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Sample records for exclusive tissue-specific expression

  1. Predicting tissue-specific expressions based on sequence characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Paik, Hyojung

    2011-04-30

    In multicellular organisms, including humans, understanding expression specificity at the tissue level is essential for interpreting protein function, such as tissue differentiation. We developed a prediction approach via generated sequence features from overrepresented patterns in housekeeping (HK) and tissue-specific (TS) genes to classify TS expression in humans. Using TS domains and transcriptional factor binding sites (TFBSs), sequence characteristics were used as indices of expressed tissues in a Random Forest algorithm by scoring exclusive patterns considering the biological intuition; TFBSs regulate gene expression, and the domains reflect the functional specificity of a TS gene. Our proposed approach displayed better performance than previous attempts and was validated using computational and experimental methods.

  2. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard B [Athens, GA; Balish, Rebecca S [Oxford, OH; Tehryung, Kim [Athens, GA; McKinney, Elizabeth C [Athens, GA

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  3. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  4. A hierarchy of ECM-mediated signalling tissue-specific gene expression regulates tissue-specific gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskelley, Calvin D; Srebrow, Anabella; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-10-07

    A dynamic and reciprocal flow of information between cells and the extracellular matrix contributes significantly to the regulation of form and function in developing systems. Signals generated by the extracellular matrix do not act in isolation. Instead, they are processed within the context of global signalling hierarchies whose constituent inputs and outputs are constantly modulated by all the factors present in the cell's surrounding microenvironment. This is particularly evident in the mammary gland, where the construction and subsequent destruction of such a hierarchy regulates changes in tissue-specific gene expression, morphogenesis and apoptosis during each developmental cycle of pregnancy, lactation and involution.

  5. Tissue-specific splicing factor gene expression signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosso, Ana Rita; Gomes, Anita Q.; Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Thorne, Natalie P.; Grech, Godfrey; von Lindern, Marieke; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The alternative splicing code that controls and coordinates the transcriptome in complex multicellular organisms remains poorly understood. It has long been argued that regulation of alternative splicing relies on combinatorial interactions between multiple proteins, and that tissue-specific

  6. A comprehensive functional analysis of tissue specificity of human gene expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dezso, Zoltán; Nikolsky, Yuri; Sviridov, Evgeny; Shi, Weiwei; Serebriyskaya, Tatiana; Dosymbekov, Damir; Bugrim, Andrej; Rakhmatulin, Eugene; Brennan, Richard J; Guryanov, Alexey; Li, Kelly; Blake, Julie; Samaha, Raymond R; Nikolskaya, Tatiana

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the maturation of microarray technology has allowed the genome-wide analysis of gene expression patterns to identify tissue-specific and ubiquitously expressed ('housekeeping') genes...

  7. Tissue-Specific Expression of the Chicken Calpain2 Gene

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    Zeng-Rong Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We quantified chicken calpain 2 (CAPN2 expression in two Chinese chicken breeds (mountainous black-bone chicken breed [MB] and a commercial meat type chicken breed [S01] to discern the tissue and ontogenic expression pattern and its effect on muscle metabolism. Real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed for accurate measurement of the CAPN2 mRNA expression in various tissues from chickens of different ages (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks. Results showed that the breast muscle and leg muscle tissues had the highest expression of CAPN2 compared to the other tissues from the same individual (P<.05. Overall, the CAPN2 mRNA level exhibited a “rise” developmental change in all tissues. The S01 chicken had a higher expression of the CAPN2 mRNA in all tissues than the MB chicken. Our results suggest that chicken CAPN2 expression may be related to chicken breeds and tissues.

  8. Novel strong tissue specific promoter for gene expression in human germ cells

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    Kuzmin Denis

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue specific promoters may be utilized for a variety of applications, including programmed gene expression in cell types, tissues and organs of interest, for developing different cell culture models or for use in gene therapy. We report a novel, tissue-specific promoter that was identified and engineered from the native upstream regulatory region of the human gene NDUFV1 containing an endogenous retroviral sequence. Results Among seven established human cell lines and five primary cultures, this modified NDUFV1 upstream sequence (mNUS was active only in human undifferentiated germ-derived cells (lines Tera-1 and EP2102, where it demonstrated high promoter activity (~twice greater than that of the SV40 early promoter, and comparable to the routinely used cytomegaloviral promoter. To investigate the potential applicability of the mNUS promoter for biotechnological needs, a construct carrying a recombinant cytosine deaminase (RCD suicide gene under the control of mNUS was tested in cell lines of different tissue origin. High cytotoxic effect of RCD with a cell-death rate ~60% was observed only in germ-derived cells (Tera-1, whereas no effect was seen in a somatic, kidney-derived control cell line (HEK293. In further experiments, we tested mNUS-driven expression of a hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposase (SB100X. The mNUS-SB100X construct mediated stable transgene insertions exclusively in germ-derived cells, thereby providing further evidence of tissue-specificity of the mNUS promoter. Conclusions We conclude that mNUS may be used as an efficient promoter for tissue-specific gene expression in human germ-derived cells in many applications. Our data also suggest that the 91 bp-long sequence located exactly upstream NDUFV1 transcriptional start site plays a crucial role in the activity of this gene promoter in vitro in the majority of tested cell types (10/12, and an important role - in the rest two cell lines.

  9. Tissue-Specificity of Gene Expression Diverges Slowly between Orthologs, and Rapidly between Paralogs.

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    Nadezda Kryuchkova-Mostacci

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ortholog conjecture implies that functional similarity between orthologous genes is higher than between paralogs. It has been supported using levels of expression and Gene Ontology term analysis, although the evidence was rather weak and there were also conflicting reports. In this study on 12 species we provide strong evidence of high conservation in tissue-specificity between orthologs, in contrast to low conservation between within-species paralogs. This allows us to shed a new light on the evolution of gene expression patterns. While there have been several studies of the correlation of expression between species, little is known about the evolution of tissue-specificity itself. Ortholog tissue-specificity is strongly conserved between all tetrapod species, with the lowest Pearson correlation between mouse and frog at r = 0.66. Tissue-specificity correlation decreases strongly with divergence time. Paralogs in human show much lower conservation, even for recent Primate-specific paralogs. When both paralogs from ancient whole genome duplication tissue-specific paralogs are tissue-specific, it is often to different tissues, while other tissue-specific paralogs are mostly specific to the same tissue. The same patterns are observed using human or mouse as focal species, and are robust to choices of datasets and of thresholds. Our results support the following model of evolution: in the absence of duplication, tissue-specificity evolves slowly, and tissue-specific genes do not change their main tissue of expression; after small-scale duplication the less expressed paralog loses the ancestral specificity, leading to an immediate difference between paralogs; over time, both paralogs become more broadly expressed, but remain poorly correlated. Finally, there is a small number of paralog pairs which stay tissue-specific with the same main tissue of expression, for at least 300 million years.

  10. Cloning, expression, and regulation of tissue-specific genes in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korochkin, L.I. [Institute of Gene Biology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-08-01

    The family of esterase genes was studied in various Drosophilia species. These genes are classified as tissue-specific and housekeeping ones. The expression of tissue-specific esterases in the male reproductive system of Drosophilia species from the virilis and melanogaster groups was thoroughly examined. Modifier genes controlling activity level, time of synthesis, and distribution in cells of the tissue-specific esterase isozyme from the ejaculatory bulb were revealed. The structural gene coding of this enzyme was isolated, cloned, and sequenced. This gene was shown to be similar in different Drosophilia species; the transcriptional level of tissue specificity of this gene was determined. The possibility of transformating the tissue-specific gene into a housekeeping one was demonstrated. In different Drosophilia species, this gene can be expressed in different parts of the reproductive system. In transgenic males carrying the gene of another species, the foreign gene is expressed as in the donor. 68 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Tissue-specific RNA expression marks distant-acting developmental enhancers.

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    Han Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Short non-coding transcripts can be transcribed from distant-acting transcriptional enhancer loci, but the prevalence of such enhancer RNAs (eRNAs within the transcriptome, and the association of eRNA expression with tissue-specific enhancer activity in vivo remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the expression dynamics of tissue-specific non-coding RNAs in embryonic mouse tissues via deep RNA sequencing. Overall, approximately 80% of validated in vivo enhancers show tissue-specific RNA expression that correlates with tissue-specific enhancer activity. Globally, we identified thousands of tissue-specifically transcribed non-coding regions (TSTRs displaying various genomic hallmarks of bona fide enhancers. In transgenic mouse reporter assays, over half of tested TSTRs functioned as enhancers with reproducible activity in the predicted tissue. Together, our results demonstrate that tissue-specific eRNA expression is a common feature of in vivo enhancers, as well as a major source of extragenic transcription, and that eRNA expression signatures can be used to predict tissue-specific enhancers independent of known epigenomic enhancer marks.

  12. A comprehensive functional analysis of tissue specificity of human gene expression

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    Guryanov Alexey

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the maturation of microarray technology has allowed the genome-wide analysis of gene expression patterns to identify tissue-specific and ubiquitously expressed ('housekeeping' genes. We have performed a functional and topological analysis of housekeeping and tissue-specific networks to identify universally necessary biological processes, and those unique to or characteristic of particular tissues. Results We measured whole genome expression in 31 human tissues, identifying 2374 housekeeping genes expressed in all tissues, and genes uniquely expressed in each tissue. Comprehensive functional analysis showed that the housekeeping set is substantially larger than previously thought, and is enriched with vital processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis, translation and energy metabolism. Network topology of the housekeeping network was characterized by higher connectivity and shorter paths between the proteins than the global network. Ontology enrichment scoring and network topology of tissue-specific genes were consistent with each tissue's function and expression patterns clustered together in accordance with tissue origin. Tissue-specific genes were twice as likely as housekeeping genes to be drug targets, allowing the identification of tissue 'signature networks' that will facilitate the discovery of new therapeutic targets and biomarkers of tissue-targeted diseases. Conclusion A comprehensive functional analysis of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes showed that the biological function of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes was consistent with tissue origin. Network analysis revealed that tissue-specific networks have distinct network properties related to each tissue's function. Tissue 'signature networks' promise to be a rich source of targets and biomarkers for disease treatment and diagnosis.

  13. Mapping the mouse Allelome reveals tissue-specific regulation of allelic expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andergassen, Daniel; Dotter, Christoph P; Wenzel, Daniel; Sigl, Verena; Bammer, Philipp C; Muckenhuber, Markus; Mayer, Daniela; Kulinski, Tomasz M; Theussl, Hans-Christian; Penninger, Josef M; Bock, Christoph; Barlow, Denise P; Pauler, Florian M; Hudson, Quanah J

    2017-01-01

    To determine the dynamics of allelic-specific expression during mouse development, we analyzed RNA-seq data from 23 F1 tissues from different developmental stages, including 19 female tissues allowing X chromosome inactivation (XCI) escapers to also be detected. We demonstrate that allelic expression arising from genetic or epigenetic differences is highly tissue-specific. We find that tissue-specific strain-biased gene expression may be regulated by tissue-specific enhancers or by post-transcriptional differences in stability between the alleles. We also find that escape from X-inactivation is tissue-specific, with leg muscle showing an unexpectedly high rate of XCI escapers. By surveying a range of tissues during development, and performing extensive validation, we are able to provide a high confidence list of mouse imprinted genes including 18 novel genes. This shows that cluster size varies dynamically during development and can be substantially larger than previously thought, with the Igf2r cluster extending over 10 Mb in placenta. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25125.001 PMID:28806168

  14. Concordance of gene expression in human protein complexes reveals tissue specificity and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börnigen, Daniela; Pers, Tune Hannes; Thorrez, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing variants in human genes usually lead to phenotypes specific to only a few tissues. Here, we present a method for predicting tissue specificity based on quantitative deregulation of protein complexes. The underlying assumption is that the degree of coordinated expression among...... proteins in a complex within a given tissue may pinpoint tissues that will be affected by a mutation in the complex and coordinated expression may reveal the complex to be active in the tissue. We identified known disease genes and their protein complex partners in a high-quality human interactome. Each...... susceptibility gene's tissue involvement was ranked based on coordinated expression with its interaction partners in a non-disease global map of human tissue-specific expression. The approach demonstrated high overall area under the curve (0.78) and was very successfully benchmarked against a random model...

  15. Tissue-Specific Immune Gene Expression in the Migratory Locust, Locusta Migratoria

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    Tamara Pulpitel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of hosts to respond to infection involves several complex immune recognition pathways. Broadly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs allow individuals to target a range of invading microbes. Recently, studies on insect innate immunity have found evidence that a single pathogen can activate different immune pathways across species. In this study, expression changes in immune genes encoding peptidoglycan-recognition protein SA (PGRP-SA, gram-negative binding protein 1 (GNBP1 and prophenoloxidase (ProPO were investigated in Locusta migratoria, following an immune challenge using injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS solution from Escherichia coli. Since immune activation might also be tissue-specific, gene expression levels were followed across a range of tissue types. For PGRP-SA, expression increased in response to LPS within all seven of the tissue-types assayed and differed significantly between tissues. Expression of GNBP1 similarly varied across tissue types, yet showed no clear expression difference between LPS-injected and uninfected locusts. Increases in ProPO expression in response to LPS, however, could only be detected in the gut sections. This study has revealed tissue-specific immune response to add a new level of complexity to insect immune studies. In addition to variation in recognition pathways identified in previous works, tissue-specificity should be carefully considered in similar works.

  16. Global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences in rice evolution result in two contrasting types of differentially expressed genes

    KAUST Repository

    Horiuchi, Youko

    2015-12-23

    Background Since the development of transcriptome analysis systems, many expression evolution studies characterized evolutionary forces acting on gene expression, without explicit discrimination between global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences. However, different types of gene expression alteration should have different effects on an organism, the evolutionary forces that act on them might be different, and different types of genes might show different types of differential expression between species. To confirm this, we studied differentially expressed (DE) genes among closely related groups that have extensive gene expression atlases, and clarified characteristics of different types of DE genes including the identification of regulating loci for differential expression using expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analysis data. Results We detected differentially expressed (DE) genes between rice subspecies in five homologous tissues that were verified using japonica and indica transcriptome atlases in public databases. Using the transcriptome atlases, we classified DE genes into two types, global DE genes and changed-tissues DE genes. Global type DE genes were not expressed in any tissues in the atlas of one subspecies, however changed-tissues type DE genes were expressed in both subspecies with different tissue specificity. For the five tissues in the two japonica-indica combinations, 4.6 ± 0.8 and 5.9 ± 1.5 % of highly expressed genes were global and changed-tissues DE genes, respectively. Changed-tissues DE genes varied in number between tissues, increasing linearly with the abundance of tissue specifically expressed genes in the tissue. Molecular evolution of global DE genes was rapid, unlike that of changed-tissues DE genes. Based on gene ontology, global and changed-tissues DE genes were different, having no common GO terms. Expression differences of most global DE genes were regulated by cis-eQTLs. Expression

  17. Tissue-Specific Venom Composition and Differential Gene Expression in Sea Anemones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrander, Jason; Broe, Michael; Daly, Marymegan

    2016-08-25

    Cnidarians represent one of the few groups of venomous animals that lack a centralized venom transmission system. Instead, they are equipped with stinging capsules collectively known as nematocysts. Nematocysts vary in abundance and type across different tissues; however, the venom composition in most species remains unknown. Depending on the tissue type, the venom composition in sea anemones may be vital for predation, defense, or digestion. Using a tissue-specific RNA-seq approach, we characterize the venom assemblage in the tentacles, mesenterial filaments, and column for three species of sea anemone (Anemonia sulcata, Heteractis crispa, and Megalactis griffithsi). These taxa vary with regard to inferred venom potency, symbiont abundance, and nematocyst diversity. We show that there is significant variation in abundance of toxin-like genes across tissues and species. Although the cumulative toxin abundance for the column was consistently the lowest, contributions to the overall toxin assemblage varied considerably among tissues for different toxin types. Our gene ontology (GO) analyses also show sharp contrasts between conserved GO groups emerging from whole transcriptome analysis and tissue-specific expression among GO groups in our differential expression analysis. This study provides a framework for future characterization of tissue-specific venom and other functionally important genes in this lineage of simple bodied animals. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Tissue-Specific Venom Composition and Differential Gene Expression in Sea Anemones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrander, Jason; Broe, Michael; Daly, Marymegan

    2016-01-01

    Cnidarians represent one of the few groups of venomous animals that lack a centralized venom transmission system. Instead, they are equipped with stinging capsules collectively known as nematocysts. Nematocysts vary in abundance and type across different tissues; however, the venom composition in most species remains unknown. Depending on the tissue type, the venom composition in sea anemones may be vital for predation, defense, or digestion. Using a tissue-specific RNA-seq approach, we characterize the venom assemblage in the tentacles, mesenterial filaments, and column for three species of sea anemone (Anemonia sulcata, Heteractis crispa, and Megalactis griffithsi). These taxa vary with regard to inferred venom potency, symbiont abundance, and nematocyst diversity. We show that there is significant variation in abundance of toxin-like genes across tissues and species. Although the cumulative toxin abundance for the column was consistently the lowest, contributions to the overall toxin assemblage varied considerably among tissues for different toxin types. Our gene ontology (GO) analyses also show sharp contrasts between conserved GO groups emerging from whole transcriptome analysis and tissue-specific expression among GO groups in our differential expression analysis. This study provides a framework for future characterization of tissue-specific venom and other functionally important genes in this lineage of simple bodied animals. PMID:27389690

  19. Tissue-specific mRNA expression profiling in grape berry tissues

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    Cramer Grant R

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Berries of grape (Vitis vinifera contain three major tissue types (skin, pulp and seed all of which contribute to the aroma, color, and flavor characters of wine. The pericarp, which is composed of the exocarp (skin and mesocarp (pulp, not only functions to protect and feed the developing seed, but also to assist in the dispersal of the mature seed by avian and mammalian vectors. The skin provides volatile and nonvolatile aroma and color compounds, the pulp contributes organic acids and sugars, and the seeds provide condensed tannins, all of which are important to the formation of organoleptic characteristics of wine. In order to understand the transcriptional network responsible for controlling tissue-specific mRNA expression patterns, mRNA expression profiling was conducted on each tissue of mature berries of V. vinifera Cabernet Sauvignon using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Vitis oligonucleotide microarray ver. 1.0. In order to monitor the influence of water-deficit stress on tissue-specific expression patterns, mRNA expression profiles were also compared from mature berries harvested from vines subjected to well-watered or water-deficit conditions. Results Overall, berry tissues were found to express approximately 76% of genes represented on the Vitis microarray. Approximately 60% of these genes exhibited significant differential expression in one or more of the three major tissue types with more than 28% of genes showing pronounced (2-fold or greater differences in mRNA expression. The largest difference in tissue-specific expression was observed between the seed and pulp/skin. Exocarp tissue, which is involved in pathogen defense and pigment production, showed higher mRNA abundance relative to other berry tissues for genes involved with flavonoid biosynthesis, pathogen resistance, and cell wall modification. Mesocarp tissue, which is considered a nutritive tissue, exhibited a higher mRNA abundance of genes involved in cell

  20. Tissue-specific changes in pregnancy associated plasma protein-A expression with age in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, Sara L; Conover, Cheryl A

    2014-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a novel zinc metalloproteinase that functions in many systems outside of pregnancy. Data in both humans and mice suggest a role for PAPP-A in aging and age-related diseases. However, our knowledge of tissue-specific PAPP-A expression and possible changes in this expression with age is limited. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine PAPP-A mRNA expression in multiple tissues with age in both male and female mice using real-time PCR. These included the heart, liver, kidney, bone, fat, skeletal muscle, gonads, brain, thymus and spleen. In young mice, PAPP-A mRNA was expressed at relatively high levels in all tissues examined except for liver. The only difference in expression between males and females was seen in the kidney, subcutaneous fat and gonads. The highest PAPP-A mRNA expression levels were found in visceral fat and these were 10-fold higher than in subcutaneous fat. PAPP-A expression significantly increased with age in kidney, brain and gonads. PAPP-A expression significantly deceased with age in bone and skeletal muscle. In the thymus, PAPP-A mRNA showed a biphasic response with age. There were no age-related changes in PAPP-A expression seen in any of the other tissues examined. Expression of IGFBP-5 mRNA, a marker of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) bioactivity known to be regulated by PAPP-A, paralleled the changes in PAPP-A expression with age in kidney, bone, skeletal muscle and thymus. Thus, tissue-specific PAPP-A expression in mice is differentially affected during aging, and may regulate local IGF-I bioactivity in certain tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of sequence variation underlying tissue-specific transcription factor binding and gene expression.

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    Lower, Karen M; De Gobbi, Marco; Hughes, Jim R; Derry, Christopher J; Ayyub, Helena; Sloane-Stanley, Jacqueline A; Vernimmen, Douglas; Garrick, David; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R

    2013-08-01

    Although mutations causing monogenic disorders most frequently lie within the affected gene, sequence variation in complex disorders is more commonly found in noncoding regions. Furthermore, recent genome- wide studies have shown that common DNA sequence variants in noncoding regions are associated with "normal" variation in gene expression resulting in cell-specific and/or allele-specific differences. The mechanism by which such sequence variation causes changes in gene expression is largely unknown. We have addressed this by studying natural variation in the binding of key transcription factors (TFs) in the well-defined, purified cell system of erythropoiesis. We have shown that common polymorphisms frequently directly perturb the binding sites of key TFs, and detailed analysis shows how this causes considerable (~10-fold) changes in expression from a single allele in a tissue-specific manner. We also show how a SNP, located at some distance from the recognized TF binding site, may affect the recruitment of a large multiprotein complex and alter the associated chromatin modification of the variant regulatory element. This study illustrates the principles by which common sequence variation may cause changes in tissue-specific gene expression, and suggests that such variation may underlie an individual's propensity to develop complex human genetic diseases. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. A comparative approach to understanding tissue-specific expression of uncoupling protein 1 expression in adipose tissue

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    Andrew eShore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermoregulatory function of brown adipose tissue (BAT is due to the tissue-specific expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 which is thought to have evolved in early mammals. We report that a CpG island close to the UCP1 transcription start site is highly conserved in all 29 vertebrates examined apart from the mouse and xenopus. Using methylation sensitive restriction digest and bisulphite mapping we show that the CpG island in both the bovine and human is largely un-methylated and is not related to differences in UCP1 expression between white and brown adipose tissue. Tissue-specific expression of UCP1 has been proposed to be regulated by a conserved 5’ distal enhancer which has been reported to be absent in marsupials. We demonstrate that the enhancer, is also absent in 5 eutherians as well as marsupials, monotremes, amphibians and fish, is present in pigs despite UCP1 having become a pseudogene, and that absence of the enhancer element does not relate to brown adipose tissue-specific UCP1 expression. We identify an additional putative 5’ regulatory unit which is conserved in 14 eutherian species but absent in other eutherians and vertebrates, but again unrelated to UCP1 expression. We conclude that despite clear evidence of conservation of regulatory elements in the UCP1 5’ untranslated region, this does not appear to be related to species or tissues-specific expression of UCP1.

  3. Model of Tryptophan Metabolism, Readily Scalable Using Tissue-specific Gene Expression Data*

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    Stavrum, Anne-Kristin; Heiland, Ines; Schuster, Stefan; Puntervoll, Pål; Ziegler, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan is utilized in various metabolic routes including protein synthesis, serotonin, and melatonin synthesis and the kynurenine pathway. Perturbations in these pathways have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Here we present a comprehensive kinetic model of the complex network of human tryptophan metabolism based upon existing kinetic data for all enzymatic conversions and transporters. By integrating tissue-specific expression data, modeling tryptophan metabolism in liver and brain returned intermediate metabolite concentrations in the physiological range. Sensitivity and metabolic control analyses identified expected key enzymes to govern fluxes in the branches of the network. Combining tissue-specific models revealed a considerable impact of the kynurenine pathway in liver on the concentrations of neuroactive derivatives in the brain. Moreover, using expression data from a cancer study predicted metabolite changes that resembled the experimental observations. We conclude that the combination of the kinetic model with expression data represents a powerful diagnostic tool to predict alterations in tryptophan metabolism. The model is readily scalable to include more tissues, thereby enabling assessment of organismal tryptophan metabolism in health and disease. PMID:24129579

  4. Tissue-specific expression of a soybean hypersensitive-induced response (HIR) protein gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koellhoffer, Jessica P; Xing, Aiqiu; Moon, Bryan P; Li, Zhongsen

    2015-02-01

    A Glycine max gene encoding a putative protein similar to hypersensitive-induced response proteins (HIR) was identified as a gene with preferred expressions in flowers and developing seeds by whole transcriptome gene expression profiling. Its promoter gm-hir1 was cloned and revealed to strongly express a fluorescence reporter gene primarily in integuments, anther tapetum, and seed coat with unique tissue-specificity. Expression in the inner integument was apparent prior to pollination, while expression in the outer integument started to develop from the micropylar end outward as the embryo matured. A 5'-deletion study showed that the promoter can be truncated to 600 bp long relative to the translation start site without affecting expression. A positive regulatory element was identified between 600 and 481 bp that controls expression in the inner integument, with no noticeable effect on expression in the outer integument or tapetum. Additionally, removal of the 5'UTR intron had no effect on levels or location of gm-hir1 expression while truncation to 370 bp resulted in a complete loss of expression suggesting that elements controlling both the outer integument and tapetum expression are located within the 481-370 bp region.

  5. Tissue-specific expression of monocarboxylate transporters during fasting in mice.

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    Alexandra Schutkowski

    Full Text Available Monocarboxylates such as pyruvate, lactate and ketone bodies are crucial for energy supply of all tissues, especially during energy restriction. The transport of monocarboxylates across the plasma membrane of cells is mediated by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs. Out of 14 known mammalian MCTs, six isoforms have been functionally characterized to transport monocarboxylates and short chain fatty acids (MCT1-4, thyroid hormones (MCT8, -10 and aromatic amino acids (MCT10. Knowledge on the regulation of the different MCT isoforms is rare. In an attempt to get more insights in regulation of MCT expression upon energy deprivation, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of tissue specific expression of five MCT isoforms upon 48 h of fasting in mice. Due to the crucial role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-α as a central regulator of energy metabolism and as known regulator of MCT1 expression, we included both wildtype (WT and PPARα knockout (KO mice in our study. Liver, kidney, heart, small intestine, hypothalamus, pituitary gland and thyroid gland of the mice were analyzed. Here we show that the expression of all examined MCT isoforms was markedly altered by fasting compared to feeding. Expression of MCT1, MCT2 and MCT10 was either increased or decreased by fasting dependent on the analyzed tissue. MCT4 and MCT8 were down-regulated by fasting in all examined tissues. However, PPARα appeared to have a minor impact on MCT isoform regulation. Due to the fundamental role of MCTs in transport of energy providing metabolites and hormones involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, we assumed that the observed fasting-induced adaptations of MCT expression seem to ensure an adequate energy supply of tissues during the fasting state. Since, MCT isoforms 1-4 are also necessary for the cellular uptake of drugs, the fasting-induced modifications of MCT expression have to be considered in future clinical care algorithms.

  6. Tissue-Specific Expression of Monocarboxylate Transporters during Fasting in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutkowski, Alexandra; Wege, Nicole; Stangl, Gabriele I.; König, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Monocarboxylates such as pyruvate, lactate and ketone bodies are crucial for energy supply of all tissues, especially during energy restriction. The transport of monocarboxylates across the plasma membrane of cells is mediated by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Out of 14 known mammalian MCTs, six isoforms have been functionally characterized to transport monocarboxylates and short chain fatty acids (MCT1-4), thyroid hormones (MCT8, -10) and aromatic amino acids (MCT10). Knowledge on the regulation of the different MCT isoforms is rare. In an attempt to get more insights in regulation of MCT expression upon energy deprivation, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of tissue specific expression of five MCT isoforms upon 48 h of fasting in mice. Due to the crucial role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α as a central regulator of energy metabolism and as known regulator of MCT1 expression, we included both wildtype (WT) and PPARα knockout (KO) mice in our study. Liver, kidney, heart, small intestine, hypothalamus, pituitary gland and thyroid gland of the mice were analyzed. Here we show that the expression of all examined MCT isoforms was markedly altered by fasting compared to feeding. Expression of MCT1, MCT2 and MCT10 was either increased or decreased by fasting dependent on the analyzed tissue. MCT4 and MCT8 were down-regulated by fasting in all examined tissues. However, PPARα appeared to have a minor impact on MCT isoform regulation. Due to the fundamental role of MCTs in transport of energy providing metabolites and hormones involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, we assumed that the observed fasting-induced adaptations of MCT expression seem to ensure an adequate energy supply of tissues during the fasting state. Since, MCT isoforms 1–4 are also necessary for the cellular uptake of drugs, the fasting-induced modifications of MCT expression have to be considered in future clinical care algorithms. PMID:25390336

  7. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  8. Development of a GAL4-VP16/UAS trans-activation system for tissue specific expression in Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Sevin-Pujol

    Full Text Available Promoters with tissue-specific activity are very useful to address cell-autonomous and non cell autonomous functions of candidate genes. Although this strategy is widely used in Arabidopsis thaliana, its use to study tissue-specific regulation of root symbiotic interactions in legumes has only started recently. Moreover, using tissue specific promoter activity to drive a GAL4-VP16 chimeric transcription factor that can bind short upstream activation sequences (UAS is an efficient way to target and enhance the expression of any gene of interest. Here, we developed a collection of promoters with different root cell layers specific activities in Medicago truncatula and tested their abilities to drive the expression of a chimeric GAL4-VP16 transcription factor in a trans-activation UAS: β-Glucuronidase (GUS reporter gene system. By developing a binary vector devoted to modular Golden Gate cloning together with a collection of adapted tissue specific promoters and coding sequences we could test the activity of four of these promoters in trans-activation GAL4/UAS systems and compare them to "classical" promoter GUS fusions. Roots showing high levels of tissue specific expression of the GUS activity could be obtained with this trans-activation system. We therefore provide the legume community with new tools for efficient modular Golden Gate cloning, tissue specific expression and a trans-activation system. This study provides the ground work for future development of stable transgenic lines in Medicago truncatula.

  9. Tissue-specific expression pattern and histological distribution of NLRP3 in Chinese yellow chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jinhui; Yu, Meng; Zhang, Kaizhao; Liu, Jianxin; Wang, Qingnan; Tao, Pan; Jia, Kun; Liao, Ming; Ning, Zhangyong

    2015-09-01

    Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) play important role in inflammation which means response of the host to stimuli. NOD-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is involved in the onset and development of inflammation. NLRP3, as one of the most important inflammasome sensors, has significant effect on the regulation of inflammasome activation to avoid the consequences of over activation. Up to date, there are no detailed tissue specific expression and distribution data about NLPR3 in chicken. Here, NLRP3 of Chinese yellow chicken was cloned and sequence analyzed, the polyclonal antibody was produced by purified protein of recombinant prokaryotic expression. Relative expression levels and tissue distribution of NLRP3 were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical analysis, respectively. The results showed that NLRP3 gene is highly variable between mammalian and avian. The nucleotide homology of NLRP3 between yellow chicken and Bos taurus, Hainan black goat, Sus scrofa, Callithrix jacchus, Homo sapiens, Macaca mulatta, Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus were 54.2%, 53.9%, 53.7%, 55.4%, 54.3%, 54.5%, 53.5% and 53.7%. NLRP3 expressed in all detected tissues and higher in the trachea are lung than in other tissues. Cytoplasmic expression of NLRP3 was detected in ciliated epithelial cells, basal cells and cells in lamina propria of trachea, alveolar epithelial cells, cardiac muscle cells, cerebral cortex neurons, epithelial reticular cells of the spleen, and lymphocytes of medulla in stannius follicle, liver cells and the renal tubule epithelial cells. The results will help to elucidate the role of NLRP3 of different tissues in inflammatory diseases of chicken and provide a basis for further investigations in the function and evolution of NLRP3 in different species, which would be helpful for further research on avian inflammatory diseases.

  10. Finasteride treatment alters tissue specific androgen receptor expression in prostate tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Tyler M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Johnson, Karen A; Pier, Thomas; Bruskewitz, Reginald C; Ricke, William A; Huang, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Normal and pathologic growth of the prostate is dependent on the synthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) from testosterone by 5α-reductase. Finasteride is a selective inhibitor of 5α-reductase 2, one isozyme of 5α-reductase found in abundance in the human prostate. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of finasteride on androgen receptor expression and tissue morphology in human benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens. Patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate and either treated or not treated with finasteride between 2004 and 2010 at the University of Wisconsin-Hospital were retrospectively identified using an institutional database. Prostate specimens from each patient were triple-stained for androgen receptor, prostate-specific antigen, and basal marker cytokeratin 5. Morphometric analysis was performed using the multispectral imaging, and results were compared between groups of finasteride treated and non-treated patients. Epithelial androgen receptor but not stromal androgen receptor expression was significantly lower in patients treated with finasteride than in non-treated patients. Androgen receptor-regulated prostate-specific antigen was not significantly decreased in finasteride-treated patients. Significant luminal epithelial atrophy and basal cell hyperplasia were prevalent in finasteride treated patients. Epithelial androgen receptor expression was highly correlated to the level of luminal epithelial atrophy. In this study, finasteride decreased the expression of epithelial androgen receptor in a tissue specific manner. The correlation between epithelial androgen receptor and the extent of luminal epithelial atrophy suggests that epithelial androgen receptor may be directly regulating the atrophic effects observed with finasteride treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cloning and identification of tissue-specific expression of KCNN4 splice variants in rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmeyer, Christian; Rahner, Christoph; Yang, Youshan; Sigworth, Frederick J; Binder, Henry J; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M

    2010-08-01

    KCNN4 channels that provide the driving force for cAMP- and Ca(2+)-induced anion secretion are present in both apical and basolateral membranes of the mammalian colon. However, only a single KCNN4 has been cloned. This study was initiated to identify whether both apical and basolateral KCNN4 channels are encoded by the same or different isoforms. Reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), real-time quantitative-PCR (RT-QPCR), and immunofluorescence studies were used to clone and identify tissue-specific expression of KCNN4 isoforms. Three distinct KCNN4 cDNAs that are designated as KCNN4a, KCNN4b, and KCNN4c encoding 425, 424, and 395 amino acid proteins, respectively, were isolated from the rat colon. KCNN4a differs from KCNN4b at both the nucleotide and the amino acid level with distinct 628 bp at the 3'-untranslated region and an additional glutamine at position 415, respectively. KCNN4c differs from KCNN4b by lacking the second exon that encodes a 29 amino acid motif. KCNN4a and KCNN4b/c are identified as smooth muscle- and epithelial cell-specific transcripts, respectively. KCNN4b and KCNN4c transcripts likely encode basolateral (40 kDa) and apical (37 kDa) membrane proteins in the distal colon, respectively. KCNN4c, which lacks the S2 transmembrane segment, requires coexpression of a large conductance K(+) channel beta-subunit for plasma membrane expression. The KCNN4 channel blocker TRAM-34 inhibits KCNN4b- and KCNN4c-mediated (86)Rb (K(+) surrogate) efflux with an apparent inhibitory constant of 0.6 +/- 0.1 and 7.8 +/- 0.4 muM, respectively. We conclude that apical and basolateral KCNN4 K(+) channels that regulate K(+) and anion secretion are encoded by distinct isoforms in colonic epithelial cells.

  12. Pyrosequencing of Mytilus galloprovincialis cDNAs: tissue-specific expression patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Craft

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mytilus species are important in marine ecology and in environmental quality assessment, yet their molecular biology is poorly understood. Molecular aspects of their reproduction, hybridisation between species, mitochondrial inheritance, skewed sex ratios of offspring and adaptation to climatic and pollution factors are priority areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To start to address this situation, expressed genetic transcripts from M. galloprovincialis were pyrosequenced. Transcripts were isolated from the digestive gland, foot, gill and mantle of both male and female mussels. In total, 175,547 sequences were obtained and for foot and mantle, 90% of the sequences could be assembled into contiguous fragments but this reduced to 75% for the digestive gland and gill. Transcripts relating to protein metabolism and respiration dominated including ribosomal proteins, cytochrome oxidases and NADH dehydrogenase subunits. Tissue specific variation was identified in transcripts associated with mitochondrial energy metabolism, with the digestive gland and gill having the greatest transcript abundance. Using fragment recruitment it was also possible to identify sites of potential small RNAs involved in mitochondrial transcriptional regulation. Sex ratios based on Vitelline Envelop Receptor for Lysin and Vitelline Coat Lysin transcript abundances, indicated that an equal sex distribution was maintained. Taxonomic profiling of the M. galloprovincialis tissues highlighted an abundant microbial flora associated with the digestive gland. Profiling of the tissues for genes involved in intermediary metabolism demonstrated that the gill and digestive gland were more similar to each other than to the other two tissues, and specifically the foot transcriptome was most dissimilar. CONCLUSIONS: Pyrosequencing has provided extensive genomic information for M. galloprovincialis and generated novel observations on expression of different tissues

  13. N-glycans of human protein C inhibitor: tissue-specific expression and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    Full Text Available Protein C inhibitor (PCI is a serpin type of serine protease inhibitor that is found in many tissues and fluids in human, including blood plasma, seminal plasma and urine. This inhibitor displays an unusually broad protease specificity compared with other serpins. Previous studies have shown that the N-glycan(s and the NH₂-terminus affect some blood-related functions of PCI. In this study, we have for the first time determined the N-glycan profile of seminal plasma PCI, by mass spectrometry. The N-glycan structures differed markedly compared with those of both blood-derived and urinary PCI, providing evidence that the N-glycans of PCI are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. The most abundant structure (m/z 2592.9 had a composition of Fuc₃Hex₅HexNAc₄, consistent with a core fucosylated bi-antennary glycan with terminal Lewis(x. A major serine protease in semen, prostate specific antigen (PSA, was used to evaluate the effects of N-glycans and the NH₂-terminus on a PCI function related to the reproductive tract. Second-order rate constants for PSA inhibition by PCI were 4.3±0.2 and 4.1±0.5 M⁻¹ s⁻¹ for the natural full-length PCI and a form lacking six amino acids at the NH₂-terminus, respectively, whereas these constants were 4.8±0.1 and 29±7 M⁻¹ s⁻¹ for the corresponding PNGase F-treated forms. The 7-8-fold higher rate constants obtained when both the N-glycans and the NH₂-terminus had been removed suggest that these structures jointly affect the rate of PSA inhibition, presumably by together hindering conformational changes of PCI required to bind to the catalytic pocket of PSA.

  14. Analysis of the human tissue-specific expression by genome-wide integration of transcriptomics and antibody-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Oksvold, Per; Kampf, Caroline; Djureinovic, Dijana; Odeberg, Jacob; Habuka, Masato; Tahmasebpoor, Simin; Danielsson, Angelika; Edlund, Karolina; Asplund, Anna; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Lundberg, Emma; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Skogs, Marie; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Berling, Holger; Tegel, Hanna; Mulder, Jan; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Danielsson, Frida; Mardinoglu, Adil; Sivertsson, Asa; von Feilitzen, Kalle; Forsberg, Mattias; Zwahlen, Martin; Olsson, IngMarie; Navani, Sanjay; Huss, Mikael; Nielsen, Jens; Ponten, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias

    2014-02-01

    Global classification of the human proteins with regards to spatial expression patterns across organs and tissues is important for studies of human biology and disease. Here, we used a quantitative transcriptomics analysis (RNA-Seq) to classify the tissue-specific expression of genes across a representative set of all major human organs and tissues and combined this analysis with antibody-based profiling of the same tissues. To present the data, we launch a new version of the Human Protein Atlas that integrates RNA and protein expression data corresponding to ∼80% of the human protein-coding genes with access to the primary data for both the RNA and the protein analysis on an individual gene level. We present a classification of all human protein-coding genes with regards to tissue-specificity and spatial expression pattern. The integrative human expression map can be used as a starting point to explore the molecular constituents of the human body.

  15. Nesprins: tissue-specific expression of epsilon and other short isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thuy Duong

    Full Text Available Nesprin-1-giant and nesprin-2-giant regulate nuclear positioning by the interaction of their C-terminal KASH domains with nuclear membrane SUN proteins and their N-terminal calponin-homology domains with cytoskeletal actin. A number of short isoforms lacking the actin-binding domains are produced by internal promotion. We have evaluated the significance of these shorter isoforms using quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting with site-specific monoclonal antibodies. Within a complete map of nesprin isoforms, we describe two novel nesprin-2 epsilon isoforms for the first time. Epsilon isoforms are similar in size and structure to nesprin-1-alpha. Expression of nesprin isoforms was highly tissue-dependent. Nesprin-2-epsilon-1 was found in early embryonic cells, while nesprin-2-epsilon-2 was present in heart and other adult tissues, but not skeletal muscle. Some cell lines lack shorter isoforms and express only one of the two nesprin genes, suggesting that either of the giant nesprins is sufficient for basic cell functions. For the first time, localisation of endogenous nesprin away from the nuclear membrane was shown in cells where removal of the KASH domain by alternative splicing occurs. By distinguishing between degradation products and true isoforms on western blots, it was found that previously-described beta and gamma isoforms are expressed either at only low levels or with a limited tissue distribution. Two of the shortest alpha isoforms, nesprin-1-alpha-2 and nesprin-2-alpha-1, were found almost exclusively in cardiac and skeletal muscle and a highly conserved and alternatively-spliced exon, available in both nesprin genes, was always included in these tissues. These "muscle-specific" isoforms are thought to form a complex with emerin and lamin A/C at the inner nuclear membrane and mutations in all three proteins cause Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and/or inherited dilated cardiomyopathy, disorders in which only skeletal muscle and

  16. Genome-wide tissue-specific gene expression, co-expression and regulation of co-expressed genes in adult nematode Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Bruce A; Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2014-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has traditionally been used as a model for studying nematode biology, but its small size limits the ability for researchers to perform some experiments such as high-throughput tissue-specific gene expression studies. However, the dissection of individual tissues is possible in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum due to its relatively large size. Here, we take advantage of the recent genome sequencing of Ascaris suum and the ability to physically dissect its separate tissues to produce a wide-scale tissue-specific nematode RNA-seq datasets, including data on three non-reproductive tissues (head, pharynx, and intestine) in both male and female worms, as well as four reproductive tissues (testis, seminal vesicle, ovary, and uterus). We obtained fundamental information about the biology of diverse cell types and potential interactions among tissues within this multicellular organism. Overexpression and functional enrichment analyses identified many putative biological functions enriched in each tissue studied, including functions which have not been previously studied in detail in nematodes. Putative tissue-specific transcriptional factors and corresponding binding motifs that regulate expression in each tissue were identified, including the intestine-enriched ELT-2 motif/transcription factor previously described in nematode intestines. Constitutively expressed and novel genes were also characterized, with the largest number of novel genes found to be overexpressed in the testis. Finally, a putative acetylcholine-mediated transcriptional network connecting biological activity in the head to the male reproductive system is described using co-expression networks, along with a similar ecdysone-mediated system in the female. The expression profiles, co-expression networks and co-expression regulation of the 10 tissues studied and the tissue-specific analysis presented here are a valuable resource for studying tissue-specific biological functions in

  17. Genome-wide tissue-specific gene expression, co-expression and regulation of co-expressed genes in adult nematode Ascaris suum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A Rosa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans has traditionally been used as a model for studying nematode biology, but its small size limits the ability for researchers to perform some experiments such as high-throughput tissue-specific gene expression studies. However, the dissection of individual tissues is possible in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum due to its relatively large size. Here, we take advantage of the recent genome sequencing of Ascaris suum and the ability to physically dissect its separate tissues to produce a wide-scale tissue-specific nematode RNA-seq datasets, including data on three non-reproductive tissues (head, pharynx, and intestine in both male and female worms, as well as four reproductive tissues (testis, seminal vesicle, ovary, and uterus. We obtained fundamental information about the biology of diverse cell types and potential interactions among tissues within this multicellular organism.Overexpression and functional enrichment analyses identified many putative biological functions enriched in each tissue studied, including functions which have not been previously studied in detail in nematodes. Putative tissue-specific transcriptional factors and corresponding binding motifs that regulate expression in each tissue were identified, including the intestine-enriched ELT-2 motif/transcription factor previously described in nematode intestines. Constitutively expressed and novel genes were also characterized, with the largest number of novel genes found to be overexpressed in the testis. Finally, a putative acetylcholine-mediated transcriptional network connecting biological activity in the head to the male reproductive system is described using co-expression networks, along with a similar ecdysone-mediated system in the female.The expression profiles, co-expression networks and co-expression regulation of the 10 tissues studied and the tissue-specific analysis presented here are a valuable resource for studying tissue-specific

  18. Tissue specific haemoglobin gene expression suggests adaptation to local marine conditions in North Sea flounder (Platichthys flesus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P.F.; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Hansen, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    of the haemoglobin alpha and beta subunit genes was studied in reciprocally transplanted European flounder Platichthys flesus from the highly saline North Sea and the brackish Baltic Sea. Clear differences in expression patterns of haemoglobin alpha and beta subunit genes were found among different types of tissue....... Finally, for kidney tissue a stress response was observed in one population, with gene up-regulation when North Sea flounders were transplanted to low salinity. This study underlines the importance of tissue specific gene expression and the significance of gene expression for evolution of local adaptation...... in high gene flow marine fishes. © 2013 The Genetics Society of Korea...

  19. Supplementary Material for: Global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences in rice evolution result in two contrasting types of differentially expressed genes

    KAUST Repository

    Horiuchi, Youko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Since the development of transcriptome analysis systems, many expression evolution studies characterized evolutionary forces acting on gene expression, without explicit discrimination between global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences. However, different types of gene expression alteration should have different effects on an organism, the evolutionary forces that act on them might be different, and different types of genes might show different types of differential expression between species. To confirm this, we studied differentially expressed (DE) genes among closely related groups that have extensive gene expression atlases, and clarified characteristics of different types of DE genes including the identification of regulating loci for differential expression using expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analysis data. Results We detected differentially expressed (DE) genes between rice subspecies in five homologous tissues that were verified using japonica and indica transcriptome atlases in public databases. Using the transcriptome atlases, we classified DE genes into two types, global DE genes and changed-tissues DE genes. Global type DE genes were not expressed in any tissues in the atlas of one subspecies, however changed-tissues type DE genes were expressed in both subspecies with different tissue specificity. For the five tissues in the two japonica-indica combinations, 4.6 ± 0.8 and 5.9 ± 1.5 % of highly expressed genes were global and changed-tissues DE genes, respectively. Changed-tissues DE genes varied in number between tissues, increasing linearly with the abundance of tissue specifically expressed genes in the tissue. Molecular evolution of global DE genes was rapid, unlike that of changed-tissues DE genes. Based on gene ontology, global and changed-tissues DE genes were different, having no common GO terms. Expression differences of most global DE genes were regulated by cis

  20. Targeted expression of suicide gene by tissue-specific promoter and microRNA regulation for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danda, Ravikanth; Krishnan, Gopinath; Ganapathy, Kalaivani; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Vikas, Khetan; Elchuri, Sailaja; Chatterjee, Nivedita; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2013-01-01

    In order to realise the full potential of cancer suicide gene therapy that allows the precise expression of suicide gene in cancer cells, we used a tissue specific Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) promoter (EGP-2) that directs transgene Herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) expression preferentially in EpCAM over expressing cancer cells. EpCAM levels are considerably higher in retinoblastoma (RB), a childhood eye cancer with limited expression in normal cells. Use of miRNA regulation, adjacent to the use of the tissue-specific promoter, would provide the second layer of control to the transgene expression only in the tumor cells while sparing the normal cells. To test this hypothesis we cloned let-7b miRNA targets in the 3'UTR region of HSV-TK suicide gene driven by EpCAM promoter because let-7 family miRNAs, including let-7b, were found to be down regulated in the RB tumors and cell lines. We used EpCAM over expressing and let-7 down regulated RB cell lines Y79, WERI-Rb1 (EpCAM (+ve)/let-7b(down-regulated)), EpCAM down regulated, let-7 over expressing normal retinal Müller glial cell line MIO-M1(EpCAM (-ve)/let-7b(up-regulated)), and EpCAM up regulated, let-7b up-regulated normal thyroid cell line N-Thy-Ori-3.1(EpCAM (+ve)/let-7b(up-regulated)) in the study. The cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay, apoptosis was measured by probing cleaved Caspase3, EpCAM and TK expression were quantified by Western blot. Our results showed that the EGP2-promoter HSV-TK (EGP2-TK) construct with 2 or 4 copies of let-7b miRNA targets expressed TK gene only in Y79, WERI-Rb-1, while the TK gene did not express in MIO-M1. In summary, we have developed a tissue-specific, miRNA-regulated dual control vector, which selectively expresses the suicide gene in EpCAM over expressing cells.

  1. Targeted expression of suicide gene by tissue-specific promoter and microRNA regulation for cancer gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikanth Danda

    Full Text Available In order to realise the full potential of cancer suicide gene therapy that allows the precise expression of suicide gene in cancer cells, we used a tissue specific Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM promoter (EGP-2 that directs transgene Herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK expression preferentially in EpCAM over expressing cancer cells. EpCAM levels are considerably higher in retinoblastoma (RB, a childhood eye cancer with limited expression in normal cells. Use of miRNA regulation, adjacent to the use of the tissue-specific promoter, would provide the second layer of control to the transgene expression only in the tumor cells while sparing the normal cells. To test this hypothesis we cloned let-7b miRNA targets in the 3'UTR region of HSV-TK suicide gene driven by EpCAM promoter because let-7 family miRNAs, including let-7b, were found to be down regulated in the RB tumors and cell lines. We used EpCAM over expressing and let-7 down regulated RB cell lines Y79, WERI-Rb1 (EpCAM (+ve/let-7b(down-regulated, EpCAM down regulated, let-7 over expressing normal retinal Müller glial cell line MIO-M1(EpCAM (-ve/let-7b(up-regulated, and EpCAM up regulated, let-7b up-regulated normal thyroid cell line N-Thy-Ori-3.1(EpCAM (+ve/let-7b(up-regulated in the study. The cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay, apoptosis was measured by probing cleaved Caspase3, EpCAM and TK expression were quantified by Western blot. Our results showed that the EGP2-promoter HSV-TK (EGP2-TK construct with 2 or 4 copies of let-7b miRNA targets expressed TK gene only in Y79, WERI-Rb-1, while the TK gene did not express in MIO-M1. In summary, we have developed a tissue-specific, miRNA-regulated dual control vector, which selectively expresses the suicide gene in EpCAM over expressing cells.

  2. Highly interactive nature of flower-specific enhancers and promoters, and its potential impact on tissue-specific expression and engineering of multiple genes or agronomic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhifeng; Yang, Yazhou; Zhang, Jinjin; Wang, Xiping; Singer, Stacy; Liu, Zhongchi; Yang, Yingjun; Yan, Guohua; Liu, Zongrang

    2014-09-01

    Molecular stacking enables multiple traits to be effectively engineered in crops using a single vector. However, the co-existence of distinct plant promoters in the same transgenic unit might, like their mammalian counterparts, interfere with one another. In this study, we devised a novel approach to investigate enhancer-promoter and promoter-promoter interactions in transgenic plants and demonstrated that three of four flower-specific enhancer/promoters were capable of distantly activating a pollen- and stigma-specific Pps promoter (fused to the cytotoxic DT-A gene) in other tissues, as revealed by novel tissue ablation phenotypes in transgenic plants. The NtAGI1 enhancer exclusively activated stamen- and carpel-specific DT-A expression, thus resulting in tissue ablation in an orientation-independent manner; this activation was completely abolished by the insertion of an enhancer-blocking insulator (EXOB) between the NtAGI1 enhancer and Pps promoter. Similarly, AGL8 and AP1Lb1, but not AP1La, promoters also activated distinct tissue-specific DT-A expression and ablation, with the former causing global growth retardation and the latter ablating apical inflorescences. While the tissue specificity of the enhancer/promoters generally defined their activation specificities, the strength of their activity in particular tissues or developmental stages appeared to determine whether activation actually occurred. Our findings provide the first evidence that plant-derived enhancer/promoters can distantly interact/interfere with one another, which could pose potential problems for the tissue-specific engineering of multiple traits using a single-vector stacking approach. Therefore, our work highlights the importance of adopting enhancer-blocking insulators in transformation vectors to minimize promoter-promoter interactions. The practical and fundamental significance of these findings will be discussed. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied

  3. A human IL10 BAC transgene reveals tissue-specific control of IL-10 expression and alters disease outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Ranatunga, Dilini; Hedrich, Christian M.; Wang, Fengying; McVicar, Daniel W.; Nowak, Nathan; Joshi, Trupti; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Grant, Lindsay R.; Stäger, Simona; Bream, Jay H.

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an immunoregulatory cytokine that is produced by diverse cell populations. Studies in mice suggest that the cellular source of IL-10 is a key determinant in various disease pathologies, yet little is known regarding the control of tissue-specific human IL-10 expression. To assess cell type-specific human IL-10 regulation, we created a human IL-10 transgenic mouse with a bacterial artificial chromosome (hIL10BAC) in which the IL10 gene is positioned centrally. Since huma...

  4. Development of Plant Gene Vectors for Tissue-Specific Expression Using GFP as a Reporter Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jacquelyn; Egnin, Marceline; Xue, Qi-Han; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Reporter genes are widely employed in plant molecular biology research to analyze gene expression and to identify promoters. Gus (UidA) is currently the most popular reporter gene but its detection requires a destructive assay. The use of jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from Aequorea Victoria holds promise for noninvasive detection of in vivo gene expression. To study how various plant promoters are expressed in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), we are transcriptionally fusing the intron-modified (mGFP) or synthetic (modified for codon-usage) GFP coding regions to these promoters: double cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S) with AMV translational enhancer, ubiquitin7-intron-ubiquitin coding region (ubi7-intron-UQ) and sporaminA. A few of these vectors have been constructed and introduced into E. coli DH5a and Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105. Transient expression studies are underway using protoplast-electroporation and particle bombardment of leaf tissues.

  5. Tissue-specific expression of the Ets gene Xsap-1 during Xenopus laevis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nentwich, O; Münchberg, F E; Frommer, G; Nordheim, A

    2001-12-01

    We report the cloning of Xenopus laevis Xsap-1 cDNA, encoding a member of the ternary complex factor subfamily of ETS transcription factors. The expression pattern of Xsap-1 was examined during Xenopus embryogenesis using whole-mount in situ hybridization. Spatial expression of Xsap-1 mRNA is first detected at the animal pole at the mid-blastula stage. During neurulation Xsap-1 is expressed in cells participating in neural tube formation, in the sensorial layer of the epidermal ectoderm, and in an anterior region of the ventral mesoderm. Later, Xsap-1 expression is observed in the eye, ear vesicle, branchial arches, heart, pronephros, in the somites, and the developing nervous system, such as fore-, mid-, and hindbrain as well as in the cranial ganglion X.

  6. Gene expression analysis distinguishes tissue specific and gender related functions among adult Ascaris suum tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengyuan; Gao, Xin; Martin, John; Yin, Yong; Abubucker, Sahar; Rash, Amy C.; Li, Ben-Wen; Nash, Bill; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Jasmer, Douglas P.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-01-01

    Over a billion people are infected by Ascaris spp. intestinal parasites. To clarify functional differences among tissues of adult A. suum, we compared gene expression by various tissues of these worms by expression microarray methods.. The A. suum genome was sequenced and assembled to allow generation of microarray elements. Expression of over 40,000 60-mer elements was investigated in a variety of tissues from both male and female adult worms. Nearly 50 percent of the elements for which signal was detected exhibited differential expression among different tissues. The unique profile of transcripts identified for each tissue clarified functional distinctions among tissues, such as chitin binding in the ovary and peptidase activity in the intestines. Interestingly, hundreds of gender-specific elements were characterized in multiple non-reproductive tissues of female or male worms, with most prominence of gender differences in intestinal tissue. A. suum genes from the same family were frequently expressed differently among tissues. Transcript abundance for genes specific to A. suum, by comparison to Caenorhabditis elegans, varied to a greater extent among tissues than for genes conserved between A. suum and C. elegans. Analysis using C. elegans protein interaction data identified functional modules conserved between these two nematodes, resulting in identification of functional predictions of essential subnetworks of protein interactions and how these networks may vary among nematode tissues. A notable finding was very high module similarity between adult reproductive tissues and intestine. Our results provide the most comprehensive assessment of gene expression among tissues of a parasitic nematode to date. PMID:23572074

  7. Monocyte chemotactic protein-4: tissue-specific expression and signaling through CC chemokine receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godiska, R; Chantry, D; Raport, C J; Schweickart, V L; Trong, H L; Gray, P W

    1997-03-01

    Chemokines constitute a family of low-molecular-weight proteins that attract or activate a variety of cell types, including leukocytes, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. An electronic search of the GenBank Expressed Sequence Tags database uncovered a partial cDNA sequence with homology to the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Isolation of the full-length clone revealed that it encodes the chemokine MCP-4, an eosinophil chemoattractant recently described by Uguccioni et al. [J. Exp. Med. 183, 2379-2384]. Recombinant MCP-4 was expressed in mammalian cells and purified by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. Sequencing the amino terminus of this protein corroborated the reported sequence of recombinant MCP-4 produced in insect cells. As shown by calcium flux assays, MCP-4 activated the cloned G protein-coupled receptor CCR-2, which also recognizes MCP-1 and MCP-3. Northern hybridization indicated that MCP-4 is constitutively expressed at high levels in the small intestine, colon, and lung. This expression profile is consistent with its role as a chemoattractant for eosinophils, which can be rapidly mobilized to the lung or intestine in response to invading pathogens. In marked contrast to MCP-1, MCP-4 was not induced in cell lines treated with pro-inflammatory stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor alpha.

  8. Different Cells Make Different Proteins: A Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Tissue-Specific Protein Expression in Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarguren, Izaskun; Villamarín, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    All the cells of higher organisms have the same DNA but not the same proteins. Each type of specialised cell that forms a tissue has its own pattern of gene expression and, consequently, it contains a particular set of proteins that determine its function. Here, we describe a laboratory exercise addressed to undergraduate students that aims to…

  9. Tissue-specific alternative splicing and expression of ATP1B2 gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Na+-K+-ATPase is an essential transport enzyme expressed in all animal tissues, where it generates ion gradients to maintain membrane potential and drive the transport of other solutes. It also balances metabolism and body temperature. In this study, the characterization of three novel bovine ATP1B2 splice variants, ...

  10. Highly tissue specific expression of Sphinx supports its male courtship related role in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Sphinx is a lineage-specific non-coding RNA gene involved in regulating courtship behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. The 5' flanking region of the gene is conserved across Drosophila species, with the proximal 300 bp being conserved out to D. virilis and a further 600 bp region being conserved amongst the melanogaster subgroup (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. sechellia, D. yakuba, and D. erecta. Using a green fluorescence protein transformation system, we demonstrated that a 253 bp region of the highly conserved segment was sufficient to drive sphinx expression in male accessory gland. GFP signals were also observed in brain, wing hairs and leg bristles. An additional ∼800 bp upstream region was able to enhance expression specifically in proboscis, suggesting the existence of enhancer elements. Using anti-GFP staining, we identified putative sphinx expression signal in the brain antennal lobe and inner antennocerebral tract, suggesting that sphinx might be involved in olfactory neuron mediated regulation of male courtship behavior. Whole genome expression profiling of the sphinx knockout mutation identified significant up-regulated gene categories related to accessory gland protein function and odor perception, suggesting sphinx might be a negative regulator of its target genes.

  11. Highly tissue specific expression of Sphinx supports its male courtship related role in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Dai, Hongzheng; Chen, Sidi; Zhang, Luoying; Long, Manyuan

    2011-04-26

    Sphinx is a lineage-specific non-coding RNA gene involved in regulating courtship behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. The 5' flanking region of the gene is conserved across Drosophila species, with the proximal 300 bp being conserved out to D. virilis and a further 600 bp region being conserved amongst the melanogaster subgroup (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. sechellia, D. yakuba, and D. erecta). Using a green fluorescence protein transformation system, we demonstrated that a 253 bp region of the highly conserved segment was sufficient to drive sphinx expression in male accessory gland. GFP signals were also observed in brain, wing hairs and leg bristles. An additional ∼800 bp upstream region was able to enhance expression specifically in proboscis, suggesting the existence of enhancer elements. Using anti-GFP staining, we identified putative sphinx expression signal in the brain antennal lobe and inner antennocerebral tract, suggesting that sphinx might be involved in olfactory neuron mediated regulation of male courtship behavior. Whole genome expression profiling of the sphinx knockout mutation identified significant up-regulated gene categories related to accessory gland protein function and odor perception, suggesting sphinx might be a negative regulator of its target genes.

  12. GRAPE: a pathway template method to characterize tissue-specific functionality from gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael I; Stern, David F; Zhao, Hongyu

    2017-06-26

    Personalizing treatment regimes based on gene expression profiles of individual tumors will facilitate management of cancer. Although many methods have been developed to identify pathways perturbed in tumors, the results are often not generalizable across independent datasets due to the presence of platform/batch effects. There is a need to develop methods that are robust to platform/batch effects and able to identify perturbed pathways in individual samples. We present Gene-Ranking Analysis of Pathway Expression (GRAPE) as a novel method to identify abnormal pathways in individual samples that is robust to platform/batch effects in gene expression profiles generated by multiple platforms. GRAPE first defines a template consisting of an ordered set of pathway genes to characterize the normative state of a pathway based on the relative rankings of gene expression levels across a set of reference samples. This template can be used to assess whether a sample conforms to or deviates from the typical behavior of the reference samples for this pathway. We demonstrate that GRAPE performs well versus existing methods in classifying tissue types within a single dataset, and that GRAPE achieves superior robustness and generalizability across different datasets. A powerful feature of GRAPE is the ability to represent individual gene expression profiles as a vector of pathways scores. We present applications to the analyses of breast cancer subtypes and different colonic diseases. We perform survival analysis of several TCGA subtypes and find that GRAPE pathway scores perform well in comparison to other methods. GRAPE templates offer a novel approach for summarizing the behavior of gene-sets across a collection of gene expression profiles. These templates offer superior robustness across distinct experimental batches compared to existing methods. GRAPE pathway scores enable identification of abnormal gene-set behavior in individual samples using a non-competitive approach that

  13. Specific expression of bioluminescence reporter gene in cardiomyocyte regulated by tissue specific promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Vu Hong; Tae, Seong Ho; Le, Nguyen Uyen Chi; Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    As the human heart is not capable of regenerating the great numbers of cardiac cells that are lost after myocardial infarction, impaired cardiac function is the inevitable result of ischemic disease. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have gained popularity as a potentially ideal cell candidate for tissue regeneration. In particular, hESCs are capable of cardiac lineage-specific differentiation and confer improvement of cardiac function following transplantation into animal models. Although such data are encouraging, the specific strategy for in vivo and non-invasive detection of differentiated cardiac lineage is still limited. Therefore, in the present study, we established the gene construction in which the optical reporter gene Firefly luciferase was controlled by Myosin Heavy Chain promoter for specific expressing in heart cells. The vector consisting of - MHC promoter and a firefly luciferase coding sequence flanked by full-length bovine growth hormone (BGH) 3'-polyadenylation sequence based on pcDNA3.1- vector backbone. To test the specific transcription of this promoter in g of MHC-Fluc or CMV-Flue (for control) plasmid DNA in myocardial tissue, 20 phosphate-buffered saline was directly injected into mouse myocardium through a midline sternotomy and liver. After 1 week of injection, MHC-Fluc expression was detected from heart region which was observed under cooled CCD camera of in vivo imaging system but not from liver. In control group injected with CMV-Flue, the bioluminescence was detected from all these organs. The expression of Flue under control of Myosin Heavy Chain promoter may become a suitable optical reporter gene for stem cell-derived cardiac lineage differentiation study.

  14. Tissue-specific expression and silencing phenotypes of mitochondrial phosphate carrier paralogues in several insect species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, R; Jouraku, A; Nakakura, T; Minaba, M; Yamamoto, T; Shinohara, Y; Miyoshi, H; Shiotsuki, T

    2017-06-01

    The mitochondrial phosphate carrier gene (PiC) encodes a membrane protein that mediates the supply of inorganic phosphate from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix. This substrate-specific transport system plays an important role in efficient ATP synthesis. Mammals appear to have only one PiC with two alternative splicing variants whose functional differences remain unclear. The present study is the first to characterize the multiple genes that encode PiC in insects. Bombyx mori was found to have two PiC paralogues, one ubiquitous and one testis-specific, the latter seeming to be present only in Lepidoptera. Drosophila melanogaster was found to harbour two PiC paralogues, whereas Liriomyza chinensis, another dipteran, has three PiC paralogues. Two PiCs were found to be present in Plautia stali, and silencing either of these genes affected the normal development of P. stali nymphs, although their expression patterns differed amongst tissues. Schistocerca gregaria and Locusta migratoria have two PiC each, with different expression patterns. Tribolium castaneum was found to have only one PiC, which appears to play an essential role in larval development. Thus, although the inorganic phosphate transport system appears to be conserved across eukaryotes, PiC has become specialized in the different tissues of different insect species. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  15. Tissue-Specific Contributions of Paternally Expressed Gene 3 in Lactation and Maternal Care of Mus musculus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley D Frey

    Full Text Available Paternally Expressed Gene 3 (Peg3 is an imprinted gene that controls milk letdown and maternal-caring behaviors. In this study, a conditional knockout allele has been developed in Mus musculus to further characterize these known functions of Peg3 in a tissue-specific manner. The mutant line was first crossed with a germline Cre. The progeny of this cross displayed growth retardation phenotypes. This is consistent with those seen in the previous mutant lines of Peg3, confirming the usefulness of the new mutant allele. The mutant line was subsequently crossed individually with MMTV- and Nkx2.1-Cre lines to test Peg3's roles in the mammary gland and hypothalamus, respectively. According to the results, the milk letdown process was impaired in the nursing females with the Peg3 mutation in the mammary gland, but not in the hypothalamus. This suggests that Peg3's roles in the milk letdown process are more critical in the mammary gland than in the hypothalamus. In contrast, one of the maternal-caring behaviors, nest-building, was interrupted in the females with the mutation in both MMTV- and Nkx2.1-driven lines. Overall, this is the first study to introduce a conditional knockout allele of Peg3 and to further dissect its contribution to mammalian reproduction in a tissue-specific manner.

  16. Tissue-Specific Contributions of Paternally Expressed Gene 3 in Lactation and Maternal Care of Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Wesley D; Kim, Joomyeong

    2015-01-01

    Paternally Expressed Gene 3 (Peg3) is an imprinted gene that controls milk letdown and maternal-caring behaviors. In this study, a conditional knockout allele has been developed in Mus musculus to further characterize these known functions of Peg3 in a tissue-specific manner. The mutant line was first crossed with a germline Cre. The progeny of this cross displayed growth retardation phenotypes. This is consistent with those seen in the previous mutant lines of Peg3, confirming the usefulness of the new mutant allele. The mutant line was subsequently crossed individually with MMTV- and Nkx2.1-Cre lines to test Peg3's roles in the mammary gland and hypothalamus, respectively. According to the results, the milk letdown process was impaired in the nursing females with the Peg3 mutation in the mammary gland, but not in the hypothalamus. This suggests that Peg3's roles in the milk letdown process are more critical in the mammary gland than in the hypothalamus. In contrast, one of the maternal-caring behaviors, nest-building, was interrupted in the females with the mutation in both MMTV- and Nkx2.1-driven lines. Overall, this is the first study to introduce a conditional knockout allele of Peg3 and to further dissect its contribution to mammalian reproduction in a tissue-specific manner.

  17. Common inversion polymorphism at 17q21.31 affects expression of multiple genes in tissue-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Simone; Chepelev, Iouri; Janson, Esther; Strengman, Eric; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan H; Ophoff, Roel A

    2012-09-06

    Chromosome 17q21.31 contains a common inversion polymorphism of approximately 900 kb in populations with European ancestry. Two divergent MAPT haplotypes, H1 and H2 are described with distinct linkage disequilibrium patterns across the region reflecting the inversion status at this locus. The MAPT H1 haplotype has been associated with progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, while the H2 is linked to recurrent deletion events associated with the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome, a disease characterized by developmental delay and learning disability. In this study, we investigate the effect of the inversion on the expression of genes in the 17q21.31 region. We find the expression of several genes in and at the borders of the inversion to be affected; specific either to whole blood or different regions of the human brain. The H1 haplotype was found to be associated with an increased expression of LRRC37A4, PLEKH1M and MAPT. In contrast, a decreased expression of MGC57346, LRRC37A and CRHR1 was associated with H1. Studies thus far have focused on the expression of MAPT in the inversion region. However, our results show that the inversion status affects expression of other genes in the 17q21.31 region as well. Given the link between the inversion status and different neurological diseases, these genes may also be involved in disease pathology, possibly in a tissue-specific manner.

