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Sample records for exclusive breastfeeding promotion

  1. A qualitative study of the promotion of exclusive breastfeeding by health professionals in Niamey, Niger

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    Moussa Abba Aïssata

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The practice of exclusive breastfeeding depends on various factors related to both mothers and their environment, including the services delivered by health professionals. It is known that support and counseling by health professionals can improve rates, early initiation and total duration of breastfeeding, particularly exclusive breastfeeding. Mothers' decisions are influenced by health professionals' advice. However, in Niger the practice of exclusive breastfeeding is almost non-existent. The purpose of this exploratory study, of which some results are presented here, was to document health professionals' attitudes and practices with regard to exclusive breastfeeding promotion in hospital settings in the urban community of Niamey, Niger. Methods Fieldwork was conducted in Niamey, Niger. A qualitative approach was employed. Health professionals' practices were observed in a sample of frontline public healthcare facilities. Results The field observation results presented here indicate that exclusive breastfeeding is not promoted in healthcare facilities because the health professionals do not encourage it and their practices are inappropriate. Some still have limited knowledge or are misinformed about this practice or do not believe in it. They do not systematically discuss exclusive breastfeeding with mothers, or they mention it only briefly and without giving any explanation. Worse still, some encourage the use of breast milk substitutes, which are frequently promoted in healthcare facilities. Thus mothers often receive contradictory messages. Conclusion The results suggest the need to train or retrain health professionals with regard to exclusive breastfeeding, and regularly supervise their activities.

  2. What works to improve duration of exclusive breastfeeding: lessons from the exclusive breastfeeding promotion program in rural Indonesia.

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    Susiloretni, Kun Aristiati; Hadi, Hamam; Prabandari, Yayi Suryo; Soenarto, Yati S; Wilopo, Siswanto Agus

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to identify determinants of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) at the individual, family, community, and organizational level. This study was a secondary analysis of data from a multilevel promotion of EBF program in two rural public health centers (PHCs) in the Demak district, Central Java, Indonesia. The program was a quasi-experimental study with a pretest-posttest control group. A total of 599 participants were enrolled, consisting of 163 mother infant pairs, 163 fathers, 163 grandmothers, 82 community leaders, and 28 midwives. EBF duration and its determinants were measured and analyzed using Cox proportional-hazard model. Mothers with a high level of breastfeeding knowledge had the greatest EBF duration. Mothers who had a knowledge score >80 had a 73 % (HR 0.27, 95 % CI 0.15, 0.48) greater chance of EBF compared to mothers who had a knowledge score of <60. Factors which shortened EBF duration were grandmother's lack of support for EBF (HR 2.04, 95 % CI 1.33, 3.14), received formula samples at discharge (HR 1.99, 95 % CI 1.25, 3.16), and maternal experience of breast engorgement (HR 1.97, 95 % CI 1.32, 2.94). High maternal breastfeeding knowledge was the only factor associated with longer duration of EBF. Barriers to EBF were breast engorgement, receiving formula samples at discharge, and a grandmother's lack of support for EBF.

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Peer Counselling for the Promotion of Exclusive Breastfeeding in Uganda.

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    Lumbwe Chola

    Full Text Available Community based breastfeeding promotion programmes have been shown to be effective in increasing breastfeeding prevalence. However, there is limited data on the cost-effectiveness of these programmes in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper evaluates the cost-effectiveness of a breastfeeding promotion intervention targeting mothers and their 0 to 6 month old children.Data were obtained from a community randomized trial conducted in Uganda between 2006-2008, and supplemented with evidence from several studies in sub-Saharan Africa. In the trial, peer counselling was offered to women in intervention clusters. In the control and intervention clusters, women could access standard health facility breastfeeding promotion services (HFP. Thus, two methods of breastfeeding promotion were compared: community based peer counselling (in addition to HFP and standard HFP alone. A Markov model was used to calculate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios between the two strategies. The model estimated changes in breastfeeding prevalence and disability adjusted life years. Costs were estimated from a provider perspective. Uncertainty around the results was characterized using one-way sensitivity analyses and a probabilistic sensitivity analysis.Peer counselling more than doubled the breastfeeding prevalence as reported by mothers, but there was no observable impact on diarrhoea prevalence. Estimated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were US$68 per month of exclusive or predominant breastfeeding and U$11,353 per disability adjusted life year (DALY averted. The findings were robust to parameter variations in the sensitivity analyses.Our strategy to promote community based peer counselling is unlikely to be cost-effective in reducing diarrhoea prevalence and mortality in Uganda, because its cost per DALY averted far exceeds the commonly assumed willingness-to-pay threshold of three times Uganda's GDP per capita (US$1653. However, since the intervention significantly

  4. Cost of individual peer counselling for the promotion of exclusive breastfeeding in Uganda

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    Nankunda Jolly

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF for 6 months is the recommended form of infant feeding. Support of mothers through individual peer counselling has been proved to be effective in increasing exclusive breastfeeding prevalence. We present a costing study of an individual peer support intervention in Uganda, whose objective was to raise exclusive breastfeeding rates at 3 months of age. Methods We costed the peer support intervention, which was offered to 406 breastfeeding mothers in Uganda. The average number of counselling visits was about 6 per woman. Annual financial and economic costs were collected in 2005-2008. Estimates were made of total project costs, average costs per mother counselled and average costs per peer counselling visit. Alternative intervention packages were explored in the sensitivity analysis. We also estimated the resources required to fund the scale up to district level, of a breastfeeding intervention programme within a public health sector model. Results Annual project costs were estimated to be US$56,308. The largest cost component was peer supporter supervision, which accounted for over 50% of total project costs. The cost per mother counselled was US$139 and the cost per visit was US$26. The cost per week of EBF was estimated to be US$15 at 12 weeks post partum. We estimated that implementing an alternative package modelled on routine public health sector programmes can potentially reduce costs by over 60%. Based on the calculated average costs and annual births, scaling up modelled costs to district level would cost the public sector an additional US$1,813,000. Conclusion Exclusive breastfeeding promotion in sub-Saharan Africa is feasible and can be implemented at a sustainable cost. The results of this study can be incorporated in cost effectiveness analyses of exclusive breastfeeding promotion programmes in sub-Saharan Africa.

