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  1. Exercise training modalities and strategies to improve exercise performance in patients with respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary rehabilitation is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary, comprehensive intervention for patients with chronic respiratory diseases who are symptomatic and whose daily living activities are often restricted.Pulmonary rehabilitation programs are designed to improve the physical and emotional condition of people with chronic respiratory disease and to promote long-term adherence to health-enhancing behavior.Exercise training is at the core of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR programs. The benefits of exercise training include decreased dyspnea, improved health-related quality of life, fewer days of hospitalization, and decreased health-care utilization.To gain PR benefits, patients should be able to complete an exercise training program, preferably with high intensity exercise, and it is likely that these benefits will translate into a change from a pattern of a sedentary lifestyle to a physically active lifestyle.Chronic respiratory patients, namely COPD patients, have a low exercise tolerance due to multiple factors, such as dynamic hyperinflation and peripheral muscle dysfunction.In this article, the authors describe a variety of modalities and strategies to overcome exercise limitations and improve the effects of exercise training. Resumo: A reabilitação pulmonar é uma intervenção abrangente, multidisciplinar e baseada em evidências, para doentes com doenças respiratórias crónicas que são sintomáticas e cujas actividades da vida diária são frequentemente limitadas.Os programas de reabilitação pulmonar estão concebidos para melhorar a condição física e emocional de pessoas com doenças respiratórias crónicas e promover a adesão a longo prazo a comportamentos benéficos para a saúde.O exercício físico está no cerne dos programas de reabilitação pulmonar (RP. Os benefícios do exercício físico incluem redução da dispneia, melhor qualidade de

  2. Exercise therapy improves both mental and physical health in patients with major depression.

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    Knapen, Jan; Vancampfort, Davy; Moriën, Yves; Marchal, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    to present clinical guidelines for exercise therapy in depressed patients derived from recent meta-analyses. four meta-analyses on effects of physical exercise on mental and physical in depression were analysed. For mild to moderate depression the effect of exercise may be comparable to antidepressant medication and psychotherapy; for severe depression exercise seems to be a valuable complementary therapy to the traditional treatments. Depression is associated with a high incidence of co-morbid somatic illnesses, especially cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Exercise is extremely powerful in preventing and treating these diseases. Physical exercise is an outstanding opportunity for the treatment of patients who have a mix of mental and physical health problems. Exercise therapy also improves body image, patient s coping strategies with stress, quality of life and independence in activities of daily living in older adults. Physical therapists should be aware, that several characteristics of major depression (e.g. loss of interest, motivation and energy, generalised fatigue, a low self-worth and self-confidence, fear to move, and psychosomatic complaints) and physical health problems interfere with participation in exercise. Therefore, motivational strategies should be incorporated in exercise interventions to enhance the patients' motivation and adherence in exercise programs. Implications for Rehabilitation For mild to moderate depression, the effect of exercise may be comparable with antidepressant medication and psychotherapy; for severe depression, exercise seems to be a valuable complementary therapy to the traditional treatments. Exercise therapy also improves physical health, body image, patient's coping strategies with stress, quality of life, and independence in activities of daily living in older adults. Motivational strategies should be incorporated in exercise interventions to enhance the patients' motivation.

  3. Self-efficacy strategies to improve exercise in patients with heart failure: A systematic review.

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    Rajati, Fatemeh; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Feizi, Awat; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Hasandokht, Tolu; Mostafavi, Firoozeh

    2014-11-01

    Despite exercise is recommended as an adjunct to medication therapy in patients with heart failure (HF), non-adherence to exercise is a major problem. While improving self-efficacy is an effective way to increase physical activity, the evidence concerning the relationship between strategies to enhance self-efficacy and exercise among HF has not been systematically reviewed. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the effect of interventions to change the self-efficacy on exercise in patients with HF. A systematic database search was conducted for articles reporting exercise self-efficacy interventions. Databases such as PubMed, ProQuest, CINAHL, Scopus, and PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were searched with restrictions to the years 2000-June 2014. A search of relevant databases identified 10 studies. Published randomized controlled intervention studies focusing strategies to change self-efficacy to exercise adherence in HF were eligible for inclusion. In addition, studies that have applied self-efficacy-based interventions to improve exercise are discussed. Limited published data exist evaluating the self-efficacy strategies to improve exercise in HF. Dominant strategies to improve patients' self-efficacy were performance accomplishments, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, emotional arousal. Evidence from some trials supports the view that incorporating the theory of self-efficacy into the design of an exercise intervention is beneficial. Moreover, exercise interventions aimed at integrating the four strategies of exercise self-efficacy can have positive effects on confidence and the ability to initiate exercise and recover HF symptoms. Findings of this study suggest that a positive relationship exists between self-efficacy and initiating and maintaining exercise in HF, especially in the short-term period.

  4. Aquatic Exercise Is Effective in Improving Exercise Performance in Patients with Heart Failure and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Åsa, Cider; Maria, Schaufelberger; Katharina, Stibrant Sunnerhagen; Bert, Andersson

    2012-01-01

    Background. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and muscle function are more decreased in patients with a combination of chronic heart failure (CHF) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (2DM) compared to patients with only one of the conditions. Further, patients with 2DM have peripheral complications that hamper many types of conventional exercises. Aim. To evaluate the efficacy and applicability of eight-week aquatic exercise in patients with the combination of CHF and 2DM. Methods. Twenty patients (four women) with both CHF and 2DM (age 67.4 ± 7.1, NYHA II-III) were randomly assigned to either aquatic exercise or a control group. The patients exercised for 45 minutes 3 times/week in 33–34°C, swimming pool. Results. The training programme was well tolerated. Work rate (+11.7 ± 6.6 versus −6.4 ± 8.1 watt, P Aquatic exercise could be used to improve exercise capacity and muscle function in patients with the combination of CHF and 2DM. PMID:22593770

  5. Tailored cognitive-behavioural therapy and exercise training improves the physical fitness of patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spillekom-van Koulil, S.; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Helmond, T. van; Vedder, A.; Hoorn, H. van; Donders, A.R.T.; Wirken, L.; Cats, H.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Evers, A.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with fibromyalgia have diminished levels of physical fitness, which may lead to functional disability and exacerbating complaints. Multidisciplinary treatment comprising cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and exercise training has been shown to be effective in improving

  6. Protein-carbohydrate supplements improve muscle protein balance in muscular dystrophy patients after endurance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Grete; Ørngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals, postexercise protein supplementation increases muscle protein anabolism. In patients with muscular dystrophies, aerobic exercise improves muscle function, but the effect of exercise on muscle protein balance is unknown. Therefore, we investigated 1) muscle protein balance ....... The findings suggest that postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation could be an important add-on to exercise training therapy in muscular dystrophies, and long-term studies of postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation are warranted in these conditions....

  7. Moderate exercise improves depression parameters in treatment-resistant patients with major depressive disorder.

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    Mota-Pereira, Jorge; Silverio, Jorge; Carvalho, Serafim; Ribeiro, Jose Carlos; Fonte, Daniela; Ramos, Joaquim

    2011-08-01

    Treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) is a complex condition, with very low remission rates. Physical exercise has been used, with some encouraging results, as an alternative therapy in other depressive disorders. This study assessed the impact on depression and functioning parameters of a moderate intensity exercise program, as an adjuvant to pharmacotherapy, in treatment-resistant MDD patients. 150 individuals with treatment-resistant MDD, defined as taking combined therapy in doses considered adequate for 9-15 months, without showing clinical remission, were initially screened. 33 were randomized to one of two groups: usual pharmacotherapy (N = 11) and usual pharmacotherapy plus aerobic exercise (N = 22). The exercise program consisted of home-based 30-45 min/day walks, 5 days/week, for 12 weeks, being 1 walk per week supervised. The exercise group showed improvement of all depression and functioning parameters, as indicated by lower HAMD17, BDI and CGI-S and higher GAF (p exercise group 21% of participants showed response and 26% remission, although these differences were not statistically significant. A 12 week, home-based exercise program of 30-45 min/day walks, 5 days/week, improved depression and functioning parameters in treatment-resistant MDD patients, and contributed to remission of 26% of these patients. Moderate intensity exercise may be a helpful and effective adjuvant therapy for treatment-resistant MDD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An intensive exercise program improves motor performances in patients with dementia: translational model of geriatric rehabilitation.

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    Schwenk, Michael; Dutzi, Ilona; Englert, Stefan; Micol, William; Najafi, Bijan; Mohler, Jane; Hauer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Translation of intensive exercise programs developed specifically for patients with dementia into clinical settings is lacking. To determine if a progressive resistance and functional training program, previously evaluated in dementia outpatients, can be implemented in a geriatric inpatient setting in order to improve motor performances in patients with dementia. Eligible patients in one ward of a German geriatric hospital were assigned to the intervention group (IG, n = 74) and received intensive exercise training specifically designed for patients with dementia. Patients in the second ward were observed as a control group (CG, n = 74). All patients received usual care treatment. Primary endpoints were maximal lower extremity strength measured by a leg-press device and duration of the 5-chair-stand test for functional performance. Secondary outcomes included a number of parameters for strength and function. The rehabilitation period averaged 18.1 ± 6.8 days. The IG significantly improved in both primary endpoints (change: maximal strength, IG: +51.9 ± 42.3% versus CG: +13.5 ± 51.8%, p exercise program can be implemented in a geriatric rehabilitation setting to improve motor performances in patients with dementia. Results suggest that an intensification of training is feasible in the target group and substantially increases the benefits in comparison to receiving usual care exercise only.

  9. Oral antioxidants improve leg blood flow during exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Rossman, Matthew J.; Trinity, Joel D.; Garten, Ryan S.; Ives, Stephen J.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Bledsoe, Amber D.; Morgan, David E.; Runnels, Sean; Reese, Van R.; Zhao, Jia; Amann, Markus; Wray, D. Walter

    2015-01-01

    The consequence of elevated oxidative stress on exercising skeletal muscle blood flow as well as the transport and utilization of O2 in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not well understood. The present study examined the impact of an oral antioxidant cocktail (AOC) on leg blood flow (LBF) and O2 consumption during dynamic exercise in 16 patients with COPD and 16 healthy subjects. Subjects performed submaximal (3, 6, and 9 W) single-leg knee extensor exercise while LBF (Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial blood pressure, leg vascular conductance, arterial O2 saturation, leg arterial-venous O2 difference, and leg O2 consumption (direct Fick) were evaluated under control conditions and after AOC administration. AOC administration increased LBF (3 W: 1,604 ± 100 vs. 1,798 ± 128 ml/min, 6 W: 1,832 ± 109 vs. 1,992 ± 120 ml/min, and 9W: 2,035 ± 114 vs. 2,187 ± 136 ml/min, P exercise in COPD, whereas no effect was observed in healthy subjects. In addition, the AOC afforded a small, but significant, improvement in arterial O2 saturation only in patients with COPD. Thus, these data demonstrate a novel beneficial role of AOC administration on exercising LBF, O2 consumption, and arterial O2 saturation in patients with COPD, implicating oxidative stress as a potential therapeutic target for impaired exercise capacity in this population. PMID:26188020

  10. Oral antioxidants improve leg blood flow during exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Matthew J; Trinity, Joel D; Garten, Ryan S; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Witman, Melissa A H; Bledsoe, Amber D; Morgan, David E; Runnels, Sean; Reese, Van R; Zhao, Jia; Amann, Markus; Wray, D Walter; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-09-01

    The consequence of elevated oxidative stress on exercising skeletal muscle blood flow as well as the transport and utilization of O2 in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not well understood. The present study examined the impact of an oral antioxidant cocktail (AOC) on leg blood flow (LBF) and O2 consumption during dynamic exercise in 16 patients with COPD and 16 healthy subjects. Subjects performed submaximal (3, 6, and 9 W) single-leg knee extensor exercise while LBF (Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial blood pressure, leg vascular conductance, arterial O2 saturation, leg arterial-venous O2 difference, and leg O2 consumption (direct Fick) were evaluated under control conditions and after AOC administration. AOC administration increased LBF (3 W: 1,604 ± 100 vs. 1,798 ± 128 ml/min, 6 W: 1,832 ± 109 vs. 1,992 ± 120 ml/min, and 9W: 2,035 ± 114 vs. 2,187 ± 136 ml/min, P exercise in COPD, whereas no effect was observed in healthy subjects. In addition, the AOC afforded a small, but significant, improvement in arterial O2 saturation only in patients with COPD. Thus, these data demonstrate a novel beneficial role of AOC administration on exercising LBF, O2 consumption, and arterial O2 saturation in patients with COPD, implicating oxidative stress as a potential therapeutic target for impaired exercise capacity in this population. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Improvement in glucose tolerance after 1 wk of exercise in patients with mild NIDDM.

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    Rogers, M A; Yamamoto, C; King, D S; Hagberg, J M; Ehsani, A A; Holloszy, J O

    1988-09-01

    We investigated the effects of 1 wk of intense exercise on glucose tolerance in 10 men with abnormal glucose tolerance [7 had mild non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), and 3 had impaired glucose tolerance]. The 7 days of exercise did not result in significant changes in body weight or maximal oxygen uptake. Plasma glucose concentration at 120 min averaged 227 +/- 23 mg/dl in an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) before and 170 +/- 18 mg/dl after the 7 days of exercise (P less than .001). There was a 36% reduction in the area under the glucose tolerance curve. Plasma insulin concentration at 120 min of the OGTT averaged 172 +/- 27 microU/ml before and 106 +/- 13 microU/ml after 7 days of exercise (P less than .001); the area under the insulin curve was decreased by 32%. In contrast to the response to 7 days of exercise, one bout of exercise did not result in an improvement in glucose tolerance. These results provide evidence that regularly performed, vigorous exercise can be effective in decreasing insulin resistance and improving glucose tolerance within 7 days in some patients with mild NIDDM.

  12. Aerobic-Strength Exercise Improves Metabolism and Clinical State in Parkinson’s Disease Patients

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    Patrik Krumpolec

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Regular exercise ameliorates motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Here, we aimed to provide evidence that exercise brings additional benefits to the whole-body metabolism and skeletal muscle molecular and functional characteristics, which might help to explain exercise-induced improvements in the clinical state. 3-months supervised endurance/strength training was performed in early/mid-stage PD patients and age/gender-matched individuals (n = 11/11. The effects of exercise on resting energy expenditure (REE, glucose metabolism, adiposity, and muscle energy metabolism (31P-MRS were evaluated and compared to non-exercising PD patients. Two muscle biopsies were taken to determine intervention-induced changes in fiber type, mitochondrial content, and expression of genes related to muscle energy metabolism, as well as proliferative and regenerative capacity. Exercise improved the clinical disability score (MDS-UPDRS, bradykinesia, balance, walking speed, REE, and glucose metabolism and increased muscle expression of energy sensors (AMPK. However, the exercise-induced increase in muscle mass/strength, mitochondrial content, type II fiber size, and postexercise phosphocreatine (PCr recovery (31P-MRS were found only in controls. Nevertheless, MDS-UPDRS was associated with muscle AMPK and mechano-growth factor (MGF expression. Improvements in fasting glycemia were positively associated with muscle function and the expression of Sirt1 and Cox7a1, and the parameters of fitness/strength were positively associated with the expression of MyHC2, MyHC7, and MGF. Moreover, reduced bradykinesia was associated with better muscle metabolism (maximal oxidative capacity and postexercise PCr recovery; 31P-MRS. Exercise training improved the clinical state in early/mid-stage Parkinson’s disease patients, including motor functions and whole-body metabolism. Although the adaptive response to exercise in PD was different from that of controls, exercise

  13. Aquatic exercise improves the monocyte pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production balance in fibromyalgia patients.

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    Ortega, E; Bote, M E; Giraldo, E; García, J J

    2012-02-01

    Current hypotheses of the etiology of fibromyalgia (FM) include inflammatory disorders. We evaluated the effect of a pool-aquatic exercise program (8 months, two weekly 60-min sessions) on the inflammatory cytokine production by isolated monocytes, and on the serum concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP), in a group of female FM patients. Monocytes from FM patients released more IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, and IL-10 than those from an age-matched control group of healthy women (HW). This inflammatory disorder in FM women was also manifested by high circulating concentrations of CRP. Increased IL-6 with a concomitant decreased TNFα spontaneous release was found after 4 months (midway through) of the exercise program. At the end of the program (8 months), monocytes from FM patients showed diminished spontaneous production of pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokines, with a similar spontaneous release of IL-1β and IL-6 to that of HW, but a lower production of TNFα and higher of IL-10. Lipopolysaccharide-induced production of IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, and IL-10 also decreased at the end of the exercise program, although IL-10 remained higher than HW. The anti-inflammatory effect of the exercise program was also corroborated by a decrease in the circulating CRP concentration. Exercise also improved the health-related quality of life of FM patients. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Tailored cognitive-behavioural therapy and exercise training improves the physical fitness of patients with fibromyalgia.

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    van Koulil, S; van Lankveld, W; Kraaimaat, F W; van Helmond, T; Vedder, A; van Hoorn, H; Donders, A R T; Wirken, L; Cats, H; van Riel, P L C M; Evers, A W M

    2011-12-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia have diminished levels of physical fitness, which may lead to functional disability and exacerbating complaints. Multidisciplinary treatment comprising cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and exercise training has been shown to be effective in improving physical fitness. However, due to the high drop-out rates and large variability in patients' functioning, it was proposed that a tailored treatment approach might yield more promising treatment outcomes. High-risk fibromyalgia patients were randomly assigned to a waiting list control group (WLC) or a treatment condition (TC), with the treatment consisting of 16 twice-weekly sessions of CBT and exercise training tailored to the patient's cognitive-behavioural pattern. Physical fitness was assessed with two physical tests before and 3 months after treatment and at corresponding intervals in the WLC. Treatment effects were evaluated using linear mixed models. The level of physical fitness had improved significantly in the TC compared with the WLC. Attrition rates were low, effect sizes large and reliable change indices indicated a clinically relevant improvement among the TC. A tailored multidisciplinary treatment approach for fibromyalgia consisting of CBT and exercise training is well tolerated, yields clinically relevant changes, and appears a promising approach to improve patients' physical fitness. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT00268606.

  15. Improved reclassification of mortality risk by assessment of physical activity in patients referred for exercise testing.

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    Myers, Jonathan; Nead, Kevin T; Chang, Peter; Abella, Joshua; Kokkinos, Peter; Leeper, Nicholas J

    2015-04-01

    Inability to meet minimal guidelines on physical activity is associated with poor health outcomes, but quantifying activity can be complex. We studied whether a simple question regarding participation in regular activity improves risk classification for all-cause mortality. Maximal exercise testing was performed in 6962 patients (mean age, 58.9 ± 11 years) for clinical reasons. Subjects also were assessed for participation in regular activity using a simple yes/no response to meeting minimal recommendations on activity. The incremental value of adding a simple physical activity assessment to clinical, demographic, and exercise test information to predict mortality was determined using Cox proportional hazards models, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination index during a mean follow-up of 9.7 ± 4 years. Subjects who did not meet the minimal guidelines on activity had a lower exercise capacity (7.4 ± 4.3 vs 9.1 ± 3.6 metabolic equivalents, P mortality rate (2.42% vs 1.71%, P mortality (hazard ratio, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.51, P test variables, fitness had the highest C-index for predicting mortality (0.72, P mortality among patients who are referred for exercise testing. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Supervised physical exercise improves endothelial function in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    dos Reis-Neto, Edgard Torres; da Silva, Aline Evelyn; Monteiro, Carlos Manoel de Castro; de Camargo, Luciano Monteiro; Sato, Emilia Inoue

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of supervised physical exercise on endothelial function, ergospirometric test variables and disease activity in SLE patients. We conducted a prospective study in which women with SLE who were available to perform physical exercise were allocated to the exercise group (EG) to practise supervised physical exercise for 1 h three times per week for 16 weeks. Those who were not available for this activity were allocated to the control group (CG). Intervention consisted of walking at a heart rate corresponding to the ventilatory 1 threshold obtained from ergospirometry and monitored by a frequency meter. At baseline (T0) and after 16 weeks (T16), patients were assessed for endothelial function by brachial artery (flow-mediated dilation), ergospirometry and disease activity (SLEDAI). Statistical analysis was performed through normality tests, Student's t-test and non-parametric tests for data with non-normal distribution. P exercise tolerance [12.3 (2.4) vs 13.4 (2.6) min, P = 0.027], maximum speed [7.7 (1.0) vs 8.3 (1.2) km/h, P = 0.027] and threshold speed [5.6 (0.7) vs 6.1 (0.9) km/h, P = 0.005] in the EG without a difference in the CG. There was no difference in the SLEDAI score in both groups. Physical exercise is a useful strategy to improve endothelial function and aerobic capacity without worsening disease activity in SLE patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION; ClinicalTrials.gov (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov), NCT01712529.

  17. Whole Body Vibration Exercises and the Improvement of the Flexibility in Patient with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danúbia da Cunha Sá-Caputo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrations produced in oscillating/vibratory platform generate whole body vibration (WBV exercises, which are important in sports, as well as in treating diseases, promoting rehabilitation, and improving the quality of life. WBV exercises relevantly increase the muscle strength, muscle power, and the bone mineral density, as well as improving the postural control, the balance, and the gait. An important number of publications are found in the PubMed database with the keyword “flexibility” and eight of the analyzed papers involving WBV and flexibility reached a level of evidence II. The biggest distance between the third finger of the hand to the floor (DBTFF of a patient with metabolic syndrome (MS was found before the first session and was considered to be 100%. The percentages to the other measurements in the different sessions were determined to be related to the 100%. It is possible to see an immediate improvement after each session with a decrease of the %DBTFF. As the presence of MS is associated with poorer physical performance, a simple and safe protocol using WBV exercises promoted an improvement of the flexibility in a patient with MS.

  18. Exercise improves immune function, antidepressive response, and sleep quality in patients with chronic primary insomnia.

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    Passos, Giselle Soares; Poyares, Dalva; Santana, Marcos Gonçalves; Teixeira, Alexandre Abílio de Souza; Lira, Fábio Santos; Youngstedt, Shawn D; dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of moderate aerobic exercise training on sleep, depression, cortisol, and markers of immune function in patients with chronic primary insomnia. Twenty-one sedentary participants (16 women aged 44.7 ± 9 years) with chronic primary insomnia completed a 4-month intervention of moderate aerobic exercise. Compared with baseline, polysomnographic data showed improvements following exercise training. Also observed were reductions in depression symptoms and plasma cortisol. Immunologic assays revealed a significant increase in plasma apolipoprotein A (140.9 ± 22 to 151.2 ± 22 mg/dL) and decreases in CD4 (915.6 ± 361 to 789.6 ± 310 mm(3)) and CD8 (532.4 ± 259 to 435.7 ± 204 mm(3)). Decreases in cortisol were significantly correlated with increases in total sleep time (r = -0.51) and REM sleep (r = -0.52). In summary, long-term moderate aerobic exercise training improved sleep, reduced depression and cortisol, and promoted significant changes in immunologic variables.

  19. Effects of cardiac rehabilitation in diabetic patients: both cardiac and noncardiac factors determine improvement in exercise capacity.

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    St Clair, Mitchell; Mehta, Hardik; Sacrinty, Matthew; Johnson, Dominic; Robinson, Killian

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic patients have a worse prognosis than nondiabetic patients after myocardial infarction. Although exercise improves risk factors, exercise capacity, and mortality, it is still unclear if these benefits are the same as in nondiabetics. Furthermore, although exercise tolerance is predicted by systolic and diastolic dysfunction in nondiabetics, its role as a predictor of exercise capacity in diabetics remains unclear. Diabetics and nondiabetics see a similar improvement in their cardiac risk factors and exercise parameters from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). A series of 370 diabetics and 942 nondiabetics entered a 36-session outpatient CR program after interventions for coronary heart disease or after bypass or cardiac valve surgery. The program consisted of physical exercise, lifestyle modification, and pharmacotherapy. Quality of life, weight, blood pressure, and lipid profiles improved significantly in both groups during the 12-week program. Baseline metabolic equivalents (METs) were lower in diabetics vs nondiabetics at the start of CR (2.4 vs 2.7, P diabetics had less improvement (change in METs 1.7 vs 2.6, P diabetes remained a significant predictor of reduced improvement in exercise capacity. Diabetics saw a significant benefit in quality of life, weight, exercise tolerance, and cardiac risk factors, but to a lesser extent when compared with nondiabetics. The mechanisms for poorer improvement in diabetics following CR also include noncardiac factors and require further study. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Improvement in self-reported exercise participation with the combination of tiotropium and rehabilitative exercise training in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kesten

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Steven Kesten1, Richard Casaburi2, David Kukafka3, Christopher B Cooper41Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH, Ingelheim, Germany; 2Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA; 3Northern Colorado Pulmonary Consultants PC, Fort Collins, CO, USA; 4UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: Improvements in ventilatory mechanics with tiotropium increases exercise tolerance during pulmonary rehabilitation. We wondered whether tiotropium also increased physical activities outside of pulmonary rehabilitation.Methods: COPD patients participating in 8 weeks of pulmonary rehabilitation were studied in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tiotropium 18 µg daily (tiotropium = 47, placebo = 44. Study drug was administered for 5 weeks prior to, 8 weeks during, and 12 weeks following pulmonary rehabilitation. Patients completed a questionnaire documenting participation in pre-defined activities outside of pulmonary rehabilitation during the 2 weeks prior to each visit. Patients who submitted an activity questionnaire at week 4 and on at least one subsequent visit were included in the analysis. For each patient, the number of sessions was multiplied with the duration of each activity and then summed to give overall activity duration.Results: Patients (n = 46 had mean age of 67 years, mean baseline FEV1 of 0.84 L (33% predicted. Mean (SE increase in duration of activities (minutes during 2 weeks prior to each visit from week 4 (prior to PR to week 13 (end of PR was 145 (84 minutes with tiotropium and 66 (96 minutes with placebo. The increase from week 4 to week 25 (end of follow-up was 262 (96 and 60 (93 minutes for the respective groups. Increases in activity duration from week 4 to weeks 17, 21, and 25 were statistically significant with tiotropium. No statistical differences over time were observed within the placebo-treated group and differences between groups were not significant.Conclusions: Tiotropium appears to amplify the

  1. Low-load high-velocity resistance exercises improve strength and functional capacity in diabetic patients

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    Rodrigo Celes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of low-load high-velocity resistance exercises on neuromuscular and functional outcomes in patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2D during the early-phase of resistance training. Thirty participants with T2D performed 18 training sessions (6 weeks – 3x week in one of two groups: low-load high-velocity exercises (LLHV, n=15, 62.1±10.5 years or recreational activities (RA, n=15 56.7 ± 19.4 years. LLHV performed resistance exercises with 3x 8reps as fast as possible with 50-60% 1RM. RA performed light activities. Strength, power, and functional tests were assessed. There was significant increasing in the knee extension peak-torque at 60º/s (7.6% and 180º/s (12.2%, rate of force development in the LLHV group (P<0.05, whereas there were no changes in the RA group. Significant increases in functional test were observed in the LLHV group (P<0.01 with no changes in the RA group. In conclusion, the LLHV induced marked improvements in neuromuscular parameters, as well as in the functional capacity of participants with T2D.

  2. Walking Exercise in Water Improving Practical Ambulation in a Patient with Chronic Cerebellar Ataxia

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    池永, 康規; 豊田, 多喜子; 八幡, 徹太郎; 染矢, 富士子; 立野, 勝彦

    2002-01-01

    The specific effect of general dynamic water exercise in 41 year-old woman with chronic cerebellar ataxia induced by meningitis was observed. She was conservatively treated and took bed rest for two weeks, and she suffered from severe dynamic and static ataxia. And exercise under weight-bearing and bandage pressure and Frenkel exercise was applied for nine months. However her disability was not improved. And then she took a 30-minute walking practice in water twice weekly. After that training...

  3. Preliminary study of an exercise programme for reducing fatigue and improving sleep among long-term haemodialysis patients.

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    Maniam, Radha; Subramanian, Pathmawathi; Singh, Surindar Kaur Surat; Lim, Soo Kun; Chinna, Karuthan; Rosli, Roshaslina

    2014-09-01

    Fatigue and quality of sleep are the main factors that contribute to a poor quality of life among patients on long-term haemodialysis. Studies have also emphasised the importance of exercise for improving the wellbeing of dialysis patients. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a predialysis low-to-moderate-intensity exercise programme for reducing fatigue and improving sleep disorders among long-term haemodialysis patients. In this quasi-experimental study, an exercise programme was conducted three times a week for 12 weeks before long-term haemodialysis patients underwent dialysis at two centres. The patients were categorised into either the exercise group (n = 28) or control group (n = 27). The latter was asked to maintain their current lifestyles. Assessments of fatigue and sleep disorder levels were performed for both groups using self-reported questionnaires at baseline and after intervention. The patients' perception of the exercise programme was also determined using self-reported questionnaires. Paired sample t-test indicated improvements in fatigue level in the exercise group (mean fatigue score: post-treatment 40.5 ± 7.9 vs. pre-treatment 30.0 ± 10.9). Improvements in sleep disorders were also observed in the exercise group (mean score: post-treatment 7.6 ± 3.3 vs. pre-treatment 10.1 ± 3.8). However, sleep quality deteriorated in the control group (mean score: post-treatment 10.7 ± 2.9 vs. pre-treatment 9.3 ± 2.9). Simple low-to-moderate-intensity exercise is effective for improving fatigue, sleep disorders and the overall quality of life among haemodialysis patients.

  4. Exercise interventions in polypathological aging patients that coexist with diabetes mellitus: improving functional status and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-06-01

    In elderly populations, diabetes is associated with reduced muscle strength, poor muscle quality, and accelerated loss of muscle mass. In addition, diabetes mellitus increases risk for accelerated aging and for the development of frailty syndrome. This disease is also associated with a polypathological condition, and its complications progressively affect quality of life and survival. Exercise interventions, including resistance training, represent the cornerstones of diabetes management, especially in patients at severe functional decline. This review manuscript aimed to describe the beneficial effects of different exercise interventions on the functional capacity of elderly diabetics, including those at polypathological condition. The SciELO, Science Citation Index, MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and ScienceDirect databases were searched from 1980 to 2015 for articles published from original scientific investigations. In addition to the beneficial effects of exercise interventions on glycemic control, and on the cardiovascular risk factors associated with diabetes, physical exercise is an effective intervention to improve muscle strength, power output, and aerobic power and functional capacity in elderly diabetic patients. Thus, a combination of resistance and endurance training is the most effective exercise intervention to promote overall physical fitness in these patients. In addition, in diabetic patients with frailty and severe functional decline, a multicomponent exercise program including strength and power training, balance exercises, and gait retraining may be an effective intervention to reduce falls and improve functional capacity and quality of life in these patients.

  5. Acupuncture improves exercise tolerance of patients with heart failure: a placebo-controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristen, Arnt V; Schuhmacher, Boris; Strych, Kathrin; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Hilbel, Thomas; Haass, Markus; Katus, Hugo A; Schneider, Antonius; Streitberger, Konrad M; Backs, Johannes

    2010-09-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a complex clinical syndrome with autonomic dysbalance and increased plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines, which further worsen the syndrome. Experimental data have shown that stimulation of certain acupoints decreases autonomic dysbalance. To test the therapeutic potential of acupuncture for life-threatening diseases such as CHF. 17 stable patients with CHF (New York Heart Association class II-III, ejection fraction acupuncture (VA) and placebo acupuncture (PA) group. Cardiopulmonary function, heart rate variability and quality of life were explored. No improvements of the cardiac ejection fraction or peak oxygen uptake were observed, but the ambulated 6 min walk distance was remarkably increased in the VA group (+32+/-7 m) but not the PA group (-1+/-11 m; pefficiency, were improved after VA but not PA. Furthermore, heart rate variability increased after VA, but decreased after PA. The 'general health' score and 'body pain' score of the quality-of-life questionnaire SF-36 tended to be improved after VA. Acupuncture may become an additional therapeutic strategy to improve the exercise tolerance of patients with CHF, potentially by improving skeletal muscle function.

  6. On improvement of exercise tolerance in patients with chronic heart failure, with special reference to local muscle training

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Allan

    1996-01-01

    ON IMPROVEMENT OF EXERCISE TOLERANCE IN PATIENTS WrrH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE With special reference to local muscle traimng Thesis by Allan Gordon, MD, Division of Cardiology at the Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge University Hospital, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Reduced heart pump function and skeletal muscle abnormalities are considered important determinants for the low physical exercise capacity in chronic heart failure. Because of reduce...

  7. Neuromuscular exercise improves functional performance in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Larsen, Anders Holsgaard

    Purpose. Exercise is regarded a cornerstone in the treatment of mild to moderate osteoarthritis (OA). However, little is known of the effects in patients with advanced and end-stage OA. The purpose was to evaluate the effect of neuromuscular exercise in patients with severe hip OA. Methods. Design....... Randomized controlled trial (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01003756). 84 patients, 51% female, mean age 68.6±7.8 years, BMI 28.7±4.7 scheduled for total hip replacement at Svendborg Community Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Denmark were included. Intervention. Participants were randomized...

  8. Aerobic Exercise Improves Signs of Restless Leg Syndrome in End Stage Renal Disease Patients Suffering Chronic Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Mortazavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Restless leg syndrome (RLS is one of the prevalent complaints of patients with end stage renal diseases suffering chronic hemodialysis. Although there are some known pharmacological managements for this syndrome, the adverse effect of drugs causes a limitation for using them. In this randomized clinical trial we aimed to find a nonpharmacological way to improve signs of restless leg syndrome and patients’ quality of life. Material and Methods. Twenty-six patients were included in the study and divided into 2 groups of control and exercise. The exercise group used aerobic exercise during their hemodialysis for 16 weeks. The quality of life and severity of restless leg syndrome were assessed at the first week of study and final week. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results. The difference of means of RLS signs at the first week of study and final week was in exercise group and in control group. There was not any statistical difference between control group and exercise group in quality of life at the first week of study and final week. Conclusions. We suggest using aerobic exercise for improving signs of restless leg syndrome, but no evidence was found for its efficacy on patient’s quality of life.

  9. Dietary nitrate does not reduce oxygen cost of exercise or improve muscle mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabben, Miranda; Schmitz, Joep P J; Ciapaite, Jolita; le Clercq, Carlijn M P; van Riel, Natal A; Haak, Harm R; Nicolay, Klaas; de Coo, Irenaeus F M; Smeets, Hubert; Praet, Stephan F; van Loon, Luc J; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2017-05-01

    Muscle weakness and exercise intolerance negatively affect the quality of life of patients with mitochondrial myopathy. Short-term dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to improve exercise performance and reduce oxygen cost of exercise in healthy humans and trained athletes. We investigated whether 1 wk of dietary inorganic nitrate supplementation decreases the oxygen cost of exercise and improves mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial myopathy. Ten patients with mitochondrial myopathy (40 ± 5 yr, maximal whole body oxygen uptake = 21.2 ± 3.2 ml·min-1·kg body wt-1, maximal work load = 122 ± 26 W) received 8.5 mg·kg body wt-1·day-1 inorganic nitrate (~7 mmol) for 8 days. Whole body oxygen consumption at 50% of the maximal work load, in vivo skeletal muscle oxidative capacity (evaluated from postexercise phosphocreatine recovery using 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy), and ex vivo mitochondrial oxidative capacity in permeabilized skinned muscle fibers (measured with high-resolution respirometry) were determined before and after nitrate supplementation. Despite a sixfold increase in plasma nitrate levels, nitrate supplementation did not affect whole body oxygen cost during submaximal exercise. Additionally, no beneficial effects of nitrate were found on in vivo or ex vivo muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity. This is the first time that the therapeutic potential of dietary nitrate for patients with mitochondrial myopathy was evaluated. We conclude that 1 wk of dietary nitrate supplementation does not reduce oxygen cost of exercise or improve mitochondrial function in the group of patients tested. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Levosimendan improves exercise performance in patients with advanced chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Saima; Andreini, Daniele; Farina, Stefania; Salvioni, Elisabetta; Pontone, Gianluca; Sciomer, Susanna; Volpato, Valentina; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) provides parameters such as peak VO2 and ventilation/CO2 production (VE/VCO2) slope, which are strong prognostic predictors in patients with stable advanced chronic heart failure (ADHF). The study aim was to evaluate the effects of the inodilator levosimendan on CPET in patients with ADHF under stable clinical conditions. We enrolled patients with ADHF (peak VO2 < 12 mL/min/kg) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled protocol. Patients were randomly assigned to i.v. infusion of placebo (500 mL 5% glucose; n = 19) or levosimendan (in 500 mL 5% glucose; n = 23). Before and 24 h after the end of the infusion, patients underwent determination of New York Heart Association class, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), haemoglobin, serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen levels, as well as CPET, standard spirometry, and alveolar capillary gas diffusion. BNP showed no change with placebo (1042 ± 811 to 1043 ± 867 pg/mL), but it was decreased with levosimendan (1163 ± 897 to 509 ± 543 pg/mL, P < 0.001). No changes were observed for haemoglobin, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen in either group. With levosimendan, a minor improvement was observed in spirometry measurements, but not in alveolar capillary gas diffusion. Peak VO2 showed a small, non-significant increase with placebo (9.5 ± 1.7 to 10.0 ± 2.1 mL/kg/min, P = 0.12), and a greater increase with levosimendan (9.8 ± 1.7 to 11.0 ± 1.9 mL/kg/min, P < 0.005). The VE/VCO2 slope showed no change (44.0 ± 11 vs. 43.4 ± 10.3, P = 0.44), and a decrease (41.9 ± 10 vs. 36.6 ± 6.4, P < 0.001) in the placebo and in the levosimendan group, respectively. Levosimendan treatment significantly improves peak VO2 and reduces VE/VCO2 slope and BNP in patients with ADHF.

  11. Physical Exercise Improves Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafaina, Santos; Collado-Mateo, Daniel; Fuentes, Juan Pedro; Merellano-Navarro, Eugenio; Gusi, Narcis

    2017-09-23

    The aim of the present systematic review is to provide an up-to-date analysis of the research on the effects of exercise programs on heart rate variability (HRV) in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). An electronic search of the literature (PubMed, PEDro and Web of Science) was performed. "HRV", "heart rate variability", "exercise", "physical" and "diabetes" were the terms used for article retrieval. Lastly, 15 articles were selected. PRISMA methodology was employed and data were extracted according to the PICOS approach. Although HRV is not routinely measured in the management of T2DM, it is an important measure due to its relation with mortality and diabetic neuropathy. Physical exercise has become a therapy for T2DM, because it improves physical fitness and functional capacity, enhances metabolic control and insulin sensitivity, reduces inflammatory markers and neuropathy symptoms and can increase the regenerative capacity of cutaneous axons, slowing or preventing neuropathy progression. However, it is not clear to what extent physical exercise can improve HRV in this population. Participation in the 15 selected studies was similar in men and women (48.01% men and 51.99% women). All the intervention programs included aerobic training, and it was complemented by strength training in four studies. Duration of physical exercise sessions ranged between 30 and 75 min, the frequency being between 2 and 7 days/week. Statistically significant improvements in groups with diabetes, relative to baseline, were observed in nine studies. More than 3 days per week of aerobic training, complemented by strength training, during at least 3 months seems to improve HRV in T2DM. Weekly frequency might be the most important factor to improve HRV. These aspects could help to design better programs based in scientific evidence, incorporating HRV as an important variable associated with diabetic neuropathy and mortality.

  12. The effects of a nurse-supervised home exercise programme on improving patients' perceptions of the benefits and barriers to exercise: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xingjuan; Chow, Susan Ka Yee; Wong, Frances Ky

    2017-09-01

    To explore the effects of a home exercise programme on patients' perceptions of the barriers and benefits to exercise and adherence to the programme. Great efforts have been made to encourage dialysis patients to participate in rehabilitation regimens. The promotion of exercise in this population is still limited. This was a post hoc analysis of a randomised, two-group parallel study. A total of 113 adult patients recruited from the haemodialysis units were randomised into two groups on a 1:1 ratio. Both groups received in-centre group exercise training weekly for 6 weeks. The intervention group patients were provided with an additional individualised nurse-led home exercise prescription and behavioural support for 12 weeks. The patients' perceptions of the barriers and benefits to exercise, adherence to the home exercise prescription and their exercise level at weeks 6 and 12 were evaluated. There was a significant between-group difference in the score on patient perceptions of the barriers and benefits to exercise, with the intervention group reporting a greater reduction in perceived barriers to exercise. Significant group differences were noted in exercise level upon the completion of the programme, with the intervention group reporting higher such levels. The average adherence rate to the negotiated exercise plans was 78.9%. The intervention group of patients did better at meeting or exceeding the minimum exercise goal than did the control group. Home exercise prescriptions and behavioural support provided by trained nurses are effective at helping patients to remove barriers to engaging in exercise training. Physical exercise in a clinical arena should not be considered the exclusive domain of physical therapists; the team could collaborate with nurses to play a core role in making physical exercise for patients an essential practice of care in a multidisciplinary team. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Interval training early after heart failure decompensation is safe and improves exercise tolerance and quality of life in selected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doletsky, Artem; Andreev, Denis; Giverts, Ilya; Svet, Alexey; Brand, Anna; Kuklina, Maria; Sedov, Vsevolod; Dikur, Oxana; Syrkin, Abram; Saner, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Aims To evaluate safety and efficacy of moderate intensity interval exercise training early after heart failure decompensation on exercise tolerance and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods and results This is a prospective randomized controlled study. We screened 234 consecutive patients admitted with decompensated heart failure; 46 patients (42 men/4 women; 61 ± 12 years of age) were randomized to a moderate intensity aerobic interval training ( n = 24) or to a control group ( n = 22). Patients underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing, echocardiography and Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire (MLHFQ) at baseline, after three weeks and after three months. After three weeks, peak-VO2 increased by 17% in the training group ( p = 0.003) with further increase by 10% after three months ( p training group (from 64.6 ± 15.6 to 30.8 ± 12.9, p training group, but not in controls. Left ventricular ejection fraction was not significantly different between the two groups at baseline and after three months. No serious adverse events related to exercise testing or training were observed. Conclusions Interval exercise training early after an episode of heart failure decompensation is safe and effective in improving exercise tolerance and health-related quality of life in selected patients after achievement of clinical stability. Positive effects remained sustained after three months. Further studies are needed to define role and indications for interval exercise training early after heart failure decompensation.

  14. A systematic review protocol on the effectiveness of therapeutic exercises utilised by physiotherapists to improve function in patients with burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudawarima, Tapfuma; Chiwaridzo, Matthew; Jelsma, Jennifer; Grimmer, Karen; Muchemwa, Faith Chengetayi

    2017-10-23

    Therapeutic exercises play a crucial role in the management of burn injuries. The broad objective of this review is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness, safety and applicability to low-income countries of therapeutic exercises utilised by physiotherapists to improve function in patients with burns. Population = adults and children/adolescents with burns of any aspect of their bodies. Interventions = any aerobic and/or strength exercises delivered as part of a rehabilitation programme by anyone (e.g. physiotherapists, occupational therapists, nurses, doctors, community workers and patients themselves). Comparators = any comparator. Outcomes = any measure of outcome (e.g. quality of life, pain, muscle strength, range of movement, fear or quality of movement). Settings = any setting in any country. A systematic review will be conducted by two blinded independent reviewers who will search articles on PubMed, CiNAHL, Cochrane library, Medline, Pedro, OTseeker, EMBASE, PsychINFO and EBSCOhost using predefined criteria. Studies of human participants of any age suffering from burns will be eligible, and there will be no restrictions on total body surface area. Only randomised controlled trials will be considered for this review, and the methodological quality of studies meeting the selection criteria will be evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias. The PRISMA reporting standards will be used to write the review. A narrative analysis of the findings will be done, but if pooling is possible, meta-analysis will be considered. Burns may have a long-lasting impact on both psychological and physical functioning and thus it is important to identify and evaluate the effects of current and past aerobic and strength exercises on patients with burns. By identifying the characteristics of effective exercise programmes, guidelines can be suggested for developing intervention programmes aimed at improving the function of patients with burns

  15. Exercise adherence improving long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.G.; Twisk, J.W.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence within the prescribed physical therapy treatment period and after physical therapy discharge on patients' outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or

  16. Trunk exercises performed on an unstable surface improve trunk muscle activation, postural control, and gait speed in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyoung-Sim; Cho, Hwi-Young; In, Tae-Sung

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of trunk exercises performed on an unstable surface on trunk muscle activation, postural control, and gait speed in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-four participants with stroke were recruited in this study and randomly distributed into experimental (n = 12) and control groups (n = 12). [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group participated in trunk exercises on the balance pad for 30 min, five times a week for 4 weeks; those in the control group performed trunk exercises on a stable surface for 30 min, five times a week for 4 weeks. Trunk muscle activation was measured by using surface electromyography, and trunk control was evaluated with the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS). Gait speed was measured with the 10-Meter Walk Test. [Results] Activity of the external and internal oblique muscles in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group. The TIS score of the experimental group showed significantly greater improvement than did that of the control group. The 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT) score also significantly improved in the experimental group. [Conclusion] Trunk exercises on an unstable surface improve trunk muscle activation, postural control, and gait speed in patients with hemiparetic stroke.

  17. A combined aerobic and resistance exercise program improves physical functional performance in patients with heart failure: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Rebecca A; Cress, M Elaine; Higgins, Melinda K; Smith, Andrew L; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2012-01-01

    Recent guidelines for exercise in patients with heart failure (HF) recommended aerobic and resistance exercise as being safe and effective; however, the clinical and functional significance of these combined training modalities has not been established. In this pilot study, combined aerobic and resistance training was hypothesized to improve physical function, muscle strength, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) compared with an attention control wait list (ACWL). The 10-item Continuous Scale Physical Functional Performance Test (CS-PFP10), which simulates common household chores; muscle strength (handgrip and knee extension); and HRQOL (Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire) were evaluated at baseline (T1) and at 12 weeks (T2). The home-based moderate-intensity walking and resistance training program was performed 5 days a week. Twenty-four New York Heart Association class II to III HF patients (mean [SD] age, 60 [10] years; mean [SD] left ventricular ejection fraction, 25% [9%]) were randomized to a combined aerobic and resistance exercise program or to an ACWL group. Of the total group, 58% were New York Heart Association class III HF patients, 50% were white, and 50% were female. The CS-PFP10 total scores were significantly increased in the exercise group, from 45 (18) to 56 (16). The Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire overall summary score was significantly improved (P exercise intervention group compared with the ACWL group. Participants provided the home-based, combined aerobic and resistance exercise program had significantly improved physical function, muscle strength, symptom severity, and HRQOL compared with the ACWL group. The findings of this study must be interpreted cautiously owing to the limitations of a small sample, data collection from a single center, and differences between control and interventions groups at baseline. A combined aerobic and resistance exercise approach may improve physical function in stable HF patients, but

  18. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation improves exercise tolerance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with better preserved fat-free mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Maris Nápolis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation increases exercise tolerance in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients. However, it is conceivable that its benefits are more prominent in patients with better-preserved peripheral muscle function and structure. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation in COPD patients with better-preserved peripheral muscle function. Design: Prospective and cross-over study. METHODS: Thirty COPD patients were randomly assigned to either home-based, high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation or sham stimulation for six weeks. The training intensity was adjusted according to each subject's tolerance. Fat-free mass, isometric strength, six-minute walking distance and time to exercise intolerance (Tlim were assessed. RESULTS: Thirteen (46.4% patients responded to high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation; that is, they had a post/pre Δ Tlim >10% after stimulation (unimproved after sham stimulation. Responders had a higher baseline fat-free mass and six-minute walking distance than their seventeen (53.6% non-responding counterparts. Responders trained at higher stimulation intensities; their mean amplitude of stimulation during training was significantly related to their fat-free mass (r = 0.65; p<0.01. Logistic regression revealed that fat-free mass was the single independent predictor of Tlim improvement (odds ratio [95% CI] = 1.15 [1.04-1.26]; p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation improved the exercise capacity of COPD patients with better-preserved fat-free mass because they tolerated higher training stimulus levels. These data suggest that early training with high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation before tissue wasting begins might enhance exercise tolerance in patients with less advanced COPD.

  19. Home-based neuromuscular electrical stimulation improves exercise tolerance and health-related quality of life in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coquart JB

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jérémy B Coquart,1 Jean-Marie Grosbois,2,3 Cecile Olivier,4 Frederic Bart,2 Ingrid Castres,1 Benoit Wallaert4 1Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Université de Rouen, CETAPS, EA 3832, Mont Saint Aignan, 2Service de Pneumologie, Centre Hospitalier de Béthune, Beuvry, 3Formaction Santé, Perenchies, 4Service de Pneumologie et Immunoallergologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille, Hôpital Calmette, Université de Lille 2, France Background: This retrospective, observational study of a routine clinical practice reports the feasibility and efficiency of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (PR, including transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES or usual endurance physical exercise (UEPE, on exercise tolerance, anxiety/depression, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL in patients with COPD.Methods: Seventy-one patients with COPD participated in home-based PR with NMES (Group NMES [GNMES], while 117 patients participated in home-based PR with the UEPEs (Group UEPE [GUEPE]. NMES was applied for 30 minutes twice a day, every day. The endurance exercises in GUEPE began with a minimum 10-minute session at least 5 days a week, with the goal being 30–45 minutes per session. Three upper and lower limb muscle strengthening exercises lasting 10–15 minutes were also proposed to both the groups for daily practice. Moreover, PR in both the groups included a weekly 90-minute session based on an educational needs assessment. The sessions comprised endurance physical exercise for GUEPE, NMES for GNMES, resumption of physical daily living activities, therapeutic patient education, and psychosocial support to facilitate health behavior changes. Before and after PR, functional mobility and physical exercise capacity, anxiety, depression, and HRQoL were evaluated at home.Results: The study revealed that NMES significantly improved functional mobility (−18.8% in GNMES and −20.6% in GUEPE, exercise capacity (+20.8% in GNMES and +21

  20. Exercise adherence improves long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.; Twisk, J.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence, within the prescribed physiotherapy treatment period and after discharge, on patients’ outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. Relevance: The

  1. Improving exercise prescriptions for hematological cancer patients during and after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Conclusions from two large randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kühl, Rea Maria

    2016-01-01

    The evidence of exercise as adjuvant therapy option in cancer patients is increasing. Exercise constitutes a promising intervention to reduce treatment-related side-effects and to improve the rehabilitation process. Thus, there is growing interest in determining optimally targeted exercise prescriptions to maximize effects. However, few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were conducted in haematological cancer patients during and after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Consequ...

  2. Spa treatment for primary fibromyalgia syndrom: a combination of thalassotherapy , exercise and patient education improves symptoms and quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, T.R.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Bernelot Moens, H.J.; Taal, Erik; Zakraoui, L.; Rasker, Hans J.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To study the effect of a combination of thalassotherapy, exercise and patient education in people with fibromyalgia. - Methods: Patients with fibromyalgia, selected from a rheumatology out-patient department and from members of the Dutch fibromyalgia patient association, were

  3. Exercise during school hours when added to patient education improves outcome for 2 years in adolescent patellofemoral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, M S; Roos, E M; Olesen, J L

    2015-01-01

    to determine the effect of exercise therapy as an add-on therapy to patient education compared with education alone. METHODS: 121 adolescents from 15-19 years of age were cluster randomised to patient education or patient education combined with exercise therapy. Patient education covered self...

  4. A systematic review protocol on the effectiveness of therapeutic exercises utilised by physiotherapists to improve function in patients with burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapfuma Mudawarima

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapeutic exercises play a crucial role in the management of burn injuries. The broad objective of this review is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness, safety and applicability to low-income countries of therapeutic exercises utilised by physiotherapists to improve function in patients with burns. Population = adults and children/adolescents with burns of any aspect of their bodies. Interventions = any aerobic and/or strength exercises delivered as part of a rehabilitation programme by anyone (e.g. physiotherapists, occupational therapists, nurses, doctors, community workers and patients themselves. Comparators = any comparator. Outcomes = any measure of outcome (e.g. quality of life, pain, muscle strength, range of movement, fear or quality of movement. Settings = any setting in any country. Methods/design A systematic review will be conducted by two blinded independent reviewers who will search articles on PubMed, CiNAHL, Cochrane library, Medline, Pedro, OTseeker, EMBASE, PsychINFO and EBSCOhost using predefined criteria. Studies of human participants of any age suffering from burns will be eligible, and there will be no restrictions on total body surface area. Only randomised controlled trials will be considered for this review, and the methodological quality of studies meeting the selection criteria will be evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias. The PRISMA reporting standards will be used to write the review. A narrative analysis of the findings will be done, but if pooling is possible, meta-analysis will be considered. Discussion Burns may have a long-lasting impact on both psychological and physical functioning and thus it is important to identify and evaluate the effects of current and past aerobic and strength exercises on patients with burns. By identifying the characteristics of effective exercise programmes, guidelines can be suggested for developing intervention

  5. [Using Interdisciplinary Cooperation to Improve the Rate of Proper Performance of a Hand Exercise Among Hemodialysis Patients With Arteriovenous Fistula Construction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ya-Hsin; Shin, Miao-Ling; Huang, Cyong-Pei; Chen, Siang-Jyun; Huang, Tsuey-Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Patients who undergo new arteriovenous fistula (AVF) construction as part of their hemodialysis treatment program are required to perform hand exercises properly in order to maintain AVF function. However, poor performance of these hand exercises currently results in the failure of many patients to preserve AVF function. To increase the rate of performing this hand exercise properly from 55% to 80%. A comprehensive investigation identified the following five main problems: (a) Insufficient muscular endurance; (b) Resistance was not labeled on the ball; (c) Difficulties with maintaining a grip on the ball during the exercise; (d) Lack of standardized education procedures; and (e) Nurses lack latest knowledge on the hand exercise. The strategies used to improve the situation included: (a) Interdisciplinary team cooperation with physiotherapists to design individualized resistance training regimens; (b) Exercise tool improvement; (c) Standardized AVF care; (d) Continuous education for nursing staffs; and (e) Seed teacher program for hand exercise. The rate of proper hand exercise performance increased from 55% to 93%. This nursing project involved an interdisciplinary team that included physiotherapists in order to successfully improve the rate at which the hand exercise was performed properly. This positive experience may be applied to other hemodialysis departments in the treatment of patients with AVF.

  6. Supervised physical exercise to improve the quality of life of cancer patients: the EFICANCER randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Aintzane; Carrera, Sergio; Arietaleanizbeascoa, Marisol; Arce, Veronica; Gallastegui, Nere Mendizabal; Giné March, Anna; Sanz-Guinea, Aitor; Eskisabel, Araceli; Rodriguez, Ana Lopez; Martín, Rosa A; Lopez-Vivanco, Guillermo; Grandes, Gonzalo

    2015-02-06

    The optimal form of exercise for individuals with cancer has yet to be identified, but there is evidence that exercise improves their quality of life. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy and efficiency of an innovative physical exercise programme, for individuals undergoing chemotherapy for breast, gastrointestinal or non-small cell lung tumours, for improving quality of life, reducing level of fatigue, and enhancing functional capacity over time. We will conduct a clinical trial in 66 patients with stage IV breast, gastrointestinal or non-small cell lung cancer, recruited by the Department of Oncology of the referral hospital from 4 primary care health centres of the Basque Health Service (Osakidetza). These patients will be randomised to one of two groups. The treatment common to both groups will be the usual care for cancer: optimized usual drug therapies and strengthening of self-care; in addition, patients in the intervention group will participate in a 2-month exercise programme, including both aerobic and strength exercises, supervised by nurses in their health centre. The principal outcome variable is health-related quality of life, measured blindly with the 30-item European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire and Short Form-36 four times: at baseline, and 2, 6 and 12 months later. The secondary outcome variables are fatigue (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue questionnaire), functional capacity (6-Minute Walk Test and cardiorespiratory test), muscle strength (hand-held dynamometry and sit-to-stand test), radiological response to treatment (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors) and progression-free and overall survival. Age, sex, diagnosis, chemotherapy regimen, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status and smoking status will be considered as predictive variables. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis, comparing changes at each time

  7. Spa treatment for primary fibromyalgia syndrom: a combination of thalassotherapy , exercise and patient education improves symptoms and quality of life.

    OpenAIRE

    Zijlstra, T.R.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Bernelot Moens, H.J.; Taal, Erik; Zakraoui, L.; Rasker, Hans J.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To study the effect of a combination of thalassotherapy, exercise and patient education in people with fibromyalgia. - Methods: Patients with fibromyalgia, selected from a rheumatology out-patient department and from members of the Dutch fibromyalgia patient association, were pre-randomized to receive either 2 weeks of treatment in a Tunisian spa resort, including thalassotherapy, supervised exercise and group education (active treatment) or treatment as usual (control treatment)....

  8. Specific balance training included in an endurance-resistance exercise program improves postural balance in elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frih, Bechir; Mkacher, Wajdi; Jaafar, Hamdi; Frih, Ameur; Ben Salah, Zohra; El May, Mezry; Hammami, Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 6 months of specific balance training included in endurance-resistance program on postural balance in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Forty-nine male patients undergoing HD were randomly assigned to an intervention group (balance training included in an endurance-resistance training, n = 26) or a control group (resistance-endurance training only, n = 23). Postural control was assessed using six clinical tests; Timed Up and Go test, Tinetti Mobility Test, Berg Balance Scale, Unipodal Stance test, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Activities Balance Confidence scale. All balance measures increased significantly after the period of rehabilitation training in the intervention group. Only the Timed Up and Go, Berg Balance Scale, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Activities Balance Confidence scores were improved in the control group. The ranges of change in these tests were greater in the balance training group. In HD patients, specific balance training included in a usual endurance-resistance training program improves static and dynamic balance better than endurance-resistance training only. Implications for rehabilitation Rehabilitation using exercise in haemodialysis patients improved global mobility and functional abilities. Specific balance training included in usual endurance resistance training program could lead to improved static and dynamic balance.

  9. Acute exercise improves motor memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Kasper Christen; Roig, Marc; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that a single bout of acute cardiovascular exercise improves motor skill learning through an optimization of long-term motor memory. Here we expand this previous finding, to explore potential exercise-related biomarkers and their association with measures of motor memory...... and skill acquisition. Thirty-two healthy young male subjects were randomly allocated into either an exercise or control group. Following either an intense bout of cycling or rest subjects practiced a visuomotor tracking task. Motor skill acquisition was assessed during practice and retention 1 hour, 24...... hours and 7 days after practice. Plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine and lactate were analyzed at baseline, immediately after exercise or rest and during motor...