  18. Post-mortem stability of RNA in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue and the tissue-specific expression of myostatin, perilipin and associated factors in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Philippa K; Bing, Chen; Harris, Patricia A; Maltin, Charlotte A; Grove-White, Dai; Argo, Caroline McG

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, a major concern for equine welfare, is highly prevalent in the leisure horse population. Skeletal-muscle and adipose tissues are important determinants of maintenance energy requirements. The myostatin and perilipin pathways play key roles in the regulation of muscle mass and lipolysis respectively and have both been associated with obesity predisposition in other mammalian species. High quality samples, suitable for molecular biology, are an essential prerequisite for detailed investigations of gene and protein expression. Hence, this study has evaluated a) the post-mortem stability of RNA extracted from skeletal-muscle and adipose-tissues collected under commercial conditions and b) the tissue-specific presence of myostatin, the moystatin receptor (activin receptor IIB, ActRIIB), follistatin and perilipin, genes and proteins across a range of equine tissues. Objectives were addressed using tissues from 7 Thoroughbred horses presented for slaughter at a commercial abattoir; a) samples were collected at 7 time-points from Masseter muscle and perirenal adipose from 5 minutes to 6 hours post-mortem. Extracted RN was appraised by Optical Density analysis and agarose-gel electrophoresis. b) Quantitative real time PCR and Western Blotting were used to evaluate gene and protein expression in anatomically-defined samples collected from 17 tissues (6 organs, 4 skeletal muscles and 7 discrete adipose depots). The results indicate that, under the present collection conditions, intact, good quality RNA could be extracted from skeletal-muscle for up to 2 hours post-mortem. However, RNA from adipose tissue may be more susceptible to degradation/contamination and samples should be collected no later than 30 minutes post-mortem. The data also show that myostatin and ActRIIB genes and proteins were almost exclusively expressed in skeletal muscle. The follistatin gene showed a more diverse gene expression profile, with expression evident in several organs, adipose tissue

  19. Description of electrophoretic loci and tissue specific gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-02-09

    Feb 9, 1994 ... The expression of one locus (L-Idh-I) was restricted to endodermal tissue, specifically to liver, and no locus was expressed exclusively in tissues of ectodermal ori- gin. Of the remaining 39 loci, 23 were expressed in one or more tissues derived from each germ layer. The products of. 13 loci were found in ...

  20. Salt-Induced Tissue-Specific Cytosine Methylation Downregulates Expression of HKT Genes in Contrasting Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Beena, Ananda Sankara; Awana, Monika; Singh, Archana

    2017-04-01

    Plants have evolved several strategies, including regulation of genes through epigenetic modifications, to cope with environmental stresses. DNA methylation is dynamically regulated through the methylation and demethylation of cytosine in response to environmental perturbations. High-affinity potassium transporters (HKTs) have accounted for the homeostasis of sodium and potassium ions in plants under salt stress. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is sensitive to soil salinity, which impedes its growth and development, resulting in decreased productivity. The differential expression of HKTs has been reported to confer tolerance to salt stress in plants. In this study, we investigated variations in cytosine methylation and their effects on the expression of HKT genes in contrasting wheat genotypes under salt stress. We observed a genotype- and tissue-specific increase in cytosine methylation induced by NaCl stress that downregulated the expression of TaHKT2;1 and TaHKT2;3 in the shoot and root tissues of Kharchia-65, thereby contributing to its improved salt-tolerance ability. Although TaHKT1;4 was expressed only in roots and was downregulated under the stress in salt-tolerant genotypes, it was not regulated through variations in cytosine methylation. Thus, understanding epigenetic regulation and the function of HKTs would enable an improvement in salt tolerance and the development of salt-tolerant crops.

  1. Tissue-specific expression patterns of microRNA during acute graft-versus-host disease in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasaradha Jalapothu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNA have emerged as central regulators of diverse biological processes, and contribute to driving pathology in several diseases. Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD represents a major complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, caused by alloreactive donor T cells attacking host tissues leading to inflammation and tissue destruction. Changes in miRNA expression patterns occur during aGvHD, and we hypothesized that we could identify miRNA signatures in target tissues of aGvHD that may potentially help understand the underlying molecular pathology of the disease. We utilized a rat model of aGvHD with transplantation of fully MHC-mismatched T cell depleted bone marrow, followed by infusion of donor T cells. The expression pattern of 423 rat miRNAs was investigated in skin, gut, and lung tissues and intestinal T cells with the NanoString hybridization platform, in combination with validation by quantitative PCR. MHC-matched transplanted rats were included as controls. In the skin, up-regulation of miR-34b and down-regulation of miR-326 was observed, while in the intestines we detected down-regulation of miR-743b and a trend towards down-regulation of miR-345-5p. Thus tissue-specific expression patterns of miRNAs were observed. Neither miR-326 nor miR-743b has previously been associated with aGvHD. Moreover, we identified up-regulation of miR-146a and miR-155 in skin tissue of rats suffering from aGvHD. Analysis of intestinal T cells indicated 23 miRNAs differentially regulated between aGvHD and controls. Two of these miRNAs were differentially expressed either in skin (miR-326 or in intestinal (miR-345-5p tissue. Comparison of intestinal and peripheral blood T cells indicated common dysregulated expression of miR-99a, miR-223, miR-326, and miR-345-5p. Analysis of predicted gene targets for these miRNAs indicated potential targeting of an inflammatory network both in skin and in the intestines that may

  2. Mouse Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster sequence and expression analyses reveal conservation of tissue-specific MHC-independent immunosurveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Rahim, Mir Munir A; Allan, David S J; Tu, Megan M; Belanger, Simon; Abou-Samra, Elias; Ma, Jaehun; Sekhon, Harman S; Fairhead, Todd; Zein, Haggag S; Carlyle, James R; Anderson, Stephen K; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    The Nkrp1 (Klrb1)-Clr (Clec2) genes encode a receptor-ligand system utilized by NK cells as an MHC-independent immunosurveillance strategy for innate immune responses. The related Ly49 family of MHC-I receptors displays extreme allelic polymorphism and haplotype plasticity. In contrast, previous BAC-mapping and aCGH studies in the mouse suggest the neighboring and related Nkrp1-Clr cluster is evolutionarily stable. To definitively compare the relative evolutionary rate of Nkrp1-Clr vs. Ly49 gene clusters, the Nkrp1-Clr gene clusters from two Ly49 haplotype-disparate inbred mouse strains, BALB/c and 129S6, were sequenced. Both Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster sequences are highly similar to the C57BL/6 reference sequence, displaying the same gene numbers and order, complete pseudogenes, and gene fragments. The Nkrp1-Clr clusters contain a strikingly dissimilar proportion of repetitive elements compared to the Ly49 clusters, suggesting that certain elements may be partly responsible for the highly disparate Ly49 vs. Nkrp1 evolutionary rate. Focused allelic polymorphisms were found within the Nkrp1b/d (Klrb1b), Nkrp1c (Klrb1c), and Clr-c (Clec2f) genes, suggestive of possible immune selection. Cell-type specific transcription of Nkrp1-Clr genes in a large panel of tissues/organs was determined. Clr-b (Clec2d) and Clr-g (Clec2i) showed wide expression, while other Clr genes showed more tissue-specific expression patterns. In situ hybridization revealed specific expression of various members of the Clr family in leukocytes/hematopoietic cells of immune organs, various tissue-restricted epithelial cells (including intestinal, kidney tubular, lung, and corneal progenitor epithelial cells), as well as myocytes. In summary, the Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster appears to evolve more slowly relative to the related Ly49 cluster, and likely regulates innate immunosurveillance in a tissue-specific manner.

  3. Mouse Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster sequence and expression analyses reveal conservation of tissue-specific MHC-independent immunosurveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    Full Text Available The Nkrp1 (Klrb1-Clr (Clec2 genes encode a receptor-ligand system utilized by NK cells as an MHC-independent immunosurveillance strategy for innate immune responses. The related Ly49 family of MHC-I receptors displays extreme allelic polymorphism and haplotype plasticity. In contrast, previous BAC-mapping and aCGH studies in the mouse suggest the neighboring and related Nkrp1-Clr cluster is evolutionarily stable. To definitively compare the relative evolutionary rate of Nkrp1-Clr vs. Ly49 gene clusters, the Nkrp1-Clr gene clusters from two Ly49 haplotype-disparate inbred mouse strains, BALB/c and 129S6, were sequenced. Both Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster sequences are highly similar to the C57BL/6 reference sequence, displaying the same gene numbers and order, complete pseudogenes, and gene fragments. The Nkrp1-Clr clusters contain a strikingly dissimilar proportion of repetitive elements compared to the Ly49 clusters, suggesting that certain elements may be partly responsible for the highly disparate Ly49 vs. Nkrp1 evolutionary rate. Focused allelic polymorphisms were found within the Nkrp1b/d (Klrb1b, Nkrp1c (Klrb1c, and Clr-c (Clec2f genes, suggestive of possible immune selection. Cell-type specific transcription of Nkrp1-Clr genes in a large panel of tissues/organs was determined. Clr-b (Clec2d and Clr-g (Clec2i showed wide expression, while other Clr genes showed more tissue-specific expression patterns. In situ hybridization revealed specific expression of various members of the Clr family in leukocytes/hematopoietic cells of immune organs, various tissue-restricted epithelial cells (including intestinal, kidney tubular, lung, and corneal progenitor epithelial cells, as well as myocytes. In summary, the Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster appears to evolve more slowly relative to the related Ly49 cluster, and likely regulates innate immunosurveillance in a tissue-specific manner.

  4. Tissue-Specific, Development-Dependent Phenolic Compounds Accumulation Profile and Gene Expression Pattern in Tea Plant [Camellia sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Lei; Meng, Fei; Wang, Yunsheng; Tan, Huarong; Yang, Hua; Wei, Chaoling; Wan, Xiaochun; Gao, Liping; Xia, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds in tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.)] play a crucial role in dominating tea flavor and possess a number of key pharmacological benefits on human health. The present research aimed to study the profile of tissue-specific, development-dependent accumulation pattern of phenolic compounds in tea plant. A total of 50 phenolic compounds were identified qualitatively using liquid chromatography in tandem mass spectrometry technology. Of which 29 phenolic compounds were quantified based on their fragmentation behaviors. Most of the phenolic compounds were higher in the younger leaves than that in the stem and root, whereas the total amount of proanthocyanidins were unexpectedly higher in the root. The expression patterns of 63 structural and regulator genes involved in the shikimic acid, phenylpropanoid, and flavonoid pathways were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and cluster analysis. Based on the similarity of their expression patterns, the genes were classified into two main groups: C1 and C2; and the genes in group C1 had high relative expression level in the root or low in the bud and leaves. The expression patterns of genes in C2-2-1 and C2-2-2-1 groups were probably responsible for the development-dependent accumulation of phenolic compounds in the leaves. Enzymatic analysis suggested that the accumulation of catechins was influenced simultaneously by catabolism and anabolism. Further research is recommended to know the expression patterns of various genes and the reason for the variation in contents of different compounds in different growth stages and also in different organs. PMID:23646127

  5. Tissue-specific, development-dependent phenolic compounds accumulation profile and gene expression pattern in tea plant [Camellia sinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaolan; Liu, Yajun; Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Lei; Meng, Fei; Wang, Yunsheng; Tan, Huarong; Yang, Hua; Wei, Chaoling; Wan, Xiaochun; Gao, Liping; Xia, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds in tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.)] play a crucial role in dominating tea flavor and possess a number of key pharmacological benefits on human health. The present research aimed to study the profile of tissue-specific, development-dependent accumulation pattern of phenolic compounds in tea plant. A total of 50 phenolic compounds were identified qualitatively using liquid chromatography in tandem mass spectrometry technology. Of which 29 phenolic compounds were quantified based on their fragmentation behaviors. Most of the phenolic compounds were higher in the younger leaves than that in the stem and root, whereas the total amount of proanthocyanidins were unexpectedly higher in the root. The expression patterns of 63 structural and regulator genes involved in the shikimic acid, phenylpropanoid, and flavonoid pathways were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and cluster analysis. Based on the similarity of their expression patterns, the genes were classified into two main groups: C1 and C2; and the genes in group C1 had high relative expression level in the root or low in the bud and leaves. The expression patterns of genes in C2-2-1 and C2-2-2-1 groups were probably responsible for the development-dependent accumulation of phenolic compounds in the leaves. Enzymatic analysis suggested that the accumulation of catechins was influenced simultaneously by catabolism and anabolism. Further research is recommended to know the expression patterns of various genes and the reason for the variation in contents of different compounds in different growth stages and also in different organs.

  6. Promoter complexity and tissue-specific expression of stress response components in Mytilus galloprovincialis, a sessile marine invertebrate species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysa Pantzartzi

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of stress tolerance in sessile animals, such as molluscs, can offer fundamental insights into the adaptation of organisms for a wide range of environmental challenges. One of the best studied processes at the molecular level relevant to stress tolerance is the heat shock response in the genus Mytilus. We focus on the upstream region of Mytilus galloprovincialis Hsp90 genes and their structural and functional associations, using comparative genomics and network inference. Sequence comparison of this region provides novel evidence that the transcription of Hsp90 is regulated via a dense region of transcription factor binding sites, also containing a region with similarity to the Gamera family of LINE-like repetitive sequences and a genus-specific element of unknown function. Furthermore, we infer a set of gene networks from tissue-specific expression data, and specifically extract an Hsp class-associated network, with 174 genes and 2,226 associations, exhibiting a complex pattern of expression across multiple tissue types. Our results (i suggest that the heat shock response in the genus Mytilus is regulated by an unexpectedly complex upstream region, and (ii provide new directions for the use of the heat shock process as a biosensor system for environmental monitoring.

  7. Tissue Restricted Splice Junctions Originate Not Only from Tissue-Specific Gene Loci, but Gene Loci with a Broad Pattern of Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Hestand

    Full Text Available Cellular mechanisms that achieve protein diversity in eukaryotes are multifaceted, including transcriptional components such as RNA splicing. Through alternative splicing, a single protein-coding gene can generate multiple mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms, some of which are tissue-specific. We have conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses of the Bodymap 2.0 messenger RNA-sequencing data from 16 human tissue samples and identified 209,363 splice junctions. Of these, 22,231 (10.6% were not previously annotated and 21,650 (10.3% were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Tissue-restricted alternative splicing was found to be widespread, with approximately 65% of expressed multi-exon genes containing at least one tissue-specific splice junction. Interestingly, we observed many tissue-specific splice junctions not only in genes expressed in one or a few tissues, but also from gene loci with a broad pattern of expression.

  8. Association of DNA Methylation Levels with Tissue-specific Expression of Adipogenic and Lipogenic Genes in Muscle of Korean Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Baik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation status, may regulate adipogenesis and lipogenesis, thus affecting intramuscular fat (IMF deposition in longissimus dorsi muscle (LM of beef cattle. In Korean cattle steers, the LM consists mainly of muscle tissue. However, the LM tissue also contains IMF. We compared the gene expression levels between the IMF and muscle portions of the LM after tissue separation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the mRNA levels of both adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma isoform 1 (PPARG1 and lipogenic fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 were higher (p<0.01 in the IMF than in the muscle portion of the LM. We determined DNA methylation levels of regulatory regions of the PPARG1 and FABP4 genes by pyrosequencing of genomic DNA. DNA methylation levels of two of three CpG sites in the PPARG1 gene promoter region were lower (p<0.05 in the IMF than in the muscle portion of the LM. DNA methylation levels of all five CpG sites from the FABP4 gene promoter region were also lower (p<0.001 in the IMF than in the muscle portion. Thus, mRNA levels of both PPARG1 and FABP4 genes were inversely correlated with DNA methylation levels in regulatory regions of CpG sites of the corresponding gene. Our findings suggest that DNA methylation status regulates tissue-specific expression of adipogenic and lipogenic genes in the IMF and muscle portions of LM tissue in Korean cattle.

  9. Structural and enzymatic characterization of Drosophila Dm2-MMP, a membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase with tissue-specific expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llano, Elena; Adam, Geza; Pendás, Alberto M; Quesada, Víctor; Sánchez, Luis M; Santamariá, Iñigo; Noselli, Stéphane; López-Otín, Carlos

    2002-06-28

    We report the isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding Dm2-MMP, the second matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) identified in the Drosophila melanogaster genome. The cloned cDNA codes for a polypeptide of 758 residues that displays a domain organization similar to that of other MMPs, including signal peptide, propeptide, catalytic, and hemopexin domains. However, the structure of Dm2-MMP is unique because of the presence of an insertion of 214 amino acids between the catalytic and hemopexin domains that is not present in any of the previously described MMPs. Dm2-MMP also contains a C-terminal extension predicted to form a cleavable glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor site. Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis of S2 cells transfected with the isolated cDNA confirmed that Dm2-MMP is localized at the cell surface. Production of the catalytic domain of Dm2-MMP in Escherichia coli and analysis of its enzymatic activity revealed that this proteinase cleaves several synthetic peptides used for analysis of vertebrate MMPs. This proteolytic activity was abolished by MMP inhibitors such as BB-94, confirming that the isolated cDNA codes for an enzymatically active metalloproteinase. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that Dm2-MMP is expressed at low levels in all of the developmental stages of Drosophila as well as in adult flies. However, detailed in situ hybridization at the larval stage revealed a strong tissue-specific expression in discrete regions of the brain and eye imaginal discs. According to these results, we propose that Dm2-MMP plays both general proteolytic functions during Drosophila development and in adult tissues and specific roles in eye development and neural tissues through the degradation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix.

  10. Sex and tissue specific gene expression patterns identified following de novo transcriptomic analysis of the Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotllant, Guiomar; Nguyen, Tuan Viet; Sbragaglia, Valerio; Rahi, Lifat; Dudley, Kevin J; Hurwood, David; Ventura, Tomer; Company, Joan B; Chand, Vincent; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Mather, Peter B

    2017-08-16

    The Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, is economically important in European fisheries and is a key organism in local marine ecosystems. Despite multi-faceted scientific interest in this species, our current knowledge of genetic resources in this species remains very limited. Here, we generated a reference de novo transcriptome for N. norvegicus from multiple tissues in both sexes. Bioinformatic analyses were conducted to detect transcripts that were expressed exclusively in either males or females. Patterns were validated via RT-PCR. Sixteen N. norvegicus libraries were sequenced from immature and mature ovary, testis and vas deferens (including the masculinizing androgenic gland). In addition, eyestalk, brain, thoracic ganglia and hepatopancreas tissues were screened in males and both immature and mature females. RNA-Sequencing resulted in >600 million reads. De novo assembly that combined the current dataset with two previously published libraries from eyestalk tissue, yielded a reference transcriptome of 333,225 transcripts with an average size of 708 base pairs (bp), with an N50 of 1272 bp. Sex-specific transcripts were detected primarily in gonads followed by hepatopancreas, brain, thoracic ganglia, and eyestalk, respectively. Candidate transcripts that were expressed exclusively either in males or females were highlighted and the 10 most abundant ones were validated via RT-PCR. Among the most highly expressed genes were Serine threonine protein kinase in testis and Vitellogenin in female hepatopancreas. These results align closely with gene annotation results. Moreover, a differential expression heatmap showed that the majority of differentially expressed transcripts were identified in gonad and eyestalk tissues. Results indicate that sex-specific gene expression patterns in Norway lobster are controlled by differences in gene regulation pattern between males and females in somatic tissues. The current study presents the first multi-tissue reference

  11. Tissue-Specific Expression of DNA Methyltransferases Involved in Early-Life Nutritional Stress of Chicken, Gallus gallus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong W. Kang

    2017-12-01

    liver GR in early-life nutritional stress response of birds. Taken together, results suggest that DNA methylation regulator genes are tissue-specifically responsive to acute and chronic stress, and hepatic GR may play a critical role in regulating the early-life nutritional stress response of birds. In addition, the downregulation of DNMT1 and DMAP1 may be one of the adaptive mechanisms to chronic early-life nutritional stress via passive demethylation.

  12. Effects of adeno-associated virus serotype and tissue-specific expression on circulating biomarkers of propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenzel, Adam J; Hillestad, Matthew L; Matern, Dietrich; Barry, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). This enzyme is composed of six PCCA and six PCCB subunits and mediates a critical step in catabolism of odd chain fatty acids and certain amino acids. Current treatment options for PA are limited to stringent dietary restriction of protein consumption and some patients undergo elective liver transplantation. We previously generated a hypomorphic model of PA, designated Pcca(-/-)(A138T), with 2% of wild-type enzyme activity that mimics many aspects of the human disease. In this study, we used the differing tissue tropisms of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to probe the ability of liver or muscle-directed gene therapy to treat systemic aspects of this disease that affects many cell types. Systemic therapy with muscle-biased AAV1, liver-biased AAV8, and broadly tropic AAVrh10 mediated significant biochemical corrections in circulating propionylcarnitine (C3) and methyl citrate by all vectors. The innate tissue bias of AAV1 and AAV8 gene expression was made more specific by the use of muscle-specific muscle creatine kinase (specifically MCK6) and hepatocyte-specific transthyretin (TTR) promoters, respectively. Under these targeted conditions, both vectors mediated significant long-term correction of circulating metabolites, demonstrating that correction of muscle and likely other tissue types in addition to liver is necessary to fully correct pathology caused by PA. Liver-specific AAV8-TTR-PCCA mediated better correction than AAV1-MCK-PCCA. These data suggest that targeted gene therapy may be a viable alternative to liver transplantation for PA. They also demonstrate the effects of tissue-specific and broad gene therapy on a cell autonomous systemic genetic disease.

  13. Chicken pleiotrophin: regulation of tissue specific expression by estrogen in the oviduct and distinct expression pattern in the ovarian carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Pleiotrophin (PTN is a developmentally-regulated growth factor which is widely distributed in various tissues and also detected in many kinds of carcinomas. However, little is known about the PTN gene in chickens. In the present study, we found chicken PTN to be highly conserved with respect to mammalian PTN genes (91-92.6% and its mRNA was most abundant in brain, heart and oviduct. This study focused on the PTN gene in the oviduct where it was detected in the glandular (GE and luminal (LE epithelial cells. Treatment of young chicks with diethylstilbesterol induced PTN mRNA and protein in GE and LE, but not in other cell types of the oviduct. Further, several microRNAs, specifically miR-499 and miR-1709 were discovered to influence PTN expression via its 3'-UTR which suggests that post-transcriptional regulation influences PTN expression in chickens. We also compared expression patterns and CpG methylation status of the PTN gene in normal and cancerous ovaries from chickens. Our results indicated that PTN is most abundant in the GE of adenocarcinoma of cancerous, but not normal ovaries of hens. Bisulfite sequencing revealed that 30- and 40% of -1311 and -1339 CpG sites are demethylated in ovarian cancer cells, respectively. Collectively, these results indicate that chicken PTN is a novel estrogen-induced gene expressed mainly in the oviductal epithelia implicating PTN regulation of oviduct development and egg formation, and also suggest that PTN is a biomarker for epithelial ovarian carcinoma that could be used for diagnosis and monitoring effects of therapies for the disease.

  14. Human protein secretory pathway genes are expressed in a tissue-specific pattern to match processing demands of the secretome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feizi, Amir; Gatto, Francesco; Uhlén, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    -translational modifications in each tissue's secretome. Our findings conciliate both the housekeeping and tissue-specific nature of the protein secretory pathway, which we attribute to a fine-tuned regulation of defined gene families to support the diversity of secreted proteins and their modifications....

  15. Alternative promoters and repetitive DNA elements define the species-dependent tissue-specific expression of the FMO1 genes of human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Elizabeth A; Chandan, Pritpal; Stevanovic-Walker, Milena; Edwards, Mina; Phillips, Ian R

    2007-09-15

    In humans, expression of the FMO1 (flavin-containing mono-oxygenase 1) gene is silenced postnatally in liver, but not kidney. In adult mouse, however, the gene is active in both tissues. We investigated the basis of this species-dependent tissue-specific transcription of FMO1. Our results indicate the use of three alternative promoters. Transcription of the gene in fetal human and adult mouse liver is exclusively from the P0 promoter, whereas in extra-hepatic tissues of both species, P1 and P2 are active. Reporter gene assays showed that the proximal P0 promoters of human (hFMO1) and mouse (mFmo1) genes are equally effective. However, sequences upstream (-2955 to -506) of the proximal P0 of mFmo1 increased reporter gene activity 3-fold, whereas hFMO1 upstream sequences (-3027 to -541) decreased reporter gene activity by 75%. Replacement of the upstream sequence of human P0 with the upstream sequence of mouse P0 increased activity of the human proximal P0 8-fold. Species-specific repetitive elements are present immediately upstream of the proximal P0 promoters. The human gene contains five LINE (long-interspersed nuclear element)-1-like elements, whereas the mouse gene contains a poly A region, an 80-bp direct repeat, an LTR (long terminal repeat), a SINE (short-interspersed nuclear element) and a poly T tract. The rat and rabbit FMO1 genes, which are expressed in adult liver, lack some (rat) or all (rabbit) of the elements upstream of mouse P0. Thus silencing of FMO1 in adult human liver is due apparently to the presence upstream of the proximal P0 of L1 (LINE-1) elements rather than the absence of retrotransposons similar to those found in the mouse gene.

  16. Large-Scale Cognitive GWAS Meta-Analysis Reveals Tissue-Specific Neural Expression and Potential Nootropic Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Lam

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a large (n = 107,207 genome-wide association study (GWAS of general cognitive ability (“g”, further enhanced by combining results with a large-scale GWAS of educational attainment. We identified 70 independent genomic loci associated with general cognitive ability. Results showed significant enrichment for genes causing Mendelian disorders with an intellectual disability phenotype. Competitive pathway analysis implicated the biological processes of neurogenesis and synaptic regulation, as well as the gene targets of two pharmacologic agents: cinnarizine, a T-type calcium channel blocker, and LY97241, a potassium channel inhibitor. Transcriptome-wide and epigenome-wide analysis revealed that the implicated loci were enriched for genes expressed across all brain regions (most strongly in the cerebellum. Enrichment was exclusive to genes expressed in neurons but not oligodendrocytes or astrocytes. Finally, we report genetic correlations between cognitive ability and disparate phenotypes including psychiatric disorders, several autoimmune disorders, longevity, and maternal age at first birth.

  17. Proteome profiling reveals tissue-specific protein expression in male and female accessory glands of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhaoming; Wang, Xiaohuan; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Quanmei; Zhang, Xiaolu; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-05-01

    Male accessory gland (MAG) and female accessory gland (FAG) of the reproductive system are, respectively, responsible for producing seminal proteins and adhesive proteins during copulation and ovulation. Seminal proteins are ejaculated to female along with sperms, whereas adhesive proteins are excreted along with eggs. Proteins from the male and female reproductive organs are usually indicative of rapid adaptive evolution. Understanding the reproductive isolation and species divergence requires identifying reproduction-related proteins from many different species. Here, we present our proteomic analyses of male and female accessory glands of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Using LC/MS-MS, we identified 2133 MAG proteins and 1872 FAG proteins. In total, 652 proteins were significant more abundant in the MAG than in the FAG, including growth factors, odorant-binding proteins, enzymes, and proteins of unknown function. Growth factors and odorant-binding proteins are potential signaling molecules, whereas most of proteins of unknown function were found to be Lepidoptera-specific proteins with high evolutionary rates. Microarray experiments and semi-quantitative RT-PCR validated that MAG-specific proteins were expressed exclusively in male moths. Totally, 192 proteins were considered as FAG-specific proteins, including protease inhibitors, enzymes, and other proteins. Protease inhibitors were found to be the most abundant FAG-specific proteins, which may protect eggs from infection by inhibiting pathogen-derived proteases. These results provide comprehensive insights into copulation and oviposition. Moreover, the newly identified Lepidoptera-specific MAG proteins provide useful data for future research on the evolution of reproductive proteins in insects.

  18. Genome-wide identification and expression profiling reveal tissue-specific expression and differentially-regulated genes involved in gibberellin metabolism between Williams banana and its dwarf mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Xie, Jianghui; Duan, Yajie; Hu, Huigang; Hu, Yulin; Li, Weiming

    2016-05-27

    Dwarfism is one of the most valuable traits in banana breeding because semi-dwarf cultivars show good resistance to damage by wind and rain. Moreover, these cultivars present advantages of convenient cultivation, management, and so on. We obtained a dwarf mutant '8818-1' through EMS (ethyl methane sulphonate) mutagenesis of Williams banana 8818 (Musa spp. AAA group). Our research have shown that gibberellins (GAs) content in 8818-1 false stems was significantly lower than that in its parent 8818 and the dwarf type of 8818-1 could be restored by application of exogenous GA3. Although GA exerts important impacts on the 8818-1 dwarf type, our understanding of the regulation of GA metabolism during banana dwarf mutant development remains limited. Genome-wide screening revealed 36 candidate GA metabolism genes were systematically identified for the first time; these genes included 3 MaCPS, 2 MaKS, 1 MaKO, 2 MaKAO, 10 MaGA20ox, 4 MaGA3ox, and 14 MaGA2ox genes. Phylogenetic tree and conserved protein domain analyses showed sequence conservation and divergence. GA metabolism genes exhibited tissue-specific expression patterns. Early GA biosynthesis genes were constitutively expressed but presented differential regulation in different tissues in Williams banana. GA oxidase family genes were mainly transcribed in young fruits, thus suggesting that young fruits were the most active tissue involved in GA metabolism, followed by leaves, bracts, and finally approximately mature fruits. Expression patterns between 8818 and 8818-1 revealed that MaGA20ox4, MaGA20ox5, and MaGA20ox7 of the MaGA20ox gene family and MaGA2ox7, MaGA2ox12, and MaGA2ox14 of the MaGA2ox gene family exhibited significant differential expression and high-expression levels in false stems. These genes are likely to be responsible for the regulation of GAs content in 8818-1 false stems. Overall, phylogenetic evolution, tissue specificity and differential expression analyses of GA metabolism genes can provide a

  19. Green tissue-specific co-expression of chitinase and oxalate oxidase 4 genes in rice for enhanced resistance against sheath blight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Subhasis; Molla, Kutubuddin Ali; Chanda, Palas K; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2016-01-01

    Green tissue-specific simultaneous overexpression of two defense-related genes ( OsCHI11 & OsOXO4 ) in rice leads to significant resistance against sheath blight pathogen ( R. solani ) without distressing any agronomically important traits. Overexpressing two defense-related genes (OsOXO4 and OsCHI11) cloned from rice is effective at enhancing resistance against sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani. These genes were expressed under the control of two different green tissue-specific promoters, viz. maize phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene promoter, PEPC, and rice cis-acting 544-bp DNA element, immediately upstream of the D54O translational start site, P D54O-544 . Putative T0 transgenic rice plants were screened by PCR and integration of genes was confirmed by Southern hybridization of progeny (T1) rice plants. Successful expression of OsOXO4 and OsCHI11 in all tested plants was confirmed. Expression of PR genes increased significantly following pathogen infection in overexpressing transgenic plants. Following infection, transgenic plants exhibited elevated hydrogen peroxide levels, significant changes in activity of ROS scavenging enzymes and reduced membrane damage when compared to their wild-type counterpart. In a Rhizoctonia solani toxin assay, a detached leaf inoculation test and an in vivo plant bioassay, transgenic plants showed a significant reduction in disease symptoms in comparison to non-transgenic control plants. This is the first report of overexpression of two different PR genes driven by two green tissue-specific promoters providing enhanced sheath blight resistance in transgenic rice.

  20. Gene expression analysis distinguishes tissue-specific and gender-related functions among adult Ascaris suum tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengyuan; Gao, Xin; Martin, John; Yin, Yong; Abubucker, Sahar; Rash, Amy C; Li, Ben-Wen; Nash, Bill; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-06-01

    Over a billion people are infected by Ascaris spp. intestinal parasites. To clarify functional differences among tissues of adult A. suum, we compared gene expression by various tissues of these worms by expression microarray methods. The A. suum genome was sequenced and assembled to allow generation of microarray elements. Expression of over 40,000 60-mer elements was investigated in a variety of tissues from both male and female adult worms. Nearly 50 percent of the elements for which signal was detected exhibited differential expression among different tissues. The unique profile of transcripts identified for each tissue clarified functional distinctions among tissues, such as chitin binding in the ovary and peptidase activity in the intestines. Interestingly, hundreds of gender-specific elements were characterized in multiple non-reproductive tissues of female or male worms, with most prominence of gender differences in intestinal tissue. A. suum genes from the same family were frequently expressed differently among tissues. Transcript abundance for genes specific to A. suum, by comparison to Caenorhabditis elegans, varied to a greater extent among tissues than for genes conserved between A. suum and C. elegans. Analysis using C. elegans protein interaction data identified functional modules conserved between these two nematodes, resulting in identification of functional predictions of essential subnetworks of protein interactions and how these networks may vary among nematode tissues. A notable finding was very high module similarity between adult reproductive tissues and intestine. Our results provide the most comprehensive assessment of gene expression among tissues of a parasitic nematode to date.

  1. Multigenic lentiviral vectors for combined and tissue-specific expression of miRNA- and protein-based antiangiogenic factors

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    Anne Louise Askou

    Full Text Available Lentivirus-based gene delivery vectors carrying multiple gene cassettes are powerful tools in gene transfer studies and gene therapy, allowing coexpression of multiple therapeutic factors and, if desired, fluorescent reporters. Current strategies to express transgenes and microRNA (miRNA clusters from a single vector have certain limitations that affect transgene expression levels and/or vector titers. In this study, we describe a novel vector design that facilitates combined expression of therapeutic RNA- and protein-based antiangiogenic factors as well as a fluorescent reporter from back-to-back RNApolII-driven expression cassettes. This configuration allows effective production of intron-embedded miRNAs that are released upon transduction of target cells. Exploiting such multigenic lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate robust miRNA-directed downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression, leading to reduced angiogenesis, and parallel impairment of angiogenic pathways by codelivering the gene encoding pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF. Notably, subretinal injections of lentiviral vectors reveal efficient retinal pigment epithelium-specific gene expression driven by the VMD2 promoter, verifying that multigenic lentiviral vectors can be produced with high titers sufficient for in vivo applications. Altogether, our results suggest the potential applicability of combined miRNA- and protein-encoding lentiviral vectors in antiangiogenic gene therapy, including new combination therapies for amelioration of age-related macular degeneration.

  2. Tissue-specific posttranscriptional downregulation of expression of the S100A4(mts1) gene in transgenic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambartsumian, N; Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Grigorian, M

    1998-01-01

    The S100A4(mts1) is a gene associated with generation of metastatic disease. In order to analyze the consequences of alteration of the pattern of expression of the S100A4(mts1) gene we obtained strains of transgenic mice bearing the S100A4(mts1) gene under the control of a ubiquitous...... that normally do not express the gene in the wild-type animal. The transgene RNA is detected in the polysomes indicating that it could be translated into the S100A4(Mts1) protein. The specificity of the S100A4(Mts1) protein expression is determined by a complex mechanism including regulation of translation and/or...... and constitutive 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGCR) gene promoter. In transgenic animals the expression of the transgene RNA was detected in all organs, but only some of the organs showed elevated levels of the protein. Expression of the S100A4(Mts1) protein was downregulated in the organs...

  3. Identification of FXYD Protein Genes in a Teleost: Tissue-specific Expression and Response to Salinity Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk

    2008-01-01

    It is increasingly clear, that alterations in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase kinetics to fit the demands in specialized cell types, is vital for the enzyme to execute its different physiological roles in diverse tissues. In addition to tissue dependent expression of isoforms of the conventional subunits, alph....... In addition to identify novel FXYD isoforms, these studies are the first to show the tissue dependence in their expression and modulation by salinity in any teleosts. Key words: Atlantic salmon, Na+,K+-ATPase, Osmoregulation, Salmo salar, QPCR....

  4. Tissue-specific expression of the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene in transgenic strawberry (Fragaria Xananassa) plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, J.G.; Salentijn, E.M.J.; Krens, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    The strawberry ( Fragaria spp) is regarded as a false fruit because it originates from the receptacle, which is a non-ovarian tissue. For this reason, fruit-specific promoters isolated from plant species in which the fruit is derived from the ovary wall might not be suited to control gene expression

  5. Genomic organization and tissue-specific expression of hepcidin in the pacific mutton hamlet, Alphestes immaculatus (Breder, 1936).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masso-Silva, Jorge; Diamond, Gill; Macias-Rodriguez, Maria; Ascencio, Felipe

    2011-12-01

    Hepcidin is a cysteine-rich peptide involved in iron metabolism, inflammatory response and as antimicrobial peptide. Despite the fact that hepcidins have been identified in several fish species, only few have been completely characterized. This study, described the identification and complete molecular characterization of the hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 (HAMP1) gene of Alphestes immaculatus. Moreover, its specific expression level at both basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced conditions in different tissues was also determined by real-time PCR. Results showed that the HAMP1gene consists of three exons and two introns encoding a preprohepcidin composed of 90 aa (24 aa for signal peptide, 40 aa for prodomain and 26 aa for mature peptide). The promoter region analysis revealed a TATA box sequence and several putative transcription factor binding sites. A comparative analysis showed CEBPα, CEBPβ, NF-kB, HNF3, GATA-1 and c-Rel as the most common found in fishes. The mature peptide possesses a pI of 8.34, which is the average among fish hepcidin. In addition, the structural modeling showed a hairpin structure with four putative disulfide bonds. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that this hepcidin gene is a HAMP1 class, and is clustered into the same group with the Serranid fish Epinephelus moara and the Antarctic fish Lycodichthys dearborni. Finally, the relative expression levels showed high basal values in liver and muscle, whereas in LPS-induced fish the relative expression tendency changed, with the highest values in spleen and head kidney tissues. This study describes the completely characterized HAMP1 gene of A. immaculatus and their patterns of expression level at different conditions and in different tissues, showing by first time muscle hepcidin expression could be relevant in the immune response in fish. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A tissue-specific promoter derived from a SINE retrotransposon drives biallelic expression of PLAGL1 in human lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E L Smith

    Full Text Available The imprinted gene PLAGL1 is an important regulator of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Loss of its expression has been implicated in tumorigenesis in a range of different cancers, and overexpression during fetal development causes transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM. PLAGL1 lies within an imprinted region of chromosome 6q24, and monoallelic expression from the major, differentially methylated promoter (P1 occurs in most human tissues. However, in peripheral blood leukocytes, the active promoter (P2 is non-imprinted and drives biallelic transcription. We report here a novel PLAGL1 promoter (P5 derived from the insertion of a primate-specific, MIR3 SINE retrotransposon. P5 is highly utilized in lymphocytes, particularly in T cells, and like P2, directs biallelic transcription. Our results show that it is important to consider P5 in relation to PLAGL1 function in T cells when investigating the dysregulation of this gene.

  7. Dicer expression exhibits a tissue-specific diurnal pattern that is lost during aging and in diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqing Yan

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of circadian rhythmicity is identified as a key factor in disease pathogenesis. Circadian rhythmicity is controlled at both a transcriptional and post-transcriptional level suggesting the role of microRNA (miRNA and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA in this process. Endonuclease Dicer controls miRNA and dsRNA processing, however the role of Dicer in circadian regulation is not known. Here we demonstrate robust diurnal oscillations of Dicer expression in central and peripheral clock control systems including suprachiasmatic nucleolus (SCN, retina, liver, and bone marrow (BM. The Dicer oscillations were either reduced or phase shifted with aging and Type 2 diabetes. The decrease and phase shift of Dicer expression was associated with a similar decrease and phase shift of miRNAs 146a and 125a-5p and with an increase in toxic Alu RNA. Restoring Dicer levels and the diurnal patterns of Dicer-controlled miRNA and RNA expression may provide new therapeutic strategies for metabolic disease and aging-associated complications.

  8. Gene expression programs of human smooth muscle cells: tissue-specific differentiation and prognostic significance in breast cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Tsan Chi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle is present in a wide variety of anatomical locations, such as blood vessels, various visceral organs, and hair follicles. Contraction of smooth muscle is central to functions as diverse as peristalsis, urination, respiration, and the maintenance of vascular tone. Despite the varied physiological roles of smooth muscle cells (SMCs, we possess only a limited knowledge of the heterogeneity underlying their functional and anatomic specializations. As a step toward understanding the intrinsic differences between SMCs from different anatomical locations, we used DNA microarrays to profile global gene expression patterns in 36 SMC samples from various tissues after propagation under defined conditions in cell culture. Significant variations were found between the cells isolated from blood vessels, bronchi, and visceral organs. Furthermore, pervasive differences were noted within the visceral organ subgroups that appear to reflect the distinct molecular pathways essential for organogenesis as well as those involved in organ-specific contractile and physiological properties. Finally, we sought to understand how this diversity may contribute to SMC-involving pathology. We found that a gene expression signature of the responses of vascular SMCs to serum exposure is associated with a significantly poorer prognosis in human cancers, potentially linking vascular injury response to tumor progression.

  9. {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate uptake in hepatoma cells due to tissue-specific human sodium iodide symporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Libo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200233 Shanghai (China); Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Altman, Annette [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Mier, Walter [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lu Hankui [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200233 Shanghai (China); Zhu Ruisen [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200233 Shanghai (China); Haberkorn, Uwe [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany) and Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: uwe_haberkorn@med.uni-heidelberg.de

    2006-05-15

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene could be used as an ideal reporter gene as well as a promising therapeutic gene. {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate has proven to be more advantageous than {sup 131}I-iodide with respect to image quality, procedure and radiation dose in examination of thyroid uptake and scintigraphy. Herein, we investigated the feasibility of monitoring human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression with {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate in hepatoma cells (MH3924A) following tissue-specific expression. Methods: MH3924A cells were stably transfected with the recombinant retroviral vector, in which hNIS cDNA was driven by murine albumin enhancer/promoter (mAlb) and coupled to hygromycin resistance gene using an internal ribosomal entry site. Functional NIS expression in hepatoma cells was confirmed by an {sup 125}I{sup -} uptake assay. The dynamic uptake and efflux of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate was determined both in vitro and in vivo. Results: The {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate was up to 254-fold higher in stably transfected MH3924A cells than in wild-type cells. However, the in vitro efflux of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate out of recombinant cells was rapid with a half-life of less than 2 min. Further, the in vivo studies yielded clear images and quantitative data of mAlbhNIS-infected tumor xenografts using {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate and {gamma} camera. Conclusion: The current study demonstrates enhanced {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate uptake in hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo following tissue-specific gene transfer using a recombinant retrovirus with the albumin enhancer/promoter and the hNIS gene. It is feasible to monitor hNIS gene expression noninvasively and quantitatively using conventional {gamma} camera and {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate.

  10. Differential domain evolution and complex RNA processing in a family of paralogous EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes facilitates expression of diverse tissue-specific isoforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Chan, Nadine; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Dubchak, Inna; Narla, Mohandas; Gascard, Philippe D.; Conboy, John G.

    2004-07-15

    The EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes epitomize the resourcefulness of the mammalian genome to encode a complex proteome from a small number of genes. By utilizing alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3, and EPB41L1 encode a diverse array of structural adapter proteins. Comparative genomic and transcript analysis of these 140kb-240kb genes indicates several unusual features: differential evolution of highly conserved exons encoding known functional domains, interspersed with unique exons whose size and sequence variations contribute substantially to intergenic diversity: alternative first exons, most of which map far upstream of the coding regions; and complex tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing that facilitates synthesis of functionally different complements of 4.1 proteins in various cells. Understanding the splicing regulatory networks that control protein 4.1 expression will be critical to a full appreciation of the many roles of 4.1 proteins in normal cell biology and their proposed roles in human cancer.

  11. Tissue-specific expression and in vivo regulation of zebrafish orthologues of mammalian genes related to symptomatic hypomagnesemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Francisco J; Chen, Yu-Xuan; Flik, Gert; Bindels, René J; Hoenderop, Joost G

    2013-10-01

    Introduction of zebrafish as a model for human diseases with symptomatic hypomagnesemia urges to identify the regulatory transport genes involved in zebrafish Mg(2+) physiology. In humans, mutations related to hypomagnesemia are located in the genes TRPM6 and CNNM2, encoding for a Mg(2+) channel and transporter, respectively; EGF (epidermal growth factor); SLC12A3, which encodes for the Na(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter NCC; KCNA1 and KCNJ10, encoding for the K(+) channels Kv1.1 and Kir4.1, respectively; and FXYD2, which encodes for the γ-subunit of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Orthologues of these genes were found in the zebrafish genome. For cnnm2, kcna1 and kcnj10, two conserved paralogues were retrieved. Except for fxyd2, kcna1b and kcnj10 duplicates, transcripts of orthologues were detected in ionoregulatory organs such as the gills, kidney and gut. Gene expression analyses in zebrafish acclimated to a Mg(2+)-deficient (0 mM Mg(2+)) or a Mg(2+)-enriched (2 mM Mg(2+)) water showed that branchial trpm6, gut cnnm2b and renal slc12a3 responded to ambient Mg(2+). When changing the Mg(2+) composition of the diet (the main source for Mg(2+) in fish) to a Mg(2+)-deficient (0.01 % (w/w) Mg) or a Mg(2+)-enriched diet (0.7 % (w/w) Mg), mRNA expression of branchial trpm6, gut trpm6 and cnnm2 duplicates, and renal trpm6, egf, cnnm2a and slc12a3 was the highest in fish fed the Mg(2+)-deficient diet. The gene regulation patterns were in line with compensatory mechanisms to cope with Mg(2+)-deficiency or surplus. Our findings suggest that trpm6, egf, cnnm2 paralogues and slc12a3 are involved in the in vivo regulation of Mg(2+) transport in ionoregulatory organs of the zebrafish model.

  12. Mouse microsomal triglyceride transfer protein large subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamuta, Makoto; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn; Hoogeveen, R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) catalyzes the transfer of triglyceride, cholesteryl ester, and phospholipid between membranes. It is essential for the secretion of apolipoprotein B from the cell. Mutations in MTP are a major cause of abetalipoproteinemia. The mouse is a popular animal model for lipoprotein metabolism. We have cloned and sequenced mouse MTP cDNA. The DNA-deduced amino acid sequence indicates that mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence indicates that mouse MTP contains 894 amino acids; the mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence identity to the hamster, human, and bovine sequences, respectively. Northern blot analysis indicates that mouse MTP mRNA is expressed at high levels in the small intestine and at substantially lower levels in the liver and that it is not detectable in six other tissues examined. The mouse MTP gene has been localized to the distal region of chromosome 3 by Southern blots of interspecific backcross panels using progeny derived from matings of (C57BL/6J x SPRET/Ei)F1 x SPRET/Ei. Comparison of MTP sequences from human, bovine, hamster, and mouse indicates that the C-terminal region of MTP is better conserved than its N-terminal region. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Mouse thymic epithelial cell lines expressing "Aire" and peripheral tissue-specific antigens reproduce in vitro negative selection of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Chen, Jiabing; Sakai, Kosuke; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2011-08-15

    In the human thymus, AIRE (autoimmune regulator) gene is expressed in a very limited type of medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) and no cognate cell lines are available, hence the molecular analysis of AIRE gene function has been difficult. To improve this situation, we attempted to isolate Aire-expressing cells and established three cell lines (Aire⁺TEC1, Aire⁺TEC2, Aire⁺DC) from the abnormally enlarged thymus, which was developed in the transgenic mice expressing SV40 T-antigen driven by the mouse Aire gene promoter. When these Aire⁺ cell lines were co-cultured with fresh thymocytes, they adhered to the majority of thymocytes and induced apoptosis as if negative selection of T-cells in the thymus is occurring in vitro. Further analysis revealed that these Aire⁺ cell lines are derived from mTECs and exhibit characteristic natures of "antigen presenting cells" including several distinct abilities: to express a variety of peripheral tissue-specific antigens, to produce immunoproteasome and immunological synapse, and to express some of TNFSFs (tumor necrosis factor super families). Thus, the newly established Aire⁺ cell lines will be invaluable for the further detailed analysis of AIRE gene function in the central tolerance of immunity and autoimmune disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pfkfb (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase) isoforms display a tissue-specific and dynamic expression during Xenopus laevis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Caterina; Maczkowiak, Frederique; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2013-10-01

    Pfkfb (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase) enzymes are bi-functional enzymes encoded by four different genes (pfkfb1, pfkfb2, pfkfb3, pfkfb4) in vertebrates. They are involved in the regulation of glycolysis: they catalyze the synthesis and the degradation of F-2,6-BP (fructose-2,6-bisphosphate), the most potent allosteric activator of phosphofructokinase 1 (Pfk1), a key glycolytic enzyme. By producing F-2,6-BP, Pfkfb enzymes allow glycolysis to proceed, while by degrading F-2,6-BP they block glycolysis. As major regulators of glycolysis, Pfkfb enzymes are involved in cancer: tumor cells have a higher glycolytic rate compared to normal cells, even in the presence of adequate oxygen levels (Warburg effect) and several cancer cell lines express elevated levels of Pfkfb enzymes. Glycolysis is also important for energy and metabolite production in proliferating cells. In embryos, however, the role of glycolysis and the expression of glycolysis regulators remain to be explored. Here, we provide a phylogenetic analysis of Pfkfb enzymes in vertebrates, and we detail the expression pattern of pfk1, pfkfb1, pfkfb2, pfkfb3, and pfkfb4 genes in Xenopus laevis embryos. We show that pfkfb transcripts expression is overlapping at blastula and gastrula stages and that from neurulation to tadpole stages, they display tissue-specific, complementary and dynamic expression patterns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Housekeeping and tissue-specific genes in mouse tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Amand Jonny

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to characterize the housekeeping and tissue-specific genes in 15 mouse tissues by using the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE strategy which indicates the relative level of expression for each transcript matched to the tag. Results Here, we identified constantly expressed housekeeping genes, such as eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2, which is expressed in all tissues without significant difference in expression levels. Moreover, most of these genes were not regulated by experimental conditions such as steroid hormones, adrenalectomy and gonadectomy. In addition, we report previously postulated housekeeping genes such as peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and beta-actin, which are expressed in all the tissues, but with significant difference in their expression levels. We have also identified genes uniquely detected in each of the 15 tissues and other tissues from public databases. Conclusion These identified housekeeping genes could represent appropriate controls for RT-PCR and northern blot when comparing the expression levels of genes in several tissues. The results reveal several tissue-specific genes highly expressed in testis and pituitary gland. Furthermore, the main function of tissue-specific genes expressed in liver, lung and bone is the cell defence, whereas several keratins involved in cell structure function are exclusively detected in skin and vagina. The results from this study can be used for example to target a tissue for agent delivering by using the promoter of tissue-specific genes. Moreover, this study could be used as basis for further researches on physiology and pathology of these tissues.

  16. Mouse and human BAC transgenes recapitulate tissue-specific expression of the vitamin D receptor in mice and rescue the VDR-null phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Min; Bishop, Kathleen A; Goellner, Joseph J; O'Brien, Charles A; Pike, J Wesley

    2014-06-01

    The biological actions of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is expressed in numerous target tissues in a cell type-selective manner. Recent studies using genomic analyses and recombineered bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) have defined the specific features of mouse and human VDR gene loci in vitro. In the current study, we introduced recombineered mouse and human VDR BACs as transgenes into mice and explored their expression capabilities in vivo. Individual transgenic mouse strains selectively expressed BAC-derived mouse or human VDR proteins in appropriate vitamin D target tissues, thereby recapitulating the tissue-specific expression of endogenous mouse VDR. The mouse VDR transgene was also regulated by 1,25(OH)2D3 and dibutyryl-cAMP. When crossed into a VDR-null mouse background, both transgenes restored wild-type basal as well as 1,25(OH)2D3-inducible gene expression patterns in the appropriate tissues. This maneuver resulted in the complete rescue of the aberrant phenotype noted in the VDR-null mouse, including systemic features associated with altered calcium and phosphorus homeostasis and disrupted production of parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor 23, and abnormalities associated with the skeleton, kidney, parathyroid gland, and the skin. This study suggests that both mouse and human VDR transgenes are capable of recapitulating basal and regulated expression of the VDR in the appropriate mouse tissues and restore 1,25(OH)2D3 function. These results provide a baseline for further dissection of mechanisms integral to mouse and human VDR gene expression and offer the potential to explore the consequence of selective mutations in VDR proteins in vivo.

  17. Tissue-specific expression of Sarcoplasmic/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPases (ATP2A/SERCA) 1, 2, 3 during Xenopus laevis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Caterina; Pollet, Nicolas; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-ATPase pumps are critical in most cells, to sequester calcium into intracytoplasmic stores and regulate general calcium signalling. In addition, cell-specific needs for calcium signals have been described and employ a diversity of calcium ATPases in adult tissues and oocytes. A major family of such calcium pumps is ATP2A/SERCA family, for Sarcoplasmic/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPases. Although largely studied in adults, the developmental expression of the atp2a/serca genes remains unknown. Here, we provide genome organisation in Xenopuslaevis and tropicalis and phylogeny of atp2a/serca genes in craniates. We detail embryonic expression for the three X. laevis atp2a/serca genes. We found that the three atp2a/serca genes are strongly conserved among vertebrates and display complementary and tissue-specific expression in embryos. These expression patterns present variations when compared to the data reported in adults. Atp2a1/serca1 is expressed as soon as the end of gastrulation in a subset of the myod-positive cells, and later labels prospective slow muscle cells in the superficial part of the somite. In contrast atp2a2/serca2 is found in a larger subset of cells, but is not ubiquitous as reported in adults. Notably, atp2a2/serca2 is prominently expressed in the neural-related tissues, i.e. the neural plate, cement gland, but is excluded from premigratory neural crest. Finally, atp2a3/serca3 expression is restricted to the ectoderm throughout development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural evolution and tissue-specific expression of tetrapod-specific second isoform of secretory pathway Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestov, Nikolay B., E-mail: korn@mail.ibch.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Kostina, Maria B. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Korneenko, Tatyana V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Shakhparonov, Mikhail I. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Modyanov, Nikolai N., E-mail: nikolai.modyanov@utoledo.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full-length secretory pathway Ca-ATPase (SPCA2) cloned from rat duodenum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATP2C2 gene (encoding SPCA2) exists only in genomes of Tetrapoda. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rat and pig SPCA2 are expressed in intestines, lung and some secretory glands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subcellular localization of SPCA2 may depend on tissue type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In rat duodenum, SPCA2 is localized in plasma membrane-associated compartments. -- Abstract: Secretory pathway Ca-ATPases are less characterized mammalian calcium pumps than plasma membrane Ca-ATPases and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPases. Here we report analysis of molecular evolution, alternative splicing, tissue-specific expression and subcellular localization of the second isoform of the secretory pathway Ca-ATPase (SPCA2), the product of the ATP2C2 gene. The primary structure of SPCA2 from rat duodenum deduced from full-length transcript contains 944 amino acid residues, and exhibits 65% sequence identity with known SPCA1. The rat SPCA2 sequence is also highly homologous to putative human protein KIAA0703, however, the latter seems to have an aberrant N-terminus originating from intron 2. The tissue-specificity of SPCA2 expression is different from ubiquitous SPCA1. Rat SPCA2 transcripts were detected predominantly in gastrointestinal tract, lung, trachea, lactating mammary gland, skin and preputial gland. In the newborn pig, the expression profile is very similar with one remarkable exception: porcine bulbourethral gland gave the strongest signal. Upon overexpression in cultured cells, SPCA2 shows an intracellular distribution with remarkable enrichment in Golgi. However, in vivo SPCA2 may be localized in compartments that differ among various tissues: it is intracellular in epidermis, but enriched in plasma membranes of the intestinal epithelium. Analysis of SPCA2 sequences from various vertebrate species argue that ATP2C2

  19. Tissue-Specific and Light-Mediated Expression of the C4 Photosynthetic NAD-Dependent Malic Enzyme of Amaranth Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J. J.; Berry, J. O.

    1996-01-01

    In the C4 dicotyledonous grain plant amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus), a mitochondrial NAD-dependent malic enzyme (NAD-ME; EC 1.1.1.39) serves a specialized and essential role in photosynthetic carbon fixation. In this study we have examined specialized photosynthetic gene expression patterns for the NAD-ME [alpha] subunit. We show here that the [alpha] subunit gene is preferentially expressed in leaves and cotyledons (the most photosynthetically active tissues), and this expression is specific to the bundle-sheath cells of these tissues from the earliest stages of development. Synthesis of the [alpha] subunit polypeptide and accumulation of its corresponding mRNA are strongly light-dependent, but this regulation is also influenced by seedling development. In addition, light-dependent accumulation of the [alpha] subunit mRNA is regulated at transcriptional as well as posttranscriptional levels. Our findings demonstrate that the NAD-ME of amaranth has acquired numerous complex tissue-specific and light-mediated regulation patterns that define its specialized function as a key enzyme in the C4 photosynthetic pathway. PMID:12226404

  20. Ghrelin potentiates TSH-induced expression of the thyroid tissue-specific genes thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase and sodium-iodine symporter, in rat PC-Cl3 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo-Bernal, J; Fernández-Santos, J M; De Miguel, M; García-Marín, R; Gordillo-Martínez, F; Díaz-Parrado, E; Utrilla, J C; Martín-Lacave, I

    2011-11-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide that stimulates pituitary growth-hormone secretion and modulates food-intake and energy metabolism in mammals. It is mainly secreted by the stomach, but it is also expressed in many other tissues such as cartilage or the thyroid gland. In the present study we have analyzed by RT-PCR and using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence the expression and tissue distribution of ghrelin and its functional receptor (GHS-R type 1α) in thyroid cell-lines and in normal and pathological rat thyroid tissue. Additionally, by measuring the incorporation of BrdU, we have investigated if, as previously noted for FRTL-5 cells, ghrelin enhances the proliferation rate in the PC-Cl3 rat-thyrocyte cell-line. Finally, we have determined the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on TSH-induced expression of the tissue-specific key genes involved in the synthesis of thyroid hormone: thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase and sodium-iodine symporter. Our data provide direct evidence that C-cell secreted ghrelin may be involved in the paracrine regulation of the thyroid follicular cell function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tissue-specific expression of Sprouty1 in mice protects against high-fat diet-induced fat accumulation, bone loss and metabolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urs, Sumithra; Henderson, Terry; Le, Phuong; Rosen, Clifford J; Liaw, Lucy

    2012-09-28

    We recently characterised Sprouty1 (Spry1), a growth factor signalling inhibitor as a regulator of marrow progenitor cells promoting osteoblast differentiation at the expense of adipocytes. Adipose tissue-specific Spry1 expression in mice resulted in increased bone mass and reduced body fat, while conditional knockout of Spry1 had the opposite effect with decreased bone mass and increased body fat. Because Spry1 suppresses normal fat development, we tested the hypothesis that Spry1 expression prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity, bone loss and associated lipid abnormalities, and demonstrate that Spry1 has a long-term protective effect on mice fed a high-energy diet. We studied diet-induced obesity in mice with fatty acid binding promoter-driven expression or conditional knockout of Spry1 in adipocytes. Phenotyping was performed by whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, microCT, histology and blood analysis. In conditional Spry1-null mice, a high-fat diet increased body fat by 40 %, impaired glucose regulation and led to liver steatosis. However, overexpression of Spry1 led to 35 % (P fat, reduced bone loss and normal metabolic function compared with single transgenics. This protective phenotype was associated with decreased circulating insulin (70 %) and leptin (54 %; P fat diet. Additionally, Spry1 expression decreased adipose tissue inflammation by 45 %. We show that conditional Spry1 expression in adipose tissue protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity and associated bone loss.

  2. Honey bee PTEN--description, developmental knockdown, and tissue-specific expression of splice-variants correlated with alternative social phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Navdeep S; Wang, Ying; Kaftanoglu, Osman; Amdam, Gro V

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatase and TENsin (PTEN) homolog is a negative regulator that takes part in IIS (insulin/insulin-like signaling) and Egfr (epidermal growth factor receptor) activation in Drosophila melanogaster. IIS and Egfr signaling events are also involved in the developmental process of queen and worker differentiation in honey bees (Apis mellifera). Here, we characterized the bee PTEN gene homologue for the first time and begin to explore its potential function during bee development and adult life. Honey bee PTEN is alternatively spliced, resulting in three splice variants. Next, we show that the expression of PTEN can be down-regulated by RNA interference (RNAi) in the larval stage, when female caste fate is determined. Relative to controls, we observed that RNAi efficacy is dependent on the amount of PTEN dsRNA that is delivered to larvae. For larvae fed queen or worker diets containing a high amount of PTEN dsRNA, PTEN knockdown was significant at a whole-body level but lethal. A lower dosage did not result in a significant gene down-regulation. Finally, we compared same-aged adult workers with different behavior: nursing vs. foraging. We show that between nurses and foragers, PTEN isoforms were differentially expressed within brain, ovary and fat body tissues. All isoforms were expressed at higher levels in the brain and ovaries of the foragers. In fat body, isoform B was expressed at higher level in the nurse bees. Our results suggest that PTEN plays a central role during growth and development in queen- and worker-destined honey bees. In adult workers, moreover, tissue-specific patterns of PTEN isoform expression are correlated with differences in complex division of labor between same-aged individuals. Therefore, we propose that knowledge on the roles of IIS and Egfr activity in developmental and behavioral control may increase through studies of how PTEN functions can impact bee social phenotypes.

  3. Differential accumulation of β-carotene and tissue specific expression of phytoene synthase (MaPsy) gene in banana (Musa sp) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandapani, R; Singh, V P; Arora, A; Bhattacharya, R C; Rajendran, Ambika

    2017-12-01

    An experiment was conducted with twelve major Indian banana cultivars to investigate the molecular relationship between the differential accumulation of β-carotene in peel and pulp of the banana fruit and carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes. The high performance liquid chromatography showed that all banana cultivars accumulated two-three fold more β-carotene in non-edible portion of the banana fruit. However, Nendran, a famous orange fleshed cultivar of South India, had high β-carotene content (1362 µg/100 g) in edible pulp. The gene encoding Musa accuminata phytoene synthase (MaPsy) was successfully amplified using a pair of degenerate primers designed from Oncidium orchid. The deduced amino acid sequences shared a high level of identity to phytoene synthase gene from other plants. Gene expression analysis confirmed the presence of two isoforms (MaPsy1 and MaPsy2) of MaPsy gene in banana fruits. Presence of two isoforms of MaPsy gene in peel and one in pulp confirmed the differential accumulation of β-carotene in banana fruits. However, Nendran accumulated more β-carotene in edible pulp due to presence of both the isoforms of MaPsy gene. Thus, carotenoid accumulation is a tissue specific process strongly dependent on differential expression pattern of two isoforms of MaPsy gene in banana.

  4. Persistent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection in the Nasopharynx of Cattle; Tissue-Specific Distribution and Local Cytokine Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Juan M.; Smoliga, George R.; O’Donnell, Vivian; Brito, Barbara P.; Stenfeldt, Carolina; Rodriguez, Luis L.; Arzt, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Tissues obtained post-mortem from cattle persistently infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were analyzed to characterize the tissue-specific localization of FMDV and partial transcriptome profiles for selected immunoregulatory cytokines. Analysis of 28 distinct anatomic sites from 21 steers infected with FMDV serotype A, O or SAT2, had the highest prevalence of overall viral detection in the dorsal nasopharynx (80.95%) and dorsal soft palate (71.43%). FMDV was less frequently detected in laryngeal mucosal tissues, oropharyngeal mucosal sites, and lymph nodes draining the pharynx. Immunomicroscopy indicated that within persistently infected mucosal tissues, FMDV antigens were rarely detectable within few epithelial cells in regions of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Transcriptome analysis of persistently infected pharyngeal tissues by qRT-PCR for 14 cytokine genes indicated a general trend of decreased mRNA levels compared to uninfected control animals. Although, statistically significant differences were not observed, greatest suppression of relative expression (RE) was identified for IP-10 (RE = 0.198), IFN-β (RE = 0.269), IL-12 (RE = 0.275), and IL-2 (RE = 0.312). Increased relative expression was detected for IL-6 (RE = 2.065). Overall, this data demonstrates that during the FMDV carrier state in cattle, viral persistence is associated with epithelial cells of the nasopharynx in the upper respiratory tract and decreased levels of mRNA for several immunoregulatory cytokines in the infected tissues. PMID:25996935

  5. Persistent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection in the Nasopharynx of Cattle; Tissue-Specific Distribution and Local Cytokine Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Pacheco

    Full Text Available Tissues obtained post-mortem from cattle persistently infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV were analyzed to characterize the tissue-specific localization of FMDV and partial transcriptome profiles for selected immunoregulatory cytokines. Analysis of 28 distinct anatomic sites from 21 steers infected with FMDV serotype A, O or SAT2, had the highest prevalence of overall viral detection in the dorsal nasopharynx (80.95% and dorsal soft palate (71.43%. FMDV was less frequently detected in laryngeal mucosal tissues, oropharyngeal mucosal sites, and lymph nodes draining the pharynx. Immunomicroscopy indicated that within persistently infected mucosal tissues, FMDV antigens were rarely detectable within few epithelial cells in regions of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT. Transcriptome analysis of persistently infected pharyngeal tissues by qRT-PCR for 14 cytokine genes indicated a general trend of decreased mRNA levels compared to uninfected control animals. Although, statistically significant differences were not observed, greatest suppression of relative expression (RE was identified for IP-10 (RE = 0.198, IFN-β (RE = 0.269, IL-12 (RE = 0.275, and IL-2 (RE = 0.312. Increased relative expression was detected for IL-6 (RE = 2.065. Overall, this data demonstrates that during the FMDV carrier state in cattle, viral persistence is associated with epithelial cells of the nasopharynx in the upper respiratory tract and decreased levels of mRNA for several immunoregulatory cytokines in the infected tissues.

  6. Prolactin receptor, growth hormone receptor, and putative somatolactin receptor in Mozambique tilapia: tissue specific expression and differential regulation by salinity and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A L; Fox, B K; Davis, L K; Visitacion, N; Kitahashi, T; Hirano, T; Grau, E G

    2007-01-01

    , liver levels of GHR1 and GHR2 transcripts, and liver and muscle levels of IGF-I transcripts were unaffected by fasting. These results clearly indicate tissue specific expression and differential physiological regulation of GH family receptors in the tilapia.

  7. Tissue-specific expression and regulation by 1,25(OH)2D3 of chick protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetto, G S; Henry, H L

    1997-02-01

    The heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) protein is a specific and potent competitive inhibitor of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Previously, it has been shown that vitamin D status affects chick kidney PKI activity: a 5- to 10-fold increase in PKI activity was observed in kidneys of chronically vitamin D-deficient chicks and treatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3) in cultured kidney cells resulted in a 95% decrease in PKI activity. The authors have recently cloned the cDNA for chick kidney PKI and have used the coding sequence to study the regulation of PKI mRNA. Northern analysis showed the expression of two PKI messages, which are 2.7 and 3.3 kb in size. These mRNAs are expressed in brain, muscle, testis, and kidney, but not in pancreas, liver, or intestine. PKI mRNA steady-state levels are downregulated by 47% in kidneys from vitamin D-replete chicks as compared to vitamin D-deficient chicks. PKI mRNA levels in brain, muscle, and testis are not affected by vitamin D status. Treatment of primary chick kidney cultures treated with 10(-7) M 1,25(OH)2D3 for 24h resulted in a 20-30% decrease in PKI mRNA. 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment does not affect the stability of PKI mRNA as determined by treatment of cell cultures with actinomycin D. This study shows that 1,25(OH)2D3 directly and tissue-specifically downregulates PKI mRNA in the chick kidney.

  8. Green-tissue-specific, C(4)-PEPC-promoter-driven expression of Cry1Ab makes transgenic potato plants resistant to tuber moth (Phthorimaea operculella, Zeller).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasimi Hagh, Ziba; Rahnama, Hassan; Panahandeh, Jaber; Baghban Kohneh Rouz, Bahram; Arab Jafari, Khoda Morad; Mahna, Nasser; Mahna, Naser

    2009-12-01

    An important strategy for obtaining a safer transgenic plant may be the use of a spatial- or tissue-specific promoter, instead of a constitutive one. In this study, we have used a light-inducible maize PEPC promoter to regulate the cry1Ab gene, aiming to produce transgenic potatoes that are resistant to potato tuber moth (PTM) (Phthorimaea operculella, Zeller). Out of 60 regenerated lines having normal phenotypes, 55 lines were PCR-positive for both the cry1Ab and nptII genes. Southern analysis on three selected putative transgenic lines revealed that they have only a single intact copy of the cry1Ab gene. An investigation of the Cry1Ab protein in the leaves and light-exposed (LE) tubers of the transgenic lines demonstrated the presence of the protein in the foliage and green tubers but not in the light-not exposed (LNE) tubers. A bioassay analysis of excised leaves of nine randomly selected lines showed that eight lines had 100% PTM larval mortality. Confirming results were obtained in six selected lines using the whole plant bioassay in the greenhouse. LE transgenic tubers also exhibited 100% larval mortality; however, the levels of damage to the LNE transgenic tubers were high and statistically the same as those incurred by the non-transgenic ones. Based on the results, we believe that this spatial expression of Cry1Ab using the light-inducible PEPC promoter can control PTM infestation in the field and significantly reduce pollution transmission to storage potatoes.

  9. Splicing reporter mice revealed the evolutionally conserved switching mechanism of tissue-specific alternative exon selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihide Takeuchi

    Full Text Available Since alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is essential for generating tissue-specific diversity in proteome, elucidating its regulatory mechanism is indispensable to understand developmental process or tissue-specific functions. We have been focusing on tissue-specific regulation of mutually exclusive selection of alternative exons because this implies the typical molecular mechanism of alternative splicing regulation and also can be good examples to elicit general rule of "splice code". So far, mutually exclusive splicing regulation has been explained by the outcome from the balance of multiple regulators that enhance or repress either of alternative exons discretely. However, this "balance" model is open to questions of how to ensure the selection of only one appropriate exon out of several candidates and how to switch them. To answer these questions, we generated an original bichromatic fluorescent splicing reporter system for mammals using fibroblast growth factor-receptor 2 (FGFR2 gene as model. By using this splicing reporter, we demonstrated that FGFR2 gene is regulated by the "switch-like" mechanism, in which key regulators modify the ordered splice-site recognition of two mutually exclusive exons, eventually ensure single exon selection and their distinct switching. Also this finding elucidated the evolutionally conserved "splice code," in which combination of tissue-specific and broadly expressed RNA binding proteins regulate alternative splicing of specific gene in a tissue-specific manner. These findings provide the significant cue to understand how a number of spliced genes are regulated in various tissue-specific manners by a limited number of regulators, eventually to understand developmental process or tissue-specific functions.