  5. Promotion of exclusive breastfeeding among HIV-positive mothers: an exploratory qualitative study.

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    Hazemba, Alice N; Ncama, Busisiwe P; Sithole, Sello L

    2016-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding has the potential to reduce infant and under-five mortality, but research shows the practice is not widespread in resource-poor settings of sub-Saharan Africa. We explored factors influencing the decision to exclusively breastfeed among HIV-positive mothers accessing interventions for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in selected sites of Zambia. This exploratory qualitative study was embedded in research conducted on: HIV and infant feeding; choices and decision-outcomes in the context of prevention of mother-to-child transmission among HIV-positive mothers in Zambia. Thirty HIV-positive mothers and six key informants were recruited from two health facilities providing mother-to-child HIV transmission prevention services. A semi-structured guide was used to conduct interviews, which were digitally recorded and simultaneously transcribed. Data coding and analysis was done with the support of QRS Nvivo 10 version software. Despite the known benefits of exclusive breastfeeding, gaps in understanding and potential for behaviour change remained. We found that information promoting exclusive breastfeeding may have been understood by mothers as instructions from the health care workers indicating how to feed their HIV-exposed babies rather than as an option for the mothers' own informed-decision. This understanding influenced a mother's perceptions of breast milk safety while on antiretroviral medicine, of the formula feeding option, and of the baby crying after breastfeeding. The meanings mothers attached to exclusive breastfeeding thus influenced their understanding of breast milk insufficiency, abrupt weaning and mixed feeding in the context of preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV. In order to enhance feeding practices for HIV-exposed infants, our study suggests a broader health campaign supporting all mothers to exclusively breastfeed.

  6. Using community volunteers to promote exclusive breastfeeding in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show decreased EBF practice among working mothers, young women, mothers with poor education and fewer than five children. Counseling is a useful strategy for promoting the duration of EBF for six months and for developing support systems for nursing mothers. Working mothers may need additional ...

  7. Costs of promoting exclusive breastfeeding at community level in three sites in South Africa.

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    Lungiswa Leonora Nkonki

    Full Text Available Community-based peer support has been shown to be effective in improving exclusive breastfeeding rates in a variety of settings.We conducted a cost analysis of a community cluster randomised-controlled trial (Promise-EBF, aimed at promoting exclusive infant feeding in three sites in South Africa. The costs were considered from the perspective of health service providers. Peer supporters in this trial visited women to support exclusive infant feeding, once antenatally and four times postpartum.The total economic cost of the Promise-EBF intervention was US$393 656, with average costs per woman and per visit of US$228 and US$52, respectively. The average costs per woman and visit in an operational 'non research' scenario were US$137 and US$32 per woman and visit, respectively. Investing in the promotion of exclusive infant feeding requires substantial financial commitment from policy makers. Extending the tasks of multi-skilled community health workers (CHWs to include promoting exclusive infant feeding is a potential option for reducing these costs. In order to avoid efficiency losses, we recommend that the time requirements for delivering the promotion of exclusive infant feeding are considered when integrating it within the existing activities of CHWs.This paper focuses on interventions for exclusive infant feeding, but its findings more generally illustrate the importance of documenting and quantifying factors that affect the feasibility and sustainability of community-based interventions, which are receiving increased focus in low income settings.

  8. Exclusive Breastfeeding Determinants in Breastfeeding Mother

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    Ika Mustika

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Exclusive breastfeeding until 6 month is very important for baby. The proportion of mothers who exclusively breastfeed their babies up to 6 months remains low. Factors influencing the exclusive breastfeeding namely sociodemograph factors , factors pre / post delivery , and psychosocial factors. This aims of this study to identify determinant factors of exclusive breastfeeding on mother. This research method is a systematic review , by analyzing the various studies on exclusive breastfeeding. There are 17 studies. The results obtained occupational factors most studied with significant results ( median OR = 1.265 . Psychosocial factors that have significant relationship is support of her husband (average OR = 4.716 and family support ( average OR = 1.770 . Conclusions : factors influencing the exclusive breastfeeding is occupational factor. Socialization and support from people nearby, health workers, and all parties is needed for exclusive breastfeeding for six months can be achieved.

  9. Knowledge and practice of exclusive breastfeeding among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and practice of exclusive breastfeeding among women with children aged between 9 ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Conclusion: Most mothers knew the benefits and definitions of exclusive breastfeeding.

  10. Promotion of exclusive breastfeeding is not likely to be cost effective in West Africa. A randomized intervention study from Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne S; Sodemann, Morten; Biai, Sidu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of promotion of exclusive breastfeeding on infant health in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, where mortality rates are high, breastfeeding is widely practiced but exclusive breastfeeding is rare. METHOD: At the Bandim Health Project in Guinea Bissau, West Africa, a birth...... cohort of 1721 infants were randomized to receive health education: promotion of exclusive breastfeeding for the first 4-6 months of life according to WHO recommendations at the time of the study. All children were followed from birth to 6 months of age. RESULTS: Introduction of both water and weaning...

  11. Effect of prenatal education on breastfeeding initiation and exclusive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence of breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding is low globally in both developing and developed countries despite the promotion interventions on breastfeeding rates in early infancy. In Ethiopia, the proportion of women who practiced early breastfeeding initiation (EBI) and exclusive ...

  12. Implementing a WIC-Based Intervention to Promote Exclusive Breastfeeding: Challenges, Facilitators, and Adaptive Strategies.

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    Eldridge, Johanna D; Hartnett, Josette O; Lee, Furrina F; Sekhobo, Jackson P; Edmunds, Lynn S

    Understand factors that contributed to the implementation of a successful multicomponent intervention to promote exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) within Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Woman, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinics. Qualitative study of staff implementers' experiences using implementation status reports, facilitated group discussion immediately after implementation, and WIC administrative data. WIC staff from 12 clinics participated in an EBF Learning Community composed of 8 intervention trainings and ongoing support from trainers and peers. A total of 47 WIC staff including 11 directors, 20 other administrators, 8 nutritionists, and 6 peer counselors. A WIC-integrated EBF promotion initiative, supported through a Learning Community, composed of prenatal screening, tailored trimester-specific counseling, and timely postpartum follow-up. Challenges and facilitators to implementation within clinics. Iterative qualitative analysis using directed, emergent, and thematic coding. Implementation experiences were characterized by (1) perceived benefits of implementation, including improved EBF knowledge and counseling confidence among staff; and (2) managing implementation, including responding to challenges posed by clinic settings (resources, routine practices, values, and perceptions of mothers) through strategies such as adapting clinic practices and intervention components. Implementation was shaped by clinic setting and adaptive strategies. Future WIC interventions may benefit from formal consideration of intervention fit with local clinic setting and allowable adaptations. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Barriers to Exclusive Breastfeeding among Urban Mothers

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    Lazina Sharmin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breastfeeding is the unique source of nutrition and it plays an important role in the growth, development and survival of the infants. The initiation of breastfeeding within one hour and continuation of only breast milk up to six months ensure maximum benefits. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding in Bangladesh is 56% which is low. We designed this study to find out the factors influencing the duration of breastfeeding in Bangladeshi population. Objective: To study the factors influencing noncompliance to exclusive breastfeeding. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in Dhaka Shishu Hospital during the period January to June 2011. It includes 125 infant (1–12 months-mother pairs randomly selected from the inpatient and outpatient departments of Dhaka Shishu Hospital. Mother-infant pairs were divided into two groups based on continuation of only breastfeeding up to six months. Outcomes were compared between two groups. Results: In this study exclusive breastfeeding was found in 27.2% and nonexclusive breastfeeding was in 72.8% cases. It was found that in most cases (40% termination of breastfeeding was at 3--4 months. The study revealed that insufficient milk production due to poor position and attachment, social factors such as influence of husband and other family members, joining to service etc act as barrier to exclusive breastfeeding. Mass media and advice from health professionals had a higher influence on lower rate of exclusive breastfeeding. Women who were multiparous, housewives were more likely to maintain optimal breastfeeding. Conclusion: The present study reveals some important factors contributing to low rate of exclusive breastfeeding in Bangladesh.