  10. Comparison of Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises and sinusoidal support surface translations to improve balance in patients with unilateral vestibular deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corna, Stefano; Nardone, Antonio; Prestinari, Alessandro; Galante, Massimo; Grasso, Margherita; Schieppati, Marco

    2003-08-01

    To compare the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation by using Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises with that of instrumental rehabilitation. The main study (n=32) used a pre-post rehabilitation (A-B) design; the ancillary studies used a subset of 11 patients 1 month before rehabilitation versus pre-post rehabilitation (A-A-B design) and 9 patients pre-post rehabilitation versus 1 month after (A-B-B design). Division of physical therapy and rehabilitation at a scientific institute in Italy. Patients (Cawthorne-Cooksey, n=17; instrumental rehabilitation, n=15) with a complete or incomplete unilateral vestibular lesion due to ischemic, inflammatory, cranial nerve VIII sectioning, or unknown cause. Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises or instrumental rehabilitation training consisting of standing with eyes open (EO) or closed (EC) on a platform moving, relative to the subjects, in the anteroposterior (AP) or mediolateral direction, at a sinusoidal translation frequency of 0.2 or 0.6Hz; training sessions for both interventions were twice daily, 30 minutes per session, for 5 days. Body sway and subjective score of sway during quiet stance with EO or EC, with feet 10cm apart (FA) or together (FT); the standard deviation of the AP displacement of the malleolus, hip, and head during AP platform translations; the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI); and performance-oriented evaluation of balance and gait (according to Tinetti). Both interventions improved patients' balance. Under each postural and visual condition, both groups showed reduction in body sway, and the post rehabilitation sway values approached those observed in normal subjects; improvement was significantly better for instrumental rehabilitation under FA EO, FA EC, and FT EC conditions. All patients reported a subjective feeling of increased steadiness. Sway recorded 1 month before treatment did not differ from that at the start of treatment. The follow-up evaluation showed persistence of effect. Parallel to the improved

  11. Targeted individual exercise programmes for older medical patients are feasible, and may change hospital and patient outcomes: a service improvement project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Susie

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this project was primarily to assess the feasibility of individual exercise programs for older hospitalised patients at risk of functional decline, and secondarily to evaluate impact on discharge outcomes. Methods Design: Cohort service improvement project Setting: 500 bed acute metropolitan hospital Subjects: Patients aged 70 and older admitted to Flinders Medical Centre under the general medical, aged care and respiratory units from June to November 2006, at intermediate or high risk of functional decline, and able to commence exercise within 48 hours of admission Intervention: Functional Maintenance Program (FMP; an individually tailored exercise program to maintain functional mobility, prescribed and progressed by a physiotherapist, and supervised by an Allied Health Assistant (AHA, provided in addition to usual physiotherapy care Outcome measures: Feasibility (number of admissions suitable, commencing and complying with FMP. Impact (length of hospital stay (LOS, Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT referrals and approvals, hospital readmissions within 28 days, and functional mobility (Elderly Mobility Scale Data Analysis: Descriptive and logistic regression analysis Results Of 1021 admissions of patients aged 70 or older to general medical, aged care and respiratory units, 22% (n = 220 were identified within 48 hours as suitable for FMP: 196 (89% commenced FMP within 48 hours of admission (FMP patients; 24 (11% received usual physiotherapy (usual care patients. Feasibility of individually tailored exercise programs for older medical patients was supported by high uptake (89%, low withdrawal (17% shown by those who commenced FMP, and good compliance with exercise sessions (70%. Logistic regression analysis showed a statistically significant decreased likelihood of referral for nursing home admission (OR = 0.228, 95% CI 0.088–0.587 and decreased likelihood of approval for admission to residential care (OR = 0

  12. Active assistive forced exercise provides long-term improvement to gait velocity and stride length in patients bilaterally affected by Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckenschneider, T; Helmich, I; Raabe-Oetker, A; Froböse, I; Feodoroff, B

    2015-10-01

    Forced exercise training presents a valid method of improving symptoms of Parkinson's disease such as rigor, dyskinesia and gait dysfunctions. Brain imaging data suggest that use of active assistive forced exercise could improve Parkinsonian symptoms more effectively than passive assistive forced exercise. However, the long-term effects of active versus passive assistive forced exercise on the symptoms of Parkinson's disease are unknown. Here, 24 patients showing bilateral effects of Parkinson's disease underwent a 12 week intervention of either passive or active assistive forced exercise. We analyzed tremor scores, gait patterns, and scores on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III from three timepoints--before beginning the intervention, upon completion of the intervention, and twelve weeks after completion of the intervention. Participation in both passive and active assistive forced exercise increased gait velocity (0.5 km/h), swing phase (2%), monopedal stance phase (2%), elongated stride length (11 cm) and decreased double stance phase (4%). However, with participation in active assistive forced exercise, postural and kinetic tremor were also reduced and gait velocity and stride length were increased long-term. Given these findings, we conclude that future treatment for patients bilaterally affected by Parkinson's disease should carefully consider the type of assistive forced exercise intervention to be used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Peter; Mjøsund, Hanne L; Petersen, Ditte H D

    2010-04-08

    A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted) treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Current Contents, AMED and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were electronically searched, reference lists were examined and citation tracking performed. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLPB that used trial designs capable of providing robust information on targeted treatment (treatment effect modification) for the outcomes of activity limitation and pain. Included trials needed to be hypothesis-testing studies published in English, Danish or Norwegian. Method quality was assessed using the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Four high-quality randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLBP met the inclusion criteria. One study showed statistically significant effects for short-term outcomes using McKenzie directional preference-based exercise. Research into subgroups requires much larger sample sizes than traditional two-group trials and other included studies showed effects that might be clinically important in size but were not statistically significant with their samples sizes. The clinical implications of these results are that they provide very cautious evidence supporting the notion that treatment targeted to subgroups of patients with NSLBP may improve patient outcomes. The results of the studies included in this review are too patchy, inconsistent and the

  14. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mjøsund Hanne L

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP. Method MEDLINE, EMBASE, Current Contents, AMED and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were electronically searched, reference lists were examined and citation tracking performed. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLPB that used trial designs capable of providing robust information on targeted treatment (treatment effect modification for the outcomes of activity limitation and pain. Included trials needed to be hypothesis-testing studies published in English, Danish or Norwegian. Method quality was assessed using the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Results Four high-quality randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLBP met the inclusion criteria. One study showed statistically significant effects for short-term outcomes using McKenzie directional preference-based exercise. Research into subgroups requires much larger sample sizes than traditional two-group trials and other included studies showed effects that might be clinically important in size but were not statistically significant with their samples sizes. Conclusions The clinical implications of these results are that they provide very cautious evidence supporting the notion that treatment targeted to subgroups of patients with NSLBP may improve patient outcomes. The results of the

  15. COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS OF DIAPHRAGMATIC BREATHING AND PURSEDLIP EXPIRATION EXERCISES IN IMPROVING THE FORCED EXPIRATORY FLOW RATE AND CHEST EXPANSION IN PATIENTS WITH BRONCHIAL ASTHMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Shine

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asthma is growing problem in India and throughout the world. Breathing exercises are commonly incorporated in overall pulmonary rehabilitation program of patients with bronchial asthma. However there is a lack of awareness regarding following a specific exercise prescription which is based on individual’s requirements. Physiotherapist can help in designing an exercise prescription specific to an individual possibly to achieve more control over bronchial asthma. Methods: Thirty patients both male and female aged between 20 and 40 years diagnosed with bronchial asthma by the physician were assigned in two groups. Group-1 patients were given diaphragmatic breathing exercises and group-2 patients were given pursed-lip expiration exercises. Both groups received selected intervention for 6 weeks, 5 days in a week, 2 times in a day, and 20 minutes per session. Pre and post-test measures of forced expiratory flow rate were taken by peak expiratory flow meter and chest expansion was measured by inch tape. Data were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 17.0 software. The analysis was performed by using students paired t-test. Results: The study shows statistically significant improvement in diaphragmatic breathing exercise group when compared to pursed-lip expiration exercise group. The value of chest expansion has shown 2.04 % improvement in group1 and 1.01 % in group 2 whereas peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR showed 16.9 % improvement in group 1 and 2.27 % in group 2. Conclusion: Diaphragmatic breathing exercises play a vital role in rehabilitation of asthmatic patients to gain functional improvement and independence.

  16. An investigation and comparison of the effectiveness of different exercise programmes in improving glucose metabolism and pancreatic β cell function of type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S F; Pei, D; Chi, M J; Jeng, C

    2015-10-01

    Moderately intensive aerobic exercise can improve glucose metabolism and pancreatic β cell function in diabetic patients. To date, there is no evidence to support the long-term effectiveness of home-based exercise interventions on these outcomes. This study investigated the effectiveness of two moderately intense exercise programmes on glucose metabolism and pancreatic β cell function in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. A randomised controlled trial of 120 T2DM patients (with a mean age of 55.54 ± 9.09 years) was conducted. Patients were assigned by block randomisation to either an aerobic exercise group (AEG), an accumulated million steps group (AMSG), or a control group (CG); each consisting of 40 patients. Glucose metabolism and pancreatic β cell function of patients were measured at three time intervals for 1 year. There was no difference in baseline scores, and respective compliance rates for the AEG and AMSG were 94.4% and 99.2%. After generalised estimating equation analysis, the AMSG results for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were significantly lower than those of the CG. The insulinogenic index-acute insulin response (BIGTT-AIR ) of both exercise groups was significantly higher than that of the CG. The AMSG group improved their overall HbA1c and BIGTT-AIR results compared with the AEG group after 3 months exercise programme (T1 ) and 12 months of implementation (T2 ). This study demonstrates that regardless of the type of exercise intervention, it is potentially beneficially effective for glucose metabolism and pancreatic β cell function in T2DM patients. The AMSG had better glucose metabolism and pancreatic β cell function compared with those in the AEG. Nurses can easily integrate exercise interventions into T2DM patient care plans. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Does a combination of physical training, specific exercises and pain education improve health-related quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ris, I; Søgaard, Karen; Gram, B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of combining pain education, specific exercises and graded physical activity training (exercise) compared with pain education alone (control) on physical health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: A multicentre randomised...... anterior and cervical spine, Cranio-cervical Flexion, Cervical Extension muscle function, and oculomotion) were recorded at baseline and after 4 months. RESULTS: The exercise group showed statistically significant improvement in physical HR-QoL, mental HR-QoL, depression, cervical pressure pain threshold......, cervical extension movement, muscle function, and oculomotion. Per protocol analyses confirmed these results with additional significant improvements in the exercise group compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS: This multimodal intervention may be an effective intervention for chronic neck pain patients...

  18. Supervised physical exercise improves VO2max, quality of life, and health in early stage breast cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casla, Soraya; López-Tarruella, Sara; Jerez, Yolanda; Marquez-Rodas, Iván; Galvão, Daniel A; Newton, Robert U; Cubedo, Ricardo; Calvo, Isabel; Sampedro, Javier; Barakat, Rubén; Martín, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer patients suffer impairment in cardiorespiratory fitness after treatment for primary disease, affecting patients' health and survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of a pragmatic exercise intervention to improve cardiorespiratory fitness of breast cancer patients after primary treatment. Between February 2013 and December 2014, 94 women with early stage (I-III) breast cancer, 1-36 months post-chemotherapy, and radiotherapy were randomly assigned to an intervention program (EX) combining supervised aerobic and resistance exercise (n = 44) or usual care (CON) (n = 45) for 12 weeks. Primary study endpoint was VO2max. Secondary endpoints were muscle strength, shoulder range of motion, body composition, and quality of life (QoL). Assessments were undertaken at baseline, 12-week, and 6-month follow-ups. Eighty-nine patients aged 29-69 years were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks. The EX group showed significant improvements in VO2max, muscle strength, percent fat, and lean mass (p ≤ 0.001 in all cases) and QoL compared with usual care (CON). Apart from body composition, improvements were maintained for the EX at 6-month follow-up. There were no adverse events during the testing or exercise intervention program. A combined exercise intervention produced considerable improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness, physical function, and quality of life in breast cancer patients previously treated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Importantly, most of these benefits were maintained 6 months after ceasing the supervised exercise intervention.

  19. Exercise and physical activity for patients with end-stage liver disease: Improving functional status and sarcopenia while on the transplant waiting list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Rojo, Andrés; Ruiz-Margáin, Astrid; Montaño-Loza, Aldo J; Macías-Rodríguez, Ricardo U; Ferrando, Arny; Kim, W Ray

    2018-01-01

    Sarcopenia and physical deconditioning are frequent complications in patients with cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease (ESLD). They are the end result of impaired dietary intake, chronic inflammation, altered macronutrient and micronutrient metabolism, and low physical activity. Frailty is the end result of prolonged sarcopenia and physical deconditioning. It severely affects a patient's functional status and presents in approximately 1 in 5 patients on the liver transplantation waiting list. Sarcopenia, poor physical fitness/cardiopulmonary endurance (CPE), and frailty are all associated with increased mortality in ESLD. Clinical trials addressing the usefulness of exercise in patients with cirrhosis have shown that it improves the metabolic syndrome, sarcopenia, CPE, health-related quality of life, and hepatic venous pressure gradient. Although evidence on the benefits of exercise on clinical outcomes derived from large clinical trials is still missing, based on existing literature from multiple medical subspecialties, we believe that an exercise program coupled to a tailored nutritional intervention benefits both cardiopulmonary and musculoskeletal functions, ultimately translating into improved functional status, sense of well-being, and possibly less complications from portal hypertension. In conclusion, although supervised exercise training is the prevailing approach to manage ESLD patients, such intervention is not sustainable or feasible for most patients. Innovative home-based physical activity interventions may be able to effectively reach a larger number of patients. Liver Transplantation 24 122-139 2018 AASLD. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  20. Heart rate recovery improvement in patients following acute myocardial infarction: exercise training, β-blocker therapy or both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Wladimir M; de Luca, Fabio A; de Figueredo Júnior, Alcides R; Mendes, Felipe A R; Gun, Carlos

    2017-04-12

    Heart rate recovery (HRR) is a strong mortality predictor. Exercise training (ET) and β-blocker therapy have significant impact on the HRR of patients following myocardial infarction (MI). However, the combination of ET and β-blocker therapy, as well as its effectiveness in patients with a more compromised HRR (≤12 bpm), has been under-studied. Male patients (n = 64) post-MI were divided: Training + β-blocker (n = 19), Training (n = 15), β-blocker (n = 11) and Control (n = 19). Participants performed an ergometric test before and after 3 months of intervention. HRR was obtained during 5 min of recovery and corrected by the cardiac reserve (HRRcorrCR ). Compared to pre-intervention, HRRcorrCR was significantly increased during the 1st and 2nd minutes of recovery in the Training + β-blocker group (70·5% and 37·5%, respectively; Pblocker group showed a reduction in HRRcorrCR during the 2nd and 3rd minutes of recovery (-21·2% and -16·3%, respectively; P 12 bpm. Combination of β-blocker therapy with ET does not compromise the effect of training and instead promotes HRR and aerobic capacity improvement. In addition, this combination is particularly beneficial for individuals presenting with a more compromised HRR. However, chronic administration of β-blocker therapy alone did not promote improvement in HRR or aerobic capacity. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The short-term effect of gloving in combination with Traditional Thai Massage, heat, and stretching exercise to improve hand mobility in scleroderma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunavut Vannajak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a chronic, multisystem connective tissue disorder characterized by autoimmune activation, microvascular endothelium damage, and excessive collagen proliferation. The most affected hand presents claw hand deformity and microvascular disease. Deformed hands can cause functional disability and decrease the quality of life. A daily home program can improve mobility of scleroderma patients. Objective: We sought to determine the effect of a daily home exercise program on hand mobility among scleroderma patients. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized control trial. Twenty-eight participants were divided into two groups, both of which received the same daily home treatment: Group 1 with gloves (n = 14 and Group 2 without gloves (n = 14. The 2-week daily home program combined traditional Thai massage (TTM with stretching exercises and heat. Hand mobility was assessed using hand mobility in scleroderma (HAMIS. The study was conducted in patients who were already on vasodilator drugs. Results: Both groups showed a significant improvement in hand mobility after 2 weeks of daily home exercise program (P < 0.05. Wearing the glove, however, resulted in better thumb mobility. Conclusions: A daily home exercise program improved hand mobility among patients with scleroderma and wearing gloves may improve thumb mobility.

  2. The short-term effect of gloving in combination with Traditional Thai Massage, heat, and stretching exercise to improve hand mobility in scleroderma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannajak, Kunavut; Boonprakob, Yodchai; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Ungpansattawong, Supunnee; Nanagara, Ratanavadee

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic, multisystem connective tissue disorder characterized by autoimmune activation, microvascular endothelium damage, and excessive collagen proliferation. The most affected hand presents claw hand deformity and microvascular disease. Deformed hands can cause functional disability and decrease the quality of life. A daily home program can improve mobility of scleroderma patients. We sought to determine the effect of a daily home exercise program on hand mobility among scleroderma patients. This was a randomized control trial. Twenty-eight participants were divided into two groups, both of which received the same daily home treatment: Group 1 with gloves (n = 14) and Group 2 without gloves (n = 14). The 2-week daily home program combined traditional Thai massage (TTM) with stretching exercises and heat. Hand mobility was assessed using hand mobility in scleroderma (HAMIS). The study was conducted in patients who were already on vasodilator drugs. Both groups showed a significant improvement in hand mobility after 2 weeks of daily home exercise program (P < 0.05). Wearing the glove, however, resulted in better thumb mobility. A daily home exercise program improved hand mobility among patients with scleroderma and wearing gloves may improve thumb mobility.

  3. Magnitude of exercise capacity and quality of life improvement following repeat pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandoz JS

    2017-04-01

    ; P=0.63. Conclusion: In physician-referred patients who underwent repeat PRP as clinically required, there were clear benefits in functional exercise capacity following each repeat PRP, which was not affected by the time interval between PRPs. Health-related quality of life and mood improved after the first two PRPs, but not after a third. Keywords: exercise therapy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, quality of life, exercise test

  4. Efficacy of muscle exercise in patients with muscular dystrophy: a systematic review showing a missed opportunity to improve outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gianola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although muscular dystrophy causes muscle weakness and muscle loss, the role of exercise in the management of this disease remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of exercise interventions on muscle strength in patients with muscular dystrophy. METHODS: We performed systematic electronic searches in Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus and Pedro as well as a list of reference literature. We included trials assessing muscle exercise in patients with muscular dystrophy. Two reviewers independently abstracted data and appraised risk of bias. RESULTS: We identified five small (two controlled and three randomized clinical trials comprising 242 patients and two ongoing randomized controlled trials. We were able to perform two meta-analyses. We found an absence of evidence for a difference in muscle strength (MD 4.18, 95% CIs - 2.03 to 10.39; p = 0.91 and in endurance (MD -0.53, 95% CIs -1.11 to 0.05; p = 0.26. In both, the direction of effects favored muscle exercise. CONCLUSIONS: The first included trial about the efficacy of muscular exercise was published in 1978. Even though some benefits of muscle exercise were consistently reported across studies, the benefits might be due to the small size of studies and other biases. Detrimental effects are still possible. After several decades of research, doctors cannot give advice and patients are, thus, denied basic information. A multi-center randomized trial investigating the strength of muscles, fatigue, and functional limitations is needed.

  5. The effect of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on balancing ability of scoliosis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Gui Bin; Kim, Jwa Jun; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to closely examine the efficiency of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise in improving the on the static balancing ability by applying them to patients with scoliosis and to compare the effects of the interventions. [Subjects] Forty scoliosis patients were divided into a Swiss ball exercise group (SEG, N = 20) and a Resistance exercise group (REG, N = 20) randomly. [Methods] SEG conducted chest stretching, trunk exercise using the Swiss ball. REG ...

  6. Triacylglycerol infusion improves exercise endurance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy due to complex I deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roef, MJ; de Meer, K; Reijngoud, DJ; Straver, HWHC; de Barse, M; Kalhan, SC; Berger, R

    Background: A high-fat diet has been recommended for the treatment of patients with mitochondrial myopathy due to complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) deficiency (CID). Objective: This study evaluated the effects of intravenous infusion of isoenergetic amounts of triacylglycerol or glucose on substrate

  7. Improvements in Limb Kinetic Apraxia by Repetition of a Newly Designed Facilitation Exercise in a Patient with Corticobasal Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahira, Kazumi; Noma, Tomokazu; Iiyama, Junichi; Etoh, Seiji; Ogata, Atsuko; Shimodozono, Megumi

    2009-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by a combination of parkinsonism and cortical dysfunction such as limb kinetic apraxia, alien limb phenomenon, and dementia. To study the effect of repetitive facilitation exercise (RFE) in a patient with corticobasal degeneration, we used a newly designed facilitation…

  8. Exercise And Heart Failure: Advancing Knowledge And Improving Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Paulino; Hannawi, Bashar; Guha, Ashrith

    2016-01-01

    Exercise limitation is the hallmark of heart failure, and an increasing degree of intolerance is associated with poor prognosis. Objective evaluation of functional class (e.g., cardiopulmonary exercise testing) is essential for adequate prognostication in patients with advanced heart failure and for implementing an appropriate exercise training program. A graded exercise program has been shown to be beneficial in patients with heart failure and has become an essential component of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in these patients. An exercise program tailored to the patient's preferences, possibilities, and physiologic reserve has the greatest chance of being successful. Despite being safe, effective, and a guideline-recommended treatment to improve quality of life, exercise training remains grossly underutilized. Patient, physician, insurance and practice barriers need to be addressed to improve this quality gap.

  9. Does a weight-training exercise programme given to patients four or more years after total knee arthroplasty improve mobility: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unver, Bayram; Bakirhan, Serkan; Karatosun, Vasfi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of the home exercise therapy performed after at least four years postoperatively on skeletal muscle strength and functionality in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Sixty patients (age; 69.66±7.53, weight; 81.56±14.43 kg, 10 male, 50 female) followed up four or more years were randomly divided into two groups. An 8-week exercise program was designed for bilateral TKA patients. While the patients in one group were assigned to weighted exercise group, the patients in the other group were assigned to non-weighted exercise group. The primary outcome was the isometric muscle strength of quadriceps femoris (QF) and hamstring muscles assessed by Hand-Held Dynamometer. The secondary outcomes were the pain level, 30s sit-to-stand test, 10 m walk test, range of motion, and the knee function score of the Hospital for Special Surgery. The assessments were performed before and after the treatment. After treatment, significant differences were found in all evaluation parameters (except rest pain and range of motion) in favour of the weighted group. QF muscle strength changes (kg); weighted group: 1.99±1.70, non-weighted group: 0.51±1.14 (p=0.000), 30s sit-to-stand test changes (repetitions); weighted group: 3.66±2.23, non-weighted group: 1.70±1.95 (p=0.000), 10 m walk test changes (seconds); weighted group: -2.60±1.30, non-weighted group: -0.83±3.51 (p=0.000). Home exercise programs applied to TKA patients after at least four years postoperatively was effective in increasing muscle strength, decreasing severity of pain, and improving functional activities. The improvements were significantly greater in weighted compared with the non-weighted exercise group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on balancing ability of scoliosis patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Song, Gui Bin; Kim, Jwa Jun; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to closely examine the efficiency of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise in improving the on the static balancing ability by applying them to patients...

  11. [The role of physical exercises in the improvement of cognitive functions in patients who survived stroke, in the early rehabilitative period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, E A; Kulishova, T V; Shumakher, G I; Iusupkhodzhaev, R V

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of a complex of physical therapy exercises "Brain gymnastics" in post-stroke patients. Eighty three such patients enrolled in the study were randomly allocated to two groups. The program of physical rehabilitation for patients comprising one group (n = 41) included regular exercises with elements of "brain gymnastics" whereas patients of the other group (n = 41) received standard rehabilitative treatment. Patients of group 1 enjoyed improvement of cognitive functions, mood, and quality of life. Disturbances of short-term memory and voluntary attention were partly corrected, astheno-neurotic reactions and manifestations of advantage by illness became less apparent than in the control group while the level of self-assessment increased. None of the patients in group 1 exhibited undesirable reactions to the offered treatment.

  12. Effect of progressive resistive exercise training in improving mobility and functional ability of middle adulthood patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv K Sah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD in their middle adulthood are more prone to reduced mobility than younger patients having the same medical condition. Progressive resistive exercise training (PRT is deemed an effective treatment approach for the management of muscular weakness in patients with CKD. The present review is an attempt to understand the effectiveness of PRT in the mobility and functional ability of patients suffering from CKD. We systematically searched electronic databases, including Medline, Scopus, PubMed, CINAHL, PEDRo and Cochrane, to review the published literature on this subject. Electronic searches were limited to training programs carried out on resistive, aerobic, endurance and therapeutic exercises reporting outcome measures including muscular strength, size, physical function and functional capacity in the clinical population with CKD aged >40 years. Studies with a minimum duration of eight weeks of exercise training or more were considered eligible for review. The methodological criteria of the included studies were assessed with the PEDro scale. A total of 80 articles were identified using the keywords in the above-mentioned databases. However, based on the study′s inclusion and exclusion criteria, only 11 articles were finally included. The results of this review substantiate the effectiveness of PRT in patients with CKD. However, further research is warranted in this area due to the limited availability of high-quality published evidence.

  13. Clinical feasibility of cervical exercise to improve neck pain, body function, and psychosocial factors in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Seong Doo; Kim, Suhn Yeop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of cervical exercise on neck pain, disability, and psychosocial factors in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. [Subjects] Thirty patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, who also complained of neck pain. [Methods] The cervical exercise group (n = 15) participated in cervical exercises for 30?min, 3 times/week for 6 weeks, and the control group (n = 16) underwent conventional physical therapy alone, without exercise. The exercises were perform...

  14. [Improving of muscle mass and force in rehabilitation of heart-lung patients. Aerobic interval training, resistance-exercises, excentric exercises, vibration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apor, Péter; Tihanyi, József; Borka, Péter

    2005-09-18

    Improvement of muscle mass and force which got depleted by inactivity or pathological processes is one of the aims and also a prerequisite of a rehabilitative intervention. Metabolically active larger and stronger muscles diminish the cardiovascular risk, permit the aerobic preventive and rehabilitative activities and enables a higher quality of life. Interval forms of aerobic exercise improves also the muscles. The resistance training plays an important part in rehabilitation. Beside the traditional dynamic strength training with weights, gym machines, body weight etc. the excentric type of muscle activity potentiates higher muscle load with lesser energy consumption, therefore it is suitable in the case of smaller performance ability. Vibration of the whole body or parts of it by machines improves the co-activity of the motor units and results in force development with small metabolic involvement.

  15. Neurocognitive therapeutic exercise improves pain and function in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, E; Rabini, A; Piccinini, G; Piazzini, D B; Vulpiani, M C; Vetrano, M; Specchia, A; Ferriero, G; Bertolini, C; Saraceni, V M

    2014-06-01

    Traditional rehabilitation improves pain and function in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Neurocognitive rehabilitation has shown to be highly effective after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. However, its effects in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome have not yet been established. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of neurocognitive therapeutic exercise, based on proprioception and neuromuscular control, on pain and function in comparison to traditional therapeutic exercise in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Single-blind randomized, non-inferiority clinical trial. Outpatient clinic of Geriatrics and Physiatrics, University Hospital. Forty-eight patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (Neer stage I) and pain lasting for at least three months. Participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to either neurocognitive therapeutic exercise or traditional therapeutic exercise. Both treatments were provided one-hour session, three times a week for five weeks. The primary outcome measure was the short form of the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (Quick-DASH questionnaire) for the assessment of physical ability and symptoms of the upper extremity. Constant-Murley shoulder outcome score for the determination of range of motion, pain and strength; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Society standardized shoulder assessment form for the evaluation of physical ability in daily-living tasks; a visual analogue scale for pain assessment at rest and during movements; Likert score for the estimation of participant satisfaction. before treatment, end of treatment, 12 and 24 weeks after the completion of each intervention for all outcome measures, except for the Likert score that was evaluated only at the end of treatment. 24 weeks. At the end of treatment and at follow-up, both treatment groups experienced improvements in all outcomes measures relative to baseline values, except for the

  16. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Kent, Peter; Mjøsund, Hanne L; Petersen, Ditte HD

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted) treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in o...

  17. Multicomponent Exercise Improves Hemodynamic Parameters and Mobility, but Not Maximal Walking Speed, Transfer Capacity, and Executive Function of Older Type II Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio José Coelho Junior

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a 6-month multicomponent exercise program (MCEP on functional, cognitive, and hemodynamic parameters of older Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients. Moreover, additional analyses were performed to evaluate if T2DM patients present impaired adaptability in response to physical exercise when compared to nondiabetic volunteers. A total of 72 T2DM patients and 72 age-matched healthy volunteers (CG were recruited and submitted to functional, cognitive, and hemodynamic evaluations before and after six months of a MCEP. The program of exercise was performed twice a week at moderate intensity. Results indicate T2DM and nondiabetic patients present an increase in mobility (i.e., usual walking speed after the MCEP. However, improvements in maximal walking speed, transfer capacity, and executive function were only observed in the CG. On the other hand, only T2DM group reveals a marked decline in blood pressure. In conclusion, data of the current study indicate that a 6-month MCEP improves mobility and reduce blood pressure in T2DM patients. However, maximal walking speed, transfer capacity, and executive function were only improved in CG, indicating that T2DM may present impaired adaptability in response to physical stimulus.

  18. Exercise training in older patients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Hjardem-Hansen, Rasmus; Dela, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    Training improves exercise capacity in patients with heart failure (CHF) but most evidence is on selected younger patients with systolic CHF.......Training improves exercise capacity in patients with heart failure (CHF) but most evidence is on selected younger patients with systolic CHF....

  19. Hormonal responses to exercise in diabetic and nondiabetic pregnant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artal, R; Wiswell, R; Romem, Y

    1985-06-01

    The hormonal responses to low-level exercise in pregnancy have been studied in 13 insulin-requiring diabetic patients and 42 control subjects. We found no significant changes in plasma glucose, epinephrine, glucagon, or FFA with this level of exercise in the study group and control subjects; but plasma norepinephrine showed a significant increase with exercise. This type of exercise appears to be safe and could serve as a model for exercise prescription for attaining improved glucose tolerance in pregnant diabetic women.

  20. Exercise in bipolar patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Matias Carvalho Aguiar; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco; Albuquerque, Saulo Giovanni Castor; de Bruin, Veralice Meireles Sales

    2016-07-01

    Sedentary lifestyle is frequent in psychiatric disorders, however the directions of this association and benefits of physical activity are unclear. This is a systematic review about exercise in patients with bipolar disorder. We performed a systematic literature search of studies published in English (1995 Jan to 2016 Jan) in PubMed, and Cochrane Library combining the medical terms 'physical activity' or 'sedentary' or 'physical exercise' with 'bipolar disorder' or 'mania' or 'bipolar depression'. Thirty-one studies were selected and included 15,587 patients with bipolar disorder. Sedentary lifestyle varied from 40% to 64.9%. Physical activity was associated with less depressive symptoms, better quality of life and increased functioning. Some evidence indicates a relationship between vigorous exercises and mania. Three prospective cohorts were reported; and no prospective randomized controlled trial was identified. Three studies focused on biomarkers in bipolar patients; and one reported the relationship between exercise and sleep in this group. Two assessed physical exercise in adolescents. (1) Differences between studies preventing a unified analysis; (2) most studies were cross-sectional; (3) motivation for exercising is a selection bias in most studies; (4) no intervention study assessing only physical exercise; (5) lack of studies comparing exercise across mood states. Generally, exercise was associated with improved health measures including depressive symptoms, functioning and quality of life. Evidence was insufficient to establish a cause-effect relationship between mood and physical exercise. Future research including randomized trials is needed to clarify the role of physical activity in bipolar patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Mjøsund, Hanne L; Petersen, Ditte H D

    2010-01-01

    A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted) treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient...... outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP....

  2. Protein-carbohydrate supplements improve muscle protein balance in muscular dystrophy patients after endurance exercise: a placebo-controlled crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Grete; Ørngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai; Jeppesen, Tina D; Krag, Thomas O; Hauerslev, Simon; van Hall, Gerrit; Vissing, John

    2015-01-15

    In healthy individuals, postexercise protein supplementation increases muscle protein anabolism. In patients with muscular dystrophies, aerobic exercise improves muscle function, but the effect of exercise on muscle protein balance is unknown. Therefore, we investigated 1) muscle protein balance before, during, and after exercise and 2) the effect of postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation on muscle protein balance in patients with muscular dystrophies. In 17 patients [7 women and 10 men, aged 33 ± 11 yr (18-52), body mass index: 22 ± 3 kg/m(2) (16-26)] and 8 healthy matched controls [3 women and 5 men, age 33 ± 13 years (19-54), body mass index: 23 ± 3 kg/m(2) (19-27)], muscle protein synthesis, breakdown, and fractional synthesis rates (FSR) were measured across the leg using tracer dilution methodology on two occasions, with and without oral postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation. In patients, muscle protein breakdown increased in the recovery period (11 ± 1 μmol phenylalanine/min) vs. rest (8 ± 1 μmol phenylalanine/min, P = 0.02), enhancing net muscle protein loss. In contrast, postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation reduced protein breakdown, abolished net muscle protein loss, and increased the muscle FSR in patients (0.04 to 0.06%/h; P = 0.03). In conclusion, postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation reduces skeletal mixed-muscle protein breakdown, enhances FSR, resulting in a reduced net muscle loss in patients with muscular dystrophies. The findings suggest that postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation could be an important add-on to exercise training therapy in muscular dystrophies, and long-term studies of postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation are warranted in these conditions. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. The effect of additional core stability exercises on improving dynamic sitting balance and trunk control for subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanas-Valdés, Rosa; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Caballero-Gómez, Fernanda Mª; Hernández-Valiño, Montserrat; Urrútia Cuchí, Gerard

    2016-10-01

    To examine the effect of core stability exercises on trunk control, dynamic sitting and standing balance, gait, and activities of daily living in subacute stroke patients. A randomized controlled trial. Inpatient rehabilitation hospital in two centres. Eighty patients (mean of 23.25 (±16.7) days post-stroke) were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group. Both groups underwent conventional therapy for five days/week for five weeks and the experimental group performed core stability exercises for 15 min/day. The patients were assessed before and after intervention. The Trunk Impairment Scale (Spanish-Version) and Function in Sitting Test were used to measure the primary outcome of dynamic sitting balance. Secondary outcome measures were standing balance and gait as evaluated via Berg Balance Scale, Tinetti Test, Brunel Balance Assessment, Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (Spanish-Version), and activities of daily living using Barthel Index. The experimental group showed statistically significant differences for all of the total scale scores (PCore stability exercises in addition to conventional therapy improves trunk control, dynamic sitting balance, standing balance, gait and activities of daily living in subacute post-stroke patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Comparison of the Effect of Exercise Therapy with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Improvement of Pain and Function in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Akbari

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: One of the most common disorders of the knee joint in adult is patellofemoral pain syndrome. Sometimes it becomes chronic and causes activity limitation. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of exercise therapy with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on improvement of pain intensity, knee function, muscle atrophy and range of knee flexion. Materials & Methods: This double-blind, randomized clinical trial was carried out in Zahedan Razmejo-Moghadam Physiotherapy Clinic, in 2007. Thirty-two patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome were recruited through simple non-probability sampling. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the equal groups, exercise therapy (including hip, knee, and leg muscles strengthening and stretching exercises or electrical stimulation group. Before and after intervention, we assessed pain through Visual Analog Scale (VAS (ordinal, function (ordinal with Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS, thigh circumference with tape measure (centimeter and range of knee flexion with goniometer (degree. A 10 session treatment program, three sessions per week and one hour per session was performed for both groups. Independent t-test or Mann-Whitney U and paired t-test or Wilcoxon were used for comparison between the pretreatment and post treatment results between groups and within groups, in SPSS software, respectively. Results: The mean total score of knee function increased from 100.53±19.25 to 130.87±18.25 in the electrical stimulation group and from 107.67±22.69 to 131.47±15.11 in the exercise therapy group (p=0.001. The mean score of knee function subscales including symptoms, pain, functional limitation, recreational activity, and life style improved in both groups (p<0.05. The pain score and range of knee flexion improved in both groups (p<0.05. After treatment, range of knee flexion significantly increased in the exercise group compared with the electrical

  5. Improvements in sleep and handwriting after complementary medical intervention using acupuncture, applied kinesiology, and respiratory exercises in a nine-year-old ADHD patient on methylphenidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molsberger, Friedrich; Raak, Christa; Witthinrich, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    The case study reports on the effect of pharmacological, complementary, and alternative medicine including acupuncture, Applied Kinesiology, and respiratory exercises in a boy with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on methylphenidate. A nine-year-old male patient was referred to treatment with a three-year diagnosis of ADHD, sleeping troubles, and dissatisfaction with methylphenidate. Examination included Applied Kinesiology, the coachman׳s test, assessment of breathing pattern disorders, and traditional chinese medicine (TCM) diagnosis. Muscle weakness related to thoracic breathing was found in the coachman׳s test. Respiratory exercises, acupuncture with permanent needles, and Applied Kinesiology treatments were given. Within the first treatment, muscle function as assessed by the coachman׳s test normalized. After two treatments, sleep behavior improved rapidly, and with further treatments, handwriting was improving. Methylphenidate continues to be given. The results were stable after 15 months. A multimodal approach to ADHD integrating pharmacological treatment and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) including Applied Kinesiology, breathing exercises, and acupuncture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial on additional core stability exercises training for improving dynamic sitting balance and trunk control in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanas-Valdés, Rosa; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Caballero-Gómez, Fernanda Mª; du Port de Pontcharra-Serra, Helena; German-Romero, Ana; Urrútia, Gerard

    2017-11-01

    Analyse the effect of core stability exercises in addition to conventional physiotherapy training three months after the intervention ended. A randomized controlled trial. Outpatient services. Seventy-nine stroke survivors. In the intervention period, both groups underwent conventional physiotherapy performed five days/week for five weeks, and in addition the experimental group performed core stability exercises for 15 minutes/day. Afterwards, during a three-month follow-up period, both groups underwent usual care that could eventually include conventional physiotherapy or physical exercise but not in a controlled condition. Primary outcome was trunk control and dynamic sitting balance assessed by the Spanish-Version of Trunk Impairment Scale 2.0 and Function in Sitting Test. Secondary outcomes were standing balance and gait evaluated by the Berg Balance Scale, Tinetti Test, Brunel Balance Assessment, Spanish-Version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke and activities of daily living using the Barthel Index. A total of 68 subjects out of 79 completed the three-month follow-up period. The mean difference (SD) between groups was 0.78 (1.51) points ( p = 0.003) for total score on the Spanish-Version of Trunk Impairment Scale 2.0, 2.52 (6.46) points ( p = 0.009) for Function in Sitting Test, dynamic standing balance was 3.30 (9.21) points ( p= 0.009) on the Berg Balance Scale, gait was 0.82 (1.88) points ( p = 0.002) by Brunel Balance Assessment (stepping), and 1.11 (2.94) points ( p = 0.044) by Tinetti Test (gait), all in favour of core stability exercises. Core stability exercises plus conventional physiotherapy have a positive long-term effect on improving dynamic sitting and standing balance and gait in post-stroke patients.

  7. Home-based functional exercises aimed at managing kinesiophobia contribute to improving disability and quality of life of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona; Rocca, Barbara; Salvaderi, Stefano; Fiorentini, Roberta; Restelli, Maddalena; Foti, Calogero

    2013-02-01

    To compare the improvement in disability, kinesiophobia, pain, and quality of life obtained by means of home-based functional exercises aimed at managing kinesiophobia with that obtained by giving subjects undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) advice to stay active after discharge from a rehabilitation unit. Randomized controlled trial with 6-months' follow-up. Patients' homes. Patients (N=110; 40 men; mean age, 67y) at the end of a 15-day period of in-hospital rehabilitation after undergoing primary TKA. In the experimental group, before returning home, the patients were asked to continue the functional exercises learned during hospitalization in twice-weekly 60-minute sessions for 6 months, and were given a book containing theoretical information about the management of kinesiophobia. In the control group, the patients were advised to stay active and gradually recover their usual activities. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance with baseline values as the covariates (Pkinesiophobia was useful in changing the course of disability, fear-avoidance beliefs, pain, and the quality of life in patients with TKA. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exercise and quality of life in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Mette; Jacobsen, Ulla; Bregnballe, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    patients declined to be enrolled in the exercise programme but completed the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire for Adolescents and Adults (CFQ-R 14+). Four patients did not want to participate at all. The 14 patients completing the exercise programme had a significantly increased VO(2max), but they showed......-week individually tailored unsupervised aerobic exercise programme where HR monitors were used significantly affected VO(2max). Improvement in QoL could not be demonstrated in this study....

  9. Physiotherapy and rehabilitative interventions in patients with chronic respiratory diseases: exercise and non-exercise treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellessen, A; Hernandes, N A; Pitta, F

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this literature review was to describe and discuss the available evidence about different modalities of physical therapy treatment and pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) involving exercise training in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiectasis and interstitial lung disease (ILD). The search was performed by using the Cochrane Library and PubMed databases. We selected studies published between 2001 and 2012 which involved physiotherapy treatment and included patients with COPD, asthma, bronchiectasis or ILD, aged 18 years or more, in stable or unstable disease condition. PR involving exercise training was effective in improving exercise capacity, muscle force, quality of life and reducing symptoms in patients with COPD and asthma. Although there are few studies published about exercise training in patients with bronchiectasis, improvement in exercise capacity and quality of life in those patients was also observed. Patients with ILD also respond to exercise training; however, the response is less pronounced than in COPD and they lose the gains more quickly. Non-exercise-based interventions, such as bronchial hygiene techniques and inspiratory muscle training, also present positive results when applied to patients with COPD, asthma and bronchiectasis. In some cases it is recommended that these interventions are combined with exercise training. Studies about non-exercise based interventions applied to patients with ILD are still necessary.

  10. Exercise for Cancer Patients; Guidelines and Precautions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winningham, Maryl L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Research and clinical observation indicate that exercise is a promising restorative technique for cancer patients. Guidelines for designing an exercise program are offered, including considerations for initial screening and ongoing monitoring of patients. (Author/MT)

  11. Which exercise prescriptions improve quality of life and physical function in patients with cancer during and following treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweegers, Maike G; Altenburg, Teatske M; Chinapaw, Mai J; Kalter, Joeri; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Courneya, Kerry S; Newton, Robert U; Aaronson, Neil K; Jacobsen, Paul B; Brug, Johannes; Buffart, Laurien M

    2017-09-27

    Certain exercise prescriptions for patients with cancer may improve self-reported quality of life (QoL) and self-reported physical function (PF). We investigated the effects of exercise on QoL and PF in patients with cancer and studied differences in effects between different intervention-related and exercise-related characteristics. We searched four electronic databases to identify randomised controlled trials investigating exercise effects on QoL and PF in patients with cancer. Pooled effects (Hedges' g) were calculated using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. Subgroup analyses were conducted based on intervention dimensions, including timing, duration and delivery mode, and exercise dimensions, including frequency, intensity, type and time (FITT factors). We included 74 exercise arms. Patients who were randomised to exercise interventions had significantly improved QoL (g=0.15, 95% CI (0.10 to 0.20), n=67 exercise arms) and PF (g=0.21, 95% CI (0.15 to 0.27), n=59 exercise arms) compared with patients in control groups. We found a significant between-group difference for exercise delivery mode, with significant beneficial effects for supervised exercise interventions (g=0.20, 95% CI (0.14 to 0.26) for QoL and g=0.27, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.33) for PF), but not for unsupervised interventions (g=0.04, 95% CI (-0.06 to 0.13) for QoL and g=0.09, 95% CI (-0.01 to 0.19) for PF). No statistically significant differences in intervention effects were found for variations in intervention timing, duration or exercise FITT factors. Unsupervised exercise with higher weekly energy expenditure was more effective than unsupervised exercise with lower energy expenditure (z=2.34, p=0.02). Exercise interventions, especially when supervised, have statistically significant and small clinical benefit on self-reported QoL and PF in patients with cancer. Unsupervised exercise intervention effects on PF were larger when prescribed at a higher weekly energy expenditure. © Article

  12. Can primary care doctors prescribe exercise to improve fitness? The Step Test Exercise Prescription (STEP) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, Robert J; Koval, John J; Cunningham, David A; Paterson, Donald H

    2003-05-01

    Sedentary lifestyle is associated with adverse health outcomes. Available evidence suggests that, despite positive attitudes toward regular exercise in promoting a healthy lifestyle, few physicians actually prescribe exercise for their patients. Barriers include lack of skills and standard office instruments. Because primary care physicians have regular contact with a large proportion of the population, the impact of preventive health interventions may be great. To determine the effect of an exercise prescription instrument (i.e., Step Test Exercise Prescription [STEP]), compared to usual-care exercise counseling delivered by primary care doctors on fitness and exercise self-efficacy among elderly community-dwelling patients. Randomized controlled trial; baseline assessment and intervention delivery with postintervention follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months. Four large (>5000 active patient files) academic, primary care practices: three in urban settings and one in a rural setting, each with four primary care physicians; two clinics provided the STEP intervention and two provided usual care control. A total of 284 healthy community-dwelling patients (72 per clinic) aged >65 years were recruited in 1998-1999. STEP included exercise counseling and prescription of an exercise training heart rate. The primary outcome measure was aerobic fitness (VO(2max)). Secondary outcomes included predicted VO(2max) from the STEP test, exercise self-efficacy (ESE), and clinical anthropometric parameters. A total of 241 subjects (131 intervention, 110 control) completed the trial. VO(2max) was significantly increased in the STEP intervention group (11%; 21.3 to 24ml/kg/min) compared to the control group (4%; 22 to 23ml/kg/min) over 6 months (p Exercise counseling time was significantly (p or =80% of available exercise opportunities in the STEP group. Primary care physicians can improve fitness and exercise confidence of their elderly patients using a tailored exercise prescription (e

  13. Exercise Capacity in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To enhance glycaemic control and improve general well being, physical exercises, in addition to drugs and/or diet are usually prescribed to patients with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2D). Assessment of the capacity of these patients to exercise based on the simple Six Minute Walk Test (6MWT) is however not sufficiently ...

  14. How rheumatologists and patients with rheumatoid arthritis discuss exercise and the influence of discussions on exercise prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Maura D; Eaton, Holley M; Daltroy, Lawren H

    2004-02-15

    To describe how patients and their rheumatologists discuss exercise, and to identify predictors of exercise prescriptions. Twenty-five rheumatologists and 132 patients with rheumatoid arthritis completed questionnaires and were audiotaped during a subsequent clinic visit. Chi-square and t-tests assessed associations between variables. Principal components analysis identified patterns of talk about exercise. Multivariate logistic regression identified predictors of an exercise prescription. Seventy of the 132 patients (53%) discussed exercise. Of these, 18 (26%) received an exercise prescription. Principal components analysis identified 3 patterns of talk about exercise. Aerobic exercise discussions contained more information about drawbacks, side effects, pain, and bargaining than did discussions about general exercises, and referral to physical therapy for exercise. Significant predictors of a prescription included rheumatologist-initiated discussion about exercise (odds ratio [OR] 4.6; P = 0.03); talk about exercise in improving function, exercise instructions, opinions about the usefulness of exercise (OR 3.1; P = 0.01); and discussions about non-exercise treatments (OR 1.6; P = 0.01). Exercise and referral to physical therapy for exercise are discussed differently and are 4 times more likely to occur when the rheumatologist initiates the discussion. These discussions strongly impact on the likelihood a patient receives an exercise prescription.

  15. STRENGTH EXERCISES COMBINED WITH DRY NEEDLING WITH ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IMPROVE PAIN AND FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and Purpose Rotator cuff tendinopathy (RTCT) is regularly treated by the physical therapist. Multiple etiologies for RTCT exist, leading an individual to seek treatment from their provider of choice. Strengthening exercises (SE) have been reported to be effective in the treatment of RTCT, but there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of dry needing (DN) for this condition. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to investigate DN to various non-trigger point-based anatomical locations coupled with strengthening exercises (SE) as a treatment strategy to decrease pain and increase function in healthy patients with chronic RTC pathology. Case Descriptions Eight patients with RTCT were treated 1-2 times per week for up to eight weeks, and no more than sixteen total treatment sessions of SE and DN. Outcomes were tested at baseline and upon completion of therapy. A long-term outcome measure follow up averaging 8.75 months (range 3 to 20 months) was also performed. The outcome measures included the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Quick Dash (QD). Outcomes Clinically meaningful improvements in disability and pain in the short term and upon long-term follow up were demonstrated for each patient. The mean VAS was broken down into best (VASB), current (VASC), and worst (VASW) rated pain levels and the mean was calculated for the eight patients. The mean VASB improved from 22.5 mm at the initial assessment to 2.36 mm upon completion of the intervention duration. The mean VASC improved from 28.36 mm to 5.0 mm, and the mean VASW improved from 68.88 mm to 13.25 mm. At the long-term follow up (average 8.75 months), The mean VASB, VASC, and VASW scores were 0.36 mm, 4.88 mm, and 17.88 mm respectively. The QDmean for the eight patients improved from 43.09 at baseline to 16.04 at the completion of treatment. At long-term follow-up, the QDmean was 6.59. Conclusion Clinically meaningful improvements in pain and disability were

  16. STRENGTH EXERCISES COMBINED WITH DRY NEEDLING WITH ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IMPROVE PAIN AND FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor-Pavkovich, Estee

    2016-06-01

    Rotator cuff tendinopathy (RTCT) is regularly treated by the physical therapist. Multiple etiologies for RTCT exist, leading an individual to seek treatment from their provider of choice. Strengthening exercises (SE) have been reported to be effective in the treatment of RTCT, but there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of dry needing (DN) for this condition. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to investigate DN to various non-trigger point-based anatomical locations coupled with strengthening exercises (SE) as a treatment strategy to decrease pain and increase function in healthy patients with chronic RTC pathology. Eight patients with RTCT were treated 1-2 times per week for up to eight weeks, and no more than sixteen total treatment sessions of SE and DN. Outcomes were tested at baseline and upon completion of therapy. A long-term outcome measure follow up averaging 8.75 months (range 3 to 20 months) was also performed. The outcome measures included the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Quick Dash (QD). Clinically meaningful improvements in disability and pain in the short term and upon long-term follow up were demonstrated for each patient. The mean VAS was broken down into best (VAS(B)), current (VAS(C)), and worst (VAS(W)) rated pain levels and the mean was calculated for the eight patients. The mean VAS(B) improved from 22.5 mm at the initial assessment to 2.36 mm upon completion of the intervention duration. The mean VASC improved from 28.36 mm to 5.0 mm, and the mean VAS(W) improved from 68.88 mm to 13.25 mm. At the long-term follow up (average 8.75 months), The mean VAS(B), VAS(C), and VAS(W) scores were 0.36 mm, 4.88 mm, and 17.88 mm respectively. The QD(mean) for the eight patients improved from 43.09 at baseline to 16.04 at the completion of treatment. At long-term follow-up, the QD(mean) was 6.59. Clinically meaningful improvements in pain and disability were noted with the intervention protocol. All subjects

  17. Home-based exercise: promising rehabilitation for symptom relief, improved functional status and quality of life for post-surgical lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Amy J; Brintnall, Ruth Ann; von Eye, Alexander; Jones, Lee W; Alderink, Gordon; Patzelt, Lawrence H; Brown, Jean K

    2014-06-01

    Post-thoracotomy non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients report cancer-related fatigue (CRF) as a severe symptom that may increase the occurrence and severity of other symptoms while decreasing functional status and quality of life (QOL). The aim of this pilot study was to describe the effects of a home-based rehabilitative exercise intervention on CRF, other symptoms, functional status, and QOL for post-surgical NSCLC patients starting within days after hospital discharge. Seven post-thoracotomy NSCLC patients completed the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) measuring CRF severity, and the M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory measuring symptom severity at pre- and post-surgery, and at the end of each week of the six-week intervention. Additionally, the Medical Outcomes Short-Form-36 measuring physical and mental functional status; and the Quality of Life Index (QLI) measuring QOL were completed pre- and post-surgery, after week 3, and at the end of the intervention (week 6). Participants had a mean age of 65 years, a mean of 6 co-morbid conditions, and initiated the intervention within 4 days after hospital discharge. Participants' CRF severity scores were reduced to mild levels while the mean number of symptoms decreased from 10.4 post-surgery to 7.0 at week 6 with lower levels of severity and interference. Likewise, participants' post-intervention functional status and QOL improved to near or above pre-surgical levels. The exercise intervention for post-surgical NSCLC patients showed promising preliminary efficacy in improving CRF, other symptom severity, functional status, and QOL. Further testing via a two-arm randomized controlled trial is being conducted.

  18. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: improvement after removal of amalgam in dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsunuma, T; Iikura, Y; Nagakura, T; Saitoh, H; Akimoto, K; Akasawa, A; Kindaichi, S

    1990-05-01

    We present a case of exercise-induced anaphylaxis with improvement following the removal of dental amalgam. Although her symptoms were unresponsive to various kinds of therapy until removal of the amalgam, her symptoms related to exercise improved remarkably after the removal. The increase in plasma histamine levels for exercise provocation test also improved. This suggests that sensitivity to metals might cause exercise-induced asthma in some patients.

  19. Resistance exercise improves hippocampus-dependent memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Cassilhas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that resistance exercise improves cognitive functions in humans. Thus, an animal model that mimics this phenomenon can be an important tool for studying the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms. Here, we tested if an animal model for resistance exercise was able to improve the performance in a hippocampus-dependent memory task. In addition, we also evaluated the level of insulin-like growth factor 1/insulin growth factor receptor (IGF-1/IGF-1R, which plays pleiotropic roles in the nervous system. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (N = 10 for each group: control, SHAM, and resistance exercise (RES. The RES group was submitted to 8 weeks of progressive resistance exercise in a vertical ladder apparatus, while the SHAM group was left in the same apparatus without exercising. Analysis of a cross-sectional area of the flexor digitorum longus muscle indicated that this training period was sufficient to cause muscle fiber hypertrophy. In a step-through passive avoidance task (PA, the RES group presented a longer latency than the other groups on the test day. We also observed an increase of 43 and 94% for systemic and hippocampal IGF-1 concentration, respectively, in the RES group compared to the others. A positive correlation was established between PA performance and systemic IGF-1 (r = 0.46, P < 0.05. Taken together, our data indicate that resistance exercise improves the hippocampus-dependent memory task with a concomitant increase of IGF-1 level in the rat model. This model can be further explored to better understand the effects of resistance exercise on brain functions.

  20. Predictors of exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation in patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Jamal; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Lewinter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to undertake a comprehensive assessment of the patient, intervention and trial-level factors that may predict exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation in patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure. DESIGN: Meta-analysis and meta...... of improvement in exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation compared to control among patients with coronary heart disease or heart failure. Whilst higher exercise intensities were associated with a greater level of post-rehabilitation exercise capacity, there was no strong evidence to support...

  1. Does a combination of physical training, specific exercises and pain education improve health-related quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain? A randomised control trial with a 4-month follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ris, I; Søgaard, K; Gram, B; Agerbo, K; Boyle, E; Juul-Kristensen, B

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the effect of combining pain education, specific exercises and graded physical activity training (exercise) compared with pain education alone (control) on physical health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in chronic neck pain patients. A multicentre randomised controlled trial of 200 neck pain patients receiving pain education. The exercise group received additional exercises for neck/shoulder, balance and oculomotor function, plus graded physical activity training. Patient-reported outcome measures (Short Form-36 Physical and Mental component summary scores, EuroQol-5D, Beck Depression Inventory-II, Neck Disability Index, Pain Bothersomeness, Patient-Specific Functioning Scale, Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, Global Perceived Effect) and clinical tests (Aastrand Physical Fitness, cervical Range of Motion, Pressure Pain Threshold at infraspinatus, tibialis anterior and cervical spine, Cranio-cervical Flexion, Cervical Extension muscle function, and oculomotion) were recorded at baseline and after 4 months. The exercise group showed statistically significant improvement in physical HR-QoL, mental HR-QoL, depression, cervical pressure pain threshold, cervical extension movement, muscle function, and oculomotion. Per protocol analyses confirmed these results with additional significant improvements in the exercise group compared with controls. This multimodal intervention may be an effective intervention for chronic neck pain patients. The trial was registered on www.ClinicalTrials.govNCT01431261 and at the Regional Scientific Ethics Committee of Southern Denmark S-20100069. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exercise in Patients on Dialysis: A Multicenter, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Fabio; Mallamaci, Francesca; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Baggetta, Rossella; Bolignano, Davide; Torino, Claudia; Lamberti, Nicola; Bertoli, Silvio; Ciurlino, Daniele; Rocca-Rey, Lisa; Barillà, Antonio; Battaglia, Yuri; Rapanà, Renato Mario; Zuccalà, Alessandro; Bonanno, Graziella; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Rapisarda, Francesco; Rastelli, Stefania; Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Messa, Piergiorgio; De Paola, Luciano; Lombardi, Luigi; Cupisti, Adamasco; Fuiano, Giorgio; Lucisano, Gaetano; Summaria, Chiara; Felisatti, Michele; Pozzato, Enrico; Malagoni, Anna Maria; Castellino, Pietro; Aucella, Filippo; Abd ElHafeez, Samar; Provenzano, Pasquale Fabio; Tripepi, Giovanni; Catizone, Luigi; Zoccali, Carmine

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested the benefits of physical exercise for patients on dialysis. We conducted the Exercise Introduction to Enhance Performance in Dialysis trial, a 6-month randomized, multicenter trial to test whether a simple, personalized walking exercise program at home, managed by dialysis staff, improves functional status in adult patients on dialysis. The main study outcomes included change in physical performance at 6 months, assessed by the 6-minute walking test and the five times sit-to-stand test, and in quality of life, assessed by the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form (KDQOL-SF) questionnaire. We randomized 296 patients to normal physical activity (control; n=145) or walking exercise (n=151); 227 patients (exercise n=104; control n=123) repeated the 6-month evaluations. The distance covered during the 6-minute walking test improved in the exercise group (mean distance±SD: baseline, 328±96 m; 6 months, 367±113 m) but not in the control group (baseline, 321±107 m; 6 months, 324±116 m; Pquality of social interaction score (P=0.01) in the kidney disease component of the KDQOL-SF improved significantly in the exercise arm compared with the control arm. Hence, a simple, personalized, home-based, low-intensity exercise program managed by dialysis staff may improve physical performance and quality of life in patients on dialysis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  3. Synchronized personalized music audio-playlists to improve adherence to physical activity among patients participating in a structured exercise program: a proof-of-principle feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, David A; O'Sullivan, Mary; Oh, Paul I; Redelmeier, Donald A; Marzolini, Susan; Liu, Richard; Forhan, Mary; Silver, Michael; Goodman, Jack M; Bartel, Lee R

    2015-01-01

    Preference-based tempo-pace synchronized music has been shown to reduce perceived physical activity exertion and improve exercise performance. The extent to which such strategies can improve adherence to physical activity remains unknown. The objective of the study is to explore the feasibility and efficacy of tempo-pace synchronized preference-based music audio-playlists on adherence to physical activity among cardiovascular disease patients participating in a cardiac rehabilitation. Thirty-four cardiac rehabilitation patients were randomly allocated to one of two strategies: (1) no music usual-care control and (2) tempo-pace synchronized audio-devices with personalized music playlists + usual-care. All songs uploaded onto audio-playlist devices took into account patient personal music genre and artist preferences. However, actual song selection was restricted to music whose tempos approximated patients' prescribed exercise walking/running pace (steps per minute) to achieve tempo-pace synchrony. Patients allocated to audio-music playlists underwent further randomization in which half of the patients received songs that were sonically enhanced with rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) to accentuate tempo-pace synchrony, whereas the other half did not. RAS was achieved through blinded rhythmic sonic-enhancements undertaken manually to songs within individuals' music playlists. The primary outcome consisted of the weekly volume of physical activity undertaken over 3 months as determined by tri-axial accelerometers. Statistical methods employed an intention to treat and repeated-measures design. Patients randomized to personalized audio-playlists with tempo-pace synchrony achieved higher weekly volumes of physical activity than did their non-music usual-care comparators (475.6 min vs. 370.2 min, P  music usual-care controls, respectively, P  music with RAS utilized their audio-playlist devices more frequently than did non-RAS music counterparts ( P

  4. Exercise training improves liver steatosis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alex, S.; Boss, A.; Heerschap, A.; Kersten, S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly turning into the most common liver disorder worldwide. One of the strategies that has been shown to effectively improve NAFLD is regular exercise, which seems to lower steatosis partly independent of weight loss. However, limited data

  5. Exercise training improves liver steatosis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alex, Sheril; Boss, Andreas; Heerschap, Arend; Kersten, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly turning into the most common liver disorder worldwide. One of the strategies that has been shown to effectively improve NAFLD is regular exercise, which seems to lower steatosis partly independent of weight loss. However,

  6. Whole-body vibration exercise improves functional parameters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) have abnormal bone modelling and resorption. The bone tissue adaptation and responsivity to dynamic and mechanical loading may be of therapeutic use under controlled circumstances. Improvements due to the wholebody vibration (WBV) exercises have been ...