  10. The differential pattern of tissue-specific expression of ruminant pancreatic type ribonucleases may help to understand the evolutionary history of their genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, M P; Lombardi, M; Confalone, E; Carsana, A; Palmieri, M; Furia, A

    1999-02-18

    Molecular evolutionary analyses of mammalian ribonucleases have shown that gene duplication events giving three paralogous genes occurred in ruminant ancestors. The enzymes of the bovine species encoded by these genes, isolated from pancreas, brain and seminal vesicles, present similar enzymological properties but distinct structural features. In other ruminant species, genomic sequences orthologous to the bovine genes of pancreas and brain ribonucleases encode active enzymes. In mammalian species other than ruminant artiodactyls, only one gene encoding ribonuclease of the pancreatic type is generally present. In this work, we describe a differential pattern of transcriptional expression of the pancreas and brain ribonuclease genes in the ox species and report transcription of the human ribonuclease gene in brain as well as in pancreas and in mammary gland. We also report the molecular cloning of the gene encoding the bovine seminal ribonuclease in which the structural organization already described for the two paralogous genes is conserved. The seminal RNAase is exclusively expressed in seminal vesicles of Bos taurus, whereas in other ruminant species, the orthologous sequence is a pseudogene. Previous studies from a number of research groups demonstrated that, unlike other mammalian ribonucleases, the seminal enzyme is a covalent dimer, and its unique quaternary structure correlates with special biological activities. The major determinant of dimer formation, i.e. the presence of two adjacent cysteine residues, is absent in the pseudogenes. We advance the hypothesis that the differentiation of distinct expression patterns could represent an important evolutionary determinant for the genes encoding pancreas and brain ribonucleases in ruminants, whereas the differentiation of a quaternary structure endowed with new biological functions could be the main determinant for the evolutionary success of the seminal gene in the bovine species.

  11. Genome-wide analysis, molecular cloning and expression profiling reveal tissue-specifically expressed, feedback-regulated, stress-responsive and alternatively spliced novel genes involved in gibberellin metabolism in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qing; Li, Caili; Li, Dongqiao; Lu, Shanfa

    2015-12-21

    Gibberellin (GA), a classical phytohormone, plays significant roles in plant growth and development. It shares the important intermediate diphosphate precursor, GGPP, with the main lipophilic bioactive components, diterpenoid tanshinones in Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, one of the most important Traditional Chinese Medicine materials and an emerging model medicinal plant. Analysis of GA metabolism and regulation may help to demonstrate the biological functions of GAs and the crosstalk between GA metabolism and tanshinone biosynthesis in S. miltiorrhiza. However, genes involved in the conversion of ent-kaurene to GAs have not been systematically studied. Through genome-wide prediction and molecular cloning, twenty two candidate gibberellin metabolism pathway genes were systematically identified for the first time. It includes a SmKO, two SmKAOs, six SmGA20oxs, two SmGA3oxs and eleven SmGA2oxs, of which twenty genes are novel. The deduced proteins showed sequence conservation and divergence. Gibberellin metabolism pathway genes exhibited tissue-specific expression patterns and responded differentially to exogenous GA3 treatment, indicating differential regulation of gibberellin metabolism in different tissue types in S. miltiorrhiza. SmKAO1, SmKAO2, SmGA2ox2, and SmGA2ox4-SmGA2ox7 were significantly up-regulated; SmGA20ox2, SmGA3ox1, SmGA2ox1, SmGA2ox8, SmGA2ox10 and SmGA2ox11 were significantly down-regulated; while the responses of many other genes varied among different tissue-types and time-points of GA3 treatment, suggesting the complexity of feedback regulation. Tanshinone biosynthesis-related genes, such as SmCPS1 and SmKSL1, were up-regulated in response to GA3 treatment. Among the 22 identified genes, nine responded to yeast extract and Ag(+)-treatment in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots. Moreover, tissue-specifically expressed splice variants were identified for SmKO, SmGA20ox3, SmGA2ox3 and SmGA2ox11, of which SmKOv1, SmGA20ox3v and SmGA2ox11v1 were GA3-responsive

  12. The sweet potato RbcS gene (IbRbcS1) promoter confers high-level and green tissue-specific expression of the GUS reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Noriaki; Tamoi, Masahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-08-10

    Sweet potato is an important crop because of its high yield and biomass production. We herein investigated the potential of the promoter activity of a small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RbcS) from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) in order to develop the high expression system of exogenous DNA in Arabidopsis. We isolated two different cDNAs (IbRbcS1 and IbRbcS2) encoding RbcS from sweet potato. Their predicted amino acid sequences were well conserved with the mature RbcS protein of other plants. The tissue-specific expression patterns of these two genes revealed that expression of IbRbcS1 was specific to green tissue, whereas that of IbRbcS2 was non-photosynthetic tissues such as roots and tubers. These results suggested that IbRbcS1 was predominantly expressed in the green tissue-specific of sweet potato over IbRbcS2. Therefore, the IbRbcS1 promoter was transformed into Arabidopsis along with β-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter gene. GUS staining and semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that the IbRbcS1 promoter conferred the expression of the GUS reporter gene in green tissue-specific and light-inducible manners. Furthermore, qPCR showed that the expression levels of GUS reporter gene in IbRbcS1 pro:GUS were same as those in CaMV 35S pro:GUS plants. These results suggest that the IbRbcS1 promoter is a potentially strong foreign gene expression system for genetic transformation in plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeted Expression of Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Gland Provides Evidence for a Role of Proteinases in Branching Morphogenesis and the Requirement for an Intact Basement Membrane for Tissue-specific Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Talhouk, Rabih S; Alexander, Caroline M; Chin, Jennie R; Cliff, Shirley M; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1994-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important regulator of the differentiated phenotype of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Despite the fact that ECM-degrading enzymes have been implicated in morphogenesis and tissue remodeling, there is little evidence for a direct role for such regulation in vivo. We generated transgenic mice that express autoactivated isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, under the control of the whey acidic protein gene promoter, to examine the effect of inappropriate expression of this enzyme. Stromelysin-1 is implicated as the primary player in the loss of basement membrane and loss of function in the mammary gland during involution. The transgene was expressed at low levels in mammary glands of virgin female mice, leading to an unexpected phenotype: The primary ducts had supernumerary branches and showed precocious development of alveoli that expressed beta-casein at levels similar to that of an early- to mid-pregnant gland. Lactating glands showed high levels of transgene expression, with accumulation at the basement membrane, and a decrease in laminin and collagen IV, resulting in a loss of basement membrane integrity; this was accompanied by a dramatic alteration of alveolar morphology, with decreased size and shrunken lumina containing little beta-casein. During pregnancy, expression of endogenous whey acidic protein and beta-casein was reduced in transgenic glands, confirming the observed dependence of milk protein transcription of ECM in mammary epithelial cells in culture. These data provide direct evidence that stromelysin-1 activity can be morphogenic for mammary epithelial cells, inducing hyperproliferation and differentiation in virgin animals, and that its lytic activity can, indeed, disrupt membrane integrity and reduce mammary-specific function. We conclude that the balance of ECM-degrading enzymes with their inhibitors, and the associated regulation of ECM structure, is crucial for tissue-specific gene

  14. Positive- and negative-acting regulatory elements contribute to the tissue-specific expression of INNER NO OUTER, a YABBY-type transcription factor gene in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Marissa K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The INNER NO OUTER (INO gene, which encodes a YABBY-type transcription factor, specifies and promotes the growth of the outer integument of the ovule in Arabidopsis. INO expression is limited to the abaxial cell layer of the developing outer integument of the ovule and is regulated by multiple regions of the INO promoter, including POS9, a positive element that when present in quadruplicate can produce low-level expression in the normal INO pattern. Results Significant redundancy in activity between different regions of the INO promoter is demonstrated. For specific regulatory elements, multimerization or the addition of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S general enhancer was able to activate expression of reporter gene constructs that were otherwise incapable of expression on their own. A new promoter element, POS6, is defined and is shown to include sufficient positive regulatory information to reproduce the endogenous pattern of expression in ovules, but other promoter regions are necessary to fully suppress expression outside of ovules. The full-length INO promoter, but not any of the INO promoter deletions tested, is able to act as an enhancer-blocking insulator to prevent the ectopic activation of expression by the 35S enhancer. Sequence conservation between the promoter regions of Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa aligns closely with the functional definition of the POS6 and POS9 regions, and with a defined INO minimal promoter. The B. oleracea INO promoter is sufficient to promote a similar pattern and level of reporter gene expression in Arabidopsis to that observed for the Arabidopsis promoter. Conclusions At least two independent regions of the INO promoter contain sufficient regulatory information to direct the specific pattern but not the level of INO gene expression. These regulatory regions act in a partially redundant manner to promote the expression in a specific pattern in the ovule and

  15. Too much data, but little inter-changeability: a lesson learned from mining public data on tissue specificity of gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffin Kevin

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue expression pattern of a gene often provides an important clue to its potential role in a biological process. A vast amount of gene expression data have been and are being accumulated in public repository through different technology platforms. However, exploitations of these rich data sources remain limited in part due to issues of technology standardization. Our objective is to test the data comparability between SAGE and microarray technologies, through examining the expression pattern of genes under normal physiological states across variety of tissues. Results There are 42–54% of genes showing significant correlations in tissue expression patterns between SAGE and GeneChip, with 30–40% of genes whose expression patterns are positively correlated and 10–15% of genes whose expression patterns are negatively correlated at a statistically significant level (p = 0.05. Our analysis suggests that the discrepancy on the expression patterns derived from technology platforms is not likely from the heterogeneity of tissues used in these technologies, or other spurious correlations resulting from microarray probe design, abundance of genes, or gene function. The discrepancy can be partially explained by errors in the original assignment of SAGE tags to genes due to the evolution of sequence databases. In addition, sequence analysis has indicated that many SAGE tags and Affymetrix array probe sets are mapped to different splice variants or different sequence regions although they represent the same gene, which also contributes to the observed discrepancies between SAGE and array expression data. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report attempting to mine gene expression patterns across tissues using public data from different technology platforms. Unlike previous similar studies that only demonstrated the discrepancies between the two gene expression platforms, we carried out in-depth analysis to further

  16. Targeted gene expression without a tissue-specific promoter: creating mosaic embryos using laser-induced single-cell heat shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, M. S.; Kose, H.; Chiba, A.; Keshishian, H.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a method to target gene expression in the Drosophila embryo to a specific cell without having a promoter that directs expression in that particular cell. Using a digitally enhanced imaging system to identify single cells within the living embryo, we apply a heat shock to each cell individually by using a laser microbeam. A 1- to 2-min laser treatment is sufficient to induce a heat-shock response but is not lethal to the heat-shocked cells. Induction of heat shock was measured in a variety of cell types, including neurons and somatic muscles, by the expression of beta-galactosidase from an hsp26-lacZ reporter construct or by expression of a UAS target gene after induction of hsGAL4. We discuss the applicability of this technique to ectopic gene expression studies, lineage tracing, gene inactivation studies, and studies of cells in vitro. Laser heat shock is a versatile technique that can be adapted for use in a variety of research organisms and is useful for any studies in which it is desirable to express a given gene in only a distinct cell or clone of cells, either transiently or constitutively, at a time point of choice.

  17. Tissue-specific expression of ghrelinergic and NUCB2/nesfatin-1 systems in goldfish (Carassius auratus) is modulated by macronutrient composition of diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Ayelén M; Bertucci, Juan I; Delgado, María J; Valenciano, Ana I; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-05-01

    The macronutrient composition of diets is a very important factor in the regulation of body weight and metabolism. Several lines of research in mammals have shown that macronutrients differentially regulate metabolic hormones, including ghrelin and nesfatin-1 that have opposing effects on energy balance. This study aimed to determine whether macronutrients modulate the expression of ghrelin and the nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2) encoded nesfatin-1 in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Fish were fed once daily on control, high-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fat and very high-fat diets for 7 (short-term) or 28 (long-term) days. The expression of preproghrelin, ghrelin O-acyl transferase (goat), growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1 (ghs-r1) and nucb2/nesfatin-1 mRNAs was quantified in the hypothalamus, pituitary, gut and liver. Short-term feeding with fat-enriched diets significantly increased nucb2 mRNA levels in hypothalamus and liver, preproghrelin, goat and ghs-r1 expression in pituitary, and ghs-r1 expression in gut. Fish fed on a high-protein diet exhibited a significant reduction in preproghrelin and ghs-r1 mRNAs in the liver. After long-term feeding, fish fed on high-carbohydrate and very high-fat diets had significantly increased preproghrelin, goat and ghs-r1 expression in pituitary. Feeding on a high-carbohydrate diet also upregulated goat and ghs-r1 transcripts in gut, while feeding on a high-fat diet elicited the same effect only for ghs-r1 in liver. Nucb2 expression increased in pituitary, while it decreased in gut after long-term feeding of a high-protein diet. Collectively, these results show for the first time in fish that macronutrients differentially regulate the expression of ghrelinergic and NUCB2/nesfatin-1 systems in central and peripheral tissues of goldfish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cinnamon intake reduces serum T3 level and modulates tissue-specific expression of thyroid hormone receptor and target genes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaique, Thaiane G; Lopes, Bruna P; Souza, Luana L; Paula, Gabriela S M; Pazos-Moura, Carmen C; Oliveira, Karen J

    2016-06-01

    Cinnamon has several effects on energy metabolism. However, no data exist on the impact of cinnamon intake on thyroid hormone serum concentrations and action, since thyroid hormones (THs) play a major role in metabolism. Male rats were treated with cinnamon water extract (400 mg kg(-1) body weight, 25 days). Cinnamon supplementation resulted in a lower serum total T3 level accompanied by normal serum T4 and TSH levels. The cinnamon-treated rats did not exhibit significant differences in TSHβ subunit, TRβ or deiodinase type 2 mRNA expression in the pituitary. In the liver, cinnamon did not change the TRβ protein expression or the deiodinase type 1 mRNA expression, suggesting that there were no changes in T3 signaling or metabolism in this organ. However, mitochondrial GPDH, a target gene for T3 in the liver, exhibited no changes in mRNA expression, although its activity level was reduced by cinnamon. In the cardiac ventricle, T3 action was markedly reduced by cinnamon, as demonstrated by the lower TRα mRNA and protein levels, reduced SERCA2a and RyR2 and increased phospholamban mRNA expression. This study has revealed that TH action is a novel target of cinnamon, demonstrating impairment of T3 signaling in the cardiac ventricles. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. A novel pleckstrin homology-related gene family defined by Ipl/Tssc3, TDAG51, and Tih1: tissue-specific expression, chromosomal location, and parental imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, D; Mendelsohn, C L; Ciccone, E; Svensson, K; Ohlsson, R; Tycko, B

    1999-12-01

    We previously described a gene, Ipl (Tssc3), that is expressed selectively from the maternal allele in placenta, yolk sac, and fetal liver and that maps within the imprinted domain of mouse distal Chromosome (Chr) 7/human Chr 11p15.5 (Hum Mol Genet 6, 2021, 1997). Ipl is similar to TDAG51, a gene that is involved in FAS/CD95 expression. Here we describe another gene, Tih1 (TDAG/Ipl homologue 1), with equivalent sequence similarity to Ipl. Structural prediction indicates that the products of these three genes share a central motif resembling a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, and TIH1 protein has weak sequence similarity to the PH-domain protein SEC7/CYTOHESIN. Like Ipl, Tih1 is a small gene with a single small intron. Tih1 maps to distal mouse Chr 1 and human Chr 1q31, chromosomal regions that have not shown evidence for imprinting and, in contrast to Ipl, Tih1 is expressed equally from both parental alleles. Ipl, Tih1, and TDAG51 have overlapping but distinct patterns of expression. Tih1 and TDAG51 are expressed in multiple fetal and adult tissues. In contrast, during early mouse development Ipl mRNA and protein are highly specific for two tissues involved in maternal/fetal exchange: visceral endoderm of the yolk sac and labyrinthine trophoblast of the placenta. These findings highlight the dominance of chromosomal context over gene structure in some examples of parental imprinting and extend previous evidence for placenta-specific expression of imprinted genes. The data also define a new subfamily of PH domain genes.

  20. Species-specific differences in tissue-specific expression of alcohol dehydrogenase are under the control of complex cis-acting loci: Evidence from Drosophila hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganayakulu, G.; Reddy, A.R. (University of Hyderbad (India)); Kirkpatrick, R.B.; Martin, P.F. (Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1991-12-01

    Differences in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase in the hindgut and testis of adult Drosophila virilis, D. texana, D. novamexicana and D. borealis flies were observed. These heritable differences do not arise due to chromosomal rearrangements, since the polytene chromosome banding patterns did not reveal any such gross chromosomal rearrangements near the Adh locus in any of the tested species. Analysis of the interspecific hybrids revealed that these differences are controlled by complex cis-acting genetic loci. Further, the cis-acting locus controlling the expression of ADH in testis was found to be separable by crossing-over.

  1. A novel method for the determination of basal gene expression of tissue-specific promoters: an analysis of prostate-specific promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Poel, H G; McCadden, J; Verhaegh, G W; Kruszewski, M; Ferrer, F; Schalken, J A; Carducci, M; Rodriguez, R

    2001-12-01

    Because the toxicity of suicide gene therapeutics is directly related to basal promoter activity, we developed an assay to test for promoter "leakiness" using a diphtheria toxin mutant. Sequences of 15 prostate-specific gene promoter constructs were cloned in an expression plasmid (pBK; Stratagene, La Jolla, CA) backbone driving expression of an attenuated mutant of diphtheria toxin A (tox176). Low expression levels of the DT-tox176 result in significant protein synthesis inhibition reflected by a decreased expression of the luciferase activity of a simultaneously transfected CMV luciferase construct. ID50 (dose of plasmid with 50% luciferase inhibition) was calculated for each promoter construct in different cell lines. Highest transactivational activity (ID50 CN65 (PSA promoter/enhancer) and PSE-hK2 (PSA enhancer and basal human kallikrein 2 promoter) in HEK293 and DLD cells indicating "leakiness" of these promoter constructs. Low basal promoter activity in nonprostate cell lines was found for the minimal PSA promoter, hK2, DD3, and OC promoters. The DT-tox176 assay can better predict basal promoter activity compared to less sensitive dual luciferase assay.

  2. A novel method for the determination of basal gene expression of tissue-specific promoters: an analysis of prostate-specific promoters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, H.G. van der; McCadden, J.; Verhaegh, G.W.C.T.; Kruszewski, M.; Ferrer, F.; Schalken, J.A.; Carducci, M.; Rodriguez, R.

    2001-01-01

    Because the toxicity of suicide gene therapeutics is directly related to basal promoter activity, we developed an assay to test for promoter "leakiness" using a diphtheria toxin mutant. Sequences of 15 prostate-specific gene promoter constructs were cloned in an expression plasmid (pBK; Stratagene,

  3. Hypercholesterolemia and tissue-specific differential mRNA expression of type-1 5'-iodothyronine deiodinase under different selenium status in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANJIV DHINGRA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 5'-iodothyronine deiodinase (5'-DI is responsible for conversion of T4 to T3. Selenium (Se is an integral part of this enzyme. Keeping in view the strong association between atherosclerosis and hypothyroidism, the present study examined the behavior of 5'-DI in liver, aorta and thyroid during hypercholesterolemia following different Se status, i.e., Se deficiency (0.02ppm, adequate (0.2ppm and excess dose (1ppm in SD male rats. Animals were fed a control or high-cholesterol diet (2% for 1 and 2 months. 5'-DI activity and mRNA expression was measured by RIA and RT-PCR respectively. In liver and aorta, 5'-DI expression significantly decreased with the Se-deficient and the high-cholesterol diet. The trend was opposite in thyroid, i.e., mRNA expression increased significantly during selenium deficiency and with a high-cholesterol feeding. But with 1ppm Se supplementation, the 5'-DI expression increased in all the three tissues. The present study indicates that hypercholesterolemia along with selenium deficiency is co-responsible for differential regulation of 5'-DI enzyme in thyroidal vs. extrathyroidal tissues. Distinct regulation of 5'-DI in the thyroid reflects the clinical importance of this selenoprotein during hypercholesterolemia as this enzyme is essential for T3 production, which further has a vital role in the maintenance of lipid metabolism

  4. Tissue-specific expression of transgenic secreted ACE in vasculature can restore normal kidney functions, but not blood pressure, of Ace-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Chattopadhyay

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE regulates normal blood pressure and fluid homeostasis through its action in the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS. Ace-/- mice are smaller in size, have low blood pressure and defective kidney structure and functions. All of these defects are cured by transgenic expression of somatic ACE (sACE in vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice. sACE is expressed on the surface of vascular endothelial cells and undergoes a natural cleavage secretion process to generate a soluble form in the body fluids. Both the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE are enzymatically active, and generate the vasoactive octapeptide Angiotensin II (Ang II with equal efficiency. To assess the relative physiological roles of the secreted and the cell-bound forms of ACE, we expressed, in the vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice, the ectodomain of sACE, which corresponded to only the secreted form of ACE. Our results demonstrated that the secreted form of ACE could normalize kidney functions and RAS integrity, growth and development of Ace-/- mice, but not their blood pressure. This study clearly demonstrates that the secreted form of ACE cannot replace the tissue-bound ACE for maintaining normal blood pressure; a suitable balance between the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE is essential for maintaining all physiological functions of ACE.

  5. Tissue-Specific Expression of Transgenic Secreted ACE in Vasculature Can Restore Normal Kidney Functions, but Not Blood Pressure, of Ace-/- Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Kessler, Sean P.; Colucci, Juliana Almada; Yamashita, Michifumi; Senanayake, Preenie deS; Sen, Ganes C.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) regulates normal blood pressure and fluid homeostasis through its action in the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS). Ace-/- mice are smaller in size, have low blood pressure and defective kidney structure and functions. All of these defects are cured by transgenic expression of somatic ACE (sACE) in vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice. sACE is expressed on the surface of vascular endothelial cells and undergoes a natural cleavage secretion process to generate a soluble form in the body fluids. Both the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE are enzymatically active, and generate the vasoactive octapeptide Angiotensin II (Ang II) with equal efficiency. To assess the relative physiological roles of the secreted and the cell-bound forms of ACE, we expressed, in the vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice, the ectodomain of sACE, which corresponded to only the secreted form of ACE. Our results demonstrated that the secreted form of ACE could normalize kidney functions and RAS integrity, growth and development of Ace-/- mice, but not their blood pressure. This study clearly demonstrates that the secreted form of ACE cannot replace the tissue-bound ACE for maintaining normal blood pressure; a suitable balance between the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE is essential for maintaining all physiological functions of ACE. PMID:24475296

  6. Marker-free, tissue-specific expression of Cry1Ab as a safe transgenic strategy for insect resistance in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yongbin; Chen, Lei; He, Xiuling; Jin, Qingsheng; Zhang, Xiaoming; He, Zuhua

    2013-01-01

    Rice is the major food resource for nearly half of the global population; however, insect infestation could severely affect the production of this staple food. To improve rice insect resistance and reduce the levels of Bt toxin released into the environment, the Cry1Ab gene was conjugated to the rice rbcS promoter to express Bt toxin in specific tissues of transgenic plants. Eight marker-free, T(2) lines were separated from the T(0) cotransformants. Using RT-PCR, high levels of Cry1Ab expression were detected in the leaf but not in the seed. The Cry1Ab protein level ranged from 1.66 to 3.31 µg g(-1) in the leaves of four transgenic lines, but was barely detectable in their seeds by ELISA. Bioassays showed that the mortality rate of silkworm larvae feeding on mulberry leaves dipped in transgenic rice flour and pollen was less than that of the positive control (KMD), and that their average weight was higher than that of KMD, suggesting that the Cry1Ab protein was not expressed in the seed and pollen. The transgene conferred a high level of resistance to insects and biosafety to the rice plants, which could be directly used in rice breeding. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. cis-acting DNA elements regulating expression of the liver pyruvate kinase gene in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Evidence for tissue-specific activators and extinguisher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognet, M; Bergot, M O; Kahn, A

    1991-04-25

    To identify the DNA sequences that cis-regulate the expression of the rat liver pyruvate kinase (L-PK) genes, a series of constructs in which the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter genes is driven by various deleted fragments of the 3200 base pairs (bp) upstream of the L-PK gene cap site have been assayed for transient expression after introduction into hepatoma HepG2 cells, rat hepatocytes in primary culture, fibroblast LTK- cells, myogenic C2C12 cells, and CHO cells. Four distinct regulatory domains have been characterized. A proximal promoter region containing a binding site for the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1) which is sufficient to confer liver specificity, even in the presence of a ubiquitous enhancer. A distal promoter region (-96 to -283 bp) containing binding sites for the liver-specific factor A1 (LFA1), the ubiquitous nuclear factor 1 (NF1), the major late transcriptional factor (MLTF), and so far unidentified proteins binding to the L5-PK region which is essential to maximally activate expression of the construct in HepG2 cells. An extinguisher region, located between positions -2082 and -1170 bp, which decreases efficiency of the L-PK promoter in HepG2 cells, but not in hepatocytes in primary culture. Finally, a far upstream region (-2900 to -2500 bp) which seems to correspond to a liver-specific DNase I hypersensitive site and which behaves in HepG2 cells as an activating sequence efficient in the absence of the extinguisher.

  8. Efficient Generation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitors Based on Tissue-Specific Enhanced Green Fluorescence Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebényi, Kornélia; Péntek, Adrienn; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Várady, György; Orbán, Tamás I.; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are committed to the cardiac lineage but retain their proliferative capacity before becoming quiescent mature cardiomyocytes (CMs). In medical therapy and research, the use of human pluripotent stem cell-derived CPCs would have several advantages compared with mature CMs, as the progenitors show better engraftment into existing heart tissues, and provide unique potential for cardiovascular developmental as well as for pharmacological studies. Here, we demonstrate that the CAG promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) reporter system enables the identification and isolation of embryonic stem cell-derived CPCs. Tracing of CPCs during differentiation confirmed up-regulation of surface markers, previously described to identify cardiac precursors and early CMs. Isolated CPCs express cardiac lineage-specific transcripts, still have proliferating capacity, and can be re-aggregated into embryoid body-like structures (CAG-EGFPhigh rEBs). Expression of troponin T and NKX2.5 mRNA is up-regulated in long-term cultured CAG-EGFPhigh rEBs, in which more than 90% of the cells become Troponin I positive mature CMs. Moreover, about one third of the CAG-EGFPhigh rEBs show spontaneous contractions. The method described here provides a powerful tool to generate expandable cultures of pure human CPCs that can be used for exploring early markers of the cardiac lineage, as well as for drug screening or tissue engineering applications. PMID:24734786

  9. A Maize Vacuolar Invertase, IVR2, Is Induced by Water Stress. Organ/Tissue Specificity and Diurnal Modulation of Expression1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Yean; Mahé, Aline; Brangeon, Judy; Prioul, Jean-Louis

    2000-01-01

    The expression of invertases was analyzed in vegetative organs of well-watered and water-stressed maize (Zea mays) plants. Early changes in sucrose metabolism and in acid soluble invertase expression were observed in vegetative sink and source organs under mild water stress. The organ-specific induction of acid invertase activity was correlated with an increase in the Ivr2 gene transcripts and in the vacuolar invertase proteins. In addition diurnal changes in activity and Ivr2 transcripts for vacuolar invertase were noted in shoots. Hexoses (glucose and fructose) accumulated in all organs examined from water-stressed plants. In situ localization studies showed that glucose accumulation, vacuolar invertase activity, invertase protein, and the Ivr2 transcripts colocalized specifically in bundle sheath and vascular tissue cells of mature stressed leaf; in primary roots the stress-induced increase of Ivr2 transcripts was detected only in root tips. Based on these results different regulatory roles are proposed in sink and source organs for the stress induced Ivr2 vacuolar invertase. PMID:10982423

  10. Efficient generation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitors based on tissue-specific enhanced green fluorescence protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebényi, Kornélia; Péntek, Adrienn; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Várady, György; Orbán, Tamás I; Sarkadi, Balázs; Apáti, Ágota

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are committed to the cardiac lineage but retain their proliferative capacity before becoming quiescent mature cardiomyocytes (CMs). In medical therapy and research, the use of human pluripotent stem cell-derived CPCs would have several advantages compared with mature CMs, as the progenitors show better engraftment into existing heart tissues, and provide unique potential for cardiovascular developmental as well as for pharmacological studies. Here, we demonstrate that the CAG promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) reporter system enables the identification and isolation of embryonic stem cell-derived CPCs. Tracing of CPCs during differentiation confirmed up-regulation of surface markers, previously described to identify cardiac precursors and early CMs. Isolated CPCs express cardiac lineage-specific transcripts, still have proliferating capacity, and can be re-aggregated into embryoid body-like structures (CAG-EGFP(high) rEBs). Expression of troponin T and NKX2.5 mRNA is up-regulated in long-term cultured CAG-EGFP(high) rEBs, in which more than 90% of the cells become Troponin I positive mature CMs. Moreover, about one third of the CAG-EGFP(high) rEBs show spontaneous contractions. The method described here provides a powerful tool to generate expandable cultures of pure human CPCs that can be used for exploring early markers of the cardiac lineage, as well as for drug screening or tissue engineering applications.

  11. Longitudinal Profiling of the Tissue-Specific Expression of Genes Related with Insulin Sensitivity in Dairy Cows during Lactation Focusing on Different Fat Depots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, Behnam; Winand, Sarah; Friedrichs, Paula; Kinoshita, Asako; Rehage, Jürgen; Dänicke, Sven; Häussler, Susanne; Breves, Gerhard; Mielenz, Manfred; Sauerwein, Helga

    2014-01-01

    In dairy cows the milk associated energy output in early lactation exceeds the input via voluntary feed intake. To spare glucose for mammary lactose synthesis, peripheral insulin sensitivity (IS) is reduced and fat mobilization is stimulated. For these processes a link between IS and the endocrine functions of adipose tissue (AT) is likely; we thus aimed to characterise the mRNA expression from bovine AT derived proteins and receptors that are related to IS according to the literature in metabolically active tissues plus systemic IS throughout lactation. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) reduce milk fat thus decreasing the milk drain of energy and potentially dampening lipolysis, but may also affect IS. Subcutaneous (s.c.) AT and liver from pluriparous cows receiving either control fat or CLA supplement (100 g/day from 1 to 182 days in milk each) were biopsied covering week −3 to 36 relative to parturition. In an additional trial with primiparous cows treated analogously and slaughtered on days in milk 1, 42 or 105, samples from liver, udder, skeletal muscle and 3 visceral and 3 s.c. AT were obtained and assayed for mRNA abundance of adiponectin, its receptors, leptin, leptin receptor, PPARγ, PPARγ2, IL-6, and TNF-α. In pluriparous animals, the mRNA abundance of most of the target genes decreased after parturition in s.c. AT but increased in liver. In primiparous cows, AT depot specific differences were mostly related to retroperitoneal AT; adiponectin receptor 1 and TNF-α were affected predominantly. CLA effects in primiparous cows were largely limited to decreased PPARγ2 mRNA abundance in udder tissue. In pluriparous cows, insulin secretion was increased by CLA resulting in decreased systemic IS but without consistent changes in tissue target mRNA abundance. The temporal gene expression profiles from the adipokines and related receptors support their coactive function in adapting to the needs of lactation. PMID:24465964

  12. Influence of three lighting regimes during ten weeks growth phase on laying performance, plasma levels- and tissue specific gene expression- of reproductive hormones in Pengxian yellow pullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shunshun; Wang, Yan; Liu, Lingyan; Li, Diyan; Liu, Zihao; Shen, Xiaoxu; Xu, Hengyong; Zhao, Xiaoling; Zhu, Qing; Yin, Huadong

    2017-01-01

    The study was conducted to optimize lighting schedule for pre-pubertal (12 to 22 weeks) Chinese native breed Pengxian yellow pullet. A total of 414 healthy pullets (10 weeks), with similar body weight were randomly distributed into three groups (n = 138) and housed in individual cages for up to 12 weeks of age in light controlled rooms and provided normal lighting schedule (10L:14D). At 12 to 18 weeks of age, pullets were housed in three rooms, having varying lighting schedule viz. G1 (8L: 16D), G2 (10L:14D), or G3 (12L:12D). From 19th week onwards lighting schedule was gradually increased every week in incremental manner till all groups started receiving 16L:8D lighting schedule. The age at first egg, weight of first egg laid, percent peak hen day egg production, concentration of plasma luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormones and expression of genes regulating synthesis or/and secretion of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I), and pituitary LH-β and FSH-β were studied during experimental period (12 to 43 weeks of age) of this study. The result indicated that pullets of long day length (G3) group had higher plasma levels of FSH and LH and also better mRNA expression that regulates synthesis or/and secretion of GnRH-I, FSH-β, and LH-β before egg laying. The age at first egg (151.3 days) in pullets of G3 group receiving longer lighting hours (12L:12D) was 8.8 days less (P0.05) compared to G2. However, significantly higher (Plighting schedule on body weight of pullets, recorded during experimental period, at all occasions; belonging to three groups (G1,G2 and G3) and receiving varying hours of photo-stimulation (P>0.05). It was inferred that the optimum lighting schedule for Chinese native breed Pengxian yellow pullets during 10 weeks of pre-pubertal growth period is short hours of photo-stimulation (i.e 8L:16D).

  13. Transcriptome of the Deep-Sea Black Scabbardfish, Aphanopus carbo (Perciformes: Trichiuridae: Tissue-Specific Expression Patterns and Candidate Genes Associated to Depth Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Stefanni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea fishes provide a unique opportunity to study the physiology and evolutionary adaptation to extreme environments. We carried out a high throughput sequencing analysis on a 454 GS-FLX titanium plate using unnormalized cDNA libraries from six tissues of A. carbo. Assemblage and annotations were performed by Newbler and InterPro/Pfam analyses, respectively. The assembly of 544,491 high quality reads provided 8,319 contigs, 55.6% of which retrieved blast hits against the NCBI nonredundant database or were annotated with ESTscan. Comparison of functional genes at both the protein sequences and protein stability levels, associated with adaptations to depth, revealed similarities between A. carbo and other bathypelagic fishes. A selection of putative genes was standardized to evaluate the correlation between number of contigs and their normalized expression, as determined by qPCR amplification. The screening of the libraries contributed to the identification of new EST simple-sequence repeats (SSRs and to the design of primer pairs suitable for population genetic studies as well as for tagging and mapping of genes. The characterization of the deep-sea fish A. carbo first transcriptome is expected to provide abundant resources for genetic, evolutionary, and ecological studies of this species and the basis for further investigation of depth-related adaptation processes in fishes.

  14. Transcriptome of the Deep-Sea Black Scabbardfish, Aphanopus carbo (Perciformes: Trichiuridae): Tissue-Specific Expression Patterns and Candidate Genes Associated to Depth Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanni, Sergio; Bettencourt, Raul; Pinheiro, Miguel; Moro, Gianluca De; Bongiorni, Lucia; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea fishes provide a unique opportunity to study the physiology and evolutionary adaptation to extreme environments. We carried out a high throughput sequencing analysis on a 454 GS-FLX titanium plate using unnormalized cDNA libraries from six tissues of A. carbo. Assemblage and annotations were performed by Newbler and InterPro/Pfam analyses, respectively. The assembly of 544,491 high quality reads provided 8,319 contigs, 55.6% of which retrieved blast hits against the NCBI nonredundant database or were annotated with ESTscan. Comparison of functional genes at both the protein sequences and protein stability levels, associated with adaptations to depth, revealed similarities between A. carbo and other bathypelagic fishes. A selection of putative genes was standardized to evaluate the correlation between number of contigs and their normalized expression, as determined by qPCR amplification. The screening of the libraries contributed to the identification of new EST simple-sequence repeats (SSRs) and to the design of primer pairs suitable for population genetic studies as well as for tagging and mapping of genes. The characterization of the deep-sea fish A. carbo first transcriptome is expected to provide abundant resources for genetic, evolutionary, and ecological studies of this species and the basis for further investigation of depth-related adaptation processes in fishes. PMID:25309900

  15. Identification of tissue-specific, abiotic stress-responsive gene expression patterns in wine grape (Vitis vinifera L. based on curation and mining of large-scale EST data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cramer Grant R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abiotic stresses, such as water deficit and soil salinity, result in changes in physiology, nutrient use, and vegetative growth in vines, and ultimately, yield and flavor in berries of wine grape, Vitis vinifera L. Large-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs were generated, curated, and analyzed to identify major genetic determinants responsible for stress-adaptive responses. Although roots serve as the first site of perception and/or injury for many types of abiotic stress, EST sequencing in root tissues of wine grape exposed to abiotic stresses has been extremely limited to date. To overcome this limitation, large-scale EST sequencing was conducted from root tissues exposed to multiple abiotic stresses. Results A total of 62,236 expressed sequence tags (ESTs were generated from leaf, berry, and root tissues from vines subjected to abiotic stresses and compared with 32,286 ESTs sequenced from 20 public cDNA libraries. Curation to correct annotation errors, clustering and assembly of the berry and leaf ESTs with currently available V. vinifera full-length transcripts and ESTs yielded a total of 13,278 unique sequences, with 2302 singletons and 10,976 mapped to V. vinifera gene models. Of these, 739 transcripts were found to have significant differential expression in stressed leaves and berries including 250 genes not described previously as being abiotic stress responsive. In a second analysis of 16,452 ESTs from a normalized root cDNA library derived from roots exposed to multiple, short-term, abiotic stresses, 135 genes with root-enriched expression patterns were identified on the basis of their relative EST abundance in roots relative to other tissues. Conclusions The large-scale analysis of relative EST frequency counts among a diverse collection of 23 different cDNA libraries from leaf, berry, and root tissues of wine grape exposed to a variety of abiotic stress conditions revealed distinct, tissue-specific expression

  16. Identification of tissue-specific, abiotic stress-responsive gene expression patterns in wine grape (Vitis vinifera L.) based on curation and mining of large-scale EST data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Abiotic stresses, such as water deficit and soil salinity, result in changes in physiology, nutrient use, and vegetative growth in vines, and ultimately, yield and flavor in berries of wine grape, Vitis vinifera L. Large-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated, curated, and analyzed to identify major genetic determinants responsible for stress-adaptive responses. Although roots serve as the first site of perception and/or injury for many types of abiotic stress, EST sequencing in root tissues of wine grape exposed to abiotic stresses has been extremely limited to date. To overcome this limitation, large-scale EST sequencing was conducted from root tissues exposed to multiple abiotic stresses. Results A total of 62,236 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from leaf, berry, and root tissues from vines subjected to abiotic stresses and compared with 32,286 ESTs sequenced from 20 public cDNA libraries. Curation to correct annotation errors, clustering and assembly of the berry and leaf ESTs with currently available V. vinifera full-length transcripts and ESTs yielded a total of 13,278 unique sequences, with 2302 singletons and 10,976 mapped to V. vinifera gene models. Of these, 739 transcripts were found to have significant differential expression in stressed leaves and berries including 250 genes not described previously as being abiotic stress responsive. In a second analysis of 16,452 ESTs from a normalized root cDNA library derived from roots exposed to multiple, short-term, abiotic stresses, 135 genes with root-enriched expression patterns were identified on the basis of their relative EST abundance in roots relative to other tissues. Conclusions The large-scale analysis of relative EST frequency counts among a diverse collection of 23 different cDNA libraries from leaf, berry, and root tissues of wine grape exposed to a variety of abiotic stress conditions revealed distinct, tissue-specific expression patterns, previously

  17. Tissue-specific alternative splicing of Tak1 is conserved in deuterostomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venables, Julian P; Vignal, Emmanuel; Baghdiguian, Stephen; Fort, Philippe; Tazi, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing allows organisms to rapidly modulate protein functions to physiological changes and therefore represents a highly versatile adaptive process. We investigated the conservation of the evolutionary history of the "Fox" family of RNA-binding splicing factors (RBFOX) as well as the conservation of regulated alternative splicing of the genes they control. We found that the RBFOX proteins are conserved in all metazoans examined. In humans, Fox proteins control muscle-specific alternative splicing of many genes but despite the conservation of splicing factors, conservation of regulation of alternative splicing has never been demonstrated between man and nonvertebrate species. Therefore, we studied 40 known Fox-regulated human exons and found that 22 had a tissue-specific splicing pattern in muscle and heart. Of these, 11 were spliced in the same tissue-specific manner in mouse tissues and 4 were tissue-specifically spliced in muscle and heart of the frog Xenopus laevis. The inclusion of two of these alternative exons was also downregulated during tadpole development. Of the 40 in the starting set, the most conserved alternative splicing event was in the transforming growth factor (TGF) beta-activated kinase Tak1 (MAP3K7) as this was also muscle specific in urochordates and in Ambulacraria, the most ancient deuterostome clade. We found exclusion of the muscle-specific exon of Tak1 was itself under control of TGF beta in cell culture and consistently that TGF beta caused an upregulation of Fox2 (RBFOX2) expression. The alternative exon, which codes for an in-frame 27 amino acids between the kinase and known regulatory domain of TAK1, contains conserved features in all organisms including potential phosphorylation sites and likely has an important conserved function in TGF beta signaling and development. This study establishes that deuterostomes share a remarkable conserved physiological process that involves a splicing factor and expression of tissue-specific

  18. Tissue-specific tagging of endogenous loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Koles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein tags have revolutionized cell and developmental biology, and in combination with binary expression systems they enable diverse tissue-specific studies of protein function. However these binary expression systems often do not recapitulate endogenous protein expression levels, localization, binding partners and/or developmental windows of gene expression. To address these limitations, we have developed a method called T-STEP (tissue-specific tagging of endogenous proteins that allows endogenous loci to be tagged in a tissue specific manner. T-STEP uses a combination of efficient CRISPR/Cas9-enhanced gene targeting and tissue-specific recombinase-mediated tag swapping to temporally and spatially label endogenous proteins. We have employed this method to GFP tag OCRL (a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase in the endocytic pathway and Vps35 (a Parkinson's disease-implicated component of the endosomal retromer complex in diverse Drosophila tissues including neurons, glia, muscles and hemocytes. Selective tagging of endogenous proteins allows, for the first time, cell type-specific live imaging and proteomics in complex tissues.

  19. Tissue-specific control elements of the Thy-1 gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Vidal; E. Spanopoulou; R. Morris (Roger); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractWe have exploited the structural homology, but different patterns of expression of the murine and human Thy-1 genes to map a number of tissue-specific enhancer elements in the genes. All of these are located downstream from the site of transcriptional initiation. The human gene contains

  20. Computational Identification of Tissue-Specific Splicing Regulatory Elements in Human Genes from RNA-Seq Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Eman; ElHefnawi, Mahmoud; Heath, Lenwood S.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a vital process for regulating gene expression and promoting proteomic diversity. It plays a key role in tissue-specific expressed genes. This specificity is mainly regulated by splicing factors that bind to specific sequences called splicing regulatory elements (SREs). Here, we report a genome-wide analysis to study alternative splicing on multiple tissues, including brain, heart, liver, and muscle. We propose a pipeline to identify differential exons across tissues and hence tissue-specific SREs. In our pipeline, we utilize the DEXSeq package along with our previously reported algorithms. Utilizing the publicly available RNA-Seq data set from the Human BodyMap project, we identified 28,100 differentially used exons across the four tissues. We identified tissue-specific exonic splicing enhancers that overlap with various previously published experimental and computational databases. A complicated exonic enhancer regulatory network was revealed, where multiple exonic enhancers were found across multiple tissues while some were found only in specific tissues. Putative combinatorial exonic enhancers and silencers were discovered as well, which may be responsible for exon inclusion or exclusion across tissues. Some of the exonic enhancers are found to be co-occurring with multiple exonic silencers and vice versa, which demonstrates a complicated relationship between tissue-specific exonic enhancers and silencers. PMID:27861625

  1. Tissue-specific gene-expression patterns of genes associated with thymol/carvacrol biosynthesis in thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) and their differential changes upon treatment with abiotic elicitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdi, Mohammad; Malekzadeh-Mashhady, Atefe; Maroufi, Asad; Crocoll, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) is known to produce a variety of phenolic monoterpenes such as thymol and carvacrol. Thymol and carvacrol are health-promoting, biocide and antitoxin compounds and have been considered as the main constituents of essential oils in T. vulgaris. To improve our understanding of the regulation of monoterpene biosynthesis in thyme, the expression of genes related to thymol and carvacrol biosynthesis in different tissues and in response to abiotic elicitors was analyzed. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA), salicylic acid (SA), trans-cinnamic acid (tCA) and UV-C irradiation were applied to T. vulgare leaves and transcript levels of early (DXR) and late (TvTPS1, CYP71D178 and CYP71D180) biosynthetic genes of thymol and carvacrol were measured. The results showed that early step and late step genes in thymol/carvacrol biosynthesis are differentially regulated. DXR was not found to be exclusively expressed in glandular trichomes; in contrast, biosynthetic genes including γ-terpinene synthase (TvTPS1) and two cytochrome P450s, CYP71D178 and CYP71D180, were preferentially expressed in glandular secretory trichomes. The high expression of late biosynthetic genes in glandular trichomes, which also contain the highest concentration of thymol and carvacrol, suggests that glandular trichomes are the structure in which thymol/carvacrol biosynthesis and accumulation occur. Our results indicate that in addition to abiotic elicitors, developmental and spatial factors also play a key role in the biosynthesis of thymol and carvacrol, most likely relating to glandular trichome density and/or activity. Hence optimization of these factors could be considered as a useful strategy to achieve high yield of valuable compounds in T. vulgare or other closely related plant species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The reconstruction and analysis of tissue specific human metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tong; Ma, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Xue-Ming; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Human tissues have distinct biological functions. Many proteins/enzymes are known to be expressed only in specific tissues and therefore the metabolic networks in various tissues are different. Though high quality global human metabolic networks and metabolic networks for certain tissues such as liver have already been studied, a systematic study of tissue specific metabolic networks for all main tissues is still missing. In this work, we reconstruct the tissue specific metabolic networks for 15 main tissues in human based on the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN). The tissue information is firstly obtained for enzymes from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and UniprotKB databases and transfers to reactions through the enzyme-reaction relationships in EHMN. As our knowledge of tissue distribution of proteins is still very limited, we replenish the tissue information of the metabolic network based on network connectivity analysis and thorough examination of the literature. Finally, about 80% of proteins and reactions in EHMN are determined to be in at least one of the 15 tissues. To validate the quality of the tissue specific network, the brain specific metabolic network is taken as an example for functional module analysis and the results reveal that the function of the brain metabolic network is closely related with its function as the centre of the human nervous system. The tissue specific human metabolic networks are available at .

  3. Belongingness as a core personality trait: how social exclusion influences social functioning and personality expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWall, C Nathan; Deckman, Timothy; Pond, Richard S; Bonser, Ian

    2011-12-01

    People have a fundamental need for positive and lasting relationships. This need to belong is rooted in evolutionary history and gave rise to the development of traits that enable individuals to gain acceptance and to avoid rejection. Because belongingness is a core component of human functioning, social exclusion should influence many cognitive, emotional, and behavioral outcomes and personality expression. This article summarizes recent evidence that social exclusion causes an assortment of outcomes, many of which depend on whether the excluded can gain acceptance or forestall possible distress. It highlights common overlap in physical and social pain systems and how a physical painkiller can reduce the pain of social exclusion. Finally, it shows how social exclusion moderates the effects of traits on cognition, emotion, and behavior. To appreciate personality processes in social contexts, scientists should consider how people respond to social exclusion and how the need to belong influences personality expression. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Tissue-specific regulation of chromatin insulator function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzat, Leah H; Dale, Ryan K; Moshkovich, Nellie; Lei, Elissa P

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin insulators organize the genome into distinct transcriptional domains and contribute to cell type-specific chromatin organization. However, factors regulating tissue-specific insulator function have not yet been discovered. Here we identify the RNA recognition motif-containing protein Shep as a direct interactor of two individual components of the gypsy insulator complex in Drosophila. Mutation of shep improves gypsy-dependent enhancer blocking, indicating a role as a negative regulator of insulator activity. Unlike ubiquitously expressed core gypsy insulator proteins, Shep is highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) with lower expression in other tissues. We developed a novel, quantitative tissue-specific barrier assay to demonstrate that Shep functions as a negative regulator of insulator activity in the CNS but not in muscle tissue. Additionally, mutation of shep alters insulator complex nuclear localization in the CNS but has no effect in other tissues. Consistent with negative regulatory activity, ChIP-seq analysis of Shep in a CNS-derived cell line indicates substantial genome-wide colocalization with a single gypsy insulator component but limited overlap with intact insulator complexes. Taken together, these data reveal a novel, tissue-specific mode of regulation of a chromatin insulator.

  5. Tissue-Specific Regulation of Chromatin Insulator Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzat, Leah H.; Dale, Ryan K.; Moshkovich, Nellie; Lei, Elissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin insulators organize the genome into distinct transcriptional domains and contribute to cell type–specific chromatin organization. However, factors regulating tissue-specific insulator function have not yet been discovered. Here we identify the RNA recognition motif-containing protein Shep as a direct interactor of two individual components of the gypsy insulator complex in Drosophila. Mutation of shep improves gypsy-dependent enhancer blocking, indicating a role as a negative regulator of insulator activity. Unlike ubiquitously expressed core gypsy insulator proteins, Shep is highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) with lower expression in other tissues. We developed a novel, quantitative tissue-specific barrier assay to demonstrate that Shep functions as a negative regulator of insulator activity in the CNS but not in muscle tissue. Additionally, mutation of shep alters insulator complex nuclear localization in the CNS but has no effect in other tissues. Consistent with negative regulatory activity, ChIP–seq analysis of Shep in a CNS-derived cell line indicates substantial genome-wide colocalization with a single gypsy insulator component but limited overlap with intact insulator complexes. Taken together, these data reveal a novel, tissue-specific mode of regulation of a chromatin insulator. PMID:23209434

  6. Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2006-07-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

  7. Positional bias of general and tissue-specific regulatory motifs in mouse gene promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farré Domènec

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arrangement of regulatory motifs in gene promoters, or promoter architecture, is the result of mutation and selection processes that have operated over many millions of years. In mammals, tissue-specific transcriptional regulation is related to the presence of specific protein-interacting DNA motifs in gene promoters. However, little is known about the relative location and spacing of these motifs. To fill this gap, we have performed a systematic search for motifs that show significant bias at specific promoter locations in a large collection of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes. Results We observe that promoters driving housekeeping gene expression are enriched in particular motifs with strong positional bias, such as YY1, which are of little relevance in promoters driving tissue-specific expression. We also identify a large number of motifs that show positional bias in genes expressed in a highly tissue-specific manner. They include well-known tissue-specific motifs, such as HNF1 and HNF4 motifs in liver, kidney and small intestine, or RFX motifs in testis, as well as many potentially novel regulatory motifs. Based on this analysis, we provide predictions for 559 tissue-specific motifs in mouse gene promoters. Conclusion The study shows that motif positional bias is an important feature of mammalian proximal promoters and that it affects both general and tissue-specific motifs. Motif positional constraints define very distinct promoter architectures depending on breadth of expression and type of tissue.

  8. Duration of exclusive breastfeeding is associated with differences in infants’ brain responses to emotional body expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Marie Krol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Much research has recognized the general importance of maternal behavior in the early development and programming of the mammalian offspring’s brain. Exclusive breastfeeding duration, the amount of time in which breastfed meals are the only source of sustenance, plays a prominent role in promoting healthy brain and cognitive development in human children. However, surprisingly little is known about the influence of breastfeeding on social and emotional development in infancy. In the current study, we examined whether and how the duration of exclusive breastfeeding impacts the neural processing of emotional signals by measuring electro-cortical responses to body expressions in 8-month-old infants. Our analyses revealed that infants with high exclusive breastfeeding experience show a significantly greater neural sensitivity to happy body expressions than those with low exclusive breastfeeding experience. Moreover, regression analyses revealed that the neural bias toward happiness or fearfulness differs as a function of the duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Specifically, longer breastfeeding duration is associated with a happy bias, whereas shorter breastfeeding duration is associated with a fear bias. These findings suggest that breastfeeding experience can shape the way in which infants respond to emotional signals.

  9. Enhanced Tissue-Specific Expression of the Herbicide Resistance bar Gene in Transgenic Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L cv. Coker 310FR) Using the Arabidopsis rbcS ats1A Promoter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KUMAR, Shashi; P. TIMKO, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A highly regenerating cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar, Coker 310FR, was used to generate transgenic plants expressing the herbicide resistance gene, bar, encoding phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT...

  10. Genome-wide de Novo Prediction of Proximal and Distal Tissue-Specific Enhancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I V

    2005-11-03

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory networks are encoded in the human genome is essential for understanding how cellular processes are directed. Here, we present a novel approach for systematically predicting tissue specific regulatory elements (REs) that blends genome-wide expression profiling, vertebrate genome comparisons, and pattern analysis of transcription factor binding sites. This analysis yields 4,670 candidate REs in the human genome with distinct tissue specificities, the majority of which reside far away from transcription start sites. We identify key transcription factors (TFs) for 34 distinct tissues and demonstrate that tissue-specific gene expression relies on multiple regulatory pathways employing similar, but different cohorts of interacting TFs. The methods and results we describe provide a global view of tissue specific gene regulation in humans, and propose a strategy for deciphering the transcriptional regulatory code in eukaryotes.

  11. Epigenomic footprints across 111 reference epigenomes reveal tissue-specific epigenetic regulation of lincRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Viren; Harris, R. Alan; Onuchic, Vitor; Jackson, Andrew R.; Charnecki, Tim; Paithankar, Sameer; Lakshmi Subramanian, Sai; Riehle, Kevin; Coarfa, Cristian; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-specific expression of lincRNAs suggests developmental and cell-type-specific functions, yet tissue specificity was established for only a small fraction of lincRNAs. Here, by analysing 111 reference epigenomes from the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics project, we determine tissue-specific epigenetic regulation for 3,753 (69% examined) lincRNAs, with 54% active in one of the 14 cell/tissue clusters and an additional 15% in two or three clusters. A larger fraction of lincRNA TSSs is marked in a tissue-specific manner by H3K4me1 than by H3K4me3. The tissue-specific lincRNAs are strongly linked to tissue-specific pathways and undergo distinct chromatin state transitions during cellular differentiation. Polycomb-regulated lincRNAs reside in the bivalent state in embryonic stem cells and many of them undergo H3K27me3-mediated silencing at early stages of differentiation. The exquisitely tissue-specific epigenetic regulation of lincRNAs and the assignment of a majority of them to specific tissue types will inform future studies of this newly discovered class of genes. PMID:25691256

  12. A convex optimization approach for identification of human tissue-specific interactomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Shahin; Grama, Ananth

    2016-06-15

    Analysis of organism-specific interactomes has yielded novel insights into cellular function and coordination, understanding of pathology, and identification of markers and drug targets. Genes, however, can exhibit varying levels of cell type specificity in their expression, and their coordinated expression manifests in tissue-specific function and pathology. Tissue-specific/tissue-selective interaction mechanisms have significant applications in drug discovery, as they are more likely to reveal drug targets. Furthermore, tissue-specific transcription factors (tsTFs) are significantly implicated in human disease, including cancers. Finally, disease genes and protein complexes have the tendency to be differentially expressed in tissues in which defects cause pathology. These observations motivate the construction of refined tissue-specific interactomes from organism-specific interactomes. We present a novel technique for constructing human tissue-specific interactomes. Using a variety of validation tests (Edge Set Enrichment Analysis, Gene Ontology Enrichment, Disease-Gene Subnetwork Compactness), we show that our proposed approach significantly outperforms state-of-the-art techniques. Finally, using case studies of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, we show that tissue-specific interactomes derived from our study can be used to construct pathways implicated in pathology and demonstrate the use of these pathways in identifying novel targets. http://www.cs.purdue.edu/homes/mohammas/projects/ActPro.html mohammadi@purdue.edu. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Prediction of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules using Bayesian networks and regression trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoyu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vertebrates, a large part of gene transcriptional regulation is operated by cis-regulatory modules. These modules are believed to be regulating much of the tissue-specificity of gene expression. Results We develop a Bayesian network approach for identifying cis-regulatory modules likely to regulate tissue-specific expression. The network integrates predicted transcription factor binding site information, transcription factor expression data, and target gene expression data. At its core is a regression tree modeling the effect of combinations of transcription factors bound to a module. A new unsupervised EM-like algorithm is developed to learn the parameters of the network, including the regression tree structure. Conclusion Our approach is shown to accurately identify known human liver and erythroid-specific modules. When applied to the prediction of tissue-specific modules in 10 different tissues, the network predicts a number of important transcription factor combinations whose concerted binding is associated to specific expression.

  14. Tissue-specific regulation of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor axis during fasting and re-feeding: Importance of muscle expression of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA in the tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Bradley K; Breves, Jason P; Davis, Lori K; Pierce, Andrew L; Hirano, Tetsuya; Grau, E Gordon

    2010-05-01

    The effects of prolonged nutrient restriction (fasting) and subsequent restoration (re-feeding) on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis were investigated in the tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Mean weight and specific growth rate declined within 1 week in fasted fish, and remained lower than controls throughout 4 weeks of fasting. Plasma levels of IGF-I were lower than fed controls during 4 weeks of fasting, suggesting a significant catabolic state. Following re-feeding, fasted fish gained weight continuously, but did not attain the weight of fed controls at 8 weeks after re-feeding. Specific growth rate increased above the continuously-fed controls during the first 6 weeks of re-feeding, clearly indicating a compensatory response. Plasma IGF-I levels increased after 1 week of re-feeding and levels were not otherwise different from fed controls. Plasma GH levels were unaffected by either fasting or re-feeding. No consistent effect of fasting or re-feeding was observed on liver expression of GH receptor (GH-R), somatolactin (SL) receptor (SL-R), IGF-I or IGF-II. In contrast, muscle expression of GH-R increased markedly during 4 weeks of fasting, and then declined below control levels upon re-feeding for weeks 1 and 2. Similarly, muscle expression of SL-R increased after 4 weeks of fasting, and reduced below control levels after 1 and 2 weeks of re-feeding. On the other hand, muscle expression of IGF-I was strongly reduced throughout the fasting period, and levels recovered 2 weeks after re-feeding. Muscle expression of IGF-II was not affected by fasting, but was reduced after 1 and 2 weeks of re-feeding. These results indicate that GH/IGF axis, particularly muscle expression of GH-R, SL-R and IGF-I and -II, is sensitive to nutritional status in the tilapia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Tissue-specific gene-expression patterns of genes associated with thymol/carvacrol biosynthesis in thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) and their differential changes upon treatment with abiotic elicitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majdi, Mohammad; Malekzadeh-Mashhady, Atefe; Maroufi, Asad

    2017-01-01

    of the regulation of monoterpene biosynthesis in thyme, the expression of genes related to thymol and carvacrol biosynthesis in different tissues and in response to abiotic elicitors was analyzed. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA), salicylic acid (SA), trans-cinnamic acid (tCA) and UV-C irradiation were applied to T. vulgare...

  16. Spatial distribution of "tissue-specific" antigens in the developing human heart and skeletal muscle. II. An immunohistochemical analysis of myosin heavy chain isoform expression patterns in the embryonic heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, A.; Vermeulen, J. L.; Virágh, S.; Kálmán, F.; Lamers, W. H.; Moorman, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial distribution of alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain isoforms (MHCs) was investigated immunohistochemically in the embryonic human heart between the 4th and the 8th week of development. The development of the overall MHC isoform expression pattern can be outlined as follows: (1) In all

  17. Tissue-specific splicing mutation in acute intermittent porphyria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandchamp, B.; Picat, C. (Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire, Paris (France)); Mignotte, V.; Romeo, P.H.; Goossens, M. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Creteil (France)); Wilson, J.H.P.; Sandkuyl, L. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Te Velde, K. (Saint Geertruiden Hospital, Deventer (Netherlands)); Nordmann, Y. (Hopital Louis Mourier, Colombes (France))

    1989-01-01

    An inherited deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase in humans is responsible for the autosomal dominant disease acute intermittent porphyria. Different classes of mutations have been described at the protein level suggesting that this is a heterogeneous disease. It was previously demonstrated that porphobilinogen deaminase is encoded by two distinct mRNA species expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Analysis of the genomic sequences indicated that these two mRNAs are transcribed from two promoters and only differ in their first exon. The first mutation identified in the human porphobilinogen deaminase gene is a single-base substitution (G {yields} A) in the canonical 5{prime} splice donor site of intron 1. This mutation leads to a particular subtype of acute intermittent porphyria characterized by the restriction of the enzymatic defect to nonerythropoietic tissues. Hybridization analysis using olignonucleotide probes after in vitro amplification of genomic DNA offers another possibility of detecting asymptomatic carriers of the mutation in affected families.

  18. Alternative Polyadenylation Directs Tissue-Specific miRNA Targeting in Caenorhabditis elegans Somatic Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazie, Stephen M; Geissel, Heather C; Wilky, Henry; Joshi, Rajan; Newbern, Jason; Mangone, Marco

    2017-06-01

    mRNA expression dynamics promote and maintain the identity of somatic tissues in living organisms; however, their impact in post-transcriptional gene regulation in these processes is not fully understood. Here, we applied the PAT-Seq approach to systematically isolate, sequence, and map tissue-specific mRNA from five highly studied Caenorhabditis elegans somatic tissues: GABAergic and NMDA neurons, arcade and intestinal valve cells, seam cells, and hypodermal tissues, and studied their mRNA expression dynamics. The integration of these datasets with previously profiled transcriptomes of intestine, pharynx, and body muscle tissues, precisely assigns tissue-specific expression dynamics for 60% of all annotated C. elegans protein-coding genes, providing an important resource for the scientific community. The mapping of 15,956 unique high-quality tissue-specific polyA sites in all eight somatic tissues reveals extensive tissue-specific 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) isoform switching through alternative polyadenylation (APA) . Almost all ubiquitously transcribed genes use APA and harbor miRNA targets in their 3'UTRs, which are commonly lost in a tissue-specific manner, suggesting widespread usage of post-transcriptional gene regulation modulated through APA to fine tune tissue-specific protein expression. Within this pool, the human disease gene C. elegans orthologs rack-1 and tct-1 use APA to switch to shorter 3'UTR isoforms in order to evade miRNA regulation in the body muscle tissue, resulting in increased protein expression needed for proper body muscle function. Our results highlight a major positive regulatory role for APA, allowing genes to counteract miRNA regulation on a tissue-specific basis. Copyright © 2017 Blazie et al.

  19. Motif Discovery in Tissue-Specific Regulatory Sequences Using Directed Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    States David

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Motif discovery for the identification of functional regulatory elements underlying gene expression is a challenging problem. Sequence inspection often leads to discovery of novel motifs (including transcription factor sites with previously uncharacterized function in gene expression. Coupled with the complexity underlying tissue-specific gene expression, there are several motifs that are putatively responsible for expression in a certain cell type. This has important implications in understanding fundamental biological processes such as development and disease progression. In this work, we present an approach to the identification of motifs (not necessarily transcription factor sites and examine its application to some questions in current bioinformatics research. These motifs are seen to discriminate tissue-specific gene promoter or regulatory regions from those that are not tissue-specific. There are two main contributions of this work. Firstly, we propose the use of directed information for such classification constrained motif discovery, and then use the selected features with a support vector machine (SVM classifier to find the tissue specificity of any sequence of interest. Such analysis yields several novel interesting motifs that merit further experimental characterization. Furthermore, this approach leads to a principled framework for the prospective examination of any chosen motif to be discriminatory motif for a group of coexpressed/coregulated genes, thereby integrating sequence and expression perspectives. We hypothesize that the discovery of these motifs would enable the large-scale investigation for the tissue-specific regulatory role of any conserved sequence element identified from genome-wide studies.

  20. Tissue-specific expression of the human laminin alpha5-chain, and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 and to distal mouse chromosome 2 near the locus for the ragged (Ra) mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Loechel, F; Mattei, M G

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the function of the laminin alpha5-chain, previously identified in mice, cDNA clones encoding the 953-amino-acid carboxy terminal G-domain of the human laminin alpha5-chain were characterized. Northern blot analysis showed that the laminin alpha5-chain is expressed in human placenta......, heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, and pancreas. The human laminin alpha5-chain gene (LAMA5) was assigned to chromosome 20q13.2-q13.3 by in situ hybridization, and the mouse gene (Lama5) was mapped by linkage analysis to a syntonic region of distal chromosome 2, close to the locus for the ragged (Ra...

  1. Integrated biological responses and tissue-specific expression of p53 and ras genes in marine mussels following exposure to benzo(α)pyrene and C60 fullerenes, either alone or in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Yanan; Aminot, Yann; Schroeder, Declan C; Readman, James W; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2017-01-01

    We used the marine bivalve (Mytilus galloprovincialis) to assess a range of biological or biomarker responses following exposure to a model-engineered nanoparticle, C60 fullerene, either alone or in combination with a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, benzo(α)pyrene [B(α)P]. An integrated biomarker approach was used that included: (i) determination of 'clearance rates' (a physiological indicator at individual level), (ii) histopathological alterations (at tissue level), (iii) DNA strand breaks using the comet assay (at cellular level) and (iv) transcriptional alterations of p53 (anti-oncogene) and ras (oncogene) determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (at the molecular/genetic level). In addition, total glutathione in the digestive gland was measured as a proxy for oxidative stress. Here, we report that mussels showed no significant changes in 'clearance rates' after 1 day exposure, however significant increases in 'clearance rates' were found following exposure for 3 days. Histopathology on selected organs (i.e. gills, digestive glands, adductor muscles and mantles) showed increased occurrence of abnormalities in all tissues types, although not all the exposed organisms showed these abnormalities. Significantly, increased levels of DNA strand breaks were found after exposure for 3-days in most individuals tested. In addition, a significant induction for p53 and ras expression was observed in a tissue and chemical-specific pattern, although large amounts of inter-individual variability, compared with other biomarkers, were clearly apparent. Overall, biological responses at different levels showed variable sensitivity, with DNA strand breaks and gene expression alterations exhibiting higher sensitivities. Furthermore, the observed genotoxic responses were reversible after a recovery period, suggesting the ability of mussels to cope with the toxicants C60 and/or B(α)P under our experimental conditions. Overall, in this comprehensive

  2. Tissue-Specific Promoters in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kügler, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    This chapter outlines some general principles of transcriptional targeting approaches using viral vectors in the central nervous system. Transcriptional targeting is first discussed in the context of vector tropism and appropriate delivery. Then, some of our own attempts to restrict expression of therapeutic factors to distinct brain cell populations are discussed, followed by a detailed description of the setscrews that are available for these experiments. A critical discussion of current stumbling blocks and necessary developments to achieve clinical applicability of advanced targeted vector systems is provided.

  3. Comparative RNA-Seq analysis reveals pervasive tissue-specific alternative polyadenylation in Caenorhabditis elegans intestine and muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazie, Stephen M; Babb, Cody; Wilky, Henry; Rawls, Alan; Park, Jin G; Mangone, Marco

    2015-01-20

    Tissue-specific RNA plasticity broadly impacts the development, tissue identity and adaptability of all organisms, but changes in composition, expression levels and its impact on gene regulation in different somatic tissues are largely unknown. Here we developed a new method, polyA-tagging and sequencing (PAT-Seq) to isolate high-quality tissue-specific mRNA from Caenorhabditis elegans intestine, pharynx and body muscle tissues and study changes in their tissue-specific transcriptomes and 3'UTRomes. We have identified thousands of novel genes and isoforms differentially expressed between these three tissues. The intestine transcriptome is expansive, expressing over 30% of C. elegans mRNAs, while muscle transcriptomes are smaller but contain characteristic unique gene signatures. Active promoter regions in all three tissues reveal both known and novel enriched tissue-specific elements, along with putative transcription factors, suggesting novel tissue-specific modes of transcription initiation. We have precisely mapped approximately 20,000 tissue-specific polyadenylation sites and discovered that about 30% of transcripts in somatic cells use alternative polyadenylation in a tissue-specific manner, with their 3'UTR isoforms significantly enriched with microRNA targets. For the first time, PAT-Seq allowed us to directly study tissue specific gene expression changes in an in vivo setting and compare these changes between three somatic tissues from the same organism at single-base resolution within the same experiment. We pinpoint precise tissue-specific transcriptome rearrangements and for the first time link tissue-specific alternative polyadenylation to miRNA regulation, suggesting novel and unexplored tissue-specific post-transcriptional regulatory networks in somatic cells.

  4. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Rama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment.

  5. Molecular cloning and identification of tissue-specific expression of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Momordica charantia (bitter melon) is widely consumed as a vegetable and as a folk medicine. Ent-kaurene oxidase is a key enzyme of gibberellin (GA) synthesis by controlling the early GA biosynthesis. In this study, ent-kaurene oxidase cDNA sequence was successfully amplified from the total cDNA of pistillate flower ...