  14. Enforcing the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes for Better Promotion of Exclusive Breastfeeding: Can Lessons Be Learned?

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    Barennes, Hubert; Slesak, Guenther; Goyet, Sophie; Aaron, Percy; Srour, Leila M

    2016-02-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding, one of the best natural resources, needs protection and promotion. The International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes (the Code), which aims to prevent the undermining of breastfeeding by formula advertising, faces implementation challenges. We reviewed frequently overlooked challenges and obstacles that the Code is facing worldwide, but particularly in Southeast Asia. Drawing lessons from various countries where we work, and following the example of successful public health interventions, we discussed legislation, enforcement, and experiences that are needed to successfully implement the Code. Successful holistic approaches that have strengthened the Code need to be scaled up. Community-based actions and peer-to-peer promotions have proved successful. Legislation without stringent enforcement and sufficient penalties is ineffective. The public needs education about the benefits and ways and means to support breastfeeding. It is crucial to combine strong political commitment and leadership with strict national regulations, definitions, and enforcement. National breastfeeding committees, with the authority to improve regulations, investigate violations, and enforce the laws, must be established. Systematic monitoring and reporting are needed to identify companies, individuals, intermediaries, and practices that infringe on the Code. Penalizing violators is crucial. Managers of multinational companies must be held accountable for international violations, and international legislative enforcement needs to be established. Further measures should include improved regulations to protect the breastfeeding mother: large-scale education campaigns; strong penalties for Code violators; exclusion of the formula industry from nutrition, education, and policy roles; supportive legal networks; and independent research of interventions supporting breastfeeding. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Association between Exclusive Breastfeeding and Child Development

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    Ghaniyyatul Khudri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Child development highly correlates with child’s quality. The fastest child development period is during the first three years, also called golden period. This research was aimed to discover correlation between exclussive breastfeeding and child development in Cipacing Village Jatinangor, district of Sumedang. Methods: This research was conducted using cross-sectional method in thirteen Pos Pelayanan Terpadu (Posyandu Cipacing Village in Jatinangor. One hundred and two children aged 12−24 months with their caregiver were recruited as respondents by using cluster sampling method. Hist ory of exclusive breastfeeding was assessed with questionnaire while child development status was assesed with Kuesioner Pra Skrining Perkembangan (KPSP in September 2013 after informed consent was obtained. Chi-square test analysis was performed to determine correlation between exclusive breastfeeding and child development status. Results: Overall, children in Cipacing Village had non-exclusive breastfeeding history (83.3%, and only 16.7% respondents had exclusive breastfeeding history. Meanwhile, 89.2% of children had normal development status, and 10.8% had delayed development status. Statistic analysis using chi-square test in the level of 95% confidence between exclusive breastfeeding and child development showed p=0.686 and odds ratio 2.133. Conclusions: There is no significant relationship between history of exclusive breastfeeding and child development status.

  16. Determinants of exclusive breastfeeding practices in Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite the demonstrated benefits of breast milk, the prevalence of breastfeeding, in-particular exclusive breastfeeding (EBF), in many developing countries including Ethiopia is lower than the international recommendation of EBF for the first six months of life. Objective: To assess the practice of EBF and ...

  17. Alternative hospital gift bags and breastfeeding exclusivity.

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    Bai, Yeon; Wunderlich, Shahla M; Kashdan, Rickie

    2013-01-01

    The type of gift bags given to new mothers at the time of discharge from the hospital can influence their confidence in breastfeeding. Most hospitals in the US continue to distribute commercial gift bags containing formula samples despite the reported negative influence of commercial bags on the duration of breastfeeding. This study compared breastfeeding outcomes in women receiving three different kinds of gift bags at discharge. A prospective intervention study was conducted during 2009-2010 in New Jersey. Three breastfeeding cohorts were recruited and assigned to three groups: COMMERCIAL received discharge bags containing formula samples, BF-INFO received breastfeeding information and supplies, and PUMP received breastfeeding information/supplies plus a manual breast pump. Follow-up contacts were at 2, 4, and 12 postpartum weeks to determine breastfeeding outcome. The mean durations of exclusive (EBF) and partial breastfeeding were compared between groups using ANOVA. A total of 386 participants completed the study. The mean EBF duration (weeks) in the PUMP (n = 138, 8.28 ± 4.86) and BF-INFO (n = 121, 7.87 ± 4.63) were significantly longer (P < 0.01) than COMMERCIAL (n = 127, 6.12 ± 4.49). The rate of EBF through 12 weeks in PUMP was most consistent. The mean duration of partial breastfeeding showed similar results: significantly longer in PUMP and BF-INFO than COMMERCIAL (P < 0.01).

  18. Teenage pregnancy and exclusive breastfeeding rates.

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    Puapompong, Pawin; Raungrongmorakot, Kasem; Manolerdtewan, Wichian; Ketsuwan, Sukwadee; Wongin, Sinutchanan

    2014-09-01

    Teenage pregnancy is an important health issue globally and in Thailand Younger age mothers decide on the breastfeeding practices ofthe first 6-month. To find the rates of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding practices of teenage mothers and compare them with the rates of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding practices in mothers who are 20 years of age or more. Three thousand five hundred sixty three normal, postpartum women, who delivered without complications at the HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Medical Center in the Nakhon Nayok Province between 2010 and2013 were included in this study. At the second daypostpartum, the data of latch scores and the data of the practice of exclusive breastfeeding were collected Telephone follow-ups on the seventh, fourteenth, and forty-fifth postpartum days and at the second, fourth, and sixth month postpartum month were collected and used for exclusive breastfeeding data following discharge. Demographic data included the maternal age, parity, gestational age, marital status, occupation, religion, route ofdelivery, estimated blood loss, body mass index, nipple length, and the childs birth weight. The collected data was analyzed by the t-test, Chi-square, and odds ratio with 95% confidence interval. The percentage of teenage pregnancies was at 14.8% (527 cases). On postpartum day 2, the percentage of latch scores of 8 or less was 66.4%. At the seventh, fourteenth, and forty-fifth day and at the second, fourth, and sixth months postpartum, the exclusive breastfeeding rates were 88.5, 78.5, 57.6, 43.1, 32.9, and27.0%, respectively. Comparison of the 6-month exclusive breastfeeding rates between teenage mothers and mothers 20 years ofage or older were not statistically significant (pteenage mothers was at 27.0% and had no significant differences from the rates of mothers 20 years of age or more.