  7. How much exercise is enough for the coronary patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, B A

    2000-01-01

    Prescribing exercise for cardiac patients is comparable in many ways to prescribing medications; that is, one recommends an optimal dosage according to individual needs and limitations. For in-patients, simple exposure to orthostatic or gravitational stress can obviate much of the deterioration in exercise tolerance that normally follows a cardiovascular event or intervention. On the other hand, the continuum of exercise therapy for outpatients may range from brisk walking to marathon running. Upper body and resistance training also have been shown to be safe and effective for clinically stable patients. Moderate intensity exercise training can produce beneficial changes in functional capacity, cardiac function, coronary risk factors, psychosocial well being, and possibly improve survival in patients with coronary artery disease. These findings may be especially relevant for the previously sedentary patient, in whom the subjective discomfort of vigorous exercise may serve as a deterrent to long-term compliance with physical training. (c) 2000 by CHF, Inc.

  8. Exercise in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engels M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael Engels,1 Raymond K Cross,1 Millie D Long2 1Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA, 2Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs, including both Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, are chronic autoimmune diseases. Both CD and UC have relapsing and remitting courses. Although effective medical treatments exist for these chronic conditions, some patients do not respond to these traditional therapies. Patients are often left frustrated with incomplete resolution of symptoms and seek alternative or complementary forms of therapy. Patients often search for modifiable factors that could improve their symptoms or help them to maintain periods of remission. In this review, we examine both the published evidence on the benefits of exercise clinically and the pathophysiological changes associated with exercise. We then describe data on exercise patterns in patients with IBDs, potential barriers to exercise in IBDs, and the role of exercise in the development and course of IBDs. While some data support physical activity as having a protective role in the development of IBDs, the findings have not been robust. Importantly, studies of exercise in patients with mild-to-moderate IBD activity show no danger of disease or symptom exacerbation. Exercise has theoretical benefits on the immune response, and the limited available data suggest that exercise may improve disease activity, quality of life, bone mineral density, and fatigue levels in patients with IBDs. Overall, exercise is safe and probably beneficial in patients with IBDs. Evidence supporting specific exercise recommendations, including aspects such as duration and heart rate targets, is needed in order to better counsel patients with IBDs. Keywords: inflammatory bowel

  9. Exercise training for patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, J M; Gremeaux, V; Damak, S; Feki, A; Pérennou, D

    2007-07-01

    This review surveys effort training, a validated and recommended therapy, in patients with atheromatous cardiovascular disease. This true therapy reduces mortality by 25-35%, reduces clinical manifestations and complications (rhythm problems, thrombosis) and improves physical capacity, reintegration and quality of life. The effects are essentially linked to improved metabolic performance of muscles and reduced endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and neurohormonal abnormalities. Training also has an impact on the evolution of major risk factors, especially diabetes and arterial hypertension. The risks are limited as long as the contraindications are respected and the programmes supervised. The indications (stable angina, chronic heart failure, peripheral arterial disease) should be described more precisely by taking into account functional criteria: physical deconditioning, exclusion, compliance, mood swings, and seriousness of risk factors. The training programme should be tailor made and based on evaluation of the patient's adaptation to effort, in terms of frequency, intensity and duration of the exercises. Various types of exercise include overall or segmental physical training; concentric, eccentric, even isokinetic muscle contraction exercises; and proprioceptive rehabilitation. However, knowledge is lacking about the molecular mechanisms of the effects of training, the most effective intensity of effort, and strategies to develop physical activity in this ever-growing population for both primary and secondary prevention.

  10. Glucocorticoids improve high-intensity exercise performance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casuso, Rafael A; Melskens, Lars; Bruhn, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    It was investigated whether oral dexamethasone (DEX) administration improves exercise performance by reducing the initial rate of muscle fatigue development during dynamic exercise.......It was investigated whether oral dexamethasone (DEX) administration improves exercise performance by reducing the initial rate of muscle fatigue development during dynamic exercise....

  11. The effect of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on balancing ability of scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gui Bin; Kim, Jwa Jun; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to closely examine the efficiency of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise in improving the on the static balancing ability by applying them to patients with scoliosis and to compare the effects of the interventions. [Subjects] Forty scoliosis patients were divided into a Swiss ball exercise group (SEG, N = 20) and a Resistance exercise group (REG, N = 20) randomly. [Methods] SEG conducted chest stretching, trunk exercise using the Swiss ball. REG conducted chest stretching, trunk exercise with therapist's resistance. Both groups received training 30 min per day, five times per week, for eight weeks. [Results] Both SEG and REG showed significant differences between pre- and post-mediation in terms of weight distribution, sway area, sway length, sway speed, and limit of stability. Sway speed and limit of stability had increased more significantly in REG than in SEG. [Conclusion] According to the result of this study, both Swiss ball exercise and chest Resistance exercise were effective for improving on the static balancing ability. But we suggest resistance exercise is more efficient to increase of sway speed, limit of stability.

  12. Dysfunctional endogenous analgesia during exercise in patients with chronic pain: to exercise or not to exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Jo; Kosek, Eva; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Meeus, Mira

    2012-07-01

    Exercise is an effective treatment for various chronic pain disorders, including fibromyalgia, chronic neck pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic low back pain. Although the clinical benefits of exercise therapy in these populations are well established (i.e. evidence based), it is currently unclear whether exercise has positive effects on the processes involved in chronic pain (e.g. central pain modulation). Reviewing the available evidence addressing the effects of exercise on central pain modulation in patients with chronic pain. Narrative review. Exercise activates endogenous analgesia in healthy individuals. The increased pain threshold following exercise is due to the release of endogenous opioids and activation of (supra)spinal nociceptive inhibitory mechanisms orchestrated by the brain. Exercise triggers the release of beta-endorphins from the pituitary (peripherally) and the hypothalamus (centrally), which in turn enables analgesic effects by activating μ-opioid receptors peripherally and centrally, respectively. The hypothalamus, through its projections on the periaqueductal grey, has the capacity to activate descending nociceptive inhibitory mechanisms. However, several groups have shown dysfunctioning of endogenous analgesia in response to exercise in patients with chronic pain. Muscle contractions activate generalized endogenous analgesia in healthy, pain-free humans and patients with either osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, but result in increased generalised pain sensitivity in fibromyalgia patients. In patients having local muscular pain (e.g. shoulder myalgia), exercising non-painful muscles activates generalized endogenous analgesia. However, exercising painful muscles does not change pain sensitivity either in the exercising muscle or at distant locations. The reviewed studies examined acute effects of exercise rather than long-term effects of exercise therapy. A dysfunctional response of patients with chronic pain and

  13. Exercise program improved subjective dry eye symptoms for office workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kokoro; Kawashima, Motoko; Takechi, Sayuri; Mimura, Masaru; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the benefits of a cognitive behavior therapy-based exercise program to reduce the dry eye symptoms of office workers. We recruited 11 office workers with dry eye symptoms, aged 31-64 years, who voluntarily participated in group health guidance at a manufacturing company. Participants learned about the role of physical activity and exercise in enhancing wellness and performed an exercise program at home 3 days per week for 10 weeks. We estimated the indexes of body composition, dry eye symptoms, and psychological distress using the Dry Eye-Related Quality of Life Score and the World Health Organization's Subjective Well-Being Inventory questionnaires pre- and postintervention. The 10-week exercise program and the questionnaires were completed by 48.1% (39 of 81) of the participants. Body composition did not change pre- and postintervention. However, the average of the Dry Eye-Related Quality of Life Score scores in participants with subjective dry eye significantly improved after the intervention. Moreover, the World Health Organization's Subjective Well-Being Inventory positive well-being score tended to increase after the intervention. In this study, we showed that a 10-week exercise program improved subjective dry eye symptoms of healthy office workers. Our study suggests that a cognitive behavior therapy-based exercise program can play an important role in the treatment of patients with dry eye disease.

  14. Clinical impact of exercise in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Marko; Jug, Borut; Lenasi, Helena

    2017-08-01

    Increasing prevalence, high morbidity and mortality, and decreased health-related quality of life are hallmarks of peripheral arterial disease. About one-third of peripheral arterial disease patients have intermittent claudication with deleterious effects on everyday activities, such as walking. Exercise training improves peripheral arterial disease symptoms and is recommended as first line therapy for peripheral arterial disease. This review examines the effects of exercise training beyond improvements in walking distance, namely on vascular function, parameters of inflammation, activated hemostasis and oxidative stress, and quality of life. Exercise training not only increases walking distance and physiologic parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease, but also improves the cardiovascular risk profile by helping patients achieve better control of hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity and dyslipidemia, thus further reducing cardiovascular risk and the prevalence of coexistent atherosclerotic diseases. American guidelines suggest supervised exercise training, performed for a minimum of 30-45 min, at least three times per week, for at least 12 weeks. Walking is the most studied exercise modality and its efficacy in improving cardiovascular parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease has been extensively proven. As studies have shown that supervised exercise training improves walking performance, cardiovascular parameters and quality of life in patients with peripheral arterial disease, it should be encouraged and more often prescribed.

  15. Pilates exercises improve low back pain and quality of life in patients with HTLV-1 virus: a randomized crossover clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Jaqueline; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes; Santana, Nayara; Souza, Israel; Kruschewsky, Ramon A; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Sá, Katia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain is highly prevalent in patients with HTLV-1. The effects of physical activity on this condition are not known, but postural misalignment and motor deficits are frequently present. To assess the effect of Pilates exercises on chronic low back pain in these patients, and its impact on quality of life. A randomized crossover clinical trial was conducted, involving 22 patients from a reference center in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The VAS was used to evaluate the effect of Pilates on pain intensity and the SF-36 to assess its impact on quality of life. Our results provide evidence of positive effects on pain intensity and almost all domains of quality of life when patients followed the Pilates exercise program described. The Pilates method may be a useful tool in alleviating the symptoms of low back pain, and had a significant impact on quality of life in this sample of patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of regular exercise on senile dementia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Y-S; Um, S-Y; Son, T-G; Kim, D-J

    2008-06-01

    Dementia population worldwide is considerable in elderly people. Exercise regulates the brain function, but the mechanism by which it does so is unknown. The effect of regular exercise on cognitive function and exercise capacity in senile dementia patients was investigated. Thirty female patients with senile dementia who participated in the study were divided into two groups: the exercise group (EG, n = 15) and the control group (CG, n = 15). The exercise group completed a regular exercise program, and their cognitive function, activities of daily living and exercise capacity levels were evaluated at baseline, 6 months and after 12 months. Subjects exercised 30 - 60 minutes per day, 2 - 3 times per week for 12 months. Mini-mental state examination (MMSE) (pre: 14.53 +/- 5.34, post: 17.47 +/- 6.90) and ADL (pre: 14.40 +/- 5.32, post: 17.53 +/- 5.46) scores were significantly enhanced in the exercise group with senile dementia, compared to those in the control group. Exercise capacities such as cardiopulmonary function (pre: 128.47 +/- 55.43, post: 184.40 +/- 41.16), muscle strength (pre: 10.07 +/- 3.61, post: 13.7 +/- 3.90), muscular endurance (pre: 8.13 +/- 4.45, post: 12.13 +/- 5.14), flexibility (- 1.53 +/- .30, post: 2.20 +/- .70, balance (pre: 1.73 +/- .28, post: 1.20 +/- .77), and agility (pre: 21.80 +/- 3.24, post: 10.87 +/- 2.99) also increased in the exercise group. Our findings showed that regular exercise can enhance cognitive and functional activity scores in dementia patients, suggesting that senile dementia may improve by participating in a regular exercise program.

  17. Impact of a 12weeks supervised exercise training program on pulmonary functions of patients with exercise induced asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Heba, Helmy A.; Ashraf, Kotb A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Exercise induced bronchoconstriction typically develops within 5–15 min after completing exercise. Patients develop typical asthma symptoms or sometimes troublesome cough, which usually resolve spontaneously within 30–45 min. Previous studies tried to find the best way for these subjects aiming to improve exercise performance, respiratory symptoms and quality of life without provoking this type of asthma. Objective: To investigate the effect of supervised exercise training on s...

  18. Improvement in the efficacy of exercise first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in detecting coronary artery disease and the effect of patient age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, P R; Vervaet, A; Ranquin, R; Lieber, S; van den Heuvel, P; van den Branden, F; Dobbeleir, A A; Vandevivere, J

    1992-09-01

    The most widely used criterion of normality during exercise radionuclide angiocardiography (a five EF units increase in left ventricular ejection fraction from rest to exercise) has been established in young, healthy volunteers resulting in a relatively low specificity when applied to older, less fit patients or in women. In a group of 57 patients ranging in age from 22 to 79 years with a low likelihood of coronary artery disease, the age of the patient was the only independent variable predicting left ventricular ejection fraction change during exercise. The efficacy of a new age-based criterion for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease was then evaluated in 115 patients with chest pain undergoing both exercise first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography and coronary arteriography. Compared to the classic five EF unit criterion, the age-based criterion had a higher specificity (73.2% vs 34.1% P less than 0.001) without significant loss in sensitivity (85.1% vs 92.6%; P = NS).

  19. Exercise barriers in Korean colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong-Woo; Chung, Jae Youn; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Junga; Park, Ji-Hye; Kim, Dong-Il; Jones, Lee W; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Justin Y

    2014-01-01

    To identify barriers to exercise in Korean colorectal cancer patients and survivors, and to analyze differences in exercise barriers by age, gender, treatment status, and physical activity level. A total of 427 colorectal cancer patients and survivors from different stages and medical status completed a self-administered questionnaire that surveyed their barriers to exercise and exercise participation. The greatest perceived exercise barriers for the sampled population as a whole were fatigue, low level of physical fitness, and poor health. Those under 60-years old reported lack of time (p=0.008), whereas those over 60 reported low level of physical fitness (p=0.014) as greater exercise barriers than their counterparts. Women reported fatigue as a greater barrier than men (pACSM guidelines, cancer-related exercise barriers were additionally reported (p<0.001), compared to those who were. Our study suggests that fatigue, low level of physical fitness, and poor health are most reported exercise barriers for Korean colorectal cancer survivors and there are differences in exercise barriers by age, sex, treatment status, and physical activity level. Therefore, support for cancer patients should be provided considering these variables to increase exercise participation.

  20. Exercises commonly used in rehabilitation of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: cardiopulmonary responses and effect over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Boer, R.C. de; Broek, L. van den; Dekhuijzen, R.; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare conventional exercise-based assessment of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) with improvement in training exercises employed during a PR program, and to describe the cardiopulmonary response of different training exercises during PR of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary

  1. Exercise for improving balance in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Tracey E; Rochester, Lynn; Neil, Fiona; Skelton, Dawn A; Ballinger, Claire

    2011-11-09

    , 2 studies).Few adverse events were reported but most studies did not monitor or report adverse events.In general, the more effective programmes ran three times a week for three months and involved dynamic exercise in standing. There is weak evidence that some types of exercise (gait, balance, co-ordination and functional tasks; strengthening exercise; 3D exercise and multiple exercise types) are moderately effective, immediately post intervention, in improving clinical balance outcomes in older people. Such interventions are probably safe. There is either no or insufficient evidence to draw any conclusions for general physical activity (walking or cycling) and exercise involving computerised balance programmes or vibration plates. Further high methodological quality research using core outcome measures and adequate surveillance is required.

  2. Exercise program improved subjective dry eye symptoms for office workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sano K

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Kokoro Sano,1 Motoko Kawashima,1 Sayuri Takechi,2 Masaru Mimura,2 Kazuo Tsubota1 1Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Introduction: We investigated the benefits of a cognitive behavior therapy-based exercise program to reduce the dry eye symptoms of office workers. Materials and methods: We recruited 11 office workers with dry eye symptoms, aged 31–64 years, who voluntarily participated in group health guidance at a manufacturing company. Participants learned about the role of physical activity and exercise in enhancing wellness and performed an exercise program at home 3 days per week for 10 weeks. We estimated the indexes of body composition, dry eye symptoms, and psychological distress using the Dry Eye-Related Quality of Life Score and the World Health Organization’s Subjective Well-Being Inventory questionnaires pre- and postintervention. Results: The 10-week exercise program and the questionnaires were completed by 48.1% (39 of 81 of the participants. Body composition did not change pre- and postintervention. However, the average of the Dry Eye-Related Quality of Life Score scores in participants with subjective dry eye significantly improved after the intervention. Moreover, the World Health Organization’s Subjective Well-Being Inventory positive well-being score tended to increase after the intervention. Conclusion: In this study, we showed that a 10-week exercise program improved subjective dry eye symptoms of healthy office workers. Our study suggests that a cognitive behavior therapy-based exercise program can play an important role in the treatment of patients with dry eye disease. Keywords: dry eye, exercise, office workers, cognitive behavioral therapy

  3. Exercise manual for liver disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongi, Vivian; Dos Santos, Daniele Costa; de Oliveira da Silva, Aurea Maria; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira; Stucchi, Raquel Silveira Bello

    2016-06-24

    To increase inspiratory muscle strength and improve the quality of life of candidates for liver transplantation. Twenty-three candidates for liver transplantation participated in the control group and 14 made up the intervention group. The control group consisted of 18 men and 5 women, body mass index (BMI) 27.3 ± 4.5 kg/m(2) and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) 18.2 ± 6.1. The intervention group consisted of 11 men and 3 women, BMI 28.6 ± 5.4 kg/m(2) and MELD 18 ± 4.5. The presence or absence of ascites was identified in the first patient evaluation and after three months. We evaluated maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure, spirometry, root mean square (RMS) of diaphragm and rectus abdominis, and the quality of life. The exercises were performed daily by patients at home for three months and were supervised at distance monthly. The manual consisted of diaphragmatic breathing exercises, diaphragmatic isometric exercise, Threshold IMT(®), lifting upper limbs with a bat and strengthening the abdomen. There was significant difference (P = 0.01) between the first (initial) and the third month (final) MIP in the control group and in the intervention group, but there was no difference (P = 0.45) between the groups. The RMS of the diaphragm was lower (P = 0.001) and the functional capacity was higher (P = 0.006) in the intervention group compared to the control. The general health and mental health domains received higher scores after three months in the control group (P = 0.01) and the intervention group (P = 0.004), but there was no significant difference between them. The comparison between the presence of initial ascites with the presence of ascites was performed after three months in the control group (P = 0.083) and intervention group (P = 0.31). There was no significant difference, in relation to the presence of ascites after three months between groups (P = 0.21). In the intervention group, patients with ascites at the end

  4. Effect of combining music media therapy with lower extremity exercise on elderly patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ji

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Music media treatment combined with lower extremity exercise can both significantly increase the extent of exercise compliance of elderly patients suffering from diabetes mellitus, as well as improve blood circulation in their feet.

  5. Feasibility of Exercise Training in Cancer Patients Scheduled for Elective Gastrointestinal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, Karin; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; Schippers, Carlo C; Wanders, Lisa; Lemmens, Lidwien; Backx, Frank J G; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: This study examines the feasibility of a preoperative exercise program to improve the physical fitness of a patient before gastrointestinal surgery. METHODS: An outpatient exercise program was developed to increase preoperative aerobic capacity, peripheral muscle endurance and

  6. Exercise and quality of life in patients with cystic fibrosis: A 12-week intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Mette; Jacobsen, Ulla; Bregnballe, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    It was hypothesised that increased exercise capacity is related to improved quality of life (QoL) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A 12-week individually tailored unsupervised aerobic exercise programme was offered to 42 patients with CF. At the start and at the end of the exercise programm......-week individually tailored unsupervised aerobic exercise programme where HR monitors were used significantly affected VO(2max). Improvement in QoL could not be demonstrated in this study....

  7. Chair rising exercise is more effective than one-leg standing exercise in improving dynamic body balance: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, F; Iwamoto, J; Osugi, T; Yamazaki, M; Takakuwa, M

    2012-06-01

    A randomized controlled trial was conducted to compare the effect of a one-leg standing exercise and a chair-rising exercise on body balance in patients with locomotive disorders. Thirty ambulatory patients (mean age: 66.6 years) were randomly divided into two groups (n=15 in each group): a one-leg standing exercise group and a chair-rising exercise group. All the participants performed calisthenics of the major muscles, a tandem gait exercise, and a stepping exercise. The exercises were performed 3 days per week, and the study period was 5 months. Physical function was evaluated at baseline and at one-month intervals. No significant differences in the baseline characteristics were observed between the two groups. After the 5-month exercise program, the timed up and go, one-leg standing time, and tandem gait time improved significantly in the one-leg standing exercise group, while the walking time and chair-rising time in addition to above parameters improved significantly in the chair-rising exercise group. The improvements in the walking time, chair-rising time, and tandem gait time were significantly greater in the chair-rising exercise group than in the one-leg standing exercise group. The present study showed that the chair-rising exercise was more effective than the one-leg standing exercise for improving walking velocity and dynamic body balance.

  8. Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors Improve Clinical Outcomes, Exercise Capacity and Pulmonary Hemodynamics in Patients With Heart Failure With Reduced Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchis, Renato; Cesaro, Arturo; Ariano, Carmelina; Giasi, Anna; Cioppa, Carmela

    2017-06-01

    .76 mL/min/kg; 95% CI: 3.27 - 4.25) as well as in 6MWD (MD: 22.7 m; 95% CI: 8.19 - 37.21) and LVEF (MD: 4.30%; 95% CI: 2.18% to 6.42%). For patients with HFREF, PDE5 inhibitors caused a non-significant reduction in mPAP, while PASP was significantly reduced (MD: -11.52 mm Hg; 95% CI: -15.56 to -7.49; P clinical, ergospirometric or hemodynamic endpoints. PDE5 inhibitors improved clinical outcomes, exercise capacity and pulmonary hemodynamics in patients with HFREF, but not in HFpEF. However, considering the relatively small size of the HFpEF subset enrolled so far in the RCTs that explored the PDE5 inhibitor effects, further research in this field is undoubtedly warranted.

  9. Addition of vitamin B12 to exercise training improves cycle ergometer endurance in advanced COPD patients: A randomized and controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, Fernanda Viana; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Chiappa, Gaspar R; Müller, Paulo de Tarso

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is essential in the homocysteine, mitochondrial, muscle and hematopoietic metabolisms, and its effects on exercise tolerance and kinetics adjustments of oxygen consumption (V'O2p) in rest-to-exercise transition in COPD patients are unknown. This randomized, double-blind, controlled study aimed to verify a possible interaction between vitamin B12 supplementation and these outcomes. After recruiting 69 patients, 35 subjects with moderate-to-severe COPD were eligible and 32 patients concluded the study, divided into four groups (n = 8 for each group): 1. rehabilitation group; 2. rehabilitation plus B12 group; 3. B12 group; and 4. placebo group. The primary endpoint was cycle ergometry endurance before and after 8 weeks and the secondary endpoints were oxygen uptake kinetics parameters (time constant). The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency was high (34.4%) and there was a statistically significant interaction (p  0.05 for both). Supplementation with vitamin B12 appears to lead to discrete positive effects on exercise tolerance in groups of subjects with more advanced COPD and further studies are needed to establish indications for long-term supplementation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Short-term exercise training improves the cardiovascular response to exercise in the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shigeki; Fu, Qi; Bivens, Tiffany B; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Wang, Wade; Levine, Benjamin D

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the presence of cardiac atrophy as a key component of the pathogenesis of the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), similar to physical deconditioning. It has also been shown that exercise intolerance is associated with a reduced stroke volume (SV) in POTS, and that the high heart rate (HR) observed at rest and during exercise in these patients is due to this low SV. We tested the hypotheses that (a) circulatory control during exercise is normal in POTS; and (b) that physical ‘reconditioning’ with exercise training improves exercise performance in patients with POTS. Nineteen (18 women) POTS patients completed a 3 month training programme. Cardiovascular responses during maximal exercise testing were assessed in the upright position before and after training. Resting left ventricular diastolic function was evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Results were compared with those of 10 well-matched healthy sedentary controls. A lower SV resulted in a higher HR in POTS at any given oxygen uptake () during exercise while the cardiac output ()– relationship was normal. was lower in POTS than controls (26.1 ± 1.0 (SEM) vs. 36.3 ± 0.9 ml kg−1 min−1; P physical fitness and cardiovascular responses during exercise in patients with POTS. PMID:22641777

  11. Randomized trial of exercise and an online recovery tool to improve rehabilitation outcomes of cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Anna L; Biddle-Newberry, Mary; de Heer, Hendrik Dirk

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effects of a cancer survivor exercise program and an online recovery awareness program (Restwise) on physical outcomes of aerobic capacity and muscle strength. Randomized controlled trial design. Treasure Valley Family YMCA, Boise, ID. Fifty cancer survivors. Subjects were randomly assigned to the 12-week exercise program or the exercise program and Restwise. Restwise required users to complete daily objective and subjective ratings. Restwise compiles these data to provide individualized feedback recommending the exercise dose to maximize recovery and minimize fatigue. Baseline and posttest measures of physical performance (6-minute walk, 1-repetition maximum of lower and upper body strength). The exercise plus Restwise group demonstrated significant improvements (P exercise-only group demonstrated significant within-group improvement only on the 6-minute walk. The exercise plus Restwise group demonstrated an 18.5% greater improvement in the 6-minute walk, and a 35.2% and 45%, respectively, greater improvement on the leg and chest press than the exercise-only group. However, the between-group differences were not significant. Cancer survivors who use the Restwise online recovery program in conjunction with an exercise program demonstrated minimal clinically important differences compared with other clinical populations on all 3 measures, whereas the exercise-only group had improvements only on the 6-minute walk. Patient adherence to the Restwise program was good, and patients provided positive feedback.

  12. [Exercise in haemodyalisis patients: a literature systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Ortí, Eva

    2010-01-01

    95%: 2.52-8.61). Summarizing, moderate evidence exists on the improvement on exercise capacity of aerobic training, isolated or combined with strength training. Strength training improves health related quality of life, functional capacity and lower limbs strength. Future studies should clarify which out of the three modalities results in higher benefits for HD patients.

  13. High intensity exercise or conventional exercise for patients with rheumatoid arthritis?: outcome expectations of patients, rheumatologists, and physiotherapists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munneke, M.; Jong, Z. de; Zwinderman, A.H.; Ronday, H.K.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the outcome expectations of RA patients, rheumatologists, and physiotherapists regarding high intensity exercise programmes compared with conventional exercise programmes. METHODS: An exercise outcome expectations questionnaire was administered to 807 RA patients, 153

  14. High intensity exercise or conventional exercise for patients with rheumatoid arthritis? Outcome expectations of patients, rheumatologists, and physiotherapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munneke, M.; de Jong, Z.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Ronday, H. K.; van den Ende, C. H. M.; Vliet Vlieland, T. P. M.; Hazes, J. M. W.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the outcome expectations of RA patients, rheumatologists, and physiotherapists regarding high intensity exercise programmes compared with conventional exercise programmes. METHODS: An exercise outcome expectations questionnaire was administered to 807 RA patients, 153

  15. Arrhythmia and exercise intolerance in Fontan patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, L; Juul, K; Jensen, A S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term survival after the Fontan procedure shows excellent results but is associated with a persistent risk of arrhythmias and exercise intolerance. We aimed to analyze the current burden of clinically relevant arrhythmia and severe exercise intolerance in Danish Fontan patients...... and estimated to 99.1% per year. Prevalence of clinically relevant arrhythmia and severe exercise intolerance increased significantly with age and was found in 32% and 85% of patients ≥20years, respectively. Thus, from survival data and logistic regression models the future prevalence of patients, clinically...... relevant arrhythmia and severe exercise intolerance were estimated, revealing a considerable augmentation. Furthermore, resting and maximum cardiac index, resting stroke volume index and pulmonary diffusing capacity decreased significantly with age while diastolic and systolic ventricular function...

  16. Pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD improves exercise time rather than exercise tolerance: effects and mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki K

    2017-04-01

    positive correlation with the baseline body mass index (BMI (r=0.496, P=0.002 were obtained.Conclusions: PR in COPD patients improves Tex rather than exercise tolerance, economizing oxygen requirements, resulting in reduced ventilatory requirements without cardiac loads followed by reduced exertional dyspnea. In addition, the time–slope and BMI could be used to predict PR responses beforehand. Keywords: cardiopulmonary exercise testing, oxygen requirement, ventilatory equivalents, body weight, carbon dioxide output

  17. Acute moderate exercise improves mnemonic discrimination in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwabe, Kazuya; Hyodo, Kazuki; Byun, Kyeongho; Ochi, Genta; Yassa, Michael A; Soya, Hideaki

    2017-03-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that regular moderate exercise increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and improves memory functions in both humans and animals. The DG is known to play a role in pattern separation, which is the ability to discriminate among similar experiences, a fundamental component of episodic memory. While long-term voluntary exercise improves pattern separation, there is little evidence of alterations in DG function after an acute exercise session. Our previous studies showing acute moderate exercise-enhanced DG activation in rats, and acute moderate exercise-enhanced prefrontal activation and executive function in humans, led us to postulate that acute moderate exercise may also activate the hippocampus, including more specifically the DG, thus improving pattern separation. We thus investigated the effects of a 10-min moderate exercise (50% V̇O 2peak ) session, the recommended intensity for health promotion, on mnemonic discrimination (a behavioral index of pattern separation) in young adults. An acute bout of moderate exercise improved mnemonic discrimination performance in high similarity lures. These results support our hypothesis that acute moderate exercise improves DG-mediated pattern separation in humans, proposing a useful human acute-exercise model for analyzing the neuronal substrate underlying acute and regular exercise-enhanced episodic memory based on the hippocampus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Randomized clinical trial of 3 types of physical exercise for patients with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Lisa M; Katzel, Leslie I; Ivey, Frederick M; Sorkin, John D; Favors, Knachelle; Anderson, Karen E; Smith, Barbara A; Reich, Stephen G; Weiner, William J; Macko, Richard F

    2013-02-01

    To compare the efficacy of treadmill exercises and stretching and resistance exercises in improving gait speed, strength, and fitness for patients with Parkinson disease. A comparative, prospective, randomized, single-blinded clinical trial of 3 types of physical exercise. The Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center at the University of Maryland and the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center. A total of 67 patients with Parkinson disease who had gait impairment were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 arms of the trial. INTERVENTIONS; (1) A higher-intensity treadmill exercise (30 minutes at 70%-80% of heart rate reserve), (2) a lower-intensity treadmill exercise (50 minutes at 40%-50% of heart rate reserve), and (3) stretching and resistance exercises (2 sets of 10 repetitions on each leg on 3 resistance machines [leg press, leg extension, and curl]). These exercises were performed 3 times a week for 3 months. The primary outcome measures were gait speed (6-minute walk), cardiovascular fitness (peak oxygen consumption per unit time [$$ VO2], and muscle strength (1-repetition maximum strength). All 3 types of physical exercise improved distance on the 6-minute walk: lower-intensity treadmill exercise (12% increase; P=.001), stretching and resistance exercises (9% increase; Pexercise (6% increase; P=.07), with no between-group differences. Both treadmill exercises improved peak $$ VO2 (7%-8% increase; Pexercises. Only stretching and resistance improved muscle strength (16% increase; Pexercise were seen across all 3 exercise groups. The lower-intensity treadmill exercise resulted in the greatest improvement in gait speed. Both the higher- and lower-intensity treadmill exercises improved cardiovascular fitness. Only the stretching and resistance exercises improved muscle strength. Therefore, exercise can improve gait speed, muscle strength, and fitness for patients with Parkinson disease. The combination of

  19. Exercise Prescriptions for Training and Rehabilitation in Patients with Heart and Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Pietro; Corrà, Ugo

    2017-07-01

    Rehabilitation in patients with advanced cardiac and pulmonary disease has been shown to increase survival and improve quality of life, among many other benefits. Exercise training is the fundamental ingredient in these rehabilitation programs. However, determining the amount of exercise is not straightforward or uniform. Most rehabilitation and training programs fix the time of exercise and set the exercise intensity to the goals of the rehabilitation program and the exercise-related hurdles of the individual. The exercise training intensity prescription must balance the desired gain in conditioning with safety. Symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing is the fundamental tool to identify the exercise intensity and define the appropriate training. In addition, cardiopulmonary exercise testing provides an understanding of the systems involved in oxygen transport and utilization, making it possible to identify the factors limiting exercise capacity in individual patients.

  20. Exercise rehabilitation in patients with cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoski, Susan G.; Eves, Neil D.; Douglas, Pamela S.; Jones, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that patients with cancer have considerable impairments in cardiorespiratory fitness, which is likely to be a result of the direct toxic effects of anticancer therapy as well as the indirect consequences secondary to therapy (for example, deconditioning). This reduced cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with heightened symptoms, functional dependence, and possibly with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Current understanding of the complex interaction between the effects of the tumour and cancer-associated therapies on the organ components that govern cardiorespiratory fitness, and the effects of exercise training on these parameters is limited; further research will be critical for further progress of exercise-based rehabilitation in the oncology setting. We assess the current evidence regarding the level, mechanisms, and clinical importance of diminished cardiorespiratory fitness in patients with cancer. The efficacy and adaptations to exercise training to prevent and/or mitigate dysfunction in conjunction with exercise prescription considerations for clinical use are also discussed. PMID:22392097

  1. A Three Month Home Exercise Programme Augmented with Nordic Poles for Patients with Intermittent Claudication Enhances Quality of Life and Continues to Improve Walking Distance and Compliance After One Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, C; Spafford, C; Beard, J D

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to collect 1 year follow-up information on walking distance, speed, compliance, and cost in patients with intermittent claudication who took part in a previously reported 12 week randomised clinical trial of a home exercise programme augmented with Nordic pole walking versus controls who walked normally. A second objective was to look at quality of life and ankle brachial pressure indices (ABPIs) after a 12 week augmented home exercise programme. Thirty-two of the 38 patients who completed the original trial were followed-up after 6 and 12 months. Frequency, duration, speed, and distance of walking were recorded using diaries and pedometers. A new observational cohort of 29 patients was recruited to the same augmented home exercise programme. ABPIs, walking improvement, and quality of life questionnaire were recorded at baseline and 12 weeks (end of the programme). Both groups in the follow-up study continued to improve their walking distance and speed over the following year. Compliance was excellent: 98% of the augmented group were still walking with poles at both 6 and 12 months, while 74% of the control group were still walking at the same point. The augmented group increased their mean walking distance to 17.5 km by 12 months, with a mean speed of 4.2 km/hour. The control group only increased their mean walking distance from 4.2 km to 5.6 km, and speed to 3.3 km/hour. Repeated ANOVA showed the results to be highly significant (p = .002). The 21/29 patients who completed the observational study showed a statistically significant increase in resting ABPIs from baseline (mean ± SD 0.75 ± 0.12) to week 12 (mean ± SD 0.85 ± 0.12) (t = (20) -8.89, p = .000 [two-tailed]). All their walking improvement and quality of life parameters improved significantly (p = .002 or less in the six categories) over the same period and their mean health scores improved by 79%. Following a 12 week augmented home exercise

  2. Barriers to exercise in obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Egan, A M

    2013-07-01

    Although regular exercise is a critical component of the management of type 2 diabetes, many patients do not meet their exercise targets. Lack of exercise is associated with obesity and adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  3. Preoperative exercise training to improve postoperative outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413984141

    2017-01-01

    It is common knowledge that better preoperative physical fitness is associated with better postoperative outcomes. However, as a result of aging of the population and improved surgical and anaesthesia techniques, the proportion of frail patients with decreased physical fitness levels undergoing

  4. Polysaccharides from Portulaca oleracea L Improve Exercise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    exercise [16]. It is known that endurance capacity is markedly decreased by the inhibition of gluconeogenesis, because gluconeogenesis plays a major role in glucose homeostasis during endurance exercise [17]. In the current study, the data show that blood glucose contents of the. POP treatment groups were significantly ...

  5. Astragalus membranaceus Improves Exercise Performance and Ameliorates Exercise-Induced Fatigue in Trained Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Shao Yeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Astragalus membranaceus (AM is a popular “Qi-tonifying” herb with a long history of use as a Traditional Chinese Medicine with multiple biological functions. However, evidence for the effects of AM on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. We evaluated the potential beneficial effects of AM on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR strain mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10 per group for treatment: (1 sedentary control and vehicle treatment (vehicle control; (2 exercise training with vehicle treatment (exercise control; and (3 exercise training with AM treatment at 0.615 g/kg/day (Ex-AM1 or (4 3.075 g/kg/day (Ex-AM5. Both the vehicle and AM were orally administered for 6 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after 15-min swimming exercise. Exercise training combined with AM supplementation increased endurance exercise capacity and increased hepatic and muscle glycogen content. AM reduced exercise-induced accumulation of the byproducts blood lactate and ammonia with acute exercise challenge. Moreover, we found no deleterious effects from AM treatment. Therefore, AM supplementation improved exercise performance and had anti-fatigue effects in mice. It may be an effective ergogenic aid in exercise training.

  6. Effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on respiratory function and trunk control ability in patients with scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jwa Jun; Song, Gui Bin; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on the respiratory function and trunk control ability of patients with scoliosis. [Subjects] Forty scoliosis patients were randomly divided into the Swiss ball exercise group (n= 20) and resistance exercise group (n = 20). [Methods] The Swiss ball and resistance exercise groups performed chest expansion and breathing exercises with a Swiss ball and a therapist's resistance, respectively. Both groups received training 30 min per day, 5 times per week for 8 weeks. [Results] Both groups exhibited significant changes in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and trunk impairment scale after the intervention. However, there was no significant change in the forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity ratio after the intervention in either group. Meanwhile, forced expiratory volume in one second and trunk impairment scale were significantly greater in the resistance exercise group after the intervention. [Conclusion] Both Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise are effective for improving the respiratory function and trunk control ability of patients with scoliosis. However, resistance exercise is more effective for increasing the forced expiratory volume in one second and trunk control ability.

  7. Overweight predicts poorer exercise capacity in congenital heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Karen; Tucker, Alicia; Khan, Munziba; Goldberg, Paula; Anne Greene, E; Smith, Megan

    2015-12-07

    Overweight (OW) and obesity (OB) are endemic in the United States and affect adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). Defining the burden of excess weight on the cardiovascular system in ACHD is the goal of this study. Limitation of exercise capacity due to overweight or obesity might be reversible with weight loss and improve quality of life for ACHD adults. Exercise tests performed using a Bruce protocol and measurement of maximum oxygen consumption were retrospectively reviewed on 418 CHD patients. OW and OB were defined as the 85-95 or > 95 percentile respectively for age and gender or by adult criteria. Severity of CHD was assigned based on criteria published in standard guidelines. 63 patients had mild, 198 moderate, and 157 severe heart disease. Each ACHD group was 32 to 34% OW or OB. Measured exercise time (ET) of CHD patients with moderate or severe heart disease was less than that of controls in each weight categories. However, OB or OW people have shorter ET than their normal weight peers with CHD. Multiple regression using ET as the dependent variable finds that female sex, relative BMI, and VE/VCO2 at peak exercise are all associated with lesser ET with high significance. Peak heart rate is associated with greater ET, with borderline significance. Severity of heart disease is not independently associated with ET. OW and OB are strongly associated with reduced ET in persons with congenital heart disease. Losing weight may improve exercise capacity in ACHD.

  8. Exercise training on chronotropic response and exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Li; Min, Gao; Wei, Chen; Min, He; Jie, Zhou

    2017-01-01

    The study was designed to observe the effects and relationship of exercise on chronotropic response (CR) and exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 30 patients with T2DM underwent symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) after excluding contraindication. For each subject individualized exercise prescription was formulated, and they received 12 weeks of exercise training after CPET retest to complete the comparison of CR indicators, includ...

  9. Age affects exercise-induced improvements in heart rate response to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciolac, E G; Roberts, C K; da Silva, J M Rodrigues; Guimarães, G V

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of age on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), muscle strength and heart rate (HR) response to exercise adaptation in women in response to a long-term twice-weekly combined aerobic and resistance exercise program. 85 sedentary women, divided into young (YG; n=22, 30.3 ± 6.2 years), early middle-aged (EMG; n=28, 44.1 ± 2.5 years), late middle-aged (LMG; n=20, 56.7 ± 3.5 years) and older (OG; n=15, 71.4 ± 6.9 years) groups, had their CRF, muscle strength (1-repetition maximum test) and HR response to exercise (graded exercise test) measured before and after 12 months of combined exercise training. Exercise training improved CRF and muscle strength in all age groups (Pdifferences were observed between groups. Exercise training also improved resting HR and recovery HR in YG and EMG (Pgroup. Combined aerobic and resistance training at a frequency of 2 days/week improves CRF and muscle strength throughout the lifespan. However, exercise-induced improvements in the HR recovery response to exercise may be impaired in late middle-aged and older women. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. A single bout of exercise improves motor memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roig, Marc; Skriver, Kasper Christen; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical activity has a positive impact on cognition and brain function. Here we investigated if a single bout of exercise can improve motor memory and motor skill learning. We also explored if the timing of the exercise bout in relation to the timing of practice has any impact...... 1 hour, 24 hours and 7 days after practice. Differences among groups in the rate of motor skill acquisition were not significant. In contrast, both exercise groups showed a significantly better retention of the motor skill 24 hours and 7 days after practice. Furthermore, compared to the subjects...... that exercised before practice, the subjects that exercised after practice showed a better retention of the motor skill 7 days after practice. These findings indicate that one bout of intense exercise performed immediately before or after practicing a motor task is sufficient to improve the long-term retention...

  11. The effect of 3 different exercise approaches on neck muscle endurance, kinesiophobia, exercise compliance, and patient satisfaction in chronic whiplash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gunnel E; Landén Ludvigsson, Maria H; O'Leary, Shaun P; Dedering, Åsa M; Wallman, Thorne; Jönsson, Margaretha I N; Peolsson, Anneli L C

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different exercise approaches on neck muscle endurance (NME), kinesiophobia, exercise compliance, and patient satisfaction in patients with chronic whiplash. This prospective randomized clinical trial included 216 individuals with chronic whiplash. Participants were randomized to 1 of 3 exercise interventions: neck-specific exercise (NSE), NSE combined with a behavioral approach (NSEB), or prescribed physical activity (PPA). Measures of ventral and dorsal NME (endurance time in seconds), perceived pain after NME testing, kinesiophobia, exercise compliance, and patient satisfaction were recorded at baseline and at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Compared with individuals in the prescribed physical activity group, participants in the NSE and NSEB groups exhibited greater gains in dorsal NME (P = .003), greater reductions in pain after NME testing (P = .03), and more satisfaction with treatment (P Kinesiophobia and exercise compliance did not significantly differ between groups (P > .07). Among patients with chronic whiplash, a neck-specific exercise intervention (with or without a behavioral approach) appears to improve NME. Participants were more satisfied with intervention including neck-specific exercises than with the prescription of general exercise. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A single bout of exercise improves motor memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Roig

    Full Text Available Regular physical activity has a positive impact on cognition and brain function. Here we investigated if a single bout of exercise can improve motor memory and motor skill learning. We also explored if the timing of the exercise bout in relation to the timing of practice has any impact on the acquisition and retention of a motor skill. Forty-eight young subjects were randomly allocated into three groups, which practiced a visuomotor accuracy-tracking task either before or after a bout of intense cycling or after rest. Motor skill acquisition was assessed during practice and retention was measured 1 hour, 24 hours and 7 days after practice. Differences among groups in the rate of motor skill acquisition were not significant. In contrast, both exercise groups showed a significantly better retention of the motor skill 24 hours and 7 days after practice. Furthermore, compared to the subjects that exercised before practice, the subjects that exercised after practice showed a better retention of the motor skill 7 days after practice. These findings indicate that one bout of intense exercise performed immediately before or after practicing a motor task is sufficient to improve the long-term retention of a motor skill. The positive effects of acute exercise on motor memory are maximized when exercise is performed immediately after practice, during the early stages of memory consolidation. Thus, the timing of exercise in relation to practice is possibly an important factor regulating the effects of acute exercise on long-term motor memory.

  13. A Single Bout of Exercise Improves Motor Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Marc; Skriver, Kasper; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Kiens, Bente; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical activity has a positive impact on cognition and brain function. Here we investigated if a single bout of exercise can improve motor memory and motor skill learning. We also explored if the timing of the exercise bout in relation to the timing of practice has any impact on the acquisition and retention of a motor skill. Forty-eight young subjects were randomly allocated into three groups, which practiced a visuomotor accuracy-tracking task either before or after a bout of intense cycling or after rest. Motor skill acquisition was assessed during practice and retention was measured 1 hour, 24 hours and 7 days after practice. Differences among groups in the rate of motor skill acquisition were not significant. In contrast, both exercise groups showed a significantly better retention of the motor skill 24 hours and 7 days after practice. Furthermore, compared to the subjects that exercised before practice, the subjects that exercised after practice showed a better retention of the motor skill 7 days after practice. These findings indicate that one bout of intense exercise performed immediately before or after practicing a motor task is sufficient to improve the long-term retention of a motor skill. The positive effects of acute exercise on motor memory are maximized when exercise is performed immediately after practice, during the early stages of memory consolidation. Thus, the timing of exercise in relation to practice is possibly an important factor regulating the effects of acute exercise on long-term motor memory. PMID:22973462

  14. Exercise Improves Cognition in Parkinson’s Disease: the PRET-PD Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Fabian J.; Robichaud, Julie A.; Leurgans, Sue E.; Poon, Cynthia; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Goldman, Jennifer G.; Comella, Cynthia L.; Vaillancourt, David E.; Corcos, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper reports on the findings of the effect of two structured exercise interventions on secondary cognitive outcomes which were gathered as part of the Progressive Resistance Exercise Training in Parkinson’s disease randomized controlled trial. Methods This study was a prospective, parallel-group, single-center trial. Fifty-one non-demented patients with mild-to-moderate Parkinson’s disease were randomly assigned either to modified Fitness Counts or to Progressive Resistance Exercise, and were followed for 24 months. Cognitive outcomes were the Digit Span, Stroop, and Brief Test of Attention. Results Eighteen patients in modified Fitness Counts and 20 patients in Progressive Resistance Exercise completed the trial. At 12 and at 24 months no differences between groups were observed. At 12 months, relative to baseline, modified Fitness Counts improved on the Digit Span (estimated change, 0.3; Inter-Quartile Range, 0, 0.7; p=0.04) and Stroop (0.3; 0, 0.6; p=0.04), and Progressive Resistance Exercise improved only on the Digit Span (0.7; 0.3, 1; pExercise improved on the Digit Span (0.5; 0.2, 0.8; pExercise or modified Fitness Counts may improve attention and working memory in non-demented patients with mild-to-moderate Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26148003

  15. Aerobic exercise and yoga improve neurocognitive function in women with early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingxia; Chan, Sherry Kw; Lee, Edwin Hm; Chang, Wing Chung; Tse, Michael; Su, Wayne Weizhong; Sham, Pak; Hui, Christy Lm; Joe, Glen; Chan, Cecilia Lw; Khong, P L; So, Kwok Fai; Honer, William G; Chen, Eric Yh

    2015-01-01

    Impairments of attention and memory are evident in early psychosis, and are associated with functional disability. In a group of stable, medicated women patients, we aimed to determine whether participating in aerobic exercise or yoga improved cognitive impairments and clinical symptoms. A total of 140 female patients were recruited, and 124 received the allocated intervention in a randomized controlled study of 12 weeks of yoga or aerobic exercise compared with a waitlist group. The primary outcomes were cognitive functions including memory and attention. Secondary outcome measures were the severity of psychotic and depressive symptoms, and hippocampal volume. Data from 124 patients were included in the final analysis based on the intention-to-treat principle. Both yoga and aerobic exercise groups demonstrated significant improvements in working memory (Pbenefits in verbal acquisition (Pexercise improved overall and depressive symptoms (all P⩽0.01) after 12 weeks. Small increases in hippocampal volume were observed in the aerobic exercise group compared with waitlist (P=0.01). Both types of exercise improved working memory in early psychosis patients, with yoga having a larger effect on verbal acquisition and attention than aerobic exercise. The application of yoga and aerobic exercise as adjunctive treatments for early psychosis merits serious consideration. This study was supported by the Small Research Funding of the University of Hong Kong (201007176229), and RGC funding (C00240/762412) by the Authority of Research, Hong Kong.

  16. Benefits of a low intensity exercise programme during haemodialysis sessions in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicent Esteve Simo

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: (1 An adapted low intensity exercise programme improved muscle strength, functional capacity and health-related quality of life in our elderly patients on HD. (2 Our results highlight the benefits from exercise in HD patients even in this elderly population. (3 In elderly patients on HD, it is worth considering an adapted low intensity intradialytic exercise programme as a part of a comprehensive care.

  17. Immunomodulatory Effect of Exercise in Patients with Asthma

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    Seda Tural Önür

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Immune responses can change with exercise. We aimed to show the changes in cytokine levels pre- and post-exercise in patients with asthma. Methods: In this prospective control trial, data of 32 patients with asthma that was under control were classified into two groups, pre- and post-exercise. Serum IL-1β and monocyte IL-1β, IL-2, and IL-10 expressions were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The patients were advised to walk for at least 30 min for 4 days/week for 12 weeks. Results: There was no significant difference in demographic properties of the participants. Monocyte IL-1β levels in the pre- and post-exercise groups were 1.99±0.35 and 1.01±0.22 pg/mL, respectively (p=0.003. IL-10 levels in the pre- and post-exercise groups were 1.64±0.02 and 1.21±0.03 pg/mL, respectively (p=0.04. IL-2 levels in the pre- and post-exercise groups were 0.64±0.045 and 0.32±0.09 pg/mL, respectively (p=0.001. However, there was a significant difference in serum IL-1β and monocyte IL-1β, IL-2, and IL-10 levels between the groups (p=0.02, p=0.003, p=0.04, and p=0.001, respectively. Conclusion: Systemic inflammatory parameters that are commonly elevated in asthma may improve by exercise. The elucidation of the mechanism of immune control in patients with asthma is useful for the future treatment of asthma.

  18. Exercise for acutely hospitalised older medical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morton, N A; Keating, J L; Jeffs, K

    2007-01-24

    A high incidence of functional decline (deterioration in physical or cognitive function) during hospitalisation of older adults is reported. The role of exercise in preventing these deconditioning effects is unclear. To determine the effect of exercise interventions for acutely hospitalised older medical patients on functional status, adverse events and hospital outcomes. We searched MEDLINE (1966-Feb 2006), CINAHL (1982-Feb 2006), EMBASE (1988 to Feb 2006), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2006), PEDro (1929- Feb 2006), Current Contents (1993- Feb 2006) and Sports Discus (1830-Feb 2006). The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society was hand searched. Additional studies were identified through reference and citation tracking, personal communications with a content expert and contacting authors of eligible trials. There was no language restriction. Eligible studies were prospective randomised controlled trials (RCT) or prospective controlled clinical trials (CCT) comparing exercise for acutely hospitalised older medical patients to usual care or no treatment controls. Two independent reviewers extracted data relating to patient and hospital outcomes and assessed the method quality of included studies. Data were pooled in meta-analysis using the relative risk (RR) and absolute risk reduction (ARR) for dichotomous outcomes and the standardised mean difference (SMD) or the weighted mean difference (WMD) for continuous outcomes. Of 3138 potentially relevant articles screened, 7 randomised controlled trials and 2 controlled clinical trials were included. The effect of exercise on functional outcome measures is unclear. No intervention effect was found on adverse events. Pooled analysis of multidisciplinary interventions that included exercise indicated a small significant increase in the proportion of patients discharged to home at hospital discharge (Relative Risk 1.08, 95% CI 1

  19. A study to evaluate the effectiveness of an indigenous exercise protocol in patients with heart failure to improve their quality of life: (Exercise in congestive heart failure study [E - CHF study

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    Urvashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congestive heart failure (CHF is characterized by an intolerance to activities of daily living, office environment and shortness of breath in any level of extraneous activity depending on their level of heart failure (HF. This significantly contributes to reduced participation and poor quality of life (QoL among these patients. Methods: The study was conducted from June 2014 to December 2014 in Cardio-Neuro-Centre, OPD, AIIMS, New Delhi on 40 medically stable CHF outpatients (mean age 46.3±11.4 years in NYHA class -I & II with 3 month follow-up. IEP (Indigenous Exercise Protocol training, consisting of one supervised session at baseline visit followed by home-based practice and telephonic encouragement and monitoring of the group was given. Outcome measures were QoL, physiological parameters (6 minute walk test - distance, VO2 max and double product and frequency of hospitalization. Results: The results showed significant difference between QoL (P < 0.02 as measured by KCCQ, mean walking distance on the 6 minute walk test (P < 0.01 and VO2 max (P < 0.01 at entry and after 12 weeks within the experimental group, but compared to the control group, no significant difference was found between the two groups. Two hospitalizations and one death were reported in the control group, whereas none was reported in the experimental group. Conclusion: IEP was effective in achieving adequate exercise tolerance in experimental group. It showed no deleterious effect and is safe to practice at home, but more evidence is needed to consider using IEP when caring for stable heart failure patient.

  20. EFFECTIVENESS OF INTERVAL EXERCISE VERSUS CONTINUOUS EXERCISE TO IMPROVE EXERCISE TOLERANCE IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Swathi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: COPD is characterized by chronic airflow limitation and a range of pathological changes in the lung. Chronic inflammation causes structural changes and narrowing of the small airways and destruction of lung parenchyma, leads to the loss of alveolar attachments to the small airways and decreases lung elastic recoil; in turn these changes diminish the expiration and the work of breathing is increased. Scarcity of evidence on continuous and interval exercises is forcing researchers conduct studies on effectiveness of interval exercise with continuous exercise on exercise tolerance in subjects with COPD. Methods: 60 subjects were selected by lottery method. All the subjects were explained about the condition and mode of assessment and written informed consent were obtained from them and divided into 2 groups interval training group and continuous exercise training group and subjects were scheduled to attend exercise session 5 days a week for 4 weeks with exercise duration 20 min’s with cycle ergometer. Outcome measure: six minute walk test and heart rate. Results: On observing the means of post test parameters of experimental group A and experimental group B Independent t-test was done and the P- value is >0.05 .It shows a no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: The results had shown that both interval exercise group and continuous exercise group who received four weeks of therapy has improved significantly on pre and post test values within the groups but when compared between these groups there is no statistical significance noted. So this study concluded that there is no significant difference between interval exercise group and continuous exercise group in improving exercise tolerance among COPD subjects.

  1. Do Critical Thinking Exercises Improve Critical Thinking Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Ellen M.; Tally, Carrie Sacco

    2009-01-01

    Although textbooks routinely include exercises to improve critical thinking skills, the effectiveness of these exercises has not been closely examined. Additionally, the connection between critical thinking skills and formal operational thought is also relatively understudied. In the study reported here, college students completed measures of…

  2. The predictors of exercise capacity impairment in diabetic patients

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    Florina Frîngu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. The exercise capacity is a key issue in a diabetic patient’s management, due to its well-known beneficial effects in terms of glycemic control, cardiovascular risk reduction and quality of life improvement. However the exercise capacity of diabetic patients is decreased many times and its determinants are sometimes less known. Our study aimed to assess the effort capacity in a cohort of diabetic patients and to find the main causative factors of its impairment. Method: 61 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled and underwent and transthoracic echocardiography and a cycloergometer exercise testing. Exercise performance was calculated and the influence of clinical data and ultrasound parameters was assessed. Sedentary status of each patient was established from total time/week of at least moderate physical activity. Results: the study group consisted of 48.4 % women, mean age 61.4 (±8.4 years. Disease median duration was 5 years and 21.3 % of the patients presented neuropathy, 4.5 % retinopathy and 6.5 % nephropathy. Exercise capacity was moderately and severe decreased (<5 METs in 37.7 % of patients and in this subgroup the diastolic dysfunction, sedentary behavior and old age has a significantly higher prevalence. Interestingly, by multivariate regression, the sedentary lifestyle was the main determinant of decreased effort capacity (beta-coefficient 1.37, p<0.001, suggesting the potential benefits of physical training in these patients. Conclusion. Our study found a decreased effort capacity in at least one third of the patients and this is mainly due to sedentary lifestyle and deconditioning, the diastolic dysfunction also contributes to decreased effort capacity in diabetic patients.

  3. Exercise for improving outcomes after osteoporotic vertebral fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangregorio, Lora M; MacIntyre, Norma J; Thabane, Lehana; Skidmore, Carly J; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Vertebral fractures are associated with increased morbidity (e.g., pain, reduced quality of life), and mortality. Therapeutic exercise is a non-pharmacologic conservative treatment that is often recommended for patients with vertebral fractures to reduce pain and restore functional movement. Objectives Our objectives were to evaluate the benefits and harms of exercise interventions of four weeks or greater (alone or as part of a physical therapy intervention) versus non-exercise/non-active physical therapy intervention, no intervention or place boon the incidence of future fractures and adverse events among adults with a history of osteoporotic vertebral fracture(s). We were also examined the effects of exercise on the following secondary outcomes: falls, pain, posture, physical function, balance, mobility, muscle function, quality of life and bone mineral density of the lumbar spine or hip measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We also reported exercise adherence. Search methods We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library (Issue 11 of 12, November 2011), MEDLINE (2005 to 2011), EMBASE (1988 to November 23, 2011), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, 1982 to November 23, 2011), AMED (1985 to November 2011), and PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database, www.pedro.fhs.usyd.edu.au/index.html, 1929 to November 23, 2011. Ongoing and recently completed trials were identified by searching the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to December 2009). Conference proceedings were searched via ISI and SCOPUS, and targeted searches of proceedings of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Search terms or MeSH headings included terms such as vertebral fracture AND exercise OR physical therapy. Selection criteria We considered all randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials comparing exercise or active

  4. Exercise for improving outcomes after osteoporotic vertebral fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangregorio, Lora M; Macintyre, Norma J; Thabane, Lehana; Skidmore, Carly J; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2013-01-31

    Vertebral fractures are associated with increased morbidity (e.g., pain, reduced quality of life), and mortality. Therapeutic exercise is a non-pharmacologic conservative treatment that is often recommended for patients with vertebral fractures to reduce pain and restore functional movement. Our objectives were to evaluate the benefits and harms of exercise interventions of four weeks or greater (alone or as part of a physical therapyintervention) versus non-exercise/non-active physical therapy intervention, no intervention or placebo on the incidence of future fractures and adverse events among adults with a history of osteoporotic vertebral fracture(s). We were also examined the effects of exercise on the following secondary outcomes: falls, pain, posture,physical function, balance,mobility, muscle function,quality of life and bone mineral density of the lumbar spine or hip measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).We also reported exercise adherence. We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library ( Issue 11 of 12, November 2011), MEDLINE (2005 to 2011), EMBASE (1988 to November 23, 2011), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, 1982 to November 23, 2011), AMED (1985 to November 2011), and PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database, www.pedro.fhs.usyd.edu.au/index.html, 1929 to November 23, 2011. Ongoing and recently completed trials were identified by searching the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to December 2009). Conference proceedings were searched via ISI and SCOPUS, and targeted searches of proceedings of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Search terms or MeSH headings included terms such as vertebral fracture AND exercise OR physical therapy. We considered all randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials comparing exercise or active physical therapy interventions with placebo/non-exercise

  5. How Exercise Can Benefit Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musanti, Rita

    2016-12-01

    Thirty years ago, the first article on exercise for patients with cancer appeared in the cancer research literature. The time from that first article to the present has included oncology nurses taking the lead in investigations related to exercise and cancer-related symptoms, most notably cancer-related fatigue (CRF). The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) has been instrumental in publishing much of the research on exercise and cancer and continues in that tradition by issuing this supplement to the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing. In addition, ONS has facilitated the translation of research findings to practicing oncology nurses by convening meetings, participating in expert opinion consensus groups, and disseminating evidence through Putting Evidence Into Practice resources.