  6. Tissue-specific splicing factor gene expression signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Grosso; A.Q. Gomes (Anita); N.L. Barbosa-Morais (Nuno); S. Caldeira (Sandra); N.P. Thorne (Natalie); G. Grech (Godfrey); M.M. von Lindern (Marieke); M. Carmo-Fonseca (Maria)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe alternative splicing code that controls and coordinates the transcriptome in complex multicellular organisms remains poorly understood. It has long been argued that regulation of alternative splicing relies on combinatorial interactions between multiple proteins, and that

  7. HA novel approach to investigate tissue-specific trinucleotide repeat instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boily Marie-Josee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Huntington's disease (HD, an expanded CAG repeat produces characteristic striatal neurodegeneration. Interestingly, the HD CAG repeat, whose length determines age at onset, undergoes tissue-specific somatic instability, predominant in the striatum, suggesting that tissue-specific CAG length changes could modify the disease process. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the tissue specificity of somatic instability may provide novel routes to therapies. However progress in this area has been hampered by the lack of sensitive high-throughput instability quantification methods and global approaches to identify the underlying factors. Results Here we describe a novel approach to gain insight into the factors responsible for the tissue specificity of somatic instability. Using accurate genetic knock-in mouse models of HD, we developed a reliable, high-throughput method to quantify tissue HD CAG repeat instability and integrated this with genome-wide bioinformatic approaches. Using tissue instability quantified in 16 tissues as a phenotype and tissue microarray gene expression as a predictor, we built a mathematical model and identified a gene expression signature that accurately predicted tissue instability. Using the predictive ability of this signature we found that somatic instability was not a consequence of pathogenesis. In support of this, genetic crosses with models of accelerated neuropathology failed to induce somatic instability. In addition, we searched for genes and pathways that correlated with tissue instability. We found that expression levels of DNA repair genes did not explain the tissue specificity of somatic instability. Instead, our data implicate other pathways, particularly cell cycle, metabolism and neurotransmitter pathways, acting in combination to generate tissue-specific patterns of instability. Conclusion Our study clearly demonstrates that multiple tissue factors reflect the level of

  8. Tissue specific regulation of lipogenesis by thyroid hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennemann, B.; Freake, H. (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs (United States))

    1990-02-26

    Thyroid hormone stimulates long chain fatty acid synthesis in rat liver by increasing the amounts of key lipogenic enzymes. Sparse and conflicting data exist concerning its action on this pathway in other tissues. The authors recently showed that, in contrast to liver, hypothyroidism stimulates lipogenesis in brown adipose tissue and have now systematically examined the effects of thyroid state on fatty acid synthesis in other rat tissues. Lipogenesis was assessed by tritiated water incorporation. Euthyroid hepatic fatty acid synthesis (16.6um H/g/h) was reduced to 30% in hypothyroid rats and increased 3 fold in hyperthyroidism. Lipogenesis was detected in euthyroid kidney and heart and these levels were also stimulated by thyroid hormone treatment. Brown adipose tissue was unique in showing increased lipogenesis in the hypothyroid state. Hyperthyroid levels were not different from euthyroid. Effects in white adipose tissue were small and inconsistent. Brain, skin and lung were all lipogenically active, but did not respond to changes in thyroid state. Low but detectable levels of fatty acid synthesis were measured in muscle, which also were non-responsive. A wide spectrum of responses to thyroid hormone are seen in different rat tissues and thus the pathway of long chain fatty acid synthesis would appear to be an excellent model for examining the tissue specific regulation of gene expression by thyroid hormone.

  9. Tissue-specific effector functions of innate lymphoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkström, Niklas K; Kekäläinen, Eliisa; Mjösberg, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) is the collective term for a group of related innate lymphocytes, including natural killer (NK) cells and the more recently discovered non-NK ILCs, which all lack rearranged antigen receptors such as those expressed by T and B cells. Similar to NK cells, the newly discovered ILCs depend on the transcription factor Id2 and the common γ-chain of the interleukin-2 receptor for development. However, in contrast to NK cells, non-NK ILCs also require interleukin-7. In addition to the cytotoxic functions of NK cells, assuring protection against tumour development and viruses, new data indicate that ILCs contribute to a wide range of homeostatic and pathophysiological conditions in various organs via specialized cytokine production capabilities. Here we summarize current knowledge on ILCs with a particular emphasis on their tissue-specific effector functions, in the gut, liver, lungs and uterus. When possible, we try to highlight the role that these cells play in humans. PMID:23489335

  10. Tissue-specific alterations in thyroid hormone homeostasis in combined Mct10 and Mct8 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Müller (Julia); S. Mayerl (Steffen); T.J. Visser (Theo); V.M. Darras (Veerle); A. Boelen (Anita); L. Frappart (Lucien); L. Mariotta (Luca); F. Verrey; H. Heuer (Heike)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe monocarboxylate transporter Mct10 (Slc16a10; T-type amino acid transporter) facilitates the cellular transport of thyroid hormone (TH) and shows an overlapping expression with the wellestablished TH transporter Mct8. Because Mct8 deficiency is associated with distinct tissue-specific

  11. Tissue-specific alterations in thyroid hormone homeostasis in combined Mct10 and Mct8 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Julia; Mayerl, Steffen; Visser, Theo J.; Darras, Veerle M.; Boelen, Anita; Frappart, Lucien; Mariotta, Luca; Verrey, Francois; Heuer, Heike

    2014-01-01

    The monocarboxylate transporter Mct10 (Slc16a10; T-type amino acid transporter) facilitates the cellular transport of thyroid hormone (TH) and shows an overlapping expression with the well-established TH transporter Mct8. Because Mct8 deficiency is associated with distinct tissue-specific

  12. Identification of novel tissue-specific genes by analysis of microarray databases: a human and mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Song

    Full Text Available Understanding the tissue-specific pattern of gene expression is critical in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of tissue development, gene function, and transcriptional regulations of biological processes. Although tissue-specific gene expression information is available in several databases, follow-up strategies to integrate and use these data are limited. The objective of the current study was to identify and evaluate novel tissue-specific genes in human and mouse tissues by performing comparative microarray database analysis and semi-quantitative PCR analysis. We developed a powerful approach to predict tissue-specific genes by analyzing existing microarray data from the NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO public repository. We investigated and confirmed tissue-specific gene expression in the human and mouse kidney, liver, lung, heart, muscle, and adipose tissue. Applying our novel comparative microarray approach, we confirmed 10 kidney, 11 liver, 11 lung, 11 heart, 8 muscle, and 8 adipose specific genes. The accuracy of this approach was further verified by employing semi-quantitative PCR reaction and by searching for gene function information in existing publications. Three novel tissue-specific genes were discovered by this approach including AMDHD1 (amidohydrolase domain containing 1 in the liver, PRUNE2 (prune homolog 2 in the heart, and ACVR1C (activin A receptor, type IC in adipose tissue. We further confirmed the tissue-specific expression of these 3 novel genes by real-time PCR. Among them, ACVR1C is adipose tissue-specific and adipocyte-specific in adipose tissue, and can be used as an adipocyte developmental marker. From GEO profiles, we predicted the processes in which AMDHD1 and PRUNE2 may participate. Our approach provides a novel way to identify new sets of tissue-specific genes and to predict functions in which they may be involved.

  13. Identification of novel tissue-specific genes by analysis of microarray databases: a human and mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Ahn, Jinsoo; Suh, Yeunsu; Davis, Michael E; Lee, Kichoon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the tissue-specific pattern of gene expression is critical in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of tissue development, gene function, and transcriptional regulations of biological processes. Although tissue-specific gene expression information is available in several databases, follow-up strategies to integrate and use these data are limited. The objective of the current study was to identify and evaluate novel tissue-specific genes in human and mouse tissues by performing comparative microarray database analysis and semi-quantitative PCR analysis. We developed a powerful approach to predict tissue-specific genes by analyzing existing microarray data from the NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public repository. We investigated and confirmed tissue-specific gene expression in the human and mouse kidney, liver, lung, heart, muscle, and adipose tissue. Applying our novel comparative microarray approach, we confirmed 10 kidney, 11 liver, 11 lung, 11 heart, 8 muscle, and 8 adipose specific genes. The accuracy of this approach was further verified by employing semi-quantitative PCR reaction and by searching for gene function information in existing publications. Three novel tissue-specific genes were discovered by this approach including AMDHD1 (amidohydrolase domain containing 1) in the liver, PRUNE2 (prune homolog 2) in the heart, and ACVR1C (activin A receptor, type IC) in adipose tissue. We further confirmed the tissue-specific expression of these 3 novel genes by real-time PCR. Among them, ACVR1C is adipose tissue-specific and adipocyte-specific in adipose tissue, and can be used as an adipocyte developmental marker. From GEO profiles, we predicted the processes in which AMDHD1 and PRUNE2 may participate. Our approach provides a novel way to identify new sets of tissue-specific genes and to predict functions in which they may be involved.

  14. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  15. Tissue-specific effects of genetic and epigenetic variation on gene regulation and splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gutierrez-Arcelus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how genetic variation affects distinct cellular phenotypes, such as gene expression levels, alternative splicing and DNA methylation levels, is essential for better understanding of complex diseases and traits. Furthermore, how inter-individual variation of DNA methylation is associated to gene expression is just starting to be studied. In this study, we use the GenCord cohort of 204 newborn Europeans' lymphoblastoid cell lines, T-cells and fibroblasts derived from umbilical cords. The samples were previously genotyped for 2.5 million SNPs, mRNA-sequenced, and assayed for methylation levels in 482,421 CpG sites. We observe that methylation sites associated to expression levels are enriched in enhancers, gene bodies and CpG island shores. We show that while the correlation between DNA methylation and gene expression can be positive or negative, it is very consistent across cell-types. However, this epigenetic association to gene expression appears more tissue-specific than the genetic effects on gene expression or DNA methylation (observed in both sharing estimations based on P-values and effect size correlations between cell-types. This predominance of genetic effects can also be reflected by the observation that allele specific expression differences between individuals dominate over tissue-specific effects. Additionally, we discover genetic effects on alternative splicing and interestingly, a large amount of DNA methylation correlating to alternative splicing, both in a tissue-specific manner. The locations of the SNPs and methylation sites involved in these associations highlight the participation of promoter proximal and distant regulatory regions on alternative splicing. Overall, our results provide high-resolution analyses showing how genome sequence variation has a broad effect on cellular phenotypes across cell-types, whereas epigenetic factors provide a secondary layer of variation that is more tissue-specific. Furthermore

  16. The first insight into the tissue specific taxus transcriptome via Illumina second generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Cheng Hao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Illumina second generation sequencing is now an efficient route for generating enormous sequence collections that represent expressed genes and quantitate expression level. Taxus is a world-wide endangered gymnosperm genus and forms an important anti-cancer medicinal resource, but the large and complex genomes of Taxus have hindered the development of genomic resources. The research of its tissue-specific transcriptome is absent. There is also no study concerning the association between the plant transcriptome and metabolome with respect to the plant tissue type. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed the de novo assembly of Taxus mairei transcriptome using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. In a single run, we produced 13,737,528 sequencing reads corresponding to 2.03 Gb total nucleotides. These reads were assembled into 36,493 unique sequences. Based on similarity search with known proteins, 23,515 Unigenes were identified to have the Blast hit with a cut-off E-value above 10⁻⁵. Furthermore, we investigated the transcriptome difference of three Taxus tissues using a tag-based digital gene expression system. We obtained a sequencing depth of over 3.15 million tags per sample and identified a large number of genes associated with tissue specific functions and taxane biosynthetic pathway. The expression of the taxane biosynthetic genes is significantly higher in the root than in the leaf and the stem, while high activity of taxane-producing pathway in the root was also revealed via metabolomic analyses. Moreover, many antisense transcripts and novel transcripts were found; clusters with similar differential expression patterns, enriched GO terms and enriched metabolic pathways with regard to the differentially expressed genes were revealed for the first time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provides the most comprehensive sequence resource available for Taxus study and will help define mechanisms of tissue

  17. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Barshir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-protein interactions (PPIs. The resulting tissue interaction networks (interactomes shared a large fraction of their proteins and PPIs, and only a small fraction of them were tissue-specific. Applying this resource to hereditary diseases, we first show that most of the disease-causing genes are widely expressed across tissues, yet, enigmatically, cause disease phenotypes in few tissues only. Upon testing for factors that could lead to tissue-specific vulnerability, we find that disease-causing genes tend to have elevated transcript levels and increased number of tissue-specific PPIs in their disease tissues compared to unaffected tissues. We demonstrate through several examples that these tissue-specific PPIs can highlight disease mechanisms, and thus, owing to their small number, provide a powerful filter for interrogating disease etiologies. As two thirds of the hereditary diseases are associated with these factors, comparative tissue analysis offers a meaningful and efficient framework for enhancing the understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary diseases.

  18. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-06-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The resulting tissue interaction networks (interactomes) shared a large fraction of their proteins and PPIs, and only a small fraction of them were tissue-specific. Applying this resource to hereditary diseases, we first show that most of the disease-causing genes are widely expressed across tissues, yet, enigmatically, cause disease phenotypes in few tissues only. Upon testing for factors that could lead to tissue-specific vulnerability, we find that disease-causing genes tend to have elevated transcript levels and increased number of tissue-specific PPIs in their disease tissues compared to unaffected tissues. We demonstrate through several examples that these tissue-specific PPIs can highlight disease mechanisms, and thus, owing to their small number, provide a powerful filter for interrogating disease etiologies. As two thirds of the hereditary diseases are associated with these factors, comparative tissue analysis offers a meaningful and efficient framework for enhancing the understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary diseases.

  19. Tissue-Specific Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Multiple Responses to Salt Stress in Populus euphratica Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Le; Ma, Jianchao; Niu, Zhimin; Bai, Xiaotao; Lei, Wenli; Shao, Xuemin; Chen, Ningning; Zhou, Fangfang; Wan, Dongshi

    2017-12-08

    Salt stress is one of the most crucial factors impacting plant growth, development and reproduction. However, information regarding differences in tissue-specific gene expression patterns, which may improve a plant's tolerance to salt stress, is limited. Here, we investigated the gene expression patterns in tissues of Populus euphratica Oliv. seedlings using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology. A total of 109.3 million, 125bp paired-end clean reads were generated, and 6428, 4797, 2335 and 3358 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in leaf, phloem, xylem and root tissues, respectively. While the tissue-specific DEGs under salt stress had diverse functions, "membrane transporter activity" was the most significant leaf function, whereas "oxidation-reduction process" was the most significant function in root tissue. Further analysis of the tissue-specific DEGs showed that the expression patterns or functions of gene families, such as SOS, NHX, GolS, GPX, APX, RBOHF and CBL, were diverse, suggesting that calcium signaling, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salt overly sensitive (SOS) pathways are all involved in ionic homeostasis in tissues from P. euphratica seedlings. The DEGs, for example the up-regulated antioxidant genes, contribute to ROS-scavenging induced by salt stress but result in decreased Na⁺ concentrations in root vasculature cells and in xylem sap, while the down-regulated rbohF leads to the reverse results. These results suggest that the divergence of DEGs expression patterns contribute to maintenance of ionic and ROS homeostasis in tissues and improve plant salinity tolerance. We comprehensively analyzed the response of P. euphratica seedlings to salt stress and provide helpful genetic resources for studying plant-abiotic stress interactions.

  20. DNA entropy reveals a significant difference in complexity between housekeeping and tissue specific gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David; Finan, Chris; Newport, Melanie J; Jones, Susan

    2015-10-01

    The complexity of DNA can be quantified using estimates of entropy. Variation in DNA complexity is expected between the promoters of genes with different transcriptional mechanisms; namely housekeeping (HK) and tissue specific (TS). The former are transcribed constitutively to maintain general cellular functions, and the latter are transcribed in restricted tissue and cells types for specific molecular events. It is known that promoter features in the human genome are related to tissue specificity, but this has been difficult to quantify on a genomic scale. If entropy effectively quantifies DNA complexity, calculating the entropies of HK and TS gene promoters as profiles may reveal significant differences. Entropy profiles were calculated for a total dataset of 12,003 human gene promoters and for 501 housekeeping (HK) and 587 tissue specific (TS) human gene promoters. The mean profiles show the TS promoters have a significantly lower entropy (pentropy distributions for the 3 datasets show that promoter entropies could be used to identify novel HK genes. Functional features comprise DNA sequence patterns that are non-random and hence they have lower entropies. The lower entropy of TS gene promoters can be explained by a higher density of positive and negative regulatory elements, required for genes with complex spatial and temporary expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A toolkit for GFP-mediated tissue-specific protein degradation in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaohe; Tang, Ngang Heok; Lara-Gonzalez, Pablo; Zhao, Zhiling; Cheerambathur, Dhanya K; Prevo, Bram; Chisholm, Andrew D; Desai, Arshad; Oegema, Karen

    2017-07-15

    Proteins that are essential for embryo production, cell division and early embryonic events are frequently reused later in embryogenesis, during organismal development or in the adult. Examining protein function across these different biological contexts requires tissue-specific perturbation. Here, we describe a method that uses expression of a fusion between a GFP-targeting nanobody and a SOCS-box containing ubiquitin ligase adaptor to target GFP-tagged proteins for degradation. When combined with endogenous locus GFP tagging by CRISPR-Cas9 or with rescue of a null mutant with a GFP fusion, this approach enables routine and efficient tissue-specific protein ablation. We show that this approach works in multiple tissues - the epidermis, intestine, body wall muscle, ciliated sensory neurons and touch receptor neurons - where it recapitulates expected loss-of-function mutant phenotypes. The transgene toolkit and the strain set described here will complement existing approaches to enable routine analysis of the tissue-specific roles of C. elegans proteins. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Aging and nutrition induce tissue-specific changes on global DNA methylation status in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarasci, Francesco; D'Aquila, Patrizia; Mandalà, Maurizio; Garasto, Sabrina; Lattanzio, F; Corsonello, Andrea; Passarino, Giuseppe; Bellizzi, Dina

    2018-02-07

    A number of epigenetic studies have demonstrated that DNA methylation patterns exhibit a tissue specificity, but not much has been done to highlight the extent of this phenomenon. Moreover, it is unknown how external factors modulate the plasticity of the tissue specific epigenetic profile. We examined global DNA methylation profiles in tissues from rats of different age, fed with standard or low-calorie diet, and evaluated their association with aging and nutrition. Tissue-specific variations occur during aging with hyper-methylation taking place in all tissues except for liver. The expression of enzymes involved in methylation reactions (DNMTs and TETs) was consistent with the methylation patterns. Nutrition affects global DNA methylation status throughout lifespan. Interestingly, what differences among different tissues are magnified in 96 weeks old rats fed with low calorie diet. Moreover, the low-calorie diet appears to affect the offspring's epigenetic status more strongly if administered during the maternal pre-gestational period then the gestational and lactation time. Therefore, we propose that changes in the global DNA methylation status may represent an epigenetic mechanism by which age and nutrition intersect each other and, in turn, influence the aging plasticity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Tissue specific DNA methylation in normal human breast epithelium and in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelet Avraham

    Full Text Available Cancer is a heterogeneous and tissue-specific disease. Thus, the tissue of origin reflects on the natural history of the disease and dictates the therapeutic approach. It is suggested that tissue differentiation, mediated mostly by epigenetic modifications, could guide tissue-specific susceptibility and protective mechanisms against cancer. Here we studied breast specific methylation in purified normal epithelium and its reflection in breast cancers. We established genome wide methylation profiles of various normal epithelial tissues and identified 110 genes that were differentially methylated in normal breast epithelium. A number of these genes also showed methylation alterations in breast cancers. We elaborated on one of them, TRIM29 (ATDC, and showed that its promoter was hypo-methylated in normal breast epithelium and heavily methylated in other normal epithelial tissues. Moreover, in breast carcinomas methylation increased and expression decreased whereas the reverse was noted for multiple other carcinomas. Interestingly, TRIM29 regulation in breast tumors clustered according to the PAM50 classification. Thus, it was repressed in the estrogen receptor positive tumors, particularly in the more proliferative luminal B subtype. This goes in line with previous reports indicating tumor suppressive activity of TRIM29 in estrogen receptor positive luminal breast cells in contrast to oncogenic function in pancreatic and lung cancers. Overall, these findings emphasize the linkage between breast specific epigenetic regulation and tissue specificity of cancer.

  4. Bioprinting Cellularized Constructs Using a Tissue-specific Hydrogel Bioink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardal, Aleksander; Devarasetty, Mahesh; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Seol, Young-Joon; Forsythe, Steven D; Bishop, Colin; Shupe, Thomas; Soker, Shay; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-21

    Bioprinting has emerged as a versatile biofabrication approach for creating tissue engineered organ constructs. These constructs have potential use as organ replacements for implantation in patients, and also, when created on a smaller size scale as model "organoids" that can be used in in vitro systems for drug and toxicology screening. Despite development of a wide variety of bioprinting devices, application of bioprinting technology can be limited by the availability of materials that both expedite bioprinting procedures and support cell viability and function by providing tissue-specific cues. Here we describe a versatile hyaluronic acid (HA) and gelatin-based hydrogel system comprised of a multi-crosslinker, 2-stage crosslinking protocol, which can provide tissue specific biochemical signals and mimic the mechanical properties of in vivo tissues. Biochemical factors are provided by incorporating tissue-derived extracellular matrix materials, which include potent growth factors. Tissue mechanical properties are controlled combinations of PEG-based crosslinkers with varying molecular weights, geometries (linear or multi-arm), and functional groups to yield extrudable bioinks and final construct shear stiffness values over a wide range (100 Pa to 20 kPa). Using these parameters, hydrogel bioinks were used to bioprint primary liver spheroids in a liver-specific bioink to create in vitro liver constructs with high cell viability and measurable functional albumin and urea output. This methodology provides a general framework that can be adapted for future customization of hydrogels for biofabrication of a wide range of tissue construct types.

  5. RBFOX and SUP-12 sandwich a G base to cooperatively regulate tissue-specific splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwasako, Kanako; Takahashi, Mari; Unzai, Satoru; Tsuda, Kengo; Yoshikawa, Seiko; He, Fahu; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Güntert, Peter; Shirouzu, Mikako; Ito, Takuhiro; Tanaka, Akiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito; Muto, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    Tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing is often cooperatively regulated by multiple splicing factors, but the structural basis of cooperative RNA recognition is poorly understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, ligand binding specificity of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) is determined by mutually exclusive alternative splicing of the sole FGFR gene, egl-15. Here we determined the solution structure of a ternary complex of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM) domains from the RBFOX protein ASD-1, SUP-12 and their target RNA from egl-15. The two RRM domains cooperatively interact with the RNA by sandwiching a G base to form the stable complex. Multichromatic fluorescence splicing reporters confirmed the requirement of the G and the juxtaposition of the respective cis elements for effective splicing regulation in vivo. Moreover, we identified a new target for the heterologous complex through an element search, confirming the functional significance of the intermolecular coordination.

  6. The prolactin gene: a paradigm of tissue-specific gene regulation with complex temporal transcription dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, K; White, M R H; Davis, J R E

    2012-07-01

    Transcription of numerous mammalian genes is highly pulsatile, with bursts of expression occurring with variable duration and frequency. The presence of this stochastic or 'noisy' expression pattern has been relatively unexplored in tissue systems. The prolactin gene provides a model of tissue-specific gene regulation resulting in pulsatile transcription dynamics in both cell lines and endocrine tissues. In most cell culture models, prolactin transcription appears to be highly variable between cells, with differences in transcription pulse duration and frequency. This apparently stochastic transcription is constrained by a transcriptional refractory period, which may be related to cycles of chromatin remodelling. We propose that prolactin transcription dynamics result from the summation of oscillatory cellular inputs and by regulation through chromatin remodelling cycles. Observations of transcription dynamics in cells within pituitary tissue show reduced transcriptional heterogeneity and can be grouped into a small number of distinct patterns. Thus, it appears that the tissue environment is able to reduce transcriptional noise to enable coordinated tissue responses to environmental change. We review the current knowledge on the complex tissue-specific regulation of the prolactin gene in pituitary and extra-pituitary sites, highlighting differences between humans and rodent experimental animal models. Within this context, we describe the transcription dynamics of prolactin gene expression and how this may relate to specific processes occurring within the cell. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. 78 FR 740 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Gene Expression Signatures of Neoplasm...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... Gene Expression Signatures of Neoplasm Responsiveness to mTOR and HDAC Inhibitor Combination Therapy... entitled, ``Gene Expression Signatures of Neoplasm Responsiveness to Therapy'' , and all continuing... multiple myeloma, breast cancer, melanoma, lymphoma, and prostate cancer. DATES: Only written comments or...

  8. Global Patterns of Tissue-Specific Alternative Polyadenylation in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Smibert

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the usage and consequences of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA in Drosophila melanogaster by using >1 billion reads of stranded mRNA-seq across a variety of dissected tissues. Beyond demonstrating that a majority of fly transcripts are subject to APA, we observed broad trends for 3′ untranslated region (UTR shortening in the testis and lengthening in the central nervous system (CNS; the latter included hundreds of unannotated extensions ranging up to 18 kb. Extensive northern analyses validated the accumulation of full-length neural extended transcripts, and in situ hybridization indicated their spatial restriction to the CNS. Genes encoding RNA binding proteins (RBPs and transcription factors were preferentially subject to 3′ UTR extensions. Motif analysis indicated enrichment of miRNA and RBP sites in the neural extensions, and their termini were enriched in canonical cis elements that promote cleavage and polyadenylation. Altogether, we reveal broad tissue-specific patterns of APA in Drosophila and transcripts with unprecedented 3′ UTR length in the nervous system.

  9. Tissue-Specific Posttranslational Modification Allows Functional Targeting of Thyrotropin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Ikegami

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; thyrotropin is a glycoprotein secreted from the pituitary gland. Pars distalis-derived TSH (PD-TSH stimulates the thyroid gland to produce thyroid hormones (THs, whereas pars tuberalis-derived TSH (PT-TSH acts on the hypothalamus to regulate seasonal physiology and behavior. However, it had not been clear how these two TSHs avoid functional crosstalk. Here, we show that this regulation is mediated by tissue-specific glycosylation. Although PT-TSH is released into the circulation, it does not stimulate the thyroid gland. PD-TSH is known to have sulfated biantennary N-glycans, and sulfated TSH is rapidly metabolized in the liver. In contrast, PT-TSH has sialylated multibranched N-glycans; in the circulation, it forms the macro-TSH complex with immunoglobulin or albumin, resulting in the loss of its bioactivity. Glycosylation is fundamental to a wide range of biological processes. This report demonstrates its involvement in preventing functional crosstalk of signaling molecules in the body.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Human Tissue Interactomes Reveals Factors Leading to Tissue-Specific Manifestation of Hereditary Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  11. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Barshir; Omer Shwartz; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Esti Yeger-Lotem

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  12. Responsiveness of genes to manipulation of transcription factors in ES cells is associated with histone modifications and tissue specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In addition to determining static states of gene expression (high vs. low), it is important to characterize their dynamic status. For example, genes with H3K27me3 chromatin marks are not only suppressed but also poised for activation. However, the responsiveness of genes to perturbations has never been studied systematically. To distinguish gene responses to specific factors from responsiveness in general, it is necessary to analyze gene expression profiles of cells responding to a large variety of disturbances, and such databases did not exist before. Results We estimated the responsiveness of all genes in mouse ES cells using our recently published database on expression change after controlled induction of 53 transcription factors (TFs) and other genes. Responsive genes (N = 4746), which were readily upregulated or downregulated depending on the kind of perturbation, mostly have regulatory functions and a propensity to become tissue-specific upon differentiation. Tissue-specific expression was evaluated on the basis of published (GNF) and our new data for 15 organs and tissues. Non-responsive genes (N = 9562), which did not change their expression much following any perturbation, were enriched in housekeeping functions. We found that TF-responsiveness in ES cells is the best predictor known for tissue-specificity in gene expression. Among genes with CpG islands, high responsiveness is associated with H3K27me3 chromatin marks, and low responsiveness is associated with H3K36me3 chromatin, stronger tri-methylation of H3K4, binding of E2F1, and GABP binding motifs in promoters. Conclusions We thus propose the responsiveness of expression to perturbations as a new way to define the dynamic status of genes, which brings new insights into mechanisms of regulation of gene expression and tissue specificity. PMID:21306619

  13. Bone marrow-derived macrophages exclusively expressed caveolin-2: The role of inflammatory activators and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceckova, Michaela; Martiskova, Hana; Koudelka, Adolf; Kubala, Lukas; Lojek, Antonin; Pekarova, Michaela

    2015-11-01

    Caveolins are specific proteins involved in regulation of signal transduction to intracellular space. Still, their contribution to immune functions has not been completely clarified. Thus, we decided to characterize the expression of caveolins in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) under resting and inflammatory conditions. The effect of classical activators (lipopolysaccharide, LPS; interferon-gamma, IFN-γ) was further potentiated with hypoxic (5% O2) conditions. The activation of p44/42-extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and expression of caveolin-1, -2, and -3, hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was monitored using the Western blot technique. The production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) was analyzed by Griess method or ELISA, respectively. BMDMs were also transfected with siRNA against caveolin-2. Importantly, our study showed for the first time that BMDMs expressed only caveolin-2, and its level decreased after activation of macrophages with LPS, IFN-γ, and/or hypoxia. The expression of caveolin-2 negatively correlates with the iNOS and HIF-1α protein levels, as well as with the LPS/IFN-γ- and hypoxia-induced activation of ERK1/2. We concluded that caveolin-2 is most probably involved in regulation of pro-inflammatory responses of BMDMs, triggered via activation of ERK1/2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. MicroRNAs show mutually exclusive expression patterns in the brain of adult male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Klausen, Mikkel; Helboe, Lone

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The brain is a major site of microRNA (miRNA) gene expression, but the spatial expression patterns of miRNAs within the brain have not yet been fully covered. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have characterized the regional expression profiles of miRNAs in five distinct regions...... of the adult rat brain: amygdala, cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus and substantia nigra. Microarray profiling uncovered 48 miRNAs displaying more than three-fold enrichment between two or more brain regions. Notably, we found reciprocal expression profiles for a subset of the miRNAs predominantly found...... (> ten times) in either the cerebellum (miR-206 and miR-497) or the forebrain regions (miR-132, miR-212, miR-221 and miR-222). CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that some miRNAs could be important for area-specific functions in the brain. Our data, combined with previous studies in mice...

  15. Differential activity of a tissue-specific extinguisher locus in hepatic and nonhepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdeau, H; Peterson, T C; Fournier, R E

    1989-05-01

    Tissue-specific extinguisher 1 (Tse-1) is a genetic locus on mouse chromosome 11 that can repress expression of several liver genes in trans. This locus is clearly active in fibroblasts, as hepatoma cells retaining fibroblast chromosome 11 are extinguished for both tyrosine aminotransferase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression. To assess the activity of Tse-1 in other tissues, we transferred mouse chromosome 11 from several different cell types into rat hepatoma recipients. Tse-1 was active in nonhepatic cell lines derived from each primary germ layer, but Tse-1 activity was not apparent in hybrids between hepatoma cells and primary mouse hepatocytes. These differences in the genetic activity of murine Tse-1 were apparently heritable in cis.

  16. Tissue-specific insulin signaling mediates female sexual attractiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Y Fedina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals choose their mates so as to maximize reproductive success, and one important component of this choice is assessment of traits reflecting mate quality. Little is known about why specific traits are used for mate quality assessment nor about how they reflect it. We have previously shown that global manipulation of insulin signaling, a nutrient-sensing pathway governing investment in survival versus reproduction, affects female sexual attractiveness in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Here we demonstrate that these effects on attractiveness derive from insulin signaling in the fat body and ovarian follicle cells, whose signals are integrated by pheromone-producing cells called oenocytes. Functional ovaries were required for global insulin signaling effects on attractiveness, and manipulations of insulin signaling specifically in late follicle cells recapitulated effects of global manipulations. Interestingly, modulation of insulin signaling in the fat body produced opposite effects on attractiveness, suggesting a competitive relationship with the ovary. Furthermore, all investigated tissue-specific insulin signaling manipulations that changed attractiveness also changed fecundity in the corresponding direction, pointing to insulin pathway activity as a reliable link between fecundity and attractiveness cues. The cues themselves, cuticular hydrocarbons, responded distinctly to fat body and follicle cell manipulations, indicating independent readouts of the pathway activity from these two tissues. Thus, here we describe a system in which female attractiveness results from an apparent connection between attractiveness cues and an organismal state of high fecundity, both of which are created by lowered insulin signaling in the fat body and increased insulin signaling in late follicle cells.

  17. HdhQ111 Mice Exhibit Tissue Specific Metabolite Profiles that Include Striatal Lipid Accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B Carroll

    Full Text Available The HTT CAG expansion mutation causes Huntington's Disease and is associated with a wide range of cellular consequences, including altered metabolism. The mutant allele is expressed widely, in all tissues, but the striatum and cortex are especially vulnerable to its effects. To more fully understand this tissue-specificity, early in the disease process, we asked whether the metabolic impact of the mutant CAG expanded allele in heterozygous B6.HdhQ111/+ mice would be common across tissues, or whether tissues would have tissue-specific responses and whether such changes may be affected by diet. Specifically, we cross-sectionally examined steady state metabolite concentrations from a range of tissues (plasma, brown adipose tissue, cerebellum, striatum, liver, white adipose tissue, using an established liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry pipeline, from cohorts of 8 month old mutant and wild-type littermate mice that were fed one of two different high-fat diets. The differential response to diet highlighted a proportion of metabolites in all tissues, ranging from 3% (7/219 in the striatum to 12% (25/212 in white adipose tissue. By contrast, the mutant CAG-expanded allele primarily affected brain metabolites, with 14% (30/219 of metabolites significantly altered, compared to wild-type, in striatum and 11% (25/224 in the cerebellum. In general, diet and the CAG-expanded allele both elicited metabolite changes that were predominantly tissue-specific and non-overlapping, with evidence for mutation-by-diet interaction in peripheral tissues most affected by diet. Machine-learning approaches highlighted the accumulation of diverse lipid species as the most genotype-predictive metabolite changes in the striatum. Validation experiments in cell culture demonstrated that lipid accumulation was also a defining feature of mutant HdhQ111 striatal progenitor cells. Thus, metabolite-level responses to the CAG expansion mutation in vivo were tissue specific and

  18. Lung Cancer Signature Biomarkers: tissue specific semantic similarity based clustering of Digital Differential Display (DDD data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Mousami

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue-specific Unigene Sets derived from more than one million expressed sequence tags (ESTs in the NCBI, GenBank database offers a platform for identifying significantly and differentially expressed tissue-specific genes by in-silico methods. Digital differential display (DDD rapidly creates transcription profiles based on EST comparisons and numerically calculates, as a fraction of the pool of ESTs, the relative sequence abundance of known and novel genes. However, the process of identifying the most likely tissue for a specific disease in which to search for candidate genes from the pool of differentially expressed genes remains difficult. Therefore, we have used ‘Gene Ontology semantic similarity score’ to measure the GO similarity between gene products of lung tissue-specific candidate genes from control (normal and disease (cancer sets. This semantic similarity score matrix based on hierarchical clustering represents in the form of a dendrogram. The dendrogram cluster stability was assessed by multiple bootstrapping. Multiple bootstrapping also computes a p-value for each cluster and corrects the bias of the bootstrap probability. Results Subsequent hierarchical clustering by the multiple bootstrapping method (α = 0.95 identified seven clusters. The comparative, as well as subtractive, approach revealed a set of 38 biomarkers comprising four distinct lung cancer signature biomarker clusters (panel 1–4. Further gene enrichment analysis of the four panels revealed that each panel represents a set of lung cancer linked metastasis diagnostic biomarkers (panel 1, chemotherapy/drug resistance biomarkers (panel 2, hypoxia regulated biomarkers (panel 3 and lung extra cellular matrix biomarkers (panel 4. Conclusions Expression analysis reveals that hypoxia induced lung cancer related biomarkers (panel 3, HIF and its modulating proteins (TGM2, CSNK1A1, CTNNA1, NAMPT/Visfatin, TNFRSF1A, ETS1, SRC-1, FN1, APLP2, DMBT1

  19. Lung cancer signature biomarkers: tissue specific semantic similarity based clustering of digital differential display (DDD) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Mousami; Khurana, Pankaj; Sugadev, Ragumani

    2012-11-02

    The tissue-specific Unigene Sets derived from more than one million expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the NCBI, GenBank database offers a platform for identifying significantly and differentially expressed tissue-specific genes by in-silico methods. Digital differential display (DDD) rapidly creates transcription profiles based on EST comparisons and numerically calculates, as a fraction of the pool of ESTs, the relative sequence abundance of known and novel genes. However, the process of identifying the most likely tissue for a specific disease in which to search for candidate genes from the pool of differentially expressed genes remains difficult. Therefore, we have used 'Gene Ontology semantic similarity score' to measure the GO similarity between gene products of lung tissue-specific candidate genes from control (normal) and disease (cancer) sets. This semantic similarity score matrix based on hierarchical clustering represents in the form of a dendrogram. The dendrogram cluster stability was assessed by multiple bootstrapping. Multiple bootstrapping also computes a p-value for each cluster and corrects the bias of the bootstrap probability. Subsequent hierarchical clustering by the multiple bootstrapping method (α = 0.95) identified seven clusters. The comparative, as well as subtractive, approach revealed a set of 38 biomarkers comprising four distinct lung cancer signature biomarker clusters (panel 1-4). Further gene enrichment analysis of the four panels revealed that each panel represents a set of lung cancer linked metastasis diagnostic biomarkers (panel 1), chemotherapy/drug resistance biomarkers (panel 2), hypoxia regulated biomarkers (panel 3) and lung extra cellular matrix biomarkers (panel 4). Expression analysis reveals that hypoxia induced lung cancer related biomarkers (panel 3), HIF and its modulating proteins (TGM2, CSNK1A1, CTNNA1, NAMPT/Visfatin, TNFRSF1A, ETS1, SRC-1, FN1, APLP2, DMBT1/SAG, AIB1 and AZIN1) are significantly down regulated

  20. EPS: an empirical Bayes approach to integrating pleiotropy and tissue-specific information for prioritizing risk genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Wan, Xiang; Ma, Shuangge; Yang, Can

    2016-06-15

    Researchers worldwide have generated a huge volume of genomic data, including thousands of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and massive amounts of gene expression data from different tissues. How to perform a joint analysis of these data to gain new biological insights has become a critical step in understanding the etiology of complex diseases. Due to the polygenic architecture of complex diseases, the identification of risk genes remains challenging. Motivated by the shared risk genes found in complex diseases and tissue-specific gene expression patterns, we propose as an Empirical Bayes approach to integrating Pleiotropy and Tissue-Specific information (EPS) for prioritizing risk genes. As demonstrated by extensive simulation studies, EPS greatly improves the power of identification for disease-risk genes. EPS enables rigorous hypothesis testing of pleiotropy and tissue-specific risk gene expression patterns. All of the model parameters can be adaptively estimated from the developed expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. We applied EPS to the bipolar disorder and schizophrenia GWAS from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, along with the gene expression data for multiple tissues from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project. The results of the real data analysis demonstrate many advantages of EPS. The EPS software is available on https://sites.google.com/site/liujin810822 CONTACT: eeyang@hkbu.edu.hk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Screening in larval zebrafish reveals tissue-specific distribution of fifteen fluorescent compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiao Yao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish is a prominent vertebrate model for low-cost in vivo whole organism screening. In our recent screening of the distribution patterns of fluorescent compounds in live zebrafish larvae, fifteen compounds with tissue-specific distributions were identified. Several compounds were observed to accumulate in tissues where they were reported to induce side-effects, and compounds with similar structures tended to be enriched in the same tissues, with minor differences. In particular, we found three novel red fluorescent bone-staining dyes: purpurin, lucidin and 3-hydroxy-morindone; purpurin can effectively label bones in both larval and adult zebrafish, as well as in postnatal mice, without significantly affecting bone mass and density. Moreover, two structurally similar chemotherapeutic compounds, doxorubicin and epirubicin, were observed to have distinct distribution preferences in zebrafish. Epirubicin maintained a relatively higher concentration in the liver, and performed better in inhibiting hepatic hyperplasia caused by the over-expression of krasG12V. In total, our study suggests that the transparent zebrafish larvae serve as valuable tools for identifying tissue-specific distributions of fluorescent compounds.

  2. Tissue specific requirements for WNT11 in developing outflow tract and dorsal mesenchymal protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Patrick P; Lin, Lizhu; Boogerd, Cornelis J; Martin, James F; Andelfinger, Gregor; Grossfeld, Paul D; Evans, Sylvia M

    2017-09-01

    Correct cardiac development is essential for fetal and adult life. Disruptions in a variety of signaling pathways result in congenital heart defects, including outflow and inflow tract defects. We previously found that WNT11 regulates outflow tract development. However, tissue specific requirements for WNT11 in this process remain unknown and whether WNT11 is required for inflow tract development has not been addressed. Here we find that germline Wnt11 null mice also show hypoplasia of the dorsal mesenchymal protrusion (DMP), which is required for atrioventricular septation. Ablation of Wnt11 with myocardial cTnTCre recapitulated outflow tract defects observed in germline Wnt11 null mice, but DMP development was unaffected. In contrast, ablation of Wnt11 with Isl1Cre fully recapitulated both outflow tract and DMP defects of Wnt11 germline nulls. DMP hypoplasia in Wnt11 mutants was associated with reduced proliferation within the DMP, but no evident defects in myocardial differentiation of the DMP. Examination of Pitx2-, Axin2-, or Patched-lacZ reporter mice revealed no alterations in reporter expression, suggesting that WNT11 was required downstream of, or in parallel to, these signaling pathways to regulate DMP formation. These studies revealed a previously unappreciated role for WNT11 for DMP formation and distinct tissue-specific requirements for WNT11 in outflow tract and DMP development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Generation of Shox2-Cre allele for tissue specific manipulation of genes in the developing heart, palate, and limb

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Chao; Gu, Shuping; Chen, YiPing

    2013-01-01

    Shox2 is expressed in several developing organs in a tissue specific manner in both mice and humans, including the heart, palate, limb, and nervous system. To better understand the spatial and temporal expression patterns of Shox2 and to systematically dissect the genetic cascade regulated by Shox2, we created Shox2-LacZ and Shox2-Cre knock-in mouse lines. We show that the Shox2-LacZ allele expresses beta-galactosidase reporter gene in a fashion that recapitulates the endogenous Shox2 express...

  4. Partitioning the human transcriptome using HKera, a novel classifier of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin W T Chiang

    Full Text Available High-throughput transcriptomic experiments have made it possible to classify genes that are ubiquitously expressed as housekeeping (HK genes and those expressed only in selective tissues as tissue-specific (TS genes. Although partitioning a transcriptome into HK and TS genes is conceptually problematic owing to the lack of precise definitions and gene expression profile criteria for the two, information whether a gene is an HK or a TS gene can provide an initial clue to its cellular and/or functional role. Consequently, the development of new and novel HK (TS classification methods has been a topic of considerable interest in post-genomics research. Here, we report such a development. Our method, called HKera, differs from the others by utilizing a novel property of HK genes that we have previously uncovered, namely that the ranking order of their expression levels, as opposed to the expression levels themselves, tends to be preserved from one tissue to another. Evaluated against multiple benchmark sets of human HK genes, including one recently derived from second generation sequencing data, HKera was shown to perform significantly better than five other classifiers that use different methodologies. An enrichment analysis of pathway and gene ontology annotations showed that HKera-predicted HK and TS genes have distinct functional roles and, together, cover most of the ontology categories. These results show that HKera is a good transcriptome partitioner that can be used to search for, and obtain useful expression and functional information for, novel HK (TS genes.

  5. Partitioning the Human Transcriptome Using HKera, a Novel Classifier of Housekeeping and Tissue-Specific Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput transcriptomic experiments have made it possible to classify genes that are ubiquitously expressed as housekeeping (HK) genes and those expressed only in selective tissues as tissue-specific (TS) genes. Although partitioning a transcriptome into HK and TS genes is conceptually problematic owing to the lack of precise definitions and gene expression profile criteria for the two, information whether a gene is an HK or a TS gene can provide an initial clue to its cellular and/or functional role. Consequently, the development of new and novel HK (TS) classification methods has been a topic of considerable interest in post-genomics research. Here, we report such a development. Our method, called HKera, differs from the others by utilizing a novel property of HK genes that we have previously uncovered, namely that the ranking order of their expression levels, as opposed to the expression levels themselves, tends to be preserved from one tissue to another. Evaluated against multiple benchmark sets of human HK genes, including one recently derived from second generation sequencing data, HKera was shown to perform significantly better than five other classifiers that use different methodologies. An enrichment analysis of pathway and gene ontology annotations showed that HKera-predicted HK and TS genes have distinct functional roles and, together, cover most of the ontology categories. These results show that HKera is a good transcriptome partitioner that can be used to search for, and obtain useful expression and functional information for, novel HK (TS) genes. PMID:24376628

  6. Partitioning the human transcriptome using HKera, a novel classifier of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Austin W T; Shaw, Grace T W; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput transcriptomic experiments have made it possible to classify genes that are ubiquitously expressed as housekeeping (HK) genes and those expressed only in selective tissues as tissue-specific (TS) genes. Although partitioning a transcriptome into HK and TS genes is conceptually problematic owing to the lack of precise definitions and gene expression profile criteria for the two, information whether a gene is an HK or a TS gene can provide an initial clue to its cellular and/or functional role. Consequently, the development of new and novel HK (TS) classification methods has been a topic of considerable interest in post-genomics research. Here, we report such a development. Our method, called HKera, differs from the others by utilizing a novel property of HK genes that we have previously uncovered, namely that the ranking order of their expression levels, as opposed to the expression levels themselves, tends to be preserved from one tissue to another. Evaluated against multiple benchmark sets of human HK genes, including one recently derived from second generation sequencing data, HKera was shown to perform significantly better than five other classifiers that use different methodologies. An enrichment analysis of pathway and gene ontology annotations showed that HKera-predicted HK and TS genes have distinct functional roles and, together, cover most of the ontology categories. These results show that HKera is a good transcriptome partitioner that can be used to search for, and obtain useful expression and functional information for, novel HK (TS) genes.

  7. An Arabidopsis tissue-specific RNAi method for studying genes essential to mitosis.

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    Brunilís Burgos-Rivera

    Full Text Available A large fraction of the genes in plants can be considered essential in the sense that when absent the plant fails to develop past the first few cell divisions. The fact that angiosperms pass through a haploid gametophyte stage can make it challenging to propagate such mutants even in the heterozygous condition. Here we describe a tissue-specific RNAi method that allows us to visualize cell division phenotypes in petals, which are large dispensable organs. Portions of the APETALA (AP3 and PISTILLATA (PI promoters confer early petal-specific expression. We show that when either promoter is used to drive the expression of a beta-glucuronidase (GUS RNAi transgene in plants uniformly expressing GUS, GUS expression is knocked down specifically in petals. We further tested the system by targeting the essential kinetochore protein CENPC and two different components of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (MAD2 and BUBR1. Plant lines expressing petal-specific RNAi hairpins targeting these genes exhibited an array of petal phenotypes. Cytological analyses of the affected flower buds confirmed that CENPC knockdown causes cell cycle arrest but provided no evidence that either MAD2 or BUBR1 are required for mitosis (although both genes are required for petal growth by this assay. A key benefit of the petal-specific RNAi method is that the phenotypes are not expressed in the lineages leading to germ cells, and the phenotypes are faithfully transmitted for at least four generations despite their pronounced effects on growth.

  8. Tissue-specific activation of a single gustatory receptor produces opposing behavioral responses in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Ryan M; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2012-10-01

    Understanding sensory systems that perceive environmental inputs and neural circuits that select appropriate motor outputs is essential for studying how organisms modulate behavior and make decisions necessary for survival. Drosophila melanogaster oviposition is one such important behavior, in which females evaluate their environment and choose to lay eggs on substrates they may find aversive in other contexts. We employed neurogenetic techniques to characterize neurons that influence the choice between repulsive positional and attractive egg-laying responses toward the bitter-tasting compound lobeline. Surprisingly, we found that neurons expressing Gr66a, a gustatory receptor normally involved in avoidance behaviors, receive input for both attractive and aversive preferences. We hypothesized that these opposing responses may result from activation of distinct Gr66a-expressing neurons. Using tissue-specific rescue experiments, we found that Gr66a-expressing neurons on the legs mediate positional aversion. In contrast, pharyngeal taste cells mediate the egg-laying attraction to lobeline, as determined by analysis of mosaic flies in which subsets of Gr66a neurons were silenced. Finally, inactivating mushroom body neurons disrupted both aversive and attractive responses, suggesting that this brain structure is a candidate integration center for decision-making during Drosophila oviposition. We thus define sensory and central neurons critical to the process by which flies decide where to lay an egg. Furthermore, our findings provide insights into the complex nature of gustatory perception in Drosophila. We show that tissue-specific activation of bitter-sensing Gr66a neurons provides one mechanism by which the gustatory system differentially encodes aversive and attractive responses, allowing the female fly to modulate her behavior in a context-dependent manner.

  9. Tissue-specific features of the X chromosome and nucleolus spatial dynamics in a malaria mosquito, Anopheles atroparvus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semen M Bondarenko

    Full Text Available Spatial organization of chromosome territories is important for maintenance of genomic stability and regulation of gene expression. Recent studies have shown tissue-specific features of chromosome attachments to the nuclear envelope in various organisms including malaria mosquitoes. However, other spatial characteristics of nucleus organization, like volume and shape of chromosome territories, have not been studied in Anopheles. We conducted a thorough analysis of tissue-specific features of the X chromosome and nucleolus volume and shape in follicular epithelium and nurse cells of the Anopheles atroparvus ovaries using a modern open-source software. DNA of the polytene X chromosome from ovarian nurse cells was obtained by microdissection and was used as a template for amplification with degenerate oligo primers. A fluorescently labeled X chromosome painting probe was hybridized with formaldehyde-fixed ovaries of mosquitoes using a 3D-FISH method. The nucleolus was stained by immunostaining with an anti-fibrillarin antibody. The analysis was conducted with TANGO-a software for a chromosome spatial organization analysis. We show that the volume and position of the X chromosome have tissue-specific characteristics. Unlike nurse cell nuclei, the growth of follicular epithelium nuclei is not accompanied with the proportional growth of the X chromosome. However, the shape of the X chromosome does not differ between the tissues. The dynamics of the X chromosome attachment regions location is tissue-specific and it is correlated with the process of nucleus growth in follicular epithelium and nurse cells.

  10. SMRT has tissue-specific isoform profiles that include a form containing one CoRNR box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Stephen; Malartre, Marianne; Sharpe, Colin

    2005-09-02

    SMRT acts as a corepressor for a range of transcription factors. The amino-terminal part of the protein includes domains that mainly mediate transcriptional repression whilst the carboxy-terminal part includes domains that interact with nuclear receptors using up to three motifs called CoRNR boxes. The region of the SMRT primary transcript encoding the interaction domains is subject to alternative splicing that varies the inclusion of the third CoRNR box. The profile in mice includes an abundant, novel SMRT isoform that possesses just one CoRNR box. Mouse tissues therefore express SMRT isoforms containing one, two or three CoRNR boxes. In frogs, the SMRT isoform profile is tissue-specific. The mouse also shows distinct profiles generated by differential expression levels of the SMRT transcript isoforms. The formation of multiple SMRT isoforms and their tissue-specific regulation indicates a mechanism, whereby cells can define the repertoire of transcription factors regulated by SMRT.

  11. A SUPERMAN-like gene is exclusively expressed in female flowers of the dioecious plant Silene latifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Yusuke; Fujiwara, Makoto T; Koizumi, Ayako; Nishihara, Kiyoshi; Nishiyama, Rie; Kifune, Etsuko; Abe, Tomoko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2009-06-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) underlying dioecious flower development, the present study analyzed a SUPERMAN (SUP) homolog, SlSUP, which was identified in Silene latifolia. The sex of this plant is determined by heteromorphic X and Y sex chromosomes. It was revealed that SlSUP is a single-copy autosomal gene expressed exclusively in female flowers. Introduction of a genomic copy of SlSUP into the Arabidopsis thaliana sup (sup-2) mutant complemented the excess-stamen and infertile phenotypes of sup-2, and the overexpression of SlSUP in transgenic Arabidopsis plants resulted in reduced stamen numbers as well as the suppression of petal elongation. During the development of the female flower in S. latifolia, the expression of SlSUP is first detectable in whorls 2 and 3 when the normal expression pattern of the B-class flowering genes was already established and persisted in the stamen primordia until the ovule had matured completely. In addition, significant expression of SlSUP was detected in the ovules, suggestive of the involvement of this gene in ovule development. Furthermore, it was revealed that the de-suppression of stamen development by infection of the S. latifolia female flower with Microbotryum violaceum was accompanied by a significant reduction in SlSUP transcript levels in the induced organs. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SlSUP is a female flower-specific gene and suggest that SlSUP has a positive role in the female flower developmental pathways of S. latifolia.

  12. Time-resolved and tissue-specific systems analysis of the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

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    Robert Kleemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sequence of events leading to the development of insulin resistance (IR as well as the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are incompletely understood. As reductionist approaches have been largely unsuccessful in providing an understanding of the pathogenesis of IR, there is a need for an integrative, time-resolved approach to elucidate the development of the disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male ApoE3Leiden transgenic mice exhibiting a humanized lipid metabolism were fed a high-fat diet (HFD for 0, 1, 6, 9, or 12 weeks. Development of IR was monitored in individual mice over time by performing glucose tolerance tests and measuring specific biomarkers in plasma, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analysis to assess IR in a tissue-specific manner. To elucidate the dynamics and tissue-specificity of metabolic and inflammatory processes key to IR development, a time-resolved systems analysis of gene expression and metabolite levels in liver, white adipose tissue (WAT, and muscle was performed. During HFD feeding, the mice became increasingly obese and showed a gradual increase in glucose intolerance. IR became first manifest in liver (week 6 and then in WAT (week 12, while skeletal muscle remained insulin-sensitive. Microarray analysis showed rapid upregulation of carbohydrate (only liver and lipid metabolism genes (liver, WAT. Metabolomics revealed significant changes in the ratio of saturated to polyunsaturated fatty acids (liver, WAT, plasma and in the concentrations of glucose, gluconeogenesis and Krebs cycle metabolites, and branched amino acids (liver. HFD evoked an early hepatic inflammatory response which then gradually declined to near baseline. By contrast, inflammation in WAT increased over time, reaching highest values in week 12. In skeletal muscle, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, and inflammation was gradually suppressed with HFD. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HFD-induced IR is a time- and tissue

  13. Tissue-specific genome editing in Ciona embryos by CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolfi, Alberto; Gandhi, Shashank; Salek, Farhana; Christiaen, Lionel

    2014-11-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has ushered in a new era of targeted genetic manipulations. Here, we report the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to induce double-stranded breaks in the genome of the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. We use electroporation to deliver CRISPR/Cas9 components for tissue-specific disruption of the Ebf (Collier/Olf/EBF) gene in hundreds of synchronized Ciona embryos. Phenotyping of transfected embryos in the 'F0' generation revealed that endogenous Ebf function is required for specification of Islet-expressing motor ganglion neurons and atrial siphon muscles. We demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9 is sufficiently effective and specific to generate large numbers of embryos carrying mutations in a targeted gene of interest, which should allow for rapid screening of gene function in Ciona. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. A mini review: RuBisCo small subunit as a strong, green tissue-specific promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhsh Allah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant genetic transformation is a powerful application used to study gene expression in plants. Transcriptomics has the potential to rapidly increase our knowledge of spatial and temporal gene expression and lead to new promoters for research and development. The availability of a broad spectrum of promoters with the ability to regulate the temporal and spatial expression patterns of transgenes can increase the successful application of transgenic technology. A variety of promoters is necessary at all levels of genetic engineering in plants, from basic research, to the development of economically viable crops and plant commodities, it can address legitimate concerns raised about the safety and containment of transgenic plants in the environment. Compared with temporal- or spatial-specific expression of a toxin, constitutive expression of foreign proteins in transgenic plants can cause adverse effects. The constitutive overexpression of transgenes that interferes with normal processes in a plant underscores the need for refinement of transgene expression. The development of tissue-specific promoters to drive transgene expression has helped fulfill that need. Therefore, in certain circumstances it is desirable to use expression-specific promoters which only express the foreign gene in specific plant tissues or organs. This review highlights the uses and benefits reaped by the use of green tissue-specific promoter for the RuBisCo small subunit in different crops and systems and thus establishing a broad range of tissue-specific promoters. Such plant promoters that are activated precisely when and where they are needed would be ideal for genetic engineering strategies.

  15. Endometrial natural killer (NK) cells reveal a tissue-specific receptor repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyaerts, D; Kuret, T; van Cranenbroek, B; van der Zeeuw-Hingrez, S; van der Heijden, O W H; van der Meer, A; Joosten, I; van der Molen, R G

    2018-02-13

    Is the natural killer (NK) cell receptor repertoire of endometrial NK (eNK) cells tissue-specific? The NK cell receptor (NKR) expression profile in pre-pregnancy endometrium appears to have a unique tissue-specific phenotype, different from that found in NK cells in peripheral blood, suggesting that these cells are finely tuned towards the reception of an allogeneic fetus. NK cells are important for successful pregnancy. After implantation, NK cells encounter extravillous trophoblast cells and regulate trophoblast invasion. NK cell activity is amongst others regulated by C-type lectin heterodimer (CD94/NKG2) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like (KIR) receptors. KIR expression on decidual NK cells is affected by the presence of maternal HLA-C and biased towards KIR2D expression. However, little is known about NKR expression on eNK cells prior to pregnancy. In this study, matched peripheral and menstrual blood (a source of endometrial cells) was obtained from 25 healthy females with regular menstrual cycles. Menstrual blood was collected during the first 36 h of menstruation using a menstrual cup, a non-invasive technique to obtain endometrial cells. KIR and NKG2 receptor expression on eNK cells was characterized by 10-color flow cytometry, and compared to matched pbNK cells of the same female. KIR and HLA-C genotypes were determined by PCR-SSOP techniques. Anti-CMV IgG antibodies in plasma were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay. KIR expression patterns of eNK cells collected from the same female do not differ over consecutive menstrual cycles. The percentage of NK cells expressing KIR2DL2/L3/S2, KIR2DL3, KIR2DL1, LILRB1 and/or NKG2A was significantly higher in eNK cells compared to pbNK cells, while no significant difference was observed for NKG2C, KIR2DL1/S1, and KIR3DL1. The NKR repertoire of eNK cells was clearly different from pbNK cells, with eNK cells co-expressing more than three NKR simultaneously. In addition, outlier analysis revealed 8 and 15 NKR

  16. Linking salinity stress tolerance with tissue-specific Na+ sequestration in wheat roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghong eWu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Salinity stress tolerance is a physiologically complex trait that is conferred by the large array of interacting mechanisms. Among these, vacuolar Na+ sequestration has always been considered as one of the key components differentiating between sensitive and tolerant species and genotypes. However, vacuolar Na+ sequestration has been rarely considered in the context of the tissue-specific expression and regulation of appropriate transporters contributing to Na+ removal from the cytosol. In this work, six bread wheat varieties contrasting in their salinity tolerance (three tolerant and three sensitive were used to understand the essentiality of vacuolar Na+ sequestration between functionally different root tissues, and link it with the overall salinity stress tolerance in this species. Roots of 4-d old wheat seedlings were treated with 100 mM NaCl for 3 days, and then Na+ distribution between cytosol and vacuole was quantified by CoroNa Green fluorescent dye imaging. Our major observations were as follows: 1 salinity stress tolerance correlated positively with vacuolar Na+ sequestration ability in the mature root zone but not in the root apex; 2 Contrary to expectations, cytosolic Na+ levels in root meristem were significantly higher in salt tolerant than sensitive group, while vacuolar Na+ levels showed an opposite trend. These results are interpreted as meristem cells playing a role of the salt sensor; 3 No significant difference in the vacuolar Na+ sequestration ability was found between sensitive and tolerant group in either transition or elongation zones; 4 The overall Na+ accumulation was highest in the elongation zone, suggesting its role in osmotic adjustment and turgor maintenance required to drive root expansion growth. Overall, the reported results suggest high tissue-specificity of Na+ uptake, signalling, and sequestration in wheat root. The implications of these findings for plant breeding for salinity stress tolerance are discussed.

  17. Hepatocyte-specific PPARA expression exclusively promotes agonist-induced cell proliferation without influence from nonparenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocker, Chad N; Yue, Jiang; Kim, Donghwan; Qu, Aijuan; Bonzo, Jessica A; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2017-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARA) is a nuclear transcription factor and key mediator of systemic lipid metabolism. Prolonged activation in rodents causes hepatocyte proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma. Little is known about the contribution of nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) to PPARA-mediated cell proliferation. NPC contribution to PPARA agonist-induced hepatomegaly was assessed in hepatocyte ( Ppara △Hep )- and macrophage ( Ppara △Mac )-specific Ppara null mice. Mice were treated with the agonist Wy-14643 for 14 days, and response of conditional null mice was compared with conventional knockout mice ( Ppara -/- ). Wy-14643 treatment caused weight loss and severe hepatomegaly in wild-type and Ppara △Mac mice, and histological analysis revealed characteristic hepatocyte swelling; Ppara △Hep and Ppara -/- mice were protected from these effects. Ppara △Mac serum chemistries, as well as aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels, matched wild-type mice. Agonist-treated Ppara △Hep mice had elevated serum cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides when compared with Ppara -/- mice, indicating a possible role for extrahepatic PPARA in regulating circulating lipid levels. BrdU labeling confirmed increased cell proliferation only in wild-type and Ppara △Mac mice. Macrophage PPARA disruption did not impact agonist-induced upregulation of lipid metabolism, cell proliferation, or DNA damage and repair-related gene expression, whereas gene expression was repressed in Ppara △Hep mice. Interestingly, downregulation of inflammatory cytokines IL-15 and IL-18 was dependent on macrophage PPARA. Cell type-specific regulation of target genes was confirmed in primary hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. These studies conclusively show that cell proliferation is mediated exclusively by PPARA activation in hepatocytes and that Kupffer cell PPARA has an important role in mediating the anti-inflammatory effects of PPARA agonists

  18. Regulating expressin of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, R N; Dai, Shunhong

    2009-12-15

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Our research supported by this program has led to the identification of rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 that play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV) through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter. RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants and to improve biofuel feedstock.

  19. 78 FR 28229 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Device and System for Expression Microdissection (xMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Device and System... start-up exclusive commercial license agreement to practice the inventions embodied in International PCT... 2004/068104 on August 12, 2004, now expired; U.S. Patent No. 7,709,047 (HHS Ref. No. E-113-2003/0-US-03...

  20. Tissue-Specific Effects of Bariatric Surgery Including Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon N. Dankel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the molecular links between obesity and disease is potentially of great benefit for society. In this paper we discuss proposed mechanisms whereby bariatric surgery improves metabolic health, including acute effects on glucose metabolism and long-term effects on metabolic tissues (adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver and mitochondrial function. More short-term randomized controlled trials should be performed that include simultaneous measurement of metabolic parameters in different tissues, such as tissue gene expression, protein profile, and lipid content. By directly comparing different surgical procedures using a wider array of metabolic parameters, one may further unravel the mechanisms of aberrant metabolic regulation in obesity and related disorders.

  1. Disease gene prioritization by integrating tissue-specific molecular networks using a robust multi-network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jingchao; Koyuturk, Mehmet; Tong, Hanghang; Haines, Jonathan; Xu, Rong; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-11-10

    Accurately prioritizing candidate disease genes is an important and challenging problem. Various network-based methods have been developed to predict potential disease genes by utilizing the disease similarity network and molecular networks such as protein interaction or gene co-expression networks. Although successful, a common limitation of the existing methods is that they assume all diseases share the same molecular network and a single generic molecular network is used to predict candidate genes for all diseases. However, different diseases tend to manifest in different tissues, and the molecular networks in different tissues are usually different. An ideal method should be able to incorporate tissue-specific molecular networks for different diseases. In this paper, we develop a robust and flexible method to integrate tissue-specific molecular networks for disease gene prioritization. Our method allows each disease to have its own tissue-specific network(s). We formulate the problem of candidate gene prioritization as an optimization problem based on network propagation. When there are multiple tissue-specific networks available for a disease, our method can automatically infer the relative importance of each tissue-specific network. Thus it is robust to the noisy and incomplete network data. To solve the optimization problem, we develop fast algorithms which have linear time complexities in the number of nodes in the molecular networks. We also provide rigorous theoretical foundations for our algorithms in terms of their optimality and convergence properties. Extensive experimental results show that our method can significantly improve the accuracy of candidate gene prioritization compared with the state-of-the-art methods. In our experiments, we compare our methods with 7 popular network-based disease gene prioritization algorithms on diseases from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. The experimental results demonstrate that our methods

  2. Juxtaposed genes in 7q21-22 amplicon contribute for two major gastric cancer sub-Types by mutual exclusive expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamilzhalagan, Sembulingam; Muthuswami, Muthulakshmi; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2017-04-01

    Genomic Copy Number Variations (CNV) and the associated gene signatures are useful for cancer prognosis, diagnosis, and targeted therapeutics. Earlier, 7q21-22 region was reported for frequent amplification in gastric cancer and potential candidate genes were identified. An analysis of the expression pattern of the 159 genes located in this amplicon revealed the consistent elevated expression of 21 genes in gastric tumors. These genes are closely arranged within the 20 Mb region, and they showed a bimodal expression pattern. SHFM1 and 14 other genes are expressed in intestinal type gastric tumors. COL1A2 and PCOLCE genes of this region are expressed in diffuse type gastric tumors. Similarly, genome-wide expression neighbors of SHFM1 and COL1A2 also showed mutually exclusive expression pattern, and stratify intestinal and diffuse type gastric tumors. The expression of COL1A2 gene-set is associated with poor prognosis, whereas the SHFM1 gene-set is associated with better prognosis among the gastric cancer patients. Despite being physical neighbors, the SHFM1 and COL1A2 genes express differentially in the two major clinical sub-types of gastric cancer in a mutually exclusive manner. The tight gene regulations operating between these juxtaposed genes deserve investigation to understand the molecular regulatory switch defining the determinants of the gastric cancer sub-types. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Tissue-Specific Gain of RTK Signalling Uncovers Selective Cell Vulnerability during Embryogenesis.

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    Yannan Fan

    Full Text Available The successive events that cells experience throughout development shape their intrinsic capacity to respond and integrate RTK inputs. Cellular responses to RTKs rely on different mechanisms of regulation that establish proper levels of RTK activation, define duration of RTK action, and exert quantitative/qualitative signalling outcomes. The extent to which cells are competent to deal with fluctuations in RTK signalling is incompletely understood. Here, we employ a genetic system to enhance RTK signalling in a tissue-specific manner. The chosen RTK is the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF receptor Met, an appropriate model due to its pleiotropic requirement in distinct developmental events. Ubiquitously enhanced Met in Cre/loxP-based Rosa26(stopMet knock-in context (Del-R26(Met reveals that most tissues are capable of buffering enhanced Met-RTK signalling thus avoiding perturbation of developmental programs. Nevertheless, this ubiquitous increase of Met does compromise selected programs such as myoblast migration. Using cell-type specific Cre drivers, we genetically showed that altered myoblast migration results from ectopic Met expression in limb mesenchyme rather than in migrating myoblasts themselves. qRT-PCR analyses show that ectopic Met in limbs causes molecular changes such as downregulation in the expression levels of Notum and Syndecan4, two known regulators of morphogen gradients. Molecular and functional studies revealed that ectopic Met expression in limb mesenchyme does not alter HGF expression patterns and levels, but impairs HGF bioavailability. Together, our findings show that myoblasts, in which Met is endogenously expressed, are capable of buffering increased RTK levels, and identify mesenchymal cells as a cell type vulnerable to ectopic Met-RTK signalling. These results illustrate that embryonic cells are sensitive to alterations in the spatial distribution of RTK action, yet resilient to fluctuations in signalling levels of an

  4. Tissue-specific interferon alpha subtype response to SIV infection in brain, spleen, and lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Luna Alammar; Dery, Alicia; Leong, Wan Yee; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E

    2013-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNalpha) is a type I interferon that plays a major role in host defense. There are 13 different IFNalpha genes in humans, but much of the work concerning their role in viral defense has been limited to studying either subtype 2 or pan IFNalpha due to the inability to distinguish between highly similar genetic and amino acid sequences. Because of recent advances in molecular and biochemical techniques, it is possible to study the regulation of individual subtypes. It has been reported that HIV/SIV infection results in impaired IFNalpha responses in certain tissues. Using a pigtailed macaque SIV model, we examined the subtype response during acute infection in 3 tissues that are known to be infected with HIV/SIV, but whose IFNalpha subtype response has not been extensively studied: the brain, spleen, and lung. We found that the expression and regulation of specific subtypes occur in a tissue-specific manner. There was more limited IFNalpha subtype expression in the lung and brain, where predominantly macrophages are infected compared to the spleen, which contains both infected CD4+ lymphocytes and macrophages. Understanding the IFNalpha subtype response in tissues known to be infected with HIV/SIV can help tailor adjunctive treatment regimens to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  5. p63 regulates Satb1 to control tissue-specific chromatin remodeling during development of the epidermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessing, Michael Y.; Mardaryev, Andrei N.; Gdula, Michal R.; Sharov, Andrey A.; Sharova, Tatyana Y.; Rapisarda, Valentina; Gordon, Konstantin B.; Smorodchenko, Anna D.; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Ferone, Giustina; Kohwi, Yoshinori; Missero, Caterina

    2011-01-01

    During development, multipotent progenitor cells establish tissue-specific programs of gene expression. In this paper, we show that p63 transcription factor, a master regulator of epidermal morphogenesis, executes its function in part by directly regulating expression of the genome organizer Satb1 in progenitor cells. p63 binds to a proximal regulatory region of the Satb1 gene, and p63 ablation results in marked reduction in the Satb1 expression levels in the epidermis. Satb1−/− mice show impaired epidermal morphology. In Satb1-null epidermis, chromatin architecture of the epidermal differentiation complex locus containing genes associated with epidermal differentiation is altered primarily at its central domain, where Satb1 binding was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation–on-chip analysis. Furthermore, genes within this domain fail to be properly activated upon terminal differentiation. Satb1 expression in p63+/− skin explants treated with p63 small interfering ribonucleic acid partially restored the epidermal phenotype of p63-deficient mice. These data provide a novel mechanism by which Satb1, a direct downstream target of p63, contributes in epidermal morphogenesis via establishing tissue-specific chromatin organization and gene expression in epidermal progenitor cells. PMID:21930775

  6. Tissue-specific transcriptomics of the exotic invasive insect pest emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittapalli, Omprakash; Bai, Xiaodong; Mamidala, Praveen; Rajarapu, Swapna Priya; Bonello, Pierluigi; Herms, Daniel A

    2010-10-28

    The insect midgut and fat body represent major tissue interfaces that deal with several important physiological functions including digestion, detoxification and immune response. The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), is an exotic invasive insect pest that has killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) primarily in the Midwestern United States and Ontario, Canada. However, despite its high impact status little knowledge exists for A. planipennis at the molecular level. Newer-generation Roche-454 pyrosequencing was used to obtain 126,185 reads for the midgut and 240,848 reads for the fat body, which were assembled into 25,173 and 37,661 high quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for the midgut and the fat body of A. planipennis larvae, respectively. Among these ESTs, 36% of the midgut and 38% of the fat body sequences showed similarity to proteins in the GenBank nr database. A high number of the midgut sequences contained chitin-binding peritrophin (248)and trypsin (98) domains; while the fat body sequences showed high occurrence of cytochrome P450s (85) and protein kinase (123) domains. Further, the midgut transcriptome of A. planipennis revealed putative microbial transcripts encoding for cell-wall degrading enzymes such as polygalacturonases and endoglucanases. A significant number of SNPs (137 in midgut and 347 in fat body) and microsatellite loci (317 in midgut and 571 in fat body) were predicted in the A. planipennis transcripts. An initial assessment of cytochrome P450s belonging to various CYP clades revealed distinct expression patterns at the tissue level. To our knowledge this study is one of the first to illuminate tissue-specific gene expression in an invasive insect of high ecological and economic consequence. These findings will lay the foundation for future gene expression and functional studies in A. planipennis.