  19. Determinants of the exclusive breastfeeding abandonment: psychosocial factors

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    Mariana Campos Martins Machado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To assess the determinants of exclusive breastfeeding abandonment. METHODS Longitudinal study based on a birth cohort in Viçosa, MG, Southeastern Brazil. In 2011/2012, 168 new mothers accessing the public health network were followed. Three interviews, at 30, 60, and 120 days postpartum, with the new mothers were conducted. Exclusive breastfeeding abandonment was analyzed in the first, second, and fourth months after childbirth. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was applied to identify depressive symptoms in the first and second meetings, with a score of ≥ 12 considered as the cutoff point. Socioeconomic, demographic, and obstetric variables were investigated, along with emotional conditions and the new mothers’ social network during pregnancy and the postpartum period. RESULTS The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding abandonment at 30, 60, and 120 days postpartum was 53.6% (n = 90, 47.6% (n = 80, and 69.6% (n = 117, respectively, and its incidence in the fourth month compared with the first was 48.7%. Depressive symptoms and traumatic delivery were associated with exclusive breastfeeding abandonment in the second month after childbirth. In the fourth month, the following variables were significant: lower maternal education levels, lack of homeownership, returning to work, not receiving guidance on breastfeeding in the postpartum period, mother’s negative reaction to the news of pregnancy, and not receiving assistance from their partners for infant care. CONCLUSIONS Psychosocial and sociodemographic factors were strong predictors of early exclusive breastfeeding abandonment. Therefore, it is necessary to identify and provide early treatment to nursing mothers with depressive symptoms, decreasing the associated morbidity and promoting greater duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Support from health professionals, as well as that received at home and at work, can assist in this process.

  20. Exclusive Breastfeeding, Prevalence and Maternal Concerns: Saudi and Egyptian Mothers

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    Nafee Elsayed, Hoda Mohamed; Al-Dossary, Latifa Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Breast milk is rich in nutrients and anti-bodies and contains the right quantities of sugar, water, fat and protein that promotes not only growth and development of infants but also important for their survive. Exclusive breastfeeding is enough to the needs of infants less than six months without any addition. Several studies mentioned that the…

  1. The Role of Social-Cognitive and Emotional Factors on Exclusive Breastfeeding Duration.

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    Shepherd, Lee; Walbey, Cherokee; Lovell, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Previous research has suggested that exclusive breastfeeding is likely to be predicted by social-cognitive variables and fear. However, there is little research assessing the role of regret and self-conscious emotions (e.g., pride and guilt) in promoting exclusive breastfeeding. Research aim: The primary aim of this research was to determine whether social-cognitive variables, fear, regret, and self-conscious emotions predict exclusive breastfeeding duration. The secondary aim of this research was to assess whether these factors predict infant-feeding choice (i.e., exclusively breastfed, combination fed, or generally formula fed). In this nonexperimental one-group self-report survey, 375 mothers rated social-cognitive variables toward breastfeeding (attitude, subjective norm, perceived control, and self-efficacy), their fear toward inadequate nutrition from breastfeeding and breastfeeding damaging their physical appearance, and the extent to which mothers may feel pride toward breastfeeding and negative self-conscious emotions (guilt and shame) and regret for not breastfeeding their infant. Exclusive breastfeeding duration was positively predicted by self-efficacy, pride, and regret but negatively predicted by the fear toward inadequate nutrition. We also found that in contrast with exclusive breastfeeding, generally formula feeding an infant was associated with lower self-efficacy, pride, and regret but higher subjective norm and fear toward inadequate nutrition through breastfeeding. The authors argue that it is important to consider the role of self-conscious emotions and regret on exclusive breastfeeding.

  2. Young mothers, first time parenthood and exclusive breastfeeding in Kenya.

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    Naanyu, Violet

    2008-12-01

    Breastfeeding behaviour is explored in Kenya using data collected in the town of Eldoret, Kenya. This paper specifically examines duration of exclusive breastfeeding among young mothers below 20 years of age as compared to older cohorts. Additionally, focus is laid on the effect of first time motherhood and breastfeeding difficulties on exclusive breastfeeding. Results show that Eldoret mothers are aware of benefits of breastfeeding; nevertheless, the mean duration for exclusive breastfeeding in this sample is 2.4 months. Higher durations of exclusive breastfeeding are associated with increasing age and first time motherhood. Predictably, breastfeeding difficulties bear a negative association with exclusive breastfeeding. While HIV is transmissible through breastfeeding, breast milk remains a vital source of nourishment for infants in Sub-Saharan Africa. More research on mothering should examine the changing socio-economic milieu and its influence on women's infant feeding decisions

  3. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding among mothers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study could help mothers, Ministry of Health and other nongovernmental organisations working with child health programmes, in likely interventions and supporting the ongoing child survival programmes, by taking appropriate steps in enhancing exclusive breastfeeding. As mothers attend antenatal and ...

  4. Exclusive breastfeeding among Canadian Inuit: results from the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey.

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    McIsaac, Kathryn E; Lou, Wendy; Sellen, Daniel; Young, T Kue

    2014-05-01

    Very little population-based research has been conducted around the exclusive breastfeeding practices of Inuit Canadians. This research aims to assess the distribution of exclusive breastfeeding among Inuit Canadians and to identify factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding as recommended. We use data from 188 infant-mother dyads who completed the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey, a cross-sectional, population-based survey of Inuit children aged 3 to 5 years. A series of multinomial logistic regression models were run to identify factors associated with 4 exclusive breastfeeding durations (≤ 1 month, > 1- 6.5 months). Of infants, 23% were exclusively breastfed as recommended (ie, between 5.5 and 6.5 months; 95% CI, 16.2-29.3). Many infants (61%) were exclusively breastfed for less than 5.5 months and 16% (95% CI, 10.9-22.0) were exclusively breastfed for more than 6.5 months. Families receiving income support were less likely to discontinue exclusive breastfeeding before 5.5 months (pOR1- Inuit Canadian infants receive suboptimal exclusive breastfeeding. National, provincial, and community-specific interventions to protect, promote, and support exclusive breastfeeding should emphasize not only the benefits of exclusively breastfeeding to 6 months but also the importance of timely introduction of complementary foods into the infant's diet.