  6. Exercise for patients with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Speyer, Helene

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise in patients with depression. DESIGN: Systematic review DATA SOURCES: Bibliographical databases were searched until 20 June 2017. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA AND OUTCOMES: Eligible trials were randomised clinical trials assessing the effect...... of exercise in participants diagnosed with depression. Primary outcomes were depression severity, lack of remission and serious adverse events (eg, suicide) assessed at the end of the intervention. Secondary outcomes were quality of life and adverse events such as injuries, as well as assessment of depression...... severity and lack of remission during follow-up after the intervention. RESULTS: Thirty-five trials enrolling 2498 participants were included. The effect of exercise versus control on depression severity was -0.66 standardised mean difference (SMD) (95% CI -0.86 to -0.46; p

  7. Improving patient safety culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellings, Johan; Schrooten, Ward; Klazinga, Niek S.; Vleugels, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Improving hospital patient safety means an open and stimulating culture is needed. This article aims to describe a patient safety culture improvement approach in five Belgian hospitals. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Patient safety culture was measured using a validated Belgian adaptation of

  8. [Factors influencing the participation of post coronary artery bypass patients in cardiac rehabilitation exercise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hsin-Ju; Tsai, Shiau-Ting; Chou, Fan-Hao

    2013-12-01

    Studies have shown that cardiovascular rehabilitation exercise improves quality of life in post-coronary-bypass-surgery patients. However, the rate of participation in this exercise by this patient group in Taiwan has increased only 8.2% during the past 13 years (from 61.9% in 1996 to 70.1% in 2009). Little is known about the factors that influence patient motivation to participate in cardiovascular rehabilitation exercise. This study explores the factors that influence patient participation in rehabilitation exercise following coronary bypass surgery. This cross-sectional, correlational study recruited a convenience sample of 253 patients who had undergone coronary bypass surgery at a medical center in southern Taiwan. Structured questionnaires, including a patient rehabilitation exercise experience questionnaire, Short Form-36 Health Survey-Taiwan Form, and cardiac rehabilitation exercise design factors questionnaire were used for data collection. SPSS19.0 was used to analyze data. The variables "healthcare provider recommendation of rehabilitation exercise", "exercise program accessibility", "physical health status", and "patient post-surgical exercise patterns" each had a significant influence on participant participation in post-surgical rehabilitation exercise. Binary logistic regression analyses identified "receiving information on rehabilitation exercise", "level of patient-perceived importance of rehabilitation exercise", and "having post-surgical exercise patterns" as important predictors of participation in a rehabilitation exercise program, with OR ratios of 112, 7.86, and 3.23 times respectively. These 3 factors accounted for 90.1% of the total variance. Patient education on coronary bypass post-surgical rehabilitation exercise programs should be emphasized during pre-surgical consultation and care in order to facilitate the recovery of normal life functions following coronary bypass surgery.

  9. Exercise and Weight Loss Improve Muscle Mitochondrial Respiration, Lipid Partitioning, and Insulin Sensitivity After Gastric Bypass Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Coen, Paul M.; Menshikova, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Giovanna; Zheng, Donghai; Tanner, Charles J.; Standley, Robert A.; Helbling, Nicole L.; Dubis, Gabriel S.; Ritov, Vladimir B.; Xie, Hui; Desimone, Marisa E.; Smith, Steven R.; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Toledo, Frederico G.S.; Houmard, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Both Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and exercise can improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with severe obesity. However, the impact of RYGB with or without exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondria, intramyocellular lipids, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) is unknown. We conducted a randomized exercise trial in patients (n = 101) who underwent RYGB surgery and completed either a 6-month moderate exercise (EX) or a health education control (CON) intervention. SI was determined b...

  10. [Exercises that should be prescribed for heart patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud-Ekstrand, S; Loyer, J

    1996-06-01

    The goal of cardiac rehabilitation is to assist the patient in regaining, as close as possible, normal functioning. Participation in an exercise program is one way to achieve this objective. Exercise improves not only the physiologic state of the patient, but also produces many psychosocial benefits. However, exercise prescription is different for cardiac patients, according to the factors associated with the type of cardiac pathology and the surgical intervention. The goal of this article is to inform and guide the nurse in prescribing exercise for cardiac patients. A case study of a patient with cardiac pathologies such as angina, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure is presented. The nurse will learn how to prescribe the appropriate types of activities as well as the intensity, duration and frequency of the training sessions. The nurse will also be able to recommend appropriate physical activities for phase II of cardiac rehabilitation, a phase embracing the time from hospital discharge through the following three months. Finally, a list of activities and hobbies, with various energy costs, is presented.

  11. Systematic review of published studies on aquatic exercise for balance in patients with multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichanan Methajarunon, MSc, PT

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Aquatic exercises may be effective at improving balance impairment in patients with hemiplegia and multiple sclerosis. There is a need for further research investigating its effect on Parkinson's disease before encouraging the use of aquatic exercises.

  12. Bosentan Improves Exercise Capacity in Adolescents and Adults After Fontan Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebert, Anders; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Thilen, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Fontan procedure has improved survival in children with functionally univentricular hearts. With time, however, complications such as reduced exercise capacity are seen more frequently. Exercise intolerance is multifactorial, but pulmonary vascular resistance probably plays...... of this study was therefore to examine the efficacy and safety of bosentan in Fontan patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Seventy-five adolescents and adults were randomized 1:1 to 14 weeks of treatment with bosentan or placebo. Cardiopulmonary exercise test, functional class, blood samples, and quality......)) in the placebo group (P=0.02). Cardiopulmonary exercise test time increased by 0.48 minute (from 6.79 to 7.27 minutes) versus 0.08 minute (from 6.94 to 7.02 minutes; P=0.04). Nine bosentan-treated patients improved 1 functional class, whereas none improved in the placebo group (P=0.0085). Side effects were mild...

  13. Aerobic exercise to improve cognitive function in adults with neurological disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Michelle N; Smith, Ashleigh E; Mackintosh, Shylie F

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate whether aerobic exercise improves cognition in adults diagnosed with neurologic disorders. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, EMBASE, PEDro, AMED, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, ERIC, and Google Scholar, with the last search performed in December 2010. We included controlled clinical trials and randomized controlled trials with adults diagnosed with a neurologic disorder. Studies were included if they compared a control group with a group involved in an aerobic exercise program to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and if they measured cognition as an outcome. Two reviewers independently extracted data and methodologic quality of the included trials. From the 67 trials reviewed, a total of 7 trials, involving 249 participants, were included. Two trials compared the effectiveness of yoga and aerobic exercise in adults with multiple sclerosis. Two trials evaluated the effect of exercise on patients with dementia, and 2 trials evaluated the effectiveness of exercise to improve cognition after traumatic brain injury. One trial studied the effect of a cycling program in people with chronic stroke. Lack of commonality between measures of cognition limited meta-analyses. Results from individual studies show that aerobic exercise improved cognition in people with dementia, improved attention and cognitive flexibility in patients with traumatic brain injury, improved choice reaction time in people with multiple sclerosis, and enhanced motor learning in people with chronic stroke. There is limited evidence to support the use of aerobic exercise to improve cognition in adults with neurologic disorders. Of the 67 studies retrieved, less than half included cognition as an outcome, and few studies continued the aerobic exercise program long enough to be considered effective. Further studies investigating the effect of aerobic exercise interventions on cognition in people with neurologic conditions are required. Copyright

  14. The effectiveness of selected Tai Chi exercises in a program of strategic rehabilitation aimed at improving the self-care skills of patients aroused from prolonged coma after severe TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mańko, Grzegorz; Ziółkowski, Artur; Mirski, Andrzej; Kłosiński, Michał

    2013-09-16

    Difficulties in self-care constitute a very common problem for patients recovering from prolonged coma after a severe TBI, and a major factor reducing their quality of life. Effective new rehabilitation programs that would help solve this problem are urgently needed. The purpose of our experiment was to evaluate improvement in this respect in a group of patients aroused from prolonged coma who participated in a goal-oriented rehabilitation program (Rehab-3), enhanced with selected elements of Tai-Chi. We examined 40 patients aroused from prolonged coma after a severe TBI, undergoing long-term rehabilitation according to a standard phased rehabilitation program. These patients were divided into two numerically even groups: a control group treated according to the standard program, and an experimental group, who received an additional goal oriented program enhanced with selected Tai-Chi exercises. The research methods included analysis of documentation (MRI, CT), a structured clinical interview, and the Standard Self-Care Scale. The experimental group achieved significant improvement of self-care skills, whereas in the control group the improvement was slight and not statistically significant. The value of co-efficient j (0.64) indicates a very strong association between the rehabilitation procedure and improved self-care in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Our results confirmed that a goal-oriented rehabilitation program enhanced with elements of Tai-Chi was more effective than the standard program in improving the performance of activities of daily living.

  15. EFFECT OF A HOME EXERCISE TRAINING-PROGRAM IN PATIENTS WITH CYSTIC-FIBROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEJONG, W; GREVINK, RG; ROORDA, RJ; KAPTEIN, AA; VANDERSCHANS, CP

    Physical training in patients with pulmonary diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF), may improve exercise tolerance in these patients. Most training programs are performed in a clinical setting. Little information is available concerning the effect of home exercise training programs in CF

  16. Exercise to improve physiologic and functional performance in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, J M; Hadley, E C

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the impact of exercise in elderly men and women. The type and intensity of exercise, the health status of the participants, and the outcomes measured vary widely across studies. In general, studies of exercise interventions in older adults show positive physiologic effects in persons of all ages. Musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems, regardless of age, can respond to both resistance and aerobic training as measured by impairments such as strength and maximum oxygen uptake. The magnitude of physiologic effect may be dampened in frailer individuals in response to lower intensity exercise stimuli. In the most impaired elders, exercise may help to forestall further decline in physiologic reserve rather than produce significant gains. The extent to which exercise programs impact performance and disability is less clear. Exercise programs in frailer individuals appear to have greater effect on gait speed and chair rise time than similar programs in healthier individuals. The impact of exercise on measures of disability has not been widely reported. Studies reviewed in this article suggest that exercise training in elders is a potential means of reducing the burden of impairments and ultimately improving function.

  17. Exercise prescription for patients with multiple sclerosis; potential benefits and practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabchi, Farzin; Alizadeh, Zahra; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Abolhasani, Maryam

    2017-09-16

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) can result in significant mental and physical symptoms, specially muscle weakness, abnormal walking mechanics, balance problems, spasticity, fatigue, cognitive impairment and depression. Patients with MS frequently decrease physical activity due to the fear from worsening the symptoms and this can result in reconditioning. Physicians now believe that regular exercise training is a potential solution for limiting the reconditioning process and achieving an optimal level of patient activities, functions and many physical and mental symptoms without any concern about triggering the onset or exacerbation of disease symptoms or relapse. Appropriate exercise can cause noteworthy and important improvements in different areas of cardio respiratory fitness (Aerobic fitness), muscle strength, flexibility, balance, fatigue, cognition, quality of life and respiratory function in MS patients. Aerobic exercise training with low to moderate intensity can result in the improvement of aerobic fitness and reduction of fatigue in MS patients affected by mild or moderate disability. MS patients can positively adapt to resistance training which may result in improved fatigue and ambulation. Flexibility exercises such as stretching the muscles may diminish spasticity and prevent future painful contractions. Balance exercises have beneficial effects on fall rates and better balance. Some general guidelines exist for exercise recommendation in the MS population. The individualized exercise program should be designed to address a patient's chief complaint, improve strength, endurance, balance, coordination, fatigue and so on. An exercise staircase model has been proposed for exercise prescription and progression for a broad spectrum of MS patients. Exercise should be considered as a safe and effective means of rehabilitation in MS patients. Existing evidence shows that a supervised and individualized exercise program may improve fitness, functional capacity and

  18. Comparing the efficacy of aquatic exercises and land-based exercises for patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsae-Jyy; Lee, Shu-Chiung; Liang, Shu-Yuan; Tung, Heng-Hsin; Wu, Shu-Fang V; Lin, Yu-Ping

    2011-09-01

    The study aims to compare changes over time among three study groups on the primary outcome, pain, as well as on the secondary outcomes, other symptoms, activities of daily living function, sport and recreation function, knee-related quality of life, knee range of motions and the six-minute walk test and to investigate whether aquatic exercises would be superior compared with land exercise on pain reduction. Osteoarthritis is a prevalent musculoskeletal disorder. Appropriate exercise may prevent osteoarthritis-associated disabilities and increase life quality. To date, research that compares the effects of different types of exercise for knee osteoarthritis has been limited. The study is a randomised trial. Eighty-four participants with knee osteoarthritis were recruited from local community centres. Participants were randomly assigned to the control, aquatic or land-based exercise group. Exercise in both groups ran for 60 minutes, three times a week for 12 weeks. Data were collected at baseline, week 6 and week 12 during 2006-2007. The instruments included the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, a standard plastic goniometer and the six-minute walk test. Generalised estimation equations were used to compare changes over time among groups for key outcomes. Results showed statistically significant group-by-time interactions in pain, symptoms, sport/recreation and knee-related quality of life dimensions of Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, knee range of motions and the six-minute walk test. However, the aquatic group did not show any significant difference from the land group at both weeks 12 and 6. Both aquatic and land-based exercise programmes are effective in reducing pain, improving knee range of motions, six-minute walk test and knee-related quality of life in people with knee osteoarthritis. The aquatic exercise is not superior to land-based exercise in pain reduction. Similar outcomes could be possible with the two programmes. Health

  19. Rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of an exercise program to improve the quality of life of patients with heart failure in primary care: The EFICAR study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Torre Maria M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of life (QoL decreases as heart failure worsens, which is one of the greatest worries of these patients. Physical exercise has been shown to be safe for people with heart failure. Previous studies have tested heterogeneous exercise programs using different QoL instruments and reported inconsistent effects on QoL. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a new exercise program for people with heart failure (EFICAR, additional to the recommended optimal treatment in primary care, to improve QoL, functional capacity and control of cardiovascular risk factors. Methods/Design Multicenter clinical trial in which 600 patients with heart failure in NYHA class II-IV will be randomized to two parallel groups: EFICAR and control. After being recruited, through the reference cardiology services, in six health centres from the Spanish Primary Care Prevention and Health Promotion Research Network (redIAPP, patients are followed for 1 year after the beginning of the intervention. Both groups receive the optimized treatment according to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines. In addition, the EFICAR group performs a 3 month supervised progressive exercise program with an aerobic (high-intensity intervals and a strength component; and the programme continues linked with community resources for 9 months. The main outcome measure is the change in health-related QoL measured by the SF-36 and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaires at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes considered are changes in functional capacity measured by the 6-Minute Walking Test, cardiac structure (B-type natriuretic peptides, muscle strength and body composition. Both groups will be compared on an intention to treat basis, using multi-level longitudinal mixed models. Sex, age, social class, co-morbidity and cardiovascular risk factors will be considered as potential confounding and predictor variables. Discussion

  20. INDEPENDENCE FUNCTIONS OF STROKE PATIENTS WITH "GAIT" EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlina Marlina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is a cerebro vascular disease which has clinical manifestation based on the location and the damaged lesion. The disorder of oxygen flow to the brain results clinical manifestation called hemipharese or the de fi ciency of some parts of extremities which is indicated by the muscle deficiency. Effect of exercise gait program in needed in order to recover the strength functional self care of which is indicated by the improve strength extremitas. The aimed of this study was to analyze the effect of exercise gait to the improvement of functionalself care of the patients at Sigli General Hospital in Kabupaten Pidie Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam. Methods: A quasi experimental with pretest-postest group design was used in this study. Thirty four patients were selected by using non probability sampling (consecutive sampling tehnigue as the sample of the study. Fourteen days of exercise gait program were given to the patient. An evaluation to the result of the program was conducted after fourteen days by measuring functional self care of the subjects. Result: The statistical analysis showed that the average of the stroke patiens functional self care is significantly after the treatment (p=0.000. There was a relationship between patients age and the functional selfcare (p=0.000 and there was no relationship between sex and the functional self care (p=0.148. There was also no relationship between risk factor the functional self care (p=0.13. Discussion: This study recommended the use of exercise gait to improve functional self care of stroke patients in order to improve their ability to do daily living activities.

  1. Exercise behavior and knowledge among the DM type II patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadchavalpanichaya, Navaporn; Intaratep, Nualpis

    2010-05-01

    To study the exercise behavior and knowledge about physical exercise among diabetic patients. The authors explored the correlation between the exercise behavior and knowledge of physical exercise. DM type II patients aged more than 18 years, who attended the DM clinic, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok between April and August 2007 were randomly interviewed by using questionnaires while they were waiting to see their doctors. One hundred and ninety six patients were interviewed. They were 62 males and 134 females with an average age of 60.5 years. Most of them exercised regularly at least three times a week (65.8%). Most of them exercised by walking (67%). They liked to exercise in their houses (48.7%), and in the morning (41.8%). Health care providers provided knowledge about exercise (58.2%). The benefit of exercise known the least was that it could increase endorphin release (61.2%). The aerobic exercise principle known the least was the proper frequency of exercise (50.5%). In addition, the exercise principle in DM known the least was that the DM patients should consult their doctors before starting to exercise (49%). Most of the DM patients exercised regularly, but some had insufficient knowledge. The researchers will take the results to provide the adequate knowledge to the DM patients in the future.

  2. Exercise capacity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Moreira Mortari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The association between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and exercise capacity is still not well determined. However, it is known that many OSAS patients present limited response to physical exercise. Such limitation, among other reasons, may be associated to the poor sleep quality that leads, mainly, to excessive daytime sleepiness. The aim of this study was to perform a literature review about exercise capacity in OSAS patients. The search was performed at the data basis Pubmed, LILACS and SciELO. We performed 3 searches in each data basis, with the following terms combination: “apnea” and “exercise” and “capacity”, “apnea” and “exercise” and “CPAP” and “apnea” and “cardiopulmonary” and “test”. Articles in Portuguese, English and Spanish would be included; with samples composed by OSAS patients treated or not. From the 108 articles identified, 24 filled the inclusion criteria and were then analyzed. In conclusion, exercise capacity seems to be diminished in OSAS patients and CPAP is associated to an improvement in physical performance.

  3. Inspiratory muscle training improves exercise capacity with thoracic load carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shei, Ren-Jay; Chapman, Robert F; Gruber, Allison H; Mickleborough, Timothy D

    2018-02-01

    Thoracic load carriage (LC) exercise impairs exercise performance compared to unloaded exercise, partially due to impaired respiratory mechanics. We investigated the effects of LC on exercise and diaphragmatic fatigue in a constant-load exercise task; and whether inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improved exercise capacity and diaphragmatic fatigue with LC. Twelve recreationally active males completed three separate running trials to exhaustion (T lim ) at a fixed speed eliciting 70% of their V˙O 2max . The first two trials were completed either unloaded (UL) or while carrying a 10 kg backpack (LC). Subjects then completed 6 weeks of either true IMT or placebo-IMT. Posttraining, subjects completed an additional LC trial identical to the pretraining LC trial. Exercise metabolic and ventilatory measures were recorded. Diaphragm fatigue was assessed as the difference between preexercise and postexercise twitch diaphragmatic pressure (P di, tw ), assessed by bilateral stimulation of the phrenic nerve with esophageal balloon-tipped catheters measuring intrathoracic pressures. T lim was significantly shorter (P  0.05). Minute ventilation and breathing mechanics were unchanged post-IMT (P > 0.05). Six weeks of flow-resistive IMT improved exercise capacity, but did not mitigate diaphragmatic fatigue following submaximal, constant-load running to volitional exhaustion with LC. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  4. The influence of physical exercise on improvement of cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Stanislava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews contemporary studies on the influence of physical exercise on human cognitive functioning. One of the aims of the interdisciplinary neuroscience that connects psychology, medicine and sport, is in discovering the mechanisms by which physical exercise might improve cognitive functioning across the lifespan, especially in the old age, when cognitive efficiency naturally decreases. Studies have shown that physical exercise produces cognitive benefit over the lifetime, both directly, through physiological mechanisms and structural brain changes, and indirectly, through mood improvement and stress reduction. However, studies have shown that the effects of physical exercise depend on the exercise intensity - while moderate physical activity has a positive impact on the cognitive functioning, the high-intensity exercise shows the reversed effect. Also, studies have suggested that the effect of physical exercise on cognitive functioning depends on the type of physical activity. Overall, studies have demonstrated that physical exercise may produce positive effects on different cognitive processes, but still have not provided a clear mechanism underlying this influence. Also, existing studies have not revealed to what extent the various physical activities differ in their effects and whether such effects are specific or potentially beneficial for cognitive functioning in general.

  5. The evaluation of research methods during disaster exercises: applicability for improving disaster health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legemaate, G A Guido; Burkle, Frederick M; Bierens, Joost J L M

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether disaster exercises can be used as a proxy environment to evaluate potential research instruments designed to study the application of medical care management resources during a disaster. During an 06 April 2005 Ministerial-level exercise in the Netherlands, three functional areas of patient contact were assessed: (1) Command and Control, through the application of an existing incident management system questionnaire; (2) patient flow and quality of patient distribution, through registration of data from prehospital casualty collection points, ambulances, and participating trauma centers (with inclusion of data in a flow chart); and (3) hospital coping capacity, through timed registration reports from participating trauma centers. The existing incident management system questionnaire used for evaluating Command and Control during a disaster exercise would benefit from minor adaptations and validation that could not be anticipated in the exercise planning stage. Patient flow and the quality of patient distribution could not be studied during the exercise because of inconsistencies among data, and lack of data from various collection points. Coping capacity was better measured by using 10-minute rather than one hour time intervals, but provided little information regarding bottlenecks in surge capacity. Research instruments can be evaluated and improved when tested during a disaster exercise. Lack of data recovery hampers disaster research even in the artificial setting of a national disaster exercise. Providers at every level must be aware that proper data collection is essential to improve the quality of health care during a disaster, and that predisaster cooperation is crucial to validate patient outcomes. These problems must be addressed pre-exercise by stakeholders and decision-makers during planning, education, and training. If not, disaster exercises will not meet their full potential.

  6. Improved insulin sensitivity after exercise: focus on insulin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    After a single bout of exercise, the ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake is markedly improved locally in the previously active muscles. This makes exercise a potent stimulus counteracting insulin resistance characterizing type 2 diabetes (T2D). It is believed that at least part...... of the mechanism relates to an improved ability of insulin to stimulate translocation of glucose transporters (GLUT4) to the muscle membrane after exercise. How this is accomplished is still unclear; however, an obvious possibility is that exercise interacts with the insulin signaling pathway to GLUT4...... translocation allowing for a more potent insulin response. Parallel to unraveling of the insulin signaling cascade, this has been investigated within the past 25 years. Reviewing existing studies clearly indicates that improved insulin action can occur independent of interactions with proximal insulin signaling...

  7. A Scientific Rationale to Improve Resistance Training Prescription in Exercise Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairman, Ciaran M; Zourdos, Michael C; Helms, Eric R; Focht, Brian C

    2017-08-01

    To date, the prevailing evidence in the field of exercise oncology supports the safety and efficacy of resistance training to attenuate many oncology treatment-related adverse effects, such as risk for cardiovascular disease, increased fatigue, and diminished physical functioning and quality of life. Moreover, findings in the extant literature supporting the benefits of exercise for survivors of and patients with cancer have resulted in the release of exercise guidelines from several international agencies. However, despite research progression and international recognition, current exercise oncology-based exercise prescriptions remain relatively basic and underdeveloped, particularly in regards to resistance training. Recent publications have called for a more precise manipulation of training variables such as volume, intensity, and frequency (i.e., periodization), given the large heterogeneity of a cancer population, to truly optimize clinically relevant patient-reported outcomes. Indeed, increased attention to integrating fundamental principles of exercise physiology into the exercise prescription process could optimize the safety and efficacy of resistance training during cancer care. The purpose of this article is to give an overview of the current state of resistance training prescription and discuss novel methods that can contribute to improving approaches to exercise prescription. We hope this article may facilitate further evaluation of best practice regarding resistance training prescription, monitoring, and modification to ultimately optimize the efficacy of integrating resistance training as a supportive care intervention for survivors or and patients with cancer.

  8. Primary care physicians' own exercise habits influence exercise counseling for patients with chronic kidney disease: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Numata, Akihiko; Miki, Atushi; Okada, Mari; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Takemoto, Fumi; Ando, Yasuhiro; Muto, Shigeaki; Nagata, Daisuke; Kusano, Eiji

    2014-03-19

    The appropriate exercise counseling for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is crucial to improve their prognosis. There have been few studies about exercise counseling by primary care physicians for CKD patients. We investigated primary care physicians' exercise counseling practices for CKD patients, and the association of these physicians' own exercise habits with exercise counseling. The population of this cross-sectional study was 3310 medical doctors who graduated from Jichi Medical University from 1978 to 2012. The study instrument was a self-administered questionnaire that was mailed in August 2012 to investigate their age class, specialty, workplace, exercise habits, and practices of exercise counseling for CKD. 581 (64.8%) medical doctors practiced the management of CKD among a total of 933 responses. These 581 medical doctors were defined as CKD primary care physicians and their answers were analyzed. CKD primary care physicians' own exercise habits (frequencies and intensities) were as follows: frequencies: daily, 71 (12.1%); ≥ 2-3 times/week, 154 (26.5%); ≥ 1 time/week, 146 (25.1%); and ≤ 1 time/month, 176 (30.2%); intensities: high (≥ 6 Mets), 175 (30.1%); moderate (4-6 Mets), 132 (22.7%); mild (3-4 Mets), 188 (32.3%); very mild (influenced the exercise counseling for CKD patients. The establishment of guidelines for exercise by CKD patients and their dissemination among primary care physicians are needed.(University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trial Registry. number, UMIN000011803. Registration date, Sep/19/2013).

  9. A Self Directed Adherence Management Program for Patients' with Heart Failure Completing Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Training

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, Kathleen; Pozehl, Bunny; Norman, Joseph F.; Hertzog, Melody

    2009-01-01

    This study measured the impact of the Exercise Adherence Management Program (EAMP) provided to 20 patients with heart failure (HF) who participated in a combined resistance and aerobic exercise training program during two, 12 week phases. The EAMP included strategies designed to support exercise self-efficacy and adherence. Results indicate an improvement in exercise self-efficacy occurred during the study period while exercise adherence declined during the unsupervised phase. The highest rat...

  10. Talking to patients with fibromyalgia about physical activity and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooks, Daniel S

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the application of basic exercise principles to individuals with fibromyalgia to encourage clinicians to discuss with their patients ways of becoming more physically active. The goals of increased physical activity and exercise for individuals with fibromyalgia are to improve or maintain general fitness, physical function, emotional well being, symptoms and overall health, and provide them with a feeling of control over their well being. Describing ways of increasing activity through home, work and leisure-related tasks or exercise provides a universal approach to increasing physical activity that applies to individuals with fibromyalgia and fits a counseling model of health behavior familiar to clinicians. The patient-clinician relationship provides a unique opportunity for health professionals to counsel individuals with fibromyalgia to become and remain more physically active. Regular physical activity and exercise has numerous physical, psychological, and functional benefits for individuals with fibromyalgia and should be included in treatment plans. Clinicians can help patients adopt a more physically active lifestyle through targeted discussions, support and consistent follow up.

  11. Massage therapy and exercise therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Rezaie, Solmaz; Goharpey, Shahin

    2013-12-01

    The primary aim was to investigate the comparative effects of massage therapy and exercise therapy on patients with multiple sclerosis. The secondary aim was to investigate whether combination of both massage and exercise has an additive effect. Randomized controlled pilot trial with repeated measurements and blinded assessments. Local Multiple Sclerosis Society. A total of 48 patients with multiple sclerosis were randomly assigned to four equal subgroups labelled as massage therapy, exercise therapy, combined massage-exercise therapy and control group. The treatment group received 15 sessions of supervised intervention for five weeks. The massage therapy group received a standard Swedish massage. The exercise therapy group was given a combined set of strength, stretch, endurance and balance exercises. Patients in the massage-exercise therapy received a combined set of massage and exercise treatments. Patients in the control group were asked to continue their standard medical care. Pain, fatigue, spasticity, balance, gait and quality of life were assessed before and after intervention. Massage therapy resulted in significantly larger improvement in pain reduction (mean change 2.75 points, P = 0.001), dynamic balance (mean change, 3.69 seconds, P = 0.009) and walking speed (mean change, 7.84 seconds, P = 0.007) than exercise therapy. Patients involved in the combined massage-exercise therapy showed significantly larger improvement in pain reduction than those in the exercise therapy (mean change, 1.67 points, P = 0.001). Massage therapy could be more effective than exercise therapy. Moreover, the combination of massage and exercise therapy may be a little more effective than exercise therapy alone.

  12. A randomized controlled trial of aquatic and land-based exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, H.; Weile, U.; Christensen, R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of aquatic exercise and a land-based exercise programme vs control in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Primary outcome was change in pain, and in addition Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire (KOOS). Standing balance and strength...... was also measured after and at 3-month follow-up. Seventy-nine patients (62 women), with a mean age of 68 years (age range 40-89 years) were randomized to aquatic exercise (n = 27), land-based exercise (n = 25) or control (n = 27). Results: No effect was observed immediately after exercise cessation (8...... weeks). At 3-month follow-up a reduction in pain was observed only in the land-based exercise group compared with control (-8.1 mm, (95% confidence interval -15.4 to -0.4; p = 0. 039), but no differences between groups were observed for KOOS; and no improvement following aquatic exercise. Eleven...

  13. Effects of adding concentration therapy to Kegel exercise to improve continence after radical prostatectomy, randomized control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongtragul, Jaruwan; Tukhanon, Wanvara; Tudpudsa, Piyanuch; Suedee, Kanita; Tienchai, Supaporn; Leewansangtong, Sunai; Nualgyong, Chaiyong

    2014-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of pelvic floor muscle exercise with the concentration therapy versus pelvic floor muscle exercise alone after radical prostatectomy. One hundred thirty five patients were randomized into the intervention group that concentration therapy was added to Kegel exercise, and control group that was Kegel exercise only, using the stratified randomization (stratified by taking the catheter off before and after discharge) and type of surgery. Incontinence was defined as a loss of urine equal or more than to 2 grams in one-hour pad test, before and after the test in each sample group. Follow-up results were obtained by phone visit at 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks after surgery In the intervention group, 65 of 68 cases (95.6%) had continence in three months, compared to 48 of 67 (71.6%) in the control group, with significant statistical difference (p-value Kegel exercise had significantly improved continence after radical prostatectomy

  14. A comprehensive review of the effectiveness of different exercise programs for patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Yvonne M; Allen, Kelli D; Caine, Dennis J

    2012-11-01

    Exercise is recommended as a first-line conservative intervention approach for osteoarthritis (OA). A wide range of exercise programs are available and scientific evidence is necessary for choosing the optimal strategy of treatment for each patient. The purpose of this review is to discuss the effectiveness of different types of exercise programs for OA based on trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses in the literature. Publications from January 1997 to July 2012 were searched in 4 electronic databases using the terms osteoarthritis, exercise, exercise program, effectiveness, and treatment outcome. Strong evidence supports that aerobic and strengthening exercise programs, both land- and water-based, are beneficial for improving pain and physical function in adults with mild-to-moderate knee and hip OA. Areas that require further research include examination of the long-term effects of exercise programs for OA, balance training for OA, exercise programs for severe OA, the effect of exercise programs on progression of OA, the effectiveness of exercise for joint sites other than the knee or hip, and the effectiveness of exercise for OA by such factors as age, sex, and obesity. Efforts to improve adherence to evidence-based exercise programs for OA and to promote the dissemination and implementation of these programs are crucial.

  15. Aerobic Exercise Improves Cognitive Functioning in People With Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Brendon; Rosenbaum, Simon; Vancampfort, Davy; Malchow, Berend; Schuch, Felipe; Elliott, Rebecca; Nuechterlein, Keith H.; Yung, Alison R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cognitive deficits are pervasive among people with schizophrenia and treatment options are limited. There has been an increased interest in the neurocognitive benefits of exercise, but a comprehensive evaluation of studies to date is lacking. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis of all controlled trials investigating the cognitive outcomes of exercise interventions in schizophrenia. Studies were identified from a systematic search across major electronic databases from inception to April 2016. Meta-analyses were used to calculate pooled effect sizes (Hedges g) and 95% CIs. We identified 10 eligible trials with cognitive outcome data for 385 patients with schizophrenia. Exercise significantly improved global cognition (g = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.13–0.53, P = .001) with no statistical heterogeneity (I2 = 0%). The effect size in the 7 studies which were randomized controlled trials was g = 0.43 (P exercise are associated with larger improvements in global cognition (β = .005, P = .065). Interventions which were supervised by physical activity professionals were also more effective (g = 0.47, P Exercise significantly improved the cognitive domains of working memory (g = 0.39, P = .024, N = 7, n = 282), social cognition (g = 0.71, P = .002, N = 3, n = 81), and attention/vigilance (g = 0.66, P = .005, N = 3, n = 104). Effects on processing speed, verbal memory, visual memory and reasoning and problem solving were not significant. This meta-analysis provides evidence that exercise can improve cognitive functioning among people with schizophrenia, particularly from interventions using higher dosages of exercise. Given the challenges in improving cognition, and the wider health benefits of exercise, a greater focus on providing supervised exercise to people with schizophrenia is needed. PMID:27521348

  16. Aerobic Exercise Improves Cognitive Functioning in People With Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Joseph; Stubbs, Brendon; Rosenbaum, Simon; Vancampfort, Davy; Malchow, Berend; Schuch, Felipe; Elliott, Rebecca; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Yung, Alison R

    2017-05-01

    Cognitive deficits are pervasive among people with schizophrenia and treatment options are limited. There has been an increased interest in the neurocognitive benefits of exercise, but a comprehensive evaluation of studies to date is lacking. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis of all controlled trials investigating the cognitive outcomes of exercise interventions in schizophrenia. Studies were identified from a systematic search across major electronic databases from inception to April 2016. Meta-analyses were used to calculate pooled effect sizes (Hedges g) and 95% CIs. We identified 10 eligible trials with cognitive outcome data for 385 patients with schizophrenia. Exercise significantly improved global cognition (g = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.13-0.53, P = .001) with no statistical heterogeneity (I2 = 0%). The effect size in the 7 studies which were randomized controlled trials was g = 0.43 (P exercise are associated with larger improvements in global cognition (β = .005, P = .065). Interventions which were supervised by physical activity professionals were also more effective (g = 0.47, P Exercise significantly improved the cognitive domains of working memory (g = 0.39, P = .024, N = 7, n = 282), social cognition (g = 0.71, P = .002, N = 3, n = 81), and attention/vigilance (g = 0.66, P = .005, N = 3, n = 104). Effects on processing speed, verbal memory, visual memory and reasoning and problem solving were not significant. This meta-analysis provides evidence that exercise can improve cognitive functioning among people with schizophrenia, particularly from interventions using higher dosages of exercise. Given the challenges in improving cognition, and the wider health benefits of exercise, a greater focus on providing supervised exercise to people with schizophrenia is needed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  17. Aerobic Dance Exercise Improves Blood Glucose Level in Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aerobic Dance Exercise Improves Blood Glucose Level in Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. ... Thirty (30) of the participants completed the study and so only their data were analysed using Repeated Measure ANOVA and Independent t-test. Results of the study showed significant improvement in the ...

  18. Effect of treadmill testing and exercise training on self-efficacy in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Roberta K; DeMarco, Teresa; Haskell, William L

    2005-09-01

    Self-efficacy is a person's confidence in being able to successfully perform a specific activity or behavior. Self-efficacy has been shown to influence exercise capacity in patients post myocardial infarction, but has not been fully explored in patients with heart failure (HF). This study examined the impact of performance of a single treadmill exercise test and participation in a 3-month program of walking and resistance exercise on self-efficacy in HF patients. 24 patients were randomized to either a home-based walking and resistance exercise program or usual care for 3 months. Prior to enrollment into the exercise program all participants performed a single treadmill exercise test with respiratory gas analysis. Self-efficacy questionnaires were completed at 3 time points, 1) prior to performance of an exercise treadmill test; 2) immediately after completing an exercise test; and 3) at the end of a 3-month exercise program. Self-efficacy for walking (p=0.07), climbing (p=0.17), lifting (p=0.73) and general activity (p=0.15) did not improve after performance of a single treadmill exercise test and usual care. However, self-efficacy for walking increased after 3 months of a walking and resistance exercise program. (p=0.04). The findings from this study suggest that in patients with stable mild to moderate heart failure, self-efficacy is improved with participation in a home-based walking and endurance exercise program. Self-efficacy is not enhanced by performance of a single treadmill exercise test and usual care.

  19. The effect of exercise on coagulation and fibrinolysis factors in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patelis, Nikolaos; Karaolanis, Georgios; Kouvelos, Georgios N; Hart, Collin; Metheiken, Sean

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a widely prevalent atherosclerotic occlusive disorder. Symptoms commence with exercise-induced pain in the lower extremities, known as claudication. Despite the fact that exercise has been shown to improve fibrinolytic profile some patients, the effect of exercise on coagulation and fibrinolysis cascades in claudicants has not been comprehensively defined. Literature search in English language yielded 13 studies of exercise on claudicants, including 420 patients. Claudicants tend to have a higher coagulation activity at rest compared to healthy individuals, a trend that persists even after exercise. Post-exercise coagulation activity of claudicants is increased when compared to their respective baseline levels, but it is so in a non-consistent manner. From the available data, it has been suggested that claudicants have a functional and effective fibrinolytic mechanism in place, operating continuously at a relatively higher activity level compared to healthy individuals. Fibrinolysis seems to be activated by exercise; a positive outcome with a prolonged effect as shown by a few of the studies. A final conclusion whether coagulation or fibrinolysis activity is affected mostly by exercise type and intensity in claudicants could not be answered. All conclusions regarding the effect of exercise on the coagulation and fibrinolysis mechanisms should be taken under cautious consideration, due to the limited number of studies, the small number of patients and the different exercise strategies employed in each study. Further randomized studies with similar exercise protocols could provide safer conclusions in the future. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  20. The effect of modified bridge exercise on balance ability of stroke patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Song, Gui-bin; Heo, Ju-young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to verify the effects of a modified bridging exercise on stroke patients with improvement in weight bearing on the affected side in standing and static balancing ability. [Subjects...

  1. Benefits from aerobic exercise in patients with major depression: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Dimeo, F; Bauer, M.; Varahram, I; Proest, G; Halter, U

    2001-01-01

    Background—Several reports indicate that physical activity can reduce the severity of symptoms in depressed patients. Some data suggest that even a single exercise bout may result in a substantial mood improvement.

  2. A prospective 2-site parallel intervention trial of a research-based film to increase exercise amongst older hemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kontos, Pia; Alibhai, Shabbir M.H.; Miller, Karen-Lee; Brooks, Dina; Colobong, Romeo; Parsons, Trisha; Jassal, Sarbjit Vanita; Thomas, Alison; Binns, Malcolm; Naglie, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that exercise training for hemodialysis patients positively improves morbidity and mortality outcomes, yet exercise programs remain rare and are not systematically incorporated into care. We developed a research-based film, Fit for Dialysis, designed to introduce, motivate, and sustain exercise for wellness amongst older hemodialysis patients, and exercise counseling and support by nephrologists, nurses, and family caregivers. The objective of this clinical trial ...

  3. Effects of tiotropium on sympathetic activation during exercise in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitada S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Kenji Yoshimura, Ryoji Maekura, Toru Hiraga, Seigo Kitada, Keisuke Miki, Mari Miki, Yoshitaka TateishiDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Toneyama National Hospital, Osaka, JapanBackground: Tiotropium partially relieves exertional dyspnea and reduces the risk of congestive heart failure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients. However, its effect on the sympathetic activation response to exercise is unknown.Aims: This study aimed to determine whether tiotropium use results in a sustained reduction in sympathetic activation during exercise.Methods: We conducted a 12-week, open-label (treatments: tiotropium 18 µg or oxitropium 0.2 mg × 3 mg, crossover study in 17 COPD patients. Treatment order was randomized across subjects. The subjects underwent a pulmonary function test and two modes of cardiopulmonary exercise (constant work rate and incremental exercise testing using a cycle ergometer, with measurement of arterial catecholamines after each treatment period.Results: Forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity were significantly larger in the tiotropium treatment group. In constant exercise testing, exercise endurance time was longer, with improvement in dyspnea during exercise and reduction in dynamic hyperinflation in the tiotropium treatment group. Similarly, in incremental exercise testing, exercise time, carbon dioxide production, and minute ventilation at peak exercise were significantly higher in the tiotropium treatment group. Plasma norepinephrine concentrations and dyspnea intensity were also lower during submaximal isotime exercise and throughout the incremental workload exercise in the tiotropium treatment group.Conclusion: Tiotropium suppressed the increase of sympathetic activation during exercise at the end of the 6-week treatment, as compared with the effect of oxipropium. This effect might be attributed to improvement in lung function and exercise capacity and reduction in exertional dyspnea

  4. IMPROVING PATIENT SAFETY:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Taylor Kelly, Hélène; Hørdam, Britta

    Every year millions of patients worldwide suffer injury or death due to unsafe care, thus improving patient safety is both a national and international priority. A developmental project involving University College Zealand and clinical partners in the region focused upon the improvement of patient...... with respect to the prevention of clinical errors - Theoretical teaching intervention - Evaluation of effects of theoretical teaching intervention following the intervention and after 1 year - Quantitative and qualitative data collected in both the educational and clinical settings using a before and after...

  5. IMPROVING PATIENT SAFETY:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Taylor Kelly, Hélène; Hørdam, Britta

    Improving patient safety is both a national and international priority as millions of patients Worldwide suffer injury or death every year due to unsafe care. University College Zealand employs innovative pedagogical approaches in educational design. Regional challenges related to geographic......, social and cultural factors have resulted in a greater emphasis upon digital technology. Attempts to improve patient safety by optimizing students’ competencies in relation to the reporting of clinical errors, has resulted in the development of an interdisciplinary e-learning concept. The program makes...

  6. Post-Exercise Neurovascular Control in Chronic Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, T S; Groehs, R V; Azevedo, L F; Antunes-Correa, L M; Martinez, D G; Alves, M J N N; Negrao, C E

    2016-12-01

    It remains unknown whether or not a reduction in muscle sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure patients is associated over time with the effects of long- or short-term repeated exercise. 10 chronic heart failure patients, age 49±3 years old, functional class I-III NYHA, ejection fraction exercise OR high-intensity interval exercise. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) and forearm blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography) were evaluated pre- and post-exercise sessions. The moderate exercise consisted of cycle exercise at an intensity corresponding to anaerobic threshold. The interval exercise consisted of a 2-min cycle exercise at intensity corresponding to anaerobic threshold, followed by a 1-min exercise set at respiratory compensation point. Exercise capacity was evaluated by cardiopulmonary exercise test. The caloric expenditure in both sessions was 100 kcal. Baseline muscle sympathetic nerve activity and forearm blood flow levels were not different between sessions. Moderate or high-intensity exercise caused no significant changes in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and forearm blood flow. These findings suggest that the reduction in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and the increase in forearm blood flow provoked by exercise training in chronic heart failure patients are due to cumulative effects over time. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Improvement in exercise duration, lung function and well-being in G551D-cystic fibrosis patients: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over study with ivacaftor treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgeworth, Deirdre; Keating, Dominic; Ellis, Matthew; Button, Brenda; Williams, Elyssa; Clark, Denise; Tierney, Audrey; Heritier, Stephane; Kotsimbos, Tom; Wilson, John

    2017-08-01

    G551D, a mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, results in impaired chloride channel function in cystic fibrosis (CF) with multiple end-organ manifestations. The effect of ivacaftor, a CFTR-potentiator, on exercise capacity in CF is unknown. Twenty G551D-CF patients were recruited to a single-centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 28-day crossover study of ivacaftor. Variables measured included percentage change from baseline (%Δ) of VO2max (maximal oxygen consumption, primary outcome) during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), relevant other CPET physiological variables, lung function, body mass index (BMI), sweat chloride and disease-specific health related quality of life (QOL) measures (CFQ-R and Alfred Wellness (AWEscore)). %ΔVO2max was unchanged compared with placebo as was %Δminute ventilation. However, %Δexercise time (mean 7.3, CI 0.5-14,1, P=0.0222) significantly increased as did %ΔFEV1 (11.7%, range 5.3-18.1, P<0·005) and %ΔBMI (1.2%, range 0.1-2.3, P=0·0393) whereas sweat chloride decreased (mean -43.4; range -55.5-18.1 mmol·l-1, P<0·005). Total and activity based domains in both CFQ-R and AWEscore also increased. A positive treatment effect on spirometry, BMI (increased), SCT (decreased) and total and activity based CF-specific QOL measures was expected. However, the lack of discernible improvement in VO2max and VE despite other positive changes including spirometric lung function and exercise time with a 28-day ivacaftor intervention suggests that ventilatory parameters are not the sole driver of change in exercise capacity in this study cohort. Investigation over a more prolonged period may delineate the potential interdependencies of the observed discordances over time. ClinicalTrials.gov-NCT01937325. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Telemonitoring of home exercise cycle training in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franke KJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Karl-Josef Franke,1,2 Ulrike Domanski,1 Maik Schroeder,1 Volker Jansen,3 Frank Artmann,4 Uwe Weber,5 Rainer Ettler,6 Georg Nilius1,2 1Department of Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Helios Klinik Ambrock, Hagen, 2Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, 3Lung Practice Jansen, Menden, 4Aeroprax Wuppertal, Wuppertal, 5Lung Practice Witten, Witten, 6Lung Practice Ettler, Hagen, Germany Background: Regular physical activity is associated with reduced mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Interventions to reduce time spent in sedentary behavior could improve outcomes. The primary purpose was to investigate the impact of telemonitoring with supportive phone calls on daily exercise times with newly established home exercise bicycle training. The secondary aim was to examine the potential improvement in health-related quality of life and physical activity compared to baseline. Methods: This prospective crossover-randomized study was performed over 6 months in stable COPD patients. The intervention phase (domiciliary training with supporting telephone calls and the control phase (training without phone calls were randomly assigned to the first or the last 3 months. In the intervention phase, patients were called once a week if they did not achieve a real-time monitored daily cycle time of 20 minutes. Secondary aims were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Health-related quality of life was measured by the COPD Assessment Test (CAT, physical activity by the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ. Results: Of the 53 included patients, 44 patients completed the study (forced expiratory volume in 1 second 47.5%±15.8% predicted. In the intervention phase, daily exercise time was significantly higher compared to the control phase (24.2±9.4 versus 19.6±10.3 minutes. Compared to baseline (17.6±6.1, the CAT-score improved in the intervention phase to 15.3±7.6 and in the control phase to 15.7±7.3

  9. Heart rate recovery and aerobic endurance capacity in cancer survivors: interdependence and exercise-induced improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Daniel; Vogt, Lutz; Gonzalez-Rivera, Javier; Schmidt, Katharina; Banzer, Winfried

    2015-12-01

    Whilst evidence supports beneficial effects of exercise on heart rate variability in cancer patients, its impact on heart rate recovery (HRR) and possible associations of exercise capacity and HRR have not yet been investigated. We aimed to evaluate the effects of an exercise intervention on HRR in relation to the baseline aerobic capacity. Cancer patients (n = 309, 178 females) performed a cardiopulmonary exercise test at baseline and at a 4-month interval follow-up with home-based and supervised exercise programs in-between. VO2 and heart rate were assessed during and HRR at 60 and 120 s after test termination. Based on a median split of the VO2 peak baseline values, participants were dichotomized into two groups: below median (47 female; 57.5 ± 10 years) and above median (48 female; 54.3 ± 12 years). In the baseline sample (n = 309), VO2 peak correlated significantly with HRR60 (r = .327, p  .05). These findings point toward a positive linear relationship between aerobic capacity and vagal reactivation in cancer patients. Patients with initial VO2 peak values below median showed improved VO2 peak, HRR60 and HRR120 following the moderate aerobic exercise intervention and differences to patients above median in all outcomes compared.

  10. Effectiveness of a graded exercise therapy program for patients with chronic shoulder complaints.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraets, J.J.; Goossens, M.E.J.B.; Groot, I.J.M. de; Bruijn, C.P. de; Bie, R.A. de; Dinant, G.J.; Heijden, G.W. van der; Heuvel, W.J.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    An operant behavioural and time-contingent graded exercise therapy program was developed to improve functional ability irrespective of pain experience in patients with chronic shoulder complaints. The clinical effectiveness of graded exercise therapy compared to usual care was evaluated in a

  11. Exercise training in pediatric patients with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Bergen (Monique); T. Takken (Tim); R.H.H. Engelbert (Raoul); J. Groothoff (Jaap); J. Nauta (Jeroen); J. van Hoeck (Koen); P. Helders (Paul); M. Lilien (Marc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of an exercise training program to improve exercise capacity and fatigue level in pediatric patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Twenty children on dialysis intended to perform a 12-week graded

  12. Feasibility of Exercise Training in Cancer Patients Scheduled for Elective Gastrointestinal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, Karin; Trappenburg, Jaap C.A.; Schippers, Carlo C.; Wanders, Lisa; Lemmens, Lidwien; Backx, Frank J.G.; Hillegersberg, van Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study examines the feasibility of a preoperative exercise program to improve the physical fitness of a patient before gastrointestinal surgery. Methods: An outpatient exercise program was developed to increase preoperative aerobic capacity, peripheral muscle endurance and

  13. A self-directed adherence management program for patients with heart failure completing combined aerobic and resistance exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kathleen; Pozehl, Bunny; Norman, Joseph F; Hertzog, Melody

    2011-11-01

    This study measured the impact of the Exercise Adherence Management Program (EAMP) provided to 20 patients with heart failure (HF) who participated in a combined resistance and aerobic exercise training program during two 12-week phases. The EAMP included strategies designed to support exercise self-efficacy and adherence. Results indicate that an improvement in exercise self-efficacy occurred during the study period, whereas exercise adherence declined during the unsupervised phase. The highest rated adherence strategy for helpfulness and self-efficacy was group sessions. The study supports the use of adherence strategies based on self-efficacy in exercise programs for patients with HF. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Knowledge, barriers and facilitators of exercise in dialysis patients: a qualitative study of patients, staff and nephrologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhamb, Manisha; McNulty, Mary L; Ingalsbe, Gerald; Childers, Julie W; Schell, Jane; Conroy, Molly B; Forman, Daniel E; Hergenroeder, Andrea; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2016-11-24

    Despite growing evidence on benefits of increased physical activity in hemodialysis (HD) patients and safety of intra-dialytic exercise, it is not part of standard clinical care, resulting in a missed opportunity to improve clinical outcomes in these patients. To develop a successful exercise program for HD patients, it is critical to understand patients', staff and nephrologists' knowledge, barriers, motivators and preferences for patient exercise. In-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of HD patients, staff and nephrologists from 4 dialysis units. The data collection, analysis and interpretation followed Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research guidelines. Using grounded theory, emergent themes were identified, discussed and organized into major themes and subthemes. We interviewed 16 in-center HD patients (mean age 60 years, 50% females, 63% blacks), 14 dialysis staff members (6 nurses, 3 technicians, 2 dietitians, 1 social worker, 2 unit administrators) and 6 nephrologists (50% females, 50% in private practice). Although majority of the participants viewed exercise as beneficial for overall health, most patients failed to recognize potential mental health benefits. Most commonly reported barriers to exercise were dialysis-related fatigue, comorbid health conditions and lack of motivation. Specifically for intra-dialytic exercise, participants expressed concern over safety and type of exercise, impact on staff workload and resistance to changing dialysis routine. One of the most important motivators identified was support from friends, family and health care providers. Specific recommendations for an intra-dialytic exercise program included building a culture of exercise in the dialysis unit, and providing an individualized engaging program that incorporates education and incentives for exercising. Patients, staff and nephrologists perceive a number of barriers to exercise, some of which may be modifiable. Participants desired an

  15. IMPROVEMENTS IN PSYCHOSOCIAL FUNCTIONING AND HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE FOLLOWING EXERCISE AUGMENTATION IN PATIENTS WITH TREATMENT RESPONSE BUT NONREMITTED MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER: RESULTS FROM THE TREAD STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Tracy L; Trombello, Joseph M; Rethorst, Chad D; Carmody, Thomas J; Jha, Manish K; Liao, Allen; Grannemann, Bruce D; Chambliss, Heather O; Church, Timothy S; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2016-09-01

    Functional impairments often remain despite symptomatic improvement with antidepressant treatment, supporting the need for novel treatment approaches. The present study examined the extent to which exercise augmentation improved several domains of psychosocial functioning and quality of life (QoL) among depressed participants. Data were collected from 122 partial responders to antidepressant medication. Participants were randomized to either high- (16 kcal/kg of weight/week [KKW]) or low-dose (4-KKW) exercise. Participants completed a combination of supervised and home-based exercise for 12 weeks. The Short-Form Health Survey, Work and Social Adjustment Scale, Social Adjustment Scale, Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire, and Satisfaction with Life Scale were collected at 6 and 12 weeks. Participants with data for at least one of the two follow-up time points (n = 106) were analyzed using a linear mixed model to assess change from baseline within groups and the difference between groups for each psychosocial outcome measure. All analyses controlled for covariates, including baseline depressive symptomatology. Participants experienced significant improvements in functioning across tested domains, and generally fell within a healthy range of functioning on all measures at Weeks 6 and 12. Although no differences were found between exercise groups, improvements were observed across a variety of psychosocial and QoL domains, even in the low-dose exercise group. These findings support exercise augmentation of antidepressant treatment as a viable intervention for treatment-resistant depression to improve function in addition to symptoms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Improvements in psychosocial functioning and health-related quality of life following exercise augmentation in patients with treatment response but non-remitted major depressive disorder: Results from the TREAD study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Tracy L.; Trombello, Joseph M.; Rethorst, Chad D.; Carmody, Thomas J.; Jha, Manish K.; Liao, Allen; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Chambliss, Heather O.; Church, Timothy S.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Functional impairments often remain despite symptomatic improvement with antidepressant treatment, supporting the need for novel treatment approaches. The present study examined the extent to which exercise augmentation improved several domains of psychosocial functioning and quality of life among depressed participants. METHODS Data were collected from 122 partial responders to antidepressant medication. Participants were randomized to either high (16 kilocalories per kilogram of weight per week [KKW]) or low dose (4KKW) exercise. Participants completed a combination of supervised and home-based exercise for 12 weeks. The Short-Form Health Survey, Work and Social Adjustment Scale, Social Adjustment Scale, the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale were collected at 6 and 12 weeks. Participants with data for at least one of the two follow-up time points (n=106) were analyzed using a linear mixed model to assess change from baseline within groups and the difference between groups for each psychosocial outcome measure. All analyses controlled for covariates, including baseline depressive symptomatology. RESULTS Participants experienced significant improvements in functioning across tested domains, and generally fell within a healthy range of functioning on all measures at Weeks 6 and 12. While no differences were found between exercise groups, improvements were observed across a variety of psychosocial and quality-of-life domains, even in the low exercise dose group. CONCLUSIONS These findings support exercise augmentation of antidepressant treatment as a viable intervention for treatment-resistant depression to improve function in addition to symptoms. PMID:27164293

  17. Which is better in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, core stability exercises or conventional exercises?

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xibo; Gao, Qian; Dou, Honglei; Tang, Shujie

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine which is better in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, core stability exercises or conventional exercises. [Subjects and Methods] Forty participants with hemiplegia were recruited in the Department of Neurology of Yidu Central Hospital of Weifang between January 2014 and February 2015 and randomly divided into either an experimental or control group. The patients in the control group performed conventional exercises for six weeks, and those ...

  18. Recovery of overall exercise ability, quality of life, and continence after 12-week combined exercise intervention in elderly patients who underwent radical prostatectomy: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Tae Nam; Nam, Jong-Kil; Ha, Hong Koo; Shin, Dong Gil; Lee, Wan; Kim, Mi-Sook; Chung, Moon Kee

    2012-08-01

    To examine the changes from a combined exercise intervention after radical prostatectomy (RP) in elderly patients with prostate cancer, because randomized controlled trials addressing exercise intervention after RP have been lacking. From May 2009 to May 2010, all patients who underwent laparoscopic RP were assessed for eligibility. A total of 66 patients were randomized to an exercise or a control group. The exercise group received a combined exercise intervention (resistance, flexibility, and Kegel exercises) twice a week for 12 weeks, and the control group received only Kegel exercises. The primary outcome was physical function, and the secondary outcomes were continence status and quality of life after the exercise intervention. A total of 49 patients completed follow-up to the end of study. After the 12-week exercise intervention, except for grip strength, all physical functions were better in the exercise group than in the control group. The 24-hour pad test results (12.2 g in the exercise group, 46.2 g in the control group) and continence rate (73.1% in exercise group, 43.5% in the control group) recovered more promptly in the exercise group. On a questionnaire study using the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey, only the exercise group showed improvement at the last follow-up visit. A 12-week combined exercise intervention after RP results in improvement of physical function, continence rate, and quality of life. These results could help with prompt recovery of daily activities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Regular exercise and related factors in patients with Parkinson's disease: Applying zero-inflated negative binomial modeling of exercise count data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuHee; Park, Chang Gi; Choi, Moonki

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to identify risk factors that influence regular exercise among patients with Parkinson's disease in Korea. Parkinson's disease is prevalent in the elderly, and may lead to a sedentary lifestyle. Exercise can enhance physical and psychological health. However, patients with Parkinson's disease are less likely to exercise than are other populations due to physical disability. A secondary data analysis and cross-sectional descriptive study were conducted. A convenience sample of 106 patients with Parkinson's disease was recruited at an outpatient neurology clinic of a tertiary hospital in Korea. Demographic characteristics, disease-related characteristics (including disease duration and motor symptoms), self-efficacy for exercise, balance, and exercise level were investigated. Negative binomial regression and zero-inflated negative binomial regression for exercise count data were utilized to determine factors involved in exercise. The mean age of participants was 65.85 ± 8.77 years, and the mean duration of Parkinson's disease was 7.23 ± 6.02 years. Most participants indicated that they engaged in regular exercise (80.19%). Approximately half of participants exercised at least 5 days per week for 30 min, as recommended (51.9%). Motor symptoms were a significant predictor of exercise in the count model, and self-efficacy for exercise was a significant predictor of exercise in the zero model. Severity of motor symptoms was related to frequency of exercise. Self-efficacy contributed to the probability of exercise. Symptom management and improvement of self-efficacy for exercise are important to encourage regular exercise in patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces exercise-induced perceived pain and improves endurance exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astokorki, Ali H Y; Mauger, Alexis R

    2017-03-01

    Muscle pain is a natural consequence of intense and prolonged exercise and has been suggested to be a limiter of performance. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and interferential current (IFC) have been shown to reduce both chronic and acute pain in a variety of conditions. This study sought to ascertain whether TENS and IFC could reduce exercise-induced pain (EIP) and whether this would affect exercise performance. It was hypothesised that TENS and IFC would reduce EIP and result in an improved exercise performance. In two parts, 18 (Part I) and 22 (Part II) healthy male and female participants completed an isometric contraction of the dominant bicep until exhaustion (Part I) and a 16.1 km cycling time trial as quickly as they could (Part II) whilst receiving TENS, IFC, and a SHAM placebo in a repeated measures, randomised cross-over, and placebo-controlled design. Perceived EIP was recorded in both tasks using a validated subjective scale. In Part I, TENS significantly reduced perceived EIP (mean reduction of 12%) during the isometric contraction (P = 0.006) and significantly improved participants' time to exhaustion by a mean of 38% (P = 0.02). In Part II, TENS significantly improved (P = 0.003) participants' time trial completion time (~2% improvement) through an increased mean power output. These findings demonstrate that TENS can attenuate perceived EIP in a healthy population and that doing so significantly improves endurance performance in both submaximal isometric single limb exercise and whole-body dynamic exercise.