  7. Tissue-specific transcriptomics of the exotic invasive insect pest emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omprakash Mittapalli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The insect midgut and fat body represent major tissue interfaces that deal with several important physiological functions including digestion, detoxification and immune response. The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis, is an exotic invasive insect pest that has killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp. primarily in the Midwestern United States and Ontario, Canada. However, despite its high impact status little knowledge exists for A. planipennis at the molecular level. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Newer-generation Roche-454 pyrosequencing was used to obtain 126,185 reads for the midgut and 240,848 reads for the fat body, which were assembled into 25,173 and 37,661 high quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs for the midgut and the fat body of A. planipennis larvae, respectively. Among these ESTs, 36% of the midgut and 38% of the fat body sequences showed similarity to proteins in the GenBank nr database. A high number of the midgut sequences contained chitin-binding peritrophin (248and trypsin (98 domains; while the fat body sequences showed high occurrence of cytochrome P450s (85 and protein kinase (123 domains. Further, the midgut transcriptome of A. planipennis revealed putative microbial transcripts encoding for cell-wall degrading enzymes such as polygalacturonases and endoglucanases. A significant number of SNPs (137 in midgut and 347 in fat body and microsatellite loci (317 in midgut and 571 in fat body were predicted in the A. planipennis transcripts. An initial assessment of cytochrome P450s belonging to various CYP clades revealed distinct expression patterns at the tissue level. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge this study is one of the first to illuminate tissue-specific gene expression in an invasive insect of high ecological and economic consequence. These findings will lay the foundation for future gene expression and functional studies in A. planipennis.

  8. Predicting tissue specific cis-regulatory modules in the human genome using pairs of co-occurring motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girgis Hani Z

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers seeking to unlock the genetic basis of human physiology and diseases have been studying gene transcription regulation. The temporal and spatial patterns of gene expression are controlled by mainly non-coding elements known as cis-regulatory modules (CRMs and epigenetic factors. CRMs modulating related genes share the regulatory signature which consists of transcription factor (TF binding sites (TFBSs. Identifying such CRMs is a challenging problem due to the prohibitive number of sequence sets that need to be analyzed. Results We formulated the challenge as a supervised classification problem even though experimentally validated CRMs were not required. Our efforts resulted in a software system named CrmMiner. The system mines for CRMs in the vicinity of related genes. CrmMiner requires two sets of sequences: a mixed set and a control set. Sequences in the vicinity of the related genes comprise the mixed set, whereas the control set includes random genomic sequences. CrmMiner assumes that a large percentage of the mixed set is made of background sequences that do not include CRMs. The system identifies pairs of closely located motifs representing vertebrate TFBSs that are enriched in the training mixed set consisting of 50% of the gene loci. In addition, CrmMiner selects a group of the enriched pairs to represent the tissue-specific regulatory signature. The mixed and the control sets are searched for candidate sequences that include any of the selected pairs. Next, an optimal Bayesian classifier is used to distinguish candidates found in the mixed set from their control counterparts. Our study proposes 62 tissue-specific regulatory signatures and putative CRMs for different human tissues and cell types. These signatures consist of assortments of ubiquitously expressed TFs and tissue-specific TFs. Under controlled settings, CrmMiner identified known CRMs in noisy sets up to 1:25 signal-to-noise ratio. CrmMiner was

  9. Predicting tissue specific cis-regulatory modules in the human genome using pairs of co-occurring motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Hani Z; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2012-02-07

    Researchers seeking to unlock the genetic basis of human physiology and diseases have been studying gene transcription regulation. The temporal and spatial patterns of gene expression are controlled by mainly non-coding elements known as cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) and epigenetic factors. CRMs modulating related genes share the regulatory signature which consists of transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Identifying such CRMs is a challenging problem due to the prohibitive number of sequence sets that need to be analyzed. We formulated the challenge as a supervised classification problem even though experimentally validated CRMs were not required. Our efforts resulted in a software system named CrmMiner. The system mines for CRMs in the vicinity of related genes. CrmMiner requires two sets of sequences: a mixed set and a control set. Sequences in the vicinity of the related genes comprise the mixed set, whereas the control set includes random genomic sequences. CrmMiner assumes that a large percentage of the mixed set is made of background sequences that do not include CRMs. The system identifies pairs of closely located motifs representing vertebrate TFBSs that are enriched in the training mixed set consisting of 50% of the gene loci. In addition, CrmMiner selects a group of the enriched pairs to represent the tissue-specific regulatory signature. The mixed and the control sets are searched for candidate sequences that include any of the selected pairs. Next, an optimal Bayesian classifier is used to distinguish candidates found in the mixed set from their control counterparts. Our study proposes 62 tissue-specific regulatory signatures and putative CRMs for different human tissues and cell types. These signatures consist of assortments of ubiquitously expressed TFs and tissue-specific TFs. Under controlled settings, CrmMiner identified known CRMs in noisy sets up to 1:25 signal-to-noise ratio. CrmMiner was 21-75% more precise than a related CRM

  10. Tissue-specific mitotic bookmarking by hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadauke, Stephan; Udugama, Maheshi I; Pawlicki, Jan M; Achtman, Jordan C; Jain, Deepti P; Cheng, Yong; Hardison, Ross C; Blobel, Gerd A

    2012-08-17

    Tissue-specific transcription patterns are preserved throughout cell divisions to maintain lineage fidelity. We investigated whether transcription factor GATA1 plays a role in transmitting hematopoietic gene expression programs through mitosis when transcription is transiently silenced. Live-cell imaging revealed that a fraction of GATA1 is retained focally within mitotic chromatin. ChIP-seq of highly purified mitotic cells uncovered that key hematopoietic regulatory genes are occupied by GATA1 in mitosis. The GATA1 coregulators FOG1 and TAL1 dissociate from mitotic chromatin, suggesting that GATA1 functions as platform for their postmitotic recruitment. Mitotic GATA1 target genes tend to reactivate more rapidly upon entry into G1 than genes from which GATA1 dissociates. Mitosis-specific destruction of GATA1 delays reactivation selectively of genes that retain GATA1 during mitosis. These studies suggest a requirement of mitotic "bookmarking" by GATA1 for the faithful propagation of cell-type-specific transcription programs through cell division. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tissue-Specific Suppression of Thyroid Hormone Signaling in Various Mouse Models of Aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Edward Visser

    Full Text Available DNA damage contributes to the process of aging, as underscored by premature aging syndromes caused by defective DNA repair. Thyroid state changes during aging, but underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Since thyroid hormone (TH is a key regulator of metabolism, changes in TH signaling have widespread effects. Here, we reveal a significant common transcriptomic signature in livers from hypothyroid mice, DNA repair-deficient mice with severe (Csbm/m/Xpa-/- or intermediate (Ercc1-/Δ-7 progeria and naturally aged mice. A strong induction of TH-inactivating deiodinase D3 and decrease of TH-activating D1 activities are observed in Csbm/m/Xpa-/- livers. Similar findings are noticed in Ercc1-/Δ-7, in naturally aged animals and in wild-type mice exposed to a chronic subtoxic dose of DNA-damaging agents. In contrast, TH signaling in muscle, heart and brain appears unaltered. These data show a strong suppression of TH signaling in specific peripheral organs in premature and normal aging, probably lowering metabolism, while other tissues appear to preserve metabolism. D3-mediated TH inactivation is unexpected, given its expression mainly in fetal tissues. Our studies highlight the importance of DNA damage as the underlying mechanism of changes in thyroid state. Tissue-specific regulation of deiodinase activities, ensuring diminished TH signaling, may contribute importantly to the protective metabolic response in aging.

  12. Tissue specific profiling of females of Schistosoma japonicum by integrated laser microdissection microscopy and microarray analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey N Gobert

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The functions of many schistosome gene products remain to be characterized. A major step towards elucidating function of these genes would be in defining their sites of expression. This goal is rendered difficult to achieve by the generally small size of the parasites and the lack of a body cavity, which precludes analysis of transcriptional profiles of the tissues in isolation.Here, we describe a combined laser microdissection microscopy (LMM and microarray analysis approach to expedite tissue specific profiling and gene atlasing for tissues of adult female Schistosoma japonicum. This approach helps to solve the gene characterization "bottle-neck" brought about by acoelomy and the size of these parasites. Complementary RNA obtained after isolation from gastrodermis (parasite gut mucosa, vitelline glands and ovary by LMM were subjected to microarray analyses, resulting in identification of 147 genes upregulated in the gastrodermis, 4,149 genes in the ovary and 2,553 in the vitellaria.This work will help to shed light on the molecular pathobiology of this debilitating human parasite and aid in the discovery of new targets for the development of anti-schistosome vaccines and drugs.

  13. Fusarium oxysporum triggers tissue-specific transcriptional reprogramming in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Lyons

    Full Text Available Some of the most devastating agricultural diseases are caused by root-infecting pathogens, yet the majority of studies on these interactions to date have focused on the host responses of aerial tissues rather than those belowground. Fusarium oxysporum is a root-infecting pathogen that causes wilt disease on several plant species including Arabidopsis thaliana. To investigate and compare transcriptional changes triggered by F. oxysporum in different Arabidopsis tissues, we infected soil-grown plants with F. oxysporum and subjected root and leaf tissue harvested at early and late timepoints to RNA-seq analyses. At least half of the genes induced or repressed by F. oxysporum showed tissue-specific regulation. Regulators of auxin and ABA signalling, mannose binding lectins and peroxidases showed strong differential expression in root tissue. We demonstrate that ARF2 and PRX33, two genes regulated in the roots, promote susceptibility to F. oxysporum. In the leaves, defensins and genes associated with the response to auxin, cold and senescence were strongly regulated while jasmonate biosynthesis and signalling genes were induced throughout the plant.

  14. ChIP-seq Accurately Predicts Tissue-Specific Activity of Enhancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visel, Axel; Blow, Matthew J.; Li, Zirong; Zhang, Tao; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Wright, Crystal; Chen, Feng; Afzal, Veena; Ren, Bing; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2009-02-01

    A major yet unresolved quest in decoding the human genome is the identification of the regulatory sequences that control the spatial and temporal expression of genes. Distant-acting transcriptional enhancers are particularly challenging to uncover since they are scattered amongst the vast non-coding portion of the genome. Evolutionary sequence constraint can facilitate the discovery of enhancers, but fails to predict when and where they are active in vivo. Here, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation with the enhancer-associated protein p300, followed by massively-parallel sequencing, to map several thousand in vivo binding sites of p300 in mouse embryonic forebrain, midbrain, and limb tissue. We tested 86 of these sequences in a transgenic mouse assay, which in nearly all cases revealed reproducible enhancer activity in those tissues predicted by p300 binding. Our results indicate that in vivo mapping of p300 binding is a highly accurate means for identifying enhancers and their associated activities and suggest that such datasets will be useful to study the role of tissue-specific enhancers in human biology and disease on a genome-wide scale.

  15. Whole-Organ Isolation Approach as a Basis for Tissue-Specific Analyses in Schistosoma mansoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Steffen; Lu, Zhigang; Wilson, R. Alan; Grevelding, Christoph G.; Quack, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most important parasitic diseases worldwide, second only to malaria. Schistosomes exhibit an exceptional reproductive biology since the sexual maturation of the female, which includes the differentiation of the reproductive organs, is controlled by pairing. Pathogenicity originates from eggs, which cause severe inflammation in their hosts. Elucidation of processes contributing to female maturation is not only of interest to basic science but also considering novel concepts combating schistosomiasis. Methodology/Principal Findings To get direct access to the reproductive organs, we established a novel protocol using a combined detergent/protease-treatment removing the tegument and the musculature of adult Schistosoma mansoni. All steps were monitored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and bright-field microscopy (BF). We focused on the gonads of adult schistosomes and demonstrated that isolated and purified testes and ovaries can be used for morphological and structural studies as well as sources for RNA and protein of sufficient amounts for subsequent analyses such as RT-PCR and immunoblotting. To this end, first exemplary evidence was obtained for tissue-specific transcription within the gonads (axonemal dynein intermediate chain gene SmAxDynIC; aquaporin gene SmAQP) as well as for post-transcriptional regulation (SmAQP). Conclusions/Significance The presented method provides a new way of getting access to tissue-specific material of S. mansoni. With regard to many still unanswered questions of schistosome biology, such as elucidating the molecular processes involved in schistosome reproduction, this protocol provides opportunities for, e.g., sub-transcriptomics and sub-proteomics at the organ level. This will promote the characterisation of gene-expression profiles, or more specifically to complete knowledge of signalling pathways contributing to differentiation processes, so discovering involved molecules that may

  16. Identification of Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Metastasis Using Tissue Specific Virus Delivery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jechlinger, Martin

    2007-01-01

    To investigate breast cancer metastasis we propose to use a tissue-specific viral delivery system that will allow the somatic delivery of secondary lesions in the background of a tumor-inducing primary oncogene...

  17. Identification of Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Metastasis Using Tissue Specific Virus Delivery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jechlinger, Martin

    2006-01-01

    To investigate breast cancer metastasis, we propose to use a tissue specific viral delivery system that will allow the somatic delivery of secondary lesions in the background of a tumor-inducing primary oncogene...

  18. Mining tissue specificity, gene connectivity and disease association to reveal a set of genes that modify the action of disease causing genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reverter Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue specificity of gene expression has been linked to a number of significant outcomes including level of expression, and differential rates of polymorphism, evolution and disease association. Recent studies have also shown the importance of exploring differential gene connectivity and sequence conservation in the identification of disease-associated genes. However, no study relates gene interactions with tissue specificity and disease association. Methods We adopted an a priori approach making as few assumptions as possible to analyse the interplay among gene-gene interactions with tissue specificity and its subsequent likelihood of association with disease. We mined three large datasets comprising expression data drawn from massively parallel signature sequencing across 32 tissues, describing a set of 55,606 true positive interactions for 7,197 genes, and microarray expression results generated during the profiling of systemic inflammation, from which 126,543 interactions among 7,090 genes were reported. Results Amongst the myriad of complex relationships identified between expression, disease, connectivity and tissue specificity, some interesting patterns emerged. These include elevated rates of expression and network connectivity in housekeeping and disease-associated tissue-specific genes. We found that disease-associated genes are more likely to show tissue specific expression and most frequently interact with other disease genes. Using the thresholds defined in these observations, we develop a guilt-by-association algorithm and discover a group of 112 non-disease annotated genes that predominantly interact with disease-associated genes, impacting on disease outcomes. Conclusion We conclude that parameters such as tissue specificity and network connectivity can be used in combination to identify a group of genes, not previously confirmed as disease causing, that are involved in interactions with disease causing

  19. Tissue-Specific Dissociation of Diurnal Transcriptome Rhythms During Sleep Restriction in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husse, Jana; Kiehn, Jana-Thabea; Barclay, Johanna L; Naujokat, Nadine; Meyer-Kovac, Judit; Lehnert, Hendrik; Oster, Henrik

    2017-06-01

    Shortened or mistimed sleep affects metabolic homeostasis, which may in part be mediated by dysregulation of endogenous circadian clocks. In this study, we assessed the contribution of sleep disruption to metabolic dysregulation by analysing diurnal transcriptome regulation in metabolic tissues of mice subjected to a sleep restriction (SR) paradigm. Male mice were subjected to 2 × 5 days of SR with enforced waking during the first 6 hours of the light phase. SR and control mice were sacrificed at different time points of the day and RNA preparations from the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), liver, and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) were subjected to whole-genome microarray hybridization. Transcriptional rhythms were associated with changes in behavioral and physiological parameters such as sleep, body temperature, and food intake. Rhythm detection was performed with CircWave and transcription profiles were compared by 2-way analysis of variance and t-tests with Benjamini-Hochberg corrections. Clock gene rhythms were blunted in all tissues, while transcriptome regulation was associated with either clock gene expression, sleep patterns, or food intake in a tissue-specific manner. Clock gene expression was associated with apoptosis pathways in the MBH and with tumor necrosis factor alpha signalling in liver. Food intake-associated genes included cilium movement genes in the MBH and lipid metabolism-associated transcripts in liver. In mice, repeated SR profoundly alters behavioral and molecular diurnal rhythms, disrupting essential signalling pathways in MBH, liver, and eWAT, which may underlie the metabolic and cognitive disturbances observed in sleep-restricted humans such as shift workers.

  20. Comparative transcriptomics of the model mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea reveals tissue-specific armories and a conserved circuitry for sexual development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, David Fernando; Lin, Chia-Wei; van der Velden, Niels Sebastiaan Johannes; Aebi, Markus; Künzler, Markus

    2014-06-19

    It is well known that mushrooms produce defense proteins and secondary metabolites against predators and competitors; however, less is known about the correlation between the tissue-specific expression and the target organism (antagonist) specificity of these molecules. In addition, conserved transcriptional circuitries involved in developing sexual organs in fungi are not characterized, despite the growing number of gene expression datasets available from reproductive and vegetative tissue. The aims of this study were: first, to evaluate the tissue specificity of defense gene expression in the model mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea and, second, to assess the degree of conservation in transcriptional regulation during sexual development in basidiomycetes. In order to characterize the regulation in the expression of defense loci and the transcriptional circuitries controlling sexual reproduction in basidiomycetes, we sequenced the poly (A)-positive transcriptome of stage 1 primordia and vegetative mycelium of C. cinerea A43mutB43mut. Our data show that many genes encoding predicted and already characterized defense proteins are differentially expressed in these tissues. The predicted specificity of these proteins with regard to target organisms suggests that their expression pattern correlates with the type of antagonists these tissues are confronted with. Accordingly, we show that the stage 1 primordium-specific protein CC1G_11805 is toxic to insects and nematodes. Comparison of our data to analogous data from Laccaria bicolor and Schizophyllum commune revealed that the transcriptional regulation of nearly 70 loci is conserved and probably subjected to stabilizing selection. A Velvet domain-containing protein was found to be up-regulated in all three fungi, providing preliminary evidence of a possible role of the Velvet protein family in sexual development of basidiomycetes. The PBS-soluble proteome of C. cinerea primordia and mycelium was analyzed by shotgun LC

  1. Yki/YAP, Sd/TEAD and Hth/MEIS control tissue specification in the Drosophila eye disc epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi Zhang

    Full Text Available During animal development, accurate control of tissue specification and growth are critical to generate organisms of reproducible shape and size. The eye-antennal disc epithelium of Drosophila is a powerful model system to identify the signaling pathway and transcription factors that mediate and coordinate these processes. We show here that the Yorkie (Yki pathway plays a major role in tissue specification within the developing fly eye disc epithelium at a time when organ primordia and regional identity domains are specified. RNAi-mediated inactivation of Yki, or its partner Scalloped (Sd, or increased activity of the upstream negative regulators of Yki cause a dramatic reorganization of the eye disc fate map leading to specification of the entire disc epithelium into retina. On the contrary, constitutive expression of Yki suppresses eye formation in a Sd-dependent fashion. We also show that knockdown of the transcription factor Homothorax (Hth, known to partner Yki in some developmental contexts, also induces an ectopic retina domain, that Yki and Scalloped regulate Hth expression, and that the gain-of-function activity of Yki is partially dependent on Hth. Our results support a critical role for Yki- and its partners Sd and Hth--in shaping the fate map of the eye epithelium independently of its universal role as a regulator of proliferation and survival.

  2. Yki/YAP, Sd/TEAD and Hth/MEIS Control Tissue Specification in the Drosophila Eye Disc Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignoni, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    During animal development, accurate control of tissue specification and growth are critical to generate organisms of reproducible shape and size. The eye-antennal disc epithelium of Drosophila is a powerful model system to identify the signaling pathway and transcription factors that mediate and coordinate these processes. We show here that the Yorkie (Yki) pathway plays a major role in tissue specification within the developing fly eye disc epithelium at a time when organ primordia and regional identity domains are specified. RNAi-mediated inactivation of Yki, or its partner Scalloped (Sd), or increased activity of the upstream negative regulators of Yki cause a dramatic reorganization of the eye disc fate map leading to specification of the entire disc epithelium into retina. On the contrary, constitutive expression of Yki suppresses eye formation in a Sd-dependent fashion. We also show that knockdown of the transcription factor Homothorax (Hth), known to partner Yki in some developmental contexts, also induces an ectopic retina domain, that Yki and Scalloped regulate Hth expression, and that the gain-of-function activity of Yki is partially dependent on Hth. Our results support a critical role for Yki- and its partners Sd and Hth - in shaping the fate map of the eye epithelium independently of its universal role as a regulator of proliferation and survival. PMID:21811580

  3. Exclusive Dealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, Chiara; Motta, Massimo; Rønde, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies a model whereby exclusive dealing (ED) can both promote investment and foreclose a more efficient supplier. Since ED promotes the incumbent seller's investment, the seller and the buyer realize a greater surplus from bilateral trade under exclusivity. Hence, the parties involved...... may sign an ED contract that excludes a more efficient entrant in circumstances where ED would not arise absent investment. The paper therefore invites a more cautious attitude towards accepting possible investment promotion arguments as a defense for ED....

  4. Aging and environmental exposures alter tissue-specific DNA methylation dependent upon CpG island context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brock C Christensen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic control of gene transcription is critical for normal human development and cellular differentiation. While alterations of epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation have been linked to cancers and many other human diseases, interindividual epigenetic variations in normal tissues due to aging, environmental factors, or innate susceptibility are poorly characterized. The plasticity, tissue-specific nature, and variability of gene expression are related to epigenomic states that vary across individuals. Thus, population-based investigations are needed to further our understanding of the fundamental dynamics of normal individual epigenomes. We analyzed 217 non-pathologic human tissues from 10 anatomic sites at 1,413 autosomal CpG loci associated with 773 genes to investigate tissue-specific differences in DNA methylation and to discern how aging and exposures contribute to normal variation in methylation. Methylation profile classes derived from unsupervised modeling were significantly associated with age (P<0.0001 and were significant predictors of tissue origin (P<0.0001. In solid tissues (n = 119 we found striking, highly significant CpG island-dependent correlations between age and methylation; loci in CpG islands gained methylation with age, loci not in CpG islands lost methylation with age (P<0.001, and this pattern was consistent across tissues and in an analysis of blood-derived DNA. Our data clearly demonstrate age- and exposure-related differences in tissue-specific methylation and significant age-associated methylation patterns which are CpG island context-dependent. This work provides novel insight into the role of aging and the environment in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and critically informs the field of epigenomics by providing evidence of epigenetic dysregulation by age-related methylation alterations. Collectively we reveal key issues to consider both in the construction of reference and disease

  5. Detection of neuronal tissue in meat using tissue specific DNA modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris N.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A method has been developed to differentiate between non-muscle tissues such as liver, kidney and heart and that of muscle in meat samples using tissue specific DNA detection. Only muscle tissue is considered meat from the point of view of labelling (Food Labelling [Amendment] (England Regulations 2003 and Quantitative Ingredient Declaration (QUID, and also certain parts of the carcass are prohibited to be used in raw meat products (Meat Products [England] Regulations 2003. Included in the prohibited offal are brain and spinal cord. The described methodology has therefore been developed primarily to enforce labelling rules but also to contribute to the enforcement of BSE legislation on the detection of Central Nervous System (CNS tissue. The latter requires the removal of Specified Risk Material (SRM, such as bovine and ovine brain and spinal cord, from the food chain. Current methodologies for detection of CNS tissue include histological examination, analysis of cholesterol content and immunodetection. These can potentially be time consuming, less applicable to processed samples and may not be readily adapted to high throughput sample analysis. The objective of this work was therefore to develop a DNAbased detection assay that exploits the sensitivity and specificity of PCR and is potentially applicable to more highly processed food samples. For neuronal tissue, the DNA target selected was the promoter for Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP, a gene whose expression is restricted to astroglial cells within CNS tissue. The promoter fragments from both cattle and sheep have been isolated and key differences in the methylation patterns of certain CpG dinucleotides in the sequences from bovine and sheep brain and spinal cord and the corresponding skeletal muscle identified. These have been used to design a PCR assay exploiting Methylation Specific PCR (MSP to specifically amplify the neuronal tissue derived sequence and therefore identify the

  6. Tissue-specific target analysis of disease-associated microRNAs in human signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kowarsch

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are a large class of post-transcriptional regulators that bind to the 3' untranslated region of messenger RNAs. They play a critical role in many cellular processes and have been linked to the control of signal transduction pathways. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs can function as tumor suppressors or even as oncogenes when aberrantly expressed. For more general insights of disease-associated microRNAs, we analyzed their impact on human signaling pathways from two perspectives. On a global scale, we found a core set of signaling pathways with enriched tissue-specific microRNA targets across diseases. The function of these pathways reflects the affinity of microRNAs to regulate cellular processes associated with apoptosis, proliferation or development. Comparing cancer and non-cancer related microRNAs, we found no significant differences between both groups. To unveil the interaction and regulation of microRNAs on signaling pathways locally, we analyzed the cellular location and process type of disease-associated microRNA targets and proteins. While disease-associated proteins are highly enriched in extracellular components of the pathway, microRNA targets are preferentially located in the nucleus. Moreover, targets of disease-associated microRNAs preferentially exhibit an inhibitory effect within the pathways in contrast to disease proteins. Our analysis provides systematic insights into the interaction of disease-associated microRNAs and signaling pathways and uncovers differences in cellular locations and process types of microRNA targets and disease-associated proteins.

  7. Mouse tetranectin: cDNA sequence, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibaraki, K; Kozak, C A; Wewer, U M

    1995-01-01

    % identity and 87% similarity at the amino acid level. Sequence comparisons between mouse and human tetranectin and some C-type lectins confirmed a complete conservation in the position of six cysteines as well as numerous other amino acid residues, indicating an essential structure for potential function...... regulation, mouse tetranectin cDNA was cloned from a 16-day-old mouse embryo library. Sequence analysis revealed a 992-bp cDNA with an open reading frame of 606 bp, which is identical in length to the human tetranectin cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology to the human cDNA with 76......(s) of tetranectin. The sequence analysis revealed a difference in both sequence and size of the noncoding regions between mouse and human cDNAs. Northern analysis of the various tissues from mouse, rat, and cow showed the major transcript(s) to be approximately 1 kb, which is similar in size to that observed...

  8. Tissue-specific expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase gene variants in Nicotiana tabacum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurečková, J.; Sýkorová, Eva; Hafidh, Said; Honys, David; Fajkus, Jiří; Fojtová, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 245, č. 3 (2017), s. 549-561 ISSN 0032-0935 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06943S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : male gametophyte development * tobacco male gametophyte * allotetraploid nicotiana Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EF - Botanics (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  9. Cloning and study of adult-tissue-specific expression of Sox9 in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sequence analyses revealed a 2447-bp cDNA containing 233-bp 5′ untranslated region, a 927-bp 3′ untranslated region, including poly(A), and a 1287 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 428 amino acids. The HMG box of 79 amino acid motif was confirmed from positions 96–174. Sequence alignment ...

  10. Cloning and study of adult-tissue-specific expression of Sox9 in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    966. Bowles J., Schepers G. and Koopman P. 2000 Phylogeny of the SOX family of developmental transcription factors based on sequence and structural indicators. Dev. Biol. 227, 239–255. Chaboissier M. C., Kobayashi A., Vidal V. I., Lutzkendorf S., van de Kant H. J., Wegner M. et al. 2004 Functional analysis of Sox8.

  11. Involvement of an ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase in tissue-specific accumulation of specialized diterpenes in Andrographis paniculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Rajesh Chandra; Garg, Anchal; Roy, Sudeep; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh; Vasudev, Prema G; Ghosh, Sumit

    2015-11-01

    Ent-labdane-related diterpene (ent-LRD) specialized (i.e. secondary) metabolites of the medicinal plant kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata) have long been known for several pharmacological activities. However, our understanding of the ent-LRD biosynthetic pathway has remained largely incomplete. Since ent-LRDs accumulate in leaves, we carried out a comparative transcriptional analysis using leaf and root tissues, and identified 389 differentially expressed transcripts, including 223 transcripts that were preferentially expressed in leaf tissue. Analysis of the transcripts revealed various specialized metabolic pathways, including transcripts of the ent-LRD biosynthetic pathway. Two class II diterpene synthases (ApCPS1 and ApCPS2) along with one (ApCPS1') and two (ApCPS2' and ApCPS2″) transcriptional variants that were the outcomes of alternative splicing of the precursor mRNA and alternative transcriptional termination, respectively, were identified. ApCPS1 and ApCPS2 encode for 832- and 817-amino acids proteins, respectively, and are phylogenetically related to the dicotyledons ent-copalyl diphosphate synthases (ent-CPSs). The spatio-temporal patterns of ent-LRD metabolites accumulation and gene expression suggested a likely role for ApCPS1 in general (i.e. primary) metabolism, perhaps by providing precursor for the biosynthesis of phytohormone gibberellin (GA). However, ApCPS2 is potentially involved in tissue-specific accumulation of ent-LRD specialized metabolites. Bacterially expressed recombinant ApCPS2 catalyzed the conversion of (E,E,E)-geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP), the general precursor of diterpenes to ent-copalyl diphosphate (ent-CPP), the precursor of ent-LRDs. Taken together, these results advance our understanding of the tissue-specific accumulation of specialized ent-LRDs of medicinal importance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The RNA-binding protein Rumpelstiltskin antagonizes gypsy chromatin insulator function in a tissue-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew R; Matzat, Leah H; Dale, Ryan K; Lim, Su Jun; Lei, Elissa P

    2014-07-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA-protein complexes that are situated throughout the genome that are proposed to contribute to higher-order organization and demarcation into distinct transcriptional domains. Mounting evidence in different species implicates RNA and RNA-binding proteins as regulators of chromatin insulator activities. Here, we identify the Drosophila hnRNP M homolog Rumpelstiltskin (Rump) as an antagonist of gypsy chromatin insulator enhancer-blocking and barrier activities. Despite ubiquitous expression of Rump, decreasing Rump levels leads to improvement of barrier activity only in tissues outside of the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, rump mutants restore insulator body localization in an insulator mutant background only in non-CNS tissues. Rump associates physically with core gypsy insulator proteins, and chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing analysis of Rump demonstrates extensive colocalization with a subset of insulator sites across the genome. The genome-wide binding profile and tissue specificity of Rump contrast with that of Shep, a recently identified RNA-binding protein that antagonizes gypsy insulator activity primarily in the CNS. Our findings indicate parallel roles for RNA-binding proteins in mediating tissue-specific regulation of chromatin insulator activity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. The RNA-binding protein Rumpelstiltskin antagonizes gypsy chromatin insulator function in a tissue-specific manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew R.; Matzat, Leah H.; Dale, Ryan K.; Lim, Su Jun; Lei, Elissa P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromatin insulators are DNA–protein complexes that are situated throughout the genome that are proposed to contribute to higher-order organization and demarcation into distinct transcriptional domains. Mounting evidence in different species implicates RNA and RNA-binding proteins as regulators of chromatin insulator activities. Here, we identify the Drosophila hnRNP M homolog Rumpelstiltskin (Rump) as an antagonist of gypsy chromatin insulator enhancer-blocking and barrier activities. Despite ubiquitous expression of Rump, decreasing Rump levels leads to improvement of barrier activity only in tissues outside of the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, rump mutants restore insulator body localization in an insulator mutant background only in non-CNS tissues. Rump associates physically with core gypsy insulator proteins, and chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing analysis of Rump demonstrates extensive colocalization with a subset of insulator sites across the genome. The genome-wide binding profile and tissue specificity of Rump contrast with that of Shep, a recently identified RNA-binding protein that antagonizes gypsy insulator activity primarily in the CNS. Our findings indicate parallel roles for RNA-binding proteins in mediating tissue-specific regulation of chromatin insulator activity. PMID:24706949

  14. Intramyocardial Injection of siRNAs Can Efficiently Establish Myocardial Tissue-Specific Renalase Knockdown Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; Liu, Ju; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jiliang; Li, Huili

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury will cause additional death of cardiomyocytes in ischaemic heart disease. Recent studies revealed that renalase was involved in the I/R injury. So, the myocardial tissue-specific knockdown mouse models were needed for the investigations of renalase. To establish the mouse models, intramyocardial injection of siRNAs targeting renalase was performed in mice. The wild distribution and high transfection efficiency of the siRNAs were approved. And the renalase expression was efficiently suppressed in myocardial tissue. Compared with the high cost, time consumption, and genetic compensation risk of the Cre/loxP technology, RNA interference (RNAi) technology is much cheaper and less time-consuming. Among the RNAi technologies, injection of siRNAs is safer than virus. And considering the properties of the I/R injury mouse models, the efficiency and durability of injection with siRNAs are acceptable for the studies. Altogether, intramyocardial injection of siRNAs targeting renalase is an economical, safe, and efficient method to establish myocardial tissue-specific renalase knockdown mouse models.

  15. Switch-like regulation of tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA processing patterns revealed by customized fluorescence reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Hidehito

    2013-07-01

    Alternative processing of precursor mRNAs (pre-mRNAs), including alternative transcription start sites, alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation, is the major source of protein diversity and plays crucial roles in development, differentiation and diseases in higher eukaryotes. It is estimated from microarray analyses and deep sequencing of mRNAs from synchronized worms that up to 25% of protein-coding genes in Caenorhabditis elegans undergo alternative pre-mRNA processing and that many of them are subject to developmental regulation. Recent progress in visualizing the alternative pre-mRNA processing patterns in living worms with custom-designed fluorescence reporters has enabled genetic analyses of the regulatory mechanisms for alternative processing events of interest in vivo. Expression of the tissue-specific isoforms of actin depolymerising factor (ADF)/cofilin, UNC-60A and UNC-60B, is regulated by a combination of alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation of pre-mRNA from a single gene unc-60. We recently found that muscle-specific splicing regulators ASD-2 and SUP-12 cooperatively switch the pre-mRNA processing patterns of the unc-60 gene in body wall muscles. Here I summarize the bichromatic fluorescence reporter system utilized for visualizing the tissue-specific alternative processing patterns of the unc-60 pre-mRNA. I also discuss the model for the coordinated regulation of the UNC-60B-type pre-mRNA processing in body wall muscles by ASD-2 and SUP-12.

  16. Tissue specific phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins isolated from rat liver, heart muscle, and skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Steffen; León, Ileana R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    -specific phosphorylation sites were identified in tissue-specific enzymes such as those encoded by HMGCS2, BDH1, PCK2, CPS1, and OTC in liver mitochondria, and CKMT2 and CPT1B in heart and skeletal muscle. Kinase prediction showed an important role for PKA and PKC in all tissues but also for proline-directed kinases...

  17. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five gen...

  18. Scaffolding in tissue engineering: general approaches and tissue-specific considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, B.P.; Leong, K. W.

    2008-01-01

    Scaffolds represent important components for tissue engineering. However, researchers often encounter an enormous variety of choices when selecting scaffolds for tissue engineering. This paper aims to review the functions of scaffolds and the major scaffolding approaches as important guidelines for selecting scaffolds and discuss the tissue-specific considerations for scaffolding, using intervertebral disc as an example.

  19. Sperm-associated antigen 11A is expressed exclusively in the principal cells of the mouse caput epididymis in an androgen-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Epididymal sperm maturation occurs via interactions between sperm and proteins secreted by the epididymal epithelium. Although this is an important process, the genes that encode the involved proteins remain largely uncharacterized. Previous studies have demonstrated that the genes involved in sperm maturation are regulated by androgen. Spag11a is an epididymal gene that is influenced by androgen. However, little is known about the putative role of this gene in the sperm maturation process. The objective of this study was to characterize Spag11a in the mouse epididymis. Methods In silico analyses were performed to predict signal peptides and functional domains. Spag11a expression was measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Western blots and immunocytochemistry were performed to determine protein expression. Results SPAG11A is a member of the beta defensin protein family and constitutes a secretory protein. Spag11a was expressed exclusively in the epididymis. Moreover, it exhibited region-specific expression in the caput, which is typical for genes that are involved in creating a suitable microenvironment for sperm maturation. Mouse Spag11a was regulated by androgen. A significant decrease of Spag11a expression was observed at third day following a gonadectomy (P epididymal luminal fluid and spermatozoa. Conclusions Based on the characteristics of Spag11a, it is likely that this gene has a specific role in epididymal sperm maturation. Further studies using functional assays are necessary to confirm this finding. PMID:23815807

  20. Gambogic Acid Is a Tissue-Specific Proteasome Inhibitor In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gambogic acid (GA is a natural compound derived from Chinese herbs that has been approved by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration for clinical trials in cancer patients; however, its molecular targets have not been thoroughly studied. Here, we report that GA inhibits tumor proteasome activity, with potency comparable to bortezomib but much less toxicity. First, GA acts as a prodrug and only gains proteasome-inhibitory function after being metabolized by intracellular CYP2E1. Second, GA-induced proteasome inhibition is a prerequisite for its cytotoxicity and anticancer effect without off-targets. Finally, because expression of the CYP2E1 gene is very high in tumor tissues but low in many normal tissues, GA could therefore produce tissue-specific proteasome inhibition and tumor-specific toxicity, with clinical significance for designing novel strategies for cancer treatment.

  1. The tissue-specific extinguisher locus TSE1 encodes a regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshart, M; Weih, F; Nichols, M; Schütz, G

    1991-09-06

    The tissue-specific extinguisher locus TSE1, a dominant negative regulator of transcription in somatic cell hybrids, acts via a cAMP response element (CRE) to repress activity of a hepatocyte-specific enhancer. Guided by the antagonism between TSE1 and cAMP-mediated signal transduction, we identified the regulatory subunit RI alpha of protein kinase A (PKA) as the product of the TSE1 locus. The evidence derives from concordant expression of RI alpha mRNA and TSE1 genetic activity, high resolution mapping of the RI alpha gene and TSE1 on human chromosome 17, and the ability of a transfected RI alpha cDNA to generate a phenocopy of TSE1-mediated extinction. The mechanism of TSE1/RI alpha-mediated extinction involves repression of basal PKA activity, reduced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser-133, and a corresponding reduction of in vivo protein binding at the target CRE.

  2. Novel method for analysis of allele specific expression in triploid Oryzias latipes reveals consistent pattern of allele exclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzintzuni I Garcia

    Full Text Available Assessing allele-specific gene expression (ASE on a large scale continues to be a technically challenging problem. Certain biological phenomena, such as X chromosome inactivation and parental imprinting, affect ASE most drastically by completely shutting down the expression of a whole set of alleles. Other more subtle effects on ASE are likely to be much more complex and dependent on the genetic environment and are perhaps more important to understand since they may be responsible for a significant amount of biological diversity. Tools to assess ASE in a diploid biological system are becoming more reliable. Non-diploid systems are, however, not uncommon. In humans full or partial polyploid states are regularly found in both healthy (meiotic cells, polynucleated cell types and diseased tissues (trisomies, non-disjunction events, cancerous tissues. In this work we have studied ASE in the medaka fish model system. We have developed a method for determining ASE in polyploid organisms from RNAseq data and we have implemented this method in a software tool set. As a biological model system we have used nuclear transplantation to experimentally produce artificial triploid medaka composed of three different haplomes. We measured ASE in RNA isolated from the livers of two adult, triploid medaka fish that showed a high degree of similarity. The majority of genes examined (82% shared expression more or less evenly among the three alleles in both triploids. The rest of the genes (18% displayed a wide range of ASE levels. Interestingly the majority of genes (78% displayed generally consistent ASE levels in both triploid individuals. A large contingent of these genes had the same allele entirely suppressed in both triploids. When viewed in a chromosomal context, it is revealed that these genes are from large sections of 4 chromosomes and may be indicative of some broad scale suppression of gene expression.

  3. Species and tissues specific differentiation of processed animal proteins in aquafeeds using proteomics tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasinger, J D; Marbaix, H; Dieu, M; Fumière, O; Mauro, S; Palmblad, M; Raes, M; Berntssen, M H G

    2016-09-16

    The rapidly growing aquaculture industry drives the search for sustainable protein sources in fish feed. In the European Union (EU) since 2013 non-ruminant processed animal proteins (PAP) are again permitted to be used in aquafeeds. To ensure that commercial fish feeds do not contain PAP from prohibited species, EU reference methods were established. However, due to the heterogeneous and complex nature of PAP complementary methods are required to guarantee the safe use of this fish feed ingredient. In addition, there is a need for tissue specific PAP detection to identify the sources (i.e. bovine carcass, blood, or meat) of illegal PAP use. In the present study, we investigated and compared different protein extraction, solubilisation and digestion protocols on different proteomics platforms for the detection and differentiation of prohibited PAP. In addition, we assessed if tissue specific PAP detection was feasible using proteomics tools. All work was performed independently in two different laboratories. We found that irrespective of sample preparation gel-based proteomics tools were inappropriate when working with PAP. Gel-free shotgun proteomics approaches in combination with direct spectral comparison were able to provide quality species and tissue specific data to complement and refine current methods of PAP detection and identification. To guarantee the safe use of processed animal protein (PAP) in aquafeeds efficient PAP detection and monitoring tools are required. The present study investigated and compared various proteomics workflows and shows that the application of shotgun proteomics in combination with direct comparison of spectral libraries provides for the desired species and tissue specific classification of this heat sterilized and pressure treated (≥133°C, at 3bar for 20min) protein feed ingredient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. QRI, a retina-specific gene, encodes an extracellular matrix protein exclusively expressed during neural retina differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, F J; Pouponnot, C; Jeanny, J C; Lecoq, O; Calothy, G; Pierani, A

    1996-02-01

    Neural retina development results from growth arrest of neuroectodermal precursors and differentiation of postmitotic cells. The QRI gene is specifically expressed in Müller retinal glial cells. Its expression coincides with the stage of withdrawal from the cell cycle and establishment of differentiation and is repressed upon induction of retinal cell proliferation by the v-src gene product. In this report, we show that the QR1 gene encodes several glycosylated proteins that are secreted and can either associate with the extracellular matrix or remain diffusible in the medium. By using pulse-chase experiments, the 100-103 kDa forms seem to appear first and are specifically incorporated into the extracellular matrix, whereas the 108 and 60 kDa polypeptides appear later and are detected as soluble forms in the culture medium. We also report that expression of the QR1 gene is developmentally regulated in the chicken. Its mRNA is first detectable at embryonic day 10, reaches a maximal level at embryonic day 15 and is no longer detected at embryonic day 18. Immunolocalization of the QR1 protein in chicken retina sections during development shows that expression of the protein parallels the differentiation pattern of post-miotic cells (in particular Müller cells and rods), corresponding to the two differentiation gradients in the retina: from the ganglion cell layer to the inner nuclear layer and outer nuclear layer, and from the optic nerve to the iris. At embryonic day 10, expression of the QR1 protein(s) is restricted to the optic nerve region and the inner nuclear layer, colocalizing with Müller cell bodies. As development proceeds, QR1 protein localization spreads towards the iris and towards the outer nuclear layer, following Müller cell elongations towards the photoreceptors. Between embryonic days 16 and 18, the QR1 protein is no longer detectable in the optic nerve region and is concentrated around the basal segment of the photoreceptors in the peripheral

  5. The role of the endocrine system in feeding-induced tissue-specific circadian entrainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Miho; Murakami, Mariko; Node, Koichi; Matsumura, Ritsuko; Akashi, Makoto

    2014-07-24

    The circadian clock is entrained to environmental cycles by external cue-mediated phase adjustment. Although the light input pathway has been well defined, the mechanism of feeding-induced phase resetting remains unclear. The tissue-specific sensitivity of peripheral entrainment to feeding suggests the involvement of multiple pathways, including humoral and neuronal signals. Previous in vitro studies with cultured cells indicate that endocrine factors may function as entrainment cues for peripheral clocks. However, blood-borne factors that are well characterized in actual feeding-induced resetting have yet to be identified. Here, we report that insulin may be involved in feeding-induced tissue-type-dependent entrainment in vivo. In ex vivo culture experiments, insulin-induced phase shift in peripheral clocks was dependent on tissue type, which was consistent with tissue-specific insulin sensitivity, and peripheral entrainment in insulin-sensitive tissues involved PI3K- and MAPK-mediated signaling pathways. These results suggest that insulin may be an immediate early factor in feeding-mediated tissue-specific entrainment. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cells determine cell density using a small protein bound to a unique tissue-specific phospholipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Petzold

    2013-10-01

    bone cofactor was identified as a lipid containing a ceramide phosphate, a single chained glycerol lipid and a linker. Tendon uses a different cofactor made up of two fatty acid chains linked directly to the phosphate yielding a molecule about half the size. Moreover, adding the tendon factor/cofactor to osteosarcoma cells causes them to stop growing, which is opposite to its role with tendon cells. Thus, the cofactor is cell type specific both in composition and in the triggered response. Further support of its proposed role came from frozen sections from 5 week old mice where an antibody to the factor stained strongly at the growing ends of the tendon as predicted. In conclusion, the molecule needed for cell density signaling is a small protein bound to a unique, tissue-specific phospholipid yielding a membrane associated but diffusible molecule. Signal transduction is postulated to occur by an increased ordering of the plasma membrane as the concentration of this protein/lipid increases with cell density.

  7. Identification of a feather β-keratin gene exclusively expressed in pennaceous barbule cells of contour feathers in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowata, Kinue; Nakaoka, Minori; Nishio, Kaori; Fukao, Ayaka; Satoh, Akira; Ogoshi, Maho; Takahashi, Sumio; Tsudzuki, Masaoki; Takeuchi, Sakae

    2014-05-25

    Feathers are elaborate skin appendages shared by birds and theropod dinosaurs that have hierarchical branching of the rachis, barbs, and barbules. Feather filaments consist of β-keratins encoded by multiple genes, most of which are located in tandem arrays on chromosomes 2, 25, and 27 in chicken. The expansion of the genes is thought to have contributed to feather evolution; however, it is unclear how the individual genes are involved in feather formation. The aim of the present study was to identify feather keratin genes involved in the formation of barbules. Using a combination of microarray analysis, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization, we found an uncharacterized keratin gene on chromosome 7 that was expressed specifically in barbule cells in regenerating chicken feathers. We have named the gene barbule specific keratin 1 (BlSK1). The BlSK1 gene structure was similar to the gene structure of previously characterized feather keratin genes, and consisted of a non-coding leader exon, an intron, and an exon with an open reading frame (ORF). The ORF was predicted to encode a 98 aa long protein, which shared 59% identity with feather keratin B. Orthologs of BlSK1 were found in the genomes of other avian species, including turkey, duck, zebra finch, and flycatcher, in regions that shared synteny with chromosome 7 of chicken. Interestingly, BlSK1 was expressed in feather follicles that generated pennaceous barbules but not in follicles that generated plumulaceous barbules. These results suggested that the composition of feather keratins probably varies depending on the structure of the feather filaments and, that individual feather keratin genes may be involved in building different portions and/or types of feathers in chicken. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis to Identify Anthocyanin Biosynthesis Genes Responsible for Tissue-Specific Pigmentation in Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hwa Ahn

    Full Text Available Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud. is commonly found in temperate climate regions and widely used for lawns, in part, owing to its uniform green color. However, some zoysiagrass cultivars accumulate red to purple pigments in their spike and stolon tissues, thereby decreasing the aesthetic value. Here we analyzed the anthocyanin contents of two zoysiagrass cultivars 'Anyang-jungji' (AJ and 'Greenzoa' (GZ that produce spikes and stolons with purple and green colors, respectively, and revealed that cyanidin and petunidin were primarily accumulated in the pigmented tissues. In parallel, we performed a de novo transcriptome assembly and identified differentially expressed genes between the two cultivars. We found that two anthocyanin biosynthesis genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase (ANS and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR were preferentially upregulated in the purple AJ spike upon pigmentation. Both ANS and DFR genes were also highly expressed in other zoysiagrass cultivars with purple spikes and stolons, but their expression levels were significantly low in the cultivars with green tissues. We observed that recombinant ZjDFR1 and ZjANS1 proteins successfully catalyze the conversions of dihydroflavonols into leucoanthocyanidins and leucoanthocyanidins into anthocyanidins, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that upregulation of ANS and DFR is responsible for tissue-specific anthocyanin biosynthesis and differential pigmentation in zoysiagrass. The present study also demonstrates the feasibility of a de novo transcriptome analysis to identify the key genes associated with specific traits, even in the absence of reference genome information.

  9. A High-Dimensional Atlas of Human T Cell Diversity Reveals Tissue-Specific Trafficking and Cytokine Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael Thomas; Ong, David Eng Hui; Lim, Frances Sheau Huei; Teng, Karen Wei Weng; McGovern, Naomi; Narayanan, Sriram; Ho, Wen Qi; Cerny, Daniela; Tan, Henry Kun Kiaang; Anicete, Rosslyn; Tan, Bien Keem; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon; Chan, Chung Yip; Cheow, Peng Chung; Lee, Ser Yee; Takano, Angela; Tan, Eng-Huat; Tam, John Kit Chung; Tan, Ern Yu; Chan, Jerry Kok Yen; Fink, Katja; Bertoletti, Antonio; Ginhoux, Florent; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria Alicia; Newell, Evan William

    2016-08-16

    Depending on the tissue microenvironment, T cells can differentiate into highly diverse subsets expressing unique trafficking receptors and cytokines. Studies of human lymphocytes have primarily focused on a limited number of parameters in blood, representing an incomplete view of the human immune system. Here, we have utilized mass cytometry to simultaneously analyze T cell trafficking and functional markers across eight different human tissues, including blood, lymphoid, and non-lymphoid tissues. These data have revealed that combinatorial expression of trafficking receptors and cytokines better defines tissue specificity. Notably, we identified numerous T helper cell subsets with overlapping cytokine expression, but only specific cytokine combinations are secreted regardless of tissue type. This indicates that T cell lineages defined in mouse models cannot be clearly distinguished in humans. Overall, our data uncover a plethora of tissue immune signatures and provide a systemic map of how T cell phenotypes are altered throughout the human body. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of tissue-specific cell death using methylation patterns of circulating DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Werman, Roni; Neiman, Daniel; Zemmour, Hai; Moss, Joshua; Magenheim, Judith; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Rubertsson, Sten; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty; Haller, Michael J; Wasserfall, Clive H; Schatz, Desmond A; Greenbaum, Carla J; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Markus; Zick, Aviad; Hubert, Ayala; Maoz, Myriam; Fendrich, Volker; Bartsch, Detlef K; Golan, Talia; Ben Sasson, Shmuel A; Zamir, Gideon; Razin, Aharon; Cedar, Howard; Shapiro, A M James; Glaser, Benjamin; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval

    2016-03-29

    Minimally invasive detection of cell death could prove an invaluable resource in many physiologic and pathologic situations. Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. However, existing methods rely on differences in DNA sequences in source tissues, so that cell death cannot be identified in tissues with a normal genome. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans based on tissue-specific methylation patterns in cfDNA. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome databases to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures and developed a method to detect these signatures in mixed DNA samples. We isolated cfDNA from plasma or serum of donors, treated the cfDNA with bisulfite, PCR-amplified the cfDNA, and sequenced it to quantify cfDNA carrying the methylation markers of the cell type of interest. Pancreatic β-cell DNA was identified in the circulation of patients with recently diagnosed type-1 diabetes and islet-graft recipients; oligodendrocyte DNA was identified in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; neuronal/glial DNA was identified in patients after traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest; and exocrine pancreas DNA was identified in patients with pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the tissue origins of cfDNA and thus the rate of death of specific cell types can be determined in humans. The approach can be adapted to identify cfDNA derived from any cell type in the body, offering a minimally invasive window for diagnosing and monitoring a broad spectrum of human pathologies as well as providing a better understanding of normal tissue dynamics.

  11. Single cell analysis reveals gametic and tissue-specific instability of the SCA1 CAG repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, S.S.; McCall, A.E.; Cota, J. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat within the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p22-23. We performed a comparative analysis of the SCA1 CAG repeat from blood and sperm of an affected male. Genomic amplification revealed a broader smear of the SCA1 allele product from sperm compared to that from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). To resolve this observed difference, we analyzed single sperm directly and demonstrate that the SCA1 allele in PBL is also heterogeneous, although the range of variability in allele sizes is much less than that observed in sperm. Limited genome analysis was also performed on PBL DNA from an unaffected individual with an upper normal allele of 36 repeats in parallel with an affected individual with an expanded allele of 40 repeats. The 36 repeat normal allele, which contains a CAT interruption, was completely stable compared to the uninterrupted repeat of the SCA1 allele, demonstrating a direct correlation between absence of a CAT interruption and somatic instability of the repeat. We also analyzed the size of the CAG repeat in tissues derived from various brain regions from a patient with juvenile-onset disease to determine if the size of the expansion correlated with the site of neuropathology. The results clearly show tissue-specific differences in mosaicism of repeat length. More importantly, the pattern of tissue-specific differences in repeat-length mosaicism in SCA1 within the brain parallels those seen in Huntington disease. In both disorders the expanded alleles are smaller in cerebellar tissue. These results suggest that the observed tissue-specific differences in instability of the SCA1 CAG repeat, either within the brain or between blood and sperm, are a function of the intracellular milieu or the intrinsic replicative potential of the various celltypes.

  12. Differential Tissue-Specific Function of Adora2b in Cardioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seong-wook; Koeppen, Michael; Bonney, Stephanie; Gobel, Merit; Thayer, Molly; Harter, Patrick N; Ravid, Katya; Eltzschig, Holger K; Mittelbronn, Michel; Walker, Lori; Eckle, Tobias

    2015-08-15

    The adenosine A2b receptor (Adora2b) has been implicated in cardioprotection from myocardial ischemia. As such, Adora2b was found to be critical in ischemic preconditioning (IP) or ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury of the heart. Whereas Adora2b is present on various cells types, the tissue-specific role of Adora2b in cardioprotection is still unknown. To study the tissue-specific role of Adora2b signaling on inflammatory cells, endothelia, or myocytes during myocardial ischemia in vivo, we intercrossed floxed Adora2b mice with Lyz2-Cre(+), VE-cadherin-Cre(+), or myosin-Cre(+) transgenic mice, respectively. Mice were exposed to 60 min of myocardial ischemia with or without IP (four times for 5 min) followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Cardioprotection by IP was abolished in Adora2b(f/f)-VE-cadherin-Cre(+) or Adora2b(f/f)-myosin-Cre(+), indicating that Adora2b signaling on endothelia or myocytes mediates IP. In contrast, primarily Adora2b signaling on inflammatory cells was necessary to provide cardioprotection in IR injury, indicated by significantly larger infarcts and higher troponin levels in Adora2b(f/f)-Lyz2-Cre(+) mice only. Cytokine profiling of IR injury in Adora2b(f/f)-Lyz2-Cre(+) mice pointed toward polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Analysis of PMNs from Adora2b(f/f)-Lyz2-Cre(+) confirmed PMNs as one source of identified tissue cytokines. Finally, adoptive transfer of Adora2b(-/-) PMNs revealed a critical role of Adora2b on PMNs in cardioprotection from IR injury. Adora2b signaling mediates different types of cardioprotection in a tissue-specific manner. These findings have implications for the use of Adora2b agonists in the treatment or prevention of myocardial injury by ischemia. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Generation of Tissue-Specific Mouse Models to Analyze HDAC Functions.

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    Hagelkruys, Astrid; Moser, Mirjam A; Seiser, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles during mammalian development and for cellular homeostasis. In addition, these enzymes are promising targets for small molecule inhibitors in the treatment of cancer and neurological diseases. Conditional HDAC knock-out mice are excellent tools for defining the functions of individual HDACs in vivo and for identifying the molecular targets of HDAC inhibitors in disease. Here, we describe the generation of tissue-specific HDAC knock-out mice and delineate a strategy for the generation of conditional HDAC knock-in mice.

  14. Genome-wide association analysis of eosinophilic esophagitis provides insight into the tissue specificity of this allergic disease

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    Kottyan, Leah C.; Davis, Benjamin P.; Sherrill, Joseph D.; Liu, Kan; Rochman, Mark; Kaufman, Kenneth; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Vaughn, Samuel; Lazaro, Sara; Rupert, Andrew M.; Kohram, Mojtaba; Stucke, Emily M.; Kemme, Katherine A.; Magnusen, Albert; He, Hua; Dexheimer, Phillip; Chehade, Mirna; Wood, Robert A.; Pesek, Robbie D.; Vickery, Brian P.; Fleischer, David M.; Lindbad, Robert; Sampson, Hugh A.; Mukkada, Vince; Putnam, Phil E.; Abonia, J. Pablo; Martin, Lisa J.; Harley, John B.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disorder associated with allergic hypersensitivity to food. We interrogated >1.5 million genetic variants in European EoE cases and subsequently in a multi-site cohort with local and out-of-study control subjects. In addition to replication of the 5q22 locus (meta-analysis p = 1.9×10−16), we identified association at 2p23 (encoding CAPN14, p = 2.5×10−10). CAPN14 was specifically expressed in the esophagus, dynamically upregulated as a function of disease activity and genetic haplotype and after exposure of epithelial cells to IL-13, and located in an epigenetic hotspot modified by IL-13. There was enriched esophageal expression for the genes neighboring the top 208 EoE sequence variants. Multiple allergic sensitization loci were associated with EoE susceptibility (4.8×10−2 < p < 5.1×10−11). We propose a model that elucidates the tissue specific nature of EoE that involves the interplay of allergic sensitization with an EoE-specific, IL-13–inducible esophageal response involving CAPN14. PMID:25017104

  15. Dihydroxyselenolane (DHS) supplementation improves survival following whole-body irradiation (WBI) by suppressing tissue-specific inflammatory responses.

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    Kunwar, Amit; Verma, Prachi; Bhilwade, H N; Iwaoka, Michio; Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2016-09-01

    Dihydroxyselenolane (DHS), a simple water-soluble organoselenium compound, was evaluated for radioprotection in BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation (WBI) (8Gy (60)Co, 1Gy/min), by monitoring 30-d post-irradiation survival and biochemical/histological changes in radiosensitive organs. Intraperitoneal administration of DHS at 2mg/kg for five consecutive days before irradiation and three times per week during the post-irradiation period showed maximum benefit (40% improvement in 30 d post-irradiation survival). DHS treatment, despite inducing expression of glutathione peroxidases (GPx1, GPx2, and GPx4) in spleen and intestine, did not protect against radiation-induced acute (10-day) haematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicities. DHS treatment significantly reduced radiation-induced DNA damage in peripheral leukocytes and inflammatory responses in intestine, lung, and circulation. The anti-inflammatory effect of DHS was associated with reductions in lipid peroxidation, expression of pro-inflammatory genes such as Icam-1, Ccl-2, and iNos-2, and subsequent infiltration of inflammatory cells. Irradiated mice treated with DHS survived until day 30 post-irradiation and showed restoration of spleen cellularity and intestinal villi, but had moderately increased systemic and tissue-specific inflammatory responses. Another organoselenium compound, selenomethionine, evaluated in parallel with DHS at the same dose and treatment schedule, showed comparable radioprotective effects. The mechanism of radioprotection by DHS is mainly via suppression of inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. One crisis, diverse impacts-Tissue-specificity of folate deficiency-induced circulation defects in zebrafish larvae.

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    Hung-Chi Tu

    Full Text Available Folate (vitamin B9 is an essential nutrient required for cell survival, proliferation, differentiation and therefore embryogenesis. Folate deficiency has been associated with many diseases, including congenital heart diseases and megaloblastic anemia, yet the mechanisms underlying these remains elusive. Here, we examine the impact of folate deficiency on the development of the circulation system using a zebrafish transgenic line which displays inducible folate deficiency. Impaired hematopoiesis includes decreased hemoglobin levels, decreased erythrocyte number, increased erythrocyte size and aberrant c-myb expression pattern were observed in folate deficient embryos. Cardiac defects, including smaller chamber size, aberrant cardiac function and cmlc2 expression pattern, were also apparent in folate deficient embryos. Characterization of intracellular folate content in folate deficiency revealed a differential fluctuation among the different folate derivatives that carry a single carbon group at different oxidation levels. Rescue attempts by folic acid and nucleotides resulted in differential responses among affected tissues, suggesting that different pathomechanisms are involved in folate deficiency-induced anomalies in a tissue-specific manner. The results of the current study provide an explanation for the inconsistent outcome observed clinically in patients suffering from folate deficiency and/or receiving folate supplementation. This study also supports the use of this model for further research on the defective cardiogenesis and hematopoiesis caused by folate deficiency.

  17. Rice tissue-specific promoters and condition-dependent promoters for effective translational application.

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    Jeong, Hee-Jeong; Jung, Ki-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the most important staple food crops for more than half of the world's population. The demand is increasing for food security because of population growth and environmental challenges triggered by climate changes. This scenario has led to more interest in developing crops with greater productivity and sustainability. The process of genetic transformation, a major tool for crop improvement, utilizes promoters as one of its key elements. Those promoters are generally divided into three types: constitutive, spatiotemporal, and condition-dependent. Transcriptional control of a constitutive promoter often leads to reduced plant growth, due to a negative effect of accumulated molecules during cellular functions or energy consumption. To maximize the effect of a transgene on transgenic plants, it is better to use condition-dependent or tissue-specific promoters. However, until now, those types have not been as widely applied in crop biotechnology. In this review, we introduce and discuss four groups of tissue-specific promoters (50 promoters in total) and six groups of condition-dependent promoters (27 promoters). These promoters can be utilized to fine-tune desirable agronomic traits and develop crops with tolerance to various stresses, enhanced nutritional value, and advanced productivity. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Metabolic, anabolic, and mitogenic insulin responses: A tissue-specific perspective for insulin receptor activators.

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    Bedinger, Daniel H; Adams, Sean H

    2015-11-05

    Insulin acts as the major regulator of the fasting-to-fed metabolic transition by altering substrate metabolism, promoting energy storage, and helping activate protein synthesis. In addition to its glucoregulatory and other metabolic properties, insulin can also act as a growth factor. The metabolic and mitogenic responses to insulin are regulated by divergent post-receptor signaling mechanisms downstream from the activated insulin receptor (IR). However, the anabolic and growth-promoting properties of insulin require tissue-specific inter-relationships between the two pathways, and the nature and scope of insulin-regulated processes vary greatly across tissues. Understanding the nuances of this interplay between metabolic and growth-regulating properties of insulin would have important implications for development of novel insulin and IR modulator therapies that stimulate insulin receptor activation in both pathway- and tissue-specific manners. This review will provide a unique perspective focusing on the roles of "metabolic" and "mitogenic" actions of insulin signaling in various tissues, and how these networks should be considered when evaluating selective pharmacologic approaches to prevent or treat metabolic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A tissue-specific role for intraflagellar transport genes during craniofacial development.

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    Elizabeth N Schock

    Full Text Available Primary cilia are nearly ubiquitous, cellular projections that function to transduce molecular signals during development. Loss of functional primary cilia has a particularly profound effect on the developing craniofacial complex, causing several anomalies including craniosynostosis, micrognathia, midfacial dysplasia, cleft lip/palate and oral/dental defects. Development of the craniofacial complex is an intricate process that requires interactions between several different tissues including neural crest cells, neuroectoderm and surface ectoderm. To understand the tissue-specific requirements for primary cilia during craniofacial development we conditionally deleted three separate intraflagellar transport genes, Kif3a, Ift88 and Ttc21b with three distinct drivers, Wnt1-Cre, Crect and AP2-Cre which drive recombination in neural crest, surface ectoderm alone, and neural crest, surface ectoderm and neuroectoderm, respectively. We found that tissue-specific conditional loss of ciliary genes with different functions produces profoundly different facial phenotypes. Furthermore, analysis of basic cellular behaviors in these mutants suggests that loss of primary cilia in a distinct tissue has unique effects on development of adjacent tissues. Together, these data suggest specific spatiotemporal roles for intraflagellar transport genes and the primary cilium during craniofacial development.

  20. Inter-individual variation in DNA methylation is largely restricted to tissue-specific differentially methylated regions in maize.

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    Lauria, Massimiliano; Echegoyen-Nava, Rodrigo Antonio; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Zaina, Silvio; Lund, Gertrud

    2017-02-23

    Variation in DNA methylation across distinct genetic populations, or in response to specific biotic or abiotic stimuli, has typically been studied in leaf DNA from pooled individuals using either reduced representation bisulfite sequencing, whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) or methylation sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP). The latter represents a useful alterative when sample size is large, or when analysing methylation changes in genomes that have yet to be sequenced. In this study we compared variation in methylation across ten individual leaf and endosperm samples from maize hybrid and inbred lines using MSAP. We also addressed the methodological implications of analysing methylation variation using pooled versus individual DNA samples, in addition to the validity of MSAP compared to WGBS. Finally, we analysed a subset of variable and non-variable fragments with respect to genomic location, vicinity to repetitive elements and expression patterns across leaf and endosperm tissues. On average, 30% of individuals showed inter-individual methylation variation, mostly of leaf and endosperm-specific differentially methylated DNA regions. With the exception of low frequency demethylation events, the bulk of inter-individual methylation variation (84 and 80% in leaf and endosperm, respectively) was effectively captured in DNA from pooled individuals. Furthermore, available genome-wide methylation data largely confirmed MSAP leaf methylation profiles. Most variable methylation that mapped within genes was associated with CG methylation, and many of such genes showed tissue-specific expression profiles. Finally, we found that the hAT DNA transposon was the most common class II transposable element found in close proximity to variable DNA regions. The relevance of our results with respect to future studies of methylation variation is the following: firstly, the finding that inter-individual methylation variation is largely restricted to tissue-specific

  1. Tissue-specific B-cell dysfunction and generalized memory B-cell loss during acute SIV infection.

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    Sandrine Peruchon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART. Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.. We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD(-CD27(+ B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8(+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus-B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid

  2. Combinatorial binding leads to diverse regulatory responses: Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity.

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    Paulo M F Cunha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how complex patterns of temporal and spatial expression are regulated is central to deciphering genetic programs that drive development. Gene expression is initiated through the action of transcription factors and their cofactors converging on enhancer elements leading to a defined activity. Specific constellations of combinatorial occupancy are therefore often conceptualized as rigid binding codes that give rise to a common output of spatio-temporal expression. Here, we assessed this assumption using the regulatory input of two essential transcription factors within the Drosophila myogenic network. Mutations in either Myocyte enhancing factor 2 (Mef2 or the zinc-finger transcription factor lame duck (lmd lead to very similar defects in myoblast fusion, yet the underlying molecular mechanism for this shared phenotype is not understood. Using a combination of ChIP-on-chip analysis and expression profiling of loss-of-function mutants, we obtained a global view of the regulatory input of both factors during development. The majority of Lmd-bound enhancers are co-bound by Mef2, representing a subset of Mef2's transcriptional input during these stages of development. Systematic analyses of the regulatory contribution of both factors demonstrate diverse regulatory roles, despite their co-occupancy of shared enhancer elements. These results indicate that Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity, acting as both a transcriptional activator and repressor, which has important implications for myogenesis. More generally, this study demonstrates considerable flexibility in the regulatory output of two factors, leading to additive, cooperative, and repressive modes of co-regulation.

  3. Tissue-specific DNA methylation is conserved across human, mouse, and rat, and driven by primary sequence conservation.