  5. Factors Influencing The Practice Of Exclusive Breastfeeding In Three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breastfeeding is the super food for babies and is sufficient if given exclusively in the first six months of a baby's life. In Nigeria, the practice of breastfeeding is high but Exclusive Breastfeeding (EBF) rates remain low at 13%. Several interrelating factors directly or indirectly affect the decision or ability of mothers ...

  6. Young Mothers, First Time Parenthood and Exclusive Breastfeeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    This paper specifically examines duration of exclusive breastfeeding among young mothers below ... Results show that Eldoret mothers are aware of benefits of breastfeeding; nevertheless, the ... More research on mothering should examine.

  7. [Prevalence of breastfeeding and factors associated with the start and duration of exclusive breastfeeding in the Community of Madrid among participants in the ELOIN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiro González, María D; Ortiz Marrón, Honorato; Arana Cañedo-Argüelles, Celina; Esparza Olcina, María Jesús; Cortés Rico, Olga; Terol Claramonte, María; Ordobás Gavín, María

    2017-11-02

    Breastfeeding has important benefits for population health. The aims of this study are: (i)to determine the prevalence and duration of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding; (ii)analyse the reasons for not starting or abandoning of breastfeeding, and (iii)describe the factors associated with the initiation and duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Cross sectional study using the baseline data of the ELOIN cohort, obtained using an epidemiological questionnaire. A sample of 2,627 children born in 2008-2009 from the Community of Madrid was studied. Logistic regression models were used. Prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding and breastfeeding was 77.6% and 88% respectively; prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding at 6months 25.4%, and prevalence of breastfeeding at 2years was 7.7%. The most common reasons for abandoning breastfeeding were insufficient milk (36%), and incorporation to work (25.9%). The variables associated with starting or maintaining of exclusive breastfeeding were: mother older than 35years, medium-high economic status, foreigner residing in Spain less than 10 years, and having participated in a breastfeeding workshop. Breastfeeding prevalence in the Community of Madrid did not reach the international recommendations in 2008-2009. It is necessary to intensify strategies for breastfeeding promotion, protection, and support, including their periodic monitoring. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  8. Initiation of breastfeeding and prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding at hospital discharge in urban, suburban and rural areas of Zhejiang China

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    Binns Colin W

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of exclusive breastfeeding in China are relatively low and below national targets. The aim of this study was to document the factors that influence exclusive breastfeeding initiation in Zhejiang, PR China. Methods A cohort study of infant feeding practices was undertaken in Zhejiang Province, an eastern coastal region of China. A total of 1520 mothers who delivered in four hospitals located in city, suburb and rural areas during late 2004 to 2005 were enrolled in the study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to explore factors related to exclusive breastfeeding initiation. Results On discharge from hospital, 50.3% of the mothers were exclusively breastfeeding their infants out of 96.9% of the mothers who had earlier initiated breastfeeding. Exclusive breastfeeding was positively related to vaginal birth, baby's first feed being breast milk, mother living in the suburbs or rural areas, younger age of mother, lower maternal education level and family income. Conclusion The exclusive breastfeeding rate in Zhejiang is only 50.3% on discharge and does not reach Chinese or international targets. A number of behaviours have been identified in the study that could be potentially incorporated into health promotion activities.

  9. Risk factors for exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months-Identifying women in need of targeted breastfeeding support.

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    Karin Cato

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding rates in Sweden are declining, and it is important to identify women at risk for early cessation of exclusive breastfeeding.The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum.A population-based longitudinal study was conducted at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Six hundred and seventy-nine women were included in this sub-study. Questionnaires were sent at five days, six weeks and six months postpartum, including questions on breastfeeding initiation and duration as well as several other background variables. The main outcome measure was exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used in order to calculate adjusted Odds Ratios (AOR and 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI.Seventy-seven percent of the women reported exclusive breastfeeding at two months postpartum. The following variables in the multivariate regression analysis were independently associated with exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum: being a first time mother (AOR 2.15, 95% CI 1.32-3.49, reporting emotional distress during pregnancy (AOR 2.21, 95% CI 1.35-3.62 and giving birth by cesarean section (AOR 2.63, 95% CI 1.34-5.17.Factors associated with shorter exclusive breastfeeding duration were determined. Identification of women experiencing emotional distress during pregnancy, as well as scrutiny of caregiving routines on cesarean section need to be addressed, in order to give individual targeted breastfeeding support and promote longer breastfeeding duration.

  10. FACTOR ANALYSIS ABOUT EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING ACHIEVEMENT LEVEL AMONG MOTHERS WHO PROVIDE BREASTMILK TO THEIR CHILDREN

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    Tiyas Kusumaningrum

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The number of mother who breastfeed their babies exclusively in Indonesia is low. It caused by many factors such as high intensity of formula milk advertisement, lack of awareness about the importance of breastfeeding, working mother, social culture, family support and the role of health care provider. The purpose of this research was to analyze factors related with successfulness level of exclusive breastfeeding. Method: Design used in this research was analytic retrospective. The population were all mothers at Pacarkeling Public Health Center area. Sample obtained through purposive sampling. Total sample was 61 respondents. Independent variables were knowledge, information and promotion, family support, social cultural, role of health provider, work/occupation, education and breast physiology anatomy. The dependent variable was exclusive breastfeeding. Result: The result indicated that exclusive breastfeeding achievement level was related with information and promotion (r = 0.271, family support (r = 373, health care provider role (r = 231, mother occupation (r = 251, anatomy and physiology of breast (r = 293, while the knowledge (r = 108, social cultural (r = 180 and education (r = 093 not significantly related. Discussion: In conclusion, there was a positive correlation between information and promotion, family support, health care provider role, mother’s occupation, anatomy and physiology of breast with successfulness level of exclusive breastfeeding. While the knowledge, social cultural and education did not indicate significant result. Therefore it is suggested to increase the quantity and quality of information and promotion about exclusive breastfeeding to the society, health care provider and pregnant and breastfeeding mother.

  11. Young mothers, first time parenthood and exclusive breastfeeding in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breastfeeding behaviour is explored in Kenya using data collected in the town of Eldoret, Kenya. This paper specifically examines duration of exclusive breastfeeding among young mothers below 20 years of age as compared to older cohorts. Additionally, focus is laid on the effect of first time motherhood and breastfeeding ...