  1. Endurance exercise training to improve economy of movement of people with Parkinson disease: three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkman, Margaret; Hall, Deborah; Kumar, Rajeev; Kohrt, Wendy M

    2008-01-01

    Even early in Parkinson disease (PD), individuals have reduced economy of movement. In this case report, the effects of endurance exercise training are examined on walking economy and other measures for 3 individuals in early and middle stages of PD. The patients were 1 woman and 2 men with PD, aged 52 to 72 years, classified at Hoehn and Yahr stages 2 to 2.5. Each patient completed 4 months of supervised endurance exercise training and 12 months of home exercise, with monthly clinic follow-up sessions. Strategies were included to enhance adherence to exercise. The main outcome measure was economy of movement (rate of oxygen consumption during gait) measured at 4 treadmill speeds. Secondary outcome measures included the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance Test (CS-PFP), Functional Reach Test (FRT), and Functional Axial Rotation Test (FAR). Economy of movement improved for all 3 patients after 4 months of supervised exercise and remained above baseline at 16 months. Two patients also had scores that were above baseline for UPDRS total score, CS-PFP, FRT, and FAR, even at 16 months. : Evidence from these 3 individuals suggests that gains may occur with a treadmill training program that is coupled with specific strategies to enhance adherence to exercise.

  2. Does Improving Exercise Capacity and Daily Activity Represent the Holistic Perspective of a New COPD Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Fabiano; Santus, Pierachille; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Blasi, Francesco; Centanni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In COPD patients a reduced daily activity has been well documented, resulting from both respiratory and non-respiratory manifestations of the disease. An evaluation by multisensory armband has confirmed that daily physical activity is mainly associated with dynamic hyperinflation, regardless of COPD severity. This aspect is crucial, since exercise capacity is closely correlated to life expectancy. Notwithstanding the causal key role of lung impairment in the patient's symptoms, some authors have suggested that other factors, such as systemic inflammation and co-morbidities, have an important role, particularly as mortality risk factors. Many studies suggest the efficacy of bronchodilators and rehabilitation in improving exercise capacity, and, speaking in terms of daily life, in increasing the number of days in which patients are able to perform their usual activities. On this evidence, the first aim in the management of COPD should be to improve exercise capacity and daily activity since these outcomes have direct effects on patients' quality of life, co-morbidities (heart and metabolic diseases), and prognosis. Thus, improving physical activity represents a modern approach aimed at dealing with both pulmonary and systemic manifestations of the disease. It is however worth of notice to remember that in patients affected by COPD the relationship between the improvement of "potential" exercise capacity and daily physical activity has been found to be only moderate to weak. Obtaining a significant behavior modification with regard to daily physical activity, together with the optimization of therapy thus represents currently the true challenge.

  3. Simultaneous dipyridamole/maximal subjective exercise with 99mTc-MIBI SPECT: improved diagnostic yield in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candell-Riera, J; Santana-Boado, C; Castell-Conesa, J; Aguadé-Bruix, S; Olona, M; Palet, J; Cortadellas, J; García-Burillo, A; Soler-Soler, J

    1997-03-01

    We attempted to demonstrate that simultaneous dipyridamole administration and maximal subjective exercise in patients who are unable to achieve a good exercise level can improve the diagnostic efficacy of technetium-99m methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The results of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy are unsatisfactory if the level of exercise achieved by the patient is insufficient. The use of dipyridamole with maximal subjective stress testing has been shown to improve the quality of the thallium-201 myocardial perfusion images, but there are no studies demonstrating that this combination improves the diagnostic accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT. Two hundred thirty-one consecutive patients, without a previous myocardial infarction, were classified into three groups: group 1, 91 patients with an adequate exercise test; group 2, 68 patients with an inadequate exercise test; group 3, 72 patients with an inadequate exercise test who then received intravenous dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg body weight over 4 min) simultaneously with exercise. Results for sensitivity (89%) and negative predictive value (83%) in group 3 were significantly better than those in group 2 (71% [p = 0.03] and 56% [p = 0.002], respectively) and not significantly different from those in group 1. The polar maps of 20 patients studied with an without dipyridamole at the same exercise level revealed a significantly greater extent of ischemia in each territory and in a global assessment (19 + 20% vs. 8 + 11%, p < 0.0001) when dipyridamole was administered during physical exercise. Intravenous dipyridamole administration during exercise testing is advisable in all patients who are unable to achieve an adequate exercise level. This approach permits physicians to avoid missing ergometric information while optimizing myocardial SPECT results.

  4. Oxygen-assisted exercise training in adult cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary limitation to exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijerman, H. G.; Bakker, W.; Sterk, P. J.; Dijkman, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Exercise training has been considered suitable only in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with mild to moderate pulmonary dysfunction without progressive hypoxaemia during exercise. We trained 16 CF patients, all with advanced lung disease (mean standardized forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), 30%

  5. Post-exercise hypotension and heart rate variability response after water- and land-ergometry exercise in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Bergamin, Marco; Evangelista, Alexandre Lopes; Rica, Roberta Luksevicius; Pontes, Francisco Luciano; Figueira, Aylton; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Rossi, Emilly Martinelli; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Dos Santos, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    systemic arterial hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease; physical activity for hypertensive patients is related to several beneficial cardiovascular adaptations. This paper evaluated the effect of water- and land-ergometry exercise sessions on post-exercise hypotension (PEH) of healthy normotensive subjects versus treated or untreated hypertensive patients. Forty-five older women composed three experimental groups: normotensive (N, n = 10), treated hypertensive (TH, n = 15) and untreated hypertensive (UH, n = 20). The physical exercise acute session protocol was performed at 75% of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) for 45 minutes; systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MBP) blood pressure were evaluated at rest, peak and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 minutes after exercise cessation. Additionally, the heart rate variability (HRV) was analyzed by R-R intervals in the frequency domain for the assessment of cardiac autonomic function. In both exercise modalities, equivalent increases in SBP were observed from rest to peak exercise for all groups, and during recovery, significant PEH was noted. At 90 minutes after the exercise session, the prevalence of hypotension was significantly higher in water- than in the land-based protocol. Moreover, more pronounced reductions in SBP and DBP were observed in the UH patients compared to TH and N subjects. Finally, exercise in the water was more effective in restoring HRV during recovery, with greater effects in the untreated hypertensive group. Our data demonstrated that water-ergometry exercise was able to induce expressive PEH and improve cardiac autonomic modulation in older normotensive, hypertensive treated or hypertensive untreated subjects when compared to conventional land-ergometry.

  6. Acute exercise improves motor memory consolidation in preadolescent children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Skriver, Kasper Christen; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The ability to acquire new motor skills is essential both during childhood and later in life. Recent studies have demonstrated that an acute bout of exercise can improve motor memory consolidation in adults. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether acute exercise...... protocols following motor skill practice in a school setting can also improve long-term retention of motor memory in preadolescent children. Methods: Seventy-seven pre-adolescent children (age 10.5 ± 0.75 (SD)) participated in the study. Prior to the main experiment age, BMI, fitness status and general...... physical activity level was assessed in all children and they were then randomly allocated to three groups. All children practiced a visuomotor tracking task followed by 20 min of rest (CON), high intensity intermittent floorball (FLB) or running (RUN) with comparable exercise intensity and duration...

  7. Exercise recommendations in patients with newly diagnosed fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brad; Spencer, Horace; Kortebein, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate exercise recommendations in patients newly diagnosed with fibromyalgia. A retrospective chart review. A public university rheumatology clinic. Patients newly diagnosed with fibromyalgia (N = 122). Frequency and type of exercise recommendations. The mean (standard deviation) age of these patients with fibromyalgia was 45 ± 12 years; 91% were women. Exercise was recommended as part of the documented treatment plan in 47% of these patients (57/122); only 3 patients had a documented contraindication for exercise. Aquatic exercise was most frequently recommended (56% [32/57]), followed by combined aquatic-aerobic exercise (26% [15/57]), and, infrequently, aerobic exercise only (5% [3/57]); only 7% of these patients (4/57) were referred for physical therapy. The primary method of communication was verbal discussion (94% [54/57]). Although there is well-documented evidence that exercise is beneficial for patients with fibromyalgia, we found that less than half of patients with newly diagnosed fibromyalgia in our study were provided recommendations to initiate an exercise program as part of their treatment plan. Further investigation of these findings are warranted, including evaluation of other university and community rheumatology practices as well as that of other physicians caring for patients with fibromyalgia. However, our findings indicate that there appears to be an opportunity to provide more specific and practical education regarding the implementation of an exercise regimen for patients with newly diagnosed fibromyalgia. Physiatrists may be particularly well suited to manage the exercise component of patients with fibromyalgia because of their specialized training in exercise prescription. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acceptance and commitment therapy improves exercise tolerance in sedentary women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Elena; Jensen, Dennis; Cassoff, Jamie; Gu, Fei; Knäuper, Bärbel

    2015-06-01

    To test the efficacy of an acute intervention derived from acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for increasing high-intensity constant work rate (CWR) cycle exercise tolerance in a group of low-active women age 18-45 yr. The secondary goals were to examine whether ACT would reduce perceived effort and improve in-task affect during exercise and increase postexercise enjoyment. In a randomized controlled trial, 39 women were randomized to either the experimental (using ACT-based cognitive techniques and listening to music during the CWR exercise tests) or a control group (listening to music during the CWR exercise tests). Before (CWR-1) and after the intervention (CWR-2), participants completed a CWR cycle exercise test at 80% of maximal incremental work rate (Wmax) until volitional exhaustion. On average, ACT (n = 18) and control (n = 21) groups were matched for age, body mass index, weekly leisure activity scores, and Wmax (all P > 0.05). Exercise tolerance time (ETT) increased by 15% from CWR-1 to CWR-2 for the ACT group (392.05 ± 146.4 vs 459.39 ± 209.3 s; mean ± SD) and decreased by 8% (384.71 ± 120.1 vs 353.86 ± 127.9 s) for the control group (P = 0.008). RPE were lower (e.g., by 1.5 Borg 6-20 scale units at 55% of ETT, P ≤ 0.01) during CWR-2 in the ACT versus that in the control group. By contrast, ACT had no effect on in-task affect. Exercise enjoyment was higher after CWR-2 in the ACT group versus that in the control group (P effective intervention for enhancing the established health benefits of high-intensity exercise need to be provided.

  9. Exercise Combined with Rhodiola sacra Supplementation Improves Exercise Capacity and Ameliorates Exhaustive Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage through Enhancement of Mitochondrial Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoshan Dun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence has firmly established that increased exercise capacity (EC is associated with considerable improvements in the survival of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD and that antistress capacity is a prognostic predictor of adverse cardiovascular events in patients with CVD. Previous studies have indicated that aerobic exercise (AE and supplementation with Rhodiola sacra (RS, a natural plant pharmaceutical, improve EC and enable resistance to stress; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study explored the ability of AE and RS, alone or combined, to improve EC and ameliorate exhaustive exercise- (EE- induced stress and elucidate the mechanism involved. We found that AE and RS significantly increased EC in mice and ameliorated EE-induced stress damage in skeletal and cardiac muscles (SCM; furthermore, a synergistic effect was detected for the first time. To our knowledge, the present work is the first to report that AE and RS activate mitophagy, mitochondrial dynamics, and biogenesis in SCM, both in the resting state and after EE. These data indicate that AE and RS synergistically improve EC in mice and protect SCM from EE-induced stress by enhancing mitochondrial quality control, including the activation of mitophagy, mitochondrial dynamics, and biogenesis, both at rest and after EE.

  10. A Qualitative Study to Explore Patient and Staff Perceptions of Intradialytic Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephanie; Tonelli, Marcello; Klarenbach, Scott; Molzahn, Anita

    2016-06-06

    Randomized, controlled trials show that regular exercise is beneficial for patients on hemodialysis. Intradialytic exercise may have additional benefits, such as amelioration of treatment-related symptoms. However, the factors that influence the implementation of intradialytic exercise are largely unknown. Individual semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of patients on hemodialysis who had participated in a pilot randomized, controlled trial on intradialytic exercise and dialysis staff that worked in the unit during the trial. The trial took place from July to December of 2014 and enrolled 31 patients. Interviews were conducted from April to December of 2014. Interview coding followed an inductive and broad-based approach. Thematic analysis was used to group codes into common themes, first individually and then, across staff and patient interviews. Twenty-five patients and 11 staff were interviewed. Three themes common to both groups emerged: support, norms (expected practices) within the dialysis unit, and the role of the dialysis nurse. The support of the kinesiologist enhanced patients' confidence and sense of capability and was a key component of implementation. However, the practice of initiating exercise at the start of the shift was a barrier to staff participation. Staff focused on the technical aspects of their role in intradialytic exercise, whereas patients viewed encouragement and assistance with intradialytic exercise as the staff's role. An additional theme of no time (for staff to participate in intradialytic exercise) was influenced by its low priority in their workflow and the demands of the unit. The staff's emphasis on patients setting up their own equipment and enhanced social interaction among participants were additional themes that conveyed the unintended consequences of the intervention. The kinesiologist-patient interactions and staff readiness for intradialytic exercise were important factors in the

  11. Effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on respiratory function and trunk control ability in patients with scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jwa Jun; Song, Gui Bin; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on the respiratory function and trunk control ability of patients with scoliosis. [Subjects] Forty scoliosis patients were randomly divided into the Swiss ball exercise group (n= 20) and resistance exercise group (n = 20). [Methods] The Swiss ball and resistance exercise groups performed chest expansion and breathing exercises with a Swiss ball and a therapist?s resistance, respectively. Both groups recei...

  12. Motives for physical exercise participation as a basis for the development of patient-oriented exercise interventions in osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Inga; Katzmarek, Uwe; Rieger, Monika A; Sudeck, Gorden

    2017-08-01

    Physical exercises are effective in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). There is consensus that exercise interventions should take into account the patient's preferences and needs in order to improve compliance to exercise regimes. One important personal factor is the patient's motivation for physical exercise. Health improvement is a relevant motive for exercise participation. Accordingly, exercise interventions primarily focus on health related needs such as strengthening and pain reduction. However exercising provides further many-faceted incentives that may foster exercise adherence. The present study aimed to characterize target groups for person-tailored exercise interventions in OA according to the International Classification of Functioning and Disability and Health (ICF). Target groups should be classified by similar individual exercise participation motive profiles and further described by their disease-related symptoms, limitations and psychological determinants of exercise behavior. Observational study via self-administered questionnaires. Community. We enrolled 292 adults with hip/knee OA living independently of assistance. Participants completed the Bernese Motive and Goal Inventory in Leisure and Health Sports (BMZI), the Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire for Osteoarthritis, the WOMAC-Index (pain/stiffness), the General Self-efficacy Scale and a questionnaire on perceived barriers to exercise participation. The BMZI-scales served as active variables for cluster analysis (Ward's method), other scales were used as passive variables to further describe the identified clusters. Four clusters were defined using five exercise participation motives: health, body/appearance, esthetics, nature, and contact. Based on the identified motive profiles the target groups are labelled health-focused sports people; sporty, nature-oriented individualists; functionalists primarily motivated by maintaining or improving health through exercise; and nature

  13. The effect of Tai Chi exercise on motor function and sleep quality in patients with stroke: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Li

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Tai Chi exercise can significantly improve the balance function and ability of daily activities of patients with stroke, and there are no significant differences in walking function and sleep quality. Therefore, lots of multicenter, large-sample, higher quality randomized controlled trials are needed to verify the effects of Tai Chi exercise in improving walking function and sleep quality for patients with stroke.

  14. Physical activity and exercise adherence in physical therapy exercise treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Bakker, D. de; Schellevis, F.G.; Dekker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: a lack of regular physical activity in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee is an important risk factor for functional decline. The ultimate goal of exercise therapy is to improve the overall physical function and to help individuals meet the demands of daily living.

  15. Aerobic exercise improves quality of life, psychological well-being ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Alzheimer's disease has a destructive drawbacks on the patient and his/her entire family as this disease badly affects the behavior, cognition and abilities to do activities of daily living (ADL). The physical and mental benefits of exercise are widely known but seldom available to persons suffering from ...

  16. Intradialytic Exercise Programs for Hemodialysis Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jung, Tae-Du; Park, Sun-Hee

    2011-01-01

    .... This review aimed to investigate the beneficial effects of exercise during hemodialysis and also to introduce various intradialytic exercise programs and their advantages as a first step in combining...

  17. Exercise therapy improves mental and physical health in schizophrenia: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheewe, T W; Backx, F J G; Takken, T; Jörg, F; van Strater, A C P; Kroes, A G; Kahn, R S; Cahn, W

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this multicenter randomised clinical trial was to examine the effect of exercise versus occupational therapy on mental and physical health in schizophrenia patients. Sixty-three patients with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to 2 h of structured exercise (n = 31) or occupational therapy (n = 32) weekly for 6 months. Symptoms (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) and cardiovascular fitness levels (Wpeak and VO2peak ), as assessed with a cardiopulmonary exercise test, were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome measures were the Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Camberwell Assessment of Needs, body mass index, body fat percentage, and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Intention-to-treat analyses showed exercise therapy had a trend-level effect on depressive symptoms (P = 0.07) and a significant effect on cardiovascular fitness, measured by Wpeak (P occupational therapy. Per protocol analyses showed that exercise therapy reduced symptoms of schizophrenia (P = 0.001), depression (P = 0.012), need of care (P = 0.050), and increased cardiovascular fitness (P occupational therapy. No effect for MetS (factors) was found except a trend reduction in triglycerides (P = 0.08). Exercise therapy, when performed once to twice a week, improved mental health and cardiovascular fitness and reduced need of care in patients with schizophrenia. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreelatha OK

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Omana Kesary Sreelatha,1 Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu Ramesh2 1Ophthalmology Department, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman; 2Department of Optometry, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, India Abstract: Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD, and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time

  19. A home balance exercise program improves walking in people with cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jennifer L; Bastian, Amy J

    2014-10-01

    Physical therapy intervention is the primary treatment for gait ataxia and imbalance in individuals with cerebellar damage. Our aim was to determine if a home balance exercise program is feasible for improving locomotor and balance abilities in these individuals. A total of 14 patients with cerebellar ataxia participated in a 6-week individualized home-based balance exercise program and attended 5 testing sessions (2 pretraining, 1 midtraining, 1 posttraining, and 1 one-month follow-up visit). Pretraining, posttraining, and follow-up testing included a neurological assessment, clinical gait and balance tests, and laboratory assessments of balance and walking. Participants kept logs of the frequency and level of balance challenge during their training. Walking speed improved across visits, as did stride length, percentage double-limb support time, Timed Up and Go (TUG), and Dynamic Gait Index. Post hoc comparisons in these measures revealed that significant rehabilitative improvements occurred over the 6-week training period, and all but TUG gains were retained 1 month later. There were no changes across the other measures for the group. Regression analysis indicated that improvements in walking speed were affected by the level of balance challenge but not by age, ataxia severity, proprioception, or duration of exercise. Improvement in locomotor performance in people with cerebellar ataxia was observable after a 6-week home balance exercise program. The exercise program must be designed to provide a significant challenge to the person's balance. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Effect of preoperative exercise on postoperative mobility in obese total joint replacement patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Claire E; Bono, James V; Ward, Daniel M; Barry, Marilyn T; Doren, Janice; McNinch, Amanda

    2010-09-07

    There has been a significant increase in obesity in the United States over the past 20 years. Reports in the literature identify the association of obesity-related osteoarthritis and the likelihood of future total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in this patient population. However, little is known about the effect of preoperative exercise on immediate postoperative mobility and discharge disposition in obese total joint replacement patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of preoperative exercise in the obese total joint replacement patient on early postoperative mobility and discharge disposition. We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2) who underwent primary total joint replacement surgery from June 2005 through October 2005 at 1 institution. Two hundred seven patients met the inclusion criteria. Sixty-five patients performed self-reported preoperative exercise, defined as physical activity deemed above and beyond that of activities of daily living. Fewer exercise patients, 6.8%, required the assistance of ≥2 caregivers for mobility on postoperative day 1 vs 17.4% for nonexercisers. Fifty-four percent of patients participating in preoperative exercise were discharged home vs 46% who did not participate in exercise. A preoperative exercise program can improve postoperative functional mobility and increase the likelihood of discharge home in total joint replacement patients with a BMI of ≥30 kg/m(2). Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Aerobic physical exercise for adult patients with haematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenthal, Nils; Will, Andrea; Streckmann, Fiona; Wolkewitz, Klaus-Dieter; Monsef, Ina; Engert, Andreas; Elter, Thomas; Skoetz, Nicole

    2014-11-11

    Although people with haematological malignancies have to endure long phases of therapy and immobility which is known to diminish their physical performance level, the advice to rest and avoid intensive exercises is still common practice. This recommendation is partly due to the severe anaemia and thrombocytopenia from which many patients suffer. The inability to perform activities of daily living restricts them, diminishes their quality of life and can influence medical therapy. To evaluate the efficacy, safety and feasibility of aerobic physical exercise for adults suffering from haematological malignancies. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2014, Issue 1) and MEDLINE (1950 to January 2014) as well as conference proceedings for randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We included RCTs comparing an aerobic physical exercise intervention, intending to improve the oxygen system, in addition to standard care with standard care only for adults suffering from haematological malignancies. We also included studies that evaluated aerobic exercise in addition to strength training. We excluded studies that investigated the effect of training programmes that were composed of yoga, tai chi chuan, qigong or similar types of exercise. We also excluded studies exploring the influence of strength training without additive aerobic exercise. Additionally, we excluded studies assessing outcomes without any clinical impact. Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed the quality of trials. We used risk ratios (RRs) for adverse events and 100-day survival, standardised mean differences for quality of life (QoL), fatigue, and physical performance, and mean differences for anthropometric measurements. Our search strategies identified 1518 potentially relevant references. Of these, we included nine RCTs involving 818 participants. The potential risk of bias in these trials is unclear, due

  2. Effects of 12-week combined exercise therapy on oxidative stress in female fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıfakıoğlu, Banu; Güzelant, Aliye Yıldırım; Güzel, Eda Celik; Güzel, Savaş; Kızıler, Ali Rıza

    2014-10-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of exercise therapy on the oxidative stress in fibromyalgia patients and relationship between oxidative stress and fibromyalgia symptoms. Thirty women diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to the American College of Rheumatology preliminary criteria, and 23 healthy women whose age- and weight-matched women were enrolled the study. Pain intensity with visual analog scale (VAS), the number of tender points, the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), the Beck depression inventory (BDI) were evaluated. The oxidative stress parameters thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, protein carbonyls, and nitric oxide, and antioxidant parameters thiols and catalase were investigated in patients and control group. After, combined aerobic and strengthen exercise regimen was given to fibromyalgia group. Exercise therapy consisted of a warming period of 10 min, aerobic exercises period of 20 min, muscle strengthening exercises for 20 min, and 10 min cooling down period. Therapy was lasting 1 h three times per week over a 12-week period. All parameters were reevaluated after the treatment in the patient group. The oxidative stress parameters levels were significantly higher, and antioxidant parameters were significantly lower in patients with fibromyalgia than in the controls. VAS, FIQ, and BDI scores decreased significantly with exercise therapy. The exercise improved all parameters of oxidative stress and antioxidant parameters. Also, all clinical parameters were improved with exercise. We should focus on oxidative stress in the treatment for fibromyalgia with the main objective of reducing oxidative load.

  3. Tai Chi Chuan Exercise for Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ching; Chen, Ssu-Yuan; Wong, May-Kuen; Lai, Jin Shin

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training is the cornerstone of rehabilitation for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although high-intensity exercise has significant cardiovascular benefits, light-to-moderate intensity aerobic exercise also offers health benefits. With lower-intensity workouts, patients may be able to exercise for longer periods of time and increase the acceptance of exercise, particularly in unfit and elderly patients. Tai Chi Chuan (Tai Chi) is a traditional Chinese mind-body exercise. The exercise intensity of Tai Chi is light to moderate, depending on its training style, posture, and duration. Previous research has shown that Tai Chi enhances aerobic capacity, muscular strength, balance, and psychological well-being. Additionally, Tai Chi training has significant benefits for common cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, poor exercise capacity, endothelial dysfunction, and depression. Tai Chi is safe and effective in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery, congestive heart failure (HF), and stroke. In conclusion, Tai Chi has significant benefits to patients with cardiovascular disease, and it may be prescribed as an alternative exercise program for selected patients with CVD. PMID:24348732

  4. Tai Chi Chuan Exercise for Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Lan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise training is the cornerstone of rehabilitation for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD. Although high-intensity exercise has significant cardiovascular benefits, light-to-moderate intensity aerobic exercise also offers health benefits. With lower-intensity workouts, patients may be able to exercise for longer periods of time and increase the acceptance of exercise, particularly in unfit and elderly patients. Tai Chi Chuan (Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese mind-body exercise. The exercise intensity of Tai Chi is light to moderate, depending on its training style, posture, and duration. Previous research has shown that Tai Chi enhances aerobic capacity, muscular strength, balance, and psychological well-being. Additionally, Tai Chi training has significant benefits for common cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, poor exercise capacity, endothelial dysfunction, and depression. Tai Chi is safe and effective in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG surgery, congestive heart failure (HF, and stroke. In conclusion, Tai Chi has significant benefits to patients with cardiovascular disease, and it may be prescribed as an alternative exercise program for selected patients with CVD.

  5. 手指操锻炼改善轻度老年痴呆患者生活能力的研究%Finger exercises can improve the activities of daily living in elderly patients with mild dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿杨; 张彩华; 朱宏霞

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of finger exercises on improving the activities of daily living in patients with mild dementia, and provide a theoretical basis for implementation of systematic rehabilitation training. Methods A total of 60 elderly patients with mild Alzheimer's disease were randomly and equally divided into the intervention group and control group from October 2009 to October 2010. The control group was implemented with tools of finger exercises without professional guides. The patients moved their fingers at will. The intervention group was guided by medical professionals for 6 months. The activities of daily living scale ( ADL) was used to evaluate the training effect. Results The self-care ability and basic skills of using tools in the control group had no significant differences (P >0.05), while those in the intervention group improved significantly after 6-month training (P<0.05). Conclusion The activities of daily living in elderly patients with mild dementia declines gradually with time going on. The daily finger exercises can effectively improve their self-care ability and basic skills of using tools, and improve their life quality.%目的 观察系统的手指操锻炼对改善轻度老年痴呆患者日常生活能力的效果,为实施系统的康复训练提供理论依据.方法 选择2009年10月-2010年10月入住上海交通大学附属第六人民医院老年科的轻度老年痴呆患者60例,随机分为干预组和对照组各30例,给对照组提供手指功能活动的用具,让患者根据自己的兴趣进行手指的自由活动;干预组由专业医务人员进行手指操训练,每天定时练习,坚持6个月.采用日常生活能力量表(ADL)进行评分.结果 对照组训练前后躯体自理能力和使用日常工具的基本能力无明显变化,干预组训练6个月后躯体自理能力和使用日常工具的基本能力明显改善,与对照组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 轻度认知障

  6. Exercise adherence, cardiopulmonary fitness and anthropometric changes improve exercise self-efficacy and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imayama, Ikuyo; Alfano, Catherine M; Mason, Caitlin E; Wang, Chiachi; Xiao, Liren; Duggan, Catherine; Campbell, Kristin L; Foster-Schubert, Karen E; Wang, Ching-Yun; McTiernan, Anne

    2013-07-01

    Regular exercise increases exercise self-efficacy and health-related quality of life (HRQOL); however, the mechanisms are unknown. We examined the associations of exercise adherence and physiological improvements with changes in exercise self-efficacy and HRQOL. Middle-aged adults (N = 202) were randomized to 12 months aerobic exercise (360 minutes/week) or control. Weight, waist circumference, percent body fat, cardiopulmonary fitness, HRQOL (SF-36), and exercise self-efficacy were assessed at baseline and 12 months. Adherence was measured in minutes/day from activity logs. Exercise adherence was associated with reduced bodily pain, improved general health and vitality, and reduced role-emotional scores (P(trend) ≤ 0.05). Increased fitness was associated with improved physical functioning, bodily pain and general health scores (P(trend) ≤ 0.04). Reduced weight and percent body fat were associated with improved physical functioning, general health, and bodily pain scores (P(trend) health but with reduced role-emotional scores (P(trend) ≤ 0.05). High exercise adherence, increased cardiopulmonary fitness and reduced weight, waist circumference and percent body fat were associated with increased exercise self-efficacy (P(trend) exercise programs to induce changes in cardiopulmonary fitness and body composition may lead to greater improvements in HRQOL and self-efficacy that could promote exercise maintenance.

  7. Trunk Flexibility Improvement in Response to Powered Assisted Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Bains

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background study: Flexibility in human spine has always plays an important role in dexterity and seamless ambulatory activities. When optimum range is not maintained by the trunk column, due to lack of flexibility, the posture gets affected resulting in reduce trunk rotation flexibility and mobility hence loss of complete trunk rotation. Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of Shapemaster Power Assisted Exercise Equipment (SPAEE on trunk flexibility. Methodology: Twenty healthy individual ages between 40 to 60 years were randomly divided into control and exercise groups. Shapemaster exercise program performed two times per week for 5 weeks and 45 minutes per session. Before and after 10 sessions of Shapemaster exercise protocol, Seated trunk rotation test was used to measure trunk flexibility. Results: Repeated measurement ANOVA were used to analysis data between groups. The results of this study illustrated that after 10th sessions trunk flexibility significantly improved (F (1.0, 18 = 11.732, p < 0.003. Conclusion: In conclusion results were determined that SPAEE is safe and it did effectively enhance flexibility among individual healthy adults. Keyword: Shapemaster Power Assisted Exercise Equipment (SPAEE, Trunk Flexibility, Healthy individual

  8. Exercise training improves mean arterial pressure in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Mills

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many breast cancer survivors worldwide live with treatment-related side effects, including cardiovascular health problems. This study examined effects of a 5-month exercise intervention on non-invasive markers of cardiovascular health in breast cancer survivors. Relationships between these markers and commonly used markers of overall health were also explored. Fifty-two survivors completed the exercise training at a rehabilitation center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill between 2008-2011. A combined aerobic and resistance exercise intervention (3 times/week for 1h at intensities progressing from low (40% to moderate (65-70% of VO2max for aerobic and 8-12 repetitions max for the resistance exercise were implemented. Significant reduction in mean arterial pressure (MAP was observed from baseline to final assessment. A significant correlation was found between MAP and Body Mass Index (BMI. In conclusion, 5-months combined aerobic and resistance exercise intervention positively improved MAP which was, in part, attributed to changes in BMI.

  9. Improvement in Depressive Symptoms Is Associated with Reduced Oxidative Damage and Inflammatory Response in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Subsyndromal Depression: The Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Psychoeducation, Physical Exercise, and Enhanced Treatment as Usual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučić Lovrenčić, Marijana; Pibernik-Okanović, Mirjana; Šekerija, Mario; Prašek, Manja; Ajduković, Dea; Kos, Jadranka; Hermanns, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To examine one-year changes in oxidative damage and inflammation level in type 2 diabetic patients undergoing behavioral treatment for subsyndromal depression. Materials and Methods. A randomized controlled comparison of psychoeducation (A), physical exercise (B), and enhanced treatment as usual (C) was performed in 209 eligible subjects in a tertiary diabetes care setting. Depressive symptoms (primary outcome) and selected biomarkers of oxidative damage and inflammation (secondary outcomes) were assessed at baseline and six- and twelve-month follow-up. Results. Out of the 74, 67, and 68 patients randomised into groups A, B, and C, respectively, 201 completed the interventions, and 179 were analysed. Participants in all three groups equally improved in depressive symptoms from baseline to one-year follow-up (repeated measures ANOVA; F = 12.51, p depressive symptoms at 6 months significantly predicted one-year reduction in u-8-oxodG (β = 0.15, p = 0.044). Conclusion. Simple behavioral interventions are capable not only of alleviating depressive symptoms, but also of reducing the intensity of damaging oxidative/inflammatory processes in type 2 diabetic patients with subsyndromal depression. This trial is registered with ISRCTN05673017. PMID:26347775

  10. Effects of exercise and diet in nonobese asthma patients - a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Louise Lindhardt; Meteran, Howraman; Hostrup, Morten

    2017-01-01

    the effects of an 8-week intervention of either exercise (high-intensity interval training), diet (high protein/low glycemic index), or a combination of the 2, on asthma control and clinical outcomes in nonobese patients with asthma. METHODS: Nonobese adult patients with asthma (n = 149) were randomized to 1......BACKGROUND: Behavioral interventions focusing on exercise and healthy diet improve asthma control in obese patients with asthma, but whether these interventions can lead to improvements in nonobese patients remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: In a randomized, controlled parallel-group design, we studied...... of 4 groups: an exercise group, a diet group, an exercise + diet group, or a control group. Outcomes included Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score, asthma-related quality-of-life (Asthma-Related Quality-of-Life Questionnaire [AQLQ]) score, inflammatory cell counts in induced sputum, FEV1...

  11. Hemodynamic causes of exercise intolerance in Fontan patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebert, Anders; Jensen, Annette S; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance is frequent among Fontan patients and an important determinant for quality of life. This study investigated the hemodynamic causes of impaired exercise capacity in Fontan patients with particular focus on the influence of stroke volume index (SVI) and heart rate (HR...

  12. The effects of exercise training in patients with peripheral vascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) suffer from the symptom of intermittent claudication and are therefore intolerant to walking. Exercise training has been shown to be a beneficial treatment for patients with PVD. Therefore studies have aimed to assess the efficacy of exercise training programmes. This review ...

  13. Exercise limitation in patients with Fontan circulation : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, Tim; Tacken, Marieke H. P.; Blank, A. Christian; Hulzebos, Erik H.; Strengers, Jan L. M.; Helders, Paul J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the current literature study was to perform a literature review of the factors contributing to exercise limitation and physiological response to exercise in patients with Fontan circulation. In patients with Fontan circulation, peak oxygen uptake ranged from about 14.4 to 32.3 ml/min/kg,

  14. Carbohydrate mouth rinse: does it improve endurance exercise performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that carbohydrate (CHO) supplementation can improve performance in endurance exercises through several mechanisms such as maintenance of glycemia and sparing endogenous glycogen as well as the possibility of a central nervous-system action. Some studies have emerged in recent years in order to test the hypothesis of ergogenic action via central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated that CHO mouth rinse can lead to improved performance of cyclists, and this may be associated with the activation of brain areas linked to motivation and reward. These findings have already been replicated in other endurance modalities, such as running. This alternative seems to be an attractive nutritional tool to improve endurance exercise performance. PMID:20799963

  15. EFFECTIVENESS OF CORE STABILIZATION EXERCISES AND MOTOR CONTROL EXERCISES IN PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK ACHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikranth .G .R

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motor control exercises are isolated strengthening exercise for the deep spinal muscles (transverse abdominus, multifidus whereas Core stability is achieved by global strengthening of the core muscles. There are not much studies available in the literature done or studied the short term effect of the motor control and core stabilization on subjects with low back pain. Therefore, the purpose of this study to find the comparative effect of motor control exercises versus core stabilization exercises on improvement of pain and disability in subjects with mechanical low back pain. Method: An experimental study design, 30 subjects with non-specific mechanical low back pain were randomized into 2 groups with 15 subjects each in Group A and Group B. Subjects in Group A received Motor control exercises and subjects in Group B received Core stability exercises. Both the group received conventional exercises. The duration of intervention was given for two weeks. Outcome measurements such as pain using VAS, Functional disability using Oswestry Disability Index Questionnaire were measured before and after two weeks of intervention. Results: Analysis using paired ‘t’ test and wilcoxon signed rank test found that there is a statistically significant improvement (p<0.05 in pain, functional disability within the groups. Comparative analysis using independent ‘t’ test and Mann Whitney U test for comparison of difference in improvement in VAS and ODI between two groups, it was found that there was significant difference in improvement of VAS and ODI between groups. Group-A showed better improvement in VAS and ODI compared to Group B with an effect size of 1.47 and 0.99 respectively. Conclusion: It is concluded that the Motor control exercises showed statistically significant improvement in reducing back pain and disability when compared to the Core Stabilization exercises. Thus, performing Motor Control exercises reduces pain and disability

  16. Effects of exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure and sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Linda M; Drager, Luciano F; Rodrigues, Ana C T; Rondon, Maria U P B; Braga, Ana M F W; Mathias, Wilson; Krieger, Eduardo M; Barretto, Antonio C P; Middlekauff, Holly R; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Negrão, Carlos E

    2009-05-01

    To test the effects of exercise training on sleep and neurovascular control in patients with systolic heart failure with and without sleep disordered breathing. Prospective interventional study. Cardiac rehabilitation and exercise physiology unit and sleep laboratory. Twenty-five patients with heart failure, aged 42 to 70 years, and New York Heart Association Functional Class I-III were divided into 1 of 3 groups: obstructive sleep apnea (n=8), central sleep apnea (n=9) and no sleep apnea (n=7). INTERVENTIONS Four months of no-training (control) followed by 4 months of an exercise training program (three 60-minute, supervised, exercise sessions per week). Sleep (polysomnography), microneurography, forearm blood flow (plethysmography), peak VO2, and quality of life were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the control and trained periods. No significant changes occurred in the control period. Exercise training reduced muscle sympathetic nerve activity (P sleep apnea. Exercise training improved the apnea-hypopnea index, minimum 0O saturation, and amount stage 3-4 sleep (P sleep apnea but had no significant effects in patients with central sleep apnea. The beneficial effects of exercise training on neurovascular function, functional capacity, and quality of life in patients with systolic dysfunction and heart failure occurs independently of sleep disordered breathing. Exercise training lessens the severity of obstructive sleep apnea but does not affect central sleep apnea in patients with heart failure and sleep disordered breathing.

  17. Effect of aquatic exercise on the multiple sclerosis patients' quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafeeyan, Zahra; Azarbarzin, Mehrdad; Moosa, Farhad Mustafa; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2010-01-01

    The appearance of a new innovation in medical science named aquatic exercise has faded the effects of other preventive exercises in patients with multiple sclerosis to a large extent. Since exercise is one of the beneficial factors in enhancement of quality of life, researchers decided to investigate the role of aquatic exercise on the patients' quality of life. This study is a semi experimental research that was performed on 22 patients chosen by simple random sampling. The standard SF-36 questionnaire was used and data was gathered by interview before and after aquatic exercise. Data was analyzed by paired t test via SPSS software version 10. The mean age of participants was 32.86 years. 68.2% of participants were married and 45.5% of them were high school graduates. The paired t test showed the significant differences between different aspects of quality of life before and after aquatic exercise. The findings of this research revealed that aquatic exercise has enhanced the aspects of multiple sclerosis patients' quality of life; therefore the program of this exercise is suggested to be used for the patients with multiple sclerosis along with other methods of treatment for improvement in quality of their lives.

  18. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing – effective method for evaluation and recommendation of individualized exercise training in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Avram

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to emphasize the role of cardiopulmonary exercise training (CPET in evaluation and recommendation of individualized exercise training in patients with a metabolic syndrome. Methods: We performed a prospective longitudinal study of 9 months. The study group consisted of 28 young patients (21.3±3.1 years old without contraindications to exercise, previously diagnosed with metabolic syndrome according to NCEP-ATPIII criteria. All patients were evaluating at baseline and after 3 months of intervention and at the end of the study (after 9 months. The evaluation consists in performing a CPET on bicycle ergometer in which subjects were monitored in terms of cardiac and respiratory parameters. The CPET results allow us to establish the range of effort intensity in which the patient should exercise in order to burn calories and achieve the maximum fat oxidation rate. All patients benefit from an intensive interval exercise training programme, supervised and guided by a physical therapist. Exercise training consisted in 50 minutes sessions, 3 times per week, at intensive endurance training zone (in the range of anaerobic threshold, completed by 1 minute interval in the range between anaerobic threshold (AT and respiratory compensation point (RCP, for every 5 minutes of training. Results: After 9 months of intervention we noticed an improvement of abdominal obesity (waist circumference decreased from 98.98±10.14 cm to 89.54±12.32 cm, p<0.001, physical fitness (V’O2peak increased from 1.83±0.33 l/min to 2.13±0.4 l/min, p<0.001 and endurance (Oxygen uptake in the range of anaerobic treshold increase from 1.27±0.27 l/min to 1.55±0.31 l/min, p<0.001. Conclusions: Cardiopulmonary exercise testing together with training zones determinations is a useful tool for assessing the exercise capacity and drawing up individual workouts. Active and closely monitored intervention by individualized exercise training programmes leads to

  19. [Clinical observation on improvement of motion range of cervical spine of patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy treated with rotation-traction manipulation and neck pain particles and cervical neck pain rehabilitation exercises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Peng-Chao; Zhu, Li-Guo; Gao, Jing-Hua; Yu, Jie; Feng, Min-Shan; Wei, Xu; Wang, Shang-Quan

    2010-10-01

    To observe the effects of two different therapies on patients whose cervical function were restricted due to cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Form April 2008 to October 2009, 71 cases with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were divided into group A (36 cases) and group B (35 cases). Among them, 22 cases were male and 49 cases were female, ranging in age form 45 to 65 years with an average of 52.27 years, course of disease was from 3 days to 5 years. The patients in group A were treated with rotation-traction manipulation, neck pain particles and cervical rehabilitation exercises; and the patients in group B were treated with cervical traction, Diclofenac sodium sustained release tablets and wearing neck collar. Theapeutic time was two weeks. The cervical anteflexion, extension, left and right lateral bending, left and right rotative activity were measured by helmet-style activities instrument before and after treatment (at the 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 days and 1 month after treatment respectively). There were no difference between two groups in cervical activity in all directions before treatment (P > 0.05). Compared with the beginning, cervical anteflexion and extension showed significant difference at the 5th day after treatment in group A (P group B, cervical anteflexion showed significant difference at the 13th day after treatment (P 0.05); cervical extension showed significant difference at the 7th day after treatment compared with the beginning (P group A (P group B (P group A or B, right lateral bending, left and right rotative activity showed significant difference at the same time after treatment, either the 3rd day (P groups, cervical anteflexion, left and right lateral bending, left and right rotative activity showed significant difference at the 1 month after treatment (P particles and cervical rehabilitation exercises in treating cervicalspondylotic radiculopathy have quick effect to improve the activities of cervical anteflexion, extension, left

  20. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the blood plasma properties of cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwoździński, Krzysztof; Pieniążek, Anna; Czepas, Jan; Brzeszczyńska, Joanna; Jegier, Anna; Pawlicki, Lucjan

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves exercise tolerance and general function. However, its effects on blood plasma in cardiac patients remain uncertain. Our aim was to examine the effect of comprehensive CR on the oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant plasma status in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) after cardiac interventions. Exercise-based rehabilitation was established as ergometer training, adjusted for individual patients' physical efficiency. Training was repeated three times a week for two months. The standard biochemical (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) and metabolic parameters (peak oxygen uptake [VO2] and peak workload) were determined. We assessed plasma viscosity, lipid peroxidation, carbonyl compounds levels, glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (ASC) levels and the non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity of plasma in 12 patients with CAD before and after CR. Parameters were examined before exercise, immediately after exercise, and 1 h later. We also compared morphological and biochemical parameters of blood, as well as other parameters such as heart rate and blood pressure (resting and exercise), VO2max and peak workload (W) before and after CR. Before CR, a significant decrease in GSH concentration was observed 1 h after exercise. Conversely, after CR, GSH, and ASC levels remained unchanged immediately after exercise. However, ASC increased after CR after exercise and 1 h later in comparison to before CR. There was a significant increase in ferric reduction ability of plasma immediately after exercise after CR, when compared with before CR. CR improved several blood biochemical parameters, peak VO2, induced an increase in systolic blood pressure peak, and patients' peak workload. After CR, improvements were detected in oxidative stress parameters, except in the level of carbonyls. These changes may contribute to the increased functional heart capacity and better tolerance to exercise and

  1. Cold drink ingestion improves exercise endurance capacity in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason K W; Shirreffs, Susan M; Maughan, Ronald J

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the effect of drink temperature on cycling capacity in the heat. On two separate trials, eight males cycled at 66 +/- 2% VO2peak (mean +/- SD) to exhaustion in hot (35.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C) and humid (60 +/- 1%) environments. Participants ingested three 300-mL aliquots of either a cold (4 degrees C) or a warm (37 degrees C) drink during 30 min of seated rest before exercise and 100 mL of the same drink every 10 min during exercise. Rectal and skin temperatures, heart rate, and sweat rate were recorded. Ratings of thermal sensation and perceived exertion were assessed. Exercise time was longer (P drink (63.8 +/- 4.3 min) than with the warm drink (52.0 +/- 4.1 min). Rectal temperature fell by 0.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C (P drinks. There was no effect of drink temperature on mean skin temperature at rest (P = 0.870), but mean skin temperature was lower from 20 min during exercise with ingestion of the cold drink than with the warm drink (P drink than with the warm drink (P Drink temperature influenced sweat rate (1.22 +/- 0.34 and 1.40 +/- 0.41 L x h(-1) for the cold and the warm drink, respectively; P drink was ingested. Compared with a drink at 37 degrees C, the ingestion of a cold drink before and during exercise in the heat reduced physiological strain (reduced heat accumulation) during exercise, leading to an improved endurance capacity (23 +/- 6%).

  2. The effect of aquatic exercise therapy on muscle strength and joint′s range of motion in hemophilia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Kargarfard

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The results showed that aquatic exercise therapy can be a useful method to improve joints′ strength and range of motion in hemophilia patients in order to improve their daily functioning and quality of life.

  3. Acute Exercise Improves Motor Memory Consolidation in Preadolescent Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Lundbye-Jensen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The ability to acquire new motor skills is essential both during childhood and later in life. Recent studies have demonstrated that an acute bout of exercise can improve motor memory consolidation in adults. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether acute exercise protocols following motor skill practice in a school setting can also improve long-term retention of motor memory in preadolescent children.Methods: Seventy-seven pre-adolescent children (age 10.5 ± 0.75 (SD participated in the study. Prior to the main experiment age, BMI, fitness status and general physical activity level was assessed in all children and they were then randomly allocated to three groups. All children practiced a visuomotor tracking task followed by 20 min of rest (CON, high intensity intermittent floorball (FLB or running (RUN with comparable exercise intensity and duration for exercise groups. Delayed retention of motor memory was assessed 1 h, 24 h and 7 days after motor skill acquisition.Results: During skill acquisition, motor performance improved significantly to the immediate retention test with no differences between groups. One hour following skill acquisition, motor performance decreased significantly for RUN. Twenty-four hours following skill acquisition there was a tendency towards improved performance for FLB but no significant effects. Seven days after motor practice however, both FLB and RUN performed better when compared to their immediate retention test indicating significant offline gains. This effect was not observed for CON. In contrast, 7 days after motor practice, retention of motor memory was significantly better for FLB and RUN compared to CON. No differences were observed when comparing FLB and RUN.Conclusions: Acute intense intermittent exercise performed immediately after motor skill acquisition facilitates long-term motor memory in pre-adolescent children, presumably by promoting memory consolidation. The

  4. Acute Exercise Improves Motor Memory Consolidation in Preadolescent Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Skriver, Kasper; Nielsen, Jens B; Roig, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The ability to acquire new motor skills is essential both during childhood and later in life. Recent studies have demonstrated that an acute bout of exercise can improve motor memory consolidation in adults. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether acute exercise protocols following motor skill practice in a school setting can also improve long-term retention of motor memory in preadolescent children. Methods: Seventy-seven pre-adolescent children (age 10.5 ± 0.75 (SD)) participated in the study. Prior to the main experiment age, BMI, fitness status and general physical activity level was assessed in all children and they were then randomly allocated to three groups. All children practiced a visuomotor tracking task followed by 20 min of rest (CON), high intensity intermittent floorball (FLB) or running (RUN) with comparable exercise intensity and duration for exercise groups. Delayed retention of motor memory was assessed 1 h, 24 h and 7 days after motor skill acquisition. Results: During skill acquisition, motor performance improved significantly to the immediate retention test with no differences between groups. One hour following skill acquisition, motor performance decreased significantly for RUN. Twenty-four hours following skill acquisition there was a tendency towards improved performance for FLB but no significant effects. Seven days after motor practice however, both FLB and RUN performed better when compared to their immediate retention test indicating significant offline gains. This effect was not observed for CON. In contrast, 7 days after motor practice, retention of motor memory was significantly better for FLB and RUN compared to CON. No differences were observed when comparing FLB and RUN. Conclusions: Acute intense intermittent exercise performed immediately after motor skill acquisition facilitates long-term motor memory in pre-adolescent children, presumably by promoting memory consolidation. The results also

  5. Acute Exercise Improves Motor Memory Consolidation in Preadolescent Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Skriver, Kasper; Nielsen, Jens B.; Roig, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The ability to acquire new motor skills is essential both during childhood and later in life. Recent studies have demonstrated that an acute bout of exercise can improve motor memory consolidation in adults. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether acute exercise protocols following motor skill practice in a school setting can also improve long-term retention of motor memory in preadolescent children. Methods: Seventy-seven pre-adolescent children (age 10.5 ± 0.75 (SD)) participated in the study. Prior to the main experiment age, BMI, fitness status and general physical activity level was assessed in all children and they were then randomly allocated to three groups. All children practiced a visuomotor tracking task followed by 20 min of rest (CON), high intensity intermittent floorball (FLB) or running (RUN) with comparable exercise intensity and duration for exercise groups. Delayed retention of motor memory was assessed 1 h, 24 h and 7 days after motor skill acquisition. Results: During skill acquisition, motor performance improved significantly to the immediate retention test with no differences between groups. One hour following skill acquisition, motor performance decreased significantly for RUN. Twenty-four hours following skill acquisition there was a tendency towards improved performance for FLB but no significant effects. Seven days after motor practice however, both FLB and RUN performed better when compared to their immediate retention test indicating significant offline gains. This effect was not observed for CON. In contrast, 7 days after motor practice, retention of motor memory was significantly better for FLB and RUN compared to CON. No differences were observed when comparing FLB and RUN. Conclusions: Acute intense intermittent exercise performed immediately after motor skill acquisition facilitates long-term motor memory in pre-adolescent children, presumably by promoting memory consolidation. The results also

  6. Improvement in Depressive Symptoms Is Associated with Reduced Oxidative Damage and Inflammatory Response in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Subsyndromal Depression: The Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Psychoeducation, Physical Exercise, and Enhanced Treatment as Usual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Vučić Lovrenčić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To examine one-year changes in oxidative damage and inflammation level in type 2 diabetic patients undergoing behavioral treatment for subsyndromal depression. Materials and Methods. A randomized controlled comparison of psychoeducation (A, physical exercise (B, and enhanced treatment as usual (C was performed in 209 eligible subjects in a tertiary diabetes care setting. Depressive symptoms (primary outcome and selected biomarkers of oxidative damage and inflammation (secondary outcomes were assessed at baseline and six- and twelve-month follow-up. Results. Out of the 74, 67, and 68 patients randomised into groups A, B, and C, respectively, 201 completed the interventions, and 179 were analysed. Participants in all three groups equally improved in depressive symptoms from baseline to one-year follow-up (repeated measures ANOVA; F=12.51, p<0.0001, η2=0.07. Urinary 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (u-8-oxodG decreased (F=10.66, p<0.0001, η2=0.06, as did sialic acid and leukocytes (F=84.57, η2=0.32 and F=12.61, η2=0.07, resp.; p<0.0001, while uric acid increased (F=12.53, p<0.0001, η2=0.07 in all subjects during one year. Improvement of depressive symptoms at 6 months significantly predicted one-year reduction in u-8-oxodG (β=0.15, p=0.044. Conclusion. Simple behavioral interventions are capable not only of alleviating depressive symptoms, but also of reducing the intensity of damaging oxidative/inflammatory processes in type 2 diabetic patients with subsyndromal depression. This trial is registered with ISRCTN05673017.

  7. Effect of exercise on calf muscle pump function in patients with chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D; Vandongen, Y K; Stacey, M C

    1999-03-01

    Musculoskeletal dysfunction may be associated with poor calf muscle pump function in patients with chronic venous ulceration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physical exercise on calf muscle pump function. Twenty patients were recruited into a 6-week intensive exercise programme. Calf muscle function and calf muscle pump function were assessed using an isokinetic device and air plethysmography respectively, before and after the exercise programme. There was significant improvement in calf muscle pump function, measured as increased ejection fraction and decreased residual fraction (P venous reflux was not altered (P > 0.05). Calf muscle strength and endurance parameters all increased, but not significantly (P > 0.05). Poor calf muscle pump function in patients with chronic venous ulceration can be improved by physical exercise.

  8. Aquatic Exercise Training is Effective in Maintaining Exercise Performance in Trained Heart Failure Patients: A Randomised Crossover Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsett, Julie; Morris, Norman; Kuys, Suzanne; Hwang, Rita; Mullins, Robert; Khatun, Mohsina; Paratz, Jennifer; Mudge, Alison

    2017-06-01

    Providing flexible models and a variety of exercise options are fundamental to supporting long-term exercise participation for patients with heart failure (HF). The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of aquatic exercise training during a maintenance phase for a clinical heart failure population. In this 2 x 2 crossover design trial, individuals who had previously completed HF rehabilitation were randomised into either a land-based or aquatic training program once per week for six weeks, after which time they changed to the alternate exercise training protocol for an additional six weeks. Six-minute walk test (6MWT), grip strength, walk speed, and measures of balance were compared for the two training protocols. Fifty-one participants (43 males, mean age 69.2 yrs) contributed data for the analysis. Both groups maintained function during the follow-up period, however improvements in 6MWT were greater in the land-based training group (95% CI: 0.7, 22.5; p=0.038), by a mean difference of 10.8 metres. No significant difference was observed for other parameters when the two training protocols were compared. Attending an aquatic exercise program once per week is feasible for patients with stable HF and may provide a suitable option to maintain functional performance in select patients. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Aerobic exercise increases hippocampal volume and improves memory in multiple sclerosis: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, V M; Cirnigliaro, C; Cohen, A; Farag, A; Brooks, M; Wecht, J M; Wylie, G R; Chiaravalloti, N D; DeLuca, J; Sumowski, J F

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis leads to prominent hippocampal atrophy, which is linked to memory deficits. Indeed, 50% of multiple sclerosis patients suffer memory impairment, with negative consequences for quality of life. There are currently no effective memory treatments for multiple sclerosis either pharmacological or behavioral. Aerobic exercise improves memory and promotes hippocampal neurogenesis in nonhuman animals. Here, we investigate the benefits of aerobic exercise in memory-impaired multiple sclerosis patients. Pilot data were collected from two ambulatory, memory-impaired multiple sclerosis participants randomized to non-aerobic (stretching) and aerobic (stationary cycling) conditions. The following baseline/follow-up measurements were taken: high-resolution MRI (neuroanatomical volumes), fMRI (functional connectivity), and memory assessment. Intervention was 30-minute sessions 3 times per week for 3 months. Aerobic exercise resulted in 16.5% increase in hippocampal volume and 53.7% increase in memory, as well as increased hippocampal resting-state functional connectivity. Improvements were specific, with no comparable changes in overall cerebral gray matter (+2.4%), non-hippocampal deep gray matter structures (thalamus, caudate: -4.0%), or in non-memory cognitive functioning (executive functions, processing speed, working memory: changes ranged from -11% to +4%). Non-aerobic exercise resulted in relatively no change in hippocampal volume (2.8%) or memory (0.0%), and no changes in hippocampal functional connectivity. This is the first evidence for aerobic exercise to increase hippocampal volume and connectivity and improve memory in multiple sclerosis. Aerobic exercise represents a cost-effective, widely available, natural, and self-administered treatment with no adverse side effects that may be the first effective memory treatment for multiple sclerosis patients.

  10. Preoperative Supervised Exercise Improves Outcomes After Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Hashem M; Shahin, Yousef; Khan, Junaid A; McCollum, Peter T; Chetter, Ian C

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the impact of a preoperative medically supervised exercise program on outcomes after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Functional capacity is an important predictor of postoperative outcomes after elective AAA repair. Improving patients' preoperative fitness with exercise has the potential to positively influence recovery. A randomized controlled trial was performed at a tertiary vascular unit. Patients scheduled for open or endovascular AAA repair were randomized to either 6 weeks of preoperative supervised exercise or standard treatment using sealed envelopes. The primary outcome measure was a composite endpoint of cardiac, pulmonary, and renal complications. Secondary outcome measures were 30-day mortality, lengths of hospital and critical care stay, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, reoperation, and postoperative bleeding. One hundred twenty-four patients were randomized (111 men, mean [SD] age 73 [7] y). Fourteen patients sustained postoperative complications in the exercise group (22.6%), compared with 26 in the nonexercise group (41.9%; P = 0.021). Four patients (2 in each group) died within the first 30 postoperative days. Duration of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the exercise group (median 7 [interquartile range 5-9] vs 8 [interquartile range 6-12.3] d; P = 0.025). There were no significant differences between the groups in the length of critical care stay (P = 0.845), APACHE II scores (P = 0.256), incidence of reoperations (P = 1.000), or postoperative bleeding (P = 0.343). A period of preoperative supervised exercise training reduces postoperative cardiac, respiratory, renal complications, and length of hospital stay in patients undergoing elective AAA repair.

  11. Exercise training programs to improve hand rim wheelchair propulsion capacity: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinkels, M.G.J.; Verschuren, O.W.; Janssen, T.; Ketelaar, M.; Takken, T.; Backx, F.J.G.; Groot, J.F. de; Smits, D.W.; Volman, MJM

    2014-01-01

    Objective: An adequate wheelchair propulsion capacity is required to perform daily life activities. Exercise training may be effective to gain or improve wheelchair propulsion capacity. This review investigates whether different types of exercise training programs are effective in improving

  12. Exercise training programs to improve hand rim wheelchair propulsion capacity: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinkels, M.; Verschuren, O.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Ketelaar, M.; Takken, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: An adequate wheelchair propulsion capacity is required to perform daily life activities. Exercise training may be effective to gain or improve wheelchair propulsion capacity. This review investigates whether different types of exercise training programs are effective in improving

  13. Dysfunctional endogenous analgesia during exercise in patients with chronic pain: to exercise or not to exercise?

    OpenAIRE

    Nijs, Jo; Kosek, Eva; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Meeus, Mira

    2012-01-01

    Background: Exercise is an effective treatment for various chronic pain disorders, including fibromyalgia, chronic neck pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic low back pain. Although the clinical benefits of exercise therapy in these populations are well established (i.e. evidence based), it is currently unclear whether exercise has positive effects on the processes involved in chronic pain (e.g. central pain modulation). Objectives: Reviewing the available evidence addres...

  14. Waltz dancing in patients with chronic heart failure: new form of exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, Romualdo; Lacalaprice, Francesca; Ventrella, Chiara; Volpe, Loretta; Faccenda, Ernesto

    2008-07-01

    There is evidence that aerobic exercise improves functional capacity in patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II and III chronic heart failure. However, it is unknown whether dancing is safe and able to improve functional capacity in patients with chronic heart failure. We prospectively studied 130 patients with stable chronic heart failure (107 men; mean age, 59+/-11 years) in New York Heart Association class II and III and left ventricle ejection fraction dance protocol of alternate slow (5 minutes) and fast (3 minutes) waltz lasting 21 minutes (group D, n=44). A group that did not undergo exercise training served as control (group C, n=42). On study entry and at 8 weeks, all patients underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing on a cycle ergometer until volitional fatigue, 2D-echo with Doppler, and endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery. Heart rate was 111+/-15 bpm during exercise training and 113+/-19 bpm during dancing (P=0.59). Peak o(2), anaerobic threshold, e/co(2) slope, and o(2)/W slope were all similarly improved in both E and D groups (+16% and 18%, 20% and 21%, 14% and 15%, 18% and 19%, respectively; P not significant for all comparisons; Pdancing is safe and able to improve functional capacity and endothelium-dependent dilation similar to traditional aerobic exercise training. Waltz dancing may be considered in clinical practice in combination with aerobic exercise training or as an alternative to it.