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    Zhou, Jia; Sears, Renee L; Xing, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Bo; Li, Daofeng; Rockweiler, Nicole B; Jang, Hyo Sik; Choudhary, Mayank N K; Lee, Hyung Joo; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Arand, Jason; Tabers, Brianne; Gu, C Charles; Cicero, Theodore J; Wang, Ting

    2017-09-12

    Uncovering mechanisms of epigenome evolution is an essential step towards understanding the evolution of different cellular phenotypes. While studies have confirmed DNA methylation as a conserved epigenetic mechanism in mammalian development, little is known about the conservation of tissue-specific genome-wide DNA methylation patterns. Using a comparative epigenomics approach, we identified and compared the tissue-specific DNA methylation patterns of rat against those of mouse and human across three shared tissue types. We confirmed that tissue-specific differentially methylated regions are strongly associated with tissue-specific regulatory elements. Comparisons between species revealed that at a minimum 11-37% of tissue-specific DNA methylation patterns are conserved, a phenomenon that we define as epigenetic conservation. Conserved DNA methylation is accompanied by conservation of other epigenetic marks including histone modifications. Although a significant amount of locus-specific methylation is epigenetically conserved, the majority of tissue-specific DNA methylation is not conserved across the species and tissue types that we investigated. Examination of the genetic underpinning of epigenetic conservation suggests that primary sequence conservation is a driving force behind epigenetic conservation. In contrast, evolutionary dynamics of tissue-specific DNA methylation are best explained by the maintenance or turnover of binding sites for important transcription factors. Our study extends the limited literature of comparative epigenomics and suggests a new paradigm for epigenetic conservation without genetic conservation through analysis of transcription factor binding sites.

  4. Tissue Specific Effects of Loss of Estrogen During Menopause and Aging

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    Korinna eWend

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The roles of estrogens have been best studied in the breast, breast cancers and in the female reproductive tract. However, estrogens have important functions in almost every tissue in the body. Recent clinical trials such as the Women’s Health Initiative have highlighted both the importance of estrogens and how little we know about the molecular mechanism of estrogens in these other tissues. In this review, we illustrate the diverse functions of estrogens in the bone, adipose tissue, skin, hair, brain, skeletal muscle and cardiovascular system, and how the loss of estrogens during aging affects these tissues. Early transcriptional targets of estrogen are reviewed in each tissue. We also describe the tissue-specific effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs used for the treatment of breast cancers and post-menopausal symptoms.

  5. Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific alternative splicing of Mef2D required for muscle differentiation.

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    Runfola, Valeria; Sebastian, Soji; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-02-15

    Among the Mef2 family of transcription factors, Mef2D is unique in that it undergoes tissue-specific splicing to generate an isoform that is essential for muscle differentiation. However, the mechanisms mediating this muscle-specific processing of Mef2D remain unknown. Using bioinformatics, we identified Rbfox proteins as putative modulators of Mef2D muscle-specific splicing. Accordingly, we found direct and specific Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 binding to Mef2D pre-mRNA in vivo. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 cooperate in promoting Mef2D splicing and subsequent myogenesis. Thus, our findings reveal a new role for Rbfox proteins in regulating myogenesis through activation of essential muscle-specific splicing events. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Tissue-specific actions of the metabolic hormones FGF15/19 and FGF21.

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    Owen, Bryn M; Mangelsdorf, David J; Kliewer, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) 15/19 and 21 belong to a subfamily of FGFs that function as hormones. Produced in response to specific nutritional cues, they act on overlapping sets of cell surface receptors composed of classic FGF receptors in complex with βKlotho, and regulate metabolism and related processes during periods of fluctuating energy availability. Pharmacologically, both FGF15/19 and FGF21 cause weight loss and improve both insulin-sensitivity and lipid parameters in rodent and primate models of metabolic disease. Recently, FGF21 was shown to have similar effects in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. We discuss here emerging concepts in FGF15/19 and FGF21 tissue-specific actions and critically assess their putative role as candidate targets for treating metabolic disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adipocyte dysfunction in a mouse model of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS: evidence of adipocyte hypertrophy and tissue-specific inflammation.

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    Joseph S Marino

    Full Text Available Clinical research shows an association between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS and chronic inflammation, a pathological state thought to contribute to insulin resistance. The underlying pathways, however, have not been defined. The purpose of this study was to characterize the inflammatory state of a novel mouse model of PCOS. Female mice lacking leptin and insulin receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons (IR/LepR(POMC mice and littermate controls were evaluated for estrous cyclicity, ovarian and adipose tissue morphology, and body composition by QMR and CT scan. Tissue-specific macrophage infiltration and cytokine mRNA expression were measured, as well as circulating cytokine levels. Finally, glucose regulation during pregnancy was evaluated as a measure of risk for diabetes development. Forty-five percent of IR/LepR(POMC mice showed reduced or absent ovulation. IR/LepR(POMC mice also had increased fat mass and adipocyte hypertrophy. These traits accompanied elevations in macrophage accumulation and inflammatory cytokine production in perigonadal adipose tissue, liver, and ovary. These mice also exhibited gestational hyperglycemia as predicted. This report is the first to show the presence of inflammation in IR/LepR(POMC mice, which develop a PCOS-like phenotype. Thus, IR/LepR(POMC mice may serve as a new mouse model to clarify the involvement of adipose and liver tissue in the pathogenesis and etiology of PCOS, allowing more targeted research on the development of PCOS and potential therapeutic interventions.

  8. Long-range looping of a locus control region drives tissue-specific chromatin packing within a multigene cluster.

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    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Cooke, Nancy E; Liebhaber, Stephen A

    2016-06-02

    The relationships of higher order chromatin organization to mammalian gene expression remain incompletely defined. The human Growth Hormone (hGH) multigene cluster contains five gene paralogs. These genes are selectively activated in either the pituitary or the placenta by distinct components of a remote locus control region (LCR). Prior studies have revealed that appropriate activation of the placental genes is dependent not only on the actions of the LCR, but also on the multigene composition of the cluster itself. Here, we demonstrate that the hGH LCR 'loops' over a distance of 28 kb in primary placental nuclei to make specific contacts with the promoters of the two GH genes in the cluster. This long-range interaction sequesters the GH genes from the three hCS genes which co-assemble into a tightly packed 'hCS chromatin hub'. Elimination of the long-range looping, via specific deletion of the placental LCR components, triggers a dramatic disruption of the hCS chromatin hub. These data reveal a higher-order structural pathway by which long-range looping from an LCR impacts on local chromatin architecture that is linked to tissue-specific gene regulation within a multigene cluster. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Heat stress in pigs is accompanied by adipose tissue-specific responses that favor increased triglyceride storage.

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    Qu, H; Yan, H; Lu, H; Donkin, S S; Ajuwon, K M

    2016-05-01

    Heat stress (HS) negatively affects all aspects of performance in pigs. Although certain tissue-specific responses in the liver, skeletal muscle, and intestine are known, there is paucity of information on responses within the adipose tissue. Therefore, the objective of this study was to delineate adipose tissue responses during HS in pigs. Thirty crossbred (Ossabaw × Duroc × Landrace) pigs were assigned to 3 treatments for 7 d. Treatments were 1) control and libitum fed (CON) with room temperature set at 20°C ± 1°C, 2) pair fed (PF) with room temperature as the CON treatment but pair fed to HS pigs, and 3) HS with room temperature 35°C ± 1°C and ad libitum access to feed. Compared with CON pigs, HS pigs had decreased feed intake and elevated skin temperature and respiration rate ( Heat stress also caused increased heat shock protein 70 (HSP70; = 0.067) and CCAT/enhancer-binding homologous protein (CHOP) content ( < 0.05) in the mesenteric fat compared with the CON treatment. In conclusion, induction of PCK1 expression in adipose tissue by HS suggests elevated glyceroneogenesis might be involved in the increased fat storage in pigs under HS.

  10. Subtractive hybridization cloning of a tissue-specific extinguisher: TSE1 encodes a regulatory subunit of protein kinase A.

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    Jones, K W; Shapero, M H; Chevrette, M; Fournier, R E

    1991-09-06

    Tissue-specific extinguisher 1 (TSE1) is a trans-acting locus on human chromosome 17 that down-regulates expression of seven liver genes in hepatoma x fibroblast hybrids. To study the mechanism by which TSE1 functions, we used subtractive cDNA hybridization to clone transcripts encoded within a 2-4 Mb segment of chromosome 17 that includes TSE1. High resolution mapping within this region indicated that 8 of 9 different human cDNAs so obtained were distinct from TSE1. The remaining cDNA clone mapped concordantly with TSE1 in a panel of fragment-containing hybrids. DNA sequencing indicated that this cDNA encoded regulatory subunit RI alpha of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and RI alpha mRNA levels correlated with TSE1 activity in various hybrid lines. Stable transfection of wild-type or cAMP-binding mutant RI alpha alleles into hepatoma recipients produced an extinction phenotype indistinguishable from that encoded by human TSE1. We conclude that TSE1 encodes a regulatory subunit of protein kinase A whose activity differs in different cell types.

  11. Term-tissue specific models for prediction of gene ontology biological processes using transcriptional profiles of aging in drosophila melanogaster

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    Zou Sige

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predictive classification on the base of gene expression profiles appeared recently as an attractive strategy for identifying the biological functions of genes. Gene Ontology (GO provides a valuable source of knowledge for model training and validation. The increasing collection of microarray data represents a valuable source for generating functional hypotheses of uncharacterized genes. Results This study focused on using support vector machines (SVM to predict GO biological processes from individual or multiple-tissue transcriptional profiles of aging in Drosophila melanogaster. Ten-fold cross validation was implemented to evaluate the prediction. One-tail Fisher's exact test was conducted on each cross validation and multiple testing was addressed using BH FDR procedure. The results showed that, of the 148 pursued GO biological processes, fifteen terms each had at least one model with FDR-adjusted p-value (Adj.p Conclusion We proposed the concept of term-tissue specific models indicating the fact that the major part of the optimized prediction models was trained from individual tissue data. Furthermore, we observed that the memberships of the genes involved in all the three pursued children biological processes on mitochondrial electron transport could be predicted from the transcriptional profiles of aging (Adj.p

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae clonal complex 199: genetic diversity and tissue-specific virulence.

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    Jonathan C Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of otitis media and invasive disease. Since introduction of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, there has been an increase in replacement disease due to serotype 19A clonal complex (CC199 isolates. The goals of this study were to 1 describe genetic diversity among nineteen CC199 isolates from carriage, middle ear, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid, 2 compare CC199 19A (n = 3 and 15B/C (n = 2 isolates in the chinchilla model for pneumococcal disease, and 3 identify accessory genes associated with tissue-specific disease among a larger collection of S. pneumoniae isolates. CC199 isolates were analyzed by comparative genome hybridization. One hundred and twenty-seven genes were variably present. The CC199 phylogeny split into two main clades, one comprised predominantly of carriage isolates and another of disease isolates. Ability to colonize and cause disease did not differ by serotype in the chinchilla model. However, isolates from the disease clade were associated with faster time to bacteremia compared to carriage clade isolates. One 19A isolate exhibited hypervirulence. Twelve tissue-specific genes/regions were identified by correspondence analysis. After screening a diverse collection of 326 isolates, spr0282 was associated with carriage. Four genes/regions, SP0163, SP0463, SPN05002 and RD8a were associated with middle ear isolates. SPN05002 also associated with blood and CSF, while RD8a associated with blood isolates. The hypervirulent isolate's genome was sequenced using the Solexa paired-end sequencing platform and compared to that of a reference serotype 19A isolate, revealing the presence of a novel 20 kb region with sequence similarity to bacteriophage genes. Genetic factors other than serotype may modulate virulence potential in CC199. These studies have implications for the long-term effectiveness of conjugate vaccines. Ideally, future vaccines would target common

  13. The Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Regulator Cyclophilin D Exhibits Tissue-Specific Control of Metabolic Homeostasis.

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    Rhianna C Laker

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP is a key regulator of mitochondrial function that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease. Cyclophilin D (CypD is a critical regulator that directly binds to mPTP constituents to facilitate the pore opening. We previously found that global CypD knockout mice (KO are protected from diet-induced glucose intolerance; however, the tissue-specific function of CypD and mPTP, particularly in the control of glucose homeostasis, has not been ascertained. To this end, we performed calcium retention capacity (CRC assay to compare the importance of CypD in the liver versus skeletal muscle. We found that liver mitochondria are more dependent on CypD for mPTP opening than skeletal muscle mitochondria. To ascertain the tissue-specific role of CypD in metabolic homeostasis, we generated liver-specific and muscle-specific CypD knockout mice (LKO and MKO, respectively and fed them either a chow diet or 45% high-fat diet (HFD for 14 weeks. MKO mice displayed similar body weight gain and glucose intolerance compared with wild type littermates (WT, whereas LKO mice developed greater visceral obesity, glucose intolerance and pyruvate intolerance compared with WT mice. These findings demonstrate that loss of muscle CypD is not sufficient to alter whole body glucose metabolism, while the loss of liver CypD exacerbates obesity and whole-body metabolic dysfunction in mice fed HFD.

  14. Illuminating a plant's tissue-specific metabolic diversity using computational metabolomics and information theory.

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    Li, Dapeng; Heiling, Sven; Baldwin, Ian T; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2016-11-22

    Secondary metabolite diversity is considered an important fitness determinant for plants' biotic and abiotic interactions in nature. This diversity can be examined in two dimensions. The first one considers metabolite diversity across plant species. A second way of looking at this diversity is by considering the tissue-specific localization of pathways underlying secondary metabolism within a plant. Although these cross-tissue metabolite variations are increasingly regarded as important readouts of tissue-level gene function and regulatory processes, they have rarely been comprehensively explored by nontargeted metabolomics. As such, important questions have remained superficially addressed. For instance, which tissues exhibit prevalent signatures of metabolic specialization? Reciprocally, which metabolites contribute most to this tissue specialization in contrast to those metabolites exhibiting housekeeping characteristics? Here, we explore tissue-level metabolic specialization in Nicotiana attenuata, an ecological model with rich secondary metabolism, by combining tissue-wide nontargeted mass spectral data acquisition, information theory analysis, and tandem MS (MS/MS) molecular networks. This analysis was conducted for two different methanolic extracts of 14 tissues and deconvoluted 895 nonredundant MS/MS spectra. Using information theory analysis, anthers were found to harbor the most specialized metabolome, and most unique metabolites of anthers and other tissues were annotated through MS/MS molecular networks. Tissue-metabolite association maps were used to predict tissue-specific gene functions. Predictions for the function of two UDP-glycosyltransferases in flavonoid metabolism were confirmed by virus-induced gene silencing. The present workflow allows biologists to amortize the vast amount of data produced by modern MS instrumentation in their quest to understand gene function.

  15. Tissue-specific extinguisher loci in the murine genome: a screening study based on a rat/mouse microcell hybrid panel.

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    Schafer, A J; Bulla, G A; Fournier, R E

    1994-05-01

    Extinction of tissue-specific traits in intertypic somatic cell hybrids is a well-known phenomenon. In the past few years, microcell hybrids have been used in attempts to dissect this phenotype genetically, and tissue-specific extinguisher loci have been mapped to two different mouse chromosomes. When transferred from fibroblast into hepatoma cells by microcell fusion, these loci down-regulate expression of specific liver genes in trans. However, other liver genes that are extinguished in genotypically complete hybrids seem not to be extinguished in monochromosomal hybrids. To assess the generality of monochromosomal extinction phenotypes, we assembled a collection of rat hepatoma/mouse fibroblast microcell hybrids that represent most of the mouse chromosome complement, and we screened them for expression of a large number of liver-specific genes. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression was down-regulated in hybrids containing mouse chromosome 7 or mouse chromosome 11, but other extinction phenotypes were not readily apparent. These results indicate that extinction of many liver genes may be a polygenic trait.

  16. hSAGEing: an improved SAGE-based software for identification of human tissue-specific or common tumor markers and suppressors.

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    Cheng-Hong Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression is a powerful method of analyzing gene expression for the entire transcriptome. There are currently many well-developed SAGE tools. However, the cross-comparison of different tissues is seldom addressed, thus limiting the identification of common- and tissue-specific tumor markers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To improve the SAGE mining methods, we propose a novel function for cross-tissue comparison of SAGE data by combining the mathematical set theory and logic with a unique "multi-pool method" that analyzes multiple pools of pair-wise case controls individually. When all the settings are in "inclusion", the common SAGE tag sequences are mined. When one tissue type is in "inclusion" and the other types of tissues are not in "inclusion", the selected tissue-specific SAGE tag sequences are generated. They are displayed in tags-per-million (TPM and fold values, as well as visually displayed in four kinds of scales in a color gradient pattern. In the fold visualization display, the top scores of the SAGE tag sequences are provided, along with cluster plots. A user-defined matrix file is designed for cross-tissue comparison by selecting libraries from publically available databases or user-defined libraries. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The hSAGEing tool provides a combination of friendly cross-tissue analysis and an interface for comparing SAGE libraries for the first time. Some up- or down-regulated genes with tissue-specific or common tumor markers and suppressors are identified computationally. The tool is useful and convenient for in silico cancer transcriptomic studies and is freely available at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/hSAGEing.

  17. hSAGEing: an improved SAGE-based software for identification of human tissue-specific or common tumor markers and suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Shih, Tsung-Mu; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2010-12-17

    SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) is a powerful method of analyzing gene expression for the entire transcriptome. There are currently many well-developed SAGE tools. However, the cross-comparison of different tissues is seldom addressed, thus limiting the identification of common- and tissue-specific tumor markers. To improve the SAGE mining methods, we propose a novel function for cross-tissue comparison of SAGE data by combining the mathematical set theory and logic with a unique "multi-pool method" that analyzes multiple pools of pair-wise case controls individually. When all the settings are in "inclusion", the common SAGE tag sequences are mined. When one tissue type is in "inclusion" and the other types of tissues are not in "inclusion", the selected tissue-specific SAGE tag sequences are generated. They are displayed in tags-per-million (TPM) and fold values, as well as visually displayed in four kinds of scales in a color gradient pattern. In the fold visualization display, the top scores of the SAGE tag sequences are provided, along with cluster plots. A user-defined matrix file is designed for cross-tissue comparison by selecting libraries from publically available databases or user-defined libraries. The hSAGEing tool provides a combination of friendly cross-tissue analysis and an interface for comparing SAGE libraries for the first time. Some up- or down-regulated genes with tissue-specific or common tumor markers and suppressors are identified computationally. The tool is useful and convenient for in silico cancer transcriptomic studies and is freely available at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/hSAGEing.

  18. Tissue-specific regulation of CXCL9/10/11 chemokines in keratinocytes: Implications for oral inflammatory disease.

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    Alison Marshall

    Full Text Available The IFN-γ-inducible chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 play a key role in many inflammatory conditions, particularly those mediated by T cells. Therefore, the production of these chemokines in peripheral tissues could be instrumental in the pathophysiology of tissue-specific immunological diseases such as oral lichen planus (OLP. In the present study, we assessed the production of keratinocyte-derived CXCL9/10/11 under basal and inflammatory conditions and investigated whether these chemokines were involved in the pathogenesis of OLP. We used semi-quantitative PCR, ELISA, chemotaxis assays, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS to assess the expression and functional role of CXCL9/10/11 in oral keratinocytes (three strains of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK, and the H357 oral cancer cell line in the presence or absence of IFN-γ. CXCL9/10/11 were also assessed in tissues from normal patients and those with oral lichen planus (OLP. The time course study in oral keratinocytes treated with IFN-γ showed that expression of CXCL9/10/11 chemokines was significantly enhanced by IFN-γ in a time-dependent manner. In particular, CXCL10, a prominent chemokine that was overexpressed by IFN-γ-stimulated NHOK, was able to effectively recruit CD4 lymphocytes, mainly CD4+CD45RA- cells. Significantly higher levels of CXCL9/10/11 were found in tissues from patients with OLP compared to normal oral mucosa. Taken together, the results demonstrate that normal oral keratinocytes produce chemotactic molecules that mediate T cell recruitment. This study furthers understanding of chemokine production in oral keratinocytes and their role in the pathophysiology of oral mucosa, with particular relevance to OLP.

  19. Dynamic Metabolic Profiles and Tissue-Specific Source Effects on the Metabolome of Developing Seeds of Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianqiao; Zheng, Suning; Xu, Xinying; Guo, Haolun; Ye, Wenxue

    2015-01-01

    Canola (Brassica napus) is one of several important oil-producing crops, and the physiological processes, enzymes, and genes involved in oil synthesis in canola seeds have been well characterized. However, relatively little is known about the dynamic metabolic changes that occur during oil accumulation in seeds, as well as the mechanistic origins of metabolic changes. To explore the metabolic changes that occur during oil accumulation, we isolated metabolites from both seed and silique wall and identified and characterized them by using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results showed that a total of 443 metabolites were identified from four developmental stages. Dozens of these metabolites were differentially expressed during seed ripening, including 20 known to be involved in seed development. To investigate the contribution of tissue-specific carbon sources to the biosynthesis of these metabolites, we examined the metabolic changes of silique walls and seeds under three treatments: leaf-detachment (Ld), phloem-peeling (Pe), and selective silique darkening (Sd). Our study demonstrated that the oil content was independent of leaf photosynthesis and phloem transport during oil accumulation, but required the metabolic influx from the silique wall. Notably, Sd treatment resulted in seed senescence, which eventually led to a severe reduction of the oil content. Sd treatment also caused a significant accumulation of fatty acids (FA), organic acids and amino acids. Furthermore, an unexpected accumulation of sugar derivatives and organic acid was observed in the Pe- and Sd-treated seeds. Consistent with this, the expression of a subset of genes involved in FA metabolism, sugar and oil storage was significantly altered in Pe and Sd treated seeds. Taken together, our studies suggest the metabolite profiles of canola seeds dynamically varied during the course of oil accumulation, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms of the oil

  20. Dynamic Metabolic Profiles and Tissue-Specific Source Effects on the Metabolome of Developing Seeds of Brassica napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helin Tan

    Full Text Available Canola (Brassica napus is one of several important oil-producing crops, and the physiological processes, enzymes, and genes involved in oil synthesis in canola seeds have been well characterized. However, relatively little is known about the dynamic metabolic changes that occur during oil accumulation in seeds, as well as the mechanistic origins of metabolic changes. To explore the metabolic changes that occur during oil accumulation, we isolated metabolites from both seed and silique wall and identified and characterized them by using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The results showed that a total of 443 metabolites were identified from four developmental stages. Dozens of these metabolites were differentially expressed during seed ripening, including 20 known to be involved in seed development. To investigate the contribution of tissue-specific carbon sources to the biosynthesis of these metabolites, we examined the metabolic changes of silique walls and seeds under three treatments: leaf-detachment (Ld, phloem-peeling (Pe, and selective silique darkening (Sd. Our study demonstrated that the oil content was independent of leaf photosynthesis and phloem transport during oil accumulation, but required the metabolic influx from the silique wall. Notably, Sd treatment resulted in seed senescence, which eventually led to a severe reduction of the oil content. Sd treatment also caused a significant accumulation of fatty acids (FA, organic acids and amino acids. Furthermore, an unexpected accumulation of sugar derivatives and organic acid was observed in the Pe- and Sd-treated seeds. Consistent with this, the expression of a subset of genes involved in FA metabolism, sugar and oil storage was significantly altered in Pe and Sd treated seeds. Taken together, our studies suggest the metabolite profiles of canola seeds dynamically varied during the course of oil accumulation, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms

  1. Tissue-specific increases in 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in normal weight postmenopausal women.

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    Therése Andersson

    Full Text Available With age and menopause there is a shift in adipose distribution from gluteo-femoral to abdominal depots in women. Associated with this redistribution of fat are increased risks of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Glucocorticoids influence body composition, and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11betaHSD1 which converts inert cortisone to active cortisol is a putative key mediator of metabolic complications in obesity. Increased 11betaHSD1 in adipose tissue may contribute to postmenopausal central obesity. We hypothesized that tissue-specific 11betaHSD1 gene expression and activity are up-regulated in the older, postmenopausal women compared to young, premenopausal women. Twenty-three pre- and 23 postmenopausal, healthy, normal weight women were recruited. The participants underwent a urine collection, a subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsy and the hepatic 11betaHSD1 activity was estimated by the serum cortisol response after an oral dose of cortisone. Urinary (5alpha-tetrahydrocortisol+5beta-tetrahydrocortisol/tetrahydrocortisone ratios were higher in postmenopausal women versus premenopausal women in luteal phase (P<0.05, indicating an increased whole-body 11betaHSD1 activity. Postmenopausal women had higher 11betaHSD1 gene expression in subcutaneous fat (P<0.05. Hepatic first pass conversion of oral cortisone to cortisol was also increased in postmenopausal women versus premenopausal women in follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (P<0.01, at 30 min post cortisone ingestion, suggesting higher hepatic 11betaHSD1 activity. In conclusion, our results indicate that postmenopausal normal weight women have increased 11betaHSD1 activity in adipose tissue and liver. This may contribute to metabolic dysfunctions with menopause and ageing in women.

  2. Inducible knock-down of GNOM during root formation reveals tissue-specific response to auxin transport and its modulation of local auxin biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    In plants, active transport of auxin plays an essential role in root development. Localization of the PIN1 auxin transporters to the basal membrane of cells directs auxin flow and depends on the trafficking mediator GNOM. GNOM-dependent auxin transport is vital for root development and thus offers a useful tool for the investigation of a possible tissue-specific response to dynamic auxin transport. To avoid pleiotropic effects, DEX-inducible expression of GNOM antisense RNA was used to disrupt GNOM expression transiently or persistently during embryonic root development. It was found that the elongation zone and the pericycle layer are the most sensitive to GNOM-dependent auxin transport variations, which is shown by the phenotypes in cell elongation and the initiation of lateral root primordia, respectively. This suggests that auxin dynamics is critical to cell differentiation and cell fate transition, but not to cell division. The results also reveal that GNOM-dependent auxin transport could affect local auxin biosynthesis. This suggests that local auxin biosynthesis may also contribute to the establishment of GNOM-dependent auxin gradients in specific tissues, and that auxin transport and local auxin biosynthesis may function together in the regulatory network for initiation and development of lateral root primordia. Thus, the data reveal a tissue-specific response to auxin transport and modulation of local auxin biosynthesis by auxin transport. PMID:24453227

  3. Tissue-Specific Ablation of Prkar1a Causes Schwannomas by Suppressing Neurofibromatosis Protein Production

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    Georgette N. Jones

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Signaling events leading to Schwann cell tumor initiation have been extensively characterized in the context of neurofibromatosis (NF. Similar tumors are also observed in patients with the endocrine neoplasia syndrome Carney complex, which results from inactivating mutations in PRKAR1A. Loss of PRKAR1A causes enhanced protein kinase A activity, although the pathways leading to tumorigenesis are not well characterized. Tissue-specific ablation of Prkar1a in neural crest precursor cells (TEC3KO mice causes schwannomas with nearly 80% penetrance by 10 months. These heterogeneous neoplasms were clinically characterized as genetically engineered mouse schwannomas, grades II and III. At the molecular level, analysis of the tumors revealed almost complete loss of both NF proteins, despite the fact that transcript levels were increased, implying posttranscriptional regulation. Although Erk and Akt signaling are typically enhanced in NF-associated tumors, we observed no activation of either of these pathways in TEC3KO tumors. Furthermore, the small G proteins Ras, Rac1, and RhoA are all known to be involved with NF signaling. In TEC3KO tumors, all three molecules showed modest increases in total protein, but only Rac1 showed significant activation. These data suggest that dysregulated protein kinase A activation causes tumorigenesis through pathways that overlap but are distinct from those described in NF tumorigenesis.

  4. Intermittent fasting results in tissue-specific changes in bioenergetics and redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chausse, Bruno; Vieira-Lara, Marcel A; Sanchez, Angélica B; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary intervention often used as an alternative to caloric restriction (CR) and characterized by 24 hour cycles alternating ad libitum feeding and fasting. Although the consequences of CR are well studied, the effects of IF on redox status are not. Here, we address the effects of IF on redox state markers in different tissues in order to uncover how changes in feeding frequency alter redox balance in rats. IF rats displayed lower body mass due to decreased energy conversion efficiency. Livers in IF rats presented increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and enhanced levels of protein carbonyls. Surprisingly, IF animals also presented an increase in oxidative damage in the brain that was not related to changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Conversely, IF promoted a substantial protection against oxidative damage in the heart. No difference in mitochondrial bioenergetics or redox homeostasis was observed in skeletal muscles of IF animals. Overall, IF affects redox balance in a tissue-specific manner, leading to redox imbalance in the liver and brain and protection against oxidative damage in the heart.

  5. Intermittent fasting results in tissue-specific changes in bioenergetics and redox state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Chausse

    Full Text Available Intermittent fasting (IF is a dietary intervention often used as an alternative to caloric restriction (CR and characterized by 24 hour cycles alternating ad libitum feeding and fasting. Although the consequences of CR are well studied, the effects of IF on redox status are not. Here, we address the effects of IF on redox state markers in different tissues in order to uncover how changes in feeding frequency alter redox balance in rats. IF rats displayed lower body mass due to decreased energy conversion efficiency. Livers in IF rats presented increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and enhanced levels of protein carbonyls. Surprisingly, IF animals also presented an increase in oxidative damage in the brain that was not related to changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Conversely, IF promoted a substantial protection against oxidative damage in the heart. No difference in mitochondrial bioenergetics or redox homeostasis was observed in skeletal muscles of IF animals. Overall, IF affects redox balance in a tissue-specific manner, leading to redox imbalance in the liver and brain and protection against oxidative damage in the heart.

  6. A novel CpG island set identifies tissue-specific methylation at developmental gene loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Illingworth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CpG islands (CGIs are dense clusters of CpG sequences that punctuate the CpG-deficient human genome and associate with many gene promoters. As CGIs also differ from bulk chromosomal DNA by their frequent lack of cytosine methylation, we devised a CGI enrichment method based on nonmethylated CpG affinity chromatography. The resulting library was sequenced to define a novel human blood CGI set that includes many that are not detected by current algorithms. Approximately half of CGIs were associated with annotated gene transcription start sites, the remainder being intra- or intergenic. Using an array representing over 17,000 CGIs, we established that 6%-8% of CGIs are methylated in genomic DNA of human blood, brain, muscle, and spleen. Inter- and intragenic CGIs are preferentially susceptible to methylation. CGIs showing tissue-specific methylation were overrepresented at numerous genetic loci that are essential for development, including HOX and PAX family members. The findings enable a comprehensive analysis of the roles played by CGI methylation in normal and diseased human tissues.

  7. Human in-vivo bioassay for the tissue-specific measurement of nociceptive and inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Martin S; Tingle, Martha; Schmelz, Martin; Carvalho, Brendan; Yeomans, David C

    2008-12-01

    This in-vivo human bioassay can be used to study human volunteers and patients. Samples are collected from pertinent tissue sites such as the skin via aseptically inserted microdialysis catheters (Dermal Dialysis, Erlangen, Germany). Illustrated in this example is the collection of interstitial fluid from experimentally inflamed skin in human volunteers. Sample collection can be combined with other experimental tests. For example, the simultaneous assessment of locally released biochemicals and subjective sensitivity to painful stimuli in experimentally inflamed skin provides the critical biochemical-behavioral link to identify biomarkers of pain and inflammation. Presented assay in the living human organism allows for mechanistic insight into tissue-specific processes underlying pain and/or inflammation. The method is also well suited to examine the effectiveness of existing or novel interventions--such as new drug candidates - targeting the treatment of painful and/or inflammatory conditions. This article will provide a detailed description on the use of microdialysis techniques for collecting interstitial fluid from experimentally inflamed skin lesion of human study subjects. Interstitial fluid samples are typically processed with aid of multiplex bead array immunoassays allowing assaying up to 100 analytes in samples as small in volume as 50 microliters.

  8. Tissue Specificity of a Response of the Pro- and Antioxidative System After Resuscitation

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    A. G. Zhukova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was undertaken to study the resistance of membrane structures and the level of the intracellular defense systems of the heart, brain, and liver in animals with active versus passive behavior in different periods (days 7 and 30 after resuscitation made 10 minutes following systemic circulatory arrest. All the animals in which systemic circulation had been stopped were survivors with the cession of neurological deficit. The activity of antioxidative defense enzymes, such as cata-lase and superoxide dismutase, in cardiac, cerebral, and hepatic tissues was assayed by spectrophotometry using the conventional methods. The level of stress-induced protein HSP70 was measured in the tissue cytosolic fraction by the Western blotting assay. The activity of Ca2+ transport in the myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum was determined on an Orion EA 940 ionomer («Orion Research», USA having a Ca2+-selective electrode. The findings show a significant tissue specificity in different postresuscitative periods (days 7 and 30 and varying (protective to damaging cardiac, cerebral, and hepatic responses in active and passive animals to hypoxia.

  9. Tissue-specific methylation differences and cognitive function in fragile X premutation females

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; Babul, R.; Chitayat, D. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    Tissue-specific variation in (CGG){sub n} repeat size and methylation status of the FMR1 gene was investigated in 17 female premutation carriers. Minor variation in premutation repeat size among leukocyte, lymphoblast, and fibroblast tissues was noted in some subjects. One subject exhibited a premutation size allele of (CGG){sub 64} in leukocyte and fibroblast tissues by polymerase chain reaction analysis but a normal-size allele of (CGG){sub 46} in lymphoblast cells, suggesting low-level mosaicism in blood and clonality of the lymphoblast cell line. Six subjects exhibited differences in methylation pattern between leukocytes and lymphoblasts but not between leukocytes and fibroblasts, whereas 2 subjects showed large differences in methylation pattern between leukocytes and fibroblasts. Cognitive function was studied in 14 subjects using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised. Mean Verbal and Performance IQs were well within the average range as was the mean Full Scale IQ; nevertheless, a trend toward lower Performance IQ compared with Verbal IQ was observed. No significant correlation was apparent between Full Scale IQ and (CGG){sub n} repeat size; however, a significant positive correlation was observed between Full Scale IQ and the proportion of the active X carrying the normal FMR1 allele in fibroblasts but not in leukocytes or lymphoblasts. 24 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Tissue-Specific Fatty Acids Response to Different Diets in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Markus; Schultz, Sebastian; Koussoroplis, Apostolos-Manuel; Kainz, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Fish depend on dietary fatty acids (FA) to support their physiological condition and health. Exploring the FA distribution in common carp (Cyprinus carpio), one of the world's most consumed freshwater fish, is important to understand how and where FA of different sources are allocated. We investigated diet effects on the composition of polar and neutral lipid fatty acids (PLFA and NLFA, respectively) in eight different tissues (dorsal and ventral muscle, heart, kidney, intestine, eyes, liver and adipose tissue) of common carp. Two-year old carp were exposed to three diet sources (i.e., zooplankton, zooplankton plus supplementary feeds containing vegetable, VO, or fish oil, FO) with different FA composition. The PLFA and NLFA response was clearly tissue-specific after 210 days of feeding on different diets. PLFA were generally rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated FA and only marginally influenced by dietary FA, whereas the NLFA composition strongly reflected dietary FA profiles. However, the NLFA composition in carp tissues varied considerably at low NLFA mass ratios, suggesting that carp is able to regulate the NLFA composition and thus FA quality in its tissues when NLFA contents are low. Finally, this study shows that FO were 3X more retained than VO as NLFA particularly in muscle tissues, indicating that higher nutritional quality feeds are selectively allocated into tissues and thus available for human consumption. PMID:24733499

  11. HVP10 (V-PPase, A CANDIDATE GENE FOR HvNax3 CONTROLLING SODIUM EXCLUSION AND SALINITY TOLERANCE IN BARLEY: MAPPING, SEQUENCE ANALYSIS AND GENE EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shavrukov Yuri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is a major abiotic stress limiting the production of agricultural plants in Australia and in other countries across the world. Wild relatives of cultivated barley have wider diversity in tolerance to salinity. We previously reported the identification of a major QTL for sodium exclusion (HvNax3 on chromosome 7HS, in a barley mapping population originating from a cross between the Australian feed barley Barque-73 and a Hordeum spontaneum accession, CPI-71284. Initial analysis of an AB-QTL population and F2 recombinants reduced the interval containing HvNax3 from 15.0 cM to 1.3 cM. For fine mapping of this region, four F3 progenies (60-100 individuals in each with different recombination events were genotyped with various CAPS markers and phenotyped for sodium exclusion. The interval was further reduced to 0.4 cM, limiting the number of candidate genes based on rice-barley synteny to five, with the most promising candidate encoding a vacuolar pyrophosphatase proton pump, V-PPase (HVP10 gene. The protein encoded by this gene has been shown to be responsible for establishing an electrochemical gradient across the tonoplast that allows other transporters such as Na+/H+ antiporters to transport sodium into the vacuole, thereby reducing toxic effects of excess Na+ in the cytosol. BLAST analysis of sequences of the complete HVP10 gene from both parents indicated the presence of eight exons and seven introns, with an open reading frame of 4,356 bp. The eight exons were well-conserved with only seven SNPs in the coding regions identified between the two parents but none of the SNPs altered the amino-acid sequence. The differences in Na+ accumulation between the two parents is, therefore, not related to the coding sequence of the HVP10 gene. However, Q-PCR experiments showed that expression of the gene in shoots and in roots of CPI-71284 was two-fold and 24%, respectively, higher than in Barque-73 on the third day following exposure to salt stress

  12. CXCR6, a newly defined biomarker of tissue-specific stem cell asymmetric self-renewal, identifies more aggressive human melanoma cancer stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouzbeh Taghizadeh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem in cancer research is identifying the cell type that is capable of sustaining neoplastic growth and its origin from normal tissue cells. Recent investigations of a variety of tumor types have shown that phenotypically identifiable and isolable subfractions of cells possess the tumor-forming ability. In the present paper, using two lineage-related human melanoma cell lines, primary melanoma line IGR39 and its metastatic derivative line IGR37, two main observations are reported. The first one is the first phenotypic evidence to support the origin of melanoma cancer stem cells (CSCs from mutated tissue-specific stem cells; and the second one is the identification of a more aggressive subpopulation of CSCs in melanoma that are CXCR6+.We defined CXCR6 as a new biomarker for tissue-specific stem cell asymmetric self-renewal. Thus, the relationship between melanoma formation and ABCG2 and CXCR6 expression was investigated. Consistent with their non-metastatic character, unsorted IGR39 cells formed significantly smaller tumors than unsorted IGR37 cells. In addition, ABCG2+ cells produced tumors that had a 2-fold greater mass than tumors produced by unsorted cells or ABCG2- cells. CXCR6+ cells produced more aggressive tumors. CXCR6 identifies a more discrete subpopulation of cultured human melanoma cells with a more aggressive MCSC phenotype than cells selected on the basis of the ABCG2+ phenotype alone.The association of a more aggressive tumor phenotype with asymmetric self-renewal phenotype reveals a previously unrecognized aspect of tumor cell physiology. Namely, the retention of some tissue-specific stem cell attributes, like the ability to asymmetrically self-renew, impacts the natural history of human tumor development. Knowledge of this new aspect of tumor development and progression may provide new targets for cancer prevention and treatment.

  13. LMNA E82K mutation activates FAS and mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis in heart tissue specific transgenic mice.

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    Dan Lu

    Full Text Available The lamin A/C (LMNA, nuclear intermediate filament proteins, is a basic component of the nuclear lamina. Mutations in LMNA are associated with a broad range of laminopathies, congenital diseases affecting tissue regeneration and homeostasis. Heart tissue specific transgenic mice of human LMNA E82K, a mutation causing dilated cardiomyopathy, were generated. Lmna(E82K transgenic mouse lines exhibited thin-walled, dilated left and right ventricles, a progressive decrease of contractile function assessed by echocardiography. Abnormalities of the conduction system, myocytes disarray, collagen accumulation and increased levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP, procollagen type III α1 (Col3α1 and skeletal muscle actin α1 (Actα1 were detected in the hearts of Lmna(E82K transgenic mice. The LMNA E82K mutation caused mislocation of LMNA in the nucleus and swollen mitochondria with loss of critae, together with the loss of nuclear envelope integrity. Most interestingly, we found that the level of apoptosis was 8.5-fold higher in the Lmna(E82K transgenic mice than that of non-transgenic (NTG mice. In the presence of the LMNA E82K, both of FAS and mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis were activated consistent with the increase of FAS expression, the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol and activation of caspase-8, -9 and -3. Our results suggested that the apoptosis, at least for the LMNA E82K or the mutations in the rod region of Lamin A/C, might be an important mechanism causing continuous loss of myocytes and lead to myocardial dysfunction. It could be a potential therapeutic means to suppress and/or prevent inappropriate cardiac cell death in patients carrying LMNA mutation.

  14. Adipose tissue-specific regulation of angiotensinogen in obese humans and mice: impact of nutritional status and adipocyte hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasue, Shintaro; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Okada, Sadanori; Ishii, Takako; Kozuka, Chisayo; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Fujikura, Junji; Ebihara, Ken; Hosoda, Kiminori; Katsurada, Akemi; Ohashi, Naro; Urushihara, Maki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Naoki; Kawazoe, Takeshi; Naitoh, Motoko; Okada, Mitsuru; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2010-04-01

    The adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of obesity and dysfunction of adipose tissue. However, neither regulation of angiotensinogen (AGT) expression in adipose tissue nor secretion of adipose tissue-derived AGT has been fully elucidated in humans. Human subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT) biopsies were performed for 46 subjects with a wide range of body mass index (BMI). Considering the mRNA level of AGT and indices of body fat mass, the amount of adipose tissue-derived AGT secretion (A-AGT-S) was estimated. Using a mouse model of obesity and weight reduction, plasma AGT levels were measured with a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the contribution of A-AGT-S to plasma AGT levels was assessed. A-AGT-S was substantially increased in obese humans and the value was correlated with the plasma AGT level in mice. A-AGT-S and plasma AGT were higher in obese mice, whereas lower in mice with weight reduction. However, the AGT mRNA levels in the liver, kidney, and aorta were not altered in the mouse models. In both humans and mice, the AGT mRNA levels in mature adipocytes (MAs) were comparable to those in stromal-vascular cells. Coulter Multisizer analyses revealed that AGT mRNA levels in the MAs were inversely correlated with the average size of mature adipocytes. This study demonstrates that adipose tissue-derived AGT is substantially augmented in obese humans, which may contribute considerably to elevated levels of circulating AGT. Adipose tissue-specific regulation of AGT provides a novel insight into the clinical implications of adipose tissue RAS in human obesity.

  15. Transcription elongation rate has a tissue-specific impact on alternative cleavage and polyadenylation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochuan; Freitas, Jaime; Zheng, Dinghai; Oliveira, Marta S; Hoque, Mainul; Martins, Torcato; Henriques, Telmo; Tian, Bin; Moreira, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a mechanism that generates multiple mRNA isoforms with different 3'UTRs and/or coding sequences from a single gene. Here, using 3' region extraction and deep sequencing (3'READS), we have systematically mapped cleavage and polyadenylation sites (PASs) in Drosophila melanogaster, expanding the total repertoire of PASs previously identified for the species, especially those located in A-rich genomic sequences. Cis-element analysis revealed distinct sequence motifs around fly PASs when compared to mammalian ones, including the greater enrichment of upstream UAUA elements and the less prominent presence of downstream UGUG elements. We found that over 75% of mRNA genes in Drosophila melanogaster undergo APA. The head tissue tends to use distal PASs when compared to the body, leading to preferential expression of APA isoforms with long 3'UTRs as well as with distal terminal exons. The distance between the APA sites and intron location of PAS are important parameters for APA difference between body and head, suggesting distinct PAS selection contexts. APA analysis of the RpII215C4 mutant strain, which harbors a mutant RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) with a slower elongation rate, revealed that a 50% decrease in transcriptional elongation rate leads to a mild trend of more usage of proximal, weaker PASs, both in 3'UTRs and in introns, consistent with the "first come, first served" model of APA regulation. However, this trend was not observed in the head, suggesting a different regulatory context in neuronal cells. Together, our data expand the PAS collection for Drosophila melanogaster and reveal a tissue-specific effect of APA regulation by RNAPII elongation rate. © 2017 Liu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. Two New Complete Genome Sequences Offer Insight into Host and Tissue Specificity of Plant Pathogenic Xanthomonas spp.▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanove, Adam J.; Koebnik, Ralf; Lu, Hong; Furutani, Ayako; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Patil, Prabhu B.; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Ryan, Robert P.; Meyer, Damien F.; Han, Sang-Wook; Aparna, Gudlur; Rajaram, Misha; Delcher, Arthur L.; Phillippy, Adam M.; Puiu, Daniela; Schatz, Michael C.; Shumway, Martin; Sommer, Daniel D.; Trapnell, Cole; Benahmed, Faiza; Dimitrov, George; Madupu, Ramana; Radune, Diana; Sullivan, Steven; Jha, Gopaljee; Ishihara, Hiromichi; Lee, Sang-Won; Pandey, Alok; Sharma, Vikas; Sriariyanun, Malinee; Szurek, Boris; Vera-Cruz, Casiana M.; Dorman, Karin S.; Ronald, Pamela C.; Verdier, Valérie; Dow, J. Maxwell; Sonti, Ramesh V.; Tsuge, Seiji; Brendel, Volker P.; Rabinowicz, Pablo D.; Leach, Jan E.; White, Frank F.; Salzberg, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas is a large genus of bacteria that collectively cause disease on more than 300 plant species. The broad host range of the genus contrasts with stringent host and tissue specificity for individual species and pathovars. Whole-genome sequences of Xanthomonas campestris pv. raphani strain 756C and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strain BLS256, pathogens that infect the mesophyll tissue of the leading models for plant biology, Arabidopsis thaliana and rice, respectively, were determined and provided insight into the genetic determinants of host and tissue specificity. Comparisons were made with genomes of closely related strains that infect the vascular tissue of the same hosts and across a larger collection of complete Xanthomonas genomes. The results suggest a model in which complex sets of adaptations at the level of gene content account for host specificity and subtler adaptations at the level of amino acid or noncoding regulatory nucleotide sequence determine tissue specificity. PMID:21784931

  17. Tissue-specific modulation of mitochondrial DNA segregation by a defect in mitochondrial division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Riikka; Marttinen, Paula; Stewart, James B; Neil Dear, T; Battersby, Brendan J

    2016-02-15

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that divide and fuse by remodeling an outer and inner membrane in response to developmental, physiological and stress stimuli. These events are coordinated by conserved dynamin-related GTPases. The dynamics of mitochondrial morphology require coordination with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to ensure faithful genome transmission, however, this process remains poorly understood. Mitochondrial division is linked to the segregation of mtDNA but how it affects cases of mtDNA heteroplasmy, where two or more mtDNA variants/mutations co-exist in a cell, is unknown. Segregation of heteroplasmic human pathogenic mtDNA mutations is a critical factor in the onset and severity of human mitochondrial diseases. Here, we investigated the coupling of mitochondrial morphology to the transmission and segregation of mtDNA in mammals by taking advantage of two genetically modified mouse models: one with a dominant-negative mutation in the dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1 or Dnm1l) that impairs mitochondrial fission and the other, heteroplasmic mice segregating two neutral mtDNA haplotypes (BALB and NZB). We show a tissue-specific response to mtDNA segregation from a defect in mitochondrial fission. Only mtDNA segregation in the hematopoietic compartment is modulated from impaired Dnm1l function. In contrast, no effect was observed in other tissues arising from the three germ layers during development and in mtDNA transmission through the female germline. Our data suggest a robust organization of a heteroplasmic mtDNA segregating unit across mammalian cell types that can overcome impaired mitochondrial division to ensure faithful transmission of the mitochondrial genome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Tissue-specific transcriptome analyses provide new insights into GPCR signalling in adult Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Steffen; Wheeler, Nic; Lu, Zhigang; Wangwiwatsin, Arporn; McVeigh, Paul; Maule, Aaron; Berriman, Matthew; Day, Timothy; Ribeiro, Paula; Grevelding, Christoph G

    2018-01-01

    Schistosomes are blood-dwelling trematodes with global impact on human and animal health. Because medical treatment is currently based on a single drug, praziquantel, there is urgent need for the development of alternative control strategies. The Schistosoma mansoni genome project provides a platform to study and connect the genetic repertoire of schistosomes to specific biological functions essential for successful parasitism. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest superfamily of transmembrane receptors throughout the Eumetazoan phyla, including platyhelminths. Due to their involvement in diverse biological processes, their pharmacological importance, and proven druggability, GPCRs are promising targets for new anthelmintics. However, to identify candidate receptors, a more detailed understanding of the roles of GPCR signalling in schistosome biology is essential. An updated phylogenetic analysis of the S. mansoni GPCR genome (GPCRome) is presented, facilitated by updated genome data that allowed a more precise annotation of GPCRs. Additionally, we review the current knowledge on GPCR signalling in this parasite and provide new insights into the potential roles of GPCRs in schistosome reproduction based on the findings of a recent tissue-specific transcriptomic study in paired and unpaired S. mansoni. According to the current analysis, GPCRs contribute to gonad-specific functions but also to nongonad, pairing-dependent processes. The latter may regulate gonad-unrelated functions during the multifaceted male-female interaction. Finally, we compare the schistosome GPCRome to that of another parasitic trematode, Fasciola, and discuss the importance of GPCRs to basic and applied research. Phylogenetic analyses display GPCR diversity in free-living and parasitic platyhelminths and suggest diverse functions in schistosomes. Although their roles need to be substantiated by functional studies in the future, the data support the selection of GPCR candidates

  19. Effect of exercise on burn-induced changes in tissue-specific glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Edward A; Paul, Kasie; Bonab, Ali A; Tompkins, Ronald G; Fischman, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a component of the clinical management for burn patients, to help reduce muscle wasting associated with prolonged hospitalization. In the present study the authors examined 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG) uptake in mice subjected to burn injury with and without exercise. Mice had their the dorsums shaven, were placed in molds, and the exposed area was immersed in 90°C water for 9 seconds followed by resuscitation with saline (2 ml) to produce a 30% full-thickness burn injury. Twenty-four hours later, the mice were subjected to treadmill exercise for 1 hour. Before exercise, mice were injected with ~50 μCi 18FDG. Mice were killed after running and a complete biodistribution was performed. Exercise produced a stimulation of 18FDG update by skeletal muscle and heart, while reducing 18FDG accumulation in brain. Burn injury had no significant effect on 18FDG update by skeletal muscle, but did increase 18FDG accumulation in heart, while reducing 18FDG accumulation in brain. However, exercise combined with a burn injury produced a significant increase in 18FDG uptake in the skeletal muscle compared with the burned mice, as great as that produced in the sham animals subjected to exercise. The combination of burn plus exercise appeared to prevent the stimulation of 18FDG uptake by the heart produced by burn injury alone. Exercise treatment did not correct the changes in 18FDG uptake in the brain produced by burn injury. Separately, exercise and burn injury significantly increased serum interleukin-6 levels, increases that were higher when exercise was combined with the burn injury. These findings suggest that exercise may exert some therapeutic effects in burn patients by tissue-specific modulation of glucose metabolism, and these changes may be related to interleukin-6.

  20. Tissue-specific regulation of gibberellin biosynthesis in developing pea seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Courtney D; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Kurepin, Leonid V; Jin, Alena; Pharis, Richard P; Reinecke, Dennis M

    2011-06-01

    Previous work suggests that gibberellins (GAs) play an important role in early seed development. To more fully understand the roles of GAs throughout seed development, tissue-specific transcription profiles of GA metabolism genes and quantitative profiles of key GAs were determined in pea (Pisum sativum) seeds during the seed-filling development period (8-20 d after anthesis [DAA]). These profiles were correlated with seed photoassimilate acquisition and storage as well as morphological development. Seed coat growth (8-12 DAA) and the subsequent dramatic expansion of branched parenchyma cells were correlated with both transcript abundance of GA biosynthesis genes and the concentration of the growth effector GA, GA(1). These results suggest GA(1) involvement in determining the rate of seed coat growth and sink strength. The endosperm's PsGA20ox transcript abundance and the concentration of GA(20) increased markedly as the endosperm reached its maximum volume (12 DAA), thus providing ample GA(20) substrate for the GA 3-oxidases present in both the embryo and seed coat. Furthermore, PsGA3ox transcript profiles and trends in GA(1) levels in embryos at 10 to 16 DAA and also in embryo axes at 18 DAA suggest localized GA(1)-induced growth in these tissues. A shift from synthesis of GA(1) to that of GA(8) occurred after 18 DAA in the embryo axis, suggesting that deactivation of GA(1) to GA(8) is a likely mechanism to limit embryo axis growth and allow embryo maturation to proceed. We hypothesize that GA biosynthesis and catabolism are tightly regulated to bring about the unique developmental events that occur during seed growth, development, and maturation.

  1. Tissue-Specific Regulation of Gibberellin Biosynthesis in Developing Pea Seeds1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Courtney D.; Ozga, Jocelyn A.; Kurepin, Leonid V.; Jin, Alena; Pharis, Richard P.; Reinecke, Dennis M.

    2011-01-01

    Previous work suggests that gibberellins (GAs) play an important role in early seed development. To more fully understand the roles of GAs throughout seed development, tissue-specific transcription profiles of GA metabolism genes and quantitative profiles of key GAs were determined in pea (Pisum sativum) seeds during the seed-filling development period (8–20 d after anthesis [DAA]). These profiles were correlated with seed photoassimilate acquisition and storage as well as morphological development. Seed coat growth (8–12 DAA) and the subsequent dramatic expansion of branched parenchyma cells were correlated with both transcript abundance of GA biosynthesis genes and the concentration of the growth effector GA, GA1. These results suggest GA1 involvement in determining the rate of seed coat growth and sink strength. The endosperm’s PsGA20ox transcript abundance and the concentration of GA20 increased markedly as the endosperm reached its maximum volume (12 DAA), thus providing ample GA20 substrate for the GA 3-oxidases present in both the embryo and seed coat. Furthermore, PsGA3ox transcript profiles and trends in GA1 levels in embryos at 10 to 16 DAA and also in embryo axes at 18 DAA suggest localized GA1-induced growth in these tissues. A shift from synthesis of GA1 to that of GA8 occurred after 18 DAA in the embryo axis, suggesting that deactivation of GA1 to GA8 is a likely mechanism to limit embryo axis growth and allow embryo maturation to proceed. We hypothesize that GA biosynthesis and catabolism are tightly regulated to bring about the unique developmental events that occur during seed growth, development, and maturation. PMID:21482633

  2. Snakes exhibit tissue-specific variation in cardiotonic steroid sensitivity of Na+/K+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Shabnam; Petschenka, Georg; French, Susannah S; Mori, Akira; Savitzky, Alan H

    2018-03-01

    Toads are among several groups of organisms chemically defended with lethal concentrations of cardiotonic steroids. As a result, most predators that prey on amphibians avoid toads. However, several species of snakes have gained resistance-conferring mutations of Na+/K+-ATPase, the molecular target of cardiotonic steroids, and can feed on toads readily. Despite recent advances in our understanding of this adaptation at the genetic level, we have lacked functional evidence for how mutations of Na+/K+-ATPase account for cardiotonic steroid resistance in snake tissues. To address this issue, it is necessary to determine how the Na+/K+-ATPases of snakes react to the toxins. Some tissues might have Na+/K+-ATPases that are more susceptible than others and can thus provide clues about how the toxins influence organismal function. Here we provide a mechanistic link between observed Na+/K+-ATPase substitutions and observed resistance using actual snake Na+/K+-ATPases. We used an in vitro approach to determine the tissue-specific levels of sensitivity to cardiotonic steroids in select resistant and non-resistant snakes. We compared the sensitivities of select tissues within and between species. Our results suggest that resistant snakes contain highly resistant Na+/K+-ATPases in their heart and kidney, both of which rely heavily on the enzymes to function, whereas tissues that do not rely as heavily on Na+/K+-ATPases or might be protected from cardiotonic steroids by other means (liver, gut, and brain) contain non-resistant forms of the enzyme. This study reveals functional evidence that tissue-level target-site insensitivity to cardiotonic steroids varies not only among species but also across tissues within resistant taxa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct Lymph Node Vaccination of Lentivector/Prostate-Specific Antigen is Safe and Generates Tissue-Specific Responses in Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan C. Au

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anti-cancer immunotherapy is emerging from a nadir and demonstrating tangible benefits to patients. A variety of approaches are now employed. We are invoking antigen (Ag-specific responses through direct injections of recombinant lentivectors (LVs that encode sequences for tumor-associated antigens into multiple lymph nodes to optimize immune presentation/stimulation. Here we first demonstrate the effectiveness and antigen-specificity of this approach in mice challenged with prostate-specific antigen (PSA-expressing tumor cells. Next we tested the safety and efficacy of this approach in two cohorts of rhesus macaques as a prelude to a clinical trial application. Our vector encodes the cDNA for rhesus macaque PSA and a rhesus macaque cell surface marker to facilitate vector titering and tracking. We utilized two independent injection schemas demarcated by the timing of LV administration. In both cohorts we observed marked tissue-specific responses as measured by clinical evaluations and magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate gland. Tissue-specific responses were sustained for up to six months—the end-point of the study. Control animals immunized against an irrelevant Ag were unaffected. We did not observe vector spread in test or control animals or perturbations of systemic immune parameters. This approach thus offers an “off-the-shelf” anti-cancer vaccine that could be made at large scale and injected into patients—even on an out-patient basis.

  4. Tissue-Specific Methylation of Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element-1 of Homo Sapiens (L1Hs) During Human Embryogenesis and Roles in Neural Tube Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Chang, S; Guan, J; Shangguan, S; Lu, X; Wang, Z; Wu, L; Zou, J; Zhao, H; Bao, Y; Qiu, Z; Niu, B; Zhang, T

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposition events plays crucial roles during early development. Previously we showed that LINE-1 hypomethylation in neuronal tissues is associated with pathogenesis of neural tube defect (NTD). Herein, we further evaluated LINE-1 Homo sapiens (L1Hs) methylation in tissues derived from three germ layers of stillborn NTD fetuses, to define patterns of tissue specific methylation and site-specific hypomethylation at CpG sites within an L1Hs promoter region. Stable, tissue-specific L1Hs methylation patterns throughout three germ layer lineages of the fetus, placenta, and maternal peripheral blood were observed. Samples from maternal peripheral blood exhibited the highest level of L1Hs methylation (64.95%) and that from placenta showed the lowest (26.82%). Between samples from NTDs and controls, decrease in L1Hs methylation was only significant in NTD-affected brain tissue at 7.35%, especially in females (8.98%). L1Hs hypomethylation in NTDs was also associated with a significant increase in expression level of an L1Hs-encoded transcript in females (r = -0.846, p = 0.004). This could be due to genomic DNA instability and alternation in chromatins accessibility resulted from abnormal L1Hs hypomethylation, as showed in this study with HCT-15 cells treated with methylation inhibitor 5-Aza.

  5. A tissue specific approach for analysis of membrane and secreted protein antigens from Haemonchus contortus gut and its application to diverse nematode species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, A; Jasmer, D P

    1998-11-30

    General methods to conduct tissue specific analysis are largely lacking for nematodes. An approach is described that focused on isolation of membrane and secreted protein genes from the gut of the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. The approach capitalized on a monoclonal antibody that recognizes multiple membrane and secreted worm proteins. Polyclonal antisera made against these proteins were used to screen expression cDNA libraries made either from adult worm gut or whole worm. The genes identified encode predicted or known membrane and secreted proteins from gut, including a cysteine protease, a zinc metallopeptidase and a previously described GA1 protein. Another gene, Hc40, was isolated from the whole worm cDNA library and is nearly identical to a vaccine patent sequence pBTA879. Tissue analysis demonstrated the intended focus on membrane and secreted proteins from parasite gut was achieved. Proteins related to each of those described were identified from other nematode species through data base analysis. Additionally, this analysis led to (1) identification of homologues of each gene in C. elegans; (2) deduction of a dimorphic structure in the Hc40 protein; (3) recognition of both monomorphic and dimorphic families of Hc40-related proteins; and (4) detection of two apparent classes of transcripts (mep1a and mep1b) that would each encode a divergent version of the putative zinc metallopeptidase MEP1. The tissue specific approach and information base described should generally contribute to investigations on nutrient digestion and related secretory processes in nematode gut.

  6. Tissue-specific analysis of glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α in glucose metabolism: effect of strain variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Patel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over-activity and elevated expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 has been implicated in the etiology of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Administration of specific GSK-3 inhibitors to diabetic or obese rodent models improves glycaemic control and insulin sensitivity. However, due to the indiscriminatory nature of these inhibitors, the relative contribution of the two isoforms of GSK-3 (GSK-3α and GSK-3β is not known. Recently, we demonstrated that an out-bred strain of mice (ICR lacking expression of GSK-3α in all tissues displayed improved insulin sensitivity and enhanced hepatic glucose metabolism. We also found that muscle (but not liver inactivation of GSK-3β conferred insulin and glucose sensitization in an in-bred strain of mice (C57BL/6. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have employed tissue-specific deletion of GSK-3α, to examine the relative contribution of two insulin-sensitive tissues, muscle and liver, towards the insulin sensitization phenotype originally observed in the global GSK-3α KO animals. We found that mice in which GSK-3α has been inactivated in either skeletal-muscle or liver displayed no differences in glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity compared to wild type littermates. Given the strain differences in our original analyses, we examined the insulin and glucose sensitivity of global GSK-3α KO animals bred onto a C57BL/6 background. These animals also revealed no significant differences in glucose metabolism/insulin sensitivity compared to their wild type littermates. Furthermore, deletion of hepatic GSK-3α on the out-bred, ICR background failed to reproduce the insulin sensitivity manifested by the global deletion of this isoform. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: From these data we conclude that the improved insulin sensitivity and hepatic glucose homeostasis phenotype observed upon global inactivation of GSK-3α is strain-specific. We surmise that the insulin

  7. Tissue specific responses to cadmium-based quantum dots in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Gomes, Tânia [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, NO-0349 Oslo (Norway); Mestre, Nélia C.; Cardoso, Cátia [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Bebianno, Maria João, E-mail: mbebian@ualg.pt [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Mussel gills are the main target for oxidative stress induced by Cd-based QDs. • Antioxidants responses induced by Cd-based QDs and dissolved Cd are mediated by different mechanisms. • CdTe QDs are more pro-oxidant Cd form when compared to dissolved Cd. • Differential tissue response indicated nano-specific effects. - Abstract: In recent years, Cd-based quantum dots (QDs) have generated interest from the life sciences community due to their potential applications in nanomedicine, biology and electronics. However, these engineered nanomaterials can be released into the marine environment, where their environmental health hazards remain unclear. This study investigated the tissue-specific responses related to alterations in the antioxidant defense system induced by CdTe QDs, in comparison with its dissolved counterpart, using the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were exposed to CdTe QDs and dissolved Cd for 14 days at 10 μgCd L{sup −1} and biomarkers of oxidative stress [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidases (total, Se-independent and Se-dependent GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities] were analyzed along with Cd accumulation in the gills and digestive gland of mussels. Results show that both Cd forms changed mussels’ antioxidant responses with distinct modes of action (MoA). There were tissue- and time-dependent differences in the biochemical responses to each Cd form, wherein QDs are more pro-oxidant when compared to dissolved Cd. The gills are the main tissue affected by QDs, with effects related to the increase of SOD, GST and GPx activities, while those of dissolved Cd was associated to the increase of CAT activity, Cd accumulation and exposure time. Digestive gland is a main tissue for accumulation of both Cd forms, but changes in antioxidant enzyme activities are smaller than in gills. A multivariate analysis revealed that the antioxidant patterns are tissue dependent

  8. Weak mitochondrial targeting sequence determines tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase in liver and brain cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, G.D.; Gur, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Pines, O.; Vardimon, L.

    2010-01-01

    Evolution of the uricotelic system for ammonia detoxification required a mechanism for tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase (GS). In uricotelic vertebrates, GS is mitochondrial in liver cells and cytoplasmic in brain. Because these species contain a single copy of the GS

  9. Weak mitochondrial targeting sequence determines tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase in liver and brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gideon D; Gur, Noa; Koopman, Werner J H; Pines, Ophry; Vardimon, Lily

    2010-02-01

    Evolution of the uricotelic system for ammonia detoxification required a mechanism for tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase (GS). In uricotelic vertebrates, GS is mitochondrial in liver cells and cytoplasmic in brain. Because these species contain a single copy of the GS gene, it is not clear how tissue-specific subcellular localization is achieved. Here we show that in chicken, which utilizes the uricotelic system, the GS transcripts of liver and brain cells are identical and, consistently, there is no difference in the amino acid sequence of the protein. The N-terminus of GS, which constitutes a 'weak' mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS), is sufficient to direct a chimeric protein to the mitochondria in hepatocytes and to the cytoplasm in astrocytes. Considering that a weak MTS is dependent on a highly negative mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi) for import, we examined the magnitude of DeltaPsi in hepatocytes and astrocytes. Our results unexpectedly revealed that DeltaPsi in hepatocytes is considerably more negative than that of astrocytes and that converting the targeting signal into 'strong' MTS abolished the capability to confer tissue-specific subcellular localization. We suggest that evolutional selection of weak MTS provided a tool for differential targeting of an identical protein by taking advantage of tissue-specific differences in DeltaPsi.

  10. Identification of CTLA2A, DEFB29, WFDC15B, SERPINA1F and MUP19 as Novel Tissue-Specific Secretory Factors in Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibin Zhang

    Full Text Available Secretory factors in animals play an important role in communication between different cells, tissues and organs. Especially, the secretory factors with specific expression in one tissue may reflect important functions and unique status of that tissue in an organism. In this study, we identified potential tissue-specific secretory factors in the fat, muscle, heart, lung, kidney and liver in the mouse by analyzing microarray data from NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO public repository and searching and predicting their subcellular location in GeneCards and WoLF PSORT, and then confirmed tissue-specific expression of the genes using semi-quantitative PCR reactions. With this approach, we confirmed 11 lung, 7 liver, 2 heart, 1 heart and muscle, 7 kidney and 2 adipose and liver-specific secretory factors. Among these genes, 1 lung-specific gene--CTLA2A (cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 2 alpha, 3 kidney-specific genes--SERPINA1F (serpin peptidase inhibitor, Clade A, member 1F, WFDC15B (WAP four-disulfide core domain 15B and DEFB29 (defensin beta 29 and 1 liver-specific gene--MUP19 (major urinary protein 19 have not been reported as secretory factors. These genes were tagged with hemagglutinin at the 3'end and then transiently transfected to HEK293 cells. Through protein detection in cell lysate and media using Western blotting, we verified secretion of the 5 genes and predicted the potential pathways in which they may participate in the specific tissue through data analysis of GEO profiles. In addition, alternative splicing was detected in transcripts of CTLA2A and SERPINA1F and the corresponding proteins were found not to be secreted in cell culture media. Identification of novel secretory factors through the current study provides a new platform to explore novel secretory factors and a general direction for further study of these genes in the future.

  11. Acquisition and evolution of plant pathogenesis-associated gene clusters and candidate determinants of tissue-specificity in xanthomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Lu

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas is a large genus of plant-associated and plant-pathogenic bacteria. Collectively, members cause diseases on over 392 plant species. Individually, they exhibit marked host- and tissue-specificity. The determinants of this specificity are unknown.To assess potential contributions to host- and tissue-specificity, pathogenesis-associated gene clusters were compared across genomes of eight Xanthomonas strains representing vascular or non-vascular pathogens of rice, brassicas, pepper and tomato, and citrus. The gum cluster for extracellular polysaccharide is conserved except for gumN and sequences downstream. The xcs and xps clusters for type II secretion are conserved, except in the rice pathogens, in which xcs is missing. In the otherwise conserved hrp cluster, sequences flanking the core genes for type III secretion vary with respect to insertion sequence element and putative effector gene content. Variation at the rpf (regulation of pathogenicity factors cluster is more pronounced, though genes with established functional relevance are conserved. A cluster for synthesis of lipopolysaccharide varies highly, suggesting multiple horizontal gene transfers and reassortments, but this variation does not correlate with host- or tissue-specificity. Phylogenetic trees based on amino acid alignments of gum, xps, xcs, hrp, and rpf cluster products generally reflect strain phylogeny. However, amino acid residues at four positions correlate with tissue specificity, revealing hpaA and xpsD as candidate determinants. Examination of genome sequences of xanthomonads Xylella fastidiosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia revealed that the hrp, gum, and xcs clusters are recent acquisitions in the Xanthomonas lineage.Our results provide insight into the ancestral Xanthomonas genome and indicate that differentiation with respect to host- and tissue-specificity involved not major modifications or wholesale exchange of clusters, but subtle changes in a small

  12. Prediction of disease-related genes based on weighted tissue-specific networks by using DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, Jiayi; Liu, Qing; Wang, Jianxin; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Predicting disease-related genes is one of the most important tasks in bioinformatics and systems biology. With the advances in high-throughput techniques, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which make it possible to identify disease-related genes at the network level. However, network-based identification of disease-related genes is still a challenge as the considerable false-positives are still existed in the current available protein interaction networks (PIN). Considering the fact that the majority of genetic disorders tend to manifest only in a single or a few tissues, we constructed tissue-specific networks (TSN) by integrating PIN and tissue-specific data. We further weighed the constructed tissue-specific network (WTSN) by using DNA methylation as it plays an irreplaceable role in the development of complex diseases. A PageRank-based method was developed to identify disease-related genes from the constructed networks. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we constructed PIN, weighted PIN (WPIN), TSN, WTSN for colon cancer and leukemia, respectively. The experimental results on colon cancer and leukemia show that the combination of tissue-specific data and DNA methylation can help to identify disease-related genes more accurately. Moreover, the PageRank-based method was effective to predict disease-related genes on the case studies of colon cancer and leukemia. Tissue-specific data and DNA methylation are two important factors to the study of human diseases. The same method implemented on the WTSN can achieve better results compared to those being implemented on original PIN, WPIN, or TSN. The PageRank-based method outperforms degree centrality-based method for identifying disease-related genes from WTSN.