  12. What factors influence exclusive breastfeeding based on the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Lijuan; Wan, Hongwei

    2018-04-10

    The primary objective is to investigate the related factors of exclusive breastfeeding based on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and identify the most influencing factor in first-time mothers at 4 postnatal months. A cross-sectional study was conducted and 400 first-time mothers at 4 months postnatal were approached. Data on mothers' breastfeeding knowledge, attitude, subjective norm and practice control were collected at 4 months postnatal based on the TPB. The associations between these four factors and exclusive breastfeeding outcome were analysed using logistic regression and artificial neural network. Responses were acquired from 272 mothers. Exclusive breastfeeding rate was 34.4% at 4 months. About 66% and 79% mothers stopped breastfeeding their babies partially and absolutely during the first two postnatal months. Results showed that higher scores of breastfeeding knowledge (OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.04-1.14), attitude (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.00-1.09), subjective norm (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.11-1.34) and practice control (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.02-1.20) were associated with a higher rate of exclusive breastfeeding. Among the four factors, breastfeeding knowledge was the utmost important factor contributing to exclusive breastfeeding. Breastfeeding knowledge, attitude, subjective norm and practice control are positively related to exclusive breastfeeding based on the TPB. Future breastfeeding promotion intervention should target these four factors, especially breastfeeding knowledge, and continue for at least two postnatal months. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding in the Legal Amazon and Northeast regions, Brazil, 2010

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    Alice Cristina Medeiros das Neves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to identify the factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding in children aged less than six months from the Brazilian Legal Amazon and Northeast regions. METHODS: The study used data from a survey that assessed prenatal and infant (<1 year care in 2010. Sociodemographic, prenatal, delivery, and puerperium care factors with p<0.05 in multivariate analysis were associated with exclusive breastfeeding. RESULTS: For both regions, the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding decreased with age, which was the main variable associated with early weaning. In the Legal Amazon, exclusive breastfeeding prevailed among: mothers aged 35 years or more; mothers living in state capitals; and mothers who breastfed on the first hour of life. In the Northeast, the probability of exclusive breastfeeding was greater for mothers aged 35 years or more. CONCLUSION: The factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding were child's and mother's age in both regions; and residence location and breastfeeding in the first hour of life in the Legal Amazon, suggesting the need of differentiated strategies for the promotion of exclusive breastfeeding.

  14. Constraints to exclusive breastfeeding practice among breastfeeding mothers in Southwest Nigeria: implications for scaling up

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    Agunbiade Ojo M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The practice of exclusive breastfeeding is still low despite the associated benefits. Improving the uptake and appropriating the benefits will require an understanding of breastfeeding as an embodied experience within a social context. This study investigates breastfeeding practices and experiences of nursing mothers and the roles of grandmothers, as well as the work-related constraints affecting nurses in providing quality support for breastfeeding mothers in Southwest Nigeria. Methods Using a concurrent mixed method approach, a structured questionnaire was administered to 200 breastfeeding mothers. In-depth interviews were also held with breastfeeding mothers (11, nurses (10 and a focus group discussion session with grandmothers. Results Breastfeeding was perceived as essential to baby's health. It strengthens the physical and spiritual bond between mothers and their children. Exclusive breastfeeding was considered essential but demanding. Only a small proportion (19% of the nursing mothers practiced exclusive breastfeeding. The survey showed the major constraints to exclusive breastfeeding to be: the perception that babies continued to be hungry after breastfeeding (29%; maternal health problems (26%; fear of babies becoming addicted to breast milk (26%; pressure from mother-in-law (25%; pains in the breast (25%; and the need to return to work (24%. In addition, the qualitative findings showed that significant others played dual roles with consequences on breastfeeding practices. The desire to practice exclusive breastfeeding was often compromised shortly after child delivery. Poor feeding, inadequate support from husband and conflicting positions from the significant others were dominant constraints. The nurses decried the effects of their workload on providing quality supports for nursing mothers. Conclusion Breastfeeding mothers are faced with multiple challenges as they strive to practice exclusive breastfeeding. Thus

  15. Barriers to postnatal care and exclusive breastfeeding among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Poor knowledge and inaccessibility to health facilities were the main obstacles to postnatal care while the practice of exclusive breastfeeding was limited by the stress and mothers refusal. Keywords: Exclusive breastfeeding, postnatal care, southeastern Nigeria, urban women. Nigerian Medical Journal | Vol.

  16. Exclusive Breastfeeding and Malaria in Early Infancy: Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malaria is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in African children including infants while the roles of exclusive breastfeeding in the prevention of infections and protection against several common childhood morbidities are widely acknowledged. To study the role of exclusive breastfeeding on the incidence of malaria in ...

  17. Beliefs of Pregnant Women in Qom City about Exclusive Breastfeeding until 6 Months of Age, Iran

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    Rahimi Tahereh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Exclusive breastfeeding is the most effective way of feeding infants until 6 months of age. The present study aimed to determine the beliefs of pregnant women in Qom city about exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months of age based on constructs of theory of planned behavior. : In this descriptive cross-sectional study, after designing a questionnaire to measure the constructs of theory of planned behavior, including behavioral, normative, and control beliefs, and also determining its validity and reliability, 240 pregnant women in Qom were selected using cluster sampling and completed the questionnaires. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: More emotional relationship with infants was the most important positive behavioral belief, and belief in breast malformation and fatigue was negative behavioral beliefs about exclusive breastfeeding among the pregnant women. The opinion of physicians and health care providers about exclusive breastfeeding was reported as the most important normative belief, and urging of relatives, especially mother or mother-in-law to use sweet water or powdered milk was the most important control beliefs among the mothers, which made exclusive breastfeeding difficult. Conclusion: Promoting positive beliefs and correcting wrong beliefs about exclusive breastfeeding, along with consideration of the role of health care providers and husband would help pregnant mothers to accept the choice of exclusive breastfeeding until the end of 6 months of age.

  18. Perceptions of northeast Thai breastfeeding mothers regarding facilitators and barriers to six-month exclusive breastfeeding: focus group discussions.

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    Thepha, Thiwawan; Marais, Debbie; Bell, Jacqueline; Muangpin, Somjit

    2018-01-01

    The 6-month exclusive breastfeeding rate in the Northeast region of Thailand has recently significantly decreased in contrast to all other regions in Thailand. The factors that have influenced this decrease remain unknown. Hence, it is suggested that an investigation into factors that could improve or hinder EBF for 6 months in Northeast Thailand may be required to inform the development of relevant interventions to improve this situation. This study aimed to identify perceived facilitators and barriers to providing exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months in Northeast Thailand among breastfeeding mothers. Six focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 30 mothers aged 20 to 40 years who had children aged between 4 and 6 months and were currently breastfeeding or had breastfeeding experience. Participants were recruited through self-selection sampling from Khonkaen hospital (urban), Numphong hospital (peri-urban) and private hospitals (urban) in Khonkaen, Thailand. Thematic analysis was employed to analyse the data. Five main themes, with 10 sub-themes, were identified as either facilitators (+) or barriers (-), or in some cases, as both (+/-). Breastfeeding knowledge, perceptions, maternal circumstances, support, and traditional food were the main identified themes. Mother's breastfeeding knowledge, intention to breastfeed, and social media were perceived as facilitators. Perceptions, employment, and formula milk promotion were perceived as barriers. Family, healthcare, and traditional food were perceived as both facilitators and barriers. The perception that social media was a way to access breastfeeding knowledge and support mothers in Northeast Thailand emerged as a new facilitating factor that had not previously been identified in Thai literature relating to facilitators and barriers to exclusive breastfeeding. Intention to breastfeed, family support, healthcare support and traditional food were mentioned by all groups, whereas mothers from urban