  15. Adaptation of macrophages to exercise training improves innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizaki, Takako; Takemasa, Tohru; Sakurai, Takuya; Izawa, Tetsuya; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kamiya, Shigeru; Haga, Shukoh; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko; Ohno, Hideki

    2008-07-18

    The effects of 3-week exercise training on the functions of peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice were investigated. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) and proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages from trained mice was markedly higher than those from control mice. Meanwhile, exercise training decreased the steady state level of beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR) mRNA in macrophages. Overexpression of beta(2)AR in the macrophage cell line RAW264 by transfecting with beta(2)AR cDNA suppressed NO synthase (NOS) II expression but dose not influenced proinflammatory cytokine expression. When expression of transfected beta(2)AR in RAWar cells was downregulated by a tetracycline repressor-regulated mammalian expression system, NOS II mRNA expression was significantly increased; this suggested that the changes in the beta(2)AR expression level in macrophages associated with exercise training play a role in the regulation of NO production following LPS stimulation. These findings indicate that exercise training improves macrophage innate immune function in a beta(2)AR-dependent and -independent manner.

  16. Physical exercise : effects in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Physical exercise plays an important role in cancer prevention as well as in the prevention and treatment of cancer related fatigue during and after treatment. Some of these effects are presented in the thesis of M.J. Velthuis. In Part I effects of physical exercise on anthropometric measurements

  17. Increased Releasability of Skin Mast Cells after Exercise in Patients with Exercise-induced Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Inseon S Choi; Koh, Youngil I.; Chung, Se-Woong; Lim, Ho

    2004-01-01

    The role of lung mast cells in exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is controversial. To investigate whether the skin mast cell releasability is increased after exercise in EIA, 49 young atopic men with or without asthma took part in a free-running test for 6 min and were given skin prick tests using morphine, a mast cell secretagogue, before and after the exercise. The mean diameters of the wheal induced by morphine in patients with EIA were not significantly different from those in patients withou...

  18. Movement control exercise versus general exercise to reduce disability in patients with low back pain and movement control impairment. A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saner, Jeannette; Kool, Jan; de Bie, Rob A; Sieben, Judith M; Luomajoki, Hannu

    2011-09-23

    Non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) in subacute and chronic stages can be treated effectively with exercise therapy. Research guidelines recommend evaluating different treatments in defined subgroups of patients with NSLBP. A subgroup of patients with movement control impairment (MCI) improved significantly on patient specific function and disability in a previous case series after movement control exercises. In a randomised controlled trial (RCT) we will compare the effectiveness of movement control and general exercise in patients with MCI. 106 participants aged 18 - 75 will be recruited in 5 outpatient hospital departments and 7 private practices.Patients randomly assigned to the movement control exercise group will be instructed to perform exercises according to their MCI. The general exercise group will follow an exercise protocol aimed at improving endurance and flexibility. Patients in both groups will receive 9 - 18 treatments and will be instructed to do additional exercises at home.The primary outcome is the level of disability assessed using the patient specific functional scale (PSFS) which links the perceived pain to functional situations and is measured before treatment and at 6 and 12 months follow-up. Secondary outcomes concern low back pain related disability (Roland Morris questionnaire, RMQ), graded chronic pain scale (GCPS), range of motion and tactile acuity. To our knowledge this study will be the first to compare two exercise programs for a specific subgroup of patients with NSLBP and MCI. Results of this study will provide insight into the effectiveness of movement control exercise and contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms behind MCI and its relation to NSLBP. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80064281.

  19. EFFECT OF DANCE EXERCISE ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME: A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wook Song

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group. The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants using the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease (CERAD-K. Repeated-measures ANCOVA was used to assess the effect of dance exercise on cognitive function and cardiometabolic risk factors. Compared with the control group, the exercise group significantly improved in verbal fluency (p = 0.048, word list delayed recall (p = 0.038, word list recognition (p = 0.007, and total CERAD-K score (p = 0.037. However, no significance difference was found in body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol between groups over the 6-month period. In the present study, six months of dance exercise improved cognitive function in older adults with metabolic syndrome. Thus, dance exercise may reduce the risk for cognitive disorders in elderly people with metabolic syndrome.

  20. The Association Between Insomnia Symptoms and Mood Changes During Exercise Among Patients Enrolled in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Codie R; Horsley, Kristin J; Morse, Erin; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Bacon, Simon L; Campbell, Tavis S

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia symptoms (ie, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and early awakenings) are common among patients with cardiovascular disease and may interfere with the beneficial impact of exercise on mood state. This study investigated the association of insomnia symptom severity with mood disturbance and with changes in mood state during exercise in a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) population. Insomnia symptom severity was measured using the Insomnia Severity Index upon admission to a 12-week CR program (n = 57). The Physical Activity Affect Scale was administered before and during a single bout of moderate intensity exercise to measure changes in mood state. Indices of mood disturbance included depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and pre-exercise mood state (Physical Activity Affect Scale). Greater severity of insomnia symptoms was associated with less pleasant mood overall (r = -0.45, P positive affect (r = -0.39, P = .003), and worse fatigue (r = 0.36, P = .005); greater insomnia symptom severity also predicted greater improvements during exercise in both overall mood state (b = 0.26, standard error = 0.10, P = .009) and tranquility (b = 0.09, standard error = 0.04, P = .04), following statistical adjustment for demographic variables and pre-exercise mood state. Although CR patients reporting insomnia symptoms tend to experience daytime mood disturbance, they may benefit from mood-elevating properties of exercise. Future research is needed to help optimize mood during exercise, which may have implications for improving psychological distress and CR adherence.

  1. Does exercise improve self-reported sleep quality in non-remitted major depressive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethorst, C D; Sunderajan, P; Greer, T L; Grannemann, B D; Nakonezny, P A; Carmody, T J; Trivedi, M H

    2013-04-01

    Sleep disturbances are persistent residual symptoms following remission of major depressive disorder (MDD) and are associated with an increased risk of MDD recurrence. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of exercise augmentation on self-reported sleep quality in participants with non-remitted MDD. Method Participants were randomized to receive selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) augmentation with one of two doses of exercise: 16 kilocalories per kilogram of body weight per week (KKW) or 4 KKW for 12 weeks. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the clinician-rated Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C). The four sleep-related items on the IDS-C (Sleep Onset Insomnia, Mid-Nocturnal Insomnia, Early Morning Insomnia, and Hypersomnia) were used to assess self-reported sleep quality. Significant decreases in total insomnia (p depressive symptoms. Higher baseline hypersomnia predicted a greater decrease in depression severity following exercise treatment (p = 0.0057). No significant moderating effect of any baseline sleep on change in depression severity was observed. There were no significant differences between exercise treatment groups on total insomnia or any individual sleep item. Exercise augmentation resulted in improvements in self-reported sleep quality in patients with non-remitted MDD. Given the prevalence of insomnia as a residual symptom following MDD treatment and the associated risk of MDD recurrence, exercise augmentation may have an important role in the treatment of MDD.

  2. Effect of intermittent aerobic exercise on sleep quality and sleep disturbances in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løppenthin, Katrine; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Jennum, Poul

    2014-01-01

    of an intermittent aerobic exercise intervention on sleep, assessed both objectively and subjectively in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial including 44 patients with rheumatoid arthritis randomly assigned to an exercise training intervention or to a control group....... The intervention consists of 18 session intermittent aerobic exercise training on a bicycle ergometer three times a week. Patients are evaluated according to objective changes in sleep as measured by polysomnography (primary outcome). Secondary outcomes include changes in subjective sleep quality and sleep...... disturbances, fatigue, pain, depressive symptoms, physical function, health-related quality of life and cardiorespiratory fitness. DISCUSSION: This trial will provide evidence of the effect of intermittent aerobic exercise on the improvement of sleep in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which is considered...

  3. Comparison of effects of a proprioceptive exercise program in water and on land the balance of chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seul Ki; Kim, Myung Chul; An, Chang Sik

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in balance ability of land exercise and underwater exercise on chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] A total of 60 patients received exercise for 40 minutes, three times a week, for 6 weeks. [Methods] Subjects from both groups performed general conventional treatment during the experimental period. In addition, all subjects engaged in extra treatment sessions. This extra treatment consisted of unstable surface exercise. The underwater exercise group used wonder boards in a pool (depth 1.1m, water temperature 33.5 °C, air temperature 27 °C) dedicated to underwater exercise, and the land exercise group used balance mats. [Result] The joint position sense, sway area, Berg Balance Scale showed significant improvements in both groups. However, the joint position sense test, sway area, and Berg Balance Scale showed there was more improvement in the underwater exercise group than in the land exercise group. [Conclusion] The results suggest that underwater exercise is more effective than land exercise at improving the joint position sense and balance of stroke patients.

  4. Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; thor Straten, Eivind Per

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors and a greater than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Improved immunological control of tumor progression may have important clinical implications in the prevention...... and treatment of cancer in humans....

  5. Exercise improves fat metabolism in muscle but does not increase 24-h fat oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Melanson, Edward L; Paul S MacLean; Hill, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of research into the effects of exercise on fat metabolism, there is still no clear understanding of how exercise helps to regulate fat mass. Although exercise improves the capacity of muscle to oxidize fat, our studies suggest that moderate duration exercise (≤ 1 hr) has little impact on 24-h fat oxidation.

  6. [Exercise program for chronic low back pain based on common clinical characteristics of patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2014-01-01

    exercises for gluteal muscles and 6. Flexion exercises for improvement of LS spine mobility. Our exercise program for CLBP comes unavoidably as a program of first choice in CLBP treatment. The main advantage of our program compared to standard programs is reflected in the targeted action on dysfunctional muscles and hypomobile facet joints. According to the results of our study, extension exercises for strengthening of lumbar extensors and hyperextension exercises for improvement of LS spine mobility are not appropriate for the majority of patients with CLBP.

  7. THE EFFECT OF TELE-MONITORING ON EXERCISE TRAINING ADHERENCE, FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY, QUALITY OF LIFE AND GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Marios

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We used tele-monitoring to attempt to improve exercise adherence (number of hours of exercise completed, peak VO2, HbA1c% and quality of life in an unsupervised, home based exercise program in people with type II diabetes, a cost analysis was also conducted. Thirty-nine patients with type II diabetes were randomized to tele-monitoring (TELE or control (CON groups. All patients were asked to complete 6 months exercise training and complete an exercise activity diary. The TELE group was instructed to record their exercise heart rates using a monitor and received weekly telephone calls from an exercise physiologist. Six TELE patients and seven CON patients did not complete the 6 month testing. TELE patients completed a mean weekly volume of 138 minutes, moderate intensity exercise, while CON patients completed 58 minutes weekly (p < 0.02. Neither group achieved the American Heart Association statement guideline for weekly exercise volume of 150 minutes. TELE patients improved peak VO2 (5.5 %, but neither group improved HbA1c% or quality of life. The CON group showed a 4.9% reduction in peak VO2. While tele-monitored patients completed more hours of exercise and demonstrated improved peak VO2 compared to controls, the exercise volume completed was insufficient to improve glycemic control. There is the potential via tele-monitoring to enable people with diabetes to meet exercise training guidelines.

  8. Prescribing exercise to help your patients lose weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, John P; Higgins, Christopher L

    2016-02-01

    Exercise, in conjunction with diet, is critical to losing weight and maintaining health in obese patients. While it can be challenging for an obese person to transition to a healthy lifestyle, the physical and emotional benefits of a regular exercise program make it worth the effort. Copyright © 2016 Cleveland Clinic.

  9. Smoking Counteracts the Favorable Effect of Exercise Training on Endothelial Function in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Shinji; Nakayama, Noriko; Otsuki, Shingo; Tanaka, Shiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki; Nohara, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    Background Exercise training can improve endothelial function in patients with diabetes. We hypothesized that the favorable effect of exercise training on endothelial function in patients with diabetes is counteracted by cigarette smoking. Purpose: To assess whether there is a difference in the effect of exercise on endothelial function in smokers and non-smokers with type 2 diabetes. Methods: We performed a 3-month controlled trial in 27 never-smoking and 17 smoking individuals with type 2 d...

  10. The effects of prone bridge exercise on the Oswestry disability index and proprioception of patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong-Soo; Jang, Gwon-Uk; Park, Seol

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of bridge exercises on the Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores and proprioception among patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). [Subjects and Methods] A total of 38 patients participated in this study. After eight weeks of bridge exercise, the joint position angle of the body trunk was measured and the ODI was used in survey form to investigate the intensity of the patients' low back pain. [Results] After eight weeks of exercise, the ODI showed significant differences in all three groups. Subjects' joint position sense of the trunk in both lumbar flexion and extension was also significantly different after completing the exercise program; this was true for all three groups. [Conclusion] Performing the prone bridge exercise for eight weeks improved proprioceptive function and reduced pain and impediment of activity, showing it a more effective exercise than other bridge exercises.

  11. Improved cardiac function and exercise capacity following correction of pectus excavatum: a review of current literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiberg, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with pectus excavatum (PE) often describe improvements in exercise stamina following corrective surgery. Studies have investigated the surgical effect on physiological parameters; still, no consensus has yet been reached. Therefore, the aim of this literature review was to describe the cardiac outcome after surgical correction, both at rest and during exercise. In February 2016, a detailed search of the databases PubMed, Medline, and EMBASE was performed. We assessed clinical studies that described cardiac outcomes both before and after surgical correction of PE. We only included studies reporting either pre-defined echocardiographic or exercise test parameters. No exclusion criteria or statistical analyses were applied. Twenty-one full-text articles, published between 1972 and 2016, were selected, with cohort-ranges of 3–168 patients, mean age-ranges of 5–33 years, and mean follow-up-ranges from immediately to 4 years after surgery. Twelve studies described resting cardiac parameters. Four studies measured cardiac output, where one described 36% immediate increase after surgery, one reported 15% increase after Nuss-bar removal and two found no difference. Three studies demonstrated improvement in mean stroke volume ranges of 22–34% and two studies found no difference. Fifteen studies investigated exercise capacity, with 11 considering peak O2 pr. kg, where five studies demonstrated improvements with the mean ranging from 8% to 15% after surgery, five studies demonstrated no difference, and one saw a decrease of 19% 3 months after Nuss-bar implantation. A measurable increase in exercise capacity exists following surgery, which may be caused by multiple factors. This may be owed to the relief of compressed cardiac chambers with the increased anterior-posterior thoracic dimensions, which could facilitate an improved filling of the heart. With these results, the positive physiological impact of the surgery is emphasized and the potential gain in cardiac

  12. Increased releasability of skin mast cells after exercise in patients with exercise-induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Inseon S; Koh, Youngil I; Chung, Se-Woong; Lim, Ho

    2004-10-01

    The role of lung mast cells in exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is controversial. To investigate whether the skin mast cell releasability is increased after exercise in EIA, 49 young atopic men with or without asthma took part in a free-running test for 6 min and were given skin prick tests using morphine, a mast cell secretagogue, before and after the exercise. The mean diameters of the wheal induced by morphine in patients with EIA were not significantly different from those in patients without EIA before exercise, although the baseline lung function was significantly lower and the airway hyperresponsiveness, the peripheral blood eosinophil count, and the size of the wheal in response to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus were significantly higher in patients with EIA. However, the differences of the morphine-induced wheal diameter between patients with EIA and those without EIA became significant at 120 min after exercise (presponses to histamine were not significantly different. These results suggest that exercise increases the releasability of skin mast cells in EIA patients whose asthma/allergy are relatively severe.

  13. Does exercise improve glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Kennedy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Whilst regular exercise is advocated for people with type 1 diabetes, the benefits of this therapy are poorly delineated. Our objective was to review the evidence for a glycaemic benefit of exercise in type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Electronic database searches were carried out in MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane's Controlled Trials Register and SPORTDiscus. In addition, we searched for as yet unpublished but completed trials. Glycaemic benefit was defined as an improvement in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c. Both randomised and non-randomised controlled trials were included. RESULTS: Thirteen studies were identified in the systematic review. Meta-analysis of twelve of these (including 452 patients demonstrated an HbA1c reduction but this was not statistically significant (standardised mean difference (SMD -0.25; 95% CI, -0.59 to 0.09. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis does not reveal evidence for a glycaemic benefit of exercise as measured by HbA1c. Reasons for this finding could include increased calorie intake, insulin dose reductions around the time of exercise or lack of power. We also suggest that HbA1c may not be a sensitive indicator of glycaemic control, and that improvement in glycaemic variability may not be reflected in this measure. Exercise does however have other proven benefits in type 1 diabetes, and remains an important part of its management.

  14. Swiss ball exercises improves muscle strength and walking performance in ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Marcelo Cardoso de; Jennings, Fábio; Morimoto, Hisa; Natour, Jamil

    2016-09-17

    The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of a progressive muscle strengthening program using a Swiss ball for AS patients. Sixty patients with AS were randomized into the intervention group (IG) or the control group (CG). Eight exercises were performed by the IG patients with free weights on a Swiss ball two times per week for 16 weeks. The evaluations were performed by a blinded evaluator at baseline and after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks using the following instruments: the one-repetition maximum test (1 RM), BASMI, BASFI, HAQ-S, SF-36, 6-minute walk test, Time Up and Go test, BASDAI, ASDAS, ESR and CRP dosage and Likert scale. There was a statistical difference between groups for: strength (1RM capacity) in the following exercises: abdominal, rowing, squat, triceps and reverse fly (pSwiss ball is effective for improving muscle strength and walking performance in patients with AS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  15. Swiss ball exercises improve muscle strength and walking performance in ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Marcelo Cardoso de; Jennings, Fábio; Morimoto, Hisa; Natour, Jamil

    The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of a progressive muscle strengthening program using a Swiss ball for AS patients. Sixty patients with AS were randomized into the intervention group (IG) or the control group (CG). Eight exercises were performed by the IG patients with free weights on a Swiss ball two times per week for 16 weeks. The evaluations were performed by a blinded evaluator at baseline and after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks using the following instruments: the one-repetition maximum test (1 RM), BASMI, BASFI, HAQ-S, SF-36, 6-minute walk test, time up and go test, BASDAI, ASDAS, ESR and CRP dosage and Likert scale. There was a statistical difference between groups for: strength (1 RM capacity) in the following exercises: abdominal, rowing, squat, triceps and reverse fly (pSwiss ball is effective for improving muscle strength and walking performance in patients with AS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Exercise Improves Physical Function and Mental Health of Brain Cancer Survivors: Two Exploratory Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Gregory T; Greenwood, Kenneth M; Singh, Favil; Tsoi, Daphne; Newton, Robert U

    2016-06-01

    Background Malignant brain tumors are unpredictable and incurable, with 5-year survival rates less than 30%. The poor prognosis combined with intensive treatment necessitates the inclusion of complementary and supportive therapies that optimize quality of life and reduce treatment-related declines in health. Exercise therapy has been shown to be beneficial in other cancer populations, but no evidence is available for brain cancer survivors. Therefore, we report results from 2 preliminary cases. Methods Two female patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme and oligodendroglioma participated in a structured and supervised 12-week exercise program. The program consisted of two 1-hour resistance and aerobic exercise sessions per week and additional self-managed aerobic sessions. Outcome measures of strength, cardiovascular fitness, and several psychological indicators (depression, anxiety, and quality of life) were recorded at baseline, after 6 weeks and at the conclusion of the intervention. Results Exercise was well tolerated; both participants completed all 24 sessions and the home-based component with no adverse effects. Objective outcome measures displayed positive responses relating to reduced morbidity. Similar positive responses were found for psychological outcomes. Scores on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale showed clinically meaningful improvements in depression and total distress. Conclusion These findings provide initial evidence that, despite the difficulties associated with brain cancer treatment and survivorship, exercise may be safe and beneficial and should be considered in the overall management of patients with brain cancer. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Preliminary Effectiveness and Sustainability of Group Aerobic Exercise Program in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sol; Ryu, Je-Kwang; Kim, Chan-Hyung; Chang, Jhin-Goo; Lee, Hwa-Bock; Kim, Do-Hoon; Roh, Daeyoung

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility and sustained effect of a group aerobic exercise program in patients with schizophrenia. Twenty-four schizophrenic patients participated in a group-based individually tailored 90-minute outdoor cycling session per week for 3 months with intervention to enhance motivation. Physical health was evaluated by anthropometric measures, cardiorespiratory (CR) fitness, and blood tests. Mental health was assessed on self-esteem, interpersonal relationship, quality of life, and global function. Attrition rate for the exercise program was 8.3%. Exercise program significantly increased participant's self-esteem, positive relationship, global function, and quality of life. CR fitness significantly improved after 3 months. At the 9-month follow-up, 6 months after program completion, only in interpersonal relationship change the improved effects were maintained. These findings support the feasibility of group aerobic exercise program with high level of adherence and its long-term benefits in positive relationship change.

  18. Impact of exercise on quality of life and body-self perception of patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Topsakal, Nuri; Atilgan, Oya Erkut; Alcalar, Nilufer; Camliguney, Asiye Filiz; Niyazoglu, Mutlu; Cotuk, Hasan Birol; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2014-02-01

    In acromegaly the impact of therapy on well-being and self-perception of patients is not clearly defined. The data existing on the effect of treatment on health-related quality of life in patients with acromegaly is inconclusive. In this study we addressed the effect of exercise on health-related quality of life, symptoms of depression and perception of body image in patients with acromegaly. Patients with acromegaly were stratified into two groups according to their participation in a prescheduled program of exercise. Participants in the study group performed exercise for 75 min a day for 3 days a week during cosecutive 3 months. Warming, cardio, strength, balance and stretching moves applied in every course. Both the exercise group and control group were asked to complete a questionnaire on quality of life, symptoms of depression and self-perception of body image. Each questionnaire was answered by both groups before the beginning of the exercise program (at month-0) and after the completion of the program (at month-3). In exercise group after the completion of exercise period there was a tendency towards decreament in body mass index and IGF-I, although not statistically significant (p = 0.08 and p = 0.09). Self-assessment of body image improved significantly after participation in the exercise program (p = 0.01). Present findings support that exercise may be an adjunctive method for patients with acromegaly to improve self esteem and perception.

  19. Effects of a multimodal exercise program on the functional capacity of Parkinson's disease patients considering disease severity and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Orcioli-Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a multimodal exercise program (MEP on the functional capacity of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD according to disease severity and gender. Fourteen patients with PD participated in the study and were distributed into groups according to 1 stage of disease and 2 gender. Functional capacity was evaluated before and after 6 months of intervention. The overall PD patient group improved their coordination and strength. Men and women improved in strength performance after exercise. Men also improved on coordination. For severity of disease, the unilateral group improved in strength, while the bilateral group improved in strength, balance, coordination and the UPDRS-functional score. In conclusion, a MEP is efficient in improving components of functional capacity in patients with PD, especially in strength. Gender may be considered in the exercise program. Individuals in the bilateral disease group appeared to benefit more from exercise.

  20. Response of the oxygen uptake efficiency slope to exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laethem, Christophe; Van De Veire, Nico; De Backer, Guy; Bihija, Salhi; Seghers, Tony; Cambier, Dirk; Vanderheyden, Marc; De Sutter, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) is a new exercise parameter that provides prognostic power in patients with CHF. Little is known about the effects of exercise training (ET) on OUES. To describe the response of OUES to 6 months of ET in CHF patients and compare its evolution to that of other exercise variables. 35 patients with CHF (NYHA II-III, age 54+/-9y, LVEF 31+/-10%) performed 3 maximal exercise tests, i.e. at the start, middle and end of a 6 month ET program. OUES, PeakVO(2), ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) and slope VE/VCO(2) were determined. OUES, peakVO(2), VAT, slope VE/VCO(2), peak Watt, 6MWT and NYHA-class improved during the first part of the ET period (p<0.05). Only VAT, peak Watt and 6MWT continued to improve during the second part of the ET period (p<0.05) Improvements in OUES correlated better with improvements in peakVO(2) (r=0.77, p<0.001), than changes in other prognostic variables. OUES improves significantly after 6 months of ET. Changes in peakVO(2) correlate best with changes in OUES. OUES is sensitive to ET and can be used to evaluate the progression of exercise capacity in CHF patients.

  1. Improved Left Ventricular Diastolic Function with Exercise Training in Hypertension: A Doppler Imaging Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the effects of 6 months’ exercise training on ventricular function in hypertensive patients. Methods. Both groups received routine anti-hypertensive pharmacological therapy and one received a 6 months’ exercise program in addition. All patients underwent incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test and echocardiography in baseline and after 6 months. Results. (1 In 6 months’ follow-up, PeakVO2, Powermax (max workload, AT (anaerobic threshold, VO2AT (VO2 at anaerobic threshold, tAT (time from beginning to anaerobic threshold (<.05, were increased in the exercise group. HRrest (Heart rate at rest was decreased (<.05. LAVI (left atrial volume index, peak mitral filling velocities during early (E and late (A diastole E/A ratio, DT(deceleration time of the mitral E wave, IVST(Interventricular septum thickness in diastole, tissue Doppler indice Mean Ea/Aa ratio (<.05 were also improved. (2 Correlation analysis: 4 variates had significant effect on change of PeakVO2 in the exercise group: age (=−0.39, change of HRrest (=0.59, change of E/A (=0.55, change of Mean Ea/Aa (=0.58; Through analyzing 2 groups patients’ baseline values, their age (=−0.32, VO2AT (=0.29, HRrest (=−0.25, LAVI (=−0.24, E/A (=0.41 were found to be independent predictors of MeanEa/Aa. -value under .05 was considered statistically significant. Conclusion. 6 months’ exercise could enhance hypertensive patients’ aerobic exercise level and diastolic function to a certain extent.

  2. [Adaptation to intermittent hypoxia-hyperoxia improves cognitive performance and exercise tolerance in elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, U; Glazachev, O S; Likar, R; Burtscher, M; Kofler, W; Pinter, G; Stettner, H; Demschar, S; Trummer, B; Neuwersch, S

    2017-01-01

    For improvements in exercise tolerance and cognitive function in geriatric patients Multimodal training programs (MTP) are used as combination of physiotherapy, occupational therapy and cardiovascular training. Intermittent Hypoxic-Hyperoxic Training (IHHT), a modified type of intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) is proposed to be included in MTP to elicit more pronounced beneficial effects in exercise tolerance and cognitive functions of geriatric patients likely by an additional pathway than a single MTP. Thirty four patients of the Geriatric Day Clinic aged between 64 and 92 years participated in the placebo controlled clinical trial. They were randomly assigned to receive MTP plus IHHT (experimental group - EG) or MTP plus placebo-breathing through a machine face mask (control group - CG) in a double blind fashion. Before and after the interventions course cognitive performance was assessed by the Dementia-Detection-Test (DemTect) and the Clock-Drawing-Test (CDT), and functional exercise capacity - by the total distance of 6-Minute-Walk-Test (6MWT). After IHHT combined with MTP cognitive performance (DemTect) increased significantly when compared to NG (+16,7 % vs. +0,39 %, pcognitive performance and exercise capacity in elderly performing MTP. IHHT sessions are considered to be easily applicable to and well tolerated by geriatric patients up to 92 years.

  3. Refining Measurement of Social Cognitive Theory Factors Associated with Exercise Adherence in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Laura Q; Fogleman, Amanda; Verhulst, Steven; Bhugra, Mudita; Rao, Krishna; Malone, James; Robbs, Randall; Robbins, K Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Social cognitive theory (SCT) measures related to exercise adherence in head and neck cancer (HNCa) patients were developed. Enrolling 101 HNCa patients, psychometric properties and associations with exercise behavior were examined for barriers self-efficacy, perceived barriers interference, outcome expectations, enjoyment, and goal setting. Cronbach's alpha ranged from.84 to.95; only enjoyment demonstrated limited test-retest reliability. Subscales for barriers self-efficacy (motivational, physical health) and barriers interference (motivational, physical health, time, environment) were identified. Multiple SCT constructs were cross-sectional correlates and prospective predictors of exercise behavior. These measures can improve the application of the SCT to exercise adherence in HNCa patients.

  4. EFFECT OF HIGH-INTENSITY EXERCISE ON ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH T2DM

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Carlos Alberto da; Lopes Vasconcelos-Filho, Francisco Sérgio; Serafim, Marcus; Botura, Edson; Rocha-e-Silva, Roberta Cristina da; Pacheco, Christina; Marques, Fernando Antônio Oliveira; Melo, Sebastião Iberes Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disease worldwide. Endothelial dysfunction characteristic of these patients is one of the major risk factors for atherosclerosis. Early diagnosis of endothelial dysfunction is essential for the treatment especially of non-invasive manner, such as flow mediated dilation. Physical exercise is capable of generating beneficial adaptations may improve endothelial function. Objective: Identify the effect of physical exercise, using the...

  5. Early exercise rehabilitation of muscle weakness in acute respiratory failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Michael J; Morris, Peter E

    2013-10-01

    Acute respiratory failure patients experience significant muscle weakness, which contributes to prolonged hospitalization and functional impairments after hospital discharge. Based on our previous work, we hypothesize that an exercise intervention initiated early in the intensive care unit aimed at improving skeletal muscle strength could decrease hospital stay and attenuate the deconditioning and skeletal muscle weakness experienced by these patients.

  6. A better response in exercise capacity after pulmonary rehabilitation in more severe COPD patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altenburg, Wytske A.; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Wempe, Johan B.

    Purpose: Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has positive effects on exercise capacity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). However, not all COPD patients benefit from PR to the same extent. We investigated whether there is a patient profile, which is associated with the improvement in

  7. Rehabilitation outcome in home-based versus supervised exercise programs for chronically dizzy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Chen, Liang-Kung; Chern, Chang-Ming; Hsu, Li-Chi; Chen, Chih-Chun; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation (VR) exercise between supervised and home-based programs in young and senior age groups of patients with chronic dizziness. Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), Dynamic gait index (DGI), Tinetti fall risk performance scales and Timed "Up and Go" test (TUG) were administered to patients on their initial and follow-up visits for forty-one patients suffering from chronic dizziness. Twenty-eight patients received three 30-min vestibular training exercise sessions per week. Thirteen patients who could not visit our clinic on regular basis were instructed to do the same set of exercises at home, with the same duration and frequency. All scales were evaluated again on their follow-up visits 2 months later. Patients in both groups showed statistically significant improvement in DHI and Tinetti scales. A higher percentage of patients in the supervised-exercise-program (SP) group showed clinically significant outcome improvements. Age was not a predictive factor for rehabilitation outcome. We concluded that for all ages of chronically dizzy patients, 2 months of VR can reduce handicap, improve balance function and a consequent improvement of life quality. Health care professionals need to be educated about the importance of rehabilitation program for treatment of chronic dizziness. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effects of prone bridge exercise on trunk muscle thickness in chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong-Soo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Park, Seol; Jang, Gwon-Uk

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of prone bridge exercise on trunk muscle thickness. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven chronic low back pain patients participated in this study. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of three exercise groups, namely, a prone bridge exercise group, supine bridge exercise on a Swiss ball group, and supine bridge exercise group. The thicknesses of the transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) were measured using ultrasound. [Results] After eight weeks of training, the three groups showed significant increases in the thicknesses of the TrA, IO, and EO. Among the groups, TrA and IO showed significantly different muscle thicknesses. [Conclusion] The prone bridge exercise significantly affected the thicknesses of the TrA, IO, and EO unlike the supine bridge exercises. Based on the results of this study, the prone bridge exercise is a more effective method to improve trunk stability than conventional supine bridge exercises.

  9. Can exercise increase fitness and reduce weight in patients with schizophrenia and depression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper eKrogh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPsychiatric patients have a reduced life expectancy of 15 to 20 years compared to the general population. Most years of lost life are due to excess mortality from somatic diseases. Sedentary lifestyle and medication is partly responsible for the high frequency of metabolic syndrome in this patient group and low levels of physical activity is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and all-cause mortality. This study aimed to review trials allocating patients with either schizophrenia or depression to exercise interventions for effect on cardiovascular fitness, strength and weight.MethodsWe searched Pubmed, Embase, and Psycinfo including randomized clinical trial allocating patients with either schizophrenia or depression to isolated exercise interventions.ResultsWe identified five trials including patients with schizophrenia and found little evidence that exercise could increase cardiovascular fitness or decrease weight. Nine exercise trials for patients with depression were identified increasing cardiovascular fitness by 11-30% and strength by 33-37%. No evidence in favor of exercise for weight reduction was found.ConclusionBased on the current evidence isolated exercise interventions are unlikely to improve cardiovascular fitness or induce weight loss in patients with schizophrenia. In patients with depression exercise interventions are likely to induce clinically relevant short term effects, however, due to lack of reporting little is known about the effect on cardiovascular fitness beyond the intervention and weight reduction. Future exercise trials regarding patients with mental illness should preferably measure changes in cardiovascular strength, repetition maximum and anthropometric outcomes. Ideally participants should be assessed beyond the intervention

  10. A 12-Week Exercise Therapy Program in Middle-Aged Patients With Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensrud, Silje; Roos, Ewa M.; Risberg, May Arna

    2012-01-01

    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 STUDY DESIGN: Case Series. BACKGROUND: Exercise is a viable treatment alternative to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with degenerative meniscus tears. No study has reported in detail type of exercises, progres...... if this specific program is significantly better than other interventions. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 5 September 2012. doi:10.2519/jospt.2012.4165......., progression, tolerance, and potential benefit from an exercise therapy program in these patients who have not had surgery. This study describes a progressive exercise therapy program aiming at improving neuromuscular function and muscle strength in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscus tears...

  11. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Stage, M; Laursen, J

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer...... (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home...... exercise and relaxation intervention showed an adherence rate of 76%, whereas the patients failed to comply with the home-based exercise. The hospital-based intervention initiated at time of diagnosis encouraged former sedentary lung cancer patients to participation and was undertaken safely by cancer...

  12. Comparison of the effects of a physiotherapist-supervised exercise programme and a self-supervised exercise programme on quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereli, Elif E; Yaliman, Ayse

    2010-04-01

    To compare the effects of a physiotherapist-supervised exercise programme in an exercise unit and self-supervised home exercise programme on quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. Assessor-blinded, quasi-randomized trial (alternate allocation). An outpatient exercise unit; home settings. Thirty patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Hoehn & Yahr I-III, stable medication use. Patients were included in the physiotherapist-supervised or home group. The exercise programme was performed for 10 weeks, three times/week either under the supervision of a physiotherapist or at home without supervision. Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQLQ), Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Patients in the supervised physiotherapy group improved more than the home exercise group in Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (total score, Parkinson's symptoms, emotional function), Nottingham Health Profile total, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (all domains) and Beck Depression Inventory scores. The exercise programme under physiotherapist supervision was found to be more effective at improving activities of daily living, motor, mental, emotional functions and general health quality in patients with Parkinson's disease compared with a self-supervised home programme.

  13. Caregiver-mediated exercises for improving outcomes after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vloothuis, Judith Dm; Mulder, Marijn; Veerbeek, Janne M; Konijnenbelt, Manin; Visser-Meily, Johanna Ma; Ket, Johannes Cf; Kwakkel, Gert; van Wegen, Erwin Eh

    2016-12-21

    Stroke is a major cause of long-term disability in adults. Several systematic reviews have shown that a higher intensity of training can lead to better functional outcomes after stroke. Currently, the resources in inpatient settings are not always sufficient and innovative methods are necessary to meet these recommendations without increasing healthcare costs. A resource efficient method to augment intensity of training could be to involve caregivers in exercise training. A caregiver-mediated exercise programme has the potential to improve outcomes in terms of body function, activities, and participation in people with stroke. In addition, caregivers are more actively involved in the rehabilitation process, which may increase feelings of empowerment with reduced levels of caregiver burden and could facilitate the transition from rehabilitation facility (in hospital, rehabilitation centre, or nursing home) to home setting. As a consequence, length of stay might be reduced and early supported discharge could be enhanced. To determine if caregiver-mediated exercises (CME) improve functional ability and health-related quality of life in people with stroke, and to determine the effect on caregiver burden. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (October 2015), CENTRAL (the Cochrane Library, 2015, Issue 10), MEDLINE (1946 to October 2015), Embase (1980 to December 2015), CINAHL (1982 to December 2015), SPORTDiscus (1985 to December 2015), three additional databases (two in October 2015, one in December 2015), and six additional trial registers (October 2015). We also screened reference lists of relevant publications and contacted authors in the field. Randomised controlled trials comparing CME to usual care, no intervention, or another intervention as long as it was not caregiver-mediated, aimed at improving motor function in people who have had a stroke. Two review authors independently selected trials. One review author extracted data, and assessed

  14. Patients' views toward knee osteoarthritis exercise therapy and factors influencing adherence - a survey in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Hou, Yunfei; Lin, Jianhao; Wang, Kai; Liu, Qiang

    2018-01-16

    To understand the views toward exercise therapy for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) in China and to analyze factors affecting treatment adherence. A survey-based study, which included multiple choice and open-ended questions on knee OA exercise therapy was conducted in a Chinese population. The content included the respondents' attitudes and beliefs, willingness to receive treatment, and reasons why they could or could not adhere to the treatment. We used Chi-squared tests to compare cognitive differences between the patients and non-patient groups. A total of 1,069 people responded to the questionnaire, and the response rate was 81.8%. A total of 93.6% of the patients thought that they could adhere to the exercise treatment if they received professional advice and prescriptions. The following questionnaire items achieved consensus: 'Increasing the strength of the muscles around the knee stops the knee pain from getting worse,' 'It is the person's own responsibility to continue doing their exercise program,' 'How helpful the exercise program will be determines how well a person sticks to it,' 'Health professionals should educate patients with knee pain about how to change their lifestyle for the better,' and 'Exercise for knee pain is most helpful when it is designed for each person, to suit their own particular needs.' Patient adherence was affected by multiple factors, and some negative factors included 'forgetfulness,' 'getting joint symptoms improved after therapy,' 'professional guidance, subsequent monitoring and supervision,' 'willing to enhance overall health and quality of life,' 'having no time,' 'occupational factors,' 'considering that the pain would worsen while/after exercise,' and 'family factors.' A general Chinese population accepted exercise therapy for treating KOA in our survey. Education is necessary because patients were uncertain and had misunderstandings regarding the potential benefits of exercise therapy. Some factors related to treatment

  15. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmento AO

    2017-06-01

    sympathetic activity compared to physically active older adult subjects at baseline (63.13±3.31 vs 50.45±3.55 nu, P=0.02. The variance (heart rate variability index was increased in active older adults (1,438.64±448.90 vs 1,402.92±385.14 ms, P=0.02, and cardiac sympathetic activity (symbolic analysis was increased in sedentary older adults (5,660.91±1,626.72 vs 4,381.35±1,852.87, P=0.03 during isometric handgrip exercise. Sedentary older adults showed higher cardiac sympathetic activity (spectral analysis (71.29±4.40 vs 58.30±3.50 nu, P=0.03 and lower parasympathetic modulation (28.79±4.37 vs 41.77±3.47 nu, P=0.03 compared to physically active older adult subjects during isometric handgrip exercise. Regarding muscle vasodilation response, there was an increase in the skeletal muscle blood flow in the second (4.1±0.5 vs 3.7±0.4 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.01 and third minute (4.4±0.4 vs 3.9±0.3 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.03 of handgrip exercise in active older adults. The results indicate that regular physical activity improves neurovascular control of muscle blood flow and cardiac autonomic response during isometric handgrip exercise in healthy older adult subjects. Keywords: forearm blood flow, handgrip exercise, heart rate variability, sympathetic, parasympathetic, aging

  16. Exercise training improves free testosterone in lifelong sedentary aging men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence D Hayes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT on systemic hormones in aging men is unstudied to date, we investigated whether total testosterone (TT, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG, free testosterone (free-T and cortisol (all in serum were altered following HIIT in a cohort of 22 lifelong sedentary (62 ± 2 years older men. As HIIT requires preconditioning exercise in sedentary cohorts, participants were tested at three phases, each separated by six-week training; baseline (phase A, following conditioning exercise (phase B and post-HIIT (phase C. Each measurement phase used identical methods. TT was significantly increased following HIIT (~17%; P < 0.001 with most increase occurring during preconditioning (~10%; P = 0.007. Free-T was unaffected by conditioning exercise (P = 0.102 but was significantly higher following HIIT compared to baseline (~4.5%; P = 0.023. Cortisol remained unchanged from A to C (P = 0.138. The present data indicate a combination of preconditioning, and HIIT increases TT and SHBG in sedentary older males, with the HIIT stimulus accounting for a small but statistically significant increase in free-T. Further study is required to determine the biological importance of small improvements in free-T in aging men.

  17. Chicken Essence Improves Exercise Performance and Ameliorates Physical Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ching Huang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chicken essence (CE is a liquid nutritional supplement made from cooking whole chickens. In traditional Chinese medicine, CE is used to support health, promote healing, increase metabolism, and relieve fatigue. However, few studies have examined the effect of CE on exercise performance and physical fatigue. We aimed to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of CE on fatigue and ergogenic functions following physical challenge in mice. Male ICR mice were divided into four groups to receive vehicle or CE by oral gavage at 0, 845, 1690, or 4225 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of physical fatigue-related biomarkers serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase (CK after physical challenge. CE supplementation dose-dependently elevated endurance and grip strength. CE supplementation significantly decreased lactate, ammonia, and CK levels after physical challenge. Tissue glycogen content, an important energy source for exercise, was significantly increased with CE supplementation. In addition, CE supplementation had few subchronic toxic effects. The supplementation with CE can have a wide spectrum of bioactivities on health promotion, performance improvement and anti-fatigue.

  18. Physiologic benefits of exercise training in rehabilitation of patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaburi, R; Porszasz, J; Burns, M R; Carithers, E R; Chang, R S; Cooper, C B

    1997-05-01

    We determined the effect on exercise tolerance and physiological exercise responses of rigorous rehabilitative exercise training in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Fifteen men and 10 women (mean age, 68 +/- 6 yr; FEV1, 0.93 +/- 0.27 L) participated in a rehabilitation program with an exercise component of three per week 45-min sessions of cycle ergometer training for 6 wk with exercise intensity kept near maximal targets. Before and after rehabilitation, patients performed an incremental test and a constant work rate (CWR) test at 80% of the peak work rate in the preprogram incremental test. Ventilation (V(E)) and gas exchange were measured breath by breath; arterialized venous blood was analyzed for blood gas determinations and lactate. Rehabilitation yielded an average increase in peak work rate in the incremental test of 36% (p effect. Further, for identical CWR tasks, V(E) was 10% lower (p exercise training for patients with severe COPD yields more efficient exercise breathing pattern and lower V(E); this is associated with improved exercise tolerance.

  19. Effect of aerobic exercise on physical performance in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Nanna Aue; Hoffmann, Kristine; Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Vogel, Asmus; Vestergaard, Karsten; Brændgaard, Hans; Gottrup, Hanne; Lolk, Annette; Wermuth, Lene; Jakobsen, Søren; Laugesen, Lars; Gergelyffy, Robert; Høgh, Peter; Bjerregaard, Eva; Siersma, Volkert; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Johannsen, Peter; Waldemar, Gunhild; Hasselbalch, Steen Gregers; Beyer, Nina

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge about the feasibility and effects of exercise programs to persons with Alzheimer's disease is lacking. This study investigated the effect of aerobic exercise on physical performance in community-dwelling persons with mild Alzheimer's disease. The single blinded multi-center RCT (ADEX) included 200 patients, median age 71 yrs (50-89). The intervention group received supervised moderate-to-high intensity aerobic exercise 1 hour × 3/week for 16 weeks. Assessments included cardiorespiratory fitness, single-task physical performance, dual-task performance and exercise self-efficacy. Significant between-group differences in change from baseline (mean [95%CI]) favored the intervention group for cardiorespiratory fitness (4.0 [2.3-5.8] ml/kg/min, P exercise self-efficacy (1.7 [0.5-2.8] points, P =0.004). Furthermore, an exercise attendance of ≥66.6% resulted in significant positive effects on single-task physical performance and dual-task performance. Aerobic exercise has the potential to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, single-task physical performance, dual-task performance and exercise self-efficacy in community-dwelling patients with mild Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Anders Revdal, Siri M. Hollekim-Strand, Charlotte B. Ingul

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bo...

  1. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M.; Ingul, Charlotte B.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise...

  2. Insulin resistance and exercise tolerance in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoer, Martin; Monk-Hansen, Tea; Olsen, Rasmus Huan

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage.......Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage....

  3. Strategies for cardiopulmonary exercise testing of pectus excavatum patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh H. Malek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide strategies for cardiopulmonary exercise testing of pectus excavatum patients. Currently, there are no standardized methods for assessing cardiovascular and pulmonary responses in this population; therefore, making comparisons across studies is difficult if not impossible. These strategies are intended for physicians, pulmonary technicians, exercise physiologists, and other healthcare professionals who conduct cardiopulmonary exercise testing on pectus excavatum patients. By using the strategies outlined in this report, comparisons across studies can be made, and the effects of pectus excavatum on cardiopulmonary function can be assessed with greater detail.

  4. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewinter, Christian; Doherty, Patrick; Gale, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR) for patients with heart failure (HF). However, established research has not investigated the longer-term outcomes including mortality and hospitalisation in light of the contemporary management of HF. METHODS......: This was a systematic review including a meta-analysis of EBCR on all-cause mortality, hospital admission, and standardised exercise capacity using four separate exercise tests in patients with heart failure over a minimum follow-up of six months from January 1999-January 2013. Electronic searches were performed...

  5. Respiratory muscle function and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charususin, Noppawan; Dacha, Sauwaluk; Gosselink, Rik; Decramer, Marc; Von Leupoldt, Andreas; Reijnders, Thomas; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Langer, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is common and contributes to dyspnea and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Improving dynamic function of respiratory muscles during exercise might help to reduce symptoms and improve exercise capacity. Areas covered: The aims of this review are to 1) summarize physiological mechanisms linking respiratory muscle dysfunction to dyspnea and exercise limitation; 2) provide an overview of available therapeutic approaches to better maintain load-capacity balance of respiratory muscles during exercise; and 3) to summarize current knowledge on potential mechanisms explaining effects of interventions aimed at optimizing dynamic respiratory muscle function with a special focus on inspiratory muscle training. Expert commentary: Several mechanisms which are potentially linking improvements in dynamic respiratory muscle function to symptomatic and functional benefits have not been studied so far in COPD patients. Examples of underexplored areas include the study of neural processes related to the relief of acute dyspnea and the competition between respiratory and peripheral muscles for limited energy supplies during exercise. Novel methodologies are available to non-invasively study these mechanisms. Better insights into the consequences of dynamic respiratory muscle dysfunction will hopefully contribute to further refine and individualize therapeutic approaches in patients with COPD.

  6. Effects of amiodarone on erect and supine exercise haemodynamics and exercise capacity in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenneaux, M P; Counihan, P J; Porter, A; Lipkin, D P; McKenna, W J

    1992-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary heart muscle disease associated with a high incidence of sudden death. Amiodarone is of benefit in those patients with a high risk profile for sudden death. Amiodarone has also been reported to improve symptoms dramatically in some patients with HCM but to cause functional deterioration in others. In the acute phase of oral amiodarone therapy there are few discernable changes in cardiovascular haemodynamics and the mechanisms of any beneficial effects on symptoms remain unclear. To determine the effect of amiodarone on exercise responses we measured haemodynamic indices in 10 patients during maximal supine- and symptom-limited erect treadmill exercise before and 6 weeks after amiodarone therapy. Following amiodarone therapy there was a significant reduction in resting and peak heart rate during erect exercise (76 +/- 13 vs 97 +/- 19 b.min-1; P = 0.001 and 114 +/- 26 vs 146 +/- 21 b.min-1; P = 0.001 respectively). Despite increases in peak pulmonary and systemic artery pressures with amiodarone therapy there was no difference in the peak left ventricular filling pressure or maximum cardiac output achieved. Similarly, during supine exercise the resting and peak heart rates were less following the 6 weeks amiodarone therapy. Comparison of supine and erect exercise haemodynamic indices demonstrated higher peak LV filling and higher peak systolic and pulmonary artery pressures during supine than during erect exercise (29 +/- 10 vs 25 +/- 12; P less than 0.04; 151 +/- 42 vs 126 +/- 48; P = 0.01 and 66 +/- 27 vs 62 +/- 21; P = 0.08 respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. A pilot study on the effects of exercise in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey-Goldman, R; Schilling, E M; Dunlop, D; Langman, C; Greenland, P; Thomas, R J; Chang, R W

    2000-10-01

    A pilot study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of different exercise therapies on patient-reported fatigue and functional status. Ten patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were randomly placed in either an aerobic exercise group (group 1: n = 5) or a range of motion/muscle strengthening (ROM/MS) exercise group (group 2: n = 5). Outcome measures assessed at baseline and the end of the study were fatigue, functional status, disease activity, cardiovascular fitness, isometric strength, bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and femoral neck, and parathyroid hormone and osteocalcin as representative bone biochemical markers for bone resorption and bone formation, respectively. Both aerobic and ROM/MS types of exercise were safe and did not worsen SLE disease activity. Patients in both exercise groups showed some improvement in fatigue, functional status, cardiovascular fitness, and muscle strength. Both groups showed increased bone turnover, but BMD was unchanged. Eighty percent of the patients met the compliance standard for the study. This pilot study shows the feasibility of exercise for SLE patients. The potential value of this approach shows promise in the routine management of these patients.

  8. Resveratrol improves exercise performance and skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Miranda M; Byrne, Nikole J; Robertson, Ian M; Kim, Ty T; Samokhvalov, Victor; Levasseur, Jody; Soltys, Carrie-Lynn; Fung, David; Tyreman, Neil; Denou, Emmanuel; Jones, Kelvin E; Seubert, John M; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Dyck, Jason R B

    2017-04-01

    We investigated whether treatment of mice with established pressure overload-induced heart failure (HF) with the naturally occurring polyphenol resveratrol could improve functional symptoms of clinical HF such as fatigue and exercise intolerance. C57Bl/6N mice were subjected to either sham or transverse aortic constriction surgery to induce HF. Three weeks postsurgery, a cohort of mice with established HF (%ejection fraction resveratrol (~450 mg·kg-1·day-1) or vehicle for 2 wk. Although the percent ejection fraction was similar between both groups of HF mice, those mice treated with resveratrol had increased total physical activity levels and exercise capacity. Resveratrol treatment was associated with altered gut microbiota composition, increased skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, a switch toward greater whole body glucose utilization, and increased basal metabolic rates. Although muscle mass and strength were not different between groups, mice with HF had significant declines in basal and ADP-stimulated O2 consumption in isolated skeletal muscle fibers compared with sham mice, which was completely normalized by resveratrol treatment. Overall, resveratrol treatment of mice with established HF enhances exercise performance, which is associated with alterations in whole body and skeletal muscle energy metabolism. Thus, our preclinical data suggest that resveratrol supplementation may effectively improve fatigue and exercise intolerance in HF patients.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Resveratrol treatment of mice with heart failure leads to enhanced exercise performance that is associated with altered gut microbiota composition, increased whole body glucose utilization, and enhanced skeletal muscle metabolism and function. Together, these preclinical data suggest that resveratrol supplementation may effectively improve fatigue and exercise intolerance in heart failure via these mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Exercise intensity classification in cancer patients undergoing allogeneic HCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Rea; Scharhag-Rosenberger, Friederike; Schommer, Kai; Schmidt, Martina E; Dreger, Peter; Huber, Gerhard; Bohus, Martin; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiskemann, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    Exercise intervention studies during and after cancer treatment show beneficial effects for various physical and psychosocial outcomes. Current exercise intensity guidelines for cancer patients are rather general and have been adapted from American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommendations for healthy individuals. Intensive cancer treatment regimens such as allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) may change the cardiovascular response to acute exercise. Therefore, we evaluated the relationships between %V˙O2 reserve (%V˙O2R, reference) and %HRR, %HRmax, and %V˙O2max and compared calculated intensities with given intensities by ACSM. Measurements before and 180 d after allo-HCT from a randomized controlled trial were used. Only patients who reached maximal effort and at least two exercise stages in our maximal incremental cycling test were included. Before allo-HCT, 106 patients were included, and 180 d after treatment, 49 patients met our inclusion criteria. Individual regression lines were calculated with V˙O2R as the reference. Calculated exercise intensities for endurance training prescription were compared with ACSM values. Before allo-HCT, %HRR values of patients were significantly lower than ACSM values, and %HRmax and %V˙O2max values were significantly higher (except 90% HRmax, which was significantly lower, all P exercise intensity recommendations for endurance training may not be applicable for cancer patients during and 180 d after allo-HCT because they may not meet the targeted intensity class, with the exception of %HRR 180 d after allo-HCT.

  10. The Effects of Exercise Education Intervention on the Exercise Behaviour, Depression, and Fatigue Status of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wang, Kuo-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design/methodology/approach: This was a pilot study using an exercise education program as an intervention for CKD patients. The authors used the…

  11. Strength in numbers: patient experiences of group exercise within hospice palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Lorna; Mein, Gill; Jones, Alison; Talbot-Rice, Helena; Maddocks, Matthew; Bristowe, Katherine

    2016-12-13

    Exercise is increasingly recognized as a core component of palliative rehabilitation. The group exercise model is often adopted as a means of reaching more patients with limited resource. Despite the growth of quantitative research examining this area of practice, few qualitative studies have looked at the patient experience of participating in group exercise in a palliative setting, and most exclude patients with a non-cancer diagnosis. The aim of this study was to explore patients' experiences of participating in group exercise classes in a hospice setting. In this qualitative, phenomenological study, nine patients participating in a group exercise programme at a South London hospice completed semi-structured interviews. Participants were purposively sampled by gender, age, ethnicity and diagnosis; to include diagnoses across cancer, respiratory and neurological conditions. Transcripts were interpreted using thematic analysis. All patients reported positive experiences of participating in group exercise classes. Improvements reported in physical function had a positive effect on ability to complete activities of daily living and enhanced patient mood. Other reported psychosocial benefits included: promotion of self-management; space and opportunity for reflection; supportive relationships; sharing of information; and a deeper appreciation of patients' own abilities. This study highlights the positive experiences and value of group exercise classes to groups of people with diverse cancer and non-cancer conditions. The physical, emotional and psychosocial benefits suggest hospices and other palliative services should explore similar programmes as part of their rehabilitation services. The recognition that exercise groups can be mixed and need not be bespoke to one condition has positive cost and staff resource ramifications.

  12. Which is better in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, core stability exercises or conventional exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xibo; Gao, Qian; Dou, Honglei; Tang, Shujie

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine which is better in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, core stability exercises or conventional exercises. [Subjects and Methods] Forty participants with hemiplegia were recruited in the Department of Neurology of Yidu Central Hospital of Weifang between January 2014 and February 2015 and randomly divided into either an experimental or control group. The patients in the control group performed conventional exercises for six weeks, and those in the experiment group performed core stability exercises for six weeks. The outcomes were evaluated using Modified Barthel Index and Berg Balance Scale. [Results] After treatment, the Modified Barthel Index and Berg Balance Scale were significantly increased in both groups when compared with the baseline. The Modified Barthel Index was significantly lower in the control group compared with the experimental group. The Berg Balance Scale scores in the control group were relatively lower than those in the experimental group, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. [Conclusion] Core stability exercises have a better effect on patients with hemiplegia than conventional exercises.

  13. Effects of 2 exercise training programs on physical activity in daily life in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Vanessa S; Kovelis, Demétria; Hernandes, Nídia A; Camillo, Carlos A; Cavalheri, Vinícius; Pitta, Fabio

    2011-11-01

    The effects of different exercise training programs on the level of physical activity in daily life in patients with COPD remain to be investigated. In patients with COPD we compared the effects of 2 exercise/training regimens (a high-intensity whole-body endurance-and-strength program, and a low-intensity calisthenics-and-breathing-exercises program) on physical activity in daily life, exercise capacity, muscle force, health-related quality of life, and functional status. We randomized 40 patients with COPD to perform either endurance-and-strength training (no. = 20, mean ± SD FEV(1) 40 ± 13% of predicted) at 60-75% of maximum capacity, or calisthenics-and-breathing-exercises training (no. = 20, mean ± SD FEV(1) 39 ± 14% of predicted). Both groups underwent 3 sessions per week for 12 weeks. Before and after the training programs the patients underwent activity monitoring with motion sensors, incremental cycle-ergometry, 6-min walk test, and peripheral-muscle-force test, and responded to questionnaires on health-related quality of life and functional status (activities of daily living, pulmonary functional status, and dyspnea). Time spent active and energy expenditure in daily life were not significantly altered in either group. Exercise capacity and muscle force significantly improved only in the endurance-and-strength group. Health-related quality of life and functional status improved significantly in both groups. Neither training program significantly improved time spent active or energy expenditure in daily life. The training regimens similarly improved quality of life and functional status. Exercise capacity and muscle force significantly improved only in the high-intensity endurance-and-strength group.

  14. Exercise for patients with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Speyer, Helene; Gluud, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The lifetime prevalence of major depression is estimated to affect 17% of the population and is considered the second largest health-care problem globally in terms of the number of years lived with disability. The effects of most antidepressant treatments are poor; therefore, exercise...... has been assessed in a number of randomized clinical trials. A number of reviews have previously analyzed these trials; however, none of these reviews have addresses the effect of exercise for adults diagnosed with major depression. METHODS/DESIGN: The objective of this systematic review...... is to investigate the beneficial and harmful effects of exercise, in terms of severity of depression, lack of remission, suicide, and so on, compared with treatment as usual with or without co-interventions in randomized clinical trials involving adults with a clinical diagnosis of major depression. A meta...

  15. Self-monitoring has potential for home exercise programmes in patients with haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, M; Takedani, H; Haga, N; Kubota, M; Ishiyama, M; Ito, S; Nitta, O

    2014-03-01

    Haemophiliacs who have had to keep a physically inactive lifestyle due to bleeding during childhood are likely to have little motivation for exercise. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effectiveness of the self-monitoring of home exercise for haemophiliacs. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with intervention over 8 weeks at four hospitals in Japan. Subjects included 32 male outpatients aged 26-64 years without an inhibitor who were randomly allocated to a self-monitoring group and a control group. Individual exercise guidance with physical activity for improvement of their knee functions was given to both groups. The self-monitoring materials included an activity monitor and a feedback system so that the self-monitoring group could send feedback via the Internet and cellular phone. The self-monitoring was performed by checking exercise adherence and physical activity levels, bleeding history and injection of a coagulation factor. Both groups showed significant improvements in exercise adherence (P self-efficacy (P self-monitoring group compared with those in the control group. No increase in bleeding frequency and pain scale was noted. The self-monitoring of home exercise for haemophilic patients is useful for the improvement of exercise adherence, self-efficacy and knee extension strength. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Biomechanical Modeling of the Deadlift Exercise on the HULK Device to Improve the Efficacy of Resistive Exercise Microgravity Countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagodnik, K. M.; Thompson, W. K.; Gallo, C. A.; Crentsil, L.; Funk, J. H.; Funk, N. W.; Perusek, G. P.; Sheehan, C. C.; Lewandowski, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    Extended spaceflight typically results in the loss of muscular strength and bone density due to exposure to microgravity. Resistive exercise countermeasures have been developed to maintain musculoskeletal health during spaceflight. The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) is the "gold standard" of available devices; however, its footprint and volume are too large for use in space capsules employed in exploration missions. The Hybrid Ultimate Lifting Kit (HULK) device, with its smaller footprint, is a prototype exercise device for exploration missions. This work models the deadlift exercise being performed on the HULK device using biomechanical simulation, with the long-term goal to improve and optimize astronauts' exercise prescriptions, to maximize the benefit of exercise while minimizing time and effort invested.