  13. Tissue-specific knockouts of ACAT2 reveal that intestinal depletion is sufficient to prevent diet-induced cholesterol accumulation in the liver and blood[S

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jun; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Marshall, Stephanie M.; Davis, Matthew A.; Wilson, Martha D.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Farese, Robert V.; Brown, J. Mark; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2012-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) generates cholesterol esters (CE) for packaging into newly synthesized lipoproteins and thus is a major determinant of blood cholesterol levels. ACAT2 is expressed exclusively in the small intestine and liver, but the relative contributions of ACAT2 expression in these tissues to systemic cholesterol metabolism is unknown. We investigated whether CE derived from the intestine or liver would differentially affect hepatic and plasma cholesterol hom...

  14. Cooperative activities of hematopoietic regulators recruit RNA polymerase II to a tissue-specific chromatin domain

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Boyer, Meghan E; Kiekhaefer, Carol M.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2002-01-01

    The hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1 regulates erythropoiesis and β-globin expression. Although consensus GATA-1 binding sites exist throughout the murine β-globin locus, we found that GATA-1 discriminates among these sites in vivo. Conditional expression of GATA-1 in GATA-1-null cells recapitulated the occupancy pattern. GATA-1 induced RNA polymerase II (pol II) recruitment to subregions of the locus control region and to the β-globin promoters. The hematopoietic factor NF-E2 cooper...

  15. Temporal and tissue specific regulation of RP-associated splicing factor genes PRPF3, PRPF31 and PRPC8--implications in the pathogenesis of RP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibi Cao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic mutations in several ubiquitously expressed RNA splicing genes such as PRPF3, PRP31 and PRPC8, have been found to cause retina-specific diseases in humans. To understand this intriguing phenomenon, most studies have been focused on testing two major hypotheses. One hypothesis assumes that these mutations interrupt retina-specific interactions that are important for RNA splicing, implying that there are specific components in the retina interacting with these splicing factors. The second hypothesis suggests that these mutations have only a mild effect on the protein function and thus affect only the metabolically highly active cells such as retinal photoreceptors.We examined the second hypothesis using the PRPF3 gene as an example. We analyzed the spatial and temporal expression of the PRPF3 gene in mice and found that it is highly expressed in retinal cells relative to other tissues and its expression is developmentally regulated. In addition, we also found that PRP31 and PRPC8 as well as snRNAs are highly expressed in retinal cells.Our data suggest that the retina requires a relatively high level of RNA splicing activity for optimal tissue-specific physiological function. Because the RP18 mutation has neither a debilitating nor acute effect on protein function, we suggest that retinal degeneration is the accumulative effect of decades of suboptimal RNA splicing due to the mildly impaired protein.

  16. A cyclic AMP response element mediates repression of tyrosine aminotransferase gene transcription by the tissue-specific extinguisher locus Tse-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshart, M; Weih, F; Schmidt, A; Fournier, R E; Schütz, G

    1990-06-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene expression is liver specific and inducible by glucocorticoids and via the cAMP signaling pathway. In fibroblasts and other nonliver cells the gene is subject to negative control by the trans-dominant tissue-specific extinguisher locus Tse-1. We identified a hepatocyte-specific enhancer that is repressed by Tse-1. Two distinct sequence motifs are absolutely essential for function of this enhancer: a cAMP response element (CRE), which is the target for repression by Tse-1, and a hepatocyte-specific element. The specificity of the enhancer is generated by the combination of these two essential elements, which are fully interdependent. In vivo footprinting indicates that Tse-1 acts by affecting protein binding at the CRE. A direct antagonism between Tse-1 and the cAMP signaling pathway suggests that Tse-1 plays a role in control of developmental activation of the TAT gene.

  17. Identification and tissue-specific expression of a NADH-dependent activity of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase in man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kuilenburg, A. B.; van Lenthe, H.; van Gennip, A. H.

    1996-01-01

    Homogenates of human liver and human fibroblasts were able to convert thymine into dihydrothymine in the presence of NADH whereas almost no NADH-dependent activity could be detected in human lymphocytes. The different tissue distribution of the NADH-dependent activity suggests that different types

  18. Activity and tissue-specific expression of lipases and tumor-necrosis factor alpha in lean and obese cats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenig, M.; McGoldrick, J.B.; Beer, M. de; Demacker, P.N.M.; Ferguson, D.C.

    2006-01-01

    Post-heparin plasma activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL), and fat and muscle activity of LPL were measured in neutered lean and obese cats. Lipoprotein lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), and tumor necrosis factor a (TNF) mRNA were measured in muscle and fat tissue with

  19. Small cyclic amphipathic peptides (SCAmpPs) genes in citrus provide promising tools for more effective tissue specific transgenic expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    A gene family encoding Small Cyclic Amphipathic Peptides (SCAmpPs) has been identified in citrus. Citrus genomes include 100-150 SCAmpPs genes, and about fifty transcripts are represented in the citrus EST database. These genes encode small ~50 residue precursor proteins that are post-translation...

  20. Aspergillus flavus and Fusariumverticillioides Induce Tissue Specific Gene Expression of PRms and UGT in Maize Seed before Fungal Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus and Fusariumverticillioides are fungal pathogens that colonize maize seeds and contaminate them with mycotoxins. To investigate the plant microbe interactions, we conducted histological and molecular studies to characterize the internal colonization of maize seed by the two fungal...

  1. Gene expression programs of human smooth muscle cells: tissue-specific differentiation and prognostic significance in breast cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi, Jen-Tsan; Rodriguez, Edwin H.; Wang, Zhen; Nuyten, Dimitry S. A.; Mukherjee, Sayan; van de Rijn, Matt; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Hastie, Trevor; Brown, Patrick O.

    2007-01-01

    Smooth muscle is present in a wide variety of anatomical locations, such as blood vessels, various visceral organs, and hair follicles. Contraction of smooth muscle is central to functions as diverse as peristalsis, urination, respiration, and the maintenance of vascular tone. Despite the varied

  2. A large-scale analysis of tissue-specific pathology and gene expression of human disease genes and complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Lage; Hansen, Niclas Tue; Karlberg, Erik, Olof, Linnart

    2008-01-01

    to be overexpressed in the normal tissues where defects cause pathology. In contrast, cancer genes and complexes were not overexpressed in the tissues from which the tumors emanate. We specifically identified a complex involved in XY sex reversal that is testis-specific and down-regulated in ovaries. We also...

  3. Glial and tissue-specific regulation of Kynurenine Pathway dioxygenases by acute stress of mice

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    Carlos R. Dostal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Stressors activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and immune system eliciting changes in cognitive function, mood and anxiety. An important link between stress and altered behavior is stimulation of the Kynurenine Pathway which generates neuroactive and immunomodulatory kynurenines. Tryptophan entry into this pathway is controlled by rate-limiting indoleamine/tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenases (DOs: Ido1, Ido2, Tdo2. Although implicated as mediating changes in behavior, detecting stress-induced DO expression has proven inconsistent. Thus, C57BL/6J mice were used to characterize DO expression in brain-regions, astrocytes and microglia to characterize restraint-stress-induced DO expression. Stress increased kynurenine in brain and plasma, demonstrating increased DO activity. Of three Ido1 transcripts, only Ido1-v1 expression was increased by stress and within astrocytes, not microglia, indicating transcript- and glial-specificity. Stress increased Ido1-v1 only in frontal cortex and hypothalamus, indicating brain-region specificity. Of eight Ido2 transcripts, Ido2-v3 expression was increased by stress, again only within astrocytes. Likewise, stress increased Tdo2-FL expression in astrocytes, not microglia. Interestingly, Ido2 and Tdo2 transcripts were not correspondingly induced in Ido1-knockout (Ido1KO mice, suggesting that Ido1 is necessary for the central DO response to acute stress. Unlike acute inflammatory models resulting in DO induction within microglia, only astrocyte DO expression was increased by acute restraint-stress, defining their unique role during stress-dependent activation of the Kynurenine Pathway. Keywords: Stress, Ido, Tdo, Kynurenine, Astrocyte, Liver

  4. Cell- and Tissue-Specific Transcriptome Analyses of Medicago truncatula Root Nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpens, Erik; Moling, Sjef; Hooiveld, Guido; Pereira, Patrícia A.; Bisseling, Ton; Becker, Jörg D.; Küster, Helge

    2013-01-01

    Legumes have the unique ability to host nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria as symbiosomes inside root nodule cells. To get insight into this key process, which forms the heart of the endosymbiosis, we isolated specific cells/tissues at different stages of symbiosome formation from nodules of the model legume Medicago truncatula using laser-capture microdissection. Next, we determined their associated expression profiles using Affymetrix Medicago GeneChips. Cells were collected from the nodule infection zone divided into a distal (where symbiosome formation and division occur) and proximal region (where symbiosomes are mainly differentiating), as well as infected cells from the fixation zone containing mature nitrogen fixing symbiosomes. As non-infected cells/tissue we included nodule meristem cells and uninfected cells from the fixation zone. Here, we present a comprehensive gene expression map of an indeterminate Medicago nodule and selected genes that show specific enriched expression in the different cells or tissues. Validation of the obtained expression profiles, by comparison to published gene expression profiles and experimental verification, indicates that the data can be used as digital “in situ”. This digital “in situ” offers a genome-wide insight into genes specifically associated with subsequent stages of symbiosome and nodule cell development, and can serve to guide future functional studies. PMID:23734198

  5. cell- and tissue-specific transcriptome analyses of Medicago truncatula root nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Limpens

    Full Text Available Legumes have the unique ability to host nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria as symbiosomes inside root nodule cells. To get insight into this key process, which forms the heart of the endosymbiosis, we isolated specific cells/tissues at different stages of symbiosome formation from nodules of the model legume Medicago truncatula using laser-capture microdissection. Next, we determined their associated expression profiles using Affymetrix Medicago GeneChips. Cells were collected from the nodule infection zone divided into a distal (where symbiosome formation and division occur and proximal region (where symbiosomes are mainly differentiating, as well as infected cells from the fixation zone containing mature nitrogen fixing symbiosomes. As non-infected cells/tissue we included nodule meristem cells and uninfected cells from the fixation zone. Here, we present a comprehensive gene expression map of an indeterminate Medicago nodule and selected genes that show specific enriched expression in the different cells or tissues. Validation of the obtained expression profiles, by comparison to published gene expression profiles and experimental verification, indicates that the data can be used as digital "in situ". This digital "in situ" offers a genome-wide insight into genes specifically associated with subsequent stages of symbiosome and nodule cell development, and can serve to guide future functional studies.

  6. A comprehensive genome-wide study on tissue-specific and abiotic stress-specific miRNAs in Triticum aestivum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Pandey

    Full Text Available Productivity of wheat crop is largely dependent on its growth and development that, in turn, is mainly regulated by environmental conditions, including abiotic stress factors. miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression networks involved in diverse aspects of development and stress responses in plants. Using high-throughput sequencing of eight small RNA libraries prepared from diverse abiotic stresses and tissues, we identified 47 known miRNAs belonging to 20 families, 49 true novel and 1030 candidate novel miRNAs. Digital gene expression analysis revealed that 257 miRNAs exhibited tissue-specific expression and 74 were associated with abiotic stresses. Putative target genes were predicted for miRNAs identified in this study and their grouping into functional categories indicated that the putative targets were involved in diverse biological processes. RLM-RACE of predicted targets of three known miRNAs (miR156, miR160 and miR164 confirmed their mRNA cleavage, thus indicating their regulation at post-transcriptional level by the corresponding miRNAs. Mapping of the sequenced data onto the wheat progenitors and closely related monocots revealed a large number of evolutionary conserved miRNAs. Additional expression profiling of some of these miRNAs in other abiotic stresses underline their involvement in multiple stresses. Our findings provide valuable resource for an improved understanding of the role of miRNAs in stress tolerance as well as plant development.

  7. A study of diffusion tensor imaging by tissue-specific, smoothing-compensated voxel-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Eun; Chung, Moo K; Lazar, Mariana; DuBray, Molly B; Kim, Jinsuh; Bigler, Erin D; Lainhart, Janet E; Alexander, Andrew L

    2009-02-01

    Voxel-based analysis (VBA) is commonly used for statistical analysis of image data, including the detection of significant signal differences between groups. Typically, images are co-registered and then smoothed with an isotropic Gaussian kernel to compensate for image misregistration, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), to reduce the number of multiple comparisons, and to apply random field theory. Problems with typical implementations of VBA include poor tissue specificity from image misregistration and smoothing. In this study, we developed a new tissue-specific, smoothing-compensated (T-SPOON) method for the VBA of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data with improved tissue specificity and compensation for image misregistration and smoothing. When compared with conventional VBA methods, the T-SPOON method introduced substantially less errors in the normalized and smoothed DTI maps. Another confound of the conventional DTI-VBA is that it is difficult to differentiate between differences in morphometry and DTI measures that describe tissue microstructure. T-SPOON VBA decreased the effects of differential morphometry in the DTI VBA studies. T-SPOON and conventional VBA were applied to a DTI study of white matter in autism. T-SPOON VBA results were found to be more consistent with region of interest (ROI) measurements in the corpus callosum and temporal lobe regions. The T-SPOON method may be also applicable to other quantitative imaging maps such as T1 or T2 relaxometry, magnetization transfer, or PET tracer maps.

  8. Tissue-restricted expression of Nrf2 and its target genes in zebrafish with gene-specific variations in the induction profiles.

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    Hitomi Nakajima

    Full Text Available The Keap1-Nrf2 system serves as a defense mechanism against oxidative stress and electrophilic toxicants by inducing more than one hundred cytoprotective proteins, including antioxidants and phase 2 detoxifying enzymes. Since induction profiles of Nrf2 target genes have been studied exclusively in cultured cells, and not in animal models, their tissue-specificity has not been well characterized. In this paper, we examined and compared the tissue-specific expression of several Nrf2 target genes in zebrafish larvae by whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH. Seven zebrafish genes (gstp1, mgst3b, prdx1, frrs1c, fthl, gclc and hmox1a suitable for WISH analysis were selected from candidates for Nrf2 targets identified by microarray analysis. Tissue-restricted induction was observed in the nose, gill, and/or liver for all seven genes in response to Nrf2-activating compounds, diethylmaleate (DEM and sulforaphane. The Nrf2 gene itself was dominantly expressed in these three tissues, implying that tissue-restricted induction of Nrf2 target genes is defined by tissue-specific expression of Nrf2. Interestingly, the induction of frrs1c and gclc in liver and nose, respectively, was quite low and that of hmox1a was restricted in the liver. These results indicate the existence of gene-specific variations in the tissue specificity, which can be controlled by factors other than Nrf2.

  9. Cooperative activities of hematopoietic regulators recruit RNA polymerase II to a tissue-specific chromatin domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Boyer, Meghan E.; Kiekhaefer, Carol M.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2002-01-01

    The hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1 regulates erythropoiesis and β-globin expression. Although consensus GATA-1 binding sites exist throughout the murine β-globin locus, we found that GATA-1 discriminates among these sites in vivo. Conditional expression of GATA-1 in GATA-1-null cells recapitulated the occupancy pattern. GATA-1 induced RNA polymerase II (pol II) recruitment to subregions of the locus control region and to the β-globin promoters. The hematopoietic factor NF-E2 cooperated with GATA-1 to recruit pol II to the promoters. We propose that only when GATA-1 attracts pol II to the locus control region can pol II access the promoter in a NF-E2-dependent manner. PMID:12193659

  10. A four step model for the IL-6 amplifier, a regulator of chromic inflammations in tissue specific MHC class II-associated autoimmune diseases

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    Masaaki eMurakami

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It is thought autoimmune diseases are caused by the breakdown of self-tolerance, which suggests the recognition of specific antigens by autoreactive CD4+ T cells contribute to the specificity of autoimmune diseases. In several cases, however, even for diseases associated with class II MHC alleles, the causative tissue-specific antigens recognized by memory/activated CD4+ T cells have not been established. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and arthritis in F759 knock-in mouse line (F759 mice are such examples, even though evidences support a pathogenic role for CD4+ T cells in both diseases. We have recently shown local events such as microbleeding together with an accumulation of activated CD4+ T cells in a manner independent of tissue antigen-recognitions induces arthritis in the joints of F759 mice. For example, local microbleeding-mediated CCL20 expression induced such an accumulation, causing arthritis development via chronic activation of an IL-17A-dependent IL-6 signaling amplification loop in type 1 collagen+ cells that is triggered by CD4+ T cell-derived cytokine(s such as IL-17A, which leads to the synergistic activation of STAT3 and NFκB in non hematopoietic cells in the joint. We named this loop the IL-6-mediated inflammation amplifier, or IL-6 amplifier. Thus, certain class II MHC–associated, tissue-specific autoimmune diseases may be induced by local events that cause an antigen-independent accumulation of effector CD4+ T cells followed by the induction of the IL-6 amplifier in the affected tissue. To explain this hypothesis, we have proposed a Four Step Model for MHC class II associated autoimmune diseases. The interaction of four local events results in chronic activation of the IL-6 amplifier, leading to the manifestation of autoimmune diseases. Thus, we have concluded the IL-6 amplifier is a critical regulator of chromic inflammations in tissue specific MHC class II-associated autoimmune diseases.

  11. Selection and Evaluation of Tissue Specific Reference Genes in Lucilia sericata during an Immune Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Andre; Lehmann, Rüdiger; Beckert, Annika; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Franta, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The larvae of the common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) have been used for centuries to promote wound healing, but the molecular basis of their antimicrobial, debridement and healing functions remains largely unknown. The analysis of differential gene expression in specific larval tissues before and after immune challenge could be used to identify key molecular factors, but the most sensitive and reproducible method qRT-PCR requires validated reference genes. We therefore selected 10 candidate reference genes encoding products from different functional classes (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, actin, β-tubulin, RPS3, RPLP0, EF1α, PKA, GAPDH and GST1). Two widely applied algorithms (GeNorm and Normfinder) were used to analyze reference gene candidates in different larval tissues associated with secretion, digestion, and antimicrobial activity (midgut, hindgut, salivary glands, crop and fat body). The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was then used to boost the larval immune system and the stability of reference gene expression was tested in comparison to three immune genes (lucimycin, defensin-1 and attacin-2), which target different pathogen classes. We observed no differential expression of the antifungal peptide lucimycin, whereas the representative targeting Gram-positive bacteria (defensin-1) was upregulated in salivary glands, crop, nerve ganglion and reached its maximum in fat body (up to 300-fold). The strongest upregulation in all immune challenged tissues (over 50,000-fold induction in the fat body) was monitored for attacin-2, the representative targeting Gram-negative bacteria. Here we identified and validated a set of reference genes that allows the accurate normalization of gene expression in specific tissues of L. sericata after immune challenge.

  12. Selection and Evaluation of Tissue Specific Reference Genes in Lucilia sericata during an Immune Challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Baumann

    Full Text Available The larvae of the common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae have been used for centuries to promote wound healing, but the molecular basis of their antimicrobial, debridement and healing functions remains largely unknown. The analysis of differential gene expression in specific larval tissues before and after immune challenge could be used to identify key molecular factors, but the most sensitive and reproducible method qRT-PCR requires validated reference genes. We therefore selected 10 candidate reference genes encoding products from different functional classes (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, actin, β-tubulin, RPS3, RPLP0, EF1α, PKA, GAPDH and GST1. Two widely applied algorithms (GeNorm and Normfinder were used to analyze reference gene candidates in different larval tissues associated with secretion, digestion, and antimicrobial activity (midgut, hindgut, salivary glands, crop and fat body. The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was then used to boost the larval immune system and the stability of reference gene expression was tested in comparison to three immune genes (lucimycin, defensin-1 and attacin-2, which target different pathogen classes. We observed no differential expression of the antifungal peptide lucimycin, whereas the representative targeting Gram-positive bacteria (defensin-1 was upregulated in salivary glands, crop, nerve ganglion and reached its maximum in fat body (up to 300-fold. The strongest upregulation in all immune challenged tissues (over 50,000-fold induction in the fat body was monitored for attacin-2, the representative targeting Gram-negative bacteria. Here we identified and validated a set of reference genes that allows the accurate normalization of gene expression in specific tissues of L. sericata after immune challenge.

  13. Somatostatin and its receptors contribute in a tissue-specific manner to the sex-dependent metabolic (fed/fasting) control of growth hormone axis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Chacón, José; Gahete, Manuel D; Castaño, Justo P; Kineman, Rhonda D; Luque, Raul M

    2011-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) inhibits growth hormone (GH) secretion and regulates multiple processes by signaling through its receptors sst1-5. Differential expression of SST/ssts may contribute to sex-specific GH pattern and fasting-induced GH rise. To further delineate the tissue-specific roles of SST and sst1-5 in these processes, their expression patterns were evaluated in hypothalamus, pituitary, and stomach of male and female mice under fed/fasted conditions in the presence (wild type) or absence (SST-knockout) of endogenous SST. Under fed conditions, hypothalamic/stomach SST/ssts expression did not differ between sexes, whereas male pituitary expressed more SST and sst2A/2B/3/5A/5TMD2/5TMD1 and less sst1, and male pituitary cell cultures were more responsive to SST inhibitory actions on GH release compared with females. This suggests that local pituitary SST/ssts can contribute to the sexually dimorphic pattern of GH release. Fasting (48 h) reduced stomach sst2A/B and hypothalamic SST/sst2A expression in both sexes, whereas it caused a generalized downregulation of pituitary sst subtypes in male and of sst2A only in females. Thus, fasting can reduce SST sensitivity across tissues and SST input to the pituitary, thereby jointly contributing to enhance GH release. In SST-knockout mice, lack of SST differentially altered sst subtype expression levels in both sexes, supporting an important role for SST in sex-dependent control of GH axis. Evaluation of SST, IGF-I, and glucocorticoid effects on hypothalamic and pituitary cell cultures revealed that these hormones could directly account for alterations in sst2/5 expression in the physiological states examined. Taken together, these results indicate that changes in SST output and sensitivity can contribute critically to precisely define, in a tissue-dependent manner, the sex-specific metabolic regulation of the GH axis.

  14. Tissue specific localization of pectin-Ca²⁺ cross-linkages and pectin methyl-esterification during fruit ripening in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum.

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    Hiromi Hyodo

    Full Text Available Fruit ripening is one of the developmental processes accompanying seed development. The tomato is a well-known model for studying fruit ripening and development, and the disassembly of primary cell walls and the middle lamella, such as through pectin de-methylesterified by pectin methylesterase (PE and depolymerization by polygalacturonase (PG, is generally accepted to be one of the major changes that occur during ripening. Although many reports of the changes in pectin during tomato fruit ripening are focused on the relation to softening of the pericarp or the Blossom-end rot by calcium (Ca²⁺ deficiency disorder, the changes in pectin structure and localization in each tissues during tomato fruit ripening is not well known. In this study, to elucidate the tissue-specific role of pectin during fruit development and ripening, we examined gene expression, the enzymatic activities involved in pectin synthesis and depolymerisation in fruit using biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses, and uronic acids and calcium (Ca-bound pectin were determined by secondary ion-microprobe mass spectrometry. These results show that changes in pectin properties during fruit development and ripening have tissue-specific patterns. In particular, differential control of pectin methyl-esterification occurs in each tissue. Variations in the cell walls of the pericarp are quite different from that of locular tissues. The Ca-binding pectin and hairy pectin in skin cell layers are important for intercellular and tissue-tissue adhesion. Maintenance of the globular form and softening of tomato fruit may be regulated by the arrangement of pectin structures in each tissue.

  15. Spontaneous Pancreatitis Caused by Tissue-Specific Gene Ablation of Hhex in MiceSummary

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    Mark J. Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Perturbations in pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion cause chronic pancreatitis. The physiologic mechanism of ductal secretion is known, but its transcriptional control is not. We determine the role of the transcription factor hematopoietically expressed homeobox protein (Hhex in ductal secretion and pancreatitis. Methods: We derived mice with pancreas-specific, Cre-mediated Hhex gene ablation to determine the requirement of Hhex in the pancreatic duct in early life and in adult stages. Histologic and immunostaining analyses were used to detect the presence of pathology. Pancreatic primary ductal cells were isolated to discover differentially expressed transcripts upon acute Hhex ablation on a cell autonomous level. Results: Hhex protein was detected throughout the embryonic and adult ductal trees. Ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors resulted in postnatal ductal ectasia associated with acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a progressive phenotype that ultimately resulted in chronic pancreatitis. Hhex ablation in adult mice, however, did not cause any detectable pathology. Ductal ectasia in young mice did not result from perturbation of expression of Hnf6, Hnf1β, or the primary cilia genes. RNA-seq analysis of Hhex-ablated pancreatic primary ductal cells showed mRNA levels of the G-protein coupled receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 3 (Npr3, implicated in paracrine signaling, up-regulated by 4.70-fold. Conclusions: Although Hhex is dispensable for ductal cell function in the adult, ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors results in pancreatitis. Our data highlight the critical role of Hhex in maintaining ductal homeostasis in early life and support ductal hypersecretion as a novel etiology of pediatric chronic pancreatitis. Keywords: Npr3, Pancreatic Ducts, Primary Cilia

  16. Investigation of tissue-specific human orthologous alternative splice events in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher; Salicio, Susanna Cirera

    2010-01-01

    investigated alternative splice events detected in humans, in orthologous pig genes. A total of 17 genes with predicted exon skipping events were selected for further studies. The splice events for the selected genes were experimentally verified using real-time quantitative PCR analysis (qPCR) with splice......Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA can contribute to differences between tissues or cells either by regulating gene expression or creating proteins with various functions encoded by one gene. The number of investigated alternative splice events in pig has so far been limited. In this study we have...

  17. Voluntary physical activity prevents insulin resistance in a tissue specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvas, Jessica L; Otis, Jeffrey S; Khaper, Neelam; Lees, Simon J

    2015-02-01

    Physical inactivity and a sedentary lifestyle are risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes. Here, we identified the effects 8 weeks of voluntary physical activity had on the prevention of insulin resistance in mouse skeletal muscles and liver (a hallmark of T2D). To do this, 8 week old C57BL/6J mice with (RUN) and without (SED) voluntary access to running wheels were fed a standard rodent chow ad libitum for 8 weeks. In the liver, there was a 2.5-fold increase in insulin stimulated Akt(SER) (473) phosphorylation, and a threefold increase in insulin-stimulated (0.5 U/kg) GSK3β(SER) (9) phosphorylation in RUN compared to SED mice. Although not induced in skeletal muscles, there was a twofold increase in SOCS3 expression in SED compared to RUN mice in the liver. There was no difference in the glucose tolerance test between groups. This study was the first to show differences in liver insulin sensitivity after 8 weeks of voluntary physical activity, and increased SOCS3 expression in the liver of sedentary mice compared to active mice. These findings demonstrate that even in young mice that would normally be considered healthy, the lack of physical activity leads to insulin resistance representing the initial pathogenesis of impaired glucose metabolism leading to type 2 diabetes. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  18. The tissue-specific Rep8/UBXD6 tethers p97 to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for degradation of misfolded proteins.

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    Louise Madsen

    Full Text Available The protein known as p97 or VCP in mammals and Cdc48 in yeast is a versatile ATPase complex involved in several biological functions including membrane fusion, protein folding, and activation of membrane-bound transcription factors. In addition, p97 plays a central role in degradation of misfolded secretory proteins via the ER-associated degradation pathway. This functional diversity of p97 depends on its association with various cofactors, and to further our understanding of p97 function it is important that these cofactors are identified and analyzed. Here, we isolate and characterize the human protein named Rep8 or Ubxd6 as a new cofactor of p97. Mouse Rep8 is highly tissue-specific and abundant in gonads. In testes, Rep8 is expressed in post-meiotic round spermatids, whereas in ovaries Rep8 is expressed in granulosa cells. Rep8 associates directly with p97 via its UBX domain. We show that Rep8 is a transmembrane protein that localizes to the ER membrane with its UBX domain facing the cytoplasm. Knock-down of Rep8 expression in human cells leads to a decreased association of p97 with the ER membrane and concomitantly a retarded degradation of misfolded ER-derived proteasome substrates. Thus, Rep8 tethers p97 to the ER membrane for efficient ER-associated degradation.

  19. A Wt1-controlled chromatin switching mechanism underpins tissue-specific Wnt4 activation and repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essafi, Abdelkader; Webb, Anna; Berry, Rachel L.; Slight, Joan; Burn, Sally F.; Spraggon, Lee; Velecela, Victor; Martinez-Estrada, Ofelia M.; Wiltshire, John H.; Roberts, Stefan G.E.; Brownstein, David; Davies, Jamie A.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Hohenstein, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Wt1 regulates the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the epicardium and the reverse process (MET) in kidney mesenchyme. The mechanisms underlying these reciprocal functions are unknown. Here, we show in both embryos and cultured cells that Wt1 regulates Wnt4 expression dichotomously. In kidney cells, Wt1 recruits Cbp and p300 as coactivators; in epicardial cells it enlists Basp1 as a corepressor. Surprisingly, in both tissues, Wt1 loss reciprocally switches the chromatin architecture of the entire CTCF-bounded Wnt4 locus, but not the flanking regions; we term this mode of action “chromatin flip-flop”. CTCF and cohesin are dispensable for Wt1-mediated chromatin flip-flop but essential for maintaining the insulating boundaries. This work demonstrates that a developmental regulator coordinates chromatin boundaries with the transcriptional competence of the flanked region. These findings also have implications for hierarchical transcriptional regulation in development and disease. PMID:21871842

  20. Lipodystrophy Due to Adipose Tissue-Specific Insulin Receptor Knockout Results in Progressive NAFLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Softic, Samir; Boucher, Jeremie; Solheim, Marie H; Fujisaka, Shiho; Haering, Max-Felix; Homan, Erica P; Winnay, Jonathon; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R; Kahn, C Ronald

    2016-08-01

    Ectopic lipid accumulation in the liver is an almost universal feature of human and rodent models of generalized lipodystrophy and is also a common feature of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Here we explore the progression of fatty liver disease using a mouse model of lipodystrophy created by a fat-specific knockout of the insulin receptor (F-IRKO) or both IR and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (F-IR/IGFRKO). These mice develop severe lipodystrophy, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and fatty liver disease within the first weeks of life. By 12 weeks of age, liver demonstrated increased reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, histological evidence of balloon degeneration, and elevated serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. In these lipodystrophic mice, stored liver lipids can be used for energy production, as indicated by a marked decrease in liver weight with fasting and increased liver fibroblast growth factor 21 expression and intact ketogenesis. By 52 weeks of age, liver accounted for 25% of body weight and showed continued balloon degeneration in addition to inflammation, fibrosis, and highly dysplastic liver nodules. Progression of liver disease was associated with improvement in blood glucose levels, with evidence of altered expression of gluconeogenic and glycolytic enzymes. However, these mice were able to mobilize stored glycogen in response to glucagon. Feeding F-IRKO and F-IR/IGFRKO mice a high-fat diet for 12 weeks accelerated the liver injury and normalization of blood glucose levels. Thus, severe fatty liver disease develops early in lipodystrophic mice and progresses to advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis with highly dysplastic liver nodules. The liver injury is propagated by lipotoxicity and is associated with improved blood glucose levels. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit

  1. Tissue-specific transcriptome profiling of the citrus fruit epidermis and subepidermis using laser capture microdissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas, Antonio J.; Agustí, Javier; Tadeo, Francisco R.; Talón, Manuel; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.

    2010-01-01

    Most studies of the biochemical and regulatory pathways that are associated with, and control, fruit expansion and ripening are based on homogenized bulk tissues, and do not take into consideration the multiplicity of different cell types from which the analytes, be they transcripts, proteins or metabolites, are extracted. Consequently, potentially valuable spatial information is lost and the lower abundance cellular components that are expressed only in certain cell types can be diluted below the level of detection. In this study, laser microdissection (LMD) was used to isolate epidermal and subepidermal cells from green, expanding Citrus clementina fruit and their transcriptomes were compared using a 20k citrus cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. The results show striking differences in gene expression profiles between the two cell types, revealing specific metabolic pathways that can be related to their respective organelle composition and cell wall specialization. Microscopy provided additional evidence of tissue specialization that could be associated with the transcript profiles with distinct differences in organelle and metabolite accumulation. Subepidermis predominant genes are primarily involved in photosynthesis- and energy-related processes, as well as cell wall biosynthesis and restructuring. By contrast, the most epidermis predominant genes are related to the biosynthesis of the cuticle, flavonoids, and defence responses. Furthermore, the epidermis transcript profile showed a high proportion of genes with no known function, supporting the original hypothesis that analysis at the tissue/cell specific levels can promote gene discovery and lead to a better understanding of the specialized contribution of each tissue to fruit physiology. PMID:20519339

  2. A four-step model for the IL-6 amplifier, a regulator of chronic inflammations in tissue-specific MHC class II-associated autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masaaki; Hirano, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly thought that autoimmune diseases are caused by the breakdown of self-tolerance, which suggests the recognition of specific antigens by autoreactive CD4+ T cells contribute to the specificity of autoimmune diseases (Marrack et al., 2001; Mathis and Benoist, 2004). In several cases, however, even for diseases associated with class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, the causative tissue-specific antigens recognized by memory/activated CD4+ T cells have not been established (Mocci et al., 2000; Skapenko et al., 2005). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and arthritis in F759 knock-in mice (F759 mice) are such examples (Atsumi et al., 2002; Brennan et al., 2002; Falgarone et al., 2009). These include associations with class II MHC and CD4 molecules; increased numbers of memory/activated CD4+ T cells; and improved outcomes in response to suppressions and/or deficiencies in class II MHC molecules, CD4+ T cells, and the T cell survival cytokine IL-7. Regarding the development of arthritis in F759 mice, it is not only the immune system, but also non-immune tissue that are involved, indicating that the importance of their interactions (Sawa et al., 2006, 2009; Ogura et al., 2008; Hirano, 2010; Murakami et al., 2011). Furthermore, we have shown that local events such as microbleeding together with an accumulation of activated CD4+ T cells in a manner independent of tissue antigen-recognitions induces arthritis in the joints of F759 mice (Murakami et al., 2011). For example, local microbleeding-mediated CCL20 expression induce such an accumulation, causing arthritis development via chronic activation of an IL-17A-dependent IL-6 signaling amplification loop in type 1 collagen+ cells that is triggered by CD4+ T cell-derived cytokine(s) such as IL-17A, which leads to the synergistic activation of STAT3 and NFκB in non-hematopoietic cells in the joint (Murakami et al., 2011). We named this loop the IL-6-mediated inflammation amplifier, or IL-6 amplifier for

  3. Engineering cottonseed for use in human nutrition by tissue-specific reduction of toxic gossypol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunilkumar, Ganesan; Campbell, LeAnne M; Puckhaber, Lorraine; Stipanovic, Robert D; Rathore, Keerti S

    2006-11-28

    Global cottonseed production can potentially provide the protein requirements for half a billion people per year; however, it is woefully underutilized because of the presence of toxic gossypol within seed glands. Therefore, elimination of gossypol from cottonseed has been a long-standing goal of geneticists. Attempts were made to meet this objective by developing so-called "glandless cotton" in the 1950s by conventional breeding techniques; however, the glandless varieties were commercially unviable because of the increased susceptibility of the plant to insect pests due to the systemic absence of glands that contain gossypol and other protective terpenoids. Thus, the promise of cottonseed in contributing to the food requirements of the burgeoning world population remained unfulfilled. We have successfully used RNAi to disrupt gossypol biosynthesis in cottonseed tissue by interfering with the expression of the delta-cadinene synthase gene during seed development. We demonstrate that it is possible to significantly reduce cottonseed-gossypol levels in a stable and heritable manner. Results from enzyme activity and molecular analyses on developing transgenic embryos were consistent with the observed phenotype in the mature seeds. Most relevant, the levels of gossypol and related terpenoids in the foliage and floral parts were not diminished, and thus their potential function in plant defense against insects and diseases remained untouched. These results illustrate that a targeted genetic modification, applied to an underutilized agricultural byproduct, provides a mechanism to open up a new source of nutrition for hundreds of millions of people.

  4. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 2. Normal tissue specific sites and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue sites in the human body. Considers in detail the detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects and discusses prognostic outcomes. Clearly presents radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects. Provides the most current evidence-based medicine for cancer care survivorship guidelines. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 2 of this two-volume work comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue anatomic sites in the human body. The detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects are all considered in detail, and prognostic outcomes are discussed. Radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects are clearly presented. The text is accompanied by numerous supportive illustrations and tables.

  5. A minimal set of tissue-specific hypomethylated CpGs constitute epigenetic signatures of developmental programming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Colaneri

    Full Text Available Cell specific states of the chromatin are programmed during mammalian development. Dynamic DNA methylation across the developing embryo guides a program of repression, switching off genes in most cell types. Thus, the majority of the tissue specific differentially methylated sites (TS-DMS must be un-methylated CpGs.Comparison of expanded Methyl Sensitive Cut Counting data (eMSCC among four tissues (liver, testes, brain and kidney from three C57BL/6J mice, identified 138,052 differentially methylated sites of which 23,270 contain CpGs un-methylated in only one tissue (TS-DMS. Most of these CpGs were located in intergenic regions, outside of promoters, CpG islands or their shores, and up to 20% of them overlapped reported active enhancers. Indeed, tissue-specific enhancers were up to 30 fold enriched in TS-DMS. Testis showed the highest number of TS-DMS, but paradoxically their associated genes do not appear to be specific to the germ cell functions, but rather are involved in organism development. In the other tissues the differentially methylated genes are associated with tissue-specific physiological or anatomical functions. The identified sets of TS-DMS quantify epigenetic distances between tissues, generated during development. We applied this concept to measure the extent of reprogramming in the liver of mice exposed to in utero or early postnatal nutritional stress. Different protocols of food restriction reprogrammed the liver methylome in different but reproducible ways.Thus, each identified set of differentially methylated sites constituted an epigenetic signature that traced the developmental programing or the early nutritional reprogramming of each exposed mouse. We propose that our approach has the potential to outline a number of disease-associated epigenetic states. The composition of differentially methylated CpGs may vary with each situation, behaving as a composite variable, which can be used as a pre-symptomatic marker for

  6. High-fat diet leads to tissue-specific changes reflecting risk factors for diseases in DBA/2J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Rachael S.; Wagener, Asja; Hantschel, Claudia; Svenson, Karen L.; Churchill, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the responses of individual tissues to high-fat feeding as a function of mass, fat composition, and transcript abundance. We examined a panel of eight tissues [5 white adipose tissues (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT), liver, muscle] obtained from DBA/2J mice on either a standard breeding diet (SBD) or a high-fat diet (HFD). HFD led to weight gain, decreased insulin sensitivity, and tissue-specific responses, including inflammation, in these mice. The dietary fatty acids were partially metabolized and converted in both liver and fat tissues. Saturated fatty acids (SFA) were converted in the liver to monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and oleic acid (C18:1) was the preferred MUFA for storage of excess energy in all tissues of HFD-fed mice. Transcriptional changes largely reflected the tissue-specific fat deposition. SFA were negatively correlated with genes in the collagen family and processes involving the extracellular matrix. We propose a novel role of the tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2) gene in adipose tissues of diet-induced obesity. Tissue-specific responses to HFD were identified. Liver steatosis was evident in HFD-fed mice. Gonadal, retroperitoneal and subcutaneous adipose tissue and BAT exhibited severe inflammatory and immune responses. Mesenteric adipose tissue was the most metabolically active adipose tissue. Gluteal adipose tissue had the highest mass gain but was sluggish in its metabolism. In HFD conditions, BAT functioned largely like WAT in its role as a depot for excess energy, whereas WAT played a role in thermogenesis. PMID:20215417

  7. Thyroid hormone effects on whole-body energy homeostasis and tissue-specific fatty acid uptake in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klieverik, Lars P; Coomans, Claudia P; Endert, Erik; Sauerwein, Hans P; Havekes, Louis M; Voshol, Peter J; Rensen, Patrick C N; Romijn, Johannes A; Kalsbeek, Andries; Fliers, Eric

    2009-12-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone (TH) status on energy metabolism and tissue-specific substrate supply in vivo are incompletely understood. To study the effects of TH status on energy metabolism and tissue-specific fatty acid (FA) fluxes, we used metabolic cages as well as (14)C-labeled FA and (3)H-labeled triglyceride (TG) infusion in rats treated with methimazole and either 0 (hypothyroidism), 1.5 (euthyroidism), or 16.0 (thyrotoxicosis) microg per 100 g/d T(4) for 11 d. Thyrotoxicosis increased total energy expenditure by 38% (P = 0.02), resting energy expenditure by 61% (P = 0.002), and food intake by 18% (P = 0.004). Hypothyroidism tended to decrease total energy expenditure (10%; P = 0.064) and resting energy expenditure (12%; P = 0.025) but did not affect food intake. TH status did not affect spontaneous physical activity. Thyrotoxicosis increased fat oxidation (P = 0.006), whereas hypothyroidism decreased glucose oxidation (P = 0.035). Plasma FA concentration was increased in thyrotoxic but not hypothyroid rats. Thyrotoxicosis increased albumin-bound FA uptake in muscle and white adipose tissue (WAT), whereas hypothyroidism had no effect in any tissue studied, suggesting mass-driven albumin-bound FA uptake. During thyrotoxicosis, TG-derived FA uptake was increased in muscle and heart, unaffected in WAT, and decreased in brown adipose tissue. Conversely, during hypothyroidism TG-derived FA uptake was increased in WAT in association with increased lipoprotein lipase activity but unaffected in oxidative tissues and decreased in liver. In conclusion, TH status determines energy expenditure independently of spontaneous physical activity. The changes in whole-body lipid metabolism are accompanied by tissue-specific changes in TG-derived FA uptake in accordance with hyper- and hypometabolic states induced by thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism, respectively.

  8. Liver-targeting of interferon-alpha with tissue-specific domain antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Coulstock

    Full Text Available Interferon alpha (IFNα is used for the treatment of hepatitis C infection and whilst efficacious it is associated with multiple adverse events including reduced leukocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet counts, fatigue, and depression. These events are most likely caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting the therapeutic directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFNα therapy. We genetically fused IFN to a domain antibody (dAb specific to a hepatocyte restricted antigen, asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR. Our results show that the murine IFNα2 homolog (mIFNα2 fused to an ASGPR specific dAb, termed DOM26h-196-61, could be expressed in mammalian tissue culture systems and retains the desirable biophysical properties and activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. Furthermore a clear increase in in vivo targeting of the liver by mIFNα2-ASGPR dAb fusion protein, compared to that observed with either unfused mIFNα2 or mIFNα2 fused to an isotype control dAb VHD2 (which does not bind ASGPR was demonstrated using microSPECT imaging. We suggest that these findings may be applicable in the development of a liver-targeted human IFN molecule with improved safety and patient compliance in comparison to the current standard of care, which could ultimately be used as a treatment for human hepatitis virus infections.

  9. Tissue specific roles for the ribosome biogenesis factor Wdr43 in zebrafish development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengtian Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During vertebrate craniofacial development, neural crest cells (NCCs contribute to most of the craniofacial pharyngeal skeleton. Defects in NCC specification, migration and differentiation resulting in malformations in the craniofacial complex are associated with human craniofacial disorders including Treacher-Collins Syndrome, caused by mutations in TCOF1. It has been hypothesized that perturbed ribosome biogenesis and resulting p53 mediated neuroepithelial apoptosis results in NCC hypoplasia in mouse Tcof1 mutants. However, the underlying mechanisms linking ribosome biogenesis and NCC development remain poorly understood. Here we report a new zebrafish mutant, fantome (fan, which harbors a point mutation and predicted premature stop codon in zebrafish wdr43, the ortholog to yeast UTP5. Although wdr43 mRNA is widely expressed during early zebrafish development, and its deficiency triggers early neural, eye, heart and pharyngeal arch defects, later defects appear fairly restricted to NCC derived craniofacial cartilages. Here we show that the C-terminus of Wdr43, which is absent in fan mutant protein, is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its nucleolar localization and protein interactions in metazoans. We demonstrate that Wdr43 functions in ribosome biogenesis, and that defects observed in fan mutants are mediated by a p53 dependent pathway. Finally, we show that proper localization of a variety of nucleolar proteins, including TCOF1, is dependent on that of WDR43. Together, our findings provide new insight into roles for Wdr43 in development, ribosome biogenesis, and also ribosomopathy-induced craniofacial phenotypes including Treacher-Collins Syndrome.

  10. Illumination of parainfluenza virus infection and transmission in living animals reveals a tissue-specific dichotomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal W Burke

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The parainfluenza viruses (PIVs are highly contagious respiratory paramyxoviruses and a leading cause of lower respiratory tract (LRT disease. Since no vaccines or antivirals exist, non-pharmaceutical interventions are the only means of control for these pathogens. Here we used bioluminescence imaging to visualize the spatial and temporal progression of murine PIV1 (Sendai virus infection in living mice after intranasal inoculation or exposure by contact. A non-attenuated luciferase reporter virus (rSeV-luc(M-F* that expressed high levels of luciferase yet was phenotypically similar to wild-type Sendai virus in vitro and in vivo was generated to allow visualization. After direct intranasal inoculation, we unexpectedly observed that the upper respiratory tract (URT and trachea supported robust infection under conditions that result in little infection or pathology in the lungs including a low inoculum of virus, an attenuated virus, and strains of mice genetically resistant to lung infection. The high permissivity of the URT and trachea to infection resulted in 100% transmission to naïve contact recipients, even after low-dose (70 PFU inoculation of genetically resistant BALB/c donor mice. The timing of transmission was consistent with the timing of high viral titers in the URT and trachea of donor animals but was independent of the levels of infection in the lungs of donors. The data therefore reveals a disconnect between transmissibility, which is associated with infection in the URT, and pathogenesis, which arises from infection in the lungs and the immune response. Natural infection after transmission was universally robust in the URT and trachea yet limited in the lungs, inducing protective immunity without weight loss even in genetically susceptible 129/SvJ mice. Overall, these results reveal a dichotomy between PIV infection in the URT and trachea versus the lungs and define a new model for studies of pathogenesis, development of live

  11. Explaining Social Exclusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerda Jehoel-Gijsbers; Cok Vrooman

    2007-01-01

    Although social exclusion has become a key issue on the European policy agenda in recent years, both the social phenomena the term refers to and the best way to monitor these remain unclear. In response to this, we developed a conceptual model for social exclusion and a methodology for its

  12. Social Exclusion Anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Dorte Marie

    2017-01-01

    exclusion anxiety and longing for belonging are both central aspects of the affects and processes that enact and challenge social groups. Social exclusion anxiety should not be confused with ‘social phobia’, which is a concept within clinical psychology that focuses on the individual and refers to a phobic...

  13. Tissue-Specific and Cation/Anion-Specific DNA Methylation Variations Occurred in C. virgata in Response to Salinity Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Cao, Donghui; Liu, Jie; Wang, Xiaoping; Geng, Shujuan; Liu, Bao; Shi, Decheng

    2013-01-01

    Salinity is a widespread environmental problem limiting productivity and growth of plants. Halophytes which can adapt and resist certain salt stress have various mechanisms to defend the higher salinity and alkalinity, and epigenetic mechanisms especially DNA methylation may play important roles in plant adaptability and plasticity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the different influences of various single salts (NaCl, Na2SO4, NaHCO3, Na2CO3) and their mixed salts on halophyte Chloris. virgata from the DNA methylation prospective, and discover the underlying relationships between specific DNA methylation variations and specific cations/anions through the methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis. The results showed that the effects on DNA methylation variations of single salts were ranked as follows: Na2CO3> NaHCO3> Na2SO4> NaCl, and their mixed salts exerted tissue-specific effects on C. virgata seedlings. Eight types of DNA methylation variations were detected and defined in C. virgata according to the specific cations/anions existed in stressful solutions; in addition, mix-specific and higher pH-specific bands were the main type in leaves and roots independently. These findings suggested that mixed salts were not the simple combination of single salts. Furthermore, not only single salts but also mixed salts showed tissue-specific and cations/anions-specific DNA methylation variations. PMID:24223802

  14. Opposing tissue-specific roles of angiotensin in the pathogenesis of obesity, and implications for obesity-related hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, Nicole K.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disease, specifically obesity, has now become the greatest challenge to improving cardiovascular health. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists as both a circulating hormone system and as a local paracrine signaling mechanism within various tissues including the brain, kidney, and adipose, and this system is strongly implicated in cardiovascular health and disease. Growing evidence also implicates the RAS in the control of energy balance, supporting the concept that the RAS may be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and obesity hypertension. Here, we review the involvement of the RAS in the entire spectrum of whole organism energy balance mechanisms, including behaviors (food ingestion and spontaneous physical activity) and biological processes (digestive efficiency and both aerobic and nonaerobic resting metabolic rates). We hypothesize that opposing, tissue-specific effects of the RAS to modulate these various components of energy balance can explain the apparently paradoxical results reported by energy-balance studies that involve stimulating, versus disrupting, the RAS. We propose a model in which such opposing and tissue-specific effects of the RAS can explain the failure of simple, global RAS blockade to result in weight loss in humans, and hypothesize that obesity-mediated uncoupling of endogenous metabolic rate control mechanisms can explain the phenomenon of obesity-related hypertension. PMID:26491099

  15. Tissue-specific programming of memory CD8 T cell subsets impacts protection against lethal respiratory virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Georges; Desai, Pritesh; Dastmalchi, Farhad; Stanfield, Jessica; Tahiliani, Vikas; Hutchinson, Tarun E; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram

    2016-12-12

    How tissue-specific anatomical distribution and phenotypic specialization are linked to protective efficacy of memory T cells against reinfection is unclear. Here, we show that lung environmental cues program recently recruited central-like memory cells with migratory potentials for their tissue-specific functions during lethal respiratory virus infection. After entering the lung, some central-like cells retain their original CD27hiCXCR3hi phenotype, enabling them to localize near the infected bronchiolar epithelium and airway lumen to function as the first line of defense against pathogen encounter. Others, in response to local cytokine triggers, undergo a secondary program of differentiation that leads to the loss of CXCR3, migration arrest, and clustering within peribronchoarterial areas and in interalveolar septa. Here, the immune system adapts its response to prevent systemic viral dissemination and mortality. These results reveal the striking and unexpected spatial organization of central- versus effector-like memory cells within the lung and how cooperation between these two subsets contributes to host defense. © 2016 Abboud et al.

  16. Markers of tissue-specific insulin resistance predict the worsening of hyperglycemia, incident type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fízel'ová, Mária; FízeI'ová, Mária; Cederberg, Henna; Stančáková, Alena; Jauhiainen, Raimo; Vangipurapu, Jagadish; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the ability of surrogate markers of tissue-specific insulin resistance (IR, Matsuda IR, Adipocyte IR, Liver IR) to predict deterioration of hyperglycemia, incident type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular events in the Metabolic Syndrome in Men (METSIM) Study. The METSIM Study includes 10,197 Finnish men, aged 45-73 years, and examined in 2005-2010. A total of 558 of 8,749 non-diabetic participants at baseline were diagnosed with new-onset diabetes and 239 with a new CVD event during a 5.9-year follow-up of this cohort (2010-2013). Compared to fasting plasma insulin level, Matsuda IR (IR in skeletal muscle) and Adipocyte IR were significantly better predictors of 2-hour plasma glucose and glucose area under the curve after adjustment for confounding factors. Liver IR was the strongest predictor of both incident type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio = 1.83, 95% confidence interval: 1.68-1.98) and cardiovascular events (hazard ratio = 1.31, 95% confidence interval: 1.15-1.48). Hazard ratios for fasting insulin were 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 1.32-1.42) and 1.11 (95% confidence interval: 1.00-1.24), respectively. Tissue-specific markers of IR, Matsuda IR and Adipocyte IR, were superior to fasting plasma insulin level in predicting worsening of hyperglycemia, and Liver IR was superior to fasting insulin level in predicting incident type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular events.

  17. Opposing tissue-specific roles of angiotensin in the pathogenesis of obesity, and implications for obesity-related hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, Nicole K; Grobe, Justin L

    2015-12-15

    Metabolic disease, specifically obesity, has now become the greatest challenge to improving cardiovascular health. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists as both a circulating hormone system and as a local paracrine signaling mechanism within various tissues including the brain, kidney, and adipose, and this system is strongly implicated in cardiovascular health and disease. Growing evidence also implicates the RAS in the control of energy balance, supporting the concept that the RAS may be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and obesity hypertension. Here, we review the involvement of the RAS in the entire spectrum of whole organism energy balance mechanisms, including behaviors (food ingestion and spontaneous physical activity) and biological processes (digestive efficiency and both aerobic and nonaerobic resting metabolic rates). We hypothesize that opposing, tissue-specific effects of the RAS to modulate these various components of energy balance can explain the apparently paradoxical results reported by energy-balance studies that involve stimulating, versus disrupting, the RAS. We propose a model in which such opposing and tissue-specific effects of the RAS can explain the failure of simple, global RAS blockade to result in weight loss in humans, and hypothesize that obesity-mediated uncoupling of endogenous metabolic rate control mechanisms can explain the phenomenon of obesity-related hypertension. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Comparative genomic organization and tissue-specific transcription of the duplicated fabp7 and fabp10 genes in teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Manoj B; Wright, Jonathan M

    2013-11-01

    A whole-genome duplication (WGD) early in the teleost fish lineage makes fish ideal organisms to study the fate of duplicated genes and underlying evolutionary trajectories that have led to the retention of ohnologous gene duplicates in fish genomes. Here, we compare the genomic organization and tissue-specific transcription of the ohnologous fabp7 and fabp10 genes in medaka, three-spined stickleback, and spotted green pufferfish to the well-studied duplicated fabp7 and fabp10 genes of zebrafish. Teleost fabp7 and fabp10 genes contain four exons interrupted by three introns. Polypeptide sequences of Fabp7 and Fabp10 show the highest sequence identity and similarity with their orthologs from vertebrates. Orthology was evident as the ohnologous Fabp7 and Fabp10 polypeptides of teleost fishes each formed distinct clades and clustered together with their orthologs from other vertebrates in a phylogenetic tree. Furthermore, ohnologous teleost fabp7 and fabp10 genes exhibit conserved gene synteny with human FABP7 and chicken FABP10, respectively, which provides compelling evidence that the duplicated fabp7 and fabp10 genes of teleost fishes most likely arose from the well-documented WGD. The tissue-specific distribution of fabp7a, fabp7b, fabp10a, and fabp10b transcripts provides evidence of diverged spatial transcriptional regulation between ohnologous gene duplicates of fabp7 and fabp10 in teleost fishes.

  19. Tissue-specific and cation/anion-specific DNA methylation variations occurred in C. virgata in response to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Cao, Donghui; Liu, Jie; Wang, Xiaoping; Geng, Shujuan; Liu, Bao; Shi, Decheng

    2013-01-01

    Salinity is a widespread environmental problem limiting productivity and growth of plants. Halophytes which can adapt and resist certain salt stress have various mechanisms to defend the higher salinity and alkalinity, and epigenetic mechanisms especially DNA methylation may play important roles in plant adaptability and plasticity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the different influences of various single salts (NaCl, Na2SO4, NaHCO3, Na2CO3) and their mixed salts on halophyte Chloris. virgata from the DNA methylation prospective, and discover the underlying relationships between specific DNA methylation variations and specific cations/anions through the methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis. The results showed that the effects on DNA methylation variations of single salts were ranked as follows: Na2CO3> NaHCO3> Na2SO4> NaCl, and their mixed salts exerted tissue-specific effects on C. virgata seedlings. Eight types of DNA methylation variations were detected and defined in C. virgata according to the specific cations/anions existed in stressful solutions; in addition, mix-specific and higher pH-specific bands were the main type in leaves and roots independently. These findings suggested that mixed salts were not the simple combination of single salts. Furthermore, not only single salts but also mixed salts showed tissue-specific and cations/anions-specific DNA methylation variations.

  20. Tissue-specific changes of glutamine synthetase activity in oats after rhizosphere infestation by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, T.J. [Univ. of Southern Maine, Portland, ME (United States); Temple, S.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Curces, NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-15

    Oats (Avena sativa L. lodi) tolerant of rhizosphere infestation by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci when challenged by the pathogen experience tissue-specific alterations of ammonia assimilatory capabilities. Altered ammonia assimilatory potentials between root and leaf tissue result from selective inactivation of glutamine synthetase (GS) by the toxin Tabtoxinine-B-lactam (TBL). Root GS is sensitive and leaf GSs are resistant to TBL inactivation. With prolonged challenge by the pathogen root GS activity decreases but leaf GS specific activity increase. Higher leaf GS activity is due to decreased rates of degradation rather than increased GS synthesis. Higher leaf GS activity and elevated levels of GS polypeptide appear to result from a limited interaction between GS and TBL leading to the accumulation of a less active but more stable GS holoenzyme. Tolerant challenged oats besides surviving rhizosphere infestation, experience enhanced growth. A strong correlation exists between leaf GS activity and whole plant fresh weight, suggesting that tissue-specific changes in ammonia assimilatory capability provides the plant a more efficient mechanism for uptake and utilization of nitrogen.

  1. Tissue Discrimination by Uncorrected Autofluorescence Spectra: A Proof-of-Principle Study for Tissue-Specific Laser Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Tangermann-Gerk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser surgery provides a number of advantages over conventional surgery. However, it implies large risks for sensitive tissue structures due to its characteristic non-tissue-specific ablation. The present study investigates the discrimination of nine different ex vivo tissue types by using uncorrected (raw autofluorescence spectra for the development of a remote feedback control system for tissue-selective laser surgery. Autofluorescence spectra (excitation wavelength 377 ± 50 nm were measured from nine different ex vivo tissue types, obtained from 15 domestic pig cadavers. For data analysis, a wavelength range between 450 nm and 650 nm was investigated. Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA were used to discriminate the tissue types. ROC analysis showed that PCA, followed by QDA, could differentiate all investigated tissue types with AUC results between 1.00 and 0.97. Sensitivity reached values between 93% and 100% and specificity values between 94% and 100%. This ex vivo study shows a high differentiation potential for physiological tissue types when performing autofluorescence spectroscopy followed by PCA and QDA. The uncorrected autofluorescence spectra are suitable for reliable tissue discrimination and have a high potential to meet the challenges necessary for an optical feedback system for tissue-specific laser surgery.

  2. An Intergenic Region Shared by At4g35985 and At4g35987 in Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Tissue Specific and Stress Inducible Bidirectional Promoter Analyzed in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Tobacco Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Joydeep; Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Dey, Nrisingha; Houtz, Robert L.; Maiti, Indu Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    On chromosome 4 in the Arabidopsis genome, two neighboring genes (calmodulin methyl transferase At4g35987 and senescence associated gene At4g35985) are located in a head-to-head divergent orientation sharing a putative bidirectional promoter. This 1258 bp intergenic region contains a number of environmental stress responsive and tissue specific cis-regulatory elements. Transcript analysis of At4g35985 and At4g35987 genes by quantitative real time PCR showed tissue specific and stress inducible expression profiles. We tested the bidirectional promoter-function of the intergenic region shared by the divergent genes At4g35985 and At4g35987 using two reporter genes (GFP and GUS) in both orientations in transient tobacco protoplast and Agro-infiltration assays, as well as in stably transformed transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. In transient assays with GFP and GUS reporter genes the At4g35985 promoter (P85) showed stronger expression (about 3.5 fold) compared to the At4g35987 promoter (P87). The tissue specific as well as stress responsive functional nature of the bidirectional promoter was evaluated in independent transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco lines. Expression of P85 activity was detected in the midrib of leaves, leaf trichomes, apical meristemic regions, throughout the root, lateral roots and flowers. The expression of P87 was observed in leaf-tip, hydathodes, apical meristem, root tips, emerging lateral root tips, root stele region and in floral tissues. The bidirectional promoter in both orientations shows differential up-regulation (2.5 to 3 fold) under salt stress. Use of such regulatory elements of bidirectional promoters showing spatial and stress inducible promoter-functions in heterologous system might be an important tool for plant biotechnology and gene stacking applications. PMID:24260266

  3. An intergenic region shared by At4g35985 and At4g35987 in Arabidopsis thaliana is a tissue specific and stress inducible bidirectional promoter analyzed in transgenic arabidopsis and tobacco plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joydeep Banerjee

    Full Text Available On chromosome 4 in the Arabidopsis genome, two neighboring genes (calmodulin methyl transferase At4g35987 and senescence associated gene At4g35985 are located in a head-to-head divergent orientation sharing a putative bidirectional promoter. This 1258 bp intergenic region contains a number of environmental stress responsive and tissue specific cis-regulatory elements. Transcript analysis of At4g35985 and At4g35987 genes by quantitative real time PCR showed tissue specific and stress inducible expression profiles. We tested the bidirectional promoter-function of the intergenic region shared by the divergent genes At4g35985 and At4g35987 using two reporter genes (GFP and GUS in both orientations in transient tobacco protoplast and Agro-infiltration assays, as well as in stably transformed transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. In transient assays with GFP and GUS reporter genes the At4g35985 promoter (P85 showed stronger expression (about 3.5 fold compared to the At4g35987 promoter (P87. The tissue specific as well as stress responsive functional nature of the bidirectional promoter was evaluated in independent transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco lines. Expression of P85 activity was detected in the midrib of leaves, leaf trichomes, apical meristemic regions, throughout the root, lateral roots and flowers. The expression of P87 was observed in leaf-tip, hydathodes, apical meristem, root tips, emerging lateral root tips, root stele region and in floral tissues. The bidirectional promoter in both orientations shows differential up-regulation (2.5 to 3 fold under salt stress. Use of such regulatory elements of bidirectional promoters showing spatial and stress inducible promoter-functions in heterologous system might be an important tool for plant biotechnology and gene stacking applications.

  4. Angiopoietin-1 upregulates de novo expression of IL-1β and Il1-Ra, and the exclusive release of Il1-Ra from human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Lydia E; Sirois, Martin G

    2014-01-01

    The expression of the angiopoietin (Ang) receptor, Tie2, on both endothelial and inflammatory cells supports the idea that Ang signaling may play a fundamental role in initiating and maintaining the inflammatory response. We have previously shown that Ang1 and/or Ang2 alter the innate immune response by enhancing human neutrophil survival, chemotaxis and production of inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that Ang1 and Ang2 could modulate other inflammatory signals in neutrophils, a possibility we explored through a gene-based assay looking at changes in the mRNA expression of 84 inflammatory cytokines and their receptors. We observed that Ang1 (10(-8) M), but not Ang2, increased mRNA expression of prominent pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and its natural antagonist IL-1RA, by up to 32.6- and 10.0-fold respectively, compared to PBS-control. The effects of Ang1 extended to the proteins, as Ang1 increased intracellular levels of precursor and mature IL-1β, and extracellular levels of IL-1RA proteins, by up to 4.2-, 5.0- and 4.4-fold respectively, compared to PBS-control. Interestingly, Ang1 failed at inducing IL-1β protein release or at increasing intracellular IL-1RA, but the ratio of IL-1RA to mature IL-1β remained above 100-fold molar excess inside and outside the cells. The above-noted effects of Ang1 were mediated by MAP kinases, whereby inhibiting MEK1/2 lead to up to 70% effect reduction, whereas the blockade of p38MAPK activity doubled Ang1's effect. These findings suggest that Ang1 selectively alters the balance of neutrophil-derived inflammatory cytokines, favoring the blockade of IL-1 activity, a consideration for future therapies of inflammatory diseases.

  5. Angiopoietin-1 upregulates de novo expression of IL-1β and Il1-Ra, and the exclusive release of Il1-Ra from human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia E Haddad

    Full Text Available The expression of the angiopoietin (Ang receptor, Tie2, on both endothelial and inflammatory cells supports the idea that Ang signaling may play a fundamental role in initiating and maintaining the inflammatory response. We have previously shown that Ang1 and/or Ang2 alter the innate immune response by enhancing human neutrophil survival, chemotaxis and production of inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8 in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that Ang1 and Ang2 could modulate other inflammatory signals in neutrophils, a possibility we explored through a gene-based assay looking at changes in the mRNA expression of 84 inflammatory cytokines and their receptors. We observed that Ang1 (10(-8 M, but not Ang2, increased mRNA expression of prominent pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and its natural antagonist IL-1RA, by up to 32.6- and 10.0-fold respectively, compared to PBS-control. The effects of Ang1 extended to the proteins, as Ang1 increased intracellular levels of precursor and mature IL-1β, and extracellular levels of IL-1RA proteins, by up to 4.2-, 5.0- and 4.4-fold respectively, compared to PBS-control. Interestingly, Ang1 failed at inducing IL-1β protein release or at increasing intracellular IL-1RA, but the ratio of IL-1RA to mature IL-1β remained above 100-fold molar excess inside and outside the cells. The above-noted effects of Ang1 were mediated by MAP kinases, whereby inhibiting MEK1/2 lead to up to 70% effect reduction, whereas the blockade of p38MAPK activity doubled Ang1's effect. These findings suggest that Ang1 selectively alters the balance of neutrophil-derived inflammatory cytokines, favoring the blockade of IL-1 activity, a consideration for future therapies of inflammatory diseases.

  6. [Exclusive breastfeeding in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-de Cossío, Teresita; Escobar-Zaragoza, Leticia; González-Castell, Dinorah; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Rivera-Dommarco, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of exclusive breastfeeding in Breastfeeding indicators from WHO-2008 were calculated. We estimated the effect modifier EBFBreastfeeding promotion, protection and support must be targeted mainly at the most vulnerable, food insecure families.

  7. Exclusive reactions in QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Pire, Bernard

    1996-01-01

    We review the theory of hard exclusive scattering in Quantum Chromodynamics. After recalling the classical counting rules which describe the leading scale dependence of form factors and exclusive cross-sections at fixed angle, the pedagogical example of the pion form factor is developped in some detail in order to show explicitely what factorization means in the QCD framework. The picture generalizes to many hard reactions which are at the heart of the ELFE project. We briefly present the con...

  8. Deprivation and Social Exclusion

    OpenAIRE

    BOSSERT, Walter; D'AMBROSIO, Conchita; PERAGINE, Vito

    2004-01-01

    Social exclusion manifests itself in the lack of an individual’s access to functionings as compared to other members of society. Thus, the concept is closely related to deprivation. We view deprivation as having two basic determinants: the lack of identification with other members of society and the aggregate alienation experienced by an agent with respect to those with fewer functioning failures. We use an axiomatic approach to characterize classes of deprivation and exclusion measures and a...

  9. Effects of chronic waterborne cadmium and zinc interactions on tissue-specific metal accumulation and reproduction in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessnack, Melissa K; Jamwal, Ankur; Niyogi, Som

    2017-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the interactive effects of chronic waterborne cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) on tissue-specific metal accumulation and reproduction in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Trios (1 male: 2 female; n=6-7) of fish were exposed for 21 days to: (i) control (no added Cd or Zn), (ii) waterborne Cd (7µg/L), (iii) waterborne Zn (170µg/L), and (iv) Cd and Zn in mixture (7 and 170µg/L, respectively). Exposure to Cd or Zn alone did not elicit any significant effect on reproductive output (cumulative egg production) relative to the control, however exposure to Cd and Zn in mixture resulted in a ~50% decrease in fish fecundity. Plasma estradiol in females was reduced by Cd and Zn exposures, both individually and in mixture, with the maximum reduction in the metal mixture exposure. The expression of hepatic estrogen receptor genes (ER-α and ER-β) in females was affected by exposure to Zn, alone and in mixture with Cd, but not to Cd alone, whereas hepatic vitellogenin gene expression was downregulated across all treatments. Increased follicular atresia in the ovary was also recorded, but only in fish exposed to Cd and Zn in mixture. The interactions of Cd and Zn in mixture decreased Cd accumulation in tissues (gill and liver), however no reciprocal reduction in tissue Zn accumulation was observed. In addition, the expression of the hepatic metallothionein gene was upregulated following exposure to Zn, alone and in combination with Cd, with no additive effects in the latter treatment. Overall, our findings suggest that chronic exposure to waterborne Cd and Zn in mixture may induce additive reproductive toxicity, essentially by disrupting estrogen-mediated functions in fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tissue-specific deletion of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor protects mice from virus-induced pancreatitis and myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallewaard, Nicole L; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Jin-Wen; Guttenberg, Marta; Sanchez, Melissa D; Bergelson, Jeffrey M

    2009-07-23

    In cultured cells, infection by group B coxsackievirus (CVB) is mediated by the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), but the importance of this molecule in CVB-induced disease has not been determined. We generated mice with tissue-specific ablation of CAR within each of two major CVB target organs, the pancreas and heart. In the pancreas, deletion of CAR resulted in a significant reduction in both virus titers and virus-induced tissue damage. Similarly, cardiomyocyte-specific CAR deletion resulted in a marked reduction in virus titer, infection-associated cytokine production, and histopathology within the heart. Consistent with the in vivo phenotype, CAR-deficient cardiomyocytes resisted infection in vitro. These results demonstrate a critical function for CAR in the pathogenesis of CVB infection in vivo and in virus tropism for the heart and pancreas.