  19. Influence of maternity leave on exclusive breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Fernanda R; Buccini, Gabriela Dos S; Venâncio, Sônia I; da Costa, Teresa H M

    To describe the profile of women with children aged under 4 months living in the Brazilian state capitals and in the Federal District according to their working status and to analyze the influence of maternity leave on exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) among working women. This was a cross-sectional study with data extracted from the II National Maternal Breastfeeding Prevalence Survey carried out in 2008. Initially, a descriptive analysis of the profile of 12,794 women was performed, according to their working status and maternity leave and the frequency of maternity leave in the Brazilian regions and capitals. The study used a multiple model to identify the influence of maternity leave on EBF interruption, including 3766 women who declared they were working and were on maternity leave at the time of the interview. The outcome assessed in the study was the interruption of the EBF, classified by the WHO. Regarding the working status of the mothers, 63.4% did not work outside of their homes and among those who worked, 69.8% were on maternity leave. The largest prevalence among workers was of women older than 35 years of age, with more than 12 years of schooling, primiparous and from the Southeast and South regions. The lack of maternity leave increased by 23% the chance of EBF interruption. Maternity leave contributed to increase the prevalence of EBF in the Brazilian states capitals, supporting the importance of increasing the maternity leave period from four to six months. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of maternity leave on exclusive breastfeeding

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    Fernanda R. Monteiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: To describe the profile of women with children aged under 4 months living in the Brazilian state capitals and in the Federal District according to their working status and to analyze the influence of maternity leave on exclusive breastfeeding (EBF among working women. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study with data extracted from the II National Maternal Breastfeeding Prevalence Survey carried out in 2008. Initially, a descriptive analysis of the profile of 12,794 women was performed, according to their working status and maternity leave and the frequency of maternity leave in the Brazilian regions and capitals. The study used a multiple model to identify the influence of maternity leave on EBF interruption, including 3766 women who declared they were working and were on maternity leave at the time of the interview. The outcome assessed in the study was the interruption of the EBF, classified by the WHO. Results: Regarding the working status of the mothers, 63.4% did not work outside of their homes and among those who worked, 69.8% were on maternity leave. The largest prevalence among workers was of women older than 35 years of age, with more than 12 years of schooling, primiparous and from the Southeast and South regions. The lack of maternity leave increased by 23% the chance of EBF interruption. Conclusion: Maternity leave contributed to increase the prevalence of EBF in the Brazilian states capitals, supporting the importance of increasing the maternity leave period from four to six months.

  1. "I did a lot of Googling": A qualitative study of exclusive breastfeeding support through social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alianmoghaddam, Narges; Phibbs, Suzanne; Benn, Cheryl

    2018-06-16

    Little qualitative research has been done to explore the quality of breastfeeding support through social media in New Zealand. This article aims to explore the influence of social media on exclusive breastfeeding practice. A qualitative study involving face-to-face postpartum interviews with 30 mothers who were recruited from the lower North Island of New Zealand. Each participant was followed via short monthly audio-recorded telephone interviews until giving up exclusive breastfeeding or until six months after the birth. The theories "strength of weak ties" and "landscapes of care" are applied to the thematic analysis of the interview material to illuminate the influence of social media on breastfeeding practices. Qualitative analysis of the interview material identified four themes: 1) Mothers need reliable online infant feeding information; 2) Smartphone apps can be a good option for promoting breastfeeding; 3) Information is accessed through weak ties among breastfeeding mothers on Facebook, and 4) the utility of geographically distant infant feeding support via Skype. Most participants sourced post-partum information and advice to support breastfeeding through the Internet, while those with geographically distant family members accessed emotional and practical breastfeeding support via Skype. Breastfeeding advocates should use social media to promote and support exclusive breast-feeding practice. The influence of social media on breastfeeding points to the relational nature of breastfeeding which is embedded in 'real' world and virtual social networks as well as the cultural, geographic and social contexts of a mother's life. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determinants of exclusive breastfeeding in a cohort of primiparous periurban peruvian mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Susana L; Nommsen-Rivers, Laurie A; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2012-02-01

    The authors aimed to identify factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) among 117 Peruvian mothers planning to breastfeed exclusively. Data were collected on days 0 and 3, and months 1, 3, and 6. Exclusive breastfeeding status was evaluated with a 24-hour recall of infant diet. Exclusive breastfeeding rates were 74%, 72%, and 35% at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively. At 3 months, lower maternal education, greater breastfeeding frequency (day 3), greater breast pain (day 3), and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate use (3 months) were associated with EBF, after adjusting for EBF intentions. At 6 months, greater infant birth weight and mother-not employed were associated with EBF, after controlling for EBF intentions. More educated and working mothers, and infants with lower birth weight should be targeted in interventions to promote EBF in urban Peru. Research is also warranted to explore the factors linking depot medroxyprogesterone acetate use and breast pain with EBF duration.

  3. Growth effects of exclusive breastfeeding promotion by peer counsellors in sub-Saharan Africa: the cluster-randomised PROMISE EBF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretsen, Ingunn Marie Stadskleiv; Jackson, Debra; Fadnes, Lars Thore; Nankabirwa, Victoria; Diallo, Abdoulaye Hama; Doherty, Tanya; Lombard, Carl; Swanvelder, Sonja; Nankunda, Jolly; Ramokolo, Vundli; Sanders, David; Wamani, Henry; Meda, Nicolas; Tumwine, James K; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte; Van de Perre, Philippe; Kankasa, Chipepo; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Tylleskär, Thorkild

    2014-06-21

    In this multi-country cluster-randomized behavioural intervention trial promoting exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) in Africa, we compared growth of infants up to 6 months of age living in communities where peer counsellors promoted EBF with growth in those infants living in control communities. A total of 82 clusters in Burkina Faso, Uganda and South Africa were randomised to either the intervention or the control arm. Feeding data and anthropometric measurements were collected at visits scheduled 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks post-partum. We calculated weight-for-length (WLZ), length-for-age (LAZ) and weight-for-age (WAZ) z-scores. Country specific adjusted Least Squares Means with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on a longitudinal analysis are reported. Prevalence ratios (PR) for the association between peer counselling for EBF and wasting (WLZ economic status, the mean WLZ at 24 weeks were in Burkina Faso -0.20 (95% CI -0.39 to -0.01) and in Uganda -0.23 (95% CI -0.43 to -0.03) lower in the intervention than in the control arm. In South Africa the mean WLZ at 24 weeks was 0.23 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.43) greater in the intervention than in the control arm. Differences in LAZ between the study arms were small and not statistically significant. In Uganda, infants in the intervention arm were more likely to be wasted compared to those in the control arm at 24 weeks (PR 2.36; 95% CI 1.11 to 5.00). Differences in wasting in South Africa and Burkina Faso and stunting and underweight in all three countries were small and not significantly different. There were small differences in mean anthropometric indicators between the intervention and control arms in the study, but in Uganda and Burkina Faso, a tendency to slightly lower ponderal growth (weight-for-length z-scores) was found in the intervention arms. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00397150.