  17. Exercise prescription and the patient with type 2 diabetes: a clinical approach to optimizing patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waryasz, Gregory R; McDermott, Ann Yelmokas

    2010-04-01

    To review the current recommendations for physical activity in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and propose methods to optimize compliance, reduce the pharmaceutical burden, and improve the general health and well-being of patients with T2DM. PubMed, SportDiscus, Ovid MEDLINE, Psychinfo, Web of Science, LexisNexis, and EBM reviews. T2DM is a condition in which physical activity has been documented to improve patient outcomes, yet research has noted that healthcare professionals inadequately address this issue, resulting in physical activity being an underutilized therapy. An exercise prescription consists of mode (type), frequency, intensity, duration, and progression. Determining the appropriate mode depends upon patient preference and safety issues regarding the state of T2DM or other conditions. Frequency, intensity, and duration are specific to the type of activity and should be tailored to the patient's abilities to safely perform the activity. Finally, the health professional addresses periodic progression in order to maintain the exercise stimulus needed to promote continued health improvements and prevent "plateauing." In this article, on the basis of the current scientific research, we propose recommendations that enable healthcare professionals to advocate for their patients with T2DM by offering safe and effective treatment options.

  18. [Physical activity and exercise recommendations for cancer patients during rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, E M; Baumann, F T; Pfeifer, K

    2014-02-01

    Cancer and its commonly required continuous and intensive medical treatment have a profound and lasting effect on patients' physical, functional, emotional and social wellbeing. In this context the positive comprehensive effects of physical exercise interventions increasingly prove to be promising. The aim of this review is to derive physical exercise recommendations for patients with cancer, especially concerning aerobic and resistance training during rehabilitation, based on the current literature. In a second step the 3 main cancer types breast cancer, prostate cancer and colon cancer and their distinctive features will be addressed briefly. A hierarchic literature research was conducted using the medical information portal Medpilot. The evaluation system of the "European Society of Cardiology" was applied in order to evaluate the evidence and compile evidence-based exercise recommendations for patients with cancer. When summing up the current data, physical exercise proves to be efficient, safe and feasible for patients with cancer. Both aerobic and resistance training have a positive influence on a patient's physical, psychological and social level and should therefore be included in every exercise program. While the evidence for breast cancer and increasingly also for prostate cancer is strong, research in colon cancer, for example, is still sparse. In order to create precise recommendations regarding the ideal exercise type and dose for the different cancer types during various treatment phases further high quality studies are necessary. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Effects of adding concentration therapy to Kegel exercise to improve continence after radical prostatectomy, randomized control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kongtragul, Jaruwan; Tukhanon, Wanvara; Tudpudsa, Piyanuch; Suedee, Kanita; Tienchai, Supaporn; Leewansangtong, Sunai; Nualgyong, Chaiyong

    2014-01-01

    .... One hundred thirty five patients were randomized into the intervention group that concentration therapy was added to Kegel exercise, and control group that was Kegel exercise only, using the stratified randomization...

  20. Specific Physical Exercise Improves Energetic Metabolism in the Skeletal Muscle of Amyotrophic-Lateral- Sclerosis Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desseille, Céline; Deforges, Séverine; Biondi, Olivier; Houdebine, Léo; D’amico, Domenico; Lamazière, Antonin; Caradeuc, Cédric; Bertho, Gildas; Bruneteau, Gaëlle; Weill, Laure; Bastin, Jean; Djouadi, Fatima; Salachas, François; Lopes, Philippe; Chanoine, Christophe; Massaad, Charbel; Charbonnier, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by the specific loss of motor neurons, leading to muscle paralysis and death. Although the cellular mechanisms underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-induced toxicity for motor neurons remain poorly understood, growing evidence suggest a defective energetic metabolism in skeletal muscles participating in ALS-induced motor neuron death ultimately destabilizing neuromuscular junctions. In the present study, we report that a specific exercise paradigm, based on a high intensity and amplitude swimming exercise, significantly improves glucose metabolism in ALS mice. Using physiological tests and a biophysics approach based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we unexpectedly found that SOD1(G93A) ALS mice suffered from severe glucose intolerance, which was counteracted by high intensity swimming but not moderate intensity running exercise. Furthermore, swimming exercise restored the highly ALS-sensitive tibialis muscle through an autophagy-linked mechanism involving the expression of key glucose transporters and metabolic enzymes, including GLUT4 and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Importantly, GLUT4 and GAPDH expression defects were also found in muscles from ALS patients. Moreover, we report that swimming exercise induced a triglyceride accumulation in ALS tibialis, likely resulting from an increase in the expression levels of lipid transporters and biosynthesis enzymes, notably DGAT1 and related proteins. All these data provide the first molecular basis for the differential effects of specific exercise type and intensity in ALS, calling for the use of physical exercise as an appropriate intervention to alleviate symptoms in this debilitating disease. PMID:29104532

  1. Specific Physical Exercise Improves Energetic Metabolism in the Skeletal Muscle of Amyotrophic-Lateral- Sclerosis Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Desseille

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by the specific loss of motor neurons, leading to muscle paralysis and death. Although the cellular mechanisms underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-induced toxicity for motor neurons remain poorly understood, growing evidence suggest a defective energetic metabolism in skeletal muscles participating in ALS-induced motor neuron death ultimately destabilizing neuromuscular junctions. In the present study, we report that a specific exercise paradigm, based on a high intensity and amplitude swimming exercise, significantly improves glucose metabolism in ALS mice. Using physiological tests and a biophysics approach based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, we unexpectedly found that SOD1(G93A ALS mice suffered from severe glucose intolerance, which was counteracted by high intensity swimming but not moderate intensity running exercise. Furthermore, swimming exercise restored the highly ALS-sensitive tibialis muscle through an autophagy-linked mechanism involving the expression of key glucose transporters and metabolic enzymes, including GLUT4 and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH. Importantly, GLUT4 and GAPDH expression defects were also found in muscles from ALS patients. Moreover, we report that swimming exercise induced a triglyceride accumulation in ALS tibialis, likely resulting from an increase in the expression levels of lipid transporters and biosynthesis enzymes, notably DGAT1 and related proteins. All these data provide the first molecular basis for the differential effects of specific exercise type and intensity in ALS, calling for the use of physical exercise as an appropriate intervention to alleviate symptoms in this debilitating disease.

  2. Influence of Regular Exercise on Body Fat and Eating Patterns of Patients with Intermittent Claudication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Leicht

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the impact of regular supervised exercise on body fat, assessed via anthropometry, and eating patterns of peripheral arterial disease patients with intermittent claudication (IC. Body fat, eating patterns and walking ability were assessed in 11 healthy adults (Control and age- and mass-matched IC patients undertaking usual care (n = 10; IC-Con or supervised exercise (12-months; n = 10; IC-Ex. At entry, all groups exhibited similar body fat and eating patterns. Maximal walking ability was greatest for Control participants and similar for IC-Ex and IC-Con patients. Supervised exercise resulted in significantly greater improvements in maximal walking ability (IC-Ex 148%–170% vs. IC-Con 29%–52% and smaller increases in body fat (IC-Ex −2.1%–1.4% vs. IC-Con 8.4%–10%. IC-Con patients exhibited significantly greater increases in body fat compared with Control at follow-up (8.4%–10% vs. −0.6%–1.4%. Eating patterns were similar for all groups at follow-up. The current study demonstrated that regular, supervised exercise significantly improved maximal walking ability and minimised increase in body fat amongst IC patients without changes in eating patterns. The study supports the use of supervised exercise to minimize cardiovascular risk amongst IC patients. Further studies are needed to examine the additional value of other lifestyle interventions such as diet modification.

  3. Exercise for patients with osteoporosis: management of vertebral compression fractures and trunk strengthening for fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaki, Mehrsheed

    2012-11-01

    Maintenance of bone health and quality requires mechanical strain, but the mechanical force needs to be within the bone's biomechanical competence. In osteoporosis, compression of vertebral bodies can be insidious. Therefore, absence of pain does not necessarily indicate absence of vertebral microfracture and deformity. Further, patients with previous vertebral fractures are at risk for further vertebral fractures and their associated morbidity. Exercise is a part of the comprehensive management of patients with osteoporosis and has been associated with improvement of quality of life and lowered risk of future fracture. The exercise prescription needs to match the needs of the patient. If exercise is not prescribed properly, then it may have negative consequences. In general, an exercise program, therapeutic or recreational, needs to address flexibility, muscle strength, core stability, cardiovascular fitness, and gait steadiness. As with pharmacotherapy, therapeutic exercises need to be individualized on the basis of musculoskeletal status and an individual's exercise interest. In osteoporosis, axial strength and stability are of primary importance. In particular, a spinal extensor strengthening program should be performed with progressive measured resistance as tolerated. To address falls and fractures, an exercise program should also include balance and lower extremity strength training. Proper dosing of oral cholecalciferol and calcium supplements can enhance the effect of strengthening exercises. Finally, a coordinated approach, such as the Spinal Proprioception Extension Exercise Dynamic (SPEED) program, can improve back extensor strength, the level of physical activity, and locomotion, and reduce back pain and fear and risk of falls. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effects of home exercise on insulin resistant in chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouppatham Supasyndh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance appears at an earlier stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD and closely correlates with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular mortality. Exercise training may improve hyperinsulinemia in patients with chronic disease, but it has proven difficult to motivate many such patients to undergo exercise training chronically. We aimed to demonstrate the effect of regular home rubber band exercise on insulin resistant in patients with CKD stage 3-5.The randomized controlled trial was conducted in CKD clinic at Phramongkutklao hospital, Bangkok, Thailand, during June to December 2010. The eligible CKD stage 3-5 participants were asked to randomly assigned to do only home gentle exercise (control or plus home resistance exercise by using rubber band (treatment for 12 weeks. The exercise training was supervised and strictly monitored by sport scientist every four weeks. Fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations was performed to calculate homeostasis model assessment (HOMA. There were 21 patients in the control group (mean age 66.05±13.72 years and 24 patients in the treatment group (mean age 66.05±13.72 years . At the end of study, the fasting plasma glucose (-0.76±1.84 mmol/L and HOMA-IR (-1.09±2.43 decreased significantly in the treatment group, whereas the fasting plasma glucose (0.49±1.65 mmol/L and HOMA-IR (0.38±2.12 slightly increase significantly in the control group. In addition, there were significant different of HOMA-IR between the control group and the treatment group (1.9±1.85 vs 3.72±3.26, P= 0.031, respectively. Moreover, all patients in the treatment group did not have serious side effect from resistance exercise, but only five patients had muscle cramp. In conclusion, regular home exercise ameliorate insulin resistance without any serious adverse effects in the CKD population.

  5. An 8-Week Neuromuscular Exercise Program for Patients With Mild to Moderate Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Roos, Ewa M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:   To describe the feasibility of a neuromuscular exercise (NEMEX) program in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (KOA). BACKGROUND:   Neuromuscular exercise has been increasingly used in patients with osteoarthritis to achieve sensorimotor control and improved daily...... to increased (n = 2) or persisting (n = 1) knee pain. However, their pain ratings did not show worsening symptoms. UNIQUENESS:   This NEMEX-KOA program was designed for physically active middle-aged patients with mild to moderate KOA; therefore, it involved exercises and difficulty levels that were more...... challenging than a previously described NEMEX program for patients eligible for total joint replacement. CONCLUSIONS:   In patients with baseline mild to severe pain with activity, the NEMEX-KOA program was feasible. Progression was achieved with few incidents of clinically relevant increases in pain...

  6. Acclimatization improves submaximal exercise economy at 5533 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latshang, T D; Turk, A J; Hess, T; Schoch, O D; Bosch, M M; Barthelmes, D; Merz, T M; Hefti, U; Hefti, J Pichler; Maggiorini, M; Bloch, K E

    2013-08-01

    We tested whether the better subjective exercise tolerance perceived by mountaineers after altitude acclimatization relates to enhanced exercise economy. Thirty-two mountaineers performed progressive bicycle exercise to exhaustion at 490 m and twice at 5533 m (days 6-7 and day 11), respectively, during an expedition to Mt. Muztagh Ata. Maximal work rate (W(max)) decreased from mean ± SD 356 ± 73 watts at 490 m to 191 ± 49 watts and 193 ± 45 watts at 5533 m, days 6-7 and day 11, respectively; corresponding maximal oxygen uptakes (VO2max ) were 50.7 ± 9.5, 26.3 ± 5.6, 24.7 ± 7.0 mL/min/kg (P = 0.0001 5533 m vs 490 m). On days 6-7 (5533 m), VO(2) at 75% W(max) (152 ± 37 watts) was 1.75 ± 0.45 L/min, oxygen saturation 68 ± 8%. On day 11 (5533 m), at the same submaximal work rate, VO(2) was lower (1.61 ± 0.47 L/min, P scale 50 ± 15 vs 57 ± 20, P = 0.006) and reduced symptoms of acute mountain sickness. We conclude that the better performance and subjective exercise tolerance after acclimatization were related to regression of acute mountain sickness and improved submaximal exercise economy because of lower metabolic demands for non-external work-performing functions. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Exercise reduces impairment and improves activity in people after some upper limb fractures: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Andrea; Taylor, Nicholas F; Dodd, Karen J; Shields, Nora

    2011-01-01

    What is the effect of exercise on reducing impairment and increasing activity in the rehabilitation of people with upper limb fractures? Systematic review of controlled trials. Adults following an upper limb fracture. Any exercise therapy program, including trials where exercise was delivered to both groups providing there was an expectation of different amounts of exercise. Body structure and function, and activity limitations. 13 relevant trials involving 781 participants with an upper limb fracture were identified. 12 of the 13 trials included exercise of different duration and administration in both intervention and comparison groups. In support of the role of exercise there is evidence that: exercise and advice compared to no intervention reduce pain and improve upper limb activity in the short term after distal radius fracture; starting exercise earlier after conservatively managed proximal humeral fractures can reduce pain and improve shoulder activity; and physiotherapy that included supervised exercise and home exercise increased wrist movement after distal radius fracture when compared to home exercise alone. There is contrary evidence from two trials one after distal radius fracture and one after proximal humeral fracture that a home exercise program was superior to a supervised plus home exercise program. Only a single meta-analysis was conducted due to clinical heterogeneity and a lack of common outcome measures among the included trials. There is evidence to support the role of specific exercise regimens in reducing impairments and improving upper limb function following specific upper limb fractures. Copyright © 2011 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF TRUNK TRAINING EXERCISES VERSUS SWISS BALL EXERCISES FOR IMPROVING SITTING BALANCE AND GAIT PARAMETERS IN ACUTE STROKE SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothalanka Viswaja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of trunk training and Swiss ball exercises in acute stroke subjects. Trunk is often neglected part in the stroke rehabilitation, trunk training exercises and Swiss ball exercises result in better recruitment of trunk muscles thus improving sitting balance and gait parameters in acute stroke subjects. However literature evidences for trunk training exercises and Swiss ball exercises in improving sitting balance and gait are scarce in acute stroke population. Methods: A total of 60 subjects who met the inclusion criteria were recruited from department of physiotherapy, G.S.L general hospital and were randomly allocated into 2 groups with 30 subjects in each group. Initially all of them were screened for balance and gait using trunk impairment scale and by assessing gait parameters, after that they were given a 30min of trunk training and Swiss ball exercises for 5 days a week for 4 weeks. Both the groups received conventional physiotherapy for 4 weeks. Results: Post intervention there was no significant difference between the two groups. There was improvement post treatment in trunk training group (P0.5. Conclusion: The results had shown that both groups noted significant difference. But when comparing between these two groups there is no statistical significance noted. So this study concluded that there is no significant difference between trunk training exercises and Swiss ball exercises on sitting balance and gait parameters in subjects with stroke.

  9. Supervised and home-based exercise training for patients with intermittent claudication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxiong; Zhou, Shi; Bronks, Roger; Graham, John; Myers, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Home-based exercise training, applied as the primary treatment in patients with intermittent claudication, has produced inconsistent effects on walking capacity in previous published studies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether a home-based exercise training program could maintain improved walking capacity and other functional variables achieved through a supervised exercise training program. The present design was a 48-week self-controlled study. The first 12-week period was a control stage in which no prescribed exercise program was provided, the second 12-week period was a supervised treadmill-walking training program and the following 24-week period was a home-based exercise program. Twenty-two subjects with intermittent claudication were recruited initially; 15 of them (14 men and one woman) completed the whole program. Walking capacity, peak oxygen uptake, walking economy and ankle-brachial index were measured at baseline and at 12, 24 and 48 weeks. There was no significant change in the measured variables after the control stage. The 12-week supervised treadmill-walking training program significantly increased pain-free walking time, maximal walking time and peak oxygen uptake. Walking economy was also significantly improved. These improvements were successfully maintained after 24 weeks of home-based training. The results indicated that 12 weeks of supervised treadmill-walking training followed by a home-based training program is an effective model of exercise rehabilitation for patients with intermittent claudication. PMID:22477417

  10. Effect of acute hyperoxia during exercise on quadriceps electrical activity in active COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, N; Durand, F; Poulain, M; Lambert, K; Ceugniet, F; Préfaut, C; Varray, A

    2004-07-01

    This study investigated whether acute hyperoxia improves electrical muscle activity in active chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with mild hypoxemia (rest PaO(2) = 9.1 +/- 0.4 kPa). Two identical incremental exercise tests were performed by nine patients while breathing either air or 30% oxygen. Pulmonary gas exchanges, venous concentrations of lactate and pyruvate, and the electromyographic signal of the quadriceps muscle (vastus lateralis and vastus medialis) were sampled each minute. Peak working capacity increased significantly in hyperoxia (94.4 +/- 5.2W) compared with normoxia (85.4 +/- 5.8W, P exercise and for a given work load, oxygen uptake was increased (P exercise compared with room air. Although median frequency values did not differ between conditions, the median frequency was significantly decreased for higher exercise intensity in hyperoxic condition. These modifications reflected better aerobic metabolism, later emergence of muscle fatigue, and greater muscle excitability and activation for the same level of exercise under hyperoxic condition. These data suggest that the acute addition of oxygen in active COPD patients improves their muscle electrical activity during dynamic exercise. Hypoxemia-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction most probably acts through mechanisms based on oxygen availability.

  11. Characterization of Exercise and Alcohol Self-Management Behaviors of Type 1 Diabetes Patients on Insulin Pump Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grando, Maria Adela; Groat, Danielle; Soni, Hiral; Boyle, Mary; Bailey, Marilyn; Thompson, Bithika; Cook, Curtiss B

    2017-03-01

    There is a lack of systematic ways to analyze how diabetes patients use their insulin pumps to self-manage blood glucose to compensate for alcohol ingestion and exercise. The objective was to analyze "real-life" insulin dosing decisions occurring in conjunction with alcohol intake and exercise among patients using insulin pumps. We recruited adult type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients on insulin pump therapy. Participants were asked to maintain their daily routines, including those related to exercising and consuming alcohol, and keep a 30-day journal on exercise performed and alcohol consumed. Thirty days of insulin pump data were downloaded. Participants' actual insulin dosing behaviors were compared against their self-reported behaviors in the setting of exercise and alcohol. Nineteen T1D patients were recruited and over 4000 interactions with the insulin pump were analyzed. The analysis exposed variability in how subjects perceived the effects of exercise/alcohol on their blood glucose, inconsistencies between self-reported and observed behaviors, and higher rates of blood glucose control behaviors for exercise versus alcohol. Compensation techniques and perceptions on how exercise and alcohol affect their blood glucose levels vary between patients. Improved individualized educational techniques that take into consideration a patient's unique life style are needed to help patients effectively apply alcohol and exercise compensation techniques.

  12. Much potential but many unanswered questions for high-intensity intermittent exercise training for patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkstaff, Sherry O

    2015-01-01

    There is a robust trove of scientific studies that support the positive physical and mental health benefits associated with aerobic exercise for healthy individuals. These recommendations suggest that more vigorous exercise can be performed on fewer days for the same benefit. High-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) training has begun to show promise. HIIE seems safe and improves physiology, quality of life, and functional capacity. This review defines HIIE, discusses its physiologic benefit for patients with heart failure, outlines the studies that have been conducted to date, and places it in the context of the current clinical environment of exercise training for these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aerobic exercise and intraocular pressure in normotensive and glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatzibalis Theodosios

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing number of people participating in physical aerobic exercise, jogging in particular, we considered that it would be worth knowing if there are should be limits to the exercise with regard to the intraocular pressure (IOP of the eyes. The purpose of this study is to check IOP in healthy and primary glaucoma patients after aerobic exercise. Methods 145 individuals were subdivided into seven groups: normotensives who exercised regularly (Group A; normotensives in whose right eye (RE timolol maleate 0.5% (Group B, latanoprost 0.005% (Group C, or brimonidine tartrate 0.2% (Group D was instilled; and primary glaucoma patients under monotherapy with β-blockers (Group E, prostaglandin analogues (Group F or combined antiglaucoma treatment (Group G instilled in both eyes. The IOP of both eyes was measured before and after exercise. Results A statistically significant decrease was found in IOP during jogging. The aerobic exercise reduces the IOP in those eyes where a b-blocker, a prostaglandin analogue or an α-agonist was previously instilled. The IOP is also decreased in glaucoma patients who are already under antiglaucoma treatment. Conclusion There is no ocular restriction for simple glaucoma patients in performing aerobic physical activity.

  14. Impact of exercise capacity on dyspnea and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Frølich, Anne; Godtfredsen, Nina S

    2012-01-01

    To assess the impact of the amount of exercise training during pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) program for improvements in dyspnea and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)....

  15. Effect of Endobronchial Coils vs Usual Care on Exercise Tolerance in Patients With Severe Emphysema : The RENEW Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sciurba, Frank C.; Criner, Gerard J.; Strange, Charlie; Shah, Pallav L.; Michaud, Gaetane; Connolly, Timothy A.; Deslee, Gaetan; Tillis, William P.; Delage, Antoine; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Krishna, Ganesh; Kalhan, Ravi; Ferguson, J. Scott; Jantz, Michael; Maldonado, Fabien; McKenna, Robert; Majid, Adnan; Rai, Navdeep; Gay, Steven; Dransfield, Mark T.; Angel, Luis; Maxfield, Roger; Herth, Felix J. F.; Wahidi, Momen M.; Mehta, Atul; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Preliminary clinical trials have demonstrated that endobronchial coils compress emphysematous lung tissue and may improve lung function, exercise tolerance, and symptoms in patients with emphysema and severe lung hyperinflation. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness and safety of

  16. Impact of an intensive dynamic exercise program on oxidative stress and on the outcome in patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal F Soliman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Twelve weeks of intensive dynamic exercise program should be recommended to patients with FM as it was effective in decreasing the oxidative stress parameters, increasing the antioxidant parameters, and improving the clinical outcome of this disease.

  17. The effects of exercise with TENS on spasticity, balance, and gait in patients with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Junhyuck; Seo, Dongkwon; Choi, Wonjae; Lee, Seungwon

    2014-01-01

    .... TENS has recently been applied to decrease spasticity. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the addition of TENS to an exercise program reduces spasticity and improves balance and gait in chronic stroke patients...

  18. Effects of an additional pressure support level on exercise duration in patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Huey; Lin, Hui-Ling; Hsiao, Hsiu-Feng; Huang, Ching-Tzu; Kao, Kuo-Chin; Li, Li-Fu; Huang, Chung-Chi; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2015-12-01

    Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation has been regarded as a strategy for improving exercise performance. Whether an increase in the ventilatory support level improves exercise performance in patients who have received invasive ventilation is unknown. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of an additional level of pressure support (PS) ventilation on exercise tolerance in patients undergoing prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV). This study examined 15 patients who were undergoing PMV. All patients performed an upper-arm exercise test at three PS levels: the baseline PS level (PS), a level 2 cmH2O higher than the baseline level (PS+2), and a level 4 cmH2O higher than the baseline level (PS+4). The physiological response, reasons for discontinuing the exercise test, and exercise duration were recorded and analyzed. The tidal volume increased significantly from 271.7 ± 54.7 mL to 398.3 ± 88.7 mL at the PS+4 level (p = 0.01). Significant differences in exercise duration were observed at different PS levels. The exercise duration was significantly longer at the PS+4 level than at the PS and PS+2 levels (146.3 ± 139.9 seconds vs. 108.5 ± 85.9 seconds vs. 72.8 ± 43.9 seconds, p = 0.038) as their corresponding order. There were significant relationships between resting respiratory rate and exercise duration at the PS (r = -0.639, p = 0.034) and PS+2 levels (r = -0.668, p = 0.025). In patients undergoing PMV, an additional PS level of up to 4 cmH2O compared with the baseline setting may help to improve exercise tolerance by prolonging exercise duration. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises in treating a patient with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation: a clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganiyu, Sokunbi Oluwaleke; Gujba, Kachalla Fatimah

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill 12-minute walking exercises in treating patients with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation. A 34-year-old woman with a history lumbar disc prolapse who had undergone lumbar disc surgery on two different occasions was treated using acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises three times per week for 12 weeks. The outcome measures used in this study were pain intensity, spinal range of movement, and general health. After 12 weeks of treatment, the patient had made improvement in terms of pain, which was reduced from 9/10 to 1/10. In a similar vein, the patient's general health showed improvement of >100% after 12 weeks of treatment. Pre-treatment scores of spinal flexion and left-side flexion, which measured 20 cm and 12 cm, respectively, increased to 25 cm and 16 cm after 12 weeks of treatment. This study showed that acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises were useful in relieving pain, increasing spinal range of movement, and improving the health of a patient with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Role of physical exercise in low back pain rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial of a three-month exercise program in patients who have completed multidisciplinary rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchoz, Yves; de Goumoëns, Pierre; Norberg, Michael; Paillex, Roland; So, Alexander K L

    2010-05-20

    Randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up. To analyze the effects of an exercise program or routine follow-up on patients with chronic low back pain who have completed functional multidisciplinary rehabilitation. The short- and long-term outcome in terms of symptoms and physical and social functioning was compared. Systematic reviews have shown that functional multidisciplinary rehabilitation improves physical function and reduces pain in patients with chronic low back pain. However, long-term maintenance of these improvements is inconsistent and the role of exercise in achieving this goal is unclear. One hundred five chronic patients with low back pain who had completed a 3-week functional multidisciplinary rehabilitation program were randomized to either a 3-month exercise program (n = 56) or routine follow-up (n = 49). The exercise program consisted of 24 training sessions during 12 weeks. Patients underwent evaluations of trunk muscle endurance, cardiovascular endurance, lumbar spine mobility (flexion and extension range-of-motion, fingertip-to-floor distance), pain and perceived functional ability at the beginning and the end of functional multidisciplinary rehabilitation, at the end of the exercise program (3 months) and at 1-year follow-up. Disability was also assessed at the same time points except at the beginning of functional multidisciplinary rehabilitation. At the end of the functional multidisciplinary rehabilitation, both groups improved significantly in all physical parameters except flexion and extension range-of-motion. At the 3 month and 1 year follow-up, both groups maintained improvements in all parameters except for cardiovascular endurance. Only the exercise program group improved in disability score and trunk muscle endurance. No differences between groups were found. A favorable long-term outcome was observed after functional multidisciplinary rehabilitation in both patient groups. Patients who participated in an exercise program

  1. Effects of Different Stretching Techniques on the Outcomes of Isokinetic Exercise in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Cheng Weng

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We recruited 132 subjects with bilateral knee osteoarthritis (Altman Grade II to compare the effects of different stretching techniques on the outcomes of isokinetic muscle strengthening exercises. Patients were randomly divided into four groups (I–IV. The patients in Group I received isokinetic muscular strengthening exercises, Group II received bilateral knee static stretching and isokinetic exercises, Group III received proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF stretching and isokinetic exercises, and Group IV acted as controls. Outcomes were measured by changes in Lequesne's index, range of knee motion, visual analog pain scale, and peak muscle torques during knee flexion and extension. Patients in all the treated groups experienced significant reductions in knee pain and disability, and increased peak muscle torques after treatment and at follow-up. However, only patients in Groups II and III had significant improvements in range of motion and muscle strength gain during 60°/second angular velocity peak torques. Group III demonstrated the greatest increase in muscle strength gain during 180°/second angular velocity peak torques. In conclusion, stretching therapy could increase the effectiveness of isokinetic exercise in terms of functional improvement in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PNF techniques were more effective than static stretching.

  2. Physical Exercise and Patients with Chronic Renal Failure: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhenzhen; Zheng, Kai; Zhang, Haoxiang; Feng, Ji; Wang, Lizhi; Zhou, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a severe clinical problem which has some significant socioeconomic impact worldwide and hemodialysis is an important way to maintain patients' health state, but it seems difficult to get better in short time. Considering these, the aim in our research is to update and evaluate the effects of exercise on the health of patients with chronic renal failure. The databases were used to search for the relevant studies in English or Chinese. And the association between physical exercise and health state of patients with chronic renal failure has been investigated. Random-effect model was used to compare the physical function and capacity in exercise and control groups. Exercise is helpful in ameliorating the situation of blood pressure in patients with renal failure and significantly reduces VO2 in patients with renal failure. The results of subgroup analyses show that, in the age >50, physical activity can significantly reduce blood pressure in patients with renal failure. The activity program containing warm-up, strength, and aerobic exercises has benefits in blood pressure among sick people and improves their maximal oxygen consumption level. These can help patients in physical function and aerobic capacity and may give them further benefits.

  3. The effect of Bosentan on exercise capacity in Fontan patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebert, Anders; Jensen, Annette S; Idorn, Lars

    2013-01-01

    and longer life expectancy of TCPC patients have raised new challenges. The survivors are often suffering complications such as arrhythmias, myocardial dysfunction, thromboembolic events, neuropsychological deficit, protein-losing enteropathy and reduced exercise capacity. Several causes for the reduced...... exercise capacity may be present e.g. impaired function of the single ventricle, valve dysfunction and chronotropic impairment, and perhaps also increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Thus, plasma endothelin-1 has been shown to correlate with increased pulmonary vascular resistance and the risk...

  4. Effect of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Hong; Kim, Minjeong; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Lim, Hyun-Kook; Kang, Sung-Goo; Cho, Jung-Hyoun; Park, Seo-Jin; Song, Sang-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group). The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants using the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease (CERAD-K). Repeated-measures ANCOVA was used to assess the effect of dance exercise on cognitive function and cardiometabolic risk factors. Compared with the control group, the exercise group significantly improved in verbal fluency (p = 0.048), word list delayed recall (p = 0.038), word list recognition (p = 0.007), and total CERAD-K score (p = 0.037). However, no significance difference was found in body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol between groups over the 6-month period. In the present study, six months of dance exercise improved cognitive function in older adults with metabolic syndrome. Thus, dance exercise may reduce the risk for cognitive disorders in elderly people with metabolic syndrome. Key pointsMetabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment.Aerobic exercise improves cognitive function in elderly people and contributes to the prevention of degenerative neurological disease and brain damage. Dance sport is a form of aerobic exercise that has the additional benefits of stimulating the emotions, promoting social interaction, and exposing subjects to acoustic stimulation and music.In the present study, dance exercise for a 6-month period improved cognitive function in older adults with MS. In particular, positive effects were observed in verbal fluency, word list

  5. [Impact of physical exercise in cystic fibrosis patients: A systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gal, C; Vandervelde, L; Poncin, W; Reychler, G

    2016-09-01

    Beneficial effects of physical exercise have been previously demonstrated in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the evidence supporting physical exercise to improve on lung function, exercise capacity and quality of life in cystic fibrosis patients. Medline database was used to search clinical studies from 2000 to 2015. We also analyzed the bibliographic section of the included studies, in order to identify additional references. A total of 17 studies were identified. A great disparity was found in the results of the different studies. No systematic benefit was found on lung function, exercise capacity or quality of life. No relationship between the type of program and the benefits achieved was observed. Evidence that physical exercise benefits lung function, exercise capacity and quality of life in cystic fibrosis patient is inconsistent and evidence does not support a particular standardized program for all patients. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of exercise training in symptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: results of a structured exercise training program in a cardiac rehabilitation center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klempfner, Robert; Kamerman, Tamir; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Nahshon, Amira; Hay, Ilan; Goldenberg, Ilan; Dov, Freimark; Arad, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Recent data suggest that exercise training (ET) confers significant symptomatic and functional improvements in patients with diastolic dysfunction, and thus may be beneficial in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). However, there are no data regarding the safety or efficacy of ET in HCM patients. A prospective non-randomized intervention design was used. We enrolled 20 patients with symptomatic HCM, significantly limited in everyday activity, into a supervised cardiac rehabilitation exercise program. Patients were 62 ± 13 years old, in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II (35%) or III (65%), had a mean interventricular septum dimension of 17 ± 5 mm and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 53 ± 15%. Left ventricular outflow gradient was present at rest in nine patients (mean 51 ± 24 mm Hg) and six patients had an implantable defibrillator. Exercise prescription was based on heart rate reserve (HRR) determined from a symptom-limited graded exercise stress test. Exercise intensity was gradually increased from 50% to 85% of the HRR over the training period. Patients completed an average of 41 ± 8 hours of aerobic ET. No adverse events or sustained ventricular arrhythmias occurred during the training program. Functional capacity, assessed by a graded exercise test, improved from 4.7 ± 2.2 to 7.2 ± 2.8 metabolic equivalents (METs) (p = 0.01). NYHA functional class improved from baseline by ≥ 1 grade in 10 patients (50%) and none experiencing deterioration during follow-up. The present study suggests that patients with HCM who remain symptomatic despite medical therapy may achieve considerable functional improvement through a supervised ET program. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Immediate effects of unaffected arm exercise in poststroke patients with spastic upper limb hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Keiko; Nakamura, Takeshi; Uenishi, Hiroyasu; Umemoto, Yasunori; Arakawa, Hideki; Abo, Masahiro; Saura, Ryuichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Spasticity is a major disabling symptom in stroke patients. Clinically, one of the goals of management of stroke patients should be to reduce spasticity. Recent evidence suggests that motor recovery after stroke comprises a hierarchical, dynamic framework of interacting mechanisms in brain cortex. We hypothesized that unaffected arm exercise can stimulate the ipsilateral motor cortex and change the affected upper limb function and spasticity in stroke patients. To test the hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of unaffected arm exercise on spasticity of the affected upper limb and motor function in stroke patients. The study was performed in 41 chronic stroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis. Affected upper limb spasticity and function were assessed at baseline and after each intervention by the modified Ashworth Scale and Fugl-Meyer Assessment, respectively. Patients were also evaluated clinically by the modified Rankin Scale, Functional Independence Measurement and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Subjects stood for 10 min during the control period, and then cycled an arm crank ergometer at 50% of maximum work load for 10 min by the unaffected arm in standing position. The mean age at study entry was 64.6 ± 1.7 years. The latency between onset of stroke and the study was 109.0 ± 17.0 months (range, 6-495). The cause of hemiparesis was cerebral infarction (n = 21), intracerebral hemorrhage (n = 17) or subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 3). Exercise significantly improved the modified Ashworth Scale compared with baseline (p exercise compared with baseline (p = 0.95). We conclude that 10 min of unaffected arm exercise improves the affected upper limb spasticity in stroke patients. Further studies are needed to determine the exact mechanism of such improvement and the long-term effects of unaffected arm exercise on motor performance.

  8. A neuromuscular exercise programme versus standard care for patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eshoj, Henrik; Rasmussen, Sten; Frich, Lars Henrik

    2017-01-01

    -based exercise programmes. In similar, high-impact injuries (e.g. anterior cruciate ligament tears in the knee) neuromuscular exercise has shown large success in improving physical function and QoL. Thus, the objective of this trial is to compare a nonoperative neuromuscular exercise shoulder programme......BACKGROUND: Anterior shoulder dislocation is a common injury and may have considerable impact on shoulder-related quality of life (QoL). If not warranted for initial stabilising surgery, patients are mostly left with little to no post-traumatic rehabilitation. This may be due to lack of evidence...... with standard care in patients with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations (TASD). METHODS/DESIGN: Randomised, assessor-blinded, controlled, multicentre trial. Eighty patients with a TASD will be recruited from three orthopaedic departments in Denmark. Patients with primary or recurrent anterior shoulder...

  9. Short term effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gain Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in the understanding and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension have enabled earlier diagnosis and improved prognosis. However, despite best available therapy, symptoms of exertional dyspnoea and fatigue are commonly reported and result in a reduced capacity to perform daily activities and impaired quality of life. Exercise training has demonstrated efficacy in individuals with other respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Historically, however, exercise training has not been utilised as a form of therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension due to the perceived risk of sudden cardiac death and the theoretical possibility that exercise would lead to worsening pulmonary vascular haemodynamics and deterioration in right heart function. Now, with the advances in pharmaceutical management, determining the safety and benefits of exercise training in this population has become more relevant. Only three studies of supervised exercise training in pulmonary arterial hypertension have been published. These studies demonstrated improvements in exercise capacity and quality of life, in the absence of adverse events or clinical deterioration. However, these studies have not utilised an outpatient-based, whole body exercise training program, the most common format for exercise programs within Australia. It is uncertain whether this form of training is beneficial and capable of producing sustained benefits in exercise capacity and quality of life in this population. Design/Methods This randomised controlled trial will determine whether a 12 week, outpatient-based, supervised, whole body exercise training program, followed by a home-based exercise program, is safe and improves exercise capacity and quality of life in individuals with pulmonary arterial hypertension. This study aims to recruit 34 subjects who will be randomly allocated to the exercise group (supervised exercise training 3 times a week for 12 weeks, followed by

  10. Influence of oxygen administration on pulmonary haemodynamics and tissue oxygenation during exercise in COPD patients with different ACE genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Hiroshi; Hirata, Kazuto; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2003-11-01

    We previously found that the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) DD genotype is associated with exaggerated pulmonary hypertension and disturbance of tissue oxygenation during exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. This study was designed to compare the effect of oxygen administration on pulmonary haemodynamics and tissue oxygenation during exercise in COPD patients with different ACE genotypes. Forty-three COPD patients (II=16, ID=12, DD=15) underwent right heart catheterization, and then performed an exercise test with room air or oxygen. We measured pulmonary haemodynamic variables and indices of tissue oxygenation such as mixed venous oxygen tension (PVO2) and arterial lactate concentration, both at rest and after exercise. The magnitude of difference in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance after exercise between breathing of room air and breathing of oxygen did not significantly differ among the three groups. PVO2 after exercise with room air or oxygen was significantly higher in patients with the II genotype than in those with the ID or DD genotype. In contrast, lactate concentration after exercise with room air or oxygen was significantly lower in patients with the II genotype than in those with the ID or DD genotype. Moreover, the magnitude of difference in PVO2 and lactate concentration after exercise between breathing of room air and breathing of oxygen was the II>ID>DD genotype. These findings suggest that the ability of oxygen administration to improve tissue oxygenation during exercise is associated with the ACE genotypes in COPD patients.

  11. Exercise to improve sleep in insomnia: exploration of the bidirectional effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Kelly Glazer; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2013-08-15

    Exercise improves sleep quality, mood, and quality of life among older adults with insomnia. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the daily bidirectional relationships between exercise and sleep in a sample of women with insomnia. Participants included 11 women (age M = 61.27, SD 4.15) with insomnia who engaged in 30 min of aerobic exercise 3 times per week. Self-reported sleep quality was assessed at baseline and at 16 weeks. Sleep and exercise logs and wrist activity were collected continuously. Sleep variables included subjective sleep quality and objective measures recorded via wrist actigraphy (sleep onset latency [SOL], total sleep time [TST], sleep efficiency [SE], wake after sleep onset [WASO], and fragmentation index [FI]). Age, subjective sleep quality, TST, SOL, and physical fitness at baseline were tested as moderators of the daily effects. TST, SE, and self-reported global sleep quality improved from baseline to 16 weeks (p values exercise session duration (p exercise was not associated with subjective or objective sleep variables during the corresponding night. However, participants had shorter exercise duration following nights with longer SOL (p exercise duration (p exercise was stronger in participants who had shorter TST at baseline. Results suggest that sleep influences next day exercise rather than exercise influencing sleep. The relationship between TST and next day exercise was stronger for those with shorter TST at baseline. These results suggest that improving sleep may encourage exercise participation.

  12. Promoting graded exercise as a part of multimodal treatment in patients diagnosed with stress-related exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Markus; Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H; Arvidson, Elin; Lindwall, Magnus; Lindegård, Agneta

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, by using patient cohort data, the changes in exercise habits during a 12-month multimodal treatment period, in patients seeking specialist care for stress-related exhaustion. Randomised controlled trials have greatly contributed to the fact that both physicians and patients regard regular exercise participation as a highly valuable and effective treatment for mental health disorders. Nevertheless, little is known about the adherence to physical activity recommendations for patients with stress-related mental problems in a clinical setting. Knowledge about what can be achieved within the clinical context, and how current treatments can be improved, is crucial for clinicians, researchers, educators, managers and policy makers involved in nursing practice. Longitudinal analysis of patient cohort data. The sample consisted of 169 patients (79% women; mean age = 42·7 years) who were referred to a stress clinic due to stress-related exhaustion. All patients received multimodal treatment with similar components. Two different approaches to promote exercise were used in the clinical work (general comprehensive instruction either with or without an 18-week coached exercise programme). The self-reported overall exercise level was assessed at baseline and at three, six and 12 months after the first visit. Group by time effects were examined with repeated measures analyses of variance. The frequency, duration and intensity of exercise increased substantially during the first three months of multimodal treatment. Although exercise levels tended to decrease thereafter, there was still a significant time effect at the 12-month follow-up showing that follow-up exercise levels were higher than at baseline. Both general exercise instructions and coached exercise were effective in promoting exercise involvement. Exercise can be successfully promoted as a part of multimodal treatment in patients with stress-related exhaustion. © 2015 John

  13. Exercise therapy for improved neck muscle function in helicopter aircrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Danielle M; Harrison, Michael F; Sharpe, Donald; Candow, Darren; Albert, Wayne J; Neary, J Patrick

    2013-10-01

    To address the high prevalence of neck dysfunction in helicopter aircrew, a 12-wk training program was designed to examine the effects on neck muscular strength and endurance. Subjects were recruited from Canadian Forces (CF) helicopter aircrew and randomized into either a neck coordination training program (CTP; N = 10), an endurance training program (ETP; N = 11), or a nontreatment control (CON; N = 8). Baseline assessments determined maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) strength and endurance capacity using a submaximal contraction to fatigue at 70% of their MVC for extension, flexion, and left (Ltflx) and right (Rtflx) lateral flexion. The ETP subjects performed dynamic contractions at 30% of their MVC in the four testing directions using a head harness and Thera-band tubing. The CTP consisted of exercises that focused on strengthening the deep cervical musculature using the mass of the head as resistance and progressing to exercises that incorporated the superficial cervical muscles. Post-intervention, the ETP achieved the only statistically significant increase in maximal force when compared to the CON (14.4%). Improved times to fatigue were achieved by the CTP for flexion (26.34 +/- 20.72 s), Ltflx (23.54 +/- 13.94 s), and Rtflx (28.72 +/- 4.88 s). The provision of an ETP and CTP resulted in a positive trend toward improved maximal force and muscular endurance. The greatest improvements in endurance and strength were found for those subjects assigned to the CTP treatment. Our research demonstrates the importance of including a designed and supervised training program into the daily routine of helicopter aviators.

  14. The effects of therapeutic exercises on pain, muscle strength, functional capacity, balance and hemodynamic parameters in knee osteoarthritis patients: a randomized controlled study of supervised versus home exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru Çolak, Tuğba; Kavlak, Bahar; Aydoğdu, Onur; Şahin, Emir; Acar, Gönül; Demirbüken, İlkşan; Sarı, Zübeyir; Çolak, İlker; Bulut, Güven; Polat, M Gülden

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of low-intensity exercise programs for lower extremities, either supervised or at home, on pain, muscle strength, balance and the hemodynamic parameters of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This randomized study included 78 patients with knee OA in 2 groups of supervised and home-based exercise program. Exercises were applied to the first group in the clinic as a group exercise program and were demonstrated to the second group to be performed at home. Before and after the 6-week exercise program, assessment was made of pain, quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths, 6-min walk test (6MWT), and non-invasive hemodynamic parameters. Results of the 78 patients, 56 completed the study. Pain, muscle strength, and 6MWT scores showed significant improvements in both groups. There were also significant differences in the amount of change in pain and muscle strength (pain: p = 0.041, Rqdc: 0.009, Lqdc: 0.013, Rhms: 0.04) which indicated greater improvements in the supervised group. The balance scores of supervised group showed a significant improvement (p = 0.009). No significant change was determined in hemodynamic parameters of either group. Conclusion according to the results of this study showed that low-intensity lower extremity exercises conducted in a clinic under the supervision of a physiotherapist were more effective than home-based exercises in reducing post-activity pain levels and improving quadriceps and right hamstring muscle strength. Both the supervised and home exercise programs were seen to be effective in reducing rest pain and increasing 6 MW distance in knee osteoarthritis patients.

  15. Exercise training improves free testosterone in lifelong sedentary aging men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Lawrence D; Herbert, Peter; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F; Grace, Fergal M

    2017-07-01

    As the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on systemic hormones in aging men is unstudied to date, we investigated whether total testosterone (TT), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), free testosterone (free-T) and cortisol (all in serum) were altered following HIIT in a cohort of 22 lifelong sedentary (62 ± 2 years) older men. As HIIT requires preconditioning exercise in sedentary cohorts, participants were tested at three phases, each separated by six-week training; baseline (phase A), following conditioning exercise (phase B) and post-HIIT (phase C). Each measurement phase used identical methods. TT was significantly increased following HIIT (~17%; P  HIIT compared to baseline (~4.5%; P  = 0.023). Cortisol remained unchanged from A to C ( P  = 0.138). The present data indicate a combination of preconditioning, and HIIT increases TT and SHBG in sedentary older males, with the HIIT stimulus accounting for a small but statistically significant increase in free-T. Further study is required to determine the biological importance of small improvements in free-T in aging men. © 2017 The authors.

  16. Regulatory Fit Improves Fitness for People With Low Exercise Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Sophie A; Grimm, Lisa R

    2017-04-01

    Considering only 20.8% of American adults meet current physical activity recommendations, it is important to examine the psychological processes that affect exercise motivation and behavior. Drawing from regulatory fit theory, this study examined how manipulating regulatory focus and reward structures would affect exercise performance, with a specific interest in investigating whether exercise experience would moderate regulatory fit effects. We predicted that regulatory fit effects would appear only for participants with low exercise experience. One hundred and sixty-five young adults completed strength training exercise tasks (i.e., sit-ups, squats, plank, and wall-sit) in regulatory match or mismatch conditions. Consistent with predictions, only participants low in experience in regulatory match conditions exercised more compared with those in regulatory mismatch conditions. Although this is the first study manipulating regulatory fit in a controlled setting to examine exercise behavior, findings suggest that generating regulatory fit could positively influence those low in exercise experience.

  17. The clinical and sonographic effects of kinesiotaping and exercise in comparison with manual therapy and exercise for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: a preliminary trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Derya Ozer; Baltaci, Gul; Toprak, Ugur; Atay, Ahmet Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of manual therapy with exercise to kinesiotaping with exercise for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Randomized clinical before and after trial was used. Fifty-four patients diagnosed as having subacromial impingement syndrome who were referred for outpatient treatment were included. Eligible patients (between 30 and 60 years old, with unilateral shoulder pain) were randomly allocated to 2 study groups: kinesiotaping with exercise (n = 28) or manual therapy with exercise (n = 26). In addition, patients were advised to use cold packs 5 times per day to control for pain. Visual analog scale for pain, Disability of Arm and Shoulder Questionnaire for function, and diagnostic ultrasound assessment for supraspinatus tendon thickness were used as main outcome measures. Assessments were applied at the baseline and after completing 6 weeks of related interventions. At the baseline, there was no difference between the 2 group characteristics (P > .05). There were significant differences in both groups before and after treatment in terms of pain decrease and improvement of Disability of Arm and Shoulder Questionnaire scores (P .05). The only difference between the groups was at night pain, resulting in favor of the kinesiotaping with exercise group (P < .05). For the group of subjects studied, no differences were found between kinesiotaping with exercise and manual therapy with exercise. Both treatments may have similar results in reducing pain and disability in subacromial impingement in 6 weeks. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of a renal rehabilitation exercise program in patients with CKD: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ana P; Burris, Debra D; Lucas, F Leslie; Crocker, Gail A; Wasserman, James C

    2014-12-05

    Patients with CKD have a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease associated with or exacerbated by inactivity. This randomized, controlled study investigated whether a renal rehabilitation exercise program for patients with stages 3 or 4 CKD would improve their physical function and quality of life. In total, 119 adults with CKD stages 3 and 4 were randomized, and 107 of these patients proceeded to usual care or the renal rehabilitation exercise intervention consisting of usual care plus guided exercise two times per week for 12 weeks (24 sessions). Physical function was determined by three well established performance-based tests: 6-minute walk test, sit-to-stand test, and gait-speed test. Health-related quality of life was assessed by the RAND 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. At baseline, no differences in self-reported level of activity, 6-minute walk test, and sit-to-stand test scores were observed between the usual care (n=48) and renal rehabilitation exercise (n=59) groups, although baseline gait-speed test score was higher in the renal rehabilitation exercise group (Pexercise group but not the usual care group showed significant improvements in the 6-minute walk test (+210.4±266.0 ft [19% improvement] versus -10±219.9 ft; Page prediction [29% improvement] versus +0.7±12.1% of age prediction; Pexercise regimen was generally well tolerated. A 12-week/24-session renal rehabilitation exercise program improved physical capacity and quality of life in patients with CKD stages 3 and 4. Longer follow-up is needed to determine if these findings will translate into decreased mortality rates. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Cardiovascular maladaptation to exercise in young hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusmà Piccione, Maurizio; Zito, Concetta; Khandheria, Bijoy; Madaffari, Antonio; Oteri, Alessandra; Falanga, Gabriella; Donato, Domenica; D'Angelo, Myriam; Carerj, Maria Ludovica; Di Bella, Gianluca; Imbalzano, Egidio; Pugliatti, Pietro; Carerj, Scipione

    2017-04-01

    Impairment of the adaptive mechanisms that increase cardiac output during exercise can translate to a reduced functional capacity. We investigated cardiovascular adaptation to exertion in asymptomatic hypertensive patients, aiming to identify the early signs of cardiac and vascular dysfunction. We enrolled 54 subjects: 30 patients (45.1±11.9years, 19 males) and 24 age-matched healthy controls (44.4±9.6years, 14 males). Speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) and echo-tracking were performed at rest and during exertion to assess myocardial deformation and arterial stiffness. E/E' increased from rest to peak exercise more in patients than in controls (peak stage: p=0.024). Global longitudinal strain increased significantly from rest to peak stage in controls (p=0.011) whereas it remained unchanged in patients (p=0.777). Left atrial (LA) reservoir was significantly increased throughout the exercise only in controls (p=0.001) whereas it was almost unchanged in patients (p=0.293). LA stiffness was significantly higher in patients than in controls both at rest (p=0.023) and during exercise (pexercise in both groups, showing higher values in patients in each step. Our study showed a more pronounced maladaptation during exercise, with respect to rest, of the cardiovascular system with impaired cardiac-vessel coupling in hypertensive patients compared to healthy subjects. Exercise echocardiography implemented by STE and echo-tracking is invaluable in the early detection of these cardiovascular abnormalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of Trunk Stabilization Exercises Using a Gym Ball and Conventional Back Care Exercises for Patients With Chronic Lower Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The trunk muscles are vital for the maintenance of spinal stability. Training of specific muscles surrounding the lumbar spine, which provide dynamic and segmental stability, is one of the major goals in the management of patients with chronic low back pain (LBP. However, more investigation of lumbar stabilization training using a ball is required before making any strong conclusions about its efficacy. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the effect of trunk stabilization exercises and conventional back care exercises for patients with chronic LBP. Patients and Methods Thirty male subjects with chronic LBP were randomly assigned to two groups. The experimental group received trunk stabilization exercise using a gym ball whereas the control group received conventional back care exercises for six weeks. The abdominal muscle endurance, pain intensity, and functional disability were measured using pressure biofeedback, visual analogue scale (VAS, and modified Oswestry disability questionnaire (MODQ, respectively. All the measurements were taken at baseline and during week two, four and six. Results The results of the study demonstrated significant improvements in abdominal muscle endurance and reduction in VAS and MODQ score of both groups (P = 0.001. The trunk stabilization exercise group showed greater gains in abdominal muscle endurance during weeks two to six compared to the conventional back care exercise group (P < 0.05. In addition, the trunk stabilization exercise group showed greater reduction in the VAS score (P = 0.035 and MODQ score (P = 0.001 at week six compared to the conventional back care exercise group. Conclusions The trunk stabilization exercises are more effective than conventional back care exercises in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic LBP.

  1. Physical Exercise and Patients with Chronic Renal Failure: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic renal failure is a severe clinical problem which has some significant socioeconomic impact worldwide and hemodialysis is an important way to maintain patients’ health state, but it seems difficult to get better in short time. Considering these, the aim in our research is to update and evaluate the effects of exercise on the health of patients with chronic renal failure. The databases were used to search for the relevant studies in English or Chinese. And the association between physical exercise and health state of patients with chronic renal failure has been investigated. Random-effect model was used to compare the physical function and capacity in exercise and control groups. Exercise is helpful in ameliorating the situation of blood pressure in patients with renal failure and significantly reduces VO2 in patients with renal failure. The results of subgroup analyses show that, in the age >50, physical activity can significantly reduce blood pressure in patients with renal failure. The activity program containing warm-up, strength, and aerobic exercises has benefits in blood pressure among sick people and improves their maximal oxygen consumption level. These can help patients in physical function and aerobic capacity and may give them further benefits.

  2. Do patients with lung cancer benefit from physical exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Andreas Holst; Vinther, Anders; Poulsen, Lise-Lotte

    2011-01-01

    Patients with lung cancer are often burdened by dyspnoea, fatigue, decreased physical ability and loss of weight. Earlier studies of physical exercise of patients with COPD have shown promising results. The aim of this study was to investigate, if a well-documented COPD rehabilitation protocol ca...

  3. Safety of supervised exercise therapy in patients with intermittent claudication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gommans, Lindy N. M.; Fokkenrood, Hugo J. P.; van Dalen, Hendrika C. W.; Scheltinga, Marc R. M.; Teijink, Joep A. W.; Peters, Ron J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Supervised exercise therapy (SET) is recommended as the primary treatment for patients with intermittent claudication (IC). However, there is concern regarding the safety of performing SET because IC patients are at risk for untoward cardiovascular events. The Dutch physical therapy guideline

  4. Cognitive and behavioural effects of music-based exercises in patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Winckel, Ann; Feys, Hilde; De Weerdt, Willy; Dom, René

    2004-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of a musical exercise programme on mood state and cognitive function in women with dementia. Randomized controlled trial. Public Psychiatric Hospital Rekem, Belgium. Twenty-five patients with dementia. Fifteen patients attended exercise training for three months, which consisted of daily physical exercises supported by music for 30 min/session. They were compared with a group of 10 control patients, who received an equal amount of attention through daily conversation. The effect on cognition was measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Amsterdam Dementia Screening Test 6 (ADS 6). Behaviour was evaluated with the abbreviated Stockton Geriatric Rating Scale (BOP scale). The assessments were made before, after six weeks of intervention and immediately after the three-month experimental period. The exercise group showed a significant improvement in cognition. This was documented by an increased MMSE mean score of 12.87-15.53, and by a higher median score, rising from 10 to 14 points, on the subset 'fluency' (ADS 6 test). The control group showed no significant improvement, either on the MMSE (mean score of 10.80-11.00) or on the fluency subtest of the ADS 6 (median scores were 6.5-7 points). The effects on behavioural changes were not significant. The present study suggests a beneficial effect of cognition using a music-based exercise programme in a group of patients with moderate to severe dementia. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  5. Effect of L-carnitine on exercise performance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenes, A C; Bravo, D M; Nápolis, L M; Mello, M T; Oliveira, A S B; Neder, J A; Nery, L E

    2015-04-01

    Exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative metabolism is a prominent symptom in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but it is still uncertain whether L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial for patients with MM. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on exercise performance in MM. Twelve MM subjects (mean age±SD=35.4±10.8 years) with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) were first compared to 10 healthy controls (mean age±SD=29±7.8 years) before they were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine supplementation (3 g/daily) or placebo in a double-blind crossover design. Clinical status, body composition, respiratory function tests, peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic and isometric torque) and cardiopulmonary exercise tests (incremental to peak exercise and at 70% of maximal), constant work rate (CWR) exercise test, to the limit of tolerance [Tlim]) were assessed after 2 months of L-carnitine/placebo administration. Patients with MM presented with lower mean height, total body weight, fat-free mass, and peripheral muscle strength compared to controls in the pre-test evaluation. After L-carnitine supplementation, the patients with MM significantly improved their Tlim (14±1.9 vs 11±1.4 min) and oxygen consumption ( V ˙ O 2 ) at CWR exercise, both at isotime (1151±115 vs 1049±104 mL/min) and at Tlim (1223±114 vs 1060±108 mL/min). These results indicate that L-carnitine supplementation may improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance during high-intensity CWRs in MM patients with CPEO.

  6. Effect of L-carnitine on exercise performance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenes, A.C.; Bravo, D.M.; Nápolis, L.M.; Mello, M.T.; Oliveira, A.S.B.; Neder, J.A.; Nery, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative metabolism is a prominent symptom in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but it is still uncertain whether L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial for patients with MM. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on exercise performance in MM. Twelve MM subjects (mean age±SD=35.4±10.8 years) with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) were first compared to 10 healthy controls (mean age±SD=29±7.8 years) before they were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine supplementation (3 g/daily) or placebo in a double-blind crossover design. Clinical status, body composition, respiratory function tests, peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic and isometric torque) and cardiopulmonary exercise tests (incremental to peak exercise and at 70% of maximal), constant work rate (CWR) exercise test, to the limit of tolerance [Tlim]) were assessed after 2 months of L-carnitine/placebo administration. Patients with MM presented with lower mean height, total body weight, fat-free mass, and peripheral muscle strength compared to controls in the pre-test evaluation. After L-carnitine supplementation, the patients with MM significantly improved their Tlim (14±1.9 vs 11±1.4 min) and oxygen consumption (V˙O2) at CWR exercise, both at isotime (1151±115 vs 1049±104 mL/min) and at Tlim (1223±114 vs 1060±108 mL/min). These results indicate that L-carnitine supplementation may improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance during high-intensity CWRs in MM patients with CPEO. PMID:25714882

  7. Effect of L-carnitine on exercise performance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Gimenes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative metabolism is a prominent symptom in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM, but it is still uncertain whether L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial for patients with MM. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on exercise performance in MM. Twelve MM subjects (mean age±SD=35.4±10.8 years with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO were first compared to 10 healthy controls (mean age±SD=29±7.8 years before they were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine supplementation (3 g/daily or placebo in a double-blind crossover design. Clinical status, body composition, respiratory function tests, peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic and isometric torque and cardiopulmonary exercise tests (incremental to peak exercise and at 70% of maximal, constant work rate (CWR exercise test, to the limit of tolerance [Tlim] were assessed after 2 months of L-carnitine/placebo administration. Patients with MM presented with lower mean height, total body weight, fat-free mass, and peripheral muscle strength compared to controls in the pre-test evaluation. After L-carnitine supplementation, the patients with MM significantly improved their Tlim (14±1.9 vs 11±1.4 min and oxygen consumption (V˙O2 at CWR exercise, both at isotime (1151±115 vs 1049±104 mL/min and at Tlim (1223±114 vs 1060±108 mL/min. These results indicate that L-carnitine supplementation may improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance during high-intensity CWRs in MM patients with CPEO.