  11. Tissue-specific deletion of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protects mice from virus-induced pancreatitis and myocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallewaard, Nicole L.; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Jin-Wen; Guttenberg, Marta; Sanchez, Melissa D.; Bergelson, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In cultured cells, infection by Group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) is mediated by the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), but the importance of this molecule in CVB disease has not been determined. We used tissue-specific CAR gene deletion to generate mice that lacked CAR within each of two major CVB target organs, the pancreas and heart. Deletion of CAR from the pancreas resulted in a 1000-fold reduction in virus titers within the pancreas during infection, and a significant reduction in virus-induced tissue damage and inflammation. Similarly, cardiomyocyte-specific CAR deletion resulted in a 100-fold reduction in virus titer within the heart, and a marked reduction in cytokine production and histopathology. Although primary cardiomyocytes from control animals were susceptible to virus infection, CAR-deficient cardiomyocytes resisted infection in vitro. These results demonstrate a critical function for CAR in the pathogenesis of CVB infection in vivo, and in virus tropism for the heart and pancreas. PMID:19616768

  12. A model for the relative biological effectiveness of protons: the tissue specific parameter α/β of photons is a predictor for the sensitivity to LET changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedenberg, Minna; Lind, Bengt K; Hårdemark, Björn

    2013-04-01

    The biological effects of particles are often expressed in relation to that of photons through the concept of relative biological effectiveness, RBE. In proton radiotherapy, a constant RBE of 1.1 is usually assumed. However, there is experimental evidence that RBE depends on various factors. The aim of this study is to develop a model to predict the RBE based on linear energy transfer (LET), dose, and the tissue specific parameter α/β of the linear-quadratic model for the reference radiation. Moreover, the model should capture the basic features of the RBE using a minimum of assumptions, each supported by experimental data. The α and β parameters for protons were studied with respect to their dependence on LET. An RBE model was proposed where the dependence of LET is affected by the (α/β)phot ratio of photons. Published cell survival data with a range of well-defined LETs and cell types were selected for model evaluation rendering a total of 10 cell lines and 24 RBE values. A statistically significant relation was found between α for protons and LET. Moreover, the strength of that relation varied significantly with (α/β)phot. In contrast, no significant relation between β and LET was found. On the whole, the resulting RBE model provided a significantly improved fit (p-value evaluation of treatment plans is that it only requires dose, LET, and (α/β)phot as input parameters. Hence, no proton specific biological parameters are needed.

  13. Tissue-specific conditional CCM2 knockout mice establish the essential role of endothelial CCM2 in angiogenesis: implications for human cerebral cavernous malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulday, Gwénola; Blécon, Anne; Petit, Nathalie; Chareyre, Fabrice; Garcia, Luis A.; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Giovannini, Marco; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular malformations of the brain that lead to cerebral hemorrhages. In 20% of CCM patients, this results from an autosomal dominant condition caused by loss-of-function mutations in one of the three CCM genes. High expression levels of the CCM genes in the neuroepithelium indicate that CCM lesions might be caused by a loss of function of these genes in neural cells rather than in vascular cells. However, their in vivo function, particularly during cerebral angiogenesis, is totally unknown. We developed mice with constitutive and tissue-specific CCM2 deletions to investigate CCM2 function in vivo. Constitutive deletion of CCM2 leads to early embryonic death. Deletion of CCM2 from neuroglial precursor cells does not lead to cerebrovascular defects, whereas CCM2 is required in endothelial cells for proper vascular development. Deletion of CCM2 from endothelial cells severely affects angiogenesis, leading to morphogenic defects in the major arterial and venous blood vessels and in the heart, and results in embryonic lethality at mid-gestation. These findings establish the essential role of endothelial CCM2 for proper vascular development and strongly suggest that the endothelial cell is the primary target in the cascade of events leading from CCM2 mutations to CCM cerebrovascular lesions. PMID:19259391

  14. Generation of porcine fibroblasts overexpressing 11β-HSD1 with adipose tissue-specific aP2 promoter as a porcine model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eui-Man; An, Beum-Soo; Kim, Yu-Kyung; Jeong, Young-Hee; Hwang, Woo-Suk; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome arises from a combination of disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. In previous studies, it was observed that overexpression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) induced obesity and the insulin resistance that accompanies metabolic syndrome in rodent adipose tissue. Based on these observations, it was hypothesized that overexpression of 11β-HSD1 may be suitable for the generation of a porcine model of metabolic syndrome. It was evaluated that promoter activities of the porcine adipose fatty acid-binding protein (aP2) gene generates adipose tissue-specific 11β-HSD1 expression. In adipose tissue, the maximum promoter activity (-2,826 to +51 nt) of aP2 was 200-fold higher than that of a promoterless construct. In addition, 11β-HSD1 transcriptional levels were significantly increased following the introduction of the aP2 promoter into 3T3‑L1 adipocytes. These observations indicate that the aP2 promoter may facilitate 11β-HSD1 overexpression in porcine adipose tissue. Transgenic fibroblasts were generated containing 11β-HSD1 cDNA controlled by the aP2 promoter with two screening markers, green fluorescence protein and a neomycin-resistance gene. It was hypothesized that transgenic fibroblasts may be useful for generating a porcine model of metabolic syndrome.

  15. Tissue specific diurnal rhythms of metabolites and their regulation during herbivore attack in a native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Gyu Kim

    Full Text Available Ecological performance is all about timing and the endogenous clock that allows the entrainment of rhythms and anticipation of fitness-determining events is being rapidly characterized. How plants anticipate daily abiotic stresses, such as cold in early mornings and drought at noon, as well as biotic stresses, such as the timing of pathogen infections, is being explored, but little is known about the clock's role in regulating responses to insect herbivores and mutualists, whose behaviors are known to be strongly diurnally regulated and whose attack is known to reconfigure plant metabolomes. We developed a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry procedure and analyzed its output with model-based peak picking algorithms to identify metabolites with diurnal accumulation patterns in sink/source leaves and roots in an unbiased manner. The response of metabolites with strong diurnal patterns to simulated attack from the specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta larvae was analyzed and annotated with in-house and public databases. Roots and leaves had largely different rhythms and only 10 ions of 182 oscillating ions in leaves and 179 oscillating ions in roots were rhythmic in both tissues: root metabolites mainly peaked at dusk or night, while leaf metabolites peaked during the day. Many oscillating metabolites showed tissue-specific regulation by simulated herbivory of which systemic responses in unattacked tissues were particularly pronounced. Diurnal and herbivory-elicited accumulation patterns of disaccharide, phenylalanine, tyrosine, lyciumoside I, coumaroyl tyramine, 12-oxophytodienoic acid and jasmonic acid and those of their related biosynthetic transcripts were examined in detail. We conclude that oscillating metabolites of N. attenuata accumulate in a highly tissue-specific manner and the patterns reveal pronounced diurnal rhythms in the generalized and specialized metabolism that mediates the plant's responses to herbivores and mutualists. We

  16. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for optical soft tissue differentiation as remote feedback control for tissue-specific laser surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzle, Florian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Zam, Azhar; Schmidt, Michael; Douplik, Alexandre; Nkenke, Emeka

    2010-04-01

    Laser surgery does not provide haptic feedback for operating layer-by-layer and thereby preserving vulnerable anatomical structures like nerve tissue or blood vessels. Diffuse reflectance spectra can facilitate remote optical tissue differentiation. It is the aim of the study to use this technique on soft tissue samples, to set a technological basis for a remote optical feedback system for tissue-specific laser surgery. Diffuse reflectance spectra (wavelength range: 350-650 nm) of ex vivo types of soft tissue (a total of 10,800 spectra) of the midfacial region of domestic pigs were remotely measured under reduced environmental light conditions and analyzed in order to differentiate between skin, mucosa, muscle, subcutaneous fat, and nerve tissue. We performed a principal components (PC) analysis (PCA) to reduce the number of variables. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was utilized for classification. For the tissue differentiation, we calculated the specificity and sensitivity by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and the area under curve (AUC). Six PCs were found to be adequate for tissue differentiation with diffuse reflectance spectra using LDA. All of the types of soft tissue could be differentiated with high specificity and sensitivity. Only the tissue pairs nervous tissue/fatty tissue and nervous tissue/mucosa showed a decline of differentiation due to bio-structural similarity. However, both of these tissue pairs could still be differentiated with a specificity and sensitivity of more than 90%. Analyzing diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with PCA and LDA allows for remote differentiation of biological tissue. Considering the limitations of the ex vivo conditions, the obtained results are promising and set a basis for the further development of a feedback system for tissue-specific laser surgery. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Expression of UGT2B7 is driven by two mutually exclusive promoters and alternative splicing in human tissues: changes from prenatal life to adulthood and in kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Vincent; Lévesque, Eric; Chen, Sylvia; Eap, Olivier; Joy, Melanie S; Ekström, Lena; Rane, Anders; Guillemette, Chantal

    2013-12-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 (UGT2B7) plays a major detoxification role in commonly prescribed drugs and endogenous lipophilic molecules. Additional exons and multiple alternative splicing events (ASEs) at the UGT2B7 locus were recently discovered. Novel and classical ASEs were quantified in 27 human tissues, as well as in fetal and tumoral tissues. The activity of the alternative UGT2B7 promoters was studied in cell lines. UGT2B7 expression is driven by an alternate promoter 1a associated with transcripts containing exon 1b, which is located ∼44 kb upstream of the known promoter 1 associated with transcripts containing exon 1 required for enzyme activity. The exon 1 was expressed most abundantly in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, whereas exon 1b was expressed predominantly in other extrahepatic tissues. Experimental evidence indicated endogenous translation that yields alternative UGT2B7s derived from the use of exon 1b are enzymatically inactive. Alternate 5' ASE predominates in fetal tissues (kidney, lung) and kidney tumor samples compared with normal adult kidney. These changes further correlate with reduced glucuronidation in neoplastic kidneys. This differential expression pattern was further confirmed using four liver and kidney cell lines and was consistent with the differential usage of alternate promoters in hepatic (promoter 1) and kidney cells (1a). UGT2B7 is characterized by two mutually exclusive exons 1, both flanked by a unique 5' promoter region. Data also indicated a switch toward functional enzyme upon maturation in the kidney and reversal of this process in neoplastic cells, considerably modifying the glucuronidation potential across human tissues and cells.

  18. Utilization of a state run public private emergency transportation service exclusively for childbirth: the Janani (maternal Express program in Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Sidney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2009 the state government of Madhya Pradesh, India launched an emergency obstetric transportation service, Janani Express Yojana (JEY, to support the cash transfer program that promotes institutional delivery. JEY, a large scale public private partnership, lowers geographical access barriers to facility based care. The state contracts and pays private agencies to provide emergency transportation at no cost to the user. The objective was to study (a the utilization of JEY among women delivering in health facilities, (b factors associated with usage, (c the timeliness of the service. METHODS: A cross sectional facility based study was conducted in facilities that carried out > ten deliveries a month. Researchers who spent five days in each facility administered a questionnaire to all women who gave birth there to elicit socio-demographic characteristics and transport related details. RESULTS: 35% of women utilised JEY to reach a facility, however utilization varied between study districts. Uptake was highest among women from rural areas (44%, scheduled tribes (55%, and poorly educated women (40%. Living in rural areas and belonging to scheduled tribes were significant predictors for JEY usage. Almost 1/3 of JEY users (n = 104 experienced a transport related delay. DISCUSSION: The JEY service model complements the cash transfer program by providing transport to a facility to give birth. A study of the distribution of utilization in population subgroups suggests the intervention was successful in reaching the most vulnerable population, promoting equity in access. While 1/3 of women utilized the service and it saved them money; 30% experienced significant transport related delays in reaching a facility, which is comparable to women using public transportation. Further research is needed to understand why utilization is low, to explore if there is a need for service expansion at the community level and to improve the overall time

  19. Utilization of a state run public private emergency transportation service exclusively for childbirth: the Janani (maternal) Express program in Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidney, Kristi; Ryan, Kayleigh; Diwan, Vishal; De Costa, Ayesha

    2014-01-01

    In 2009 the state government of Madhya Pradesh, India launched an emergency obstetric transportation service, Janani Express Yojana (JEY), to support the cash transfer program that promotes institutional delivery. JEY, a large scale public private partnership, lowers geographical access barriers to facility based care. The state contracts and pays private agencies to provide emergency transportation at no cost to the user. The objective was to study (a) the utilization of JEY among women delivering in health facilities, (b) factors associated with usage, (c) the timeliness of the service. A cross sectional facility based study was conducted in facilities that carried out > ten deliveries a month. Researchers who spent five days in each facility administered a questionnaire to all women who gave birth there to elicit socio-demographic characteristics and transport related details. 35% of women utilised JEY to reach a facility, however utilization varied between study districts. Uptake was highest among women from rural areas (44%), scheduled tribes (55%), and poorly educated women (40%). Living in rural areas and belonging to scheduled tribes were significant predictors for JEY usage. Almost 1/3 of JEY users (n = 104) experienced a transport related delay. The JEY service model complements the cash transfer program by providing transport to a facility to give birth. A study of the distribution of utilization in population subgroups suggests the intervention was successful in reaching the most vulnerable population, promoting equity in access. While 1/3 of women utilized the service and it saved them money; 30% experienced significant transport related delays in reaching a facility, which is comparable to women using public transportation. Further research is needed to understand why utilization is low, to explore if there is a need for service expansion at the community level and to improve the overall time efficiency of JEY.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of the CCCH zinc finger family identifies tissue specific and stress responsive candidates in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Pradhan

    Full Text Available The CCCH zinc finger is a group of proteins characterised by a typical motif consisting of three cysteine residues and one histidine residue. These proteins have been reported to play important roles in regulation of plant growth, developmental processes and environmental responses. In the present study, genome wide analysis of the CCCH zinc finger gene family was carried out in the available chickpea genome. Various bioinformatics tools were employed to predict 58 CCCH zinc finger genes in chickpea (designated CarC3H1-58, which were analysed for their physio-chemical properties. Phylogenetic analysis classified the proteins into 12 groups in which members of a particular group had similar structural organization. Further, the numbers as well as the types of CCCH motifs present in the CarC3H proteins were compared with those from Arabidopsis and Medicago truncatula. Synteny analysis revealed valuable information regarding the evolution of this gene family. Tandem and segmental duplication events were identified and their Ka/Ks values revealed that the CarC3H gene family in chickpea had undergone purifying selection. Digital, as well as real time qRT-PCR expression analysis was performed which helped in identification of several CarC3H members that expressed preferentially in specific chickpea tissues as well as during abiotic stresses (desiccation, cold, salinity. Moreover, molecular characterization of an important member CarC3H45 was carried out. This study provides comprehensive genomic information about the important CCCH zinc finger gene family in chickpea. The identified tissue specific and abiotic stress specific CCCH genes could be potential candidates for further characterization to delineate their functional roles in development and stress.

  1. Inclusive and Exclusive |Vub|

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrella, Antonio; /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara

    2011-11-17

    The current status of the determinations of CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| via exclusive and inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays is reviewed. The large datasets collected at the B-Factories, and the increased precision of theoretical calculations have allowed an improvement in the determination of |V{sub ub}|. However, there are still significant uncertainties. In the exclusive approach, the most precise measurement of the pion channel branching ratio is obtained by an untagged analysis. This very good precision can be reached by tagged analyses with more data. The problem with exclusive decays is that the strong hadron dynamics can not be calculated from first principles and the determination of the form factor has to rely on light-cone sum rules or lattice QCD calculations. The current data samples allow a comparison of different FF models with data distributions. With further developments on lattice calculations, the theoretical error should shrink to reach the experimental one. The inclusive approach still provides the most precise |V{sub ub}| determinations. With new theoretical calculations, the mild (2.5{sigma}) discrepancy with respect to the |V{sub ub}| value determined from the global UT fit has been reduced. As in the exclusive approach, theoretical uncertainties represent the limiting factor to the precision of the measurement. Reducing the theoretical uncertainties to a level comparable with the statistical error is challenging. New measurements in semileptonic decays of charm mesons could increase the confidence in theoretical calculations and related uncertainties.

  2. Ombuds' Corner: Social exclusion

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN bulletin

    2012-01-01

    In this special video edition of the Ombuds' Corner, Ombudsman Vincent Vuillemin takes a look at a social exclusion at CERN. Please note that the characters and situations appearing in this work are fictitious, and any resemblance to real persons or events is purely coincidental.

  3. Exclusive Production at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Marek

    2016-01-01

    I briefly introduce so-called central exclusive production. I mainly focus on the example analyses that have been performed in the CMS experiment at CERN. I conclude with ideas and perspectives for future work that will be done during Run 2 of the LHC. I pay special attention to the ultraperipheral collisions.

  4. EXCLUSIVELY FOR SIX MONTHS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Infant feeding practices was studied prospectively among 461 mothers who delivered in JU TH and who initially intended to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months. K. Y Result: Four hundred and twenty two (91.5%) of the recruited mothers continued EBFing practice for 6 months, while 25 (5.4%) dropped out from the ...

  5. Ombuds' Corner: Social exclusion

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2012-01-01

    In this special video edition of the Ombuds' Corner, Vincent Vuillemin takes a look at a social exclusion at CERN. Please note that the characters and situations appearing in this work are fictitious, and any resemblance to real persons or events is purely coincidental.   Contact the Ombuds Early!

  6. Life-long Maternal Cafeteria Diet Promotes Tissue-Specific Morphological Changes in Male Offspring Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAROLYNE D.S. SANTOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Here, we evaluated whether the exposure of rats to a cafeteria diet pre- and/or post-weaning, alters histological characteristics in the White Adipose Tissue (WAT, Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT, and liver of adult male offspring. Female Wistar rats were divided into Control (CTL; fed on standard rodent chow and Cafeteria (CAF; fed with the cafeteria diet throughout life, including pregnancy and lactation. After birth, only male offspring (F1 were maintained and received the CTL or CAF diets; originating four experimental groups: CTL-CTLF1; CTL-CAFF1; CAF-CTLF1; CAF-CAFF1. Data of biometrics, metabolic parameters, liver, BAT and WAT histology were assessed and integrated using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA. According to PCA analysis worse metabolic and biometric characteristics in adulthood are associated with the post-weaning CAF diet compared to pre and post weaning CAF diet. Thus, the CTL-CAFF1 group showed obesity, higher deposition of fat in the liver and BAT and high fasting plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol. Interestingly, the association between pre and post-weaning CAF diet attenuated the obesity and improved the plasma levels of glucose and triglycerides compared to CTL-CAFF1 without avoiding the higher lipid accumulation in BAT and in liver, suggesting that the impact of maternal CAF diet is tissue-specific.

  7. Variation in Metabolic Rate among Individuals Is Related to Tissue-Specific Differences in Mitochondrial Leak Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salin, Karine; Auer, Sonya K; Rudolf, Agata M; Anderson, Graeme J; Selman, Colin; Metcalfe, Neil B

    Standard metabolic rate (SMR) and maximum metabolic rate (MMR) typically vary two- or threefold among conspecifics, with both traits assumed to significantly impact fitness. However, the underlying mechanisms that determine such intraspecific variation are not well understood. We examined the influence of mitochondrial properties on intraspecific variation in SMR and MMR and hypothesized that if SMR supports the cost of maintaining the metabolic machinery required for MMR, then the mitochondrial properties underlying these traits should be shared. Mitochondrial respiratory capacity (leak and phosphorylating respiration) and mitochondrial content (cytochrome c oxidase activity) were determined in the liver and white muscle of brown trout Salmo trutta of similar age and maintenance conditions. SMR and MMR were uncorrelated across individuals and were not associated with the same mitochondrial properties, suggesting that they are under the control of separate physiological processes. Moreover, tissue-specific relationships between mitochondrial properties and whole-organism metabolic traits were observed. Specifically, SMR was positively associated with leak respiration in liver mitochondria, while MMR was positively associated with muscle mitochondrial leak respiration and mitochondrial content. These results suggest that a high SMR or MMR, rather than signaling a higher ability for respiration-driven ATP synthesis, may actually reflect greater dissipation of energy, driven by proton leak across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Knowledge of these links should aid interpretation of the potential fitness consequences of such variation in metabolism, given the importance of mitochondria in the utilization of resources and their allocation to performance.

  8. Tissue-Specific Transcriptome and Hormonal Regulation of Pollinated and Parthenocarpic Fig (Ficus carica L. Fruit Suggest that Fruit Ripening is Coordinated by the Reproductive Part of the Syconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogev Rosianski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the unconventional climacteric fig (Ficus carica fruit, pollinated and parthenocarpic fruit of the same genotype exhibit different ripening characteristics. Integrative comparative analyses of tissue-specific transcript and of hormone levels during fruit repining from pollinated vs. parthenocarpic fig fruit were employed to unravel the similarities and differences in their regulatory processes during fruit repining. Assembling tissue-specific transcripts into 147,000 transcripts with 53,000 annotated genes provided new insights into the spatial distribution of many classes of regulatory and structural genes, including those related to color, taste and aroma, storage, protein degradation, seeds and embryos, chlorophyll, and hormones. Comparison of the pollinated and parthenocarpic tissues during fruit ripening showed differential gene expression, especially in the fruit inflorescence. The distinct physiological green phase II and ripening phase III differed significantly in their gene-transcript patterns in both pulp and inflorescence tissues. Gas chromatographic analysis of whole fruits enabled the first determination of ripening-related hormone levels from pollinated and non-pollinated figs. Ethylene and auxin both increased during fruit ripening, irrespective of pollination, whereas no production of active gibberellins or cytokinins was found in parthenocarpic or pollinated ripening fruit. Tissue-specific transcriptome revealed apparent different metabolic gene patterns for ethylene, auxin and ABA in pollinated vs. parthenocarpic fruit, mostly in the fruit inflorescence. Our results demonstrate that the production of abscisic acid (ABA, non-active ABA–GE conjugate and non-active indoleacetic acid (IAA–Asp conjugate in pollinated fruits is much higher than in parthenocarpic fruits. We suggest that fruit ripening is coordinated by the reproductive part of the syconium and the differences in ABA production between pollinated and

  9. The psychology of exclusivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Jollimore

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Friendship and romantic love are, by their very nature, exclusive relationships. This paper suggests that we can better understand the nature of the exclusivity in question by understanding what is wrong with the view of practical reasoning I call the Comprehensive Surveyor View. The CSV claims that practical reasoning, in order to be rational, must be a process of choosing the best available alternative from a perspective that is as detached and objective as possible. But this view, while it means to be neutral between various value-bearers, in fact incorporates a bias against those value-bearers that can only be appreciated from a perspective that is not detached—that can only be appreciated, for instance, by agents who bear long-term commitments to the values in question. In the realm of personal relationships, such commitments tend to give rise to the sort of exclusivity that characterizes friendship and romantic love; they prevent the agent from being impartial between her beloved’s needs, interests, etc., and those of other persons. In such contexts, I suggest, needs and claims of other persons may be silenced in much the way that, as John McDowell has suggested, the temptations of immorality are silenced for the virtuous agent.

  10. A Palaeolithic-type diet causes strong tissue-specific effects on ectopic fat deposition in obese postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, M; Sandberg, S; Mellberg, C; Stegle, O; Lindahl, B; Larsson, C; Hauksson, J; Olsson, T

    2013-07-01

    Ectopic fat accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle may be an essential link between abdominal obesity, insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular disease after menopause. We hypothesized that a diet containing a relatively high content of protein and unsaturated fat [mainly monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)] but limited carbohydrates and saturated fat would reduce lipid content in liver and muscle and increase insulin sensitivity in postmenopausal women. Ten healthy, nonsmoking postmenopausal women with a body mass index (BMI) >27 (28-35) kg m(-2) were included in the study. Participants were instructed to consume an ad libitum Palaeolithic-type diet intended to provide approximately 30 energy percentage (E%) protein, 40 E% fat (mainly MUFAs) and 30 E% carbohydrate. Intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) levels in calf muscles and liver triglyceride levels were quantified using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H-MRS) before and 5 weeks after dietary intervention. Insulin sensitivity was estimated by homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA) indices and the euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp technique. Mean energy intake decreased by 25% with a weight loss of 4.5 kg. BMI, waist and hip circumference, waist/hip ratio and abdominal sagittal diameter also decreased significantly, as did diastolic blood pressure (mean -7 mmHg), levels of fasting serum glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL/HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), urinary C-peptide and HOMA indices. Whole-body insulin sensitivity did not change. Liver triglyceride levels decreased by 49%, whereas IMCL levels in skeletal muscle were not significantly altered. A modified Palaeolithic-type diet has strong and tissue-specific effects on ectopic lipid deposition in postmenopausal women. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  11. Identification of the interactome between fish plasma proteins and Edwardsiella tarda reveals tissue-specific strategies against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Huang, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Zaohai; Peng, Xuan-Xian; Peng, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the complex pathogen-host interaction is essential for a comprehensive understanding of how these remarkable agents invade their hosts and how the hosts defend against these invaders. During the infection, pathogens interact intensively with host to enable their survival, which can be revealed through their interactome. Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen causing huge economic loss in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. E. tarda is an ideal model for host-pathogen investigation as it infects fish in three distinct steps: entering the host, circulating through the blood and establishing infection. We adopted a previous established proteomic approach that inactivated E. tarda cells and covalent crosslink fish plasma proteins were used to capture plasma proteins and bacterial outer membrane proteins, respectively. By the combinatorial use of proteomic and biochemical approaches, six plasma proteins and seven outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were identified. Interactions among these proteins were validated with protein-array, far-Western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation. At last, seventeen plasma protein-bacteria protein-protein interaction were confirmed to be involved in the interaction network, forming a complex interactome. Compared to our previous results, different host proteins were detected, whereas some of the bacterial proteins were similar, which indicates that hosts adopt tissue-specific strategies to cope with the same pathogen during infection. Thus, our results provide a robust demonstration of both bacterial initiators and host receptors or interacting proteins to further explore infection and anti-infective mechanisms between hosts and microbes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tissue-specific transcript profiling for ABC transporters in the sequestering larvae of the phytophagous leaf beetle Chrysomela populi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja S Strauss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insects evolved ingenious adaptations to use extraordinary food sources. Particularly, the diet of herbivores enriched with noxious plant secondary metabolites requires detoxification mechanisms. Sequestration, which involves the uptake, transfer, and concentration of occasionally modified phytochemicals into specialized tissues or hemolymph, is one of the most successful detoxification strategies found in most insect orders. Due to the ability of ATP-binding cassette (ABC carriers to transport a wide range of molecules including phytochemicals and xenobiotics, it is highly likely that they play a role in this sequestration process. To shed light on the role of ABC proteins in sequestration, we describe an inventory of putative ABC transporters in various tissues in the sequestering juvenile poplar leaf beetle, Chrysomela populi. RESULTS: In the transcriptome of C. populi, we predicted 65 ABC transporters. To link the proteins with a possible function, we performed comparative phylogenetic analyses with ABC transporters of other insects and of humans. While tissue-specific profiling of each ABC transporter subfamily suggests that ABCB, C and G influence the plant metabolite absorption in the gut, ABCC with 14 members is the preferred subfamily responsible for the excretion of these metabolites via Malpighian tubules. Moreover, salicin, which is sequestered from poplar plants, is translocated into the defensive glands for further deterrent production. In these glands and among all identified ABC transporters, an exceptionally high transcript level was observed only for Cpabc35 (Cpmrp. RNAi revealed the deficiency of other ABC pumps to compensate the function of CpABC35, demonstrating its key role during sequestration. CONCLUSION: We provide the first comprehensive phylogenetic study of the ABC family in a phytophagous beetle species. RNA-seq data from different larval tissues propose the importance of ABC pumps to achieve a

  13. Early- and late-onset preeclampsia and the tissue-specific epigenome of the placenta and newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Emilie M; Eggink, Alex J; Willemsen, Sten P; Slieker, Roderick C; Wijnands, Kim P J; Felix, Janine F; Chen, Jun; Stubbs, Andrew; van der Spek, Peter J; van Meurs, Joyce B; Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P M

    2017-10-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) carries increased risks of cardiovascular- and metabolic diseases in mothers and offspring during the life course. While the severe early-onset PE (EOPE) phenotype originates from impaired placentation in early pregnancy, late-onset PE (LOPE) is in particular associated with pre-existing maternal cardiovascular- and metabolic risk factors. We hypothesize that PE is associated with altered epigenetic programming of placental and fetal tissues and that these epigenetic changes might elucidate the increased cardiovascular- and metabolic disease susceptibility in PE offspring. A nested case-control study was conducted in The Rotterdam Periconceptional Cohort comprising 13 EOPE, 16 LOPE, and three control groups of 36 uncomplicated pregnancies, 27 normotensive fetal growth restricted and 20 normotensive preterm birth (PTB) complicated pregnancies. Placental tissue, newborn umbilical cord white blood cells (UC-WBC) and umbilical vein endothelial cells were collected and DNA methylation of cytosine-guanine dinucleotides was measured by the Illumina HumanMethylation450K BeadChip. An epigenome-wide analysis was performed by using multiple linear regression models. Epigenome-wide tissue-specific analysis between EOPE and PTB controls revealed 5001 mostly hypermethylated differentially methylated positions (DMPs) in UC-WBC and 869 mostly hypomethylated DMPs in placental tissue, situated in or close to genes associated with cardiovascular-metabolic developmental pathways. This study shows differential methylation in UC-WBC and placental tissue in EOPE as compared to PTB, identifying DMPs that are associated with cardiovascular system pathways. Future studies should examine these loci and pathways in more detail to elucidate the associations between prenatal PE exposure and the cardiovascular disease risk in offspring. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. A new method to determine tissue specific tissue factor thrombomodulin activities: endotoxin and particulate air pollution induced disbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlofs-Nijland Miriam E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increase in tissue factor (TF and loss in thrombomodulin (TM antigen levels has been described in various inflammatory disorders. The functional consequences of such changes in antigen concentrations in the coagulation balance are, however, not known. This study was designed to assess the consequences of inflammation-driven organ specific functional properties of the procoagulant response. Methods Tissue specific procoagulant activity was assessed by adding tissue homogenate to normal human pool plasma and recording of the thrombin generation curve. The new technique was subsequently applied on two inflammation driven animal models: 1 mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced endotoxemia and 2 spontaneously hypertensive rats exposed to environmental air pollution (particulate matter (PM. Results Addition of lung tissue from untreated animals to human plasma suppressed the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP (175 ± 61 vs. 1437 ± 112 nM.min for control. This inhibitory effect was due to TM, because a it was absent in protein C deficient plasma and b lungs from TMpro/pro mice allowed full thrombin generation (ETP: 1686 ± 209 nM.min. The inhibitory effect of TM was lost after LPS administration to mice, which induced TF activity in lungs of C57Bl/6 mice as well as increased the ETP (941 ± 523 vs. 194 ± 159 nM.min for control. Another pro-inflammatory stimulus, PM dose-dependently increased TF in the lungs of spontaneously hypertensive rats at 4 and 48 hours after PM exposure. The ETP increased up to 48 hours at the highest concentration of PM (1441 ± 289 nM.min vs. saline: 164 ± 64 nM.min, p Conclusion Inflammation associated procoagulant effects in tissues are dependent on variations in activity of the TF-TM balance. The application of these novel organ specific functional assays is a useful tool to monitor inflammation-driven shifts in the coagulation balance within animal or human tissues.

  15. Tissue-specific mutagenesis by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine as the basis for urothelial carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiming; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Wu, Xue-Ru; Guttenplan, Joseph B

    2012-02-18

    Bladder cancer is one of the few cancers that have been linked to carcinogens in the environment and tobacco smoke. Of the carcinogens tested in mouse chemical carcinogenesis models, N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is one that reproducibly causes high-grade, invasive cancers in the urinary bladder, but not in any other tissues. However, the basis for such a high-level tissue-specificity has not been explored. Using mutagenesis in lacI (Big Blue™) mice, we show here that BBN is a potent mutagen and it causes high-level of mutagenesis specifically in the epithelial cells (urothelial) of the urinary bladder. After a 2-6-week treatment of 0.05% BBN in the drinking water, mutagenesis in urothelial cells of male and female mice was about two orders of magnitude greater than the spontaneous mutation background. In contrast, mutagenesis in smooth muscle cells of the urinary bladder was about five times lower than in urothelial tissue. No appreciable increase in mutagenesis was observed in kidney, ureter, liver or forestomach. In lacI (Big Blue™) rats, BBN mutagenesis was also elevated in urothelial cells, albeit not nearly as profoundly as in mice. This provides a potential explanation as to why rats are less prone than mice to the formation of aggressive form of bladder cancer induced by BBN. Our results suggest that the propensity to BBN-triggered mutagenesis of urothelial cells underlies its heightened susceptibility to this carcinogen and that mutagenesis induced by BBN represents a novel model for initiation of bladder carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic Exclusion in Bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Snustad , D. P. (1966). Limited genome expression of Bacteriophage T4-infectcd Ese h e -r ichia -coli. 1. Demonstration of the Effect. Genetics 5:2~!5...AD-RIGS 463 GENETIC EXCLUSION IN BACTERIOPHAGE T4(U) AIR FORCE INST 1/2 OF TECH NRIGHT-PRTTERSON SF9 OH J W OSRINGER 199? RFIT/CI/NR-8?-141D...10? ________4______ F4L TITLE (an Iubfil) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PEIOD COVERSO6 Genetic Exclusion in Bacteriophage T4 Afifis/DISSETATION 41. PERFORMING

  17. Small RNA and degradome deep sequencing reveals drought-and tissue-specific micrornas and their important roles in drought-sensitive and drought-tolerant tomato genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candar-Cakir, Bilgin; Arican, Ercan; Zhang, Baohong

    2016-08-01

    Drought stress has adverse impacts on plant production and productivity. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are one class of noncoding RNAs regulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. In this study, we employed small RNA and degradome sequencing to systematically investigate the tissue-specific miRNAs responsible to drought stress, which are understudied in tomato. For this purpose, root and upground tissues of two different drought-responsive tomato genotypes (Lycopersicon esculentum as sensitive and L. esculentum var. cerasiforme as tolerant) were subjected to stress with 5% polyethylene glycol for 7 days. A total of 699 conserved miRNAs belonging to 578 families were determined and 688 miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between different treatments, tissues and genotypes. Using degradome sequencing, 44 target genes were identified associated with 36 miRNA families. Drought-related miRNAs and their targets were enriched functionally by Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses. Totally, 53 miRNAs targeted 23 key drought stress- and tissue development-related genes, including DRP (dehydration-responsive protein), GTs (glycosyltransferases), ERF (ethylene responsive factor), PSII (photosystem II) protein, HD-ZIP (homeodomain-leucine zipper), MYB and NAC-domain transcription factors. miR160, miR165, miR166, miR171, miR398, miR408, miR827, miR9472, miR9476 and miR9552 were the key miRNAs functioning in regulation of these genes and involving in tomato response to drought stress. Additionally, plant hormone signal transduction pathway genes were differentially regulated by miR169, miR172, miR393, miR5641, miR5658 and miR7997 in both tissues of both sensitive and tolerant genotypes. These results provide new insight into the regulatory role of miRNAs in drought response with plant hormone signal transduction and drought-tolerant tomato breeding. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society

  18. Exclusive Diplepton Production

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    We present a first study of exclusive production of dileptons in CMS, by selecting events with a single back-to-back $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ or $e^{+}e^{-}$ pair and no significant additional activity in the detector. These events result from two-photon exchange and photoproduction of $\\Upsilon$ mesons. The two-photon events potentially provide a high-statistics calibration sample for luminosity normalization and alignment of forward proton detectors. The $\\Upsilon$ sample will allow studies of heavy flavor photoproduction at higher energies than previous experiments.

  19. Variability in the routing of dietary proteins and lipids to consumer tissues influences tissue-specific isotopic discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Nathan; Newsome, Seth D; Peters, Jacob; Fogel, Marilyn L

    2015-08-15

    The eco-physiological mechanisms that govern the incorporation and routing of macronutrients from dietary sources into consumer tissues determine the efficacy of stable isotope analysis (SIA) for studying animal foraging ecology. We document how changes in the relative amounts of dietary proteins and lipids affect the metabolic routing of these macronutrients and the consequent effects on tissue-specific discrimination factors in domestic mice using SIA. We also examine the effects of dietary macromolecular content on a commonly used methodological approach: lipid extraction of potential food sources. We used carbon ((13) C) and nitrogen ((15) N) isotopes to examine the routing of carbon from dietary proteins and lipids that were used by mice to biosynthesize hair, blood, muscle, and liver. Growing mice were fed one of four diet treatments in which the total dietary content of C4 -based lipids (δ(13) C = -14.5‰) and C(3) -based proteins (δ(13) C = -27‰) varied inversely between 5% and 40%. The δ(13) C values of mouse tissues increased by approximately 2-6‰ with increasing dietary lipid content. The difference in δ(13) C values between mouse tissues and bulk diet ranged from 0.1 ± 1.5‰ to 2.3 ± 0.6‰ for all diet treatments. The mean (±SD) difference between the δ(13) C values of mouse tissues and dietary protein varied systematically among tissues and ranged from 3.1 ± 0.1‰ to 4.5 ± 0.6‰ for low fat diets and from 5.4 ± 0.4‰ to 10.5 ± 7.3‰ for high fat diets. Mice used some fraction of their dietary lipid carbon to synthesize tissue proteins, suggesting flexibility in the routing of dietary macromolecules to consumer tissues based on dietary macromolecular availability. Consequently, all constituent dietary macromolecules, not just protein, should be considered when determining the relationship between diets and consumer tissues using SIA. In addition, in cases where animals consume diets with high lipid contents, non lipid

  20. Social exclusion and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokić Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Social exclusion is a process whereby certain individuals are pushed to the edge of society and prevented from participating fully by virtue of their poverty, or lack of basic competencies and lifelong learning opportunities or as a result of discrimination. This distances them from job, income and education opportunities as well as social and community networks and activities. Quality education (conditions and access/accessibility/availability is one of the factors that significantly influence the reduced social exclusion. In other words, education has is key role key role in ensuring social inclusion (equal opportunities and active social participation. At the same time, education and lifelong learning is established as the basis for achieving the goals of sustainable economic development (economy based on knowledge and to achieve social cohesion. Quality education is a prerequisite for progress, development and well-being of the community. Conditions and accessibility to education have become priorities of national reforms in most European countries. The subject of this paper is the educational structure of population of Serbia and the accessibility of education. The analysis covers the educational structure with regard to age, gender and type of settlement (city and other/villages settlements.

  1. Social exclusion in finite populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2015-04-01

    Social exclusion, keeping free riders from benefit sharing, plays an important role in sustaining cooperation in our world. Here we propose two different exclusion regimes, namely, peer exclusion and pool exclusion, to investigate the evolution of social exclusion in finite populations. In the peer exclusion regime, each excluder expels all the defectors independently, and thus bears the total cost on his own, while in the pool exclusion regime, excluders spontaneously form an institution to carry out rejection of the free riders, and each excluder shares the cost equally. In a public goods game containing only excluders and defectors, it is found that peer excluders outperform pool excluders if the exclusion costs are small, and the situation is converse once the exclusion costs exceed some critical points, which holds true for all the selection intensities and different update rules. Moreover, excluders can dominate the whole population under a suitable parameters range in the presence of second-order free riders (cooperators), showing that exclusion has prominent advantages over common costly punishment. More importantly, our finding indicates that the group exclusion mechanism helps the cooperative union to survive under unfavorable conditions. Our results may give some insights into better understanding the prevalence of such a strategy in the real world and its significance in sustaining cooperation.

  2. Airway-Specific Inducible Transgene Expression Using Aerosolized Doxycycline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Purushothama Rao; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Prabhu, Mythili; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Law, Brandon M.; Fontaine, Benjamin A.; Tager, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue-specific transgene expression using tetracycline (tet)-regulated promoter/operator elements has been used to revolutionize our understanding of cellular and molecular processes. However, because most tet-regulated mouse strains use promoters of genes expressed in multiple tissues, to achieve exclusive expression in an organ of interest is often impossible. Indeed, in the extreme case, unwanted transgene expression in other organ systems causes lethality and precludes the study of the transgene in the actual organ of interest. Here, we describe a novel approach to activating tet-inducible transgene expression solely in the airway by administering aerosolized doxycycline. By optimizing the dose and duration of aerosolized doxycycline exposure in mice possessing a ubiquitously expressed Rosa26 promoter–driven reverse tet-controlled transcriptional activator (rtTA) element, we induce transgene expression exclusively in the airways. We detect no changes in the cellular composition or proliferative behavior of airway cells. We used this newly developed method to achieve airway basal stem cell–specific transgene expression using a cytokeratin 5 (also known as keratin 5)–driven rtTA driver line to induce Notch pathway activation. We observed a more robust mucous metaplasia phenotype than in mice receiving doxycycline systemically. In addition, unwanted phenotypes outside of the lung that were evident when doxycycline was received systemically were now absent. Thus, our approach allows for rapid and efficient airway-specific transgene expression. After the careful strain by strain titration of the dose and timing of doxycycline inhalation, a suite of preexisting transgenic mice can now be used to study airway biology specifically in cases where transient transgene expression is sufficient to induce a phenotype. PMID:23848320

  3. Tissue-specific production of limonene in Camelina sativa with the Arabidopsis promoters of genes BANYULS and FRUITFULL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Monica; Xie, De-Yu

    2016-02-01

    Arabidopsis promoters of genes BANYULS and FRUITFULL are transcribed in Camelina. They triggered the transcription of limonene synthase and induced higher limonene production in seeds and fruits than CaMV 35S promoter. Camelina sativa (Camelina) is an oilseed crop of relevance for the production of biofuels and the plant has been target of a recent and intense program of genetic manipulation aimed to increase performance, seed yield and to modify the fatty acid composition of the oil. Here, we have explored the performance of two Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) promoters in triggering transgene expression in Camelina. The promoters of two genes BANYULS (AtBAN pro ) and FRUITFULL (AtFUL pro ), which are expressed in seed coat and valves of Arabidopsis, respectively, have been chosen to induce the expression of limonene synthase (LS) from Citrus limon. In addition, the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter was utilized to overexpress LS in Camelina . The results of experiments revealed that AtBAN pro and AtFUL pro are actively transcribed in Camelina where they also retain specificity of expression in seeds and valves as previously observed in Arabidopsis. LS induced by AtBAN pro and AtFUL pro leads to higher limonene production in seeds and fruits than when the CaMV 35S was used to trigger the expression. In conclusion, the results of experiments indicate that AtBAN pro and AtFUL pro can be successfully utilized to induce the expression of the transgenes of interest in seeds and fruits of Camelina.

  4. Tissue-specific selection of stable reference genes for real-time PCR normalization in an obese rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiati, Manuela; Raucci, Serena; Caselli, Chiara; Guzzardi, Maria Angela; D'Amico, Andrea; Prescimone, Tommaso; Giannessi, Daniela; Del Ry, Silvia

    2012-06-01

    Obesity is a complex pathology with interacting and confounding causes due to the environment, hormonal signaling patterns, and genetic predisposition. At present, the Zucker rat is an eligible genetic model for research on obesity and metabolic syndrome, allowing scrutiny of gene expression profiles. Real-time PCR is the benchmark method for measuring mRNA expressions, but the accuracy and reproducibility of its data greatly depend on appropriate normalization strategies. In the Zucker rat model, no specific reference genes have been identified in myocardium, kidney, and lung, the main organs involved in this syndrome. The aim of this study was to select among ten candidates (Actb, Gapdh, Polr2a, Ywhag, Rpl13a, Sdha, Ppia, Tbp, Hprt1 and Tfrc) a set of reference genes that can be used for the normalization of mRNA expression data obtained by real-time PCR in obese and lean Zucker rats both at fasting and during acute hyperglycemia. The most stable genes in the heart were Sdha, Tbp, and Hprt1; in kidney, Tbp, Actb, and Gapdh were chosen, while Actb, Ywhag, and Sdha were selected as the most stably expressed set for pulmonary tissue. The normalization strategy was used to analyze mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor α, the main inflammatory mediator in obesity, whose variations were more significant when normalized with the appropriately selected reference genes. The findings obtained in this study underline the importance of having three stably expressed reference gene sets for use in the cardiac, renal, and pulmonary tissues of an experimental model of obese and hyperglycemic Zucker rats.

  5. Systems Biology of Tissue-Specific Response to Anaplasma phagocytophilum Reveals Differentiated Apoptosis in the Tick Vector Ixodes scapularis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ayllón, N.; Villar, M.; Galindo, R. C.; Kocan, K.M.; Šíma, Radek; López, J.A.; Vázquez, J.; Alberdi, P.; Cabezas-Cruz, A.; Kopáček, Petr; de la Fuente, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2015), e1005120 ISSN 1553-7404 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA ČR GP13-12816P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : gene expression * human neutrophils * cancer cells Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 6.661, year: 2015

  6. Antiobesity efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide is associated with peripheral tissue-specific modulation of lipid metabolic regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decara, Juan; Arrabal, Sergio; Beiroa, Daniel; Rivera, Patricia; Vargas, Antonio; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Ballesteros, Joan; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-11-12

    To investigate the role of glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in peripheral lipid metabolism. Both lean and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity (DIO) rats were used to compare the peripheral effects of the subcutaneous and repeated administration of the GLP-1R agonist liraglutide on the expression of key regulators involved in lipid metabolism, β-oxidation and thermogenesis in liver, abdominal muscle, and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT). We observed that liraglutide reduced caloric intake, body weight, and plasma levels of triglycerides and VLDL in a diet-independent manner. However, changes in liver fat content and the expression of lipid metabolism regulators were produced in a diet and tissue-dependent manner. In lean rats, liraglutide increased the gene/protein expression of elements involved in lipogenesis (ChREBP, Acaca/ACC, Fasn/FAS, Scd1/SCD1, PPARα/γ), β-oxidation (CPT1b), and thermogenesis (Cox4i1, Ucp1/UCP1) in eWAT and muscle, which suggest an increase in fatty-acid flux and utilization to activate energy expenditure. Regarding DIO rats, the specific reduction of liver lipid content by liraglutide was associated with a decreased expression of main elements involved in lipogenesis (phospho-ACC), peroxisomal β-oxidation (ACOX1), and lipid flux/storage (Pparγ/PPARγ) in liver, which suggest a recovery of lipid homeostasis. Interestingly, the muscle of DIO rats treated with liraglutide showed a decreased expression of PPARγ and the thermogenic factor UCP1. These results help us to better understand the peripheral mechanisms regulating lipid metabolism that underlay the effectiveness of GLP-1 analogues for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):600-611, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Exclusive meson production at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Sznajder, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we summarize recent measurements of exclusive meson production performed by the COMPASS Collaboration. In particular, recent results on the transverse target spin asymmetries for exclusive r 0 production are presented. Some of these asymmetries are sensitive to the GPDs E , which are related to the orbital angular momentum of quarks. Other asymmetries are sensitive to the chiral-odd, transverse GPDs H T . Measurements of exclusive processes, which are a part of the COMPASS-II proposal, are also discussed

  8. Microvesicles derived from adult human bone marrow and tissue specific mesenchymal stem cells shuttle selected pattern of miRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Collino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs have been described as a new mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. MVs after internalization within target cells may deliver genetic information. Human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and liver resident stem cells (HLSCs were shown to release MVs shuttling functional mRNAs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether MVs derived from MSCs and HLSCs contained selected micro-RNAs (miRNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MVs were isolated from MSCs and HLSCs. The presence in MVs of selected ribonucleoproteins involved in the traffic and stabilization of RNA was evaluated. We observed that MVs contained TIA, TIAR and HuR multifunctional proteins expressed in nuclei and stress granules, Stau1 and 2 implicated in the transport and stability of mRNA and Ago2 involved in miRNA transport and processing. RNA extracted from MVs and cells of origin was profiled for 365 known human mature miRNAs by real time PCR. Hierarchical clustering and similarity analysis of miRNAs showed 41 co-expressed miRNAs in MVs and cells. Some miRNAs were accumulated within MVs and absent in the cells after MV release; others were retained within the cells and not secreted in MVs. Gene ontology analysis of predicted and validated targets showed that the high expressed miRNAs in cells and MVs could be involved in multi-organ development, cell survival and differentiation. Few selected miRNAs shuttled by MVs were also associated with the immune system regulation. The highly expressed miRNAs in MVs were transferred to target cells after MV incorporation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that MVs contained ribonucleoproteins involved in the intracellular traffic of RNA and selected pattern of miRNAs, suggesting a dynamic regulation of RNA compartmentalization in MVs. The observation that MV-highly expressed miRNAs were transferred to target cells, rises the possibility that the biological effect of stem

  9. Ganglioside Profiling of the Human Retina: Comparison with Other Ocular Structures, Brain and Plasma Reveals Tissue Specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Estelle; Berdeaux, Olivier; Martine, Lucy; Bron, Alain M; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P; He, Zhiguo; Thuret, Gilles; Bretillon, Lionel; Masson, Elodie A Y

    2016-01-01

    Gangliosides make a wide family of glycosphingolipids, highly heterogeneous in both the ceramide moiety and the oligosaccharide chain. While ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues, they are particularly abundant in the brain and the peripheral nervous system. Gangliosides are known to play a crucial role in the development, maintenance and functional integrity of the nervous system. However, the expression and roles of gangliosides in the retina, although often considered as a window on the brain, has been far less studied. We performed an in-depth analysis of gangliosides of the human retina, especially using powerful LC/MS methods. We compared the pattern of ganglioside classes and ceramide molecular species of this tissue with other ocular structures and with brain and plasma in elderly human individuals. About a hundred of ganglioside molecular species among 15 distinct classes were detected illustrating the huge structural diversity of these compounds. The retina exhibited a very diverse ganglioside profile and shared several common features with the brain (prominence of tetraosylgangliosides, abundance of d20:1 long chain base and 18:0 fatty acid…). However, the retina stood out with the specific expression of GD3, GT3 and AcGT3, which further presented a peculiar molecular species distribution. The unique ganglioside pattern we observed in the human retina suggests that these ganglioside species play a specific role in the structure and function of this tissue. This lipidomic study, by highlighting retina specific ganglioside species, opens up novel research directions for a better understanding of the biological role of gangliosides in the retina.

  10. Exclusive Rights and State Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard

    2017-01-01

    Exclusive rights are granted in order to regulate markets as one of several possible tools of public intervention. The article considers the role of State aid law in the regulation of exclusive rights. Whereas the right of Member States to organise markets as monopolies and the choice of provider...

  11. Systematic sequencing of mRNA from the Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba and first tissue specific transcriptional signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavicini Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the genome sequences of Euphausiacea (krill although these crustaceans are abundant components of the pelagic ecosystems in all oceans and used for aquaculture and pharmaceutical industry. This study reports the results of an expressed sequence tag (EST sequencing project from different tissues of Euphausia superba (the Antarctic krill. Results We have constructed and sequenced five cDNA libraries from different Antarctic krill tissues: head, abdomen, thoracopods and photophores. We have identified 1.770 high-quality ESTs which were assembled into 216 overlapping clusters and 801 singletons resulting in a total of 1.017 non-redundant sequences. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed to quantify and validate the expression levels of ten genes presenting different EST countings in krill tissues. In addition, bioinformatic screening of the non-redundant E. superba sequences identified 69 microsatellite containing ESTs. Clusters, consensuses and related similarity and gene ontology searches were organized in a dedicated E. superba database http://krill.cribi.unipd.it. Conclusion We defined the first tissue transcriptional signatures of E. superba based on functional categorization among the examined tissues. The analyses of annotated transcripts showed a higher similarity with genes from insects with respect to Malacostraca possibly as an effect of the limited number of Malacostraca sequences in the public databases. Our catalogue provides for the first time a genomic tool to investigate the biology of the Antarctic krill.

  12. Systematic sequencing of mRNA from the Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) and first tissue specific transcriptional signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pittà, Cristiano; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Mazzotta, Gabriella M; Bernante, Filippo; Rizzo, Giorgia; De Nardi, Barbara; Pallavicini, Alberto; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo; Costa, Rodolfo

    2008-01-01

    Background Little is known about the genome sequences of Euphausiacea (krill) although these crustaceans are abundant components of the pelagic ecosystems in all oceans and used for aquaculture and pharmaceutical industry. This study reports the results of an expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing project from different tissues of Euphausia superba (the Antarctic krill). Results We have constructed and sequenced five cDNA libraries from different Antarctic krill tissues: head, abdomen, thoracopods and photophores. We have identified 1.770 high-quality ESTs which were assembled into 216 overlapping clusters and 801 singletons resulting in a total of 1.017 non-redundant sequences. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed to quantify and validate the expression levels of ten genes presenting different EST countings in krill tissues. In addition, bioinformatic screening of the non-redundant E. superba sequences identified 69 microsatellite containing ESTs. Clusters, consensuses and related similarity and gene ontology searches were organized in a dedicated E. superba database . Conclusion We defined the first tissue transcriptional signatures of E. superba based on functional categorization among the examined tissues. The analyses of annotated transcripts showed a higher similarity with genes from insects with respect to Malacostraca possibly as an effect of the limited number of Malacostraca sequences in the public databases. Our catalogue provides for the first time a genomic tool to investigate the biology of the Antarctic krill. PMID:18226200

  13. Maternal high-fat diet exaggerates atherosclerosis in adult offspring by augmenting periaortic adipose tissue-specific proinflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakana, Noriyuki; Irie, Daisuke; Kikai, Masakazu; Terada, Kensuke; Yamamoto, Keita; Kawahito, Hiroyuki; Kato, Taku; Ogata, Takehiro; Ueyama, Tomomi; Matoba, Satoaki; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    Maternal obesity elicits offspring's metabolic disorders via developmental modifications of visceral adipose tissue; however, its effect on atherogenesis remains undefined. Perivascular adipose tissue has recently been implicated in vascular remodeling and vasoreactivity. We hypothesize that developmental modifications of perivascular adipose tissue by maternal high-fat diet (HFD) exposure promotes atherosclerosis in adult offspring. Eight-week-old female apolipoprotein E-deficient mice were fed an HFD or normal diet (ND) during gestation and lactation. Offspring were fed a high-cholesterol diet from 8 weeks of age. Twenty-week-old male offspring of HFD-fed dams (O-HFD) showed a 2.1-fold increase in atherosclerotic lesion of the entire aorta compared with those of ND-fed dams (O-ND). Although mRNA expressions of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and accumulation of macrophages in epididymal white adipose tissue were less in O-HFD than in O-ND, thoracic periaortic adipose tissue (tPAT) showed an exaggerated inflammatory response in O-HFD. Intra-abdominal transplantation of tPAT from 8-week-old O-HFD alongside the distal abdominal aorta exaggerated atherosclerosis development of the infrarenal aorta in recipient apolipoprotein E-deficient mice compared with tPAT from O-ND (210%, Patherosclerosis development in offspring by augmenting tPAT-specific inflammatory response proceeded by an increased expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Spatial distribution of "tissue-specific" antigens in the developing human heart and skeletal muscle. I. An immunohistochemical analysis of creatine kinase isoenzyme expression patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, A.; Vermeulen, J. L.; Virágh, S.; Kálmán, F.; Morris, G. E.; Man, N. T.; Lamers, W. H.; Moorman, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies against the M and B subunit isoforms of creatine kinase (CK) we have investigated their distribution in developing human skeletal and cardiac muscle immunohistochemically. It is demonstrated that in skeletal muscle, a switch from CK-B to CK-M takes place around the week 8

  15. Ectopic lignification in the flax lignified bast fiber1 mutant stem is associated with tissue-specific modifications in gene expression and cell wall composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantreau, Maxime; Portelette, Antoine; Dauwe, Rebecca; Kiyoto, Shingo; Crônier, David; Morreel, Kris; Arribat, Sandrine; Neutelings, Godfrey; Chabi, Malika; Boerjan, Wout; Yoshinaga, Arata; Mesnard, François; Grec, Sebastien; Chabbert, Brigitte; Hawkins, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Histochemical screening of a flax ethyl methanesulfonate population led to the identification of 93 independent M2 mutant families showing ectopic lignification in the secondary cell wall of stem bast fibers. We named this core collection the Linum usitatissimum (flax) lbf mutants for lignified bast fibers and believe that this population represents a novel biological resource for investigating how bast fiber plants regulate lignin biosynthesis. As a proof of concept, we characterized the lbf1 mutant and showed that the lignin content increased by 350% in outer stem tissues containing bast fibers but was unchanged in inner stem tissues containing xylem. Chemical and NMR analyses indicated that bast fiber ectopic lignin was highly condensed and rich in G-units. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling showed large modifications in the oligolignol pool of lbf1 inner- and outer-stem tissues that could be related to ectopic lignification. Immunological and chemical analyses revealed that lbf1 mutants also showed changes to other cell wall polymers. Whole-genome transcriptomics suggested that ectopic lignification of flax bast fibers could be caused by increased transcript accumulation of (1) the cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase monolignol biosynthesis genes, (2) several lignin-associated peroxidase genes, and (3) genes coding for respiratory burst oxidase homolog NADPH-oxidases necessary to increase H2O2 supply. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  16. Ectopic Lignification in the Flax lignified bast fiber1 Mutant Stem Is Associated with Tissue-Specific Modifications in Gene Expression and Cell Wall Composition[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantreau, Maxime; Portelette, Antoine; Dauwe, Rebecca; Kiyoto, Shingo; Crônier, David; Morreel, Kris; Arribat, Sandrine; Neutelings, Godfrey; Chabi, Malika; Boerjan, Wout; Yoshinaga, Arata; Mesnard, François; Grec, Sebastien; Chabbert, Brigitte; Hawkins, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Histochemical screening of a flax ethyl methanesulfonate population led to the identification of 93 independent M2 mutant families showing ectopic lignification in the secondary cell wall of stem bast fibers. We named this core collection the Linum usitatissimum (flax) lbf mutants for lignified bast fibers and believe that this population represents a novel biological resource for investigating how bast fiber plants regulate lignin biosynthesis. As a proof of concept, we characterized the lbf1 mutant and showed that the lignin content increased by 350% in outer stem tissues containing bast fibers but was unchanged in inner stem tissues containing xylem. Chemical and NMR analyses indicated that bast fiber ectopic lignin was highly condensed and rich in G-units. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling showed large modifications in the oligolignol pool of lbf1 inner- and outer-stem tissues that could be related to ectopic lignification. Immunological and chemical analyses revealed that lbf1 mutants also showed changes to other cell wall polymers. Whole-genome transcriptomics suggested that ectopic lignification of flax bast fibers could be caused by increased transcript accumulation of (1) the cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase monolignol biosynthesis genes, (2) several lignin-associated peroxidase genes, and (3) genes coding for respiratory burst oxidase homolog NADPH-oxidases necessary to increase H2O2 supply. PMID:25381351

  17. Food Shortage Causes Differential Effects on Body Composition and Tissue-Specific Gene Expression in Salmon Modified for Increased Growth Hormone Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernathy, Jason; Panserat, Stéphane; Welker, Thomas; Plagne-Juan, Elisabeth; Sakhrani, Dionne; Higgs, David A; Audouin, Florence; Devlin, Robert H; Overturf, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) transgenic salmon possesses markedly increased metabolic rate, appetite, and feed conversion efficiency, as well as an increased ability to compete for food resources. Thus, the ability of GH-transgenic fish to withstand periods of food deprivation as occurs in nature is potentially different than that of nontransgenic fish. However, the physiological and genetic effects of transgenic GH production over long periods of food deprivation remain largely unknown. Here, GH-transgenic coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and nontransgenic, wild-type coho salmon were subjected to a 3-month food deprivation trial, during which time performance characteristics related to growth were measured along with proximate compositions. To examine potential genetic effects of GH-transgenesis on long-term food deprivation, a group of genes related to muscle development and liver metabolism was selected for quantitative PCR analysis. Results showed that GH-transgenic fish lose weight at an increased rate compared to wild-type even though proximate compositions remained relatively similar between the groups. A total of nine genes related to muscle physiology (cathepsin, cee, insulin-like growth factor, myostatin, murf-1, myosin, myogenin, proteasome delta, tumor necrosis factor) and five genes related to liver metabolism (carnitine palmitoyltransferase, fatty acid synthase, glucose-6-phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase) were shown to be differentially regulated between GH-transgenic and wild-type coho salmon over time. These genetic and physiological responses assist in identifying differences between GH-transgenic and wild-type salmon in relation to fitness effects arising from elevated growth hormone during periods of long-term food shortage.

  18. Water Uptake along the Length of Grapevine Fine Roots: Developmental Anatomy, Tissue-Specific Aquaporin Expression, and Pathways of Water Transport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gregory A. Gambetta; Jiong Fei; Thomas L. Rost; Thorsten Knipfer; Mark A. Matthews; Ken A. Shackel; M. Andrew Walker; Andrew J. McElrone

    2013-01-01

    To better understand water uptake patterns in root systems of woody perennial crops, we detailed the developmental anatomy and hydraulic physiology along the length of grapevine (Vitis berlandieri × Vitis rupestris...

  19. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  20. Salivary gland-specific P. berghei reporter lines enable rapid evaluation of tissue-specific sporozoite loads in mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available Malaria is a life-threatening human infectious disease transmitted by mosquitoes. Levels of the salivary gland sporozoites (sgs, the only mosquito stage infectious to a mammalian host, represent an important cumulative index of Plasmodium development within a mosquito. However, current techniques of sgs quantification are laborious and imprecise. Here, transgenic P. berghei reporter lines that produce the green fluorescent protein fused to luciferase (GFP-LUC specifically in sgs were generated, verified and characterised. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the sgs stage specificity of expression of the reporter gene. The luciferase activity of the reporter lines was then exploited to establish a simple and fast biochemical assay to evaluate sgs loads in whole mosquitoes. Using this assay we successfully identified differences in sgs loads in mosquitoes silenced for genes that display opposing effects on P. berghei ookinete/oocyst development. It offers a new powerful tool to study infectivity of P. berghei to the mosquito, including analysis of vector-parasite interactions and evaluation of transmission-blocking vaccines.

  1. Genome-wide prediction and analysis of human tissue-selective genes using microarray expression data

    OpenAIRE

    Teng Shaolei; Yang Jack Y; Wang Liangjiang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Understanding how genes are expressed specifically in particular tissues is a fundamental question in developmental biology. Many tissue-specific genes are involved in the pathogenesis of complex human diseases. However, experimental identification of tissue-specific genes is time consuming and difficult. The accurate predictions of tissue-specific gene targets could provide useful information for biomarker development and drug target identification. Results In this study,...

  2. A transcription activator with restricted tissue distribution regulates cell-specific expression of alpha1(XI) collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, A; Greenwel, P; Tanaka, S; Di Liberto, M; Yoshioka, H; Ramirez, F

    1997-12-12

    Different regulatory programs are likely to control expression of the alpha1(XI) collagen (COL11A1) gene in cartilaginous and non-cartilaginous tissues and in coordination with different collagen genes. Here, we report the identification of a cis-acting element that is required for constitutive and tissue-specific activity of the proximal COL11A1 promoter. The element binds an apparently novel activator whose expression is restricted mostly, but not exclusively, to cells of mesenchymal origin. Transient transfection experiments using wild-type and mutant constructs demonstrated the critical contribution of a 45-base pair upstream element (FP9) to promoter activity. The same functional tests and DNA binding assays narrowed down the critical portion of FP9 to a 20-base pair sequence, which consists of an imperfect palindrome with strong homology to the GATA consensus motif. Despite being able to bind GATA proteins in vitro, FP9 is actually recognized by a distinct approximately 100-kDa polypeptide (FP9C) probably belonging to the zinc-finger family of transcription factors. FP9C binding was mostly identified in nuclei from cells of mesenchymal origin, including those actively engaged in COL11A1 transcription. A positive correlation was also established between the level of FP9C binding and the degree of cell differentiation in vitro. Thus, FP9C represents an unusual example of tissue-specific and differentiation-related transcription factor with overlapping expression in hard and soft connective tissues.

  3. Tissue-specific signatures in the transcriptional response to Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection of Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes ricinus tick cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar eAlberdi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaplasma phagocytophilum are transmitted by Ixodes spp. ticks and have become one of the most common and relevant tick-borne pathogens due to their impact on human and animal health. Recent results have increased our understanding of the molecular interactions between Ixodes scapularis and A. phagocytophilum through the demonstration of tissue-specific molecular pathways that ensure pathogen infection, development and transmission by ticks. However, little is known about the Ixodes ricinus genes and proteins involved in the response to A. phagocytophilum infection. The tick species I. scapularis and I. ricinus are evolutionarily closely related and therefore similar responses are expected in A. phagocytophilum-infected cells. However, differences may exist between I. scapularis ISE6 and I. ricinus IRE/CTVM20 tick cells associated with tissue-specific signatures of these cell lines. To address this hypothesis, the transcriptional response to A. phagocytophilum infection was characterized by RNA sequencing and compared between I. scapularis ISE6 and I. ricinus IRE/CTVM20 tick cell lines. The transcriptional response to infection of I. scapularis ISE6 cells resembled that of tick hemocytes while the response in I. ricinus IRE/CTVM20 cells was more closely related to that reported previously in infected tick midguts. The inhibition of cell apoptosis by A. phagocytophilum appears to be a key adaptation mechanism to facilitate infection of both vertebrate and tick cells and was used to investigate further the tissue-specific response of tick cell lines to pathogen infection. The results supported a role for the intrinsic pathway in the inhibition of cell apoptosis by A. phagocytophilum infection of I. scapularis ISE6 cells. In contrast, the results in I. ricinus IRE/CTVM20 cells were similar to those obtained in tick midguts and suggested a role for the JAK/STAT pathway in the inhibition of apoptosis in tick cells infected with A. phagocytophilum

  4. Tissue-Specific Signatures in the Transcriptional Response to Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection of Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes ricinus Tick Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, Pilar; Mansfield, Karen L; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Cook, Charlotte; Ayllón, Nieves; Villar, Margarita; Johnson, Nicholas; Fooks, Anthony R; de la Fuente, José

    2016-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum are transmitted by Ixodes spp. ticks and have become one of the most common and relevant tick-borne pathogens due to their impact on human and animal health. Recent results have increased our understanding of the molecular interactions between Ixodes scapularis and A. phagocytophilum through the demonstration of tissue-specific molecular pathways that ensure pathogen infection, development and transmission by ticks. However, little is known about the Ixodes ricinus genes and proteins involved in the response to A. phagocytophilum infection. The tick species I. scapularis and I. ricinus are evolutionarily closely related and therefore similar responses are expected in A. phagocytophilum-infected cells. However, differences may exist between I. scapularis ISE6 and I. ricinus IRE/CTVM20 tick cells associated with tissue-specific signatures of these cell lines. To address this hypothesis, the transcriptional response to A. phagocytophilum infection was characterized by RNA sequencing and compared between I. scapularis ISE6 and I. ricinus IRE/CTVM20 tick cell lines. The transcriptional response to infection of I. scapularis ISE6 cells resembled that of tick hemocytes while the response in I. ricinus IRE/CTVM20 cells was more closely related to that reported previously in infected tick midguts. The inhibition of cell apoptosis by A. phagocytophilum appears to be a key adaptation mechanism to facilitate infection of both vertebrate and tick cells and was used to investigate further the tissue-specific response of tick cell lines to pathogen infection. The results supported a role for the intrinsic pathway in the inhibition of cell apoptosis by A. phagocytophilum infection of I. scapularis ISE6 cells. In contrast, the results in I. ricinus IRE/CTVM20 cells were similar to those obtained in tick midguts and suggested a role for the JAK/STAT pathway in the inhibition of apoptosis in tick cells infected with A. phagocytophilum. Nevertheless, tick

  5. Peptide micelle-mediated delivery of tissue-specific suicide gene and combined therapy with avastin in a glioblastoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Binna; Han, Jaesik; Choi, Eunji; Tan, Xiaonan; Lee, Minhyung

    2015-04-01

    Bevacizumab (Avastin) is an angiogenesis inhibitor used as a treatment for various cancers. In this study, the combination therapy of Avastin and glioblastoma-specific thymidine kinase gene [pEpo-NI2-SV-herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase(HSVtk)] was evaluated in a glioblastoma animal model. The R7L10 peptide was used as a gene carrier of pEpo-NI2-SV-HSVtk. Gel retardation assays confirmed that R7L10 formed stable complexes with pEpo-NI2-SV-HSVtk. R7L10 protected DNA from nuclease digestion. R7L10 had lower transfection efficiency than polyethylenimine (PEI; 25 kDa). However, the in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays showed that R7L10 had lower cytotoxicity than PEI, suggesting that R7L10 is safer than PEI. For the combination therapy, Avastin was injected intravenously and the pEpo-NI2-SV-HSVtk/R7L10 complexes were injected intratumorally in the glioblastoma animal model. Tumor growth was most effectively inhibited by the combination therapy of Avastin and the gene. The immunostaining results confirmed that the HSVtk genes were expressed in the groups with the pEpo-NI2-SV-HSVtk/R7L10 complex. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay showed a higher level of apoptotic cells in the combination group than the pEpo-NI2-SV-HSVtk/R7L10 complex or Avastin group. In conclusion, the combination of Avastin and the glioblastoma-specific HSVtk gene has a higher antitumor effect than single therapy of Avastin or HSVtk after intratumoral administration in glioblastoma animal model. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  6. Genome-wide tissue-specific occupancy of the Hox protein Ultrabithorax and Hox cofactor Homothorax in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Slattery

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hox genes are responsible for generating morphological diversity along the anterior-posterior axis during animal development. The Drosophila Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx, for example, is required for specifying the identity of the third thoracic (T3 segment of the adult, which includes the dorsal haltere, an appendage required for flight, and the ventral T3 leg. Ubx mutants show homeotic transformations of the T3 leg towards the identity of the T2 leg and the haltere towards the wing. All Hox genes, including Ubx, encode homeodomain containing transcription factors, raising the question of what target genes Ubx regulates to generate these adult structures. To address this question, we carried out whole genome ChIP-chip studies to identify all of the Ubx bound regions in the haltere and T3 leg imaginal discs, which are the precursors to these adult structures. In addition, we used ChIP-chip to identify the sites bound by the Hox cofactor, Ho