  4. Factors associated with exclusive breast-feeding and breast-feeding in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Kristiansen, Anne Lene; Lande, Britt; Øverby, Nina Cecilie; Andersen, Lene Frost

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify factors associated with exclusive breast-feeding and breast-feeding during the first year of life among Norwegian infants. Design Data on breast-feeding practices were collected by a semi-quantitative FFQ. Setting In 2006?2007 about 3000 infants were invited to participate in a population-based prospective cohort study in Norway. Subjects A total of 1490 mothers/infants participated at both 6 and 12 months of age. Results Exclusive breast-feeding at 4 months was associat...

  5. Prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding in the healthy newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazo-Tomé, Pedro Luis Del; Suárez-Rodríguez, Marta

    2018-01-01

    The best nourishment for infants during the first 6 months of life is exclusive breastfeeding. It is recommended along with other food to complement the diet until the child is 2 years old, as long as the mother and the child are willing to continue with it. The objectives of this study were to determine he exclusive breastfeeding rate in full term newborns at hospital discharge and 15 days later and to analyze the factors that positively affect the exclusive breastfeeding. A prospective study was conducted in which a sample of postpartum women with full term newborns was recruited during hospital admission. Different variables were compiled and two interviews were made to determine the kind of feeding they were giving their children and if it was maintained at 15 days of birth. Exclusive breastfeeding rate at hospital discharge is much lower than recommended. It significantly decreases at 15 days of birth, increasing artificial feeding. It seems that having a vaginal birth, no complications giving birth, providing early breastfeeding and skin-to-skin contact in the delivery room are predisposing factors necessary to establish a good breastfeeding at hospital discharge. Despite the efforts of professionals, the percentage of newborns with exclusive breastfeeding at birth is not enough for the current recommendations. Copyright: © 2018 Permanyer.

  6. Knowledge and practice of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and practice of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers in a rural population in south eastern Nigeria. ... Tropical Journal of Medical Research ... Despite its numerous advantages, most lactating mothers are not practicing it.

  7. Influence of maternity leave on exclusive breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda R. Monteiro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the profile of women with children aged under 4 months living in the Brazilian state capitals and in the Federal District according to their working status and to analyze the influence of maternity leave on exclusive breastfeeding (EBF among working women. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study with data extracted from the II National Maternal Breastfeeding Prevalence Survey carried out in 2008. Initially, a descriptive analysis of the profile of 12,794 women was performed, according to their working status and maternity leave and the frequency of maternity leave in the Brazilian regions and capitals. The study used a multiple model to identify the influence of maternity leave on EBF interruption, including 3766 women who declared they were working and were on maternity leave at the time of the interview. The outcome assessed in the study was the interruption of the EBF, classified by the WHO. Results: Regarding the working status of the mothers, 63.4% did not work outside of their homes and among those who worked, 69.8% were on maternity leave. The largest prevalence among workers was of women older than 35 years of age, with more than 12 years of schooling, primiparous and from the Southeast and South regions. The lack of maternity leave increased by 23% the chance of EBF interruption. Conclusion: Maternity leave contributed to increase the prevalence of EBF in the Brazilian states capitals, supporting the importance of increasing the maternity leave period from four to six months. Resumo: Objetivos: Descrever perfil das mulheres com filhos menores de 4 meses residentes nas capitais brasileiras e no Distrito Federal segundo situação de trabalho e analisar a influência da licença-maternidade sobre o aleitamento materno exclusivo entre as mulheres trabalhadoras. Métodos: Trata-se de um estudo transversal com dados extraídos da II Pesquisa Nacional de Prevalência do Aleitamento Materno realizada em 2008

  8. Lactation accommodation in the workplace and duration of exclusive breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yeon; Wunderlich, Shahla M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess current lactation accommodations in a workplace environment and to examine the association between the different dimensions of support and the duration of exclusive breastfeeding. A survey was conducted with employees of a higher-education institution and clients of an obstetric hospital in New Jersey. Factor analysis identified dimensions of workplace support. The dimensions were correlated with the duration of exclusive breastfeeding using Pearson's r correlation analysis. One hundred and thirteen working mothers participated in the study. The mean (SD) number of working hours of the participants was 34.3 (2.8) hours per week. Participants were primarily white (89.4%), older (mean age, 33.8 [6.0] years), highly educated (>82% above college graduate), and married (92%). Participants indicated that in their workplaces, breastfeeding was not common, breast pumps were not available, and on-site day care was not always an option. The analysis identified 4 dimensions of breastfeeding accommodation: break time, workplace environment, technical support, and workplace policy. Technical support (r = 0.71, P = .01) and workplace environment (r = 0.26, P = .01) were significantly associated with the duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Employers can strengthen technical support and workplace environment to encourage breastfeeding continuation in working mothers. New federal laws should consider specific guidelines for minimum requirements for functional lactation support to achieve comprehensive breastfeeding benefits. © 2013 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  9. The practice of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers attending a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine reported infant feeding practice with reference to exclusive breastfeeding, exclusive formula feeding and mixed feeding at six weeks postpartum among women attending a postnatal clinic in the Tswaing subdistrict of North West province, and the strength of the association ...

  10. The role of exclusive breastfeeding in prevention of childhood epilepsy

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    Alexander Kurniadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Epilepsy affects 1% of children worldwide. The highest incidence is in the first year of life, and perinatal factors, such as hypoxic-ischemic injury, infection, and cortical malformation may play etiologic roles. Breast milk contains optimal nutrients for human brain in early life. Breastfeeding has been associated with lower risk of infections, better cognitive and psychomotor development. However, the role of breastfeeding in preventing childhood epilepsy remains unclear. Objective To evaluate an association between exclusive breastfeeding and childhood epilepsy. Methods A case-control study conducted from 