  8. Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercising. Count out loud as you do the exercises. View Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Home Techniques to ... Intimacy Importance of Being Together Body Changes with Age Communicating with Your Partner Exercise and Sexual Activity Less Strenuous Positions for Sexual ...

  9. Effect of acute bicarbonate administration on exercise responses of COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppoolse, R; Barstow, T J; Stringer, W W; Carithers, E; Casaburi, R

    1997-06-01

    Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are limited in their exercise tolerance by the level of ventilation (VE) they can sustain. We determined whether acutely increasing blood bicarbonate levels decreased acid stimulation to the respiratory chemoreceptors during exercise, thereby improving exercise tolerance. Responses were compared with those obtained during 100% O2 breathing (known to reduce VE in these patients) and to the responses of healthy young subjects. Participants were six patients with severe COPD (forced expired volume in 1 s = 31 +/- 11% predicted) but without chronic CO2 retention and 5 healthy young subjects. Each subject performed three incremental cycle ergometer exercise tests: 1) control, 2) after ingestion of 0.3 g.kg-1 of sodium bicarbonate and 3) while breathing 100% O2. During these tests VE was measured continuously and arterialized venous blood (patients) or arterial blood (healthy subjects) was sampled serially to assess acid base variables. Bicarbonate loading increased standard bicarbonate by 4-6 mmol.L-1 and this elevation persisted during exercise. In both groups, bicarbonate loading resulted in a substantially higher arterial pH; arterial PCO2 was either unchanged (healthy subjects) or mildly (averaging 5 torr) higher (COPD patients). However, in neither group did bicarbonate loading result in an altered VE response to exercise or an increase in exercise tolerance. In contrast, superimposing hyperoxia on bicarbonate ingestion yielded, on average, 24% reduction in VE and 50% increase in peak work rate in the patients (but not in the healthy young subjects). We conclude that acute bicarbonate loading is not an ergogenic aid in patients with severe COPD.

  10. A specific exercise strategy reduced the need for surgery in subacromial pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Hanna C Björnsson; Holmgren, Theresa; Oberg, Birgitta; Johansson, Kajsa; Adolfsson, Lars E

    2014-10-01

    A programme based on eccentric exercises for treating subacromial pain was in a previous study found effective at 3-month follow-up. The purposes of the present study were to investigate whether the results were maintained after 1 year and whether the baseline Constant-Murley score, rotator cuff status and radiological findings influenced the outcome. 97 patients on the waiting list for arthroscopic subacromial decompression had been randomised to a specific exercise programme or unspecific exercises (controls). After 3 months of exercises, the patients were asked whether they still wanted surgery and this option was available until a 1-year follow-up. 1 year after inclusion or 1 year after surgery, the number of patients who decided to have surgery in each group was compared. The choice of surgery was related to the baseline Constant-Murley score, ultrasound and radiographs taken at inclusion. All patients had improved significantly (p<0.0001) in the Constant-Murley score at the 1-year follow-up. Significantly more patients in the control group decided to have surgery (63%) than those in the specific exercise group (24%; p<0.0001). Patients who decided to have surgery had a significantly lower baseline Constant-Murley score and more often a full-thickness tear. Patients with partial tears did not differ from those with intact tendons. The positive short-term results of specific exercises were maintained after 1 year, and this exercise strategy reduces the need for surgery. Full-thickness tear and a low baseline Constant-Murley score appear to be a predictive marker for a less good outcome. Clinical trials NCT01037673. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Resistance exercise improves physical fatigue in women with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Anna; Palstam, Annie; Larsson, Anette; Löfgren, Monika; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Bjersing, Jan; Gerdle, Björn; Kosek, Eva; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa

    2016-07-30

    Fibromyalgia (FM) affects approximately 1-3 % of the general population. Fatigue limits the work ability and social life of patients with FM. A few studies of physical exercise have included measures of fatigue in FM, indicating that exercise can decrease fatigue levels. There is limited knowledge about the effects of resistance exercise on multiple dimensions of fatigue in FM. The present study is a sub-study of a multicenter randomized controlled trial in women with FM. The purpose of the present sub-study was to examine the effects of a person-centered progressive resistance exercise program on multiple dimensions of fatigue in women with FM, and to investigate predictors of the potential change in fatigue. A total of 130 women with FM (age 22-64 years) were included in this assessor-blinded randomized controlled multicenter trial examining the effects of person-centered progressive resistance exercise compared with an active control group. The intervention was performed twice a week for 15 weeks. Outcomes were five dimensions of fatigue measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20). Information about background was collected and the women also completed several health-related questionnaires. Multiple linear stepwise regression was used to analyze predictors of change in fatigue in the total population. A higher improvement was found at the post-treatment examination for change in the resistance exercise group, as compared to change in the active control group in the MFI-20 subscale of physical fatigue (resistance group Δ -1.7, SD 4.3, controls Δ 0.0, SD 2.7, p = 0.013), with an effect size of 0.33. Sleep efficiency was the strongest predictor of change in the MFI-20 subscale general fatigue (beta = -0.54, p = 0.031, R (2) = 0.05). Participating in resistance exercise (beta = 1.90, p = 0.010) and working fewer hours per week (beta = 0.84, p = 0.005) were independent significant predictors of change in physical

  12. Impact of a community-based exercise programme on physical fitness in middle-aged and older patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeu Mendes

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: A long-term community-based combined exercise programme, developed with low-cost exercise strategies, produced significant benefits in physical fitness in middle-aged and older patients with type 2 diabetes. This supervised group exercise programme significantly improved aerobic fitness, muscle strength, agility/balance and flexibility, assessed with field tests in community settings.

  13. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves exercise capacity in subjects with kyphoscoliosis and severe respiratory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuschillo, Salvatore; De Felice, Alberto; Martucci, Michele; Gaudiosi, Carlo; Pisano, Viviana; Vitale, Dino; Balzano, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Patients with kyphoscoliosis and severe respiratory impairment frequently experience reduction in exercise tolerance, limitation in daily life activities, and deterioration in health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) as an add-on treatment to long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) was shown to improve symptoms and HRQOL in these patients. Pulmonary rehabilitation can increase exercise capacity and HRQOL in patients with COPD, but its role in patients with restrictive thoracic disease, such as kyphoscoliosis, is uncertain. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of combining pulmonary rehabilitation with LTOT and NIV treatments on arterial blood gases and the 6-min walk test (6MWT) in a homogeneous group of subjects with kyphoscoliosis. Twenty-three subjects with kyphoscoliosis and respiratory failure who were being treated with both LTOT and NIV and who had been referred to a pulmonary rehabilitation program were retrospectively analyzed. Eighteen subjects were included, and there was no control group. Pulmonary rehabilitation involved educational and physical training sessions and was carried out daily for 4-6 weeks. Exercise intensity was personalized based on individual tolerance, physiologic parameters, or physiotherapist judgment. Upon completion of pulmonary rehabilitation, a significant improvement in 6-min walk distance was observed (P = .04). The dyspnea score at the end of the 6MWT improved as well, although the improvement did not reach statistical significance (P = .06). These changes were not confirmed at a 12-month follow-up visit. No significant effects of pulmonary rehabilitation on arterial blood gases were observed. A combined intervention including a tailored pulmonary rehabilitation program together with LTOT and NIV seems to be of short-term benefit in subjects with kyphoscoliosis and severe respiratory impairment. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  14. Physiological Adaptations to Chronic Endurance Exercise Training in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1987

    1987-01-01

    In a roundtable format, five doctors explore the reasons why regular physical activity should continue to play a significant role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease. Endurance exercise training improves aerobic capacity, reduces blood pressure, and decreases risk. (Author/MT)

  15. Feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of preoperative therapeutic exercise in patients with cancer: A pragmatic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, H.; Groot, J.F. de; Hulzebos, H.J.; Knikker, R. de; Kerkkamp, H.E.M.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an individually designed preoperative therapeutic exercise program (PreTEP), in patients recently diagnosed with cancer and awaiting elective surgery. The purpose is to improve their physical fitness levels

  16. Feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of preoperative therapeutic exercise in patients with cancer: a pragmatic study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, H.; Groot, J.F. de; Hulzebos, H.J.; Knikker, R. de; Kerkkamp, H.E.M.; Meeteren, N.L. van

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an individually designed preoperative therapeutic exercise program (PreTEP), in patients recently diagnosed with cancer and awaiting elective surgery. The purpose is to improve their physical fitness levels

  17. A systematic review of the effects of bronchodilators on exercise capacity in patients with COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liesker, JJW; Wijkstra, PJ; Ten Hacken, NHT; Koeter, GH; Postma, DS; Kerstjens, HAM

    One of the major goals of bronchodilator therapy in patients with COPD is to decrease airflow limitation in the airways and, as a consequence, improve dyspnea and exercise tolerance. The focus of this systematic review is to assess the effects of treatment with beta-agonists, anticholinergics, and

  18. Aerobic exercises enhance cognitive functions and brain derived neurotrophic factor in ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tamawy, Mohamed S; Abd-Allah, Foad; Ahmed, Sandra M; Darwish, Moshera H; Khalifa, Heba A

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of functional impairments. High percentage of these patients will experience some degree of cognitive affection, ranging from mild cognitive impairment to dementia. Demonstrate the role of aerobic exercises enhancing cognitive functions and its effect on Brain Derived Neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in post-ischemic stroke patients in the territory of anterior circulation. We included thirty Egyptian ischemic stroke patients in the territory of anterior circulation. They were divided into 2 groups; group 1 (G1) were subjected to physiotherapy program without aerobic exercises and group 2 (G2) were subjected to the same previous program followed by aerobic exercises. Both groups were subjected to pre- and post-treatment Addenbrookes's Cognitive Examination- Revised (ACER) and serum level of BDNF. Our results showed a significant improvement in ACER score in G2 compared to G1 post-treatment (p = 0.017). BDNF serum level significantly increased in G2 post-treatment compared to pre-treatment (p = 0.001) and compared to G1 group (p = 0.0458). ACER improvement was positively correlated to increase in serum level of BDNF (r = 0.53, p = 0.044). Aerobic exercises improve cognitive functions of ischemic stroke patients. This improvement is related to the increase in serum level of BDNF.

  19. The effect of nerve mobilization exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C-N; Xia, G; Leung, B P

    2017-09-21

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by chronic inflammation of the joints. The neurogenic inflammatory mechanism plays an important role in the inflammatory process of RA, and pathological changes in neural tissues in RA have also been noted. We aim to investigate treatment of the nervous system to relieve joint pain and inflammation in RA. Nerve mobilization, a nervous system-specific therapeutic exercise, was applied on RA patients to determine the effect of nerve mobilization on joint inflammation. Twelve RA patients were recruited from the community and were randomised into an experimental and a control group. In the experimental group, the subjects were taught a set of nerve mobilization exercises while the subjects in the control group were taught a set of gentle joint mobilization exercises. Both groups were instructed to practice the exercises daily. After a 4-week period, their RA pain scale (RAPS) and pain scores were examined, as well as the C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Subjects in the experimental group showed improvements in RAPS and pain scores after 4 weeks of nerve mobilization exercises, while CRP and ESR values remained unaffected. These preliminary data showed that nerve mobilization exercises might be beneficial in controlling joint pain in RA patients.

  20. Effects of Physical Exercise on Working Memory and Prefrontal Cortex Function in Post-Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, M; Aoki, C; Sakatani, K

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise enhances prefrontal cortex activity and improves working memory performance in healthy older adults, but it is not clear whether this remains the case in post-stroke patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the acute effect of physical exercise on prefrontal cortex activity in post-stroke patients using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We studied 11 post-stroke patients. The patients performed Sternberg-type working memory tasks before and after moderate intensity aerobic exercise (40 % of maximal oxygen uptake) with a cycling ergometer for 15 min. We measured the NIRS response at the prefrontal cortex during the working memory task. We evaluated behavioral performance (response time and accuracy) of the working memory task. It was found that physical exercise improved behavioral performance of the working memory task compared with the control condition (p prefrontal cortex activation, particularly in the right prefrontal cortex (p prefrontal cortex activity and improves working memory performance in post-stroke patients.

  1. Comparing the Effects of Therapeutic Exercise and Hydrotherapy on Pain Severity and Knee Range of Motion in Patients with Hemophilia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Mazloum

    2013-10-01

    . Results: Both experimental groups exhibited significant reduction of pain along with improved knee flexion and extension compared with the control group (P<0.001. Pain reduction in subjects treated in water treatment was significantly higher than exercise group in drought (P0.05. Conclusion: The use of therapeutic exercise in water with regular exercise rehabilitation for patients with hemophilia can be helpful to reduce pain and improve range of motion in hemophilia patients. The effect of exercise therapy on pain reduction is more effective compared to traditional pain therapy. Key words: Hydrotherapy, Exercise Therapy, Hemophilia, Knee Range of Motion

  2. The Effects of 10 Weeks Concurrent Aerobic and Strength Exercise on Quality of Life and Resilience of Kidney Transplant Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Shakoor

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kidney transplant patients are exposed to a lot of different infectious on diseases because of long usage of suppressing immune system drugs.  Quality of life (QoL is generally found to improve for renal transplant recipients, although some patients continue to experience health-related problems. Kidney transplant is the selected treatment of chronic kidney disease and it improves life quality and resilience. Objective: To evaluate The Effects of 10 Weeks Concurrent Aerobic and Strength Exercise on Quality of Life and Resilience of Kidney Transplant Patients. Methods: forty four renal transplant recipients were selected to participate in the study and randomized into exercise (n=29 and control (n=15 groups. The exercise group participated in a cumulative exercise pro¬gram 3 days a week for 10 weeks in 60–90-minute exercise sessions. Control group subjects did not participate in any regular exercise activity during this period. For measuring the variable of this research; the resilience scale of Cano and Davidson (2003 and questionnaire which measured quality of life (SF-36 measured before and after 10 weeks of exercise training. Data analysis was conducted using t-tests. Results: quality of life and resilience values were significantly increased after 10 weeks of exercise training in the exercise group relative to control (P<0.05. Conclusion: ten weeks of selected low-intensity exercise can be an effective measure to improve the quality of life and resilience in renal transplant patients. Keywords: Concurrent, Aerobic and Strength Exercise, Quality of Life, Resilience, Kidney Transplant Patients

  3. The results of "exercise therapy in coronary prone individuals and coronary patients".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavsic, C; Turkulin, K; Perman, Z; Steinel, S; Oreskovic, A; Dimnik, R; Martic, P; Fischer, F; Puharic, M; Bruketa, I; Martic, M; Stojanovic, D; Ljubetic, L

    1976-01-01

    The authors followed for at least two years 483 patients (430 coronary prone patients and 53 with proved coronary heart disease), to determine whether physical training could decrease coronary risk factors and improve exercise tolerance in the trained group as compared with the conventionally treated group (way of life, diet, drugs). There was no significant difference among the two groups for blood lipid profile, blood pressure (at rest and during exercise), functional capacity and mortality. In the authors' opinion this could be explained by the inadequate training program (45 minutes twice a week) and by a possible overlapping of the groups.

  4. Hand exercise intervention in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regardt, Malin; Schult, Marie-Louise; Axelsson, Yvonne; Aldehag, Anna; Alexanderson, Helene; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a 12-week hand exercise intervention for patients with polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) and evaluate adherence, patients' opinions of the programme design and overall feasibility, and the effect on hand function and activity limitation after the intervention. A pilot hand exercise intervention was conducted on a convenience sample of 15 patients with reduced handgrip strength and established, inactive PM and DM. Acceptable adherence was set at 75%. The programme was evaluated based on patients' opinions regarding exertion, the movements involved and overall feasibility. Hand- and pinch-grip strength, grip ability, dexterity and activity limitation were assessed. Eleven of 15 patients completed the intervention, with acceptable adherence of 78-100%. Measures of handgrip strength, dexterity and activity limitation were reduced at baseline compared with normative data from the literature. Throughout the intervention, rates of perceived exertion were scored between 'moderate' and 'fairly strong'. Finger abduction and adduction were excluded from the hand exercise programme because they were not feasible to perform. Repetitions of the exercise increased gradually to a maximum of 30 per movement. Patients regarded this as too time-consuming and suggested ten repetitions daily or 10-20 repetitions 2-4 times per week. There were some individual, clinically meaningful improvements in hand function and activity limitation. A comparison between baseline and after the intervention showed that the three-jaw (tripod) pinch-grip strength (left hand) had increased (p hand exercise programme was found to be feasible to perform by patients with established PM or DM. The effect was limited, with few individual improvements in hand function and activity limitation, indicating a need to increase the resistance in the movements and to limit the duration of each exercise session. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Impact of home-based aerobic exercise on the physical capacity of overweight patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoike, Danilo Takashi; Baria, Flavia; Kamimura, Maria Ayako; Ammirati, Adriano; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Cuppari, Lilian

    2015-02-01

    Home-based exercise has been shown to provide benefits in terms of physical capacity in the general population, but has been scarcely investigated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). To evaluate the impact of a home-based aerobic training on the cardiopulmonary and functional capacities of overweight non-dialysis-dependent patients with CKD (NDD-CKD). Twenty-nine sedentary patients (55.1 ± 11.6 years, BMI = 31.2 ± 6.1 kg/m(2), eGFR = 26.9 ± 17.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) were randomly assigned to a home-based exercise group (n = 14) or to a control group (n = 15) that remained without performing exercise. Aerobic training was performed three times per week for 12 weeks. A cardiopulmonary exercise test, functional capacity and clinical parameters were evaluated. A significant increase, ranging from 8.3 to 17 %, was observed in the cardiopulmonary capacity parameters, such as maximal ventilation (p = 0.005), VO2peak (p = 0.049), ventilatory threshold (p = 0.040) and respiratory compensation point (p exercise group. A simultaneous improvement in the functional capacity tests [6-min walk test (p exercise. Exercised patients experienced a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, average 10.6 % (p aerobic exercise program was feasible, safe and effective for the improvement in the cardiopulmonary and functional capacities of overweight NDD-CKD patients.

  6. Determinants of the effects of physical training and of the complications requiring resuscitation during exercise in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhees, Luc; Stevens, An; Schepers, Dirk; Defoor, Johan; Rademakers, Frank; Fagard, Robert

    2004-08-01

    Benefits of cardiac rehabilitation with exercise therapy are well-established, although individual reactions are heterogeneous. The identification of determinants of training effects is useful from a prognostic point of view, but data regarding this are scarce. Furthermore, limited data exist on the determinants of complications during exercise in cardiac patients. This study aimed to investigate the determinants (1) of training effects in cardiac rehabilitation and (2) of complications requiring resuscitation during exercise activities at the hospital and during continued exercise at a sports club for cardiac patients. Clinical association study. Determinants of changes in peak oxygen uptake (VO2) after 3 months of cardiac rehabilitation were determined by multiple regression analysis (n=1909). Determinants of events requiring resuscitation (n=21) were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Improvements in peak VO2 and exercise duration averaged 26%. Eighteen per cent of the variance in absolute improvements of peak VO2 was explained, with age and training characteristics as the strongest determinants. Twenty-one per cent of the variation in relative improvements was explained, with baseline exercise performance and training characteristics being the strongest determinants. The intake of anti-arrhythmics (odds ratio=5.5; P or =1 mm) at baseline exercise testing (odds ratio=1.6; PAge, baseline exercise performance and training characteristics were predictive for training effects in cardiac rehabilitation. Anti-arrhythmics and ST-segment depression at baseline exercise testing were predictive for complications.

  7. Redesigning an intensive insulin service for patients with type 1 diabetes: a patient consultation exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan S

    2013-06-01

    enhancement identified in the focus groups and observational exercise. Clinical feedback and professional continuity (median = 5, interquartile range = 1 were the most highly rated. Conclusion: The patient consultation process had generated important ideas on how the clinical team and service can improve the care provided. Key areas for service development were: a stronger emphasis of collaborative care planning; improved patient choice in the use of health technology; more resources for self-management support; and a more explicit format for the process of care in the clinic. Keywords: service development, type 1 diabetes, patient feedback, quality improvement, intensive insulin treatment

  8. Adjunctive Use of Noninvasive Ventilation During Exercise in Patients With Decompensated Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Igor Gutierrez; Kimoto, Karen Mota; Fernandes, Marcos Brandmuller; Grams, Samantha Torres; Yamaguti, Wellington Pereira

    2017-02-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) as an adjunct strategy for increasing exercise tolerance has been widely investigated in patients with pulmonary diseases. To our knowledge, there are no studies that have used NIV during exercise in patients with decompensated heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of NIV on exercise tolerance in hospitalized patients with decompensated HF. Thirteen patients (77 ± 15 years) with a mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 35 ± 15% were included. Patients underwent 2 submaximal exercise tests with constant load for lower limbs using a portable cycle ergometer. Tests were performed on the same day with a 60-minute interval between each one, using a randomized crossover design: sham ventilation (continuous positive airway pressure mode, 4 cm H2O) and intervention situation (NIV in bilevel mode). Primary outcome was the endurance time performed during exercise tests with constant load. Submaximal exercise with NIV in bilevel mode improved endurance time (7.2 ± 2.7 minutes) compared to the tests performed with continuous positive airway pressure (5.1 ± 1.5 minutes; p = 0.008). Increase in endurance time (Δ time) with bilevel test showed a significant correlation with reduction in the slope of dyspnea (Δ Borg) over time (r = -0.73; p = 0.004). There was a significant correlation between endurance time in bilevel tests and maximum inspiratory pressure % predicted (r = 0.68; p = 0.02). In conclusion, NIV was effective in increasing exercise tolerance in hospitalized patients with decompensated HF. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT02122848). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exercise therapy after ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injections in patients with subacromial pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Karen; Christensen, Robin; Rosager, Sara

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS) accounts for around 50 % of all cases of shoulder pain. The most commonly used treatments are glucocorticosteroid (steroid) injections and exercise therapy; however, despite treatment SAPS patients often experience relapse of their symptoms. Therefore...... the clinical effect of combining steroid and exercise therapy is highly relevant to clarify. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate if exercise therapy added to steroid injection in patients with SAPS will improve the effect of the injection therapy on shoulder pain. METHODS......: In this two-arm randomized trial running over 26 weeks, patients with unilateral shoulder pain (> 4 weeks) and thickened subacromial bursa (> 2 mm on US) were included. At baseline all participants received two steroid injections into the painful shoulder with an interval of one week. Subsequently they were...

  10. Long-term effects of physical exercise during rehabilitation in patients with severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzer, Paul; Voigt, Charles D; Clayton, Robert P; Andersen, Clark R; Mlcak, Ronald P; Kamolz, Lars-P; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E

    2016-09-01

    We have reported that a 12-week exercise program is beneficial for the exercise performance of severely burned children. It is not known, however, whether the beneficial effects remain at 2 years postburn. Severely burned children who received no long-term anabolic drugs were consented to this Institutional Review Board-approved study. Patients chose between a voluntary exercise program (EX-group) and no exercise (NoEX-group) after discharge from the acute burn unit. Peak torque per lean leg mass, maximal oxygen consumption, and percent predicted peak heart rate were assessed. In addition, body mass index percentile and lean body mass index were recorded. Both groups were compared for up to 2 years postburn using mixed multiple analysis of variance. A total of 125 patients with a mean age of 12 ± 4 years were analyzed. Demographics between the EX-group (N = 82) and NoEX-group (N = 43) were comparable. In the EX-group, peak torque per lean leg mass, percent predicted peak heart rate, and maximal oxygen consumption increased significantly with exercise (P Group (P group. There were no significant differences between groups in body mass index percentile, lean body mass index, peak torque per lean leg mass, and maximal oxygen consumption at 24 months postburn. Exercise significantly improves the physical performance of burned children. The benefits are limited to early time points, however, and greatly narrow with further recovery time. Continued participation in exercise activities or a maintenance exercise program is recommended for exercise-induced adaptations to continue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of health education programs on exercise behavior among patients with heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Xia; Ho, Shuk-Ching; Wong, Thomas K S

    2013-11-01

    Regular exercise has been shown to be beneficial to patients with heart disease. Previous studies have indicated that health education can effectively increase participants' physical activity. However, no systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of health education programs on changing exercise behavior among patients with heart disease. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of health education programs on exercise behavior among heart disease patients. Potential studies were retrieved in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMbase, PsycINFO, the British Nursing Index and Archive, Science Direct, and ERIC via EBSCOhost. Meta-analysis was done using the random-effect model. Thirty-seven studies were identified. Only 12 studies delivered health education based on various theories/models. Twenty-eight studies were included in the meta-analyses. The results showed that health education had significantly positive effects on exercise adherence (risk ratio = 1.35 to 1.48), exercise duration (SMD = 0.25 to 0.69), exercise frequency (MD = 0.54 to 1.46 session/week), and exercise level (SMD = 0.25), while no significant effects were found on exercise energy expenditure and cognitive exercise behavior. Health education has overall positive effects on changing exercise behavior among heart disease patients. Few theoretical underpinning studies were conducted for changing exercise behavior among heart disease patients. The findings suggest that health education improves exercise behavior for heart disease patients. Health professionals should reinforce health education programs for them. © 2013 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Effects of aquatic backward locomotion exercise and progressive resistance exercise on lumbar extension strength in patients who have undergone lumbar diskectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You-Sin; Park, Jaebum; Shim, Jae Kun

    2010-02-01

    were different from that of the CON group. The results obtained suggested that the aquatic backward locomotion exercise is as beneficial as progressive resistance exercise for improving lumbar extension strength in patients after lumbar diskectomy surgery. Copyright 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A prospective 2-site parallel intervention trial of a research-based film to increase exercise amongst older hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Pia; Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Miller, Karen-Lee; Brooks, Dina; Colobong, Romeo; Parsons, Trisha; Jassal, Sarbjit Vanita; Thomas, Alison; Binns, Malcolm; Naglie, Gary

    2017-01-26

    Evidence suggests that exercise training for hemodialysis patients positively improves morbidity and mortality outcomes, yet exercise programs remain rare and are not systematically incorporated into care. We developed a research-based film, Fit for Dialysis, designed to introduce, motivate, and sustain exercise for wellness amongst older hemodialysis patients, and exercise counseling and support by nephrologists, nurses, and family caregivers. The objective of this clinical trial is to determine whether and in what ways Fit for Dialysis improves outcomes and influences knowledge/attitudes regarding the importance of exercise for wellness in the context of end-stage renal disease. This 2-site parallel intervention trial will recruit 60 older hemodialysis patients from two urban hospitals. The trial will compare the film + a 16-week exercise program in one hospital, with a 16-week exercise-only program in another hospital. Physical fitness and activity measures will be performed at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks, and 12 weeks after the end of the program. These include the 2-min Walk Test, Grip Strength, Duke Activity Status Index, and the Timed Up-and-Go Test, as well as wearing a pedometer for one week. Throughout the 16-week exercise program, and at 12 weeks after, we will record patients' exercise using the Godin Leisure-time Exercise Questionnaire. Patients will also keep a diary of the exercise that they do at home on non-dialysis days. Qualitative interviews, conducted at baseline, 8, and 16 weeks, will explore the impact of Fit for Dialysis on the knowledge/attitudes of patients, family caregivers, and nephrology staff regarding exercise for wellness, and in what ways the film is effective in educating, motivating, or sustaining patient exercise during dialysis, at home, and in the community. This research will determine for whom Fit for Dialysis is effective, why, and under what conditions. If Fit for Dialysis is proven beneficial to patients, nephrology

  14. The effectiveness of Kayaking exercises as compared to general mobility exercises in reducing axial rigidity and improve bed mobility in early to mid stage of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shujaat, Faiza; Soomro, Nabila; Khan, Muhammad

    2014-09-01

    To determine the effectiveness of kayaking exercises in the management of axial rigidity, improve bed mobility by improving trunk rotation in Parkinson's patients. Experimental randomized controlled trail conducted at Physiotherapy department of IPM&R, DUHS and neurology Outpatient Department of Civil Hospital Karachi. Sample size of 48 was calculated with the use of openEpi. After baseline assessment 24 participants were assigned to each Kayaking exercise and general mobility exercise groups. Both groups received treatment for 75 minutes, 6 days a week for 4 weeks. Pre and post treatment measurements were determined by goniometer that assessed the cervical and thoracolumbar rotations whereas bed mobility was assessed by Modified Parkinson's Activity Scale (MPAS). In Kayaking group mean cervical spine left rotation increased from 32.95+ 9.66 to 47.25 + 10.58, right side cervical spine rotation increased from 34.00 + 10.32 to 47.58 + 11.96, left side thoracolumbar rotation increased from 23.67 + 4.70 to 28.16 + 3.44, right side thoracolumbar rotation increased from 20.79 + 5.34 to 26.45 + 4.62. In control group mean cervical spine left rotation increased from 34.66+ 9.26 to 43.08 + 8.70, right side cervical spine rotation increased from 35.37 + 9.77 to 43.83 + 9.59 , left side thoracolumbar rotation increased from 23.70 + 4.77 to 26.87 + 3.73, right side thoracicolumbar rotation increased from 21.16 + 5.29 to 24.95 + 4.53 (P value mobility on MPAS scale also showed significant improvements (P value <0.001). Both Kayaking and general exercises resulted in significant improvements after 4 weeks of treatment. However, Kayaking exercises were slightly more beneficial than general exercises.

  15. Effect of core stabilization exercises versus conventional exercises on pain and functional status in patients with non-specific low back pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inani, Sumit B; Selkar, Sohan P

    2013-01-01

    Low Back Pain (LBP) results in significant level of disability, producing significant restriction on usual activity such as an inability to work. Nearly two third of the adults are affected by non-specific low back pain at some point in their lives. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of core stabilization exercises in comparison with conventional exercises on pain, functional status in patients with non-specific LBP. Thirty patients diagnosed with non-specific LBP participated with age group between 20-50 years and divided in to 2 groups, one with core stabilization exercises and other conventional exercises, 15 subjects each. Three months study, pre and post treatment outcome measures used were VAS for pain intensity and Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index for functional status (disability). Data were analyzed using student 't' test (paired and unpaired). Whereas both groups improved significantly from the initiation of treatment, a between-group comparison revealed significantly greater (pCore stabilization exercises were found to be more effective in reducing pain and improving functional status by decreasing disability of patients with non-specific low back pain in comparison with conventional exercises.

  16. Effects of high-intensity interval training on central haemodynamics and skeletal muscle oxygenation during exercise in patients with chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, Ruud F.; Niemeijer, Victor M.; Wijn, Pieter F. F.; Doevendans, Pieter A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/164248366; Kemps, Hareld M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background High-intensity interval training (HIT) improves exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Moreover, HIT was associated with improved resting cardiac function. However, the extent to which these improvements actually contribute to training-induced changes in exercise

  17. Exercise responses in patients with chronically high creatine kinase levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher B; Dolezal, Brett A; Neufeld, Eric V; Shieh, Perry; Jenner, John R; Riley, Marshall

    2017-08-01

    Elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) is often taken to reflect muscle disease, but many individuals have elevated CK without a specific diagnosis. How elevated CK reflects muscle metabolism during exercise is not known. Participants (46 men, 48 women) underwent incremental exercise testing to assess aerobic performance, cardiovascular response, and ventilatory response. Serum lactate, ammonia, and CK were measured at rest, 4 minutes into exercise, and 2 minutes into recovery. High-CK and control subjects demonstrated similar aerobic capacities and cardiovascular responses to incremental exercise. Those with CK ≥ 300 U/L exhibited significantly higher lactate and ammonia levels after maximal exercise, together with increased ventilatory responses, whereas those with CK ≥200 U/L but ≤ 300 U/L did not. We recommend measurement of lactate and ammonia profiles during a maximal incremental exercise protocol to help identify patients who warrant muscle biopsy to rule out myopathy. Muscle Nerve 56: 264-270, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Greater prognostic value of peak VO2 after exercise training program completion in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabet, Jean-Yves; Meurin, Philippe; Benzidi, Younes; Beauvais, Florence; Ben Driss, Ahmed; Weber, Hélène; Renaud, Nathalie; Dumaine, Raphaelle; Grosdemouge, Anne; Cohen Solal, Alain

    2013-10-09

    Exercise capacity, best reflected by peak exercise oxygen consumption (peak VO(2)), is a powerful prognostic factor in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). However, the optimal time to assess exercise capacity for prognosis remains unclear and whether an exercise training program (ETP) to improve exercise capacity alters the prognostic value of cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing variables in CHF is unknown. CHF patients who underwent an ETP in two cardiac rehabilitation centers between 2004 and 2009 were prospectively included, and CPX testing was performed before and after ETP completion. We included 285 consecutive patients who underwent an ETP (19.4 ± 8.7 training sessions in 4 to 10 weeks), including segmental gymnastics and cycling sessions. During follow-up (12 months), 14 patients died, 6 underwent cardiac transplantation and 15 were hospitalized for acute heart failure. Univariate analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that CPX variables, especially peak oxygen consumption and circulatory power (product of peak VO(2) × peak systolic blood pressure) before and after ETP completion predicted prognosis. However, CPX data obtained after ETP completion had the best prognostic value (area under the ROC curve = 0.79 ± 0.03 for peak VO(2) after ETP completion vs 0.64 ± 0.04 before ETP completion, p < 0.0001). The results did not change even when considering only deaths. In patients with stable CHF who can exercise, the prognostic value of CPX data seems greater after versus before completion of a hospital-based ETP. Therefore, CPX capacity for prognostic purposes should at best be assessed after cardiac rehabilitation. © 2013.

  19. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gifford, Jayson R; Trinity, Joel D; Layec, Gwenael

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from...... in COPD. Importantly, a diminished contribution of CI-driven respiration relative to the metabolically less-efficient CII-driven respiration (CI/CII) was also observed in COPD (Con 1.28 ± 0.09, COPD 0.81 ± 0.05, P related to exercise tolerance of the patients (r = 0.64, P ....05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease....

  20. Effects of exercise training on pulmonary mechanics and functional status in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Huey; Lin, Hui-Ling; Hsiao, Hsiu-Feng; Chou, Lan-Ti; Kao, Kuo-Chin; Huang, Chung-Chi; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2012-05-01

    The functional status and outcomes in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV) are often limited by poor endurance and pulmonary mechanics, which result from the primary diseases or prolonged time bedridden. We evaluate the impact of exercise training on pulmonary mechanics, physical functional status, and hospitalization outcomes in PMV patients. Twenty-seven subjects with PMV in our respiratory care center (RCC) were divided randomly into an exercise training group (n = 12) and a control group (n = 15). The exercise program comprised 10 sessions of exercise training. The measurement of pulmonary mechanics and physical functional status (Functional Independence Measurement and Barthel index) were performed pre-study and post-study. The hospitalization outcomes included: days of mechanical ventilation, hospitalization days, and weaning and mortality rates during RCC stay. The training group had significant improvement in tidal volume (143.6 mL vs 192.5 mL, P = .02) and rapid shallow breathing index after training (162.2 vs 110.6, P = .009). No significant change was found in the control group except respiratory rate. Both groups had significant improvement in functional status during the study. However, the training group had greater changes in FIM score than the control group (44.6 vs 34.2, P = .024). The training group also had shorter RCC stay and higher weaning and survival rates than the control group, although no statistical difference was found. Subjects with PMV in our RCC demonstrated significant improvement in pulmonary mechanics and functional status after exercise training. The application of exercise training may be helpful for PMV patients to improve hospitalization outcomes.

  1. COMPARE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF EMG BIOFEEDBACK ASSISSTED CORE STABILITY EXERCISES VERSUS CORE STABILITY EXERCISES ALONE ON PAIN AND DISABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkirat Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low Back Pain (LBP is a health related problem than affects 80% of the population within the age limit of 15 to 45 years. The primary treatment used for patients with LBP includes muscle strengthening along with thermotherapeutic modalities. Thus the purpose of the study is to see the efficacy of EMG biofeedback assisted core stability exercises versus core stability exercises alone in patients suffering from pain and disability. Methodology: A total of 30 patients were divided through convenient sampling method into two group- A and B. Each group had 15 patients. In Group A-SWD, traction, IFT and core stability exercises were given where as in Group B EMG biofeedback assisted core stability exercises were given for 5 treatment session per week for 2 weeks and reassessment was done on 5th and 10th day post treatment. Result: The result of the study showed that there was statistically significant (p<0.05 improvement in both Group A and B in terms of pain (NPRS and disability (ODQ after 10th day of treatment. Whereas on comparison within groups the result showed that there was significant (p<0.05 improvement in Group B 10th day post treatment rather than Group A on day 10th. Conclusion: The study supports that EMG biofeedback assisted core stability exercises are helpful for treating patients with LBP to reduce their pain as well as disability.

  2. Five months of physical exercise in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, Stig; Eidemak, Inge; Sorensen, Helle Tauby

    2004-01-01

    of HD patients' physical capacity, self-rated health and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. METHODS: 33 HD patients were included in the study. INCLUSION CRITERIA: HD for more than 3 months, age >18 years. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Diabetes mellitus, symptomatic cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal......BACKGROUND: The number of chronic renal failure patients treated by hemodialysis (HD) is continuously increasing. Most patients have reduced physical capacity and have a high risk of cardiac and vascular diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 5 months physical exercise...... by aerobic capacity, '2-min stair climbing', 'squat test', self-rated health (SF36), blood pressure and lipids. All tests were carried out by blinded testers. The intervention consisted of 1 h of physical exercise twice a week for 5 months. RESULTS: 20 patients completed the intervention. Attendance was 74...

  3. BDNF Expression in Perirhinal Cortex is Associated with Exercise-Induced Improvement in Object Recognition Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Michael E.; Bucci, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Physical exercise induces widespread neurobiological adaptations and improves learning and memory. Most research in this field has focused on hippocampus-based spatial tasks and changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a putative substrate underlying exercise-induced cognitive improvements. Chronic exercise can also be anxiolytic and causes adaptive changes in stress reactivity. The present study employed a perirhinal cortex-dependent object recognition task as well as the eleva...

  4. Flavanol-rich cocoa consumption enhances exercise-induced executive function improvements in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Hayato; Suga, Tadashi; Ishibashi, Aya; Takenaka, Saki; Tanaka, Daichi; Hirano, Yoshitaka; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Goto, Kazushige; Ebi, Kumiko; Isaka, Tadao; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2018-02-01

    Aerobic exercise is known to acutely improve cognitive functions, such as executive function (EF) and memory function (MF). Additionally, consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa has been reported to acutely improve cognitive function. The aim of this study was to determine whether high cocoa flavanol (CF; HCF) consumption would enhance exercise-induced improvement in cognitive function. To test this hypothesis, we examined the combined effects of HCF consumption and moderate-intensity exercise on EF and MF during postexercise recovery. Ten healthy young men received either an HCF (563 mg of CF) or energy-matched low CF (LCF; 38 mg of CF) beverage 70 min before exercise in a single-blind counterbalanced manner. The men then performed moderate-intensity cycling exercise at 60% of peak oxygen uptake for 30 min. The participants performed a color-word Stroop task and face-name matching task to evaluate EF and MF, respectively, during six time periods throughout the experimental session. EF significantly improved immediately after exercise compared with before exercise in both conditions. However, EF was higher after HCF consumption than after LCF consumption during all time periods because HCF consumption improved EF before exercise. In contrast, HCF consumption and moderate-intensity exercise did not improve MF throughout the experiment. The present findings demonstrated that HCF consumption before moderate-intensity exercise could enhance exercise-induced improvement in EF, but not in MF. Therefore, we suggest that the combination of HCF consumption and aerobic exercise may be beneficial for improving EF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Important aspects in relation to patients' attendance at exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation - facilitators, barriers and physiotherapist's role: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Maria; Öberg, Birgitta; Krevers, Barbro

    2017-03-14

    In order to improve attendance at exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR), a greater insight into patients' perspectives is necessary. The aim of the study was to explore aspects that influence patients' attendance at exercise-based CR after acute coronary artery disease (CAD) and the role of the physiotherapist in patients' attendance at exercise-based CR. A total of 16 informants, (5 women; median age 64.5, range 47-79 years), diagnosed with CAD, were included in the study at the Cardiology Department, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. Qualitative interviews were conducted and analysed according to inductive content analysis. Four main categories were identified: (i) previous experience of exercise, (ii) needs in the acute phase, (iii) important prerequisites for attending exercise-based CR and (iv) future ambitions. The categories demonstrate that there are connections between the past, the present and the future, in terms of attitudes to facilitators, barriers and the use of strategies for managing exercise. An overall theme, defined as existential thoughts, had a major impact on the patients' attitudes to attending exercise-based CR. The interaction and meetings with the physiotherapists in the acute phase were described as important factors for attending exercise-based CR. Moreover, informants could feel that the physiotherapists supported them in learning the right level of effort during exercise and reducing the fear of exercise. This study adds to previous knowledge of barriers and facilitators for exercise-based CR that patients with CAD get existential thoughts both related to exercise during the rehabilitation process and for future attitudes to exercise. This knowledge might necessitate greater attention to the physiotherapist-patient interaction. To be able to tailor exercise-based CR for patients, physiotherapists need to be aware of patients' past experiences of exercise and previous phases of the rehabilitation process as these are

  6. The effects of core stability strength exercise on muscle activity and trunk impairment scale in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong-Hun; Park, Seong-Doo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of core stability-enhancing exercises on the lower trunk and muscle activity of stroke patients. The control group (n = 10) underwent standard exercise therapy, while the experiment group (n =10) underwent both the core stability-enhancing exercise and standard exercise therapy simultaneously. The standard exercise therapy applied to the two groups included weight bearing and weight shifts and joint movements to improve flexibility and the range of motion. The core stability-enhancing exercise was performed 5 times a week for 30 min over a period of 4 weeks in the room where the patients were treated. For all 20 subject, the items measured before the exercise were measured after the therapeutic intervention, and changes in muscle activity of the lower trunk were evaluated. The activity and stability of the core muscles were measured using surface electromyography and the trunk impairment scale (TIS). The mean TIS score and muscle activity of the lower trunk increased in the experiment group significantly after performing the core stability-enhancing exercise (Pcore stability-enhancing exercise is effective in improving muscle activity of the lower trunk, which is affected by hemiplegia.

  7. Effect of physical training on the recovery of acute exercise, among patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Saldivia, Marianna; Ilarraza-Lomelí, Hermes; Myers, Jonathan; Lara, Jorge; Bueno, Leopoldo

    Physical training programs (PTP) have shown several beneficial effects for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly by increasing survival and quality of life. Physiological response during the effort and recovery phases of an exercise testing, is one of the strongest prognostic markers among patients with CVD. A reasonable mechanism that explains those training effects on survival is through the adaptations seen on heart rate recovery (HRR) and oxygen uptake kinetics at the post-exertional phase (RVO 2 ). Compare the HRR and RVO 2 values before and after a PTP in patients with CVD. We studied a cohort of patients included in a cardiac rehabilitation program, whom performed a cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). Then, risk stratification and an individualized exercise training program were performed. The exercise training program included 20 sessions of aerobic exercise, 30min a day, five times a week, at moderate intensity. Finally, a second CPX was performed. A total of 215 patients were included. Peak oxygen uptake values rose 2.2±5.2ml/kg/min (p<0.001), HRR increased 1.6±10bpm (p<0.05) and RVO 2 improved -21±98s (p<0.001). A post-hoc analysis show that the percentage of maximum heart rate remained statistically associated with HRR increment. Furthermore, diabetes and sedentarism were strongly related to RVO 2 improvement. No correlation between HRR and RVO 2 was found (R 2 =0.002). Physical exercise was associated with a beneficial effect on HRR and RVO 2 . Nevertheless, both variables were statistically unrelated. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. All rights reserved.

  8. Experience of barriers and motivations for physical activities and exercise during treatment of pediatric patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Miriam; Kesting, Sabine; Winter, Corinna; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Boos, Joachim

    2014-09-01

    Due to growing evidence about the value of exercise in pediatric cancer patients, the purpose of this study was to determine factors that influence participation in physical activities and exercise in children and adolescents during treatment. This cross-sectional qualitative study included 40 pediatric cancer patients during intensive treatment. Patients were recruited at the Department for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster where a supervised exercise program has been implemented for hospital stays. The qualitative approach included semi-structured guideline interviews, transcription and coding based on grounded theory. Four major topics were discussed in the interviews: (1) values and beliefs, (2) barriers to exercise, (3) motivations to exercise, and (4) encouragement from parents and physicians. Patients reported mainly positive attitudes toward physical activities during treatment and the local exercise program was desired and valued as essential for engaging in exercise during in-patient stays. Identified barriers included physical, psychological, and organizational aspects. Motivational aspects were based on improvements in physical fitness and mental well-being. Parents' behavior related to physical activities of their children differed between being supportive, inhibiting, and inert. Few patients received information about exercise during treatment by their physicians. Interventions that aim at maintaining physical activities during treatment and eliminating exercise barriers are required due to the patients' positive attitudes and multiple motivations toward exercise. These interventions need to be supervised and should include health-counseling programs for patients, parents, and physicians to underline the importance of physical activities in childhood cancer patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [Effects on salivation, xerostomia and halitosis in elders after oral function improvement exercises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Park, Kyung Min

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of Oral Function Improvement Exercises on salivation, xerostomia and halitosis in elderly people. The participants in the study were 48 female community-dwelling elders in D city. The Oral Function Improvement Exercises were given 3 times a week, for a total of 24 times from August to October 2011. Spitting method, Visual Analogue Scale, and halimeter (mBA-21) were used to evaluate the effects of Oral Function Improvement Exercises on salivation, xerostomia, and halitosis. The data were analyzed using χ²-test and t-test with the SPSS program. The experimental group had significantly better salivation, and less xerostomia and halitosis than the control group. The results indicate that Oral Function Improvement Exercises were effective for salivation, xerostomia and halitosis in the elders. Therefore, it was suggested that Oral Function Improvement Exercise are applicable in a community nursing intervention program to improve the quality of life for elders.

  10. Core stabilization exercise prescription, part 2: a systematic review of motor control and general (global) exercise rehabilitation approaches for patients with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumitt, Jason; Matheson, J W; Meira, Erik P

    2013-11-01

    Therapeutic exercises are frequently prescribed to patients with low back pain. Numerous exercise programs for patients with low back pain have been described. Many of these treatment programs are based on 1 of 2 popular rehabilitation strategies: a motor control exercise approach or a general exercise approach. PubMed clinical queries from 1966 to March 2013 for keyword combinations including motor control exercise, core stability exercise, therapeutic exercise, general exercise, global exercise, local exercise, transversus abdominis, segmental stabilization, and low back pain. Randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of a motor control exercise approach, a general exercise approach, or both for patients with low back pain that were published in scientific peer-reviewed journals. Included studies underwent appraisal for exercise intervention and outcomes. Fifteen studies were identified (8, motor control exercise approach without general exercise comparison; 7, general exercise approach with or without motor control exercise approach comparison). Current evidence suggests that exercise interventions may be effective at reducing pain or disability in patients with low back pain. Stabilization exercises for patients with low back pain may help to decrease pain and disability. It may not be necessary to prescribe exercises purported to restore motor control of specific muscles.

  11. Trunk Exercises Improve Gait Symmetry in Parkinson Disease: A Blind Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubble, Ryan P; Naughton, Geraldine; Silburn, Peter A; Cole, Michael H

    2018-03-01

    Deficits in step-to-step symmetry and trunk muscle activations have been linked to falls in Parkinson disease. Given such symptoms are poorly managed with anti-parkinsonian medications, alternate therapies are needed. This blind phase II randomized controlled trial sought to establish whether exercise can improve step-to-step symmetry in Parkinson disease. Twenty-four Parkinson disease patients with a falls history completed baseline assessments of symptom severity, balance confidence, mobility, and quality of life. Step-to-step symmetry was assessed by deriving harmonic ratios from three-dimensional accelerations collected for the head and trunk. Patients were randomly assigned to either 12 wks of exercise and falls prevention education or falls prevention education only. Both groups repeated the baseline tests 12 and 24 wks after the initial assessment. The Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number is ACTRN12613001175763. At 12 wks, the exercise group had statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements in anterior-posterior step-to-step trunk symmetry. In contrast, the education group recorded statistically significant and clinically meaningful reductions in medial-lateral and vertical step-to-step trunk symmetry at 12 wks. Given that step-to-step symmetry improved for the exercise group and declined for the education group after intervention, active interventions seem more suited to increasing independence and quality of life for people with Parkinson disease. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to do the following: (1) Describe the effect deficits in trunk muscle function have on gait in individuals with Parkinson disease; (2) Identify the benefits of targeted trunk exercises on step-to-step symmetry; and (3) Discuss the benefits of improving step-to-step symmetry in individuals with Parkinson

  12. Exercise improves recognition memory and synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex for rats modelling vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Juntao; Zhao, Jingpu; Lin, Yangyang; Liang, Huiying; He, Xiaokuo; Zheng, Xiuyuan; Sui, Minghong; Zhuang, Zhiqiang; Yan, Tiebin

    2018-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) may induce involuntary exercise and make beneficial effects on vascular dementia (VD) by strengthening the BDNF-pCREB-mediated pathway and hippocampal plasticity. Whether FES improves recognition memory and synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was investigated by establishing a VD model. The VD rats were administered with two weeks of voluntary exercise, forced exercise, or involuntary exercise induced with FES. Sham-operated and control groups were also included. The behavioral changes were assessed with the novel object recognition test and novel object location test. The expression levels of key proteins related to synaptic plasticity in the PFC were also detected. All types of exercise improved the rats' novel object recognition index, but only voluntary exercise and involuntary exercise induced with FES improved the novel object location index. Any sort of exercise enhanced the expression of key proteins in the PFC. Involuntary exercise induced with FES can improve recognition memory in VD better than forced exercise. The mechanism is associated with increased synaptic plasticity in the PFC. FES may be a useful alternative tool for cognitive rehabilitation.

  13. How Exercise Can Benefit Older Patients. A Practical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Henry C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Physical activity has preventive and therapeutic benefits for the frail elderly. Physicians must educate patients about exercise benefits. Walking, flexibility, and strength training can prevent muscle weakness and impaired gait and balance. Changes in functional capacity can create greater independence in daily living. Physical activity also…

  14. Effects of different exercise modalities on ataxia in multiple sclerosis patients: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcı, Yeliz; Fil, Ayla; Armutlu, Kadriye; Yildiz, F Gökçem; Kurne, Aslı; Aksoy, Songül; Nurlu, Gülay; Karabudak, Rana

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effects of different exercise protocols on ataxia in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). A total of 42 MS patients, 17 male and 25 female (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS): 3-5), were enrolled in this randomized controlled study. The patients were divided into three groups: a balance training (BT) group, a lumbar stabilization (LS) group and a task-oriented training (TT) group. All groups received balance training; additionally, the LS group received lumbar stabilization exercises, and the TT group received task-oriented training. The Berg Balance Scale (BBS), International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS), Functional Reach Test (FRT), 2-Minute Walk Test (2MWT), Sensory Organization Test (SOT), and measurement of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SSEPs) were performed before and at the end of the 18 training sessions. The BBS, ICARS, FRT, 2MWT, and composite balance score of the SOT were improved in all groups. The ICARS kinetic function sub-score and the left limb cortical onset amplitudes of SSEPs were increased significantly in both the TT and the LS groups. The ICARS total score, composite balance score, and 2MWT were different between groups (p  0.005). The 2MWT results were better for the LS group than the BT group, while the BT and the TT groups improved similarly. Balance training alone is not sufficient for rehabilitation of ataxic MS patients. A combination of lumbar stabilization exercises or task-oriented training increases the success of balance rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease of central nervous system and ataxia is one of the most challenging symptoms of this disease. Different exercise modalities are commonly employed to control ataxic symptoms in MS patients. Lumbar stabilization exercises or task-oriented training should be considered as complementary approach to improve balance and coordination in ataxic multiple sclerosis

  15. Comparison of whole-body vibration exercise and plyometric exercise to improve isokinetic muscular strength, jumping performance and balance of female volleyball players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Youn; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of whole-body vibration exercise and plyometric exercise on female volleyball players. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly allocated to two exercise groups (whole-body vibration exercise group and plyometric exercise group). The exercise was conducted three times each week for 8 weeks. Isokinetic muscular strength, jumping performance, and balance were measured before starting the exercise and after finishing the 8 weeks of exercise. [Results] Measurements of isokinetic muscular strength revealed that the whole-body vibration exercise group showed significant increase after the exercise. However, the plyometric exercise group had no significant increase in lumbar flexion, extension, and knee flexion. Measurements of vertical jumping revealed that, the whole-body vibration exercise group had no significant increase after the exercise. However, the plyometric exercise group showed significant increase. Measurements of balance revealed that, the whole-body vibration exercise group showed significant increase. However, the plyometric exercise group showed no significant increase. [Conclusion] Although both whole-body vibration and plyometric exercises are effective intervention methods, the two methods have different effects on the improvement of isokinetic muscular strength, jumping performance, and balance of female volleyball players. PMID:27942136

  16. Effect of exercise training on endothelial function in heart failure patients: A systematic review meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, M J; Smart, N A

    2017-03-15

    Endothelial dysfunction contributes to the development and progression of cardiovascular disease and heart failure (HF) and is associated with an increased risk of mortality. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is widely utilised to assess endothelial function and is improved with exercise training in heart failure patients. The aim of this meta-analysis is to quantify the effect of exercise training in patients with heart failure. A large number of studies now exist that have examined endothelial function in patients with heart failure. We sought to add to the current literature by quantifying the effect of exercise training on endothelial function. We conducted database searches (PubMed, EMBASE, PROQUEST and Cochrane Trials Register to June 2016) for exercise based rehabilitation trials in heart failure, using search terms exercise training, endothelial function, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The 16 included studies provided a total of 529 participants, 293 in an intervention and 236 in controls groups. FMD was improved with exercise training in exercise vs. control, SMD of 1.08 (95%CI 0.70 to 1.46, ptraining improved endothelial function, assessed via FMD, and endothelial progenitor cells in heart failure patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exercise training-induced modification in autonomic nervous system: An update for cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnier, Florent; Labrunée, Marc; Pathak, Atul; Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Galès, Céline; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Guiraud, Thibaut

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease show autonomic dysfunction, including sympathetic activation and vagal withdrawal, which leads to fatal events. This review aims to place sympathovagal balance as an essential element to be considered in management for cardiovascular disease patients who benefit from a cardiac rehabilitation program. Many studies showed that exercise training, as non-pharmacologic treatment, plays an important role in enhancing sympathovagal balance and could normalize levels of markers of sympathetic flow measured by microneurography, heart rate variability or plasma catecholamine levels. This alteration positively affects prognosis with cardiovascular disease. In general, cardiac rehabilitation programs include moderate-intensity and continuous aerobic exercise. Other forms of activities such as high-intensity interval training, breathing exercises, relaxation and transcutaneous electrical stimulation can improve sympathovagal balance and should be implemented in cardiac rehabilitation programs. Currently, the exercise training programs in cardiac rehabilitation are individualized to optimize health outcomes. The sports science concept of the heart rate variability (HRV)-vagal index used to manage exercise sessions (for a goal of performance) could be implemented in cardiac rehabilitation to improve cardiovascular fitness and autonomic nervous system function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving the psychological evaluation of exercise referral: Psychometric properties of the Exercise Referral Quality of Life Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Hilton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing need to assess the psychological outcomes of exercise referral and the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence has called for the routine assessment of life-quality. However, a quality of life scale specific to the requirements of exercise referral is currently unavailable. Therefore, the aim of this study was to produce a quality of life measure for this purpose. The Exercise Referral Quality of Life Scale is a 22-item measure comprising three domains: mental and physical health, injury pain and illness and physical activity facilitators. Exploratory factor analysis determined the initial factor structure and was subsequently confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis. Additional scale properties were also assessed. The scale contributes to the global need for improved consistent psychological outcome assessment of exercise referral.

  19. Effects of two different exercise programs on chronic fatigue in lupus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avaux, Marie; Hoellinger, Pauline; Nieuwland-Husson, Séverine; Fraselle, Virginie; Depresseux, Geneviève; Houssiau, Frédéric A

    2016-12-01

    Fatigue is a major complaint of patients with systemic lupus erythemasosus (SLE). While several studies have demonstrated the benefits of exercise, the effects of supervised training were never compared to those of home training. Forty-five SLE patients suffering from fatigue, as defined by Krupp's fatigue severity scale (FSS) ≥ 3.7, were randomized in 3 groups: supervised training group (STG), home training group (HTG), and control group (CG). Primary outcome was the change in FSS at month 3. In parallel, we measured the physical working capacity measured at 75% of the predicted maximal heart rate (PWC75%/kg) and the modified Borg's scale to assess perception of exertion. Both STG and HTG, but not the CG, statistically improved their FSS at month 3. By contrast, the PWC75%/kg and the Borg's scale did not improve in none of the groups. Surprinsingly, compliance was similar and low (±50%) in both exercise groups. Moreover, less compliant patients improved their fatigue as much as more compliant patients. Patients included in the STG and the HTG similarly improved their fatigue, irrespectively of their level of compliance, raising the possibility that the beneficial effect on fatigue was not only exercise-related.

  20. DEMO-II trial. Aerobic exercise versus stretching exercise in patients with major depression-a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Videbech, Poul; Thomsen, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The effect of referring patients from a clinical setting to a pragmatic exercise intervention for depressive symptoms, cognitive function, and metabolic variables has yet to be determined.......The effect of referring patients from a clinical setting to a pragmatic exercise intervention for depressive symptoms, cognitive function, and metabolic variables has yet to be determined....

  1. PATIENTS OVERCOME ANXIETY AND ARE ENCOURAGED TO BE PHYSICAL ACTIVETHROUGH EXERCISE-BASED CARDIAC REHABILITATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D.

    2015-01-01

    other to begin exercising; and growing confidence in the heart, whereby the patients overcome anxiety and dare to be physically active. Conclusions. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation provides a comfort-giving setting that offers peer support and a positive physical perception leading to confidence...... interviews were performed 1-2 months later. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was conducted, comprising three methodological steps: naïve reading, structural analysis and comprehensive interpretation. Results. The preliminary findings are that although physically and especially mentally...... into that the heart endures physical activity. In addition to serving as physical guidance, exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation offers valuable mental support. The patients find help to overcome an initial anxiety and move forward towards a physically active life featuring a feeling of improved health and new...

  2. Two exercise interventions for the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Morales-Cabezas, Matilde; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to evaluate the impact of a 4-month comprehensive protocol of strengthening and flexibility exercises developed by our research group versus conventional exercises for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) on functional and mobility outcomes. Randomized controlled trial. Forty-five patients diagnosed with AS according to the modified criteria of New York were allocated to control or experimental groups using a random numbers table. The control group was treated with a conventional protocol of physical therapy in AS, whereas the experimental group was treated with the protocol suggested by our research group. The conventional intervention consisted of 20 exercises: motion and flexibility exercises of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine; stretching of the shortened muscles; and chest expansion exercises. The experimental protocol is based on the postural affectation of the AS and the treatment of the shortened muscle chains in these patients according to the Global Posture Reeducation (GPR) method. This intervention employs specific strengthening and flexibility exercises in which the shortened muscle chains are stretched and strengthened. The study lasted 4 mos. During this period, patients received a weekly group session managed by an experienced physiotherapist. Each session lasted an hour, and there were 15 total sessions. Changes in activity, mobility, and functional capacity were evaluated by an assessor blinded to the intervention, using the following previously validated scores from the Bath group: BASMI (tragus to wall dist