilling before 2012; enable automated drilling from seabed in 2020. Particular focus should be placed on developing new technology for low-cost exploration wells to stem the downward trends in the number of exploration wells drilled and the volume of discovered resources. The CEDI TTA has the following additional recommendations: The perceived gaps in addressing the key strategic drilling and

  1. Guided imagery targeting exercise, food cravings, and stress: a multi-modal randomized feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbi, Peter; Long, Dustin; Nolan, Richard; Shawley, Samantha; Johnson, Kelsey; Misra, Ranjita

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this randomized wait-list controlled trial was to test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a guided imagery based multi-behavior intervention intended to address psychological stress, food cravings, and physical activity. Personalized guided imagery scripts were created and participants were instructed to practice guided imagery every day for 35 consecutive days. Of 48 women who enrolled, we report comparisons between 16 randomized to treatment with 19 who were wait-listed (overall Mage = 45.50; Mbodymassindex = 31.43). Study completers reported 89% compliance with practicing guided imagery during the intervention. A significant time-by-group interaction was observed with reductions in food cravings and increases in physical activity compared with wait-list controls. Telephone-based multi-behavior interventions that utilize guided imagery to address food cravings and exercise behavior appear to be acceptable for overweight and obese women. Future phone-based guided imagery research testing this skill to address multiple health behaviors is justified.

  2. Effects of a psychosocial intervention programme combined with exercise in community-dwelling older adults with chronic pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirase, T; Kataoka, H; Nakano, J; Inokuchi, S; Sakamoto, J; Okita, M

    2017-11-21

    Although researchers have recommended exercise training and psychosocial intervention to manage chronic pain, an effective intervention for Japanese community-dwelling older adults with chronic pain has not been established. This randomized controlled trial examined whether exercise training combined with psychosocial intervention more effectively improves pain, psychological status and physical activity than does exercise training alone in this population. We randomized 128 older adults with chronic pain to either an intervention group (n = 64) involving exercise training combined with psychosocial intervention, or a control group (n = 64) involving only exercise training. Exercise training comprised weekly 60-min sessions for 12 weeks. Psychosocial intervention involved changing participants' focus on pain using self-management education and cognitive behavioural therapy, and participants recorded their daily pain intensity and step counts. Pain intensity, psychological status and physical activity were assessed before and 12 weeks after the intervention. A time-by-group interaction emerged for psychological status (p = 0.003) and physical activity (p psychosocial intervention improves key outcome indicators more effectively than does exercise training alone in older adults with chronic pain. Although research has shown that combined exercise and psychosocial intervention is optimal for managing chronic pain, our study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to test a specific intervention of this type in community-dwelling older adults with chronic pain in Japan. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  3. The Limerick Reading Initiative: A Reading Intervention Targeted at Struggling Readers in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Diarmuid; Olshtroon, Aoife; O'Halloran, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In this study we examined the effectiveness of a reading intervention targeting a group of 24 struggling readers in ten primary schools in Ireland. The intervention consisted of two components; component one consisted of 15-20 minutes delivery of the Toe-by-Toe programme (a well established systematic synthetic phonics programme) and the second…

  4. Using the Instructional Level as a Criterion to Target Reading Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David C.; Burns, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    The instructional hierarchy offers a useful framework for targeting academic interventions. Within this framework, the accuracy with which a student reads might function as an indicator that the student should receive an intervention that focuses either on accuracy or on fluency. The current study examined whether the instructional level for…

  5. An Evaluation of Six Brief Interventions that Target Drug-Related Problems in Correctional Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, George W.; Knight, Kevin; Simpson, D. Dwayne; Flynn, Patrick M.; Morey, Janis T.; Bartholomew, Norma G.; Tindall, Michele Staton; Burdon, William M.; Hall, Elizabeth A.; Martin, Steve S.; O'Connell, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Finding brief effective treatments for criminal justice populations is a major public need. The CJ-DATS Targeted Intervention for Corrections (TIC), which consists of six brief interventions (communication, anger, motivation, criminal thinking, social networks, and HIV/sexual health), was tested in separate federally-funded randomized control…

  6. Evaluation design for a complex intervention program targeting loneliness in non-institutionalized elderly Dutch people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaming, de R.; Haveman-Nies, A.; Veer, van 't P.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The aim of this paper is to provide the rationale for an evaluation design for a complex intervention program targeting loneliness among non-institutionalized elderly people in a Dutch community. Complex public health interventions characteristically use the combined approach of

  7. Psychostimulant and Sensory Stimulation Interventions That Target the Reading and Math Deficits of Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentall, Sydney S.; Tom-Wright, Kinsey; Lee, Jiyeon

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this review of students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was to summarize the following: (1) academic deficits in math and reading, (2) possible theoretical contributors to these deficits, and (3) psychostimulant interventions that target math and reading, as well as, parallel interventions involving…

  8. Effects of 12 months aerobic exercise intervention on work ability, need for recovery, productivity and rating of exertion among cleaners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Mark; Søgaard, Karen; Krustrup, Peter

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study assessed the effects of a worksite aerobic exercise intervention among cleaners on: work ability, need for recovery, productivity, and rating of exertion. METHODS: In a monocentric randomised controlled trial in Denmark, 116, of 250 invited, cleaners were cluster-randomised (w......PURPOSE: This study assessed the effects of a worksite aerobic exercise intervention among cleaners on: work ability, need for recovery, productivity, and rating of exertion. METHODS: In a monocentric randomised controlled trial in Denmark, 116, of 250 invited, cleaners were cluster...

  9. Targeting specific interstitial glycemic parameters with high-intensity interval exercise and fasted-state exercise in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Tasuku; Wilson, Ben J; Myette-Cόté, Etienne; Kuzik, Nicholas; Bell, Gordon J; McCargar, Linda J; Boulé, Normand G

    2016-05-01

    To compare the acute glycemic responses to a bout of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and energy-matched moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE) performed under fasted and postprandial conditions. A randomized, controlled, crossover design was used. Ten individuals with type 2 diabetes were each tested in five experimental conditions after an overnight fast: 1) fasted-state HIIE (HIIEfast); 2) post-breakfast HIIE (HIIEfed); 3) fasted-state MICE (MICEfast); 4) post-breakfast MICE (MICEfed); and 5) no exercise (control). MICE was performed at workload corresponding to 55% of V.V̇O2peak, whereas HIIE was composed of repetitions of three minutes at workload corresponding to 40% followed by one minute at workload corresponding to 100% V.V̇̇O2peak. Interstitial glucose was monitored by continuous glucose monitoring over 24h under standardized diet and medication. Fasted-state exercise attenuated postprandial glycemic increments (pbreakfast exercise did. HIIE reduced nocturnal and fasting glycemia on the day following exercise more than MICE did (main effect: both pbreakfast exercise does. Performing HIIE under fasted condition may be most advantageous as it lowered most aspects of glycemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Eliminating multiple pregnancies: an appropriate target for government intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleicher, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    The manuscript in this issue of the journal by Bissonette et al. reports on a new government-sponsored intervention into the practice of IVF within the province of Quebec, Canada, which in the authors' opinion highly successfully reduced twinning rates, while maintaining overall acceptable pregnancy rates. Given the opportunity to comment, their manuscript, in my opinion, only reemphasizes why, despite wide professional support, the concept of single embryo transfer (SET) is: (i) damaging to most infertility patients by reducing pregnancy chances; (ii) does so without compensatory benefits; (iii) impinges on patients' rights to self-determination; (iv) has significant negative impact on IVF-generated birth rates; and (v) thus, demonstrating, once more, that governments should not interfere with the patient-physician relationships. Copyright © 2011 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Preventing substance use and disordered eating: initial outcomes of the ATHENA (athletes targeting healthy exercise and nutrition alternatives) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Diane L; Goldberg, Linn; Moe, Esther L; Defrancesco, Carol A; Durham, Melissa B; Hix-Small, Hollie

    2004-11-01

    To implement and to assess the efficacy of a school-based, sport team-centered program to prevent young female high school athletes' disordered eating and body-shaping drug use. Prospective controlled trial in 18 high schools, with balanced random assignment by school to the intervention and usual-care control conditions. We enrolled 928 students from 40 participating sport teams. Mean age was 15.4 years, 92.2% were white, and follow-up retention was 72%. The ATHENA (Athletes Targeting Healthy Exercise and Nutrition Alternative) curriculum's 8 weekly 45-minute sessions were incorporated into a team's usual practice activities. Content was gender-specific, peer-led, and explicitly scripted. Topics included healthy sport nutrition, effective exercise training, drug use and other unhealthy behaviors' effects on sport performance, media images of females, and depression prevention. We assessed participants by confidential questionnaire prior to and following their sport season. We determined program effects using an analysis of covariance-based approach within the Generalized Estimating Equation framework. Experimental athletes reported significantly less ongoing and new use of diet pills and less new use of athletic-enhancing substances (amphetamines, anabolic steroids, and sport supplements) (Pdiet pills (P<.05), vomiting to lose weight (P<.05), and use of tobacco (P<.05) and muscle-building supplements (P<.005). The program's curriculum components were altered appropriately (controlling mood [P<.005], refusal skills [P = .05], belief in the media [P<.005], and perceptions of closest friends' body-shaping drug use [P<.001]). Sport teams are effective natural vehicles for gender-specific, peer-led curricula to promote healthy lifestyles and to deter disordered eating, athletic-enhancing substance use, and other health-harming behaviors.

  12. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF INTERVENTIONS TARGETING PATERNAL MENTAL HEALTH IN THE PERINATAL PERIOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominov, Holly; Pilkington, Pamela D; Giallo, Rebecca; Whelan, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Interventions targeting parents' mental health in the perinatal period are critical due to potential consequences of perinatal mental illness for the parent, the infant, and their family. To date, most programs have targeted mothers. This systematic review explores the current status and evidence for intervention programs aiming to prevent or treat paternal mental illness in the perinatal period. Electronic databases were systematically searched to identify peer-reviewed studies that described an intervention targeting fathers' mental health in the perinatal period. Mental health outcomes included depression, anxiety, and stress as well as more general measures of psychological functioning. Eleven studies were identified. Three of five psychosocial interventions and three massage-technique interventions reported significant effects. None of the couple-based interventions reported significant effects. A number of methodological limitations were identified, including inadequate reporting of study designs, and issues with the timing of interventions. The variability in outcomes measures across the studies made it difficult to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the interventions. Father-focused interventions aimed at preventing perinatal mood problems will be improved if future studies utilize more rigorous research strategies. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  13. Exercise for people with hip or knee osteoarthritis: a comparison of land-based and aquatic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmann, Ann E

    2010-07-23

    Expert opinion considers the referral of people with osteoarthritis (OA) for physiotherapy to be a core component of managing the functional disability and pain of the disease. Clinical guidelines for the physiotherapy management of people with OA focus on three main areas: exercise, pain relief, and specific manual therapy techniques. Land-based group and individual physiotherapy exercise programs, as well as manual therapy, have demonstrated a distinct benefit in favor of physiotherapy intervention. Similarly, both general and specific aquatic physiotherapy exercise programs have shown positive outcomes for people with OA. This review will focus primarily on therapeutic exercise to improve strength and fitness and reduce pain in people with hip or knee OA. An overview of the principles of hydrodynamics relevant to aquatic exercise is also included to facilitate an understanding of effective aquatic exercise programs. The issue of compliance with exercise programs will also be discussed. Clinicians will, therefore, gain an understanding of the benefits of land-based and aquatic exercise for people with OA.

  14. Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it can lead to weakness of muscles, decreased bone density with an increased risk of fracture, and shallow, inefficient breathing. An exercise program needs to fit the capabilities and limitations ...

  15. [Impact of strength training exercise on secondary prevention of childhood obesity; an intervention within the school system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Fabián; Díaz, Erik; Lera, Lydia; Meza, Jorge; Salas, Isabel; Rojas, Pamela; Atalah, Eduardo; Burrows, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    The physical exercise is an important therapeutic tool to prevent and treat obesity, as well as reducing metabolic alterations and the risk of non-communicable diseases. To evaluate the impact of a strength training exercise intervention within the school system, this includes muscular strength exercise, dietary education and psychological support in obese children. We worked with 120 obese schoolchildren, between 8 and 13 years, recruited from 3 schools. Group 1 (n = 60) participated in the intervention, which included physical exercise, dietary education, and psychological support, for 3 months. Group 2 (n = 60) received only the educational intervention and psychological support for the first 3 months, and then received the exercise intervention from months 3 to 6. Participants were evaluated for BMI, waist circumference, body fat, presence of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors. At 3 months, there were significant differences between the groups for change in BMI z-score, waist circumference, and body fat as well as prevalence of metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and fasting hyperglycemia. In group 1, these parameters decreased and increased, in group 2. From months 3 to 6, Group 2 showed a significant decrease in abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, and hypertriglyceridemia, while Group 1 showed a significant increase in high blood pressure and no change in other cardiovascular risk factors. This study demonstrates the positive impact of a strength training physical exercise program on reduction of body fat, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors. This study supports the use of exercise as a treatment for obesity and its comorbidities in schoolchildren. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Gait Biomechanics and Patient-Reported Function as Predictors of Response to a Hip Strengthening Exercise Intervention in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: e0139923

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dylan Kobsar; Sean T Osis; Blayne A Hettinga; Reed Ferber

    2015-01-01

    ...). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use pre-intervention gait kinematics and patient-reported outcome measures to predict post-intervention response to a 6-week hip strengthening exercise...

  17. Gait Biomechanics and Patient-Reported Function as Predictors of Response to a Hip Strengthening Exercise Intervention in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobsar, Dylan; Osis, Sean T; Hettinga, Blayne A; Ferber, Reed

    2015-01-01

    ...). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use pre-intervention gait kinematics and patient-reported outcome measures to predict post-intervention response to a 6-week hip strengthening exercise...

  18. Targeting Premalignant Lesions - Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0032 TITLE: Targeting Premalignant Lesions - Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention PRINCIPAL...Mar 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Premalignant Lesions - Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and...12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Breast cancer

  19. Enhancing both motor and cognitive functioning in Parkinson's disease: Aerobic exercise as a rehabilitative intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, C; Lungu, O; Nadeau, A; Robillard, M E; Boré, A; Bobeuf, F; Lafontaine, A L; Gheysen, F; Bherer, L; Doyon, J

    2015-10-01

    Aerobic exercise training (AET) has been shown to provide health benefits in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it is yet unknown to what extent AET also improves cognitive and procedural learning capacities, which ensure an optimal daily functioning. In the current study, we assessed the effects of a 3-month AET program on executive functions (EF), implicit motor sequence learning (MSL) capacity, as well as on different health-related outcome indicators. Twenty healthy controls (HC) and 19 early PD individuals participated in a supervised, high-intensity, stationary recumbent bike-training program (3 times/week for 12 weeks). Exercise prescription started at 20 min (+5 min/week up to 40 min) based on participant's maximal aerobic power. Before and after AET, EF tests assessed participants' inhibition and flexibility functions, whereas implicit MSL capacity was evaluated using a version of the Serial Reaction Time Task. The AET program was effective as indicated by significant improvement in aerobic capacity in all participants. Most importantly, AET improved inhibition but not flexibility, and motor learning skill, in both groups. Our results suggest that AET can be a valuable non-pharmacological intervention to promote physical fitness in early PD, but also better cognitive and procedural functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The ECG component of Thallium-201 exercise testing impacts on cardiac intervention rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deague, J.; Salehi, N.; Grigg, L.; Lichtenstein, M.; Better, N. [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC (Australia). Departments of Nuclear Medicine and Cardiology

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Thallium exercise testing (Tlex) offers superior sensitivity and specificity to exercise electrocardiography (ECG), but the value of the ECG data in Tlex remains poorly studied. While a normal Tlex is associated with an excellent prognosis, patients with a positive Tlex have a higher cardiac event rate. We aimed to see if a negative ECG Component of the Tlex (ECGTl) was associated with an improved outcome compared with a positive ECGTl, in those patients with a reversible Tlex defect. We followed 100 consecutive patients retrospectively with a reversible defect on Tlex (50 with negative and 50 with positive ECGTI) for 12 months. The ECG was reviewed as positive (1mm ST depression 0.08 seconds after J point or >2mm if on digoxin or prior ECG changes), negative, equivocal or uninterpretable. We excluded patients with pharmacological testing, and those with equivocal or uninterpretable ECGs. End-points included angiography, cardiac interventions and cardiac event rate (CER) incorporating unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction, and cardiac death. In conclusion 24% of patients with reversible defects on Tlex who had a negative ECGTI still proceeded to PTCA or CABG. Those with a positive ECGTI had a higher incidence of angiography and cardiac revascularisation, but this difference was only evident in patients with mild to moderate reversibility

  1. Sleep, Dietary, and Exercise Behavioral Clusters Among Truck Drivers With Obesity: Implications for Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ryan; Thompson, Sharon V; Wipfli, Brad; Hanson, Ginger; Elliot, Diane L; Anger, W Kent; Bodner, Todd; Hammer, Leslie B; Hohn, Elliot; Perrin, Nancy A

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of the study were to describe a sample of truck drivers, identify clusters of drivers with similar patterns in behaviors affecting energy balance (sleep, diet, and exercise), and test for cluster differences in health safety, and psychosocial factors. Participants' (n = 452, body mass index M = 37.2, 86.4% male) self-reported behaviors were dichotomized prior to hierarchical cluster analysis, which identified groups with similar behavior covariation. Cluster differences were tested with generalized estimating equations. Five behavioral clusters were identified that differed significantly in age, smoking status, diabetes prevalence, lost work days, stress, and social support, but not in body mass index. Cluster 2, characterized by the best sleep quality, had significantly lower lost workdays and stress than other clusters. Weight management interventions for drivers should explicitly address sleep, and may be maximally effective after establishing socially supportive work environments that reduce stress exposures.

  2. Self-reported physical activity behavior of breast cancer survivors during and after adjuvant therapy: 12 months follow-up of two randomized exercise intervention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martina E; Wiskemann, Joachim; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Steindorf, Karen

    2017-04-01

    Exercise during and after breast cancer treatment has shown several health benefits. However, little is known about the courses, patterns, and determinants of physical activity of breast cancer patients, and the role of exercise interventions on their physical activity behavior in the long run. Self-reported physical activity was assessed in 227 breast cancer survivors before, during, and three, six, and 12 months post-intervention within two randomized resistance exercise trials performed during adjuvant chemo- or radiotherapy, respectively, with similar designs. Multiple ordinal logistic regression analyses were performed to identify determinants of physical activity at these time points. While the intervention group exercised a median 1.8 h/week during adjuvant therapy (interquartile range 1.4-2.5), 68% of controls did not engage in any exercise. At 12-months follow-up 32% of patients did not engage in any exercise irrespective of the intervention. Of the patients who cycled for transportation pre-diagnosis about half stopped cycling in the long term in both groups. In contrast, walking was maintained over time. Major determinants of low levels of exercise at 12-months follow-up were low pre-diagnosis levels of exercise, lower education, being postmenopausal, and having breast problems or depressive symptoms. Further, the intervention appeared to influence the type of sports performed, with strength exercise being the most common type of exercise at follow-up in the exercise group, more frequently compared to the control group. The exercise intervention effectively countervailed the decrease in physical activity during cancer therapy and boosted strength exercise in the months following the intervention, but in the longer term many survivors were insufficiently active. Breast cancer survivors may need continued motivation and practical support tailored to their individual characteristics and physical activity history to incorporate exercise in everyday routine

  3. Physical Exercise for Late-Life Depression: Customizing an Intervention for Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetidou, Stamatula; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Menchetti, Marco; Toni, Giulio; Asioli, Fabrizio; Bagnoli, Luigi; Zocchi, Donato; Siena, Matteo; Assirelli, Barbara; Luciano, Claudia; Masotti, Mattia; Spezia, Carlo; Magagnoli, Monica; Neri, Mirco; Amore, Mario; Bertakis, Klea D

    2017-02-01

    To identify which individual- and context-related factors influence the translation into clinical practice of interventions based on physical exercise (PE) as an adjunct to antidepressants (AD) for the treatment of late-life major depression (LLMD). Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. Primary care with psychiatric consultation-liaison programs (PCLPs)-organizational protocols that regulate the clinical management of individuals with psychiatric disorders. Individuals aged 65 and older with major depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (N = 121). Participants with LLMD were randomized to AD (sertraline) or AD plus PE (AD + PE). Participant characteristics that were associated with greater effectiveness of AD + PE (moderators) were identified, and effect sizes were calculated from success rate differences. Whether the characteristics of the study setting influenced participant flow and attendance at exercise sessions was then explored, and primary care physicians (PCPs) were surveyed regarding their opinions on PE as a treatment for LLMD. The following participant characteristics were associated with greater likelihood of achieving remission from depression with AD + PE than with AD alone: aged 75 and older (effect size 0.32), polypharmacy (0.35), greater aerobic capacity (0.48), displaying psychomotor slowing (0.49), and less-severe anxiety (0.30). The longer the PCLP had been established at a particular center, the more individuals were recruited at that center. After participating in the study, PCPs expressed positive views on AD + PE as a treatment for LLMD and were more likely to use this as a therapeutic strategy. The combination of PE and sertraline could improve the management of LLMD, especially when customized for individuals with specific clinical features. Liaison programs might influence the implementation of similar interventions in primary care, and PCPs viewed them positively

  4. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Mjøsund, Hanne L; Petersen, Ditte H D

    2010-01-01

    A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted) treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient...... outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP....

  5. Translation of a tailored nutrition and resistance exercise intervention for elderly people to a real-life setting: adaptation process and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Ellen Ji; Leerlooijer, Joanne N; Steijns, Jan M; Tieland, Michael; de Groot, Lisette Cpgm; Haveman-Nies, Annemien

    2017-01-18

    Combining increased dietary protein intake and resistance exercise training for elderly people is a promising strategy to prevent or counteract the loss of muscle mass and decrease the risk of disabilities. Using findings from controlled interventions in a real-life setting requires adaptations to the intervention and working procedures of healthcare professionals (HCPs). The aim of this study is to adapt an efficacious intervention for elderly people to a real-life setting (phase one) and test the feasibility and potential impact of this prototype intervention in practice in a pilot study (phase two). The Intervention Mapping approach was used to guide the adaptation in phase one. Qualitative data were collected from the original researchers, target group, and HCPs, and information was used to decide whether and how specified intervention elements needed to be adapted. In phase two, a one-group pre-test post-test pilot study was conducted (n = 25 community-dwelling elderly), to elicit further improvements to the prototype intervention. The evaluation included participant questionnaires and measurements at baseline (T0) and follow-up (T1), registration forms, interviews, and focus group discussions (T1). Qualitative data for both phases were analysed using an inductive approach. Outcome measures included physical functioning, strength, body composition, and dietary intake. Change in outcomes was assessed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. The most important adaptations to the original intervention were the design of HCP training and extending the original protein supplementation with a broader nutrition programme aimed at increasing protein intake, facilitated by a dietician. Although the prototype intervention was appreciated by participants and professionals, and perceived applicable for implementation, the pilot study process evaluation resulted in further adaptations, mostly concerning recruitment, training session guidance, and the nutrition programme

  6. A prospective 2-site parallel intervention trial of a research-based film to increase exercise amongst older hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Pia; Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Miller, Karen-Lee; Brooks, Dina; Colobong, Romeo; Parsons, Trisha; Jassal, Sarbjit Vanita; Thomas, Alison; Binns, Malcolm; Naglie, Gary

    2017-01-26

    Evidence suggests that exercise training for hemodialysis patients positively improves morbidity and mortality outcomes, yet exercise programs remain rare and are not systematically incorporated into care. We developed a research-based film, Fit for Dialysis, designed to introduce, motivate, and sustain exercise for wellness amongst older hemodialysis patients, and exercise counseling and support by nephrologists, nurses, and family caregivers. The objective of this clinical trial is to determine whether and in what ways Fit for Dialysis improves outcomes and influences knowledge/attitudes regarding the importance of exercise for wellness in the context of end-stage renal disease. This 2-site parallel intervention trial will recruit 60 older hemodialysis patients from two urban hospitals. The trial will compare the film + a 16-week exercise program in one hospital, with a 16-week exercise-only program in another hospital. Physical fitness and activity measures will be performed at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks, and 12 weeks after the end of the program. These include the 2-min Walk Test, Grip Strength, Duke Activity Status Index, and the Timed Up-and-Go Test, as well as wearing a pedometer for one week. Throughout the 16-week exercise program, and at 12 weeks after, we will record patients' exercise using the Godin Leisure-time Exercise Questionnaire. Patients will also keep a diary of the exercise that they do at home on non-dialysis days. Qualitative interviews, conducted at baseline, 8, and 16 weeks, will explore the impact of Fit for Dialysis on the knowledge/attitudes of patients, family caregivers, and nephrology staff regarding exercise for wellness, and in what ways the film is effective in educating, motivating, or sustaining patient exercise during dialysis, at home, and in the community. This research will determine for whom Fit for Dialysis is effective, why, and under what conditions. If Fit for Dialysis is proven beneficial to patients, nephrology

  7. Effects of Exercise Intervention on Vascular Risk Factors in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Uemura

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this study is to clarify the effects of exercise intervention on vascular risk factors in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Methods: Community-dwelling older adults who met the definition of MCI using the Petersen criteria (n = 100; mean age = 75.3 years were randomly allocated to the exercise (n = 50 or education control group (n = 50. Participants in the exercise group exercised under the supervision of physiotherapists for 90 min/day, 2 days/week, 80 times for 12 months. Anthropometric profiles, blood markers, blood pressure, and physical fitness (the 6-min walking test were measured. Total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and TC/HDL-C risk ratio measurements were taken from blood samples. Results: The exercise group showed significantly reduced TC and TC/HDL-C risk ratio after training compared with baseline levels (p Conclusion: Exercise intervention was associated with positive changes in important vascular risk factors related to cognitive decline and vascular disease in older adults with MCI.

  8. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri G. Homan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02 and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003. The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy.

  9. Land- and water-based exercise intervention in women with fibromyalgia: The al-Andalus physical activity randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Ruiz, Jonatan R.; Aparicio, Virginia A.; Ortega, Francisco B.; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Álvarez-Gallardo, I. C.; Segura-Jiménez, V.; Camiletti-Moirán, D.; Romero, A.; Estévez-López, F.; Samos, B.; Casimiro, A. J.; Sierra, Á.; Latorre Román, P. A.; Pulido-Martos, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The al-Andalus physical activity intervention study is a randomised control trial to investigate the effectiveness of a land- and water-based exercise intervention for reducing the overall impact of fibromyalgia (primary outcome), and for improving tenderness and pain-related measures, body composition, functional capacity, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, fatigue, sleep quality, health-related quality of life, and cognitive function (secondary outcomes) in w...

  10. [Impact of exercise on the body composition and aerobic capacity of elderly with obesity through three models of intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Jose Antonio; Del Valle, Miguel; Nistal, Paloma; Méndez, David; Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto

    2014-12-17

    The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of aerobic exercise on body composition and aerobic capacity of a sample of older, sedentary adults with obesity rates by three different models of intervention (recommendation, prescription at home and monitoring). A total of 76 older adults with a mean age 67.1+/-1.2 years, sedentary, with a BMI> 30 kg/ m2 were randomized in to four groups: Control (CON) recommendation (REC), prescription home (PRES) and monitoring in a sports center (MON). The same program of aerobic exercise for groups of home and sports center for 24 weeks, 3 days a week was developed. It was determined before and after the intervention BMI, Waist- Hip-index (ICC), the% fat ( Σ folds) and aerobic capacity (T6M) throughout the sample. MON and PRES groups showed significant improvements in the ICC, Σ folds and T 6M variables, not the case in BMI. However the MON group presented significant differences from group PRES between-group analysis (p exercise programs in adults with obesity methodology. However the exercise prescription at home since early intervention is an important approach for people with physical and/ or psychological reasons such as obesity cannot access the sports centers to participate in activities led by a monitor. Unknowns of aerobic exercise are cleared in the home that are of great impact for social policies regarding the health of the elderly population. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of sleep complaints and depression outcomes among participants in the standard medical intervention and long-term exercise study of exercise and pharmacotherapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Kory; Smith, Patrick J; Sherwood, Andrew; Hoffman, Benson; Carney, Robert M; Freedland, Kenneth; Craighead, W Edward; Blumenthal, James A

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise and sertraline on disordered sleep in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods The Standard Medical Intervention and Long-term Exercise study randomized the patients with MDD (n = 202) to one of four arms: a) supervised exercise, b) home-based exercise, c) sertraline therapy, and d) placebo pill. Sleep disturbance was assessed with three sleep-related items from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) before and after 4 months of treatment. The patients were followed for 12 months to assess the prognostic value of sleep disturbance on MDD relapse and recovery.Results Comparison of the active treatment and placebo groups showed no treatment differences in HAM-D sleep complaints after 4 months (p = 0.758). However, residual insomnia symptoms after treatment were strongly associated with elevated depressive symptoms assessed by the HAM-D after 4 months (β = 0.342, p exercise nor sertraline was associated with greater improvements in sleep disturbance compared with the placebo controls. However, residual symptoms of insomnia after successful treatment of MDD predicted relapse, highlighting the clinical importance of addressing insomnia in patients with MDD.

  12. Comparing interventions and exploring neural mechanisms of exercise in Parkinson disease: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earhart, Gammon M; Duncan, Ryan P; Huang, John L; Perlmutter, Joel S; Pickett, Kristen A

    2015-02-05

    Effective treatment of locomotor dysfunction in Parkinson disease (PD) is essential, as gait difficulty is an early and major contributor to disability. Exercise is recommended as an adjunct to traditional treatments for improving gait, balance, and quality of life. Among the exercise approaches known to improve walking, tango and treadmill training have recently emerged as two promising therapies for improving gait, disease severity and quality of life, yet these two interventions have not been directly compared to each other. Prior studies have been helpful in identifying interventions effective in improving gait function, but have done little to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying functional improvements. The primary objective of the proposed work is to compare the effects of three community-based exercise programs, tango, treadmill training and stretching, on locomotor function in individuals with PD. In addition, we aim to determine whether and how these interventions alter functional connectivity of locomotor control networks in the brain. One hundred and twenty right-handed individuals with idiopathic PD who are at least 30 years of age will be assigned in successive waves to one of three community-based exercise groups: tango dancing, treadmill training or stretching (control). Each group will receive three months of exercise training with twice weekly one-hour group classes. Each participant will be evaluated at three time points: pre-intervention (baseline), post-intervention (3 months), and follow-up (6 months). All evaluations will include assessment of gait, balance, disease severity, and quality of life. Baseline and post-intervention evaluations will also include task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting state functional connectivity MRI. All MRI and behavioral measures will be conducted with participants OFF anti-Parkinson medication, with behavioral measures also assessed ON medication. This study will provide

  13. Tailoring exercise interventions to comorbidities and treatment-induced adverse effects in patients with early stage breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy: a framework to support clinical decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leeden, Marike; Huijsmans, Rosalie J.; Geleijn, Edwin; de Rooij, Mariëtte; Konings, Inge R.; Buffart, Laurien M.; Dekker, Joost; Stuiver, Martijn M.

    2018-01-01

    Delivery of exercise interventions to patients with early-stage breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy requires complex clinical decisions. The purpose of this study was to develop a framework to support clinical decisions for tailoring exercise interventions to common comorbidities and cancer

  14. The effectiveness of simple psychological and exercise interventions for high prevalence mental health problems in young people: a factorial randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moller Bridget

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of mental illness in young people is the highest of any age group, with the onset of depression, anxiety and substance use peaking between 18 and 24 years. Effective treatments that target sub-threshold or mild to moderate levels of disorder in young people are required to reduce the risk of persistence and recurrence. The aims of this study are to evaluate whether treatments that are less intensive than cognitive-behaviour therapy, such as problem solving therapy and exercise treatments, are acceptable and effective in managing depression and anxiety symptoms in young people and to identify possible attributes in those who are likely to respond to these treatments. Methods/design This is a factorial randomised controlled trial conducted at a large, metropolitan youth mental health service. Participants are young help-seekers aged 15-25 years with sub-threshold or mild to moderate levels of depression and anxiety (with or without comorbid substance use. The interventions comprise 4 treatment combinations delivered by psychologists over 6 sessions on a weekly basis: a psychological intervention (problem solving therapy versus supportive counselling and an exercise intervention (behavioural exercise versus psychoeducation. Structured assessments occur at baseline, mid-point, end-point (6 weeks and at a 6- and 12-month follow-up. The primary outcomes are depression and anxiety symptoms as measured by the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories. Secondary outcomes include remission (defined as no longer meeting the diagnostic criteria for a disorder if threshold level was reached at baseline, or no longer scoring in the clinical range on scale scores if sub-threshold at baseline, substance use, and functioning. Discussion The effectiveness of less complex psychological and exercise interventions in young help-seekers with sub-threshold or mild to moderate presentations of high prevalence disorders is yet to be

  15. The effectiveness of simple psychological and exercise interventions for high prevalence mental health problems in young people: a factorial randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alexandra G; Hetrick, Sarah E; Jorm, Anthony F; Yung, Alison R; McGorry, Patrick D; Mackinnon, Andrew; Moller, Bridget; Purcell, Rosemary

    2011-03-13

    The prevalence of mental illness in young people is the highest of any age group, with the onset of depression, anxiety and substance use peaking between 18 and 24 years. Effective treatments that target sub-threshold or mild to moderate levels of disorder in young people are required to reduce the risk of persistence and recurrence. The aims of this study are to evaluate whether treatments that are less intensive than cognitive-behaviour therapy, such as problem solving therapy and exercise treatments, are acceptable and effective in managing depression and anxiety symptoms in young people and to identify possible attributes in those who are likely to respond to these treatments. This is a factorial randomised controlled trial conducted at a large, metropolitan youth mental health service. Participants are young help-seekers aged 15-25 years with sub-threshold or mild to moderate levels of depression and anxiety (with or without comorbid substance use). The interventions comprise 4 treatment combinations delivered by psychologists over 6 sessions on a weekly basis: a psychological intervention (problem solving therapy versus supportive counselling) and an exercise intervention (behavioural exercise versus psychoeducation). Structured assessments occur at baseline, mid-point, end-point (6 weeks) and at a 6- and 12-month follow-up. The primary outcomes are depression and anxiety symptoms as measured by the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories. Secondary outcomes include remission (defined as no longer meeting the diagnostic criteria for a disorder if threshold level was reached at baseline, or no longer scoring in the clinical range on scale scores if sub-threshold at baseline), substance use, and functioning. The effectiveness of less complex psychological and exercise interventions in young help-seekers with sub-threshold or mild to moderate presentations of high prevalence disorders is yet to be explored. This study has been designed to examine the

  16. Effects of Short-Term Exercise Interventions on Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms in Patients with Dementia : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleiner, Tim; Leucht, Stefan; Förstl, Hans; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Haussermann, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Observational and interventional studies indicate a direct link between the patients' physical activity and the extent of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). At present, there are no evidence-based recommendations for physical exercise in the acute dementia care settings.

  17. Physical Exercise and Cancer-Related Fatigue in Hospitalized Patients: Role of the Clinical Nurse Leader in Implementation of Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Katrina

    2016-02-01

    Guidelines suggest that aerobic endurance training and moderate resistance training lessen the effects of cancer-related fatigue (CRF). However, specifics regarding frequency, intensity, and type of physical activity required to alleviate fatigue are less specific. In addition, outcomes of these interventions during the initial stages of active treatment are not well documented. The purpose of this article is to review the current evidence-based literature regarding the effects of physical exercise on CRF and the role that the clinical nurse leader (CNL) can play in implementing interventions to address CRF and promote physical exercise to improve patient outcomes. A literature review of the effect of physical exercise on CRF was conducted using the CINAHL®, PubMed, and Google Scholar databases. As leaders in health care, CNLs have the knowledge and skill to take an active role in managing CRF and to develop evidence-based interventions to address fatigue in this patient population. Interventions may include creating and evaluating individualized exercise plans for inpatients with cancer and/or developing educational programs for the inpatient setting that may be continued after discharge and during outpatient treatment.

  18. The effects of a power-assisted exercise intervention on alertness in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Marleen D.; Bossink, Leontien W.M.; van der Putten, Annette A.J.

    2017-01-01

    One of the benefits of physical activity in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is an increase in alertness. This study investigated the effect of a power-assisted exercise intervention on alertness and the relationship of this effect to the level of additional motor

  19. Physical Exercise with Multicomponent Cognitive Intervention for Older Adults with Alzheimer's Disease: A 6-Month Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ji Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study aimed to investigate the effect of 6-month physical exercise with a multicomponent cognitive program (MCP on the cognitive function of older adults with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD. Methods: We included 33 participants with AD in a 6-month randomized controlled trial. The intervention group participated in physical exercise and received a MCP. The control group received only the MCP. Before and after the intervention, cognitive outcomes were assessed using the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-cog, Mini-Mental State Examination, and the Clock Drawing Test. Physical performance was evaluated by exercise time, the number of pedal rotation, total load, grip strength, and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS. Results: In all cognitive measures, there were no significant improvements between the two groups after 6 months in the baseline value-adjusted primary analysis. However, the ADAS-cog score was significantly lower between the two groups in secondary analysis adjusted for baseline value, age, sex, and education years. All physical outcomes were significantly higher in the intervention group except for total load compared with baseline measurements. Conclusion: This study indicates that it is possible to improve cognitive function in older adults with moderate to severe AD through 6-month physical exercise with a multicomponent cognitive intervention.

  20. Rationale for combined exercise and cognition-focused interventions to improve functional independence in people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Jeanette M; Clare, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that exercise and some cognition-focused intervention approaches can be used to elicit functional improvements in older people and, to some degree, those diagnosed with dementia. Independently, the two intervention types have been found to improve functional performance in people with dementia. The mechanisms underpinning these improvements come from comparable and diverse pathways. This suggests that it may be beneficial for the two intervention types to be coupled as part of regular care in individuals with a range of cognitive impairments. The aims of this review are threefold. The first aim is to present evidence to support the use for combining exercise and cognition-focused interventions. This will be achieved by reviewing the mechanisms of both approaches in improving functional performance in older people and in people with dementia and summarising recent progress. The increased risk of depression, falls and cardiovascular disease risk in people with dementia will also be highlighted. The second aim is to discuss the parameters of the two approaches that should be considered when combining them in terms of possible efficient models, especially in relation to exercise protocols as this is where the current literature shows the most promising outcomes. Maximisation of the efficacy of preventative and treatment interventions which focus on both cognitive functioning and physical health should lead to improving and extending functional independence. Key aspects of any combined intervention would involve the inclusion of both cardiovascular and other types of exercises, including falls reduction, and exercises addressing memory and executive function via goal setting in the real-life context. The third aim is to explore some of the issues that may arise when attempting to incorporate interventions into the regular treatment of people with dementia. Consideration must also be given to caregivers and the education of health professionals as well

  1. Evaluating the effectiveness of a self-management exercise intervention on wound healing, functional ability and health-related quality of life outcomes in adults with venous leg ulcers: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jane; Finlayson, Kathleen; Kerr, Graham; Edwards, Helen

    2017-02-01

    Exercise that targets ankle joint mobility may lead to improvement in calf muscle pump function and subsequent healing. The objectives of this research were to assess the impact of an exercise intervention in addition to routine evidence-based care on the healing rates, functional ability and health-related quality of life for adults with venous leg ulcers (VLUs). This study included 63 patients with VLUs. Patients were randomised to receive either a 12-week exercise intervention with a telephone coaching component or usual care plus telephone calls at the same timepoints. The primary outcome evaluated the effectiveness of the intervention in relation to wound healing. The secondary outcomes evaluated physical activity, functional ability and health-related quality of life measures between groups at the end of the 12 weeks. A per protocol analysis complemented the effectiveness (intention-to-treat) analysis to highlight the importance of adherence to an exercise intervention. Intention-to-treat analyses for the primary outcome showed 77% of those in the intervention group healed by 12 weeks compared to 53% of those in the usual care group. Although this difference was not statistically significant due to a smaller than expected sample size, a 24% difference in healing rates could be considered clinically significant. The per protocol analysis for wound healing, however, showed that those in the intervention group who adhered to the exercise protocol 75% or more of the time were significantly more likely to heal and showed higher rates for wound healing than the control group (P = 0·01), that is, 95% of those who adhered in the intervention group healed in 12 weeks. The secondary outcomes of physical activity, functional ability and health-related quality of life were not significantly altered by the intervention. Among the secondary outcomes (physical activity, functional ability and health-related quality of life), intention-to-treat analyses did not support the

  2. The Effects of a Self-Efficacy Intervention on Exercise Behavior of Fitness Club Members in 52 Weeks and Long-Term Relationships of Transtheoretical Model Constructs

    OpenAIRE

    Middelkamp, P.J.C.; van Rooijen, M.; Wolfhagen, P.; Steenbergen, B.

    2017-01-01

    The transtheoretical model of behavior change (TTM) is often used to understand changes in health-related behavior, like exercise. Exercise behavior in fitness clubs is an understudied topic, but preliminary studies showed low frequencies and large numbers of drop-out. An initial 12-week self-efficacy intervention reported significant effects on exercise behavior. The objective of this follow up study is testing effects on exercise behavior over 52 weeks and the long-term relationships of all...

  3. Testing a mobile mindful eating intervention targeting craving-related eating: feasibility and proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Ashley E; Jhaveri, Kinnari; Cohn, Michael; Brewer, Judson A

    2017-09-16

    Theoretically driven smartphone-delivered behavioral interventions that target mechanisms underlying eating behavior are lacking. In this study, we administered a 28-day self-paced smartphone-delivered intervention rooted in an operant conditioning theoretical framework that targets craving-related eating using mindful eating practices. At pre-intervention and 1-month post-intervention, we assessed food cravings among adult overweight or obese women (N = 104; M age = 46.2 ± 14.1 years; M BMI = 31.5 ± 4.5) using ecological momentary assessment via text message (SMS), self-reported eating behavior (e.g., trait food craving), and in-person weight. Seventy-eight participants (75.0%) completed the intervention within 7 months ('all completers'), and of these, 64 completed the intervention within 3 months ('timely completers'). Participants experienced significant reductions in craving-related eating (40.21% reduction; p mindful eating training targeting craving-related eating may (1) target behavior that impacts a relative metabolic pathway, and (2) represent a low-burden and highly disseminable method to reduce problematic overeating among overweight individuals. ClinicalTrials.gov registration: NCT02694731.

  4. Improving Student Outcomes in Higher Education: The Science of Targeted Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harackiewicz, Judith M; Priniski, Stacy J

    2017-09-20

    Many theoretically based interventions have been developed over the past two decades to improve educational outcomes in higher education. Based in social-psychological and motivation theories, well-crafted interventions have proven remarkably effective because they target specific educational problems and the processes that underlie them. In this review, we evaluate the current state of the literature on targeted interventions in higher education with an eye to emerging theoretical and conceptual questions about intervention science. We review three types of interventions, which focus on the value students perceive in academic tasks, their framing of academic challenges, and their personal values, respectively. We consider interventions that (a) target academic outcomes (e.g., grades, major or career plans, course taking, retention) in higher education, as well as the pipeline to college, and (b) have been evaluated in at least two studies. Finally, we discuss implications for intervention science moving forward. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Psychology Volume 69 is January 4, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  5. Curative and health enhancement effects of aquatic exercise: evidence based on interventional studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Takuya; Kamioka, Hiroharu

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to report on the health benefits and curative effects of aquatic exercise. Methods We adopted the results of high-grade study designs (ie, randomized controlled trials and nonrandomized controlled trials), for which there were many studies on aquatic exercise. Aquatic exercise, in this study, means walking in all directions, stretching, and various exercises and conditioning performed with the feet grounded on the floor of a swimming pool. We excluded swimming. We decided to treat aquatic exercise, underwater exercise, hydrotherapy, and pool exercise as all having the same meaning. Results Aquatic exercise had significant effects on pain relief and related outcome measurements for locomotor diseases. Conclusion Patients may become more active, and improve their quality of life, as a result of aquatic exercise. PMID:24198584

  6. Curative and health enhancement effects of aquatic exercise: evidence based on interventional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Takuya; Kamioka, Hiroharu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report on the health benefits and curative effects of aquatic exercise. We adopted the results of high-grade study designs (ie, randomized controlled trials and nonrandomized controlled trials), for which there were many studies on aquatic exercise. Aquatic exercise, in this study, means walking in all directions, stretching, and various exercises and conditioning performed with the feet grounded on the floor of a swimming pool. We excluded swimming. We decided to treat aquatic exercise, underwater exercise, hydrotherapy, and pool exercise as all having the same meaning. Aquatic exercise had significant effects on pain relief and related outcome measurements for locomotor diseases. Patients may become more active, and improve their quality of life, as a result of aquatic exercise.

  7. Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; thor Straten, Eivind Per

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors and a greater than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Improved immunological control of tumor progression may have important clinical implications in the prevention...... and treatment of cancer in humans....

  8. Effects of insulin and exercise training on FGF21, its receptors and target genes in obesity and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Kruse; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Vind, Birgitte F

    2017-01-01

    that insulin and exercise increase FGF21 in plasma. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are potentially FGF21-resistant states, but to what extent FGF21 responses to insulin and exercise training are preserved, and whether FGF21, its receptors and target genes are altered, remains to be established. METHODS...... was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). RESULTS: Insulin increased serum and muscle FGF21 independent of overweight/obesity or type 2 diabetes, and there were no effects associated with exercise training. The insulin-induced increases in serum FGF21 and muscle FGF21 expression correlated tightly (p......: The effects of insulin during euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamps and 10 week endurance training on serum FGF21 were examined in individuals with type 2 diabetes and in glucose tolerant overweight/obese and lean individuals. Gene expression of FGF21, its receptors and target genes in muscle and WAT biopsies...

  9. Intervention modalities for targeting cognitive-motor interference in individuals with neurodegenerative disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajda, Douglas A; Mirelman, Anat; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with neurodegenerative disease (NDD) commonly have elevated cognitive-motor interference, change in either cognitive or motor performance (or both) when tasks are performed simultaneously, compared to healthy controls. Given that cognitive-motor interference is related to reduced community ambulation and elevated fall risk, it is a target of rehabilitation interventions. Areas covered: This review details the collective findings of previous dual task interventions in individuals with NDD. A total of 21 investigations focusing on 4 different neurodegenerative diseases and one NDD precursor (Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia other than AD, and mild cognitive impairment) consisting of 721 participants were reviewed. Expert commentary: Preliminary evidence from interventions targeting cognitive-motor interference, both directly and indirectly, show promising results for improving CMI in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases. Methodological limitations, common to pilot investigations preclude firm conclusions. Well-designed randomized control trials targeting cognitive motor interference are warranted.

  10. Utility of routine exercise treadmill testing early after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri Radha

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been few prospective studies examining the utility of routine exercise treadmill testing (ETT early after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of a routine ETT strategy early after PCI on follow-up cardiac events and procedures. Methods We examined 136 patients who underwent routine ETT at 6 weeks post-PCI in the ADORE trial. The ETT was classified as positive, indeterminate, or negative. The Duke Treadmill Score (DTS was calculated for all patients. Follow-up occurred at 9 months. Results ETT results at 6 weeks were: 32 (23.5% positive, 24 (17.6% indeterminate and 80 (58.8% negative. At 9 months, the composite event rate was 21.9% in those with a positive ETT, 20.8% in those with an indeterminate ETT and 12.5% in those with a negative ETT (p = 0.25 positive vs. negative ETT. The sensitivity of early ETT for predicting clinical events was 41.2%, the specificity was 73.3%, the positive predictive value was 21.9% and the negative predictive value was 87.5%. At 9 months, the cardiac procedure rate was 18.8% in those with a positive test, 13.0% in those with an indeterminate test, and 6.3% in those with a negative test (p = 0.07 positive vs. negative ETT. In a multivariate logistic regression model, coronary stenting during PCI and a ≥ 85% MPHR achieved were found to be inversely associated with clinical events. However, the DTS did not independently predict clinical events. Conclusion Although the statistical power of the study was limited by the small number of clinical events (particularly MI and death, the results of this study support the ACC/AHA guidelines that exercise treadmill testing should not be used routinely after PCI.

  11. The effect of targeted exercise on knee-muscle function in patients with persistent hamstring deficiency following ACL reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregenhof, Bo; Jørgensen, Uffe; Aagaard, Per

    2018-01-01

    at 12-24 months' post surgery, will be recruited through outpatient clinics and advertisements. Patients will be randomized to a 12-week progressive, strength and neuromuscular exercise group (SNG) with supervised training twice weekly or a control intervention (CON) consisting of a home-based, low...... harvest site evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), postural control, kinetic/kinematic gait characteristics and knee-related functional capacity. DISCUSSION: This RCT is designed to investigate the effect of combined, progressive-resistance and neuromuscular exercises on knee...... treatment strategies in ACL-reconstructed patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02939677 (recruiting). Registered on 20 October 2016....

  12. Influence of a 3-year exercise intervention program on fracture risk, bone mass, and bone size in prepubertal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Bjarne; Detter, Fredrik; Dencker, Magnus; Stenevi-Lundgren, Susanna; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2011-08-01

    Published prospective pediatric exercise intervention studies are short term and use skeletal traits as surrogate endpoints for fractures, whereas other reports infer exercise to be associated with more trauma and fractures. This prospective, controlled exercise intervention study therefore followed both skeletal traits and fracture risk for 36 months. Fractures were registered in children aged 7 to 9 years; there were 446 boys and 362 girls in the intervention group (2129 person-years) and 807 boys and 780 girls in the control group (4430 person-years). The intervention included school physical education of 40 minutes per day for 3 years. The control children achieved the Swedish standard of 60 minutes per week. In a subsample of 76 boys and 48 girls in the intervention group and 55 boys and 44 girls in the control group, bone mineral content (BMC, g) and bone width (cm) were followed in the lumbar spine and hip by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The rate ratio (RR) for fractures was 1.08 (0.71, 1.62) [mean (95% confidence interval)]. In the DXA-measured children, there were no group differences at baseline in age, anthropometrics, or bone traits. The mean annual gain in the intervention group in lumbar spine BMC was 0.9 SD higher in girls and 0.8 SD higher in boys (both p exercise program in 7- to 9-year-old children increases bone mass and possibly also bone size without increasing fracture risk. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  13. High prevalence of sedentary risk factors amongst university employees and potential health benefits of campus workplace exercise intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Sedentariness and physical inactivity are often reported within white-collar workers, including university campus employees. However, the prevalence of the associated sedentary risk factors and risk reduction intervention strategies within a university campus workplace are less known. This study investigates whether the prevalence of sedentary risk factors within university campus employees could be reduced with a campus based exercise intervention. 56 UK university employees (age = 50.7 ± 10.2, stature = 1.68.8 ± 8.6, body mass = 73.9 ± 15.1) were tested for body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and maximal cardiorespiratory capacity (V̇O2max). The prevalence was analyzed across genders and job roles. An exercise intervention followed for the sedentary employees involving walking and running for 25 min twice/week for 10 weeks at an intensity corresponding to individual's ventilatory threshold (VT). The university workplace demonstrated a prevalence of higher BMI, SBP and DBP than the recommended healthy thresholds, with gender having a significant effect. Males' BMI, SBP and DBP were higher than in females (p exercise training intervention significantly improved V̇O2max, VT and VT velocity in both genders (all p groups meeting the recommended thresholds following the intervention. University campus employees have a high prevalence of sedentary risk factors across different genders and job roles. These risks can be reduced by an exercise-based intervention administered within the campus workplace, which should be considered in university workplace policies.

  14. Exercise intervention for unilateral amputees with low back pain: study protocol for a randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, Joseph G; Herman, Daniel C; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Zaremski, Jason L; Tripp, Brady; Page, Phillip; Vincent, Kevin R; Vincent, Heather K

    2017-12-29

    Atraumatic lower limb amputation is a life-changing event for approximately 185,000 persons in the United States each year. A unilateral amputation is associated with rapid changes to the musculoskeletal system including leg and back muscle atrophy, strength loss, gait asymmetries, differential mechanical joint loading and leg length discrepancies. Even with high-quality medical care and prostheses, amputees still develop secondary musculoskeletal conditions such as chronic low back pain (LBP). Resistance training interventions that focus on core stabilization, lumbar strength and dynamic stability during loading have strong potential to reduce LBP and address amputation-related changes to the musculoskeletal system. Home-based resistance exercise programs may be attractive to patients to minimize travel and financial burdens. This study will be a single-assessor-blinded, pre-post-test randomised controlled trial involving 40 men and women aged 18-60 years with traumatic, unilateral transtibial amputation. Participants will be randomised to a home-based, resistance exercise group (HBRX) or a wait-list control group (CON). The HBRX will consist of 12 weeks of elastic resistance band and bodyweight training to improve core and lumbopelvic strength. Participants will be monitored via Skype or Facetime on a weekly basis. The primary outcome will be pain severity (11-point Numerical Pain Rating Scale; NRS pain ). Secondary outcomes will include pain impact on quality of life (Medical Outcomes Short Form 36, Oswestry Disability Index and Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire), kinematics and kinetics of walking gait on an instrumented treadmill, muscle morphology (muscle thickness of multifidus, transversus abdominis, internal oblique), maximal muscle strength of key lumbar and core muscles, and daily step count. The study findings will determine whether a HBRX program can decrease pain severity and positively impact several physiological and mechanical factors that

  15. Multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention in the obese: its impact on patients' perception of the disease, food and physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piana, N; Battistini, D; Urbani, L; Romani, G; Fatone, C; Pazzagli, C; Laghezza, L; Mazzeschi, C; De Feo, P

    2013-04-01

    To be successful, lifestyle intervention in obesity must take into account patients' views. The aim of the present study, conducted using a narrative-autobiographical approach, was to report on the perception of disease, food and physical exercise in a group of 80 obese patients during a structured multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention. Patients underwent lifestyle intervention, of three months' duration, structured in the following steps: 1) an initial medical examination; 2) an interview by a psychologist; 3) an assessment by a dietician, 4) a physical examination by a specialist in sports medicine; 5) an individualized program consisting of 24 sessions (two per week) of structured indoor exercise 6) eight sessions of group therapeutic education; 7) Nordic walking activity combined with walking excursions during weekends. All the narrative autobiographic texts obtained during the lifestyle intervention were submitted for content analysis; data were analysed according to the ''grounded theory'' method. According to patients' descriptions at the end of the intervention, lifestyle intervention resulted in enhanced self-efficacy and a reduction in their dependency on food and people; their fear of change was also diminished because, by undergoing intervention, they had experienced change. The findings made in the present qualitative analysis suggest that whenever multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention is planned for patients with obesity, it is of the utmost importance to tailor the approach while taking the following key aspects into account: motivation, barriers and/or facilitators in lifestyle change, patients' perceptions of obesity and relationship with food, diet and exercise. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Developing Internet interventions to target the individual impact of stigma in health conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of health problems are associated with significant stigma, a social phenomenon in which individuals become the object of negative stereotypes. In addition to experiencing negative reactions from others, stigmatised individuals and groups can experience harmful consequences when they internalise these negative prevailing attitudes. The objective of this paper was to consider the potential to develop Internet-based health-related interventions explicitly targeting the effects of stigma on the individual. A review of the literature was conducted to synthesise current conceptualisations of stigma and self-stigma across a number of groups, and to identify current intervention developments. Self-stigma reduction strategies developed for in-person services include cognitive reframing, myth busting, contact with other members of the stigmatised group, and disclosure promotion. The development and provision of interventions targeting self-stigma within an online environment is in its infancy. Our review considers there to be particular potential of online interventions for this target, associated with the capacity of the Internet to promote having contact with peers within one’s stigmatised group, and for user interaction and empowerment. We conclude that self-stigma is a domain in which there is significant potential for innovation with health-related interventions, and provide a number of recommendations for online intervention development.

  17. Review and evaluation of faith-based weight management interventions that target African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Shirley M

    2015-04-01

    This integrative review was conducted to present results of the use of recommended criteria to evaluate faith-based weight management interventions (WMIs) that target African American women. This group experiences the highest prevalence of adult obesity in the US when compared to other ethnic groups. "Best practice" WMIs can help to alleviate obesity. Faith-based interventions hold promise for helping to address the problem of obesity in African American women since a significant portion of these persons views the church as a trusted entity that advocates for their well-being. No systematic evaluation of faith-based WMIs has been reported even though there is an ongoing plea for the need for better evaluation of health interventions that prioritizes comprehensive description of their attributes (e.g., linkage to theory, interventionists' background, and dosage) to enable replication and a broader assessment of their validity to include appropriateness and feasibility). Critique criteria were applied to faith-based WMIs (n = 5) that target African American women. Findings highlighted the need for increased disclosure about the (1) interventionists' background, (2) intervention's location within the church setting, and (3) nature of any "pre-intervention"’ treatment. The review also indicated the need for interventions that are (1) designed from robust research methodologies (effectiveness) that include randomization of both church setting and participants, (2) deemed appropriate from the perspective of African American women targeted, and (3) are financially feasible-without steep participant incentives/implementation costs that compromise internal validity and any positive outcomes generated.

  18. [Regular physical activity and mental health. The role of exercise in the prevention of, and intervention in depressive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    In our review we examine the relationship between physical activity and mental health; especially we determine the effectiveness of exercise in the prevention and treatment of depression. Over the past two decades the literature in the area of physical activity and mental health has been growing. However it seems that the findings and evidences not being utilized by mental health agencies and health practitioners. Depression is the most common disorder in the world, generally has a higher prevalence among women. In our study we overview and demonstrate that the exercise is a powerful intervention for prevention and treatment not only in non-clinical but also in clinical levels of depression. In sub-clinical levels of depression the meta-analytic findings and population surveys suggest that the exercise is associated with a significant moderate reduction of depression in different groups by gender and age; as well as a physically active lifestyle associates with lower levels of depression. In clinical levels of depression the physical activity is an effective tool in the prevention, studies support an association between higher levels of physical activity and lower levels of depression. In the treatment of clinical depression the randomized-controlled trials suggest the clear positive effects of exercise. This effect is similar to psychotherapeutic interventions and it was appeared under relatively short time (4-8 weeks). The exercise is one of the most important preventive health-related behaviors. Our review suggests a protective effect from activity on the development of clinical levels of depression and depressive symptoms. In addition the randomized controlled trials support a causal connection between exercise and reduction of depression. In sum the reviewed studies clearly support the antidepressant effect of exercise.

  19. Effect of a multimodal high intensity exercise intervention in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamsen, Lis; Quist, Morten; Andersen, Christina; Møller, Tom; Herrstedt, Jørn; Kronborg, Dorte; Baadsgaard, Marie T; Vistisen, Kirsten; Midtgaard, Julie; Christiansen, Birgitte; Stage, Maria; Kronborg, Morten T; Rørth, Mikael

    2009-10-13

    To assess the effect of a multimodal group exercise intervention, as an adjunct to conventional care, on fatigue, physical capacity, general wellbeing, physical activity, and quality of life in patients with cancer who were undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment for advanced disease. Randomised controlled trial. Two university hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark. 269 patients with cancer; 73 men, 196 women, mean age 47 years (range 20-65) representing 21 diagnoses. Main exclusion criteria were brain or bone metastases. 235 patients completed follow-up. Supervised exercise comprising high intensity cardiovascular and resistance training, relaxation and body awareness training, massage, nine hours weekly for six weeks in addition to conventional care, compared with conventional care. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (MOS SF-36), Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire, muscular strength (one repetition maximum), maximum oxygen consumption (Vo(2)max). Statistical methods The general linear model was used for continuous outcome while analysis of associates between categorical outcomes was performed as analysis of marginal homogeneity in contingency tables. Adjusted for baseline score, disease, and demographic covariates, the intervention group showed an estimated improvement at six weeks for the primary outcome, fatigue, of -6.6 points (95% confidence interval -12.3 to -0.9, P=0.02; effect size=0.33, 0.04 to 0.61). Significant effects were seen on vitality (effect size 0.55, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.82), physical functioning (0.37, 0.09 to 0.65), role physical (0.37, 0.10 to 0.64), role emotional (0.32, 0.05 to 0.59), and mental health (0.28, 0.02 to 0.56) scores. Improvement was noted in physical capacity: estimated mean difference between groups for maximum oxygen consumption was 0.16 l/min (95% CI 0.1 to 0.2, Pmuscular strength (leg press) was 29.7 kg (23.4 to

  20. Exercise and quality of life in patients with cystic fibrosis: A 12-week intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Mette; Jacobsen, Ulla; Bregnballe, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    It was hypothesised that increased exercise capacity is related to improved quality of life (QoL) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A 12-week individually tailored unsupervised aerobic exercise programme was offered to 42 patients with CF. At the start and at the end of the exercise programm......-week individually tailored unsupervised aerobic exercise programme where HR monitors were used significantly affected VO(2max). Improvement in QoL could not be demonstrated in this study....

  1. Biological Rationale for Regular Physical Exercise as an Effective Intervention for the Prevention and Treatment of Depressive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Mayero, Sara; Perales, María; Garatachea, Nuria; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Emanuele, Enzo; Gálvez, Beatriz G; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a major medical and social problem. Here we review current body of knowledge on the benefits of exercise as an effective strategy for both the prevention and treatment of this condition. We also analyze the biological pathways involved in such potential benefits, which include changes in neurotrophic factors, oxidative stress and inflammation, telomere length, brain volume and microvessels, neurotransmitters or hormones. We also identify major caveats in this field of research: further studies are needed to identify which are the most appropriate types of exercise interventions (intensity, duration, or frequency) to treat and prevent depression.

  2. Health care provider targeted interventions to improve medication adherence: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, V. S.; Ruppar, T. M.; Enriquez, M.; Cooper, P. S.; Chan, K. C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This systematic review applied meta-analytic procedures to synthesize medication adherence (also termed compliance) interventions that focus on health care providers. Design Comprehensive searching located studies testing interventions that targeted health care providers and reported patient medication adherence behavior outcomes. Search strategies included 13 computerized databases, hand searches of 57 journals, and both author and ancestry searches. Study sample, intervention characteristics, design, and outcomes were reliably coded. Standardized mean difference effect sizes were calculated using random-effects models. Heterogeneity was examined with Q and I2 statistics. Exploratory moderator analyses used meta-analytic analog of ANOVA and regression. Results Codable data were extracted from 218 reports of 151,182 subjects. The mean difference effect size was 0.233. Effect sizes for individual interventions varied from .088 to 0.301. Interventions were more effective when they included multiple strategies. Risk of bias assessment documented larger effect sizes in studies with larger samples, studies that used true control groups (as compared to attention control), and studies without intention-to-treat analyses. Conclusion Overall, this meta-analysis documented that interventions targeted to health care providers significantly improved patient medication adherence. The modest overall effect size suggests that interventions addressing multiple levels of influence on medication adherence may be necessary to achieve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25728214

  3. The effectiveness of interventions targeting the stigma of mental illness at the workplace: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, Sabine E; Twomey, Conal D; Szeto, Andrew C H; Birner, Ulrich W; Nowak, Dennis; Sabariego, Carla

    2016-01-06

    The majority of people experiencing mental-health problems do not seek help, and the stigma of mental illness is considered a major barrier to seeking appropriate treatment. More targeted interventions (e.g. at the workplace) seem to be a promising and necessary supplement to public campaigns, but little is known about their effectiveness. The aim of this systematic review is to provide an overview of the evidence on the effectiveness of interventions targeting the stigma of mental illness at the workplace. Sixteen studies were included after the literature review. The effectiveness of anti-stigma interventions at the workplace was assessed by examining changes in: (1) knowledge of mental disorders and their treatment and recognition of signs/symptoms of mental illness, (2) attitudes towards people with mental-health problems, and (3) supportive behavior. The results indicate that anti-stigma interventions at the workplace can lead to improved employee knowledge and supportive behavior towards people with mental-health problems. The effects of interventions on employees' attitudes were mixed, but generally positive. The quality of evidence varied across studies. This highlights the need for more rigorous, higher-quality evaluations conducted with more diverse samples of the working population. Future research should explore to what extent changes in employees' knowledge, attitudes, and supportive behavior lead to affected individuals seeking help earlier. Such investigations are likely to inform important stakeholders about the potential benefits of current workplace anti-stigma interventions and provide guidance for the development and implementation of effective future interventions.

  4. Targeting Premalignant Lesions: Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0032 TITLE: Targeting Premalignant Lesions : Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention...2015 – 31 Mar 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0032 Targeting Premalignant Lesions : Implications for Early Breast...carcinoma. In this study, we aimed to identify peptides that specifically recognize premalignant lesions in the mammary tissue. To achieve this goal, we

  5. Influence of recent exercise and skin temperature on ultrasound Doppler measurements in patients with rheumatoid arthritis--an intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Karen; Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Henriksen, Marius

    2009-01-01

    activity. It is unclear, however, whether the hyperaemia alone reflects the disease activity or may be influenced by other factors. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with RA underwent USD examination of the wrist before and immediately after three interventions. The interventions were carried out on three...... separate days. The interventions were (i) isometric exercise of the muscles of the hand and forearm, (ii) heating and (iii) cooling of the hand. The amount of Doppler in the wrist joint was quantified by measuring the percentage of colour in the synovium-the colour fraction (CF). The CF values estimated...... before and after each intervention were compared to see if any intervention affected the amount of Doppler in the synovium. RESULTS: The CF decreased significantly after cooling of the hand (P = 0.018 and

  6. Population-, intervention- and methodology-related characteristics of clinical trials impact exercise efficacy during adjuvant therapy for breast cancer: a meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayol, Marion; Delpierre, Cyrille; Bernard, Paquito; Ninot, Grégory

    2015-07-01

    Significant heterogeneity was highlighted in recent meta-analyses examining exercise effects in cancer patients, suggesting that some characteristics may moderate exercise efficacy. The objectives of this meta-analysis are (1) to investigate the influence of methodology, population and intervention studies' characteristics on the association of exercise with fatigue, quality-of-life (QoL), anxiety and depression; (2) to identify exercise intervention characteristics that may maximize efficacy and evaluate the level of evidence about exercise efficacy in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Thirty-three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating exercise were systematically identified. Population, intervention and methodology characteristics were extracted, coded by two independent investigators and tested as moderators of exercise effect in meta-regression models. Psychological outcomes summary effects were then computed by pooling subgroup of RCTs based on categorized moderators. Indications of selection bias (random sequence generation) or attrition bias (high attrition rate, no intent-to-treat analysis) were associated with better exercise efficacy on QoL, anxiety and depression. Low total prescribed exercise doses (<140 METs.h) or short duration (<16 weeks) interventions yielded fatigue, anxiety and depression reductions whereas higher doses or duration did not. Mind-body interventions led to greater decrease of fatigue and anxiety rather than aerobic/resistance-based interventions. Our findings indicated that exercise-based interventions may improve fatigue, QoL, anxiety and depression, but the evidence mainly rely on studies prone to methodological biases. A prescription of approximately 100 MET.h, e.g. ~120 min of weekly moderate physical exercise for 10 weeks involving mind-body activities, could be advised to maximize fatigue reduction. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Effect of home-based exercise intervention on fasting insulin and Adipocytokines in colorectal cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Dong-Il; Kang, Dong-Woo; Park, Ji-Hye; Ahn, Ki-Yong; In Yang, Hyuk; Lee, Dong Hoon; Roh, Yun Ho; Lee, Ji-Won; Chu, Sang-Hui; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Jones, Lee W; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Jeon, Justin Y

    2017-11-01

    Elevated circulating insulin is associated with increased risk of recurrence and cancer mortality in early-stage colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine the effect of a 12-week home-based exercise program on fasting insulin, adipocytokines, and physical function in CRC survivors. One hundred and twenty-three stage II-III CRC patients were randomly assigned to either a home-based exercise (n=62) or standard care control group (n=61) for 12weeks. Home-based exercise consisted of aerobic and resistance training, with a goal of obtaining ≥18 metabolic equivalent task (MET)-h/wk. Participants in the exercise group were instructed to participate in >18MET-h/wk. of aerobic and resistance exercise while the participants in the control group were asked to maintain their usual daily activity. The primary outcome was fasting insulin levels. Secondary outcomes were adiponectin, TNF-α levels and 6min walk distance from baseline to post-intervention. After the 12-weeks, moderate-vigorous physical activity participation increased from 9.1±14.7MET-h/wk. to 26.6±21.7MET-h/wk. in the exercise group, with no change in the control group (pexercise group with no change in the control group (p=0.022 for group and time interaction). A similar trend was observed in TNF-α (p=0.030 for group and time interaction). Six minute walk distance increased by 25.2m in the exercise group with no change in the control group (p=0.061 for group and time interaction). The 12week home-based exercise program increased level of physical activity and decreased circulating insulin levels in CRC survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of a cognitive–behavioral intervention on diet and exercise among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Yomogida

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90% to 95% of all diabetic cases with Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders particularly at risk. The purpose was to assess the effects of a cognitive–behavioral intervention (CBI on diet and exercise among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders with type 2 diabetes. Using a double-blinded, two-arm randomized clinical trial (n = 207, data on diet and exercise were analyzed before and after a 6-week CBI. Over time, treatment group showed a decrease in kcals and increase in steps compared with control group; however, results were not statistically significant. Treatment group had lower kcals of trans-fat, saturated fat, sugar, alcohol, caffeine, and dietary fiber compared with the control group. Older subjects and females had significantly lower caloric intake (p < .01. Females exercised less and took fewer steps compared with males (p < .05. CBI may be effective in lowering calorie intake and increasing physical activity among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders with type 2 diabetes. Significant differences in gender and age point to the need for individualized research and treatment targeting this group.

  9. Effect of laser acupuncture combined with a diet-exercise intervention on metabolic syndrome in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mekawy, Hanan S; ElDeeb, Abeer M; Ghareib, Hassan O

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of laser acupuncture combined with a diet-exercise intervention on features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Twenty-eight obese post-menopausal women were randomly distributed to the control and laser acupuncture group. The control group received the diet-exercise intervention and the study group received the same intervention and sessions of laser acupuncture, 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Anthropometric measurement, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and lipid profile were assessed before and after the treatment course. Both groups showed a significant decrease in the anthropometric and metabolic parameters. However, laser acupuncture group showed a greater decrease in the waist (P = 0.001) and hip (P = 0.001) circumferences, cholesterol (P = 0.04), and insulin levels (P = 0.043) than the control group. These results suggest that laser acupuncture is a valuable approach that could be added to the diet-exercise intervention to correct features of the MetS.

  10. Effect of laser acupuncture combined with a diet-exercise intervention on metabolic syndrome in post-menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan S. El-Mekawy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of laser acupuncture combined with a diet-exercise intervention on features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS. Twenty-eight obese post-menopausal women were randomly distributed to the control and laser acupuncture group. The control group received the diet-exercise intervention and the study group received the same intervention and sessions of laser acupuncture, 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Anthropometric measurement, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, and lipid profile were assessed before and after the treatment course. Both groups showed a significant decrease in the anthropometric and metabolic parameters. However, laser acupuncture group showed a greater decrease in the waist (P = 0.001 and hip (P = 0.001 circumferences, cholesterol (P = 0.04, and insulin levels (P = 0.043 than the control group. These results suggest that laser acupuncture is a valuable approach that could be added to the diet-exercise intervention to correct features of the MetS.

  11. Differences in the effect of exercise interventions between prefrail older adults and older adults without frailty: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Eiko; Teranishi, Toshio; Watanabe, Toyoaki; Ohno, Kensuke; Kitaji, Shiko; Sawa, Shunji; Kanada, Yoshikiyo; Toba, Kenji; Kondo, Izumi

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to clarify whether there are differences in the effect of exercise interventions between prefrail older adults and older adults without frailty. The participants were community-dwelling older adults (mean age 75.1 ± 5.1 years). The participants were instructed to use a training method at home to prevent frailty. The effects of the intervention were evaluated at 4 months. Outcome measures were the Timed Up and Go test, grip strength, one leg balance, knee extension strength and the fall risk index. The present study used the criteria for frailty status of the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology in Japan. The studied sample included prefrail participants (n = 17) and robust participants (n = 24). We compared the value of outcome measures before and after the intervention in each group using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. There were significant differences for the group effect for one leg balance (P differences for the time effect for Timed Up and Go, one leg balance and knee extension strength (P age 78.0 ± 3.8 years) returned to the robust status after the intervention. No participants became frail. These results suggest that we can expect similar interventional effects for prefrail older adults and robust older adults. It is important that a frail status be prevented in prefrail older adults by using an exercise intervention. Further studies are required to determine the different effects of exercise intervention on prefrail status compared with frailty status in community-dwelling older adults. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1265-1269. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Breathing exercise combined with cognitive behavioural intervention improves sleep quality and heart rate variability in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Hui-Ching; Chung, Yu-Chu; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Jia-Fu

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise on sleep quality and heart rate variability in patients with major depression. Depression is a long-lasting illness with significant effects not only in individuals themselves, but on their family, work and social relationships as well. Cognitive behavioural therapy is considered to be an effective treatment for major depression. Breathing relaxation may improve heart rate variability, but few studies have comprehensively examined the effect of a cognitive behavioural intervention combined with relaxing breathing on patients with major depression. An experimental research design with a repeated measure was used. Eighty-nine participants completed this study and entered data analysed. The experimental group (n = 43) received the cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise for four weeks, whereas the control group (n = 46) did not. Sleep quality and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, posttest1, posttest2 and follow-up. Data were examined by chi-square tests, t-tests and generalised estimating equations. After adjusting for age, socioeconomic status, severity of disease and psychiatric history, the quality of sleep of the experimental group improved, with the results at posttest achieving significance. Heart rate variability parameters were also significantly improved. This study supported the hypothesis that the cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise could improve sleep quality and heart rate variability in patients with major depression, and the effectiveness was lasting. The cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise that included muscle relaxation, deep breathing and sleep hygiene could be provided with major depression during hospitalisation. Through group practice and experience sharing

  13. Analyzing Serum-Stimulated Prostate Cancer Cell Lines After Low-Fat, High-Fiber Diet and Exercise Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry Soliman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum from men undergoing a low-fat, high-fiber diet and exercise intervention has previously been shown to decrease growth and increase apoptosis in serum-stimulated, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells associated with a reduction in serum IGF-I. Here we sought to determine the underlying mechanisms for these anticancer effects. Again, the intervention slowed growth and increased apoptosis in LNCaP cells; responses that were eliminated when IGF-I was added back to the post-intervention samples. The p53 protein content was increased and NFκB activation reduced in the post serum-stimulated LNCaP cells. Similar results were observed when the IGF-I receptor was blocked in the pre-intervention serum. In androgen-independent PC-3 cells, growth was reduced while none of the other factors were changed by the intervention. We conclude that diet and exercise intervention might help prevent clinical PCa as well as aid in the treatment of PCa during the early stages of development.

  14. Trajectories of change in self-esteem in older adults: exercise intervention effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothe, Neha P.; Mullen, Sean P.; Wójcicki, Thomas R.; Mailey, Emily L.; White, Siobhan M.; Olson, Erin A.; Szabo, Amanda N.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2011-01-01

    This 12-month, 2 arm, single blind randomized controlled exercise trial examined relationships among changes in multidimensional self-esteem as a function of intervention mode (i.e., walking vs. flexibility-toning-balance). Data were collected on three equidistant occasions (baseline, 6 and 12 months). One-hundred seventy-nine older adults (Mage = 66.38) began the study and 145 completed assessments at all time points. Participants completed measures of physical and global self-esteem as well as demographic information. There were no significant group differences at baseline on these demographic indicators or esteem variables. Data were analyzed using linear and parallel process growth modeling procedures. Results supported the position that across both groups, domain-level (i.e., physical self-worth) was dependent upon sub-domain-level (i.e., perceived attractiveness, strength, and condition) esteem change. Furthermore, greater improvements were observed in the flexibility-toning-balance group, in terms of perceived strength and attractiveness esteem, compared to the walking group. Our findings support theoretically-based predictions and extend the literature showing unique psychological responses conditional on specific types of physical activities. PMID:21222223

  15. Effect of contrasting physical exercise interventions on rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Jesper L; Suetta, Charlotte; Kjaer, Michael; Søgaard, Karen; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2009-11-01

    Rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles is inhibited markedly more than maximal force capacity and is therefore relevant to assess in rehabilitation settings. Our objective was to investigate the effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on rapid force capacity, as well as neural and muscular adaptations in women with chronic neck muscle pain. A group of employed women (n = 42) with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia participated in a 10-wk randomized controlled trial; specific strength training of the neck/shoulder muscles, general fitness training performed as leg-bicycling; or a reference intervention without physical activity. Maximal voluntary shoulder abductions were performed at static angles of 35 degrees and 115 degrees with simultaneous recording of electromyography (EMG) in the trapezius and deltoid. Maximal muscle strength and activation (peak torque and peak EMG) as well as rapid muscle strength and activation [rate of torque development (RTD) and rate of EMG rise] were subsequently determined. Trapezius muscle fiber characteristics were determined with ATPase histochemistry. Significant changes were observed only in the specific strength training group. Whereas peak torque increased 18-29% (P muscle fibers hypertrophied 20% (P force capacity of chronically painful muscles is highly responsive to rehabilitation with specific strength training. The underlying mechanisms were related to both pain reduction and general neuromuscular adaptations to strength training. Potentially, the present method can be a useful clinical screening tool of muscle function in rehabilitation settings.

  16. Developing Targeted Health Service Interventions Using the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model: Two Australian Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jane L; Rolley, John X; Davidson, Patricia M

    2012-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. This paper provides an overview of the applicability of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to the development of targeted nursing led chronic illness interventions. Background. Changing health care practice is a complex and dynamic process that requires consideration of social, political, economic, and organisational factors. An understanding of the characteristics of the target population, health professionals, and organizations plus identification of the determinants for change are also required. Synthesizing this data to guide the development of an effective intervention is a challenging process. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model has been used in global health care settings to guide the identification, planning, implementation, and evaluation of various health improvement initiatives. Design. Using a reflective case study approach, this paper examines the applicability of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to the development of targeted chronic care improvement interventions for two distinct Australian populations: a rapidly expanding and aging rural population with unmet palliative care needs and a disadvantaged urban community at higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Results. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model approach demonstrated utility across diverse health settings in a systematic planning process. In environments characterized by increasing health care needs, limited resources, and growing community expectations, adopting planning tools such as PRECEDE-PROCEED Model at a local level can facilitate the development of the most effective interventions. Relevance to Clinical Practice. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model is a strong theoretical model that guides the development of realistic nursing led interventions with the best chance of being successful in existing health care environments.

  17. Effect of a Targeted Women's Health Intervention in an Inner-City Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Houry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of an Emergency Department (ED based, educational intervention for at-risk health behaviors. Methods. A randomized trial over a one-year period. African American women, aged 21–55, presenting to the ED waiting room were eligible. Each participant took a computer-based survey on health risk behaviors. Participants who screened positive on any of four validated scales (for IPV, nicotine, alcohol, or drug dependence were randomized to standard information about community resources (control or to targeted educational handouts based upon their screening results (intervention. Participants were surveyed at 3 months regarding contacts with community resources and harm-reduction actions. Results. 610 women were initially surveyed; 326 screened positive (13.7% for IPV, 40.1% for nicotine addiction, 26.6% for alcohol abuse, and 14.4% for drug abuse. 157 women were randomized to intervention and 169 to control. Among women who completed follow-up (=71, women in the Intervention Group were significantly more likely to have contacted local resources (37% versus 9%, =0.04 and were more likely to have taken risk-reducing action (97% versus 79%, =0.04. Conclusion. Targeted, brief educational interventions may be an effective method for targeting risk behaviors among vulnerable ED populations.

  18. Influence of controlled and uncontrolled interventions on Twitter in different target groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maanen, P.P. van; Aarts, O.; Boertjes, E.; Wijn, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the influence of interventions on Twitter users is studied. We define influence in a) number of participants, b) size of the audience, c) amount of activity, and d) reach. Influence is studied for four different target groups: a) politicians, b) journalists, c) employees and d) the

  19. The effect of interventions on Twitter in four target groups using different measures of influence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maanen, P.P. van; Wijn, R.; Boertjes, E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of interventions on Twitter users is studied. We define influence in (a) number of participants, (b) size of the audience, (c) amount of activity, and (d) reach. Influence is studied for four different target groups: (a) politicians, (b) journalists, (c) employees and

  20. Targeting Vulnerabilities to Risky Behavior: An Intervention for Promoting Adaptive Emotion Regulation in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claro, Anthony; Boulanger, Marie-Michelle; Shaw, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The paper examined the effectiveness of an in-school intervention for adolescents designed to target emotional regulation skills related to risky behaviors. The Cognitive Emotion Regulation Intended for Youth (CERTIFY) program was delivered to at-risk adolescents in Montreal, Canada. Participants were drawn from an alternative high school and a…

  1. A Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Child Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution: Identifying Possible Target Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Brendon R.; Mathee, Angela; Shafritz, Lonna B.; Krieger, Laurie; Zimicki, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Indoor air pollution has been causally linked to acute lower respiratory infections in children younger than 5. The aim of this study was to identify target behaviors for a behavioral intervention to reduce child exposure to indoor air pollution by attempting to answer two research questions: Which behaviors are protective of child respiratory…

  2. The effectiveness of a proactive coping intervention targeting self-management in diabetes patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, Floor M.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; Vinkers, Charlotte D W; van de Schoot, Rens; de Ridder, Denise T D

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study's aim was to investigate psychological, behavioral and medical long-term outcomes of an existing self-management intervention targeting the development of proactive coping skills (e.g. goal setting and identifying barriers) in type 2 diabetes patients. The study aimed to

  3. A seemingly most effective target for early detection and intervention of prostate tumor invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-gao Man

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This commentary proposes that budding tumor cell projections from focally disrupted tumor capsules represent a most effective target for early detection and intervention of prostate tumor invasion. The rationale, supporting data, and clinical applications of the hypothesis are discussed.

  4. Risk factors for the development of clinical leprosy among contacts, and their relevance for targeted interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moet, F. J.; Meima, A.; Oskam, L.; Richardus, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    Existing knowledge on risk factors for the development of clinical leprosy among contacts of known leprosy patients is reviewed with the aim to identify factors associated with leprosy among contacts that have potential for developing effective targeted interventions in leprosy control. Different

  5. Small, medium, large or supersize? The development and evaluation of interventions targeted at portion size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, W.M.; Steenhuis, I.H.M.; Poelman, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decades, portion sizes of high-caloric foods and drinks have increased and can be considered an important environmental obesogenic factor. This paper describes a research project in which the feasibility and effectiveness of environmental interventions targeted at portion size was

  6. Evaluating a community-based exercise intervention with adults living with HIV: protocol for an interrupted time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Solomon, Patricia; Tang, Ada; Murzin, Kate; Chan Carusone, Soo; Zobeiry, Mehdi; Nayar, Ayesha; Davis, Aileen M

    2016-10-20

    Our aim was to evaluate a community-based exercise (CBE) intervention with the goal of reducing disability and enhancing health for community-dwelling people living with HIV (PLWH). We will use a mixed-methods implementation science study design, including a prospective longitudinal interrupted time series study, to evaluate a CBE intervention with PLWH in Toronto, Canada. We will recruit PLWH who consider themselves medically stable and safe to participate in exercise. In the baseline phase (0-8 months), participants will be monitored bimonthly. In the intervention phase (8-14 months), participants will take part in a 24-week CBE intervention that includes aerobic, resistance, balance and flexibility exercise at the YMCA 3 times per week, with weekly supervision by a fitness instructor, and monthly educational sessions. In the follow-up phase (14-22 months), participants will be encouraged to continue to engage in unsupervised exercise 3 times per week. Quantitative assessment: We will assess cardiopulmonary fitness, strength, weight, body composition and flexibility outcomes followed by the administration of self-reported questionnaires to assess disability and contextual factor outcomes (coping, mastery, stigma, social support) bimonthly. We will use time series regression analysis to determine the level and trend of outcomes across each phase in relation to the intervention. Qualitative assessment: We will conduct a series of face-to-face interviews with a subsample of participants and recreation providers at initiation, midpoint and completion of the 24-week CBE intervention. We will explore experiences and anticipated benefits with exercise, perceived impact of CBE for PLWH and the strengths and challenges of implementing a CBE intervention. Interviews will be audio recorded and analysed thematically. Protocol approved by the University of Toronto HIV/AIDS Research Ethics Board. Knowledge translation will occur with stakeholders in the form of

  7. A family-based intervention targeting parents of preschool children with overweight and obesity: conceptual framework and study design of LOOPS- Lund overweight and obesity preschool study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önnerfält, Jenny; Erlandsson, Lena-Karin; Orban, Kristina; Broberg, Malin; Helgason, Christina; Thorngren-Jerneck, Kristina

    2012-10-17

    As the rate of overweight among children is rising there is a need for evidence-based research that will clarify what the best interventional strategies to normalize weight development are. The overall aim of the Lund Overweight and Obesity Preschool Study (LOOPS) is to evaluate if a family-based intervention, targeting parents of preschool children with overweight and obesity, has a long-term positive effect on weight development of the children. The hypothesis is that preschool children with overweight and obesity, whose parents participate in a one-year intervention, both at completion of the one-year intervention and at long term follow up (2-, 3- and 5-years) will have reduced their BMI-for-age z-score. The study is a randomized controlled trial, including overweight (n=160) and obese (n=80) children 4-6-years-old. The intervention is targeting the parents, who get general information about nutrition and exercise recommendations through a website and are invited to participate in a group intervention with the purpose of supporting them to accomplish preferred lifestyle changes, both in the short and long term. To evaluate the effect of various supports, the parents are randomized to different interventions with the main focus of: 1) supporting the parents in limit setting by emphasizing the importance of positive interactions between parents and children and 2) influencing the patterns of daily activities to induce alterations of everyday life that will lead to healthier lifestyle. The primary outcome variable, child BMI-for-age z-score will be measured at referral, inclusion, after 6 months, at the end of intervention and at 2-, 3- and 5-years post intervention. Secondary outcome variables, measured at inclusion and at the end of intervention, are child activity pattern, eating habits and biochemical markers as well as parent BMI, exercise habits, perception of health, experience of parenthood and level of parental stress. The LOOPS project will provide

  8. A family-based intervention targeting parents of preschool children with overweight and obesity: conceptual framework and study design of LOOPS- Lund overweight and obesity preschool study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Önnerfält Jenny

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the rate of overweight among children is rising there is a need for evidence-based research that will clarify what the best interventional strategies to normalize weight development are. The overall aim of the Lund Overweight and Obesity Preschool Study (LOOPS is to evaluate if a family-based intervention, targeting parents of preschool children with overweight and obesity, has a long-term positive effect on weight development of the children. The hypothesis is that preschool children with overweight and obesity, whose parents participate in a one-year intervention, both at completion of the one-year intervention and at long term follow up (2-, 3- and 5-years will have reduced their BMI-for-age z-score. Methods/Design The study is a randomized controlled trial, including overweight (n=160 and obese (n=80 children 4-6-years-old. The intervention is targeting the parents, who get general information about nutrition and exercise recommendations through a website and are invited to participate in a group intervention with the purpose of supporting them to accomplish preferred lifestyle changes, both in the short and long term. To evaluate the effect of various supports, the parents are randomized to different interventions with the main focus of: 1 supporting the parents in limit setting by emphasizing the importance of positive interactions between parents and children and 2 influencing the patterns of daily activities to induce alterations of everyday life that will lead to healthier lifestyle. The primary outcome variable, child BMI-for-age z-score will be measured at referral, inclusion, after 6 months, at the end of intervention and at 2-, 3- and 5-years post intervention. Secondary outcome variables, measured at inclusion and at the end of intervention, are child activity pattern, eating habits and biochemical markers as well as parent BMI, exercise habits, perception of health, experience of parenthood and level of

  9. A boxing-oriented exercise intervention for obese adolescent males: findings from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Sarah P; Stoner, Lee; Lambrick, Danielle M; Lane, Andrew M

    2014-12-01

    In New Zealand, obese Māori and Pasifika adolescents are at risk of numerous cardio-metabolic conditions with raising physical activity levels being proposed as a useful intervention. The present study used a mixed method design to explore the effects of a non-contact boxing-oriented training programme designed in terms of improvements to cardio-metabolic variables. Traditional recruitment strategies (media, referrals) were employed, with limited success leading to 3 adolescent boys (14-15 y) participating in the pilot intervention. Exercise sessions included 30 minutes of non-contact boxing training, followed by 30 minutes of progressive resistance training. Participants attended three 1h training sessions each week, for a total of 12 weeks. Physiological variables included anthropometric indices, visceral fat thickness, central blood pressures, central arterial stiffness (augmentation index: AIx), and carotid arterial stiffness (β). Results revealed that there was no trend for change in body weight (125.5 ± 12.1 kg vs. 126.5 ± 11.0 kg) or BMI (39.3 ± 4.1 kg·m(-2) vs. 39.0 ± 4.6 kg·m(-2)). However, there was a moderate decrease in visceral fat thickness (4.34 ± 2.51 cm vs 3.65 ± 1.11 cm, d = 0.36). There was no change in central pulse pressure (38.7 ± 7.3 mmHg vs. 38.3 ± 5.0 mmHg), however, there was a small improvement in β (3.01 ± 0.73 vs. 2.87 ± 0.84, d = 0.18). Focus group interview data with participants and their parents were used to explore issues related to motivation to participation. Results revealed participants commented on how the programme has led to new friendships, changes to their physical appearance, and increased physical fitness. Parents commented on increased self-confidence, better performance in school, and a willingness to take part in new activities. In conclusion, it appears participating in the boxing oriented training programme was motivating to participants who engaged and had some physiological benefits in obese

  10. Aerobic and resistance exercise training program intervention for enhancing gait function in elderly and chronically ill Taiwanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M S; Lin, T C; Jiang, B C

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to develop an effective exercise training program for enhancing the postural stability and gait function of chronically ill patients to avoid falls. Pre training-post-training. Analyses were limited to those randomized to the exercise intervention. The participants were chronically ill patients over 45 years old (47-89 years), of whom 25 completed the 12-week training regimen and assessment in the exercise group, whereas 29 completed the assessment in the control group, suffering from cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, or osteoporosis. The average age of the participants was 67.56 ± 10.70 years in the intervention group. All patients in this study signed institutional review board (IRB) agreements before participating (IRB approval no: FEMH-IRB-101029-E, v. 02, date: 20120429). The results revealed the beneficial effects of regular aerobic and resistance training, which improved in elderly, chronically ill patients. According to our data, most of the gait function measurements exhibited significant differences between the exercise group and control group. The duration of the 'timed up-and-go' test decreased from 7.67 s to 6.76 s (P = 0.00013), and the 'the base of support area' increased from 392.0 cm(2) to 433.2 cm(2) (P = 0.0088). Women attained more significant differences than men in the exercise and control groups (P = 0.0008), and the participants aged 45-65 years had a more satisfactory outcome than those aged > 65 years (P = 0.0109). Regular exercise regimens, such as aerobic, resistance or combination exercise training, enhance the gait function and sense of postural stability in elderly, chronically ill patients. Younger patients attained more positive results than older patients, and women attained more positive results than men. Regular exercise is a means of preventing falls; thus, the government and hospitals should increase promotional measures in aging communities to encourage regular exercise among elderly, chronically ill

  11. Effect of aerobic exercise intervention on DDT degradation and oxidative stress in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefeng Li

    2017-03-01

    Main methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into control (C, DDT without exercise training (D, and DDT plus exercise training (DE groups. The rats were treated as follows: DDT exposure to D and DE groups at the first 2 weeks; aerobic exercise treatment only to the DE group from the 1st day until the rats are killed. DDT levels in excrements, muscle, liver, serum, and hearts were analyzed. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and malondialdehyde (MDA levels were determined. Aerobic exercise accelerated the degradation of DDT primarily to DDE due to better oxygen availability and aerobic condition and promoted the degradation of DDT. Cumulative oxidative damage of DDT and exercise led to significant decrease of SOD level. Exercise resulted in consistent increase in SOD activity. Aerobic exercise enhanced activities of CAT and GSH-Px and promoted MDA scavenging. Results suggested that exercise can accelerate adaptive responses to oxidative stress and activate antioxidant enzymes activities. Exercise can also facilitate the reduction of DDT-induced oxidative damage and promoted DDT degradation. This study strongly implicated the positive effect of exercise training on DDT-induced liver oxidative stress.

  12. Curative and health enhancement effects of aquatic exercise: evidence based on interventional studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honda T

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Takuya Honda1, Hiroharu Kamioka21Research Fellow of the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science, 2Laboratory of Physical and Health Education, Faculty of Regional Environment Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to report on the health benefits and curative effects of aquatic exercise.Methods: We adopted the results of high-grade study designs (ie, randomized controlled trials and nonrandomized controlled trials, for which there were many studies on aquatic exercise. Aquatic exercise, in this study, means walking in all directions, stretching, and various exercises and conditioning performed with the feet grounded on the floor of a swimming pool. We excluded swimming. We decided to treat aquatic exercise, underwater exercise, hydrotherapy, and pool exercise as all having the same meaning.Results: Aquatic exercise had significant effects on pain relief and related outcome measurements for locomotor diseases.Conclusion: Patients may become more active, and improve their quality of life, as a result of aquatic exercise.Keywords: aquatic exercise, health enhancement, evidence

  13. Selective effects of acute exercise and breakfast interventions on mood and motivation to eat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluch, A; Hubert, P; King, N A; Blundell, J E

    2000-02-01

    The effects of exercise and breakfast manipulations on mood and motivation to eat were assessed in 11 healthy females who were regular exercisers and habitual breakfast eaters. The study involved a two by two repeated-measures design, with exercise (or no exercise) and a high-energy breakfast (or low-energy breakfast) as the repeated measures. The exercise or no-exercise session (0800 h) was followed by consumption of the low- or high-energy breakfast (0900 h). An ad libitum lunch test meal was provided 4 hours after the beginning of the exercise session (1200 h). Mood and motivation to eat were continuously tracked from 0800 until 1700 h by an electronic appetite ratings system (EARS). In general, morning subjective mood states (e.g., contentment) were significantly lower in the low-energy breakfast condition, but exercise reversed this effect. Exercise also significantly decreased feelings of lethargy, independent of the breakfast condition. Desire-to-eat and fullness ratings were significantly increased in the low-energy breakfast and high-energy breakfast conditions, respectively. Impairments of mood disappeared in the afternoon after consumption of an ad libitum lunch. In these healthy young adults, the condition inducing the largest energy deficit (exercise and low-energy breakfast) was not associated with the lowest mental states.

  14. Getting the Balance Right: A randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy and Exercise Interventions for ambulatory people with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larkin Aidan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with Multiple Sclerosis have a life long need for physiotherapy and exercise interventions due to the progressive nature of the disease and their greater risk of the complications of inactivity. The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Ireland run physiotherapy, yoga and exercise classes for their members, however there is little evidence to suggest which form of physical activity optimises outcome for people with the many and varied impairments associated with MS. Methods and design This is a multi-centre, single blind, block randomised, controlled trial. Participants will be recruited via the ten regional offices of MS Ireland. Telephone screening will establish eligibility and stratification according to the mobility section of the Guys Neurological Disability Scale. Once a block of people of the same strand in the same geographical region have given consent, participants will be randomised. Strand A will concern individuals with MS who walk independently or use one stick to walk outside. Participants will be randomised to yoga, physiotherapy led exercise class, fitness instructor led exercise class or to a control group who don't change their exercise habits. Strand B will concern individuals with MS who walk with bilateral support or a rollator, they may use a wheelchair for longer distance outdoors. Participants will be randomised to 1:1 Physiotherapist led intervention, group intervention led by Physiotherapist, group yoga intervention or a control group who don't change their exercise habits. Participants will be assessed by physiotherapist who is blind to the group allocation at week 1, week 12 (following 10 weeks intervention or control, and at 12 week follow up. The primary outcome measure for both strands is the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale. Secondary outcomes are Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, 6 Minute Walk test, and muscle strength measured with hand held dynamometry. Strand B will also use Berg Balance Test

  15. Getting the balance right: a randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy and Exercise Interventions for ambulatory people with multiple sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coote, Susan

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: People with Multiple Sclerosis have a life long need for physiotherapy and exercise interventions due to the progressive nature of the disease and their greater risk of the complications of inactivity. The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Ireland run physiotherapy, yoga and exercise classes for their members, however there is little evidence to suggest which form of physical activity optimises outcome for people with the many and varied impairments associated with MS. METHODS AND DESIGN: This is a multi-centre, single blind, block randomised, controlled trial. Participants will be recruited via the ten regional offices of MS Ireland. Telephone screening will establish eligibility and stratification according to the mobility section of the Guys Neurological Disability Scale. Once a block of people of the same strand in the same geographical region have given consent, participants will be randomised. Strand A will concern individuals with MS who walk independently or use one stick to walk outside. Participants will be randomised to yoga, physiotherapy led exercise class, fitness instructor led exercise class or to a control group who don\\'t change their exercise habits.Strand B will concern individuals with MS who walk with bilateral support or a rollator, they may use a wheelchair for longer distance outdoors. Participants will be randomised to 1:1 Physiotherapist led intervention, group intervention led by Physiotherapist, group yoga intervention or a control group who don\\'t change their exercise habits. Participants will be assessed by physiotherapist who is blind to the group allocation at week 1, week 12 (following 10 weeks intervention or control), and at 12 week follow up. The primary outcome measure for both strands is the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale. Secondary outcomes are Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, 6 Minute Walk test, and muscle strength measured with hand held dynamometry. Strand B will also use Berg Balance Test and the Modified

  16. Medication adherence interventions that target subjects with adherence problems: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Vicki S; Ruppar, Todd M; Enriquez, Maithe; Cooper, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate medication adherence is a pervasive, under-recognized cause of poor health outcomes. Many intervention trials designed to improve medication adherence have targeted adults with adherence problems. No previous reviews have synthesized the effectiveness of medication adherence interventions focused on subjects with medication adherence difficulties. This systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized findings from medication adherence intervention studies conducted among adults with medication adherence difficulties. Primary research studies were eligible for inclusion if they tested an intervention designed to increase medication adherence among adults with documented adherence difficulties and reported medication adherence behavior outcomes. Comprehensive search strategies of 13 computerized databases, author and ancestry searches, and hand searches of 57 journals were used to locate eligible primary research. Participant demographics, intervention characteristics, and methodological features were reliably coded from reports along with medication adherence outcomes. Effect sizes for outcomes were calculated as standardized mean differences, and random effects models were used to estimate overall mean effects. Exploratory dichotomous and continuous variable moderator analyses were employed to examine potential associations between medication adherence effect size and sample, intervention, and methodological characteristics. Data were extracted from 53 reports of studies involving 8243 individual primary study participants. The overall standardized mean difference effect size for treatment vs. control subjects was 0.301. For treatment pre- vs. post-intervention comparisons, the overall effect size was 0.533. Significantly larger effect sizes were associated with interventions incorporating prompts to take medications than interventions lacking medication prompts (0.497 vs. 0.234). Larger effect sizes were also found for interventions that linked

  17. Medication Adherence Interventions That Target Subjects with Adherence Problems: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Vicki S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Enriquez, Maithe; Cooper, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate medication adherence is a pervasive, under-recognized cause of poor health outcomes. Many intervention trials designed to improve medication adherence have targeted adults with adherence problems. No previous reviews have synthesized the effectiveness of medication adherence interventions focused on subjects with medication adherence difficulties. Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized findings from medication adherence intervention studies conducted among adults with medication adherence difficulties. Methods Primary research studies were eligible for inclusion if they tested an intervention designed to increase medication adherence among adults with documented adherence difficulties and reported medication adherence behavior outcomes. Comprehensive search strategies of 13 computerized databases, author and ancestry searches, and hand searches of 57 journals were used to locate eligible primary research. Participant demographics, intervention characteristics, and methodological features were reliably coded from reports along with medication adherence outcomes. Effect sizes for outcomes were calculated as standardized mean differences, and random effects models were used to estimate overall mean effects. Exploratory dichotomous and continuous variable moderator analyses were employed to examine potential associations between medication adherence effect size and sample, intervention, and methodological characteristics. Results Data were extracted from 53 reports of studies involving 8,243 individual primary study participants. The overall standardized mean difference effect size for treatment vs. control subjects was 0.301. For treatment pre- vs. post-intervention comparisons, the overall effect size was 0.533. Significantly larger effect sizes were associated with interventions incorporating prompts to take medications than interventions lacking medication prompts (0.497 vs. 0.234). Larger effect sizes were also found

  18. Effect of exercise combined with dietary intervention on obese children and adolescents associated with the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Z-C; -J Mao, L; Shi, Y-Y; Chen, J-H; Wang, L-S; Cai, W

    2015-12-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the association of the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism with the effects of the exercise and dietary intervention on obese adolescents and children in China. Total 138 chinese children and adolescents (77 males and 61 females, aged 10-18 years) were recruited in the 2012 summer camp in Shanghai. Dietary and exercise intervention was performed for four weeks. Obesity related parameters were detected by the physical examination before and after four-week's intervention. Genotyping of the FTO rs9939609 was performed by using a TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assay. SPSS 19.0 were used to do the statistical analysis. Finally, 135 campers were investigated in this study. The AA, AT and TT genotype frequencies of rs9939609 were 5.2%, 33.3% and 61.5%, respectively. The BMI in individuals with the genotype AA (or AT) was significantly higher compared with their with TT genotype (p = 0.044). The levels of body mass index (BMI), insulin (INS), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), red blood cell (RBC), Hemoglobin (HB) and hematocrit (HCT) in campers were significantly declined by the combined intervention (p < 0.05). Moreover, the levels of TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), RBC, HB, and HCT in the camper with genotype AA (or AT) were significantly decreased by the combined intervention compared with the camper with genotype TT (p < 0.05). The effects of exercise combined with dietary intervention on obesity were associated with the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism in chinese adolescents and children.

  19. Applying contemporary neuroscience in exercise interventions for chronic spinal pain: treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfliet, Anneleen; Kregel, Jeroen; Meeus, Mira; Cagnie, Barbara; Roussel, Nathalie; Dolphens, Mieke; Danneels, Lieven; Nijs, Jo

    Nonspecific chronic spinal pain is a common problem within the chronic pain population and is characterized by high social, economic and personal impact. To date, therapists are still struggling in adequately treating these types of patients, as seen in the small and short-term benefits of frequently applied primary care treatments. It is remarkable that despite the well-documented presence of abnormalities in central nociceptive processing in nonspecific chronic spinal pain patients, the implementation of this knowledge in clinical practice is still nearly non-existent. This paper provides the treatment protocol used in a large randomized controlled trial that aimed to assess the effectiveness of a modern neuroscience approach compared to usual care evidence-based physiotherapy. This comprehensive pain neuroscience treatment program combines pain neuroscience education and cognition-targeted exercise therapy. Based on previous small-scaled studies, this treatment protocol is expected to normalize central alterations by addressing central nervous system dysfunctions, psychological factors, as well as peripheral dysfunctions in a broader biopsychosocially-driven framework. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. A trial of an iPad™ intervention targeting social communication skills in children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Watson, Sue; Petrou, Alexandra; Scott-Barrett, Juliet; Dicks, Pamela; Graham, Catherine; O'Hare, Anne; Pain, Helen; McConachie, Helen

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated a technology-based early intervention for social communication skills in pre-schoolers in a randomised controlled trial. Participants were 54 children aged under 6 years with a diagnosis of autism, assigned to either intervention or control conditions. The app engaged children, who played consistently, regardless of developmental level, and was rated highly by parents. There were no significant group differences in parent-report measures post-intervention, nor in a measure of parent-child play at follow-up. Therefore, this intervention did not have an observable impact on real-world social communication skills and caution is recommended about the potential usefulness of iPad(™) apps for amelioration of difficulties in interaction. However, positive attitudes among participants, lack of harms and the potential of apps to deliver therapeutic content at low economic cost suggest this approach is worth pursuing further, perhaps targeting other skill domains. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Understanding the barriers and enablers to implementation of a self-managed exercise intervention: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Chris; Mawson, Sue; May, Stephen; Walters, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    Despite a proliferation of research evidence, there remains a 'gap' between what this evidence suggests and what happens in clinical practice. One reason why physiotherapists might not implement research evidence is because the findings do not align with their current practice preferences. While conducting a multicentre RCT we aimed to explore possible implementation barriers and facilitators with regard to the intervention under evaluation; a self-managed loaded exercise programme for rotator cuff tendinopathy. A qualitative study within the framework of a mixed methods design. Data was collected using individual semi-structured interviews and analysed using the framework method. Three NHS physiotherapy departments. Thirteen physiotherapists. Six themes were generated: (1) the physiotherapists preferred therapeutic option; (2) the role of the physiotherapist; (3) attributes of the intervention; (4) attitude to symptom response; (5) response to therapy, and (6) continuing professional development. Differences between the preferred therapeutic approach of the physiotherapists and the self-managed exercise intervention were apparent; particularly in relation to the type and number of exercises, the use of manual therapy and the extent of loading. The physiotherapists recognised their role as knowledge translators but certain attributes of the intervention appeared to serve as both a barrier and facilitator; particularly the simplicity. Opinion regarding the optimal symptom response during exercise prescription also differed. Some relevant and important physiotherapist related barriers and facilitators concerning implementation of research findings have been identified. The influence of these factors needs to be recognised and considered. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of exercise and protein supplementation intervention on body composition, functional fitness, and oxidative stress among elderly Malays with sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Suzana; Kamaruddin, Norshafarina Shari; Badrasawi, Manal; Sakian, Noor Ibrahim Mohamed; Abd Manaf, Zahara; Yassin, Zaitun; Joseph, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia, characterized as muscle loss that occurs with aging, is a major health problem in an aging population, due to its implications on mobility, quality of life, and fall risk. Protein supplementation could improve the physical fitness by increasing protein anabolism, and exercise has a documented evidence of positive effect on functional status among the elderly. However, the combined effect of both protein supplementation and exercise has not been investigated among sarcopenic elderly in the Asian population. Thus, this study aimed to determine the effectiveness of exercise intervention and protein supplementation either alone or in combination for 12 weeks, on body composition, functional fitness, and oxidative stress among elderly Malays with sarcopenia. Sixty five sarcopenic elderly Malays aged 60-74 years were assigned to the control group, exercise group (ExG), protein supplementation group (PrG), or the combination of exercise and protein supplementation group. A significant interaction effect between body weight and body mass index (BMI) was observed, with the PrG (-2.1% body weight, -1.8% BMI) showing the highest reductions. Further, there was a decrease in % body fat (-4.5%) and an increase in fat-free mass (kg) (+5.7%) in the ExG after 12 weeks (P Malaysia.

  3. Effects of a giant exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity among nursing home residents: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, Alexandre; Gillet, Nicolas; Mouton, Flore; Van Kann, Dave; Bruyère, Olivier; Cloes, Marc; Buckinx, Fanny

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a giant (4×3 m) exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA) and a broader array of physical and psychological outcomes among nursing home residents. A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was carried out in two comparable nursing homes. Ten participants (aged 82.5±6.3 and comprising 6 women) meeting the inclusion criteria took part in the 1-month intervention in one nursing home, whereas 11 participants (aged 89.9±3.1 with 8 women) were assigned to the control group in the other nursing home. The giant exercising board game required participants to per-form strength, flexibility, balance and endurance activities. The assistance provided by an exercising specialist decreased gradually during the intervention in an autonomy-oriented approach based on the self-determination theory. The following were assessed at baseline, after the intervention and after a follow-up period of 3 months: PA (steps/day and energy expenditure/day with ActiGraph), cognitive status (mini mental state examination), quality of life (EuroQol 5-dimensions), motivation for PA (Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2), gait and balance (Tinetti and Short Physical Performance Battery), functional mobility (timed up and go), and the muscular isometric strength of the lower limb muscles. In the intervention group, PA increased from 2,921 steps/day at baseline to 3,358 steps/day after the intervention (+14.9%, P =0.04) and 4,083 steps/day (+39.8%, P =0.03) after 3 months. Energy expenditure/day also increased after the intervention (+110 kcal/day, +6.3%, P =0.01) and after 3 months (+219 kcal/day, +12.3%, P =0.02). Quality of life ( P <0.05), balance and gait ( P <0.05), and strength of the ankle ( P <0.05) were also improved after 3 months. Such improvements were not observed in the control group. The preliminary results are promising but further investigation is required to confirm and evaluate the long-term effectiveness

  4. Feasibility and Impact of a Combined Supervised Exercise and Nutritional-Behavioral Intervention following Bariatric Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich C. Jassil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lifestyle intervention programs after bariatric surgery have been suggested to maximise health outcomes. This pilot study aimed to investigate the feasibility and impact of an 8-week combined supervised exercise with nutritional-behavioral intervention following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. Methods. Eight female patients (44 ± 8 years old, BMI = 38.5 ± 7.2 kgm−2 completed the program. Before and after intervention, anthropometric measures, six-minute walk test (6MWT, physical activity level, eating behavior, and quality of life (QoL were assessed. Percentage weight loss (%WL outcomes were compared with a historical matched control group. Results. The program significantly improved functional capacity (mean increment in 6MWT was 127 ± 107 meters, p=0.043, increased strenuous intensity exercise (44 ± 49 min/week, p=0.043, increased consumption of fruits and vegetables (p=0.034, reduced consumption of ready meals (p=0.034, and improved “Change in Health” in QoL domain (p=0.039. The intervention group exhibited greater %WL in the 3–12-month postsurgery period compared to historical controls, 12.2 ± 7.5% versus 5.1 ± 5.4%, respectively (p=0.027. Conclusions. Lifestyle intervention program following bariatric surgery is feasible and resulted in several beneficial outcomes. A large randomised control trial is now warranted.

  5. A systematic review of the behavioural outcomes following exercise interventions for children and youth with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Emily; Crozier, Michael; Lloyd, Meghann

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to systematically search and critically analyse the literature pertaining to behavioural outcomes of exercise interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder aged ⩽16 years. This systematic review employed a comprehensive peer-reviewed search strategy, two-stage screening process and rigorous critical appraisal, which resulted in the inclusion of 13 studies. Results demonstrated that exercise interventions consisting individually of jogging, horseback riding, martial arts, swimming or yoga/dance can result in improvements to numerous behavioural outcomes including stereotypic behaviours, social-emotional functioning, cognition and attention. Horseback riding and martial arts interventions may produce the greatest results with moderate to large effect sizes, respectively. Future research with well-controlled designs, standardized assessments, larger sample sizes and longitudinal follow-ups is necessary, in addition to a greater focus on early childhood (aged 0-5 years) and adolescence (aged 12-16 years), to better understand the extent of the behavioural benefits that exercise may provide these populations. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Peter; Mjøsund, Hanne L; Petersen, Ditte H D

    2010-04-08

    A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted) treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Current Contents, AMED and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were electronically searched, reference lists were examined and citation tracking performed. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLPB that used trial designs capable of providing robust information on targeted treatment (treatment effect modification) for the outcomes of activity limitation and pain. Included trials needed to be hypothesis-testing studies published in English, Danish or Norwegian. Method quality was assessed using the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Four high-quality randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLBP met the inclusion criteria. One study showed statistically significant effects for short-term outcomes using McKenzie directional preference-based exercise. Research into subgroups requires much larger sample sizes than traditional two-group trials and other included studies showed effects that might be clinically important in size but were not statistically significant with their samples sizes. The clinical implications of these results are that they provide very cautious evidence supporting the notion that treatment targeted to subgroups of patients with NSLBP may improve patient outcomes. The results of the studies included in this review are too patchy, inconsistent and the

  7. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mjøsund Hanne L

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP. Method MEDLINE, EMBASE, Current Contents, AMED and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were electronically searched, reference lists were examined and citation tracking performed. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLPB that used trial designs capable of providing robust information on targeted treatment (treatment effect modification for the outcomes of activity limitation and pain. Included trials needed to be hypothesis-testing studies published in English, Danish or Norwegian. Method quality was assessed using the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Results Four high-quality randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLBP met the inclusion criteria. One study showed statistically significant effects for short-term outcomes using McKenzie directional preference-based exercise. Research into subgroups requires much larger sample sizes than traditional two-group trials and other included studies showed effects that might be clinically important in size but were not statistically significant with their samples sizes. Conclusions The clinical implications of these results are that they provide very cautious evidence supporting the notion that treatment targeted to subgroups of patients with NSLBP may improve patient outcomes. The results of the

  8. Development and delivery of a physiotherapist-led exercise intervention in a randomised controlled trial for subacromial impingement syndrome (the SUPPORT trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kay; Jackson, Sue; Shufflebotham, Julie; Roddy, Edward; Foster, Nadine E

    2017-03-24

    This paper describes the development, content and delivery of a physiotherapist- led individualised, supervised and progressed exercise programme for use in a factorial randomised controlled trial testing treatments for subacromial impingement syndrome. To develop the intervention, a survey of community physiotherapists and national guidelines provided the basis for a consensus workshop through which a protocol was developed for the SUPPORT trial physiotherapist-led exercise programme (SUPPORT: SUbacromial impingement syndrome and Pain: a randomised controlled trial Of exeRcise and injection). The protocol included three stages of exercise progression: (1) scapular stability and active exercise with no resistance (2) range of motion exercise with scapular control, isometrics and stretches, and (3) through range resistance exercise. A two day training programme was developed for physiotherapists which included the trial background, current evidence and strategies to improve exercise adherence. Twenty physiotherapists were trained to deliver the exercise intervention. In the SUPPORT trial, 128 participants were randomised to physiotherapist-led exercise. Ninety nine (81%) participants had their first physiotherapy session within 2 to 3 weeks and 71 (56%) received six to eight treatment sessions. Frequently-used exercises were: stage 1 scapular setting with glenohumeral joint (GHJ) flexion to 90°, stage 2 GHJ medial rotation stretch, stage 3 scapular setting through lateral rotation, with resistance bands. We combined clinical and research expertise with national guidance in order to develop a physiotherapist-led, individualised, progressed and supervised exercise intervention for use within a randomised trial. The effectiveness of the intervention is being evaluated within the SUPPORT trial. Trial registration number ISRCTN 42399123. Copyright © 2017 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Parental Factors Associated with Child Post-traumatic Stress Following Injury: A Consideration of Intervention Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Anna E.; Delahanty, Douglas L.

    2017-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are relatively common following pediatric traumatic injury and are related to poor long-term child outcomes. However, due to concerns regarding the efficacy of early child preventive interventions, and difficulty intervening with injured and medicated children soon after the event, it is not feasible to provide early psychological interventions to children exposed to traumatic injury. Parental PTSD symptoms and reactions to the child’s traumatic injury impact child outcomes and provide potential targets for early intervention to reduce child symptom development without involving the child. The authors conducted a review of the literature using Psycinfo and Pubmed research databases (publication years = 1990–2017) and identified 65 published studies relevant to the topic of the review. The present review considers parent factors [parenting styles, parental post-traumatic pathology (PTS), adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies, and communication regarding the traumatic injury] and their impact on child PTS. We focus specifically on factors amenable to intervention. We further review moderators of these relationships (e.g., child age and gender, parent gender) and conclude that it is unlikely that a one-size-fits-all approach to treatment will be successful. Rather, it is necessary to consider the age and gender of parent child dyads in designing and providing targeted interventions to families following the traumatic injury of a child. PMID:28878711

  10. Parental Factors Associated with Child Post-traumatic Stress Following Injury: A Consideration of Intervention Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Wise

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms are relatively common following pediatric traumatic injury and are related to poor long-term child outcomes. However, due to concerns regarding the efficacy of early child preventive interventions, and difficulty intervening with injured and medicated children soon after the event, it is not feasible to provide early psychological interventions to children exposed to traumatic injury. Parental PTSD symptoms and reactions to the child’s traumatic injury impact child outcomes and provide potential targets for early intervention to reduce child symptom development without involving the child. The authors conducted a review of the literature using Psycinfo and Pubmed research databases (publication years = 1990–2017 and identified 65 published studies relevant to the topic of the review. The present review considers parent factors [parenting styles, parental post-traumatic pathology (PTS, adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies, and communication regarding the traumatic injury] and their impact on child PTS. We focus specifically on factors amenable to intervention. We further review moderators of these relationships (e.g., child age and gender, parent gender and conclude that it is unlikely that a one-size-fits-all approach to treatment will be successful. Rather, it is necessary to consider the age and gender of parent child dyads in designing and providing targeted interventions to families following the traumatic injury of a child.

  11. A Boxing-Oriented Exercise Intervention for Obese Adolescent Males: Findings from a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah P. Shultz, Lee Stoner, Danielle M. Lambrick, Andrew M. Lane

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In New Zealand, obese Māori and Pasifika adolescents are at risk of numerous cardio-metabolic conditions with raising physical activity levels being proposed as a useful intervention. The present study used a mixed method design to explore the effects of a non-contact boxing-oriented training programme designed in terms of improvements to cardio-metabolic variables. Traditional recruitment strategies (media, referrals were employed, with limited success leading to 3 adolescent boys (14-15 y participating in the pilot intervention. Exercise sessions included 30 minutes of non-contact boxing training, followed by 30 minutes of progressive resistance training. Participants attended three 1h training sessions each week, for a total of 12 weeks. Physiological variables included anthropometric indices, visceral fat thickness, central blood pressures, central arterial stiffness (augmentation index: AIx, and carotid arterial stiffness (β. Results revealed that there was no trend for change in body weight (125.5 ± 12.1 kg vs. 126.5 ± 11.0 kg or BMI (39.3 ± 4.1 kg·m-2 vs. 39.0 ± 4.6 kg·m-2. However, there was a moderate decrease in visceral fat thickness (4.34 ± 2.51 cm vs 3.65 ± 1.11 cm, d = 0.36. There was no change in central pulse pressure (38.7 ± 7.3 mmHg vs. 38.3 ± 5.0 mmHg, however, there was a small improvement in β (3.01 ± 0.73 vs. 2.87 ± 0.84, d = 0.18. Focus group interview data with participants and their parents were used to explore issues related to motivation to participation. Results revealed participants commented on how the programme has led to new friendships, changes to their physical appearance, and increased physical fitness. Parents commented on increased self-confidence, better performance in school, and a willingness to take part in new activities. In conclusion, it appears participating in the boxing oriented training programme was motivating to participants who engaged and had some physiological benefits in obese

  12. Effectiveness of interventions targeting frequent users of emergency departments: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Althaus, F.

    2012-01-01

    L'article publié de le cadre de cette thèse est intitulé "Effectiveness of interventions targeting frequent users of emergency departments: A systematic review." Il a été publié par les "Annals of Emergency Medicine (AEM)" en juillet 2011. Le titre en français pourrait être: "Efficacité des interventions ciblant les utilisateurs fréquents des services d'urgence: Une revue systématique." Le titre du journal américain pourrait être: "Annales de Médecine d'Urgence". Il s'agit du journal du "Coll...

  13. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a blended exercise intervention for patients with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis : Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloek, C.J.J.; Bossen, D.; Veenhof, C.; van Dongen, J.M.; Dekker, J.; de Bakker, D.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise therapy in patients with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis is effective in reducing pain, increasing physical activity and physical functioning, but costly and a burden for the health care budget. A web-based intervention is cheap in comparison to face-to-face exercise therapy and

  14. Feasibility of a home-based exercise intervention with remote guidance for patients with stable grade II and III gliomas : A pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gehring, K.; Kloek, C.J.J.; Aaronson, Neil K; Janssen, K.; Jones, Lee; Sitskoorn, M.M.; Stuiver, M.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: In this pilot study, we investigated the feasibility of a home-based, remotely guided exercise intervention for patients with gliomas. Design: Pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with randomization (2:1) to exercise or control group. Subjects: Patients with stable grade II and III

  15. Exercise-based interventions and C-reactive protein in overweight and obese youths: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García-Hermoso, Antonio; Sánchez-López, Mairena; Escalante, Yolanda; Saavedra, Jose M; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    .... Two independent reviewers assessed articles from seven databases. Studies were limited to physical exercise interventions in children and adolescents diagnosed as overweight or obese, and including a comparison control group...

  16. A physiotherapist-delivered, combined exercise and pain coping skills training intervention for individuals with knee osteoarthritis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Keefe, Francis J; Bryant, Christina; Metcalf, Ben R; Ahamed, Yasmin; Nicholas, Michael K; Bennell, Kim L

    2013-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is associated with a number of physical and psychological impairments. Unfortunately, very few treatment strategies are capable of addressing both types of impairments concurrently. We performed a pilot, randomized controlled, proof of principle trial investigating the feasibility and effects of an intervention combining physical exercise and pain coping skills training (PCST). Twenty patients with a clinical and radiographical diagnosis of tibiofemoral OA were randomized to receive either 10 weeks of physiotherapist supervised exercises (lower limb strengthening and walking) combined with non-directive counseling (NDC) or the same exercise program delivered concurrently with PCST. Primary outcomes included self-reported pain and pain coping, while secondary outcomes included self efficacy and self-reported physical function. Ten participants were randomized to each group and both groups exhibited significant improvements in isometric knee strength, self-reported knee pain and physical function, self efficacy for control of pain management and other arthritis symptoms. Only those in the exercise + PCST group reported statistically significant improvements in pain control coping and rational thinking. No between-group differences existed in any outcome (0.07 < p < 0.98). Based on our findings, 63 participants per group would be needed for future large-scale studies using similar outcome measures and design. Our study showed that an intervention that combines exercise and PCST within the same treatment session and delivered by specially-trained physiotherapists is feasible and can improve both physical and psychological outcomes in individuals with knee OA. Level II Clinical Trials Registry number: ACTRN12609000623291. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Two-Year BMI Outcomes From a School-Based Intervention for Nutrition and Exercise: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Laura M; Elliott, Marc N; Cowgill, Burton O; Klein, David J; Hawes-Dawson, Jennifer; Uyeda, Kimberly; Schuster, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the long-term effects on BMI of a randomized controlled trial of Students for Nutrition and Exercise, a 5-week, middle school-based obesity prevention intervention combining school-wide environmental changes, encouragement to eat healthy school cafeteria foods, and peer-led education and marketing. We randomly selected schools from the Los Angeles Unified School District and assigned 5 to the intervention group and 5 to a wait-list control group. Of the 4022 seventh-graders across schools, a total of 1368 students had their height and weight assessed at baseline and 2 years' postintervention. A multivariable linear regression was used to predict BMI percentile at ninth grade by using BMI percentile at seventh grade, school indicators, and sociodemographic characteristics (child gender, age, Latino race/ethnicity, US-born status, and National School Lunch Program eligibility [as a proxy for low-income status]). Although the Students for Nutrition and Exercise intervention did not exhibit significant effects on BMI percentile overall, intervention students who were classified as obese at baseline (in seventh grade) showed significant reductions in BMI percentile in ninth grade (b = -2.33 percentiles; SE, 0.83; P = .005) compared with control students. This outcome translated into ∼9 pounds (∼4.1 kg) lower expected body weight after 2 years for an obese student in the intervention school at the mean height and age of the sample at baseline. Multilevel school-based interventions can have long-term effects on BMI among students who are obese. Future research should examine the mechanisms by which school-based obesity interventions can affect BMI over time. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Adapting an Evidence-Based Intervention Targeting HIV-Infected Prisoners in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Copenhaver

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-infected prisoners in Malaysia represent a critical target population for secondary HIV risk reduction interventions and care. We report on the process and outcome of our formative research aimed at systematically selecting and adapting an EBI designed to reduce secondary HIV risk and improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy among soon-to-be-released HIV-infected prisoners. Our formative work involved a critical examination of established EBIs and associated published reports complemented by data elicited through structured interviews and focus groups with key stakeholders, members of the target population, and their family members. Based on all information, we adapted the Holistic Health Recovery Program targeting people living with HIV (HHRP+, an EBI, to consist of eight 2-hour sessions that cover a range of specified topics so that participants may individually apply intervention content as needed to accommodate their particular substance abuse, HIV risk, and antiretroviral adherence issues. This study provides a complete example of the process of selecting and adapting an EBI—taking into account both empirical evidence and input from target organization stakeholders and target population members and their families—for use in real world prison settings where high-risk populations are concentrated.

  19. When Intervention Meets Organisation, a Qualitative Study of Motivation and Barriers to Physical Exercise at the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Særvoll, Charlotte Ahlgren; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To provide a comprehensive understanding of the motivational factors and barriers that are important for compliance with high-intensity workplace physical exercise that is aimed at reducing musculoskeletal disorders. Method. The present study, which used semideductive, thematic, and structured in-depth interviews, was nested in a 20-week cluster randomised controlled trial among office workers. Interviews were conducted with 18 informants with diverse fields of sedentary office work who participated in strength training at the workplace for 20 minutes, three times per week. Organisational, implementational, and individual motives and barriers were explored. Results & Discussion. The results show that attention should be given to the interaction between the management, the employees, and the intervention, as the main barrier to compliance was the internal working culture. The results emphasised the need for a clear connection between the management's implementational intentions and the actual implementation. The results emphasise the importance of ensuring the legitimacy of the intervention among managers, participants, and colleagues. Moreover, it is important to centrally organise, structure, and ensure flexibility in the working day to free time for participants to attend the intervention. Recommendations from this study suggest that a thorough intervention mapping process should be performed to analyse organisational and implementational factors before initiating workplace physical exercise training. PMID:26380361

  20. When Intervention Meets Organisation, a Qualitative Study of Motivation and Barriers to Physical Exercise at the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredahl, Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup; Særvoll, Charlotte Ahlgren; Kirkelund, Lasse; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2015-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive understanding of the motivational factors and barriers that are important for compliance with high-intensity workplace physical exercise that is aimed at reducing musculoskeletal disorders. The present study, which used semideductive, thematic, and structured in-depth interviews, was nested in a 20-week cluster randomised controlled trial among office workers. Interviews were conducted with 18 informants with diverse fields of sedentary office work who participated in strength training at the workplace for 20 minutes, three times per week. Organisational, implementational, and individual motives and barriers were explored. The results show that attention should be given to the interaction between the management, the employees, and the intervention, as the main barrier to compliance was the internal working culture. The results emphasised the need for a clear connection between the management's implementational intentions and the actual implementation. The results emphasise the importance of ensuring the legitimacy of the intervention among managers, participants, and colleagues. Moreover, it is important to centrally organise, structure, and ensure flexibility in the working day to free time for participants to attend the intervention. Recommendations from this study suggest that a thorough intervention mapping process should be performed to analyse organisational and implementational factors before initiating workplace physical exercise training.

  1. When Intervention Meets Organisation, a Qualitative Study of Motivation and Barriers to Physical Exercise at the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup Bredahl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide a comprehensive understanding of the motivational factors and barriers that are important for compliance with high-intensity workplace physical exercise that is aimed at reducing musculoskeletal disorders. Method. The present study, which used semideductive, thematic, and structured in-depth interviews, was nested in a 20-week cluster randomised controlled trial among office workers. Interviews were conducted with 18 informants with diverse fields of sedentary office work who participated in strength training at the workplace for 20 minutes, three times per week. Organisational, implementational, and individual motives and barriers were explored. Results & Discussion. The results show that attention should be given to the interaction between the management, the employees, and the intervention, as the main barrier to compliance was the internal working culture. The results emphasised the need for a clear connection between the management’s implementational intentions and the actual implementation. The results emphasise the importance of ensuring the legitimacy of the intervention among managers, participants, and colleagues. Moreover, it is important to centrally organise, structure, and ensure flexibility in the working day to free time for participants to attend the intervention. Recommendations from this study suggest that a thorough intervention mapping process should be performed to analyse organisational and implementational factors before initiating workplace physical exercise training.

  2. Cervical radiculopathy: Study protocol of a randomised clinical trial evaluating the effect of mobilisations and exercises targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen [NCT01500044

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langevin Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical radiculopathy is a common form of neck pain and has been shown to lead to severe disability. Clinical rehabilitation approaches for cervical radiculopathies commonly include exercise and manual therapy interventions targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen, but evidence regarding their effectiveness is scarce. The primary objective of this randomised clinical trial is to compare, in terms of pain and disability, a rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen to a conventional rehabilitation program, for patients presenting acute or subacute cervical radiculopathies. The hypothesis is that the rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen will be significantly more effective in reducing pain and disability than the conventional rehabilitation program. Methods/Design This study is a double-blind (participants and evaluators blinded randomised clinical trial that will allow the comparison of patients with a cervical radiculopathy randomly assigned to one of two groups: one group will receive a 4-week rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen, and the second group will receive a 4-week conventional rehabilitation program. Thirty-six subjects with cervical radiculopathy will be recruited from participating medical and physiotherapy clinics and will be evaluated at baseline, at the end of the 4-week program and four weeks following the end of the program. The primary outcome measure will be the validated Neck Disability Index questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures will include the short version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, a numerical pain rating scale, cervicothoracic mobility and patients' perceived global rating of change. During the 4-week rehabilitation program, each participant will take part in eight physiotherapy treatment sessions (2 session/week and will perform a home exercise program. A

  3. The pain-relieving qualities of exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susko AM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Allyn M Susko, G Kelley Fitzgerald Department of Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The purpose of this review article is to explore the role of therapeutic exercise in managing the pain associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Therapeutic exercise is often recommended as a first-line conservative treatment for knee OA, and current evidence supports exercise as an effective pain-relieving intervention. We explore the current state of evidence for exercise as a pain-relieving intervention for knee OA. Next, the mechanisms by which knee OA pain occurs and the potential ways in which exercise may act on those mechanisms are discussed. Clinical applicability and future research directions are suggested. Although evidence demonstrates that exercise reduces knee OA pain, optimal exercise mode and dosage have not been determined. In addition, it is not clearly understood whether exercise provides pain relief via peripheral or central mechanisms or a combination of both. Published clinical trials have explored a variety of interventions, but these interventions have not been specifically designed to target pain pathways. Current evidence strongly supports exercise as a pain-relieving option for those with knee OA. Future research needs to illuminate the mechanisms by which exercise reduces the pain associated with knee OA and the development of therapeutic exercise interventions to specifically target these mechanisms. Keywords: knee, OA, exercise, pain

  4. A multi-modal intervention in management of left ventricular assist device outpatients: dietary counselling, controlled exercise and psychosocial support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Christiane; Malehsa, Doris; Schrader, Eva; Tegtbur, Uwe; Guetzlaff, Elke; Haverich, Axel; Strueber, Martin

    2012-12-01

    Newer generation left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are established for long-term support. The aim of this multi-modal intervention was to improve the body weight, exercise tolerance and psychosocial status in outpatients on long-term LVAD support. Seventy patients participated in this non-randomized intervention study [intervention group (IGr) n = 34; control group (CGr) n = 36] over 18 months (T1-T4); the baseline sample characteristics showed no differences between groups. Dietary counselling and weight management intervention was performed by a dietician based on a specific algorithm. Physical reconditioning followed a home ergometry protocol and was supplemented by psychosocial counselling. The outcomes were measured based on the body mass index (BMI), cardiopulmonary exercise testing and self-report [hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), SF-36]. The intervention showed a strong positive effect on nutrition and weight management [95% confidence interval (CI): -0.71-0.69; effect size (ES): 0.907; P = 0.02)], resulting in the normal BMI (kg/m(2)) values in the IGr (T1: 24.0 ± 0.6; T4: 24.5 ± 1.1; P = 0.35) compared with a significant BMI increase in the CGr (T1: 23.8 ± 0.6; T4: 29.7 ± 0.8; P = 0.05). Significant differences appeared regarding exercise tolerance (VO(2)max/% predicted) in favour of IGr patients (IGr: 69 ± 2.9; CGr 62 ± 3.7; P = 0.04). This increase was reflected by patients' self-reporting based on the SF-36 physical component score (IGr: P = 0.04; CGr: P = 0.54). SF-36 psychosocial component scores showed no changes for both groups. However, CGr showed a tendency for increased anxiety scores relative to their counterparts (IGr: 4.95 ± 0.4; CGr: 6.6 ± 0.9; P = 0.03). IGr patients showed a strong benefit from a multi-modal intervention, including dietary counselling, controlled exercise and psychosocial support. Dietary counselling holds potential to prevent obesity in this patient population.

  5. Effects of Three Types of Exercise Interventions on Healthy Old Adults' Gait Speed: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortobágyi, Tibor; Lesinski, Melanie; Gäbler, Martijn; VanSwearingen, Jessie M; Malatesta, Davide; Granacher, Urs

    2015-12-01

    Habitual walking speed predicts many clinical conditions later in life, but it declines with age. However, which particular exercise intervention can minimize the age-related gait speed loss is unclear. Our objective was to determine the effects of strength, power, coordination, and multimodal exercise training on healthy old adults' habitual and fast gait speed. We performed a computerized systematic literature search in PubMed and Web of Knowledge from January 1984 up to December 2014. Search terms included 'Resistance training', 'power training', 'coordination training', 'multimodal training', and 'gait speed (outcome term). Inclusion criteria were articles available in full text, publication period over past 30 years, human species, journal articles, clinical trials, randomized controlled trials, English as publication language, and subject age ≥65 years. The methodological quality of all eligible intervention studies was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. We computed weighted average standardized mean differences of the intervention-induced adaptations in gait speed using a random-effects model and tested for overall and individual intervention effects relative to no-exercise controls. A total of 42 studies (mean PEDro score of 5.0 ± 1.2) were included in the analyses (2495 healthy old adults; age 74.2 years [64.4-82.7]; body mass 69.9 ± 4.9 kg, height 1.64 ± 0.05 m, body mass index 26.4 ± 1.9 kg/m2, and gait speed 1.22 ± 0.18 m/s). The search identified only one power training study, therefore the subsequent analyses focused only on the effects of resistance, coordination, and multimodal training on gait speed. The three types of intervention improved gait speed in the three experimental groups combined (n = 1297) by 0.10 m/s (±0.12) or 8.4% (±9.7), with a large effect size (ES) of 0.84. Resistance (24 studies; n = 613; 0.11 m/s; 9.3%; ES: 0.84), coordination (eight studies, n = 198; 0.09 m/s; 7.6%; ES: 0.76), and

  6. Developing Targeted Health Service Interventions Using the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model: Two Australian Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane L. Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives. This paper provides an overview of the applicability of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to the development of targeted nursing led chronic illness interventions. Background. Changing health care practice is a complex and dynamic process that requires consideration of social, political, economic, and organisational factors. An understanding of the characteristics of the target population, health professionals, and organizations plus identification of the determinants for change are also required. Synthesizing this data to guide the development of an effective intervention is a challenging process. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model has been used in global health care settings to guide the identification, planning, implementation, and evaluation of various health improvement initiatives. Design. Using a reflective case study approach, this paper examines the applicability of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to the development of targeted chronic care improvement interventions for two distinct Australian populations: a rapidly expanding and aging rural population with unmet palliative care needs and a disadvantaged urban community at higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Results. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model approach demonstrated utility across diverse health settings in a systematic planning process. In environments characterized by increasing health care needs, limited resources, and growing community expectations, adopting planning tools such as PRECEDE-PROCEED Model at a local level can facilitate the development of the most effective interventions. Relevance to Clinical Practice. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model is a strong theoretical model that guides the development of realistic nursing led interventions with the best chance of being successful in existing health care environments.

  7. TARPARE: a method for selecting target audiences for public health interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, R J; Egger, G; Francas, M

    1999-06-01

    This paper presents a model to assist the health promotion practitioner systematically compare and select what might be appropriate target groups when there are a number of segments competing for attention and resources. TARPARE assesses previously identified segments on the following criteria: T: The Total number of persons in the segment; AR: The proportion of At Risk persons in the segment; P: The Persuability of the target audience; A: The Accessibility of the target audience; R: Resources required to meet the needs of the target audience; and E: Equity, social justice considerations. The assessment can be applied qualitatively or can be applied such that scores can be assigned to each segment. Two examples are presented. TARPARE is a useful and flexible model for understanding the various segments in a population of interest and for assessing the potential viability of interventions directed at each segment. The model is particularly useful when there is a need to prioritise segments in terms of available budgets. The model provides a disciplined approach to target selection and forces consideration of what weights should be applied to the different criteria, and how these might vary for different issues or for different objectives. TARPARE also assesses segments in terms of an overall likelihood of optimal impact for each segment. Targeting high scoring segments is likely to lead to greater program success than targeting low scoring segments.

  8. A Randomized Control Intervention Investigating the Effects of Acute Exercise on Emotional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Meghan K; Rhodes, Ryan E; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2017-09-01

    Exercise may help to cope with hectic or demanding events after a stressful situation occurs. Limited research has evaluated whether exercise, prior to a stressor, helps to facilitate subsequent emotional regulation. This pilot study addresses this novel paradigm. We employed a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effects of acute exercise on emotional regulation. Participants were randomly assigned to stretch (control group, N = 10), walk (N = 9), or jog (N = 8) for 15-minutes, after which they were exposed to a film clip intended to elicit a negative emotional response. Participants' emotions were monitored before and during exercise, as well as after the film clip. Emotional responses were evaluated using the Exercise Induced Feeling Inventory and Affective Circumplex Scale. A group x time splitplot interaction effect was significant for anger (p = .046) and anxiousness (p = .038). Follow-up analyses showed that only the stretching group (p = .048) had a significantly increased anger score from baseline to post-film clip, suggesting a protective emotional effect from walking and jogging. Exercise was effective in regulating anger and anxiousness after a stressful event. These findings provide evidence for potential preventive effects of exercise in facilitating emotional regulation.

  9. Systematic review of public-targeted communication interventions to improve antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Elizabeth Louise Anne; Tolfree, Robert; Kipping, Ruth

    2017-04-01

    Excessive use of antibiotics accelerates the acquisition/spread of antimicrobial resistance. A systematic review was conducted to identify the components of successful communication interventions targeted at the general public to improve antibiotic use. The databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science and Cochrane Library were searched. Search terms were related to the population (public, community), intervention (campaign, mass media) and outcomes (antibiotic, antimicrobial resistance). References were screened for inclusion by one author with a random subset of 10% screened by a second author. No date restrictions were applied and only articles in the English language were considered. Studies had to have a control group or be an interrupted time-series. Outcomes had to measure change in antibiotic-related prescribing/consumption and/or the public's knowledge, attitudes or behaviour. Two reviewers assessed the quality of studies. Narrative synthesis was performed. Fourteen studies were included with an estimated 74-75 million participants. Most studies were conducted in the United States or Europe and targeted both the general public and clinicians. Twelve of the studies measured changes in antibiotic prescribing. There was quite strong ( P  < 0·05 to ≥ 0·01) to very strong ( P  < 0·001) evidence that interventions that targeted prescribing for RTIs were associated with decreases in antibiotic prescribing; the majority of these studies reported reductions of greater than -14% with the largest effect size reaching -30%. Multi-faceted communication interventions that target both the general public and clinicians can reduce antibiotic prescribing in high-income countries but the sustainability of reductions in antibiotic prescribing is unclear.

  10. Targeted and anonymized smartphone-based public health interventions in a participatory sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Andrew; Steele, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Public health interventions comprising information dissemination to affect behavioral adjustment have long been a significant component of public health campaigns. However, there has been limited development of public health intervention systems to make use of advances in mobile computing and telecommunications technologies. Such developments pose significant challenges to privacy and security where potentially sensitive data may be collected. In our previous work we identified and demonstrated the feasibility of using mobile devices as anonymous public health data collection devices as part of a Health Participatory Sensing Network (HPSN). An advanced capability of these networks extended in this paper would be the ability to distribute, apply, report on and analyze the usage and effectiveness of targeted public health interventions in an anonymous way. In this paper we describe such a platform, its place in the HPSN and demonstrate its feasibility through an implementation.

  11. A Camp-based Intervention Targeting Independence Among Individuals with Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Mahar, Kerry; Jandasek, Barbara; Zukerman, Jill

    2010-01-01

    Objective To design and evaluate a camp-based intervention, the goal of which was to increase independence among children, adolescents, and adults with spina bifida. Methods An intervention targeting independence was embedded within a typical week long camp experience. The intervention consisted of the following: collaborative (i.e., parent and camper) goal identification, group sessions consisting of psycho-education and cognitive tools, and goal monitoring by camp counselors. Camper and parent report of demographic variables, goal attainment, spina bifida knowledge, and independence were gathered. Interventionist report of adherence to the treatment manual was also collected. Results Campers made significant gains in individual goals, management of spina bifida responsibilities, and independence with general spina bifida tasks, with medium effect sizes observed in goal attainment. Conclusions Results indicated that significant progress was made on individually oriented goals from pre- to post-camp. Design issues are discussed. PMID:20026569

  12. Targeted community based interventions improved malaria management competencies in rural Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quakyi, Isabella A; Adjei, George O; Sullivan, David J; Stephens, Judith K; Laar, Amos; Ama Aubyn, Vivian N; Owusu, Richmond; Sakyi, Kwame S; Coleman, Nathaniel; Krampa, Francis D; Vanotoo, Linda; Tuakli, Julliette; Bortei, Bernard B; Essuman, Edward; Sorvor, Felix; Boateng, Isaac A; Bart-Plange, Constance; Addison, Ebenezer A; Winch, Peter; Adjei, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most challenging public health concerns in the developing world. To address its impact in endemic regions, several interventions are implemented by stakeholders. The Affordable Medicine Facility-malaria (AMFm) is an example of such interventions. Its activities include communication interventions to enhance the knowledge of caregivers of children under five years, licensed chemical sellers (LCS) and prescribers on malaria management with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the AMFm activities on malaria among targeted groups in two rural communities in Ghana. A communication intervention study was conducted in the Asante-Akim North and South Districts of Ghana. Repeated cross-sectional pre and post surveys were deployed. Relevant malaria messages were designed and used to develop the information, education and communication (IEC) tools for the intervention. With the aid of posters and flipcharts developed by our study, community health workers (CHWs), prescribers, and licenced chemical sellers provided proper counselling to clients on malaria management. Trained CHWs and community based volunteers educated caregivers of children under five years on malaria management at their homes and at public gatherings such as churches, mosques, schools. Chi-square tests and logistic regression were run to determine associations and control for demographic differences respectively. There was significantly high exposure to malaria/ACT interventions in the intervention district than in the comparison district (OR = 16.02; 95% CI = 7.88-32.55) and same for malaria/ACT-related knowledge (OR = 3.63; 95% CI = 2.52-5.23). The participants in the intervention district were also more knowledgeable about correct administration of dispersible drug for children communication campaigns contributed to the AMFm-related awareness, improved knowledge on malaria/ACTs and management practices.

  13. Exercise intervention during pregnancy can be used to manage weight gain and improve pregnancy outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Zhu, Weiwei; Wei, Yumei; Feng, Hui; Su, Rina; Yang, Huixia

    2015-10-12

    The study aimed to evaluate whether exercise intervention can be applied to pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) for controlling gestational weight gain (GWG) and combating GDM-related outcomes. Retrospective six months analysis of 14,168 single pregnant women without diabetes from 15 hospitals in Beijing in 2013. Each participant's demographic data, interventions condition and medical information were collected individually by questionnaires and relying on medical records. The level of statistical significance was set equal to 0.05. 2750 (19.4%) pregnant women were diagnosed with GDM, 74.9% of them received exercise intervention during pregnancy, and the starting time was 25.8 ± 3.7 gestational weeks. Women with GDM with exercise intervention (GDM-E) had the lowest BMI increase during late and mid-pregnancy than women with GDM without exercise intervention (GDM-nE) (2.05 ± 1.32 kg/m(2) vs. 2.40 ± 1.30 kg/m(2), p  0.05) than GDM-nE group. After including dietary factors in the analysis, women with GDM without either dietary or exercise intervention (GDM-nDnE) had the highest risk of preterm birth(OR = 1.64, 95 % CI, 1.14-2.36), while women with GDM with dietary intervention only (GDM-DnE) had the highest risk of low birth weight (OR = 3.10, 95 % CI, 1.23-7.81). However, women with GDM with both dietary and exercise intervention had the lowest rate of macrosomia. Exercise intervention is a suitable non-invasive therapeutic option that can be readily applied to manage weight gain and improve pregnancy outcomes in women with GDM.

  14. A transdisciplinary approach to the selection of moderators of an exercise promotion intervention: baseline data and rationale for Colorado STRIDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Renee E; Nilsson, Renea; Marcus, Bess H; Ciccolo, Joseph T; Bryan, Angela D

    2013-02-01

    A transdisciplinary approach incorporating biological, psychological, behavioral, and genetic factors was taken to better identify proposed moderators of the effectiveness of an intervention to increase physical activity. This paper illustrates how theory-based individual difference variables can be integrated into a complex randomized controlled trial. The transdisciplinary framework guiding the selection of moderators, the COSTRIDE intervention study and sample, and the relationships among baseline variables are provided. Participants were non-active individuals randomly assigned to either the STRIDE exercise or health-and-wellness contact control condition. Structural equation modeling was utilized to demonstrate that relationships among baseline variables confirm hypothesized relationships in the transdisciplinary framework. Preliminary data from COSTRIDE suggest that interventions among sedentary individuals may be more effective if a broader range of factors influencing physical activity are considered.

  15. The OPERA trial: protocol for a randomised trial of an exercise intervention for older people in residential and nursing accommodation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Stephanie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is common in residents of Residential and Nursing homes (RNHs. It is usually undetected and often undertreated. Depression is associated with poor outcomes including increased morbidity and mortality. Exercise has potential to improve depression, and has been shown in existing trials to improve outcomes among younger and older people. Existing evidence comes from trials that are short, underpowered and not from RNH settings. The aim of the OPERA trial is to establish whether exercise is effective in reducing the prevalence of depression among older RNH residents. Method OPERA is a cluster randomised controlled trial. RNHs are randomised to one of two groups with interventions lasting 12 months Intervention group: a depression awareness and physical activity training session for care home staff, plus a whole home physical activation programme including twice weekly physiotherapist-led exercise groups. The intervention lasts for one year from randomisation, or Control group: a depression awareness training session for care home staff. Participants are people aged 65 or over who are free of severe cognitive impairment and willing to participate in the study. Our primary outcome is the prevalence of depressive symptoms, a GDS-15 score of five or more, in all participants at the end of the one year intervention period. Our secondary depression outcomes include remission of depressive symptoms and change in GDS-15 scores in those with depressive symptoms prior to randomisation. Other secondary outcomes include, fear of falling, mobility, fractures, pain, cognition, costs and health related quality of life. We aimed to randomise 77 RNHs. Discussion Home recruitment was completed in May 2010; 78 homes have been randomised. Follow up will finish in May 2011 and results will be available late 2011. Trial Registration [ISRCTN: ISRCTN43769277

  16. The OPERA trial: protocol for a randomised trial of an exercise intervention for older people in residential and nursing accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Martin; Eldridge, Sandra; Lamb, Sallie; Potter, Rachel; Sheehan, Bartley; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Taylor, Stephanie; Thorogood, Margaret; Weich, Scott

    2011-02-02

    Depression is common in residents of Residential and Nursing homes (RNHs). It is usually undetected and often undertreated. Depression is associated with poor outcomes including increased morbidity and mortality. Exercise has potential to improve depression, and has been shown in existing trials to improve outcomes among younger and older people. Existing evidence comes from trials that are short, underpowered and not from RNH settings. The aim of the OPERA trial is to establish whether exercise is effective in reducing the prevalence of depression among older RNH residents. OPERA is a cluster randomised controlled trial. RNHs are randomised to one of two groups with interventions lasting 12 months. INTERVENTION GROUP: a depression awareness and physical activity training session for care home staff, plus a whole home physical activation programme including twice weekly physiotherapist-led exercise groups. The intervention lasts for one year from randomisation, or a depression awareness training session for care home staff.Participants are people aged 65 or over who are free of severe cognitive impairment and willing to participate in the study. Our primary outcome is the prevalence of depressive symptoms, a GDS-15 score of five or more, in all participants at the end of the one year intervention period. Our secondary depression outcomes include remission of depressive symptoms and change in GDS-15 scores in those with depressive symptoms prior to randomisation. Other secondary outcomes include, fear of falling, mobility, fractures, pain, cognition, costs and health related quality of life. We aimed to randomise 77 RNHs. Home recruitment was completed in May 2010; 78 homes have been randomised. Follow up will finish in May 2011 and results will be available late 2011. [ISRCTN: ISRCTN43769277].

  17. Adolescent weight control: an intervention targeting parent communication and modeling compared with minimal parental involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelalian, Elissa; Hadley, Wendy; Sato, Amy; Kuhl, Elizabeth; Rancourt, Diana; Oster, Danielle; Lloyd-Richardson, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Adolescent weight control interventions demonstrate variable findings, with inconsistent data regarding the appropriate role for parents. The current study examined the efficacy of a standard adolescent behavioral weight control (BWC) intervention that also targeted parent-adolescent communication and parental modeling of healthy behaviors (Standard Behavioral Treatment + Enhanced Parenting; SBT + EP) compared with a standard BWC intervention (SBT). 49 obese adolescents (M age = 15.10; SD = 1.33; 76% female; 67.3% non-Hispanic White) and a caregiver were randomly assigned to SBT or SBT + EP. Adolescent and caregiver weight and height, parental modeling, and weight-related communication were obtained at baseline and end of the 16-week intervention. Significant decreases in adolescent weight and increases in parental self-monitoring were observed across both conditions. Analyses of covariance revealed a trend for greater reduction in weight and negative maternal commentary among SBT condition participants. Contrary to hypotheses, targeting parent-adolescent communication and parental modeling did not lead to better outcomes in adolescent weight control. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Management of acute coronary syndromes at hospital discharge: do targeted educational interventions improve practice quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gregory M; Thompson, Angus; Pulver, Lisa K; Robertson, Marion B; Brieger, David; Wai, Angela; Tett, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines exist for the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), yet adherence is suboptimal. The Discharge Management of Acute Coronary Syndrome project used a quality improvement approach, with targeted intervention strategies to optimize: prescription of guideline-recommended medications; education regarding lifestyle modifications, including cardiac rehabilitation (CR); and communication between hospital staff, patients, and general practitioners. Hospitals across Australia participated in a quality improvement cycle of audit, feedback, intervention, and reaudit. Interventions involved educational meetings, academic detailing and point-of-care reminders, and feedback of baseline audit results. Outcome measures included prescription of guideline-recommended medications, referral to CR, and documentation and communication of management plan. At baseline, 49 hospitals recruited 1,545 patients, and postintervention, 45 hospitals remained active in the project and recruited 1,589 patients. Three thousand and thirty-four hospital staff attended group education or academic detailing sessions. Postintervention, there was a significant increase in the prescription of all four guideline-recommended medications (69% vs. 57%; pplans. Targeted educational interventions used as part of a quality improvement cycle can enhance adherence to evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with ACS. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  19. A Low-Glycemic Diet Lifestyle Intervention Improves Fat Utilization during Exercise in Older Obese Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Haus, Jacob M; Cook, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of dietary glycemic index on exercise training-induced adaptations in substrate oxidation in obesity. Design and Methods: Twenty older, obese individuals undertook 3 months of fully supervised aerobic exercise and were randomized to low- (LoGIX) or high......-glycemic (HiGIX) diets. Changes in indirect calorimetry (VO2 ; VCO2 ) were assessed at rest, during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and during submaximal exercise (walking: 65% VO2 max, 200 kcal energy expenditure). Intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) was measured by (1) H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy...

  20. Exercise intervention in childhood obesity: a randomized controlled trial comparing hospital-versus home-based groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisón, Juan Francisco; Real-Montes, José María; Torró, Isabel; Arguisuelas, María Dolores; Alvarez-Pitti, Julio; Martínez-Gramage, J; Aguilar, Francisco; Lurbe, Empar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a hospital clinic group- versus home-based combined exercise-diet program for the treatment of childhood obesity. One hundred ten overweight/obese Spanish children and adolescents (6-16 years) in 2 intervention groups (hospital clinic group-based [n = 45] and home-based [n = 41]) and a sex-age-matched control group (n = 24) were randomly assigned to participate in a 6-month combined exercise (aerobic and resistance training) and Mediterranean diet program. Anthropometric values (including body weight, height, body mass index, BMI-Z score, and waist circumference) were measured pre- and postintervention for all the participants. Percentage body fat was also determined with a body fat analyzer (TANITA TBF-410 M). Our study showed a significant reduction in percentage body fat and body mass index Z-score among both intervention-group participants (4%, 0.16, hospital clinic group-based; 4.4%, 0.23, home-based; P exercise and Mediterranean diet program may be effective among overweight and obese children and adolescents, because it improves body composition, is feasible and can be adopted on a large scale without substantial expenses. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving medication adherence with a targeted, technology-driven disease management intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David B; Allison, Wanda; Chen, Joyce C; Demand, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Treatment adherence is critical in managing chronic disease, but achieving it remains an elusive goal across many prevalent conditions. As part of its care management strategy, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina (BCBSSC) implemented the Longitudinal Adherence Treatment Evaluation program, a behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence among members with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. The objectives of this study were to 1) assess the effectiveness of telephonic intervention in influencing reinitiation of medication therapy, and 2) evaluate the rate and timing of medication reinitiation. BCBSSC applied algorithms against pharmacy claims data to identify patients prescribed targeted medications who were 60 or more days overdue for refills. This information was provided to care managers to address during their next patient contact. Care managers received focused training on techniques for medication behavior change, readiness to change, motivational interviewing, and active listening. Training also addressed common barriers to adherence and available resources, including side effect management, mail order benefits, drug assistance programs, medication organizers, and reminder systems. Overdue refills were tracked for 12 months, with medication reinitiation followed for an additional 3 months. In the intervention group, 94 patients were identified with 123 instances of late medication refills. In the age- and gender-matched comparison group, 61 patients were identified with 76 late refills. The intervention group had a significantly higher rate of medication reinitiation (59.3%) than the control group (42.1%; P < 0.05). Time to reinitiation was significantly shorter in the intervention group, 59.5 (+/- 69.0) days vs. 107.4 (+/- 109) days for the control group (P < 0.05). This initiative demonstrated that a targeted disease management intervention promoting patient behavior change increased the number of patients who reinitiated therapy after a

  2. Adherence support strategies for exercise interventions in people with mild cognitive impairment and dementia: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika van der Wardt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-based therapy may improve health status for people with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI or dementia but cannot work without adherence, which has proven difficult. This review aimed to evaluate strategies to support adherence among people with MCI or Dementia and was completed in Nottingham/UK in 2017. A narrative synthesis was used to investigate the effectiveness or usefulness of adherence support strategies. Fifteen adherence support strategies were used including theoretical underpinning (programmes based on behavior change theories, individual tailoring, worksheets and exercise booklets, goal setting, phone calls or reminders, newsletters, support to overcome exercise barriers, information, adaptation periods, individual supervision, support for clinicians, group setting, music, accelerometers/pedometers and emphasis on enjoyable activities. Music was the only strategy that was investigated in a comparative design but was found to be effective only for those who were generally interested in participating in activities. A wide range of adherence support strategies are being included in exercise interventions for people with MCI or dementia, but the evidence regarding their effectiveness is limited.

  3. Effects of 12 months aerobic exercise intervention on work ability, need for recovery, productivity and rating of exertion among cleaners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Mark; Søgaard, Karen; Krustrup, Peter

    2018-01-01

    -randomised (work location; sex; age; length of service) to aerobic exercise [N = 57, 44.9 years, 75.4% female, body mass index (BMI) 26.2], receiving 2 weekly aerobic exercise sessions during 12 months, or a reference group (N = 59, 45.7 years, 76.3% female, BMI 27.1), receiving health-promoting lectures. Self......PURPOSE: This study assessed the effects of a worksite aerobic exercise intervention among cleaners on: work ability, need for recovery, productivity, and rating of exertion. METHODS: In a monocentric randomised controlled trial in Denmark, 116, of 250 invited, cleaners were cluster....... Aerobic exercise adherence was 51% during the first 4 months. At 4 month follow-up no effects were found. At 12 month follow-up, work ability significantly increased by 0.59 on a 0-10 scale (95% CI 0.05-1.13) and need for recovery significantly decreased by - 11.0 on a 0-100 scale (95% CI - 19.8 to - 2...

  4. Efficacy of an exercise intervention for employees with work-related fatigue: study protocol of a two-arm randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Juriena D; van Hooff, Madelon L M; Geurts, Sabine A E; Kompier, Michiel A J

    2015-11-12

    The aim of the current study is to evaluate the efficacy of an exercise intervention to reduce work-related fatigue. Exercise is a potentially effective intervention strategy to reduce work-related fatigue, since it may enhance employees' ability to cope with work stress and it helps to detach from work. However, based on available research, no clear causal inferences regarding its efficacy can be made. This RCT therefore investigates whether exercise is effective in reducing work-related fatigue, and in improving other indicators of employees' mental and physical well-being and performance. A two-arm parallel trial will be conducted. Participants (N = 108) who experience high levels of work-related fatigue will be randomized at a 1:1 ratio to a 6-week exercise intervention or wait list (control). The exercise intervention consists of three one-hour low-intensity outdoor running sessions a week. Each week, two sessions take place in a group under supervision of a trainer, and one session is completed individually. The running sessions will be carried out during leisure time. The primary outcome is work-related fatigue. Secondary outcomes include work ability, self-efficacy, sleep quality, cognitive functioning, and aerobic fitness. These data will be collected at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and at 6 weeks and 12 weeks after the intervention. In addition, weekly measures of employees' well-being, and exercise activities (i.e. type, frequency, and duration) and experiences (i.e. pleasure, effort, and detachment) will be collected during the intervention period. This study will compare an exercise intervention to a wait list. This enables us to examine the effect of exercise on work-related fatigue compared to the natural course of these symptoms. As such, this study contributes to a better understanding of the causal link between exercise and work-related fatigue. If the intervention is proven effective, the results could provide a basis for future

  5. Exercise as an Intervention to Reduce Study-Related Fatigue among University Students: A Two-Arm Parallel Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juriena D de Vries

    Full Text Available Many university students experience high levels of study-related fatigue. This high prevalence, and the negative impact of fatigue on health and academic performance, call for prevention and reduction of these symptoms. The primary aim of the current study was to investigate to what extent an exercise intervention is effective in reducing three indicators of study-related fatigue (emotional exhaustion, overall fatigue, and need for recovery. Effects of exercise on secondary outcomes (sleep quality, self-efficacy, physical fitness, and cognitive functioning were also investigated.Participants were students with high levels of study-related fatigue, currently not exercising or receiving other psychological or pharmacological treatments, and with no medical cause of fatigue. They were randomly assigned to either a six-week exercise intervention (low-intensity running three times a week, n = 49 or wait list (no intervention, n = 48. All participants were measured before the intervention (T0, and immediately after the intervention (T1. Exercisers were also investigated 4 weeks (T2 and 12 weeks (T3 after the intervention.Participants in the exercise condition showed a larger decrease in two of the three indicators of study-related fatigue (i.e., overall fatigue and need for recovery as compared to controls. Additionally, sleep quality and some indicators of cognitive functioning improved more among exercisers than among controls. No effects were found for self-efficacy, and physical fitness. The initial effects of the exercise intervention lasted at follow-up (T2 and T3. At 12-week follow up (T3, 80% of participants in the exercise condition still engaged in regular exercise, and further enhancements were seen for emotional exhaustion, overall fatigue, and sleep quality.These results underline the value of low-intensity exercise for university students with high levels of study-related fatigue. The follow-up effects that were found in this study imply

  6. Exercise as an Intervention to Reduce Study-Related Fatigue among University Students: A Two-Arm Parallel Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Juriena D; van Hooff, Madelon L M; Geurts, Sabine A E; Kompier, Michiel A J

    2016-01-01

    Many university students experience high levels of study-related fatigue. This high prevalence, and the negative impact of fatigue on health and academic performance, call for prevention and reduction of these symptoms. The primary aim of the current study was to investigate to what extent an exercise intervention is effective in reducing three indicators of study-related fatigue (emotional exhaustion, overall fatigue, and need for recovery). Effects of exercise on secondary outcomes (sleep quality, self-efficacy, physical fitness, and cognitive functioning) were also investigated. Participants were students with high levels of study-related fatigue, currently not exercising or receiving other psychological or pharmacological treatments, and with no medical cause of fatigue. They were randomly assigned to either a six-week exercise intervention (low-intensity running three times a week, n = 49) or wait list (no intervention, n = 48). All participants were measured before the intervention (T0), and immediately after the intervention (T1). Exercisers were also investigated 4 weeks (T2) and 12 weeks (T3) after the intervention. Participants in the exercise condition showed a larger decrease in two of the three indicators of study-related fatigue (i.e., overall fatigue and need for recovery) as compared to controls. Additionally, sleep quality and some indicators of cognitive functioning improved more among exercisers than among controls. No effects were found for self-efficacy, and physical fitness. The initial effects of the exercise intervention lasted at follow-up (T2 and T3). At 12-week follow up (T3), 80% of participants in the exercise condition still engaged in regular exercise, and further enhancements were seen for emotional exhaustion, overall fatigue, and sleep quality. These results underline the value of low-intensity exercise for university students with high levels of study-related fatigue. The follow-up effects that were found in this study imply that

  7. Screen-Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH): a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Ralph; Marsh, Samantha; Foley, Louise; Epstein, Leonard H; Olds, Timothy; Dewes, Ofa; Heke, Ihirangi; Carter, Karen; Jiang, Yannan; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni

    2014-09-10

    Screen-based activities, such as watching television (TV), playing video games, and using computers, are common sedentary behaviors among young people and have been linked with increased energy intake and overweight. Previous home-based sedentary behaviour interventions have been limited by focusing primarily on the child, small sample sizes, and short follow-up periods. The SWITCH (Screen-Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home) study aimed to determine the effect of a home-based, family-delivered intervention to reduce screen-based sedentary behaviour on body composition, sedentary behaviour, physical activity, and diet over 24 weeks in overweight and obese children. A two-arm, parallel, randomized controlled trial was conducted. Children and their primary caregiver living in Auckland, New Zealand were recruited via schools, community centres, and word of mouth. The intervention, delivered over 20 weeks, consisted of a face-to-face meeting with the parent/caregiver and the child to deliver intervention content, which focused on training and educating them to use a wide range of strategies designed to reduce their child's screen time. Families were given Time Machine TV monitoring devices to assist with allocating screen time, activity packages to promote alternative activities, online support via a website, and monthly newsletters. Control participants were given the intervention material on completion of follow-up. The primary outcome was change in children's BMI z-score from baseline to 24 weeks. Children (n = 251) aged 9-12 years and their primary caregiver were randomized to receive the SWITCH intervention (n = 127) or no intervention (controls; n = 124). There was no significant difference in change of zBMI between the intervention and control groups, although a favorable trend was observed (-0.016; 95% CI: -0.084, 0.051; p = 0.64). There were also no significant differences on secondary outcomes, except for a trend towards

  8. Safety and feasibility of a combined exercise intervention for inoperable lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist, Morten; Rørth, Mikael; Langer, Seppo

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the safety and feasibility of a six-week supervised structured exercise and relaxation training programme on estimated peak oxygen consumption, muscle strength and health related quality of life (HRHRQOL) in patients with inoperable lung cancer, undergoing chemotherapy....

  9. How useful are the stages of change for targeting interventions? Randomized test of a brief intervention to reduce smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Christopher J; Arden, Madelynne A

    2008-11-01

    To see whether the stages of change are useful for targeting a brief intervention to reduce smoking based on implementation intentions. A second objective was to rule out demand characteristics as an alternative explanation for the findings of intervention studies based on the transtheoretical model and implementation intentions. Participants (N = 350) were randomized to a passive control condition (questionnaire only), active control condition (questionnaire plus instruction to plan to quit), or experimental condition (questionnaire, plan to quit, form an implementation intention). Their behavior and psychosocial orientation to quit were measured at baseline and at 2-month follow-up. Theory of planned behavior variables, nicotine dependence, and quitting. Significantly more people quit smoking in the experimental condition than in the control conditions, and the planning instructions changed intention to quit and perceived control over quitting, but not behavior. Stage of change moderated these effects such that implementation intentions worked best for individuals who were in the preparation stage at baseline. Harnessing both motivational and volitional processes seems to enhance the effectiveness of smoking cessation programs, although further work is required to clarify inconsistencies in the literature using the stages of change.

  10. Real-time non-rigid target tracking for ultrasound-guided clinical interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachiu, C.; Ries, M.; Ramaekers, P.; Guey, J.-L.; Moonen, C. T. W.; de Senneville, B. Denis

    2017-10-01

    Biological motion is a problem for non- or mini-invasive interventions when conducted in mobile/deformable organs due to the targeted pathology moving/deforming with the organ. This may lead to high miss rates and/or incomplete treatment of the pathology. Therefore, real-time tracking of the target anatomy during the intervention would be beneficial for such applications. Since the aforementioned interventions are often conducted under B-mode ultrasound (US) guidance, target tracking can be achieved via image registration, by comparing the acquired US images to a separate image established as positional reference. However, such US images are intrinsically altered by speckle noise, introducing incoherent gray-level intensity variations. This may prove problematic for existing intensity-based registration methods. In the current study we address US-based target tracking by employing the recently proposed EVolution registration algorithm. The method is, by construction, robust to transient gray-level intensities. Instead of directly matching image intensities, EVolution aligns similar contrast patterns in the images. Moreover, the displacement is computed by evaluating a matching criterion for image sub-regions rather than on a point-by-point basis, which typically provides more robust motion estimates. However, unlike similar previously published approaches, which assume rigid displacements in the image sub-regions, the EVolution algorithm integrates the matching criterion in a global functional, allowing the estimation of an elastic dense deformation. The approach was validated for soft tissue tracking under free-breathing conditions on the abdomen of seven healthy volunteers. Contact echography was performed on all volunteers, while three of the volunteers also underwent standoff echography. Each of the two modalities is predominantly specific to a particular type of non- or mini-invasive clinical intervention. The method demonstrated on average an accuracy of

  11. A healthcare utilization cost comparison between employees receiving a worksite mindfulness or a diet/exercise lifestyle intervention to matched controls 5 years post intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Maryanna D; Sieck, Cynthia; Gascon, Gregg; Malarkey, William; Huerta, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    To compare healthcare costs and utilization among participants in a study of two active lifestyle interventions implemented in the workplace and designed to foster awareness of and attention to health with a propensity score matched control group. We retrospectively compared changes in healthcare (HC) utilization among participants in the mindfulness intervention (n=84) and the diet/exercise intervention (n=86) to a retrospectively matched control group (n=258) drawn for this study. The control group was matched from the non-participant population on age, gender, relative risk score, and HC expenditures in the 9 month preceding the study. Measures included number of primary care visits, number and cost of pharmacy prescriptions, number of hospital admissions, and overall healthcare costs tracked for 5 years after the intervention. Significantly fewer primary care visits (pgroups as compared to controls, with a non-significant trend towards lower overall HC utilization (4,300.00 actual dollar differences) and hospital admissions for the intervention groups after five years. Pharmacy costs and number of prescriptions were significantly higher for the two intervention groups compared to controls over the five years (p<0.05), yet still resulted in less HC utilization costs, potentially indicating greater self-management of care. This study provides valuable information as to the cost savings and value of providing workplace lifestyle interventions that focus on awareness of one's body and health. Health economic studies validate the scale of personal and organization health cost savings that such programs can generate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcome of a Targeted Nutritional Intervention Among Older Adults With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatenstein, Bryna; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Reid, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    A 6-month dietary intervention program was designed for community-dwelling older adults with Alzheimer's disease. Sixty-seven persons aged 70 years and above were recruited with their caregivers from six hospital memory and geriatric outpatient clinics, and allocated to intervention ( n = 34 dyads) or control group ( n = 33 dyads). Usual diet was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire and current diet by two nonconsecutive diet recalls or records corroborated by caregivers, at recruitment (T1) and exit from the study (T2). Intervention participants received targeted dietary recommendations; control participants received Canada's Food Guide leaflets. The program was assessed using paired and independent t tests and nonparametric statistics. Fat intakes increased at T2 within intervention participants (54 ± 16 vs. 67 ± 23 g, p = .013), and there was a tendency for higher energy, protein, and calcium intakes at T2 within this group. Proportions with adequate protein intakes almost doubled from T1 to T2 in intervention group women ( p = .028) but decreased in female controls ( p = .030). Longer follow-up is necessary to determine persistence of benefits.

  13. A novel cognitive intervention for compulsive checking: Targeting maladaptive beliefs about memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcolado, Gillian M; Radomsky, Adam S

    2016-12-01

    Compulsive checking is one of the most common symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Recently it has been proposed that those who check compulsively may believe their memory is poor, rather than having an actual memory impairment. The current study sought to develop and assess a brief cognitive intervention focused on improving maladaptive beliefs about memory, as they pertain to both checking symptoms and memory performance. Participants (N = 24) with a diagnosis of OCD and clinical levels of checking symptomatology were randomly assigned either to receive two weekly 1-hour therapy sessions or to self-monitor during a similar waitlist period. Time spent checking, checking symptoms, maladaptive beliefs about memory, and visuospatial memory were assessed both pre- and post-treatment/waitlist. Results showed that compared to the waitlist condition, individuals in the treatment condition displayed significant decreases in their maladaptive beliefs about memory and checking symptoms from pre- to post-intervention. They also exhibited increased recall performance on a measure of visuospatial memory. Changes in beliefs about memory were predictors of reduced post-intervention checking, but were not predictive of increased post-intervention memory scores. The lack of long term follow-up data and use of a waitlist control leave questions about the stability and specificity of the intervention. Findings provide preliminary evidence that strategies targeting beliefs about memory may be worthy of inclusion in cognitive-behavioural approaches to treating compulsive checking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pilot evaluation of a web-based intervention targeting sexual health service access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K E; Newby, K; Caley, M; Danahay, A; Kehal, I

    2016-04-01

    Sexual health service access is fundamental to good sexual health, yet interventions designed to address this have rarely been implemented or evaluated. In this article, pilot evaluation findings for a targeted public health behavior change intervention, delivered via a website and web-app, aiming to increase uptake of sexual health services among 13-19-year olds are reported. A pre-post questionnaire-based design was used. Matched baseline and follow-up data were identified from 148 respondents aged 13-18 years. Outcome measures were self-reported service access, self-reported intention to access services and beliefs about services and service access identified through needs analysis. Objective service access data provided by local sexual health services were also analyzed. Analysis suggests the intervention had a significant positive effect on psychological barriers to and antecedents of service access among females. Males, who reported greater confidence in service access compared with females, significantly increased service access by time 2 follow-up. Available objective service access data support the assertion that the intervention may have led to increases in service access. There is real promise for this novel digital intervention. Further evaluation is planned as the model is licensed to and rolled out by other local authorities in the United Kingdom. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Efficacy of physical exercise intervention on mobility and physical functioning in older people with dementia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkälä, Kaisu; Savikko, Niina; Poysti, Minna; Strandberg, Timo; Laakkonen, Marja-Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Numerous trials have shown that physical activity and exercise training have beneficial effects in general older populations. However, few have studied its effectiveness among people with dementia. The aim of this systematic review is to examine the efficacy of trials using a rigorous randomised, controlled design and including physical activity or exercise as a major component of intervention on the physical functioning, mobility and functional limitations of people with dementia. We found 20 randomised controlled trials that included a total of 1378 participants. Of these, only three were of high methodological quality, and six of moderate quality. Nevertheless, these studies consistently show that intensive physical rehabilitation enhances mobility and, when administered over a long period, may also improve the physical functioning of patients with dementia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Home-based video exercise intervention for community-dwelling frail older women: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Sonja; Kronborg, Christian; Puggaard, Lis

    2008-01-01

    , handgrip, biceps strength, chair rise, and 10-m maximal walking-speed in the training group, and for walking-speed and self-rated health in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that homebased training for frail older women using an exercise video induces lasting health-related quality...... and health-related quality of life. METHODS: Communitydwelling frail women >/=75 yrs, receiving public home care, were randomized into a training group (n=30) and a control group (n=31). Participants exercised for 26 minutes, three times per week for five months. Both groups received a bi-weekly telephone...... call. The effect of intervention was evaluated by the physical performance test, mobility-tiredness score, maximal isometric handgrip and biceps strength, lower limb explosive power, repeated chair rise (5 times), 10-m maximal walking-speed, semi-tandem balance, and health-related quality of life...

  17. Targeted nanotechnologies for cancer intervention: a patent review (2010-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, Priyamvada; Kumar, Pradeep; Choonara, Yahya E; Pillay, Viness

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, several active targeting nanostrategies have been patented for application in cancer theranostics. The versatility of nanostructures in terms of composition, manufacturability, functionalization, and matrix formation make them ideal for carrying large dose of bioactive contents, high density of targeting ligands on their surface, efficient delivery to the site of interest, and capable of forming multicomponent platforms. Areas covered: The patents were classified into polymeric and non-polymeric nanostructures and their applicability in addressing the targeting paradigm related to cancer intervention was explored. Specialized platforms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, nanocomposites, nanotubes, quantum dots, metal/silica particles, and dendrimers were cited as targeted nanostructures along with ligands such as antibody fragments, synthetic peptides, aptamers, small molecules, and folates. Here, we focused on patented targeted nanotechnological advances in recent years (2010-2016). Expert opinion: The formulation and performance prerequisites, available nanomaterial options, fabrication feasibility, and challenges and issues related with regulatory approval and patenting of cancer targeted nanocarriers are reviewed. Future research in this area should focus on clinically relevant bioactive combinations, better metastasis control, integration of imaging and theranostic techniques, predictive animal/pre-clinical models, maximal utilisation of extra- and intracellular tumor microenvironment for drug delivery, and exploring the metabolomic-, proteomic-, and genomic-based personalization of cancer nanomedicine.

  18. A one-year exercise intervention program in pre-pubertal girls does not influence hip structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlborg Henrik G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that a one-year school-based exercise intervention program influences the accrual of bone mineral in pre-pubertal girls. This report aims to evaluate if also hip structure is affected, as geometry independent of bone mineral influences fracture risk. Methods Fifty-three girls aged 7 – 9 years were included in a curriculum-based exercise intervention program comprising 40 minutes of general physical activity per school day (200 minutes/week. Fifty healthy age-matched girls who participated in the general Swedish physical education curriculum (60 minutes/week served as controls. The hip was scanned by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA and the hip structural analysis (HSA software was applied to evaluate bone mineral content (BMC, areal bone mineral density (aBMD, periosteal and endosteal diameter, cortical thickness, cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI, section modulus (Z and cross-sectional area (CSA of the femoral neck (FN. Annual changes were compared. Group comparisons were done by independent student's t-test between means and analyses of covariance (ANCOVA. Pearson's correlation test was used to evaluate associations between activity level and annual changes in FN. All children remained at Tanner stage 1 throughout the study. Results No between-group differences were found during the 12 months study period for changes in the FN variables. The total duration of exercise during the year was not correlated with the changes in the FN traits. Conclusion Evaluated by the DXA technique and the HSA software, a general one-year school-based exercise program for 7–9-year-old pre-pubertal girls seems not to influence the structure of the hip.

  19. Effects of a giant exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity among nursing home residents: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouton A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Alexandre Mouton,1 Nicolas Gillet,1 Flore Mouton,1 Dave Van Kann,2,3 Olivier Bruyère,1,4 Marc Cloes,1 Fanny Buckinx41Department of Sport and Rehabilitation Sciences, Multidisciplinary Research Unit on Health and Society, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium; 2Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+, Maastricht, 3School of Sport Studies, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Eindhoven, the Netherlands; 4Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège Teaching Hospital (CHU, Liège, BelgiumPurpose: This study examined the effects of a giant (4×3 m exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA and a broader array of physical and psychological outcomes among nursing home residents.Materials and methods: A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was carried out in two comparable nursing homes. Ten participants (aged 82.5±6.3 and comprising 6 women meeting the inclusion criteria took part in the 1-month intervention in one nursing home, whereas 11 participants (aged 89.9±3.1 with 8 women were assigned to the control group in the other nursing home. The giant exercising board game required participants to perform strength, flexibility, balance and endurance activities. The assistance provided by an exercising specialist decreased gradually during the intervention in an autonomy-oriented approach based on the self-determination theory. The following were assessed at baseline, after the intervention and after a follow-up period of 3 months: PA (steps/day and energy expenditure/day with ActiGraph, cognitive status (mini mental state examination, quality of life (EuroQol 5-dimensions, motivation for PA (Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2, gait and balance (Tinetti and Short Physical Performance Battery, functional mobility (timed up and go, and the muscular isometric strength of the lower limb muscles.Results and conclusion: In the

  20. Effects of Supervised Multimodal Exercise Interventions on Cancer-Related Fatigue: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Meneses-Echávez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Cancer-related fatigue (CRF is the most common and devastating problem in cancer patients even after successful treatment. This study aimed to determine the effects of supervised multimodal exercise interventions on cancer-related fatigue through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Design. A systematic review was conducted to determine the effectiveness of multimodal exercise interventions on CRF. Databases of PubMed, CENTRAL, EMBASE, and OVID were searched between January and March 2014 to retrieve randomized controlled trials. Risk of bias was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Results. Nine studies n=772 were included in both systematic review and meta-analysis. Multimodal interventions including aerobic exercise, resistance training, and stretching improved CRF symptoms (SMD=-0.23; 95% CI: −0.37 to −0.09; P=0.001. These effects were also significant in patients undergoing chemotherapy P<0.0001. Nonsignificant differences were found for resistance training interventions P=0.30. Slight evidence of publication bias was observed P=0.04. The studies had a low risk of bias (PEDro scale mean score of 6.4 (standard deviation (SD ± 1.0. Conclusion. Supervised multimodal exercise interventions including aerobic, resistance, and stretching exercises are effective in controlling CRF. These findings suggest that these exercise protocols should be included as a crucial part of the rehabilitation programs for cancer survivors and patients during anticancer treatments.

  1. Systematic review of the effect of diet and exercise lifestyle interventions in the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Judith A; Smith, Susan M; Hart, Nigel; Cupples, Margaret E

    2010-12-19

    The effectiveness of lifestyle interventions within secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) remains unclear. This systematic review aimed to determine their effectiveness and included randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions, in primary care or community settings, with a minimum follow-up of three months, published since 1990. 21 trials with 10,799 patients were included; the interventions were multifactorial (10), educational (4), psychological (3), dietary (1), organisational (2), and exercise (1). The overall results for modifiable risk factors suggested improvements in dietary and exercise outcomes but no overall effect on smoking outcomes. In trials that examined mortality and morbidity, significant benefits were reported for total mortality (in 4 of 6 trials; overall risk ratio (RR) 0.75 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.65, 0.87)), cardiovascular mortality (3 of 8 trials; overall RR 0.63 (95% CI 0.47, 0.84)), and nonfatal cardiac events (5 of 9 trials; overall RR 0.68 (95% CI 0.55, 0.84)). The heterogeneity between trials and generally poor quality of trials make any concrete conclusions difficult. However, the beneficial effects observed in this review are encouraging and should stimulate further research.

  2. Systematic Review of the Effect of Diet and Exercise Lifestyle Interventions in the Secondary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A. Cole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of lifestyle interventions within secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD remains unclear. This systematic review aimed to determine their effectiveness and included randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions, in primary care or community settings, with a minimum follow-up of three months, published since 1990. 21 trials with 10,799 patients were included; the interventions were multifactorial (10, educational (4, psychological (3, dietary (1, organisational (2, and exercise (1. The overall results for modifiable risk factors suggested improvements in dietary and exercise outcomes but no overall effect on smoking outcomes. In trials that examined mortality and morbidity, significant benefits were reported for total mortality (in 4 of 6 trials; overall risk ratio (RR 0.75 (95% confidence intervals (CI 0.65, 0.87, cardiovascular mortality (3 of 8 trials; overall RR 0.63 (95% CI 0.47, 0.84, and nonfatal cardiac events (5 of 9 trials; overall RR 0.68 (95% CI 0.55, 0.84. The heterogeneity between trials and generally poor quality of trials make any concrete conclusions difficult. However, the beneficial effects observed in this review are encouraging and should stimulate further research.

  3. Open- and Closed-Skill Exercise Interventions Produce Different Neurocognitive Effects on Executive Functions in the Elderly: A 6-Month Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Liang Tsai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the effects of open- and closed-skill exercise interventions on the neurocognitive performance of executive functions in the elderly. Sixty-four healthy elderly males were randomly assigned to either a closed-skill (bike riding or brisk walking/jogging, n = 22, open-skill (table tennis, n = 21, or control (n = 21 group. Various neuropsychological [e.g., accuracy rates (AR and reaction time (RT] and electrophysiological [e.g., event-related potential (ERP P3 component] measures were assessed during a variant of the task-switching paradigm, as well as an N-back task at baseline and after either a 6-month exercise intervention or control period. The results showed that, when performing the task-switching paradigm, the two exercise groups relative to control group showed significantly faster RTs in the switch trials after the exercise intervention. However, the RT facilitation in the non-switch and switch trials post-exercise relative to pre-exercise only emerged in the open-skill group. In terms of the N-back task, the two exercise groups significantly increased ARs in the 1-back condition after the exercise intervention, and the beneficial AR effect on the 2-back condition only emerged in the closed-skill group. In addition, the two exercise groups exhibited significantly larger P3 amplitudes on the frontal-to-parietal cortex areas after the exercise intervention relative to the baseline when performing the two cognitive tasks. These neurocognitive results still remained unchanged even when the confounding factors (e.g., cardiorespiratory fitness, social participation, and BMI were controlled for. The present study concluded that, although 6-month open- and closed-skill exercise interventions facilitate overall electrophysiological effects (i.e., increased ERP P3 amplitudes on the frontal-to-parietal cortices in the elderly, the two exercise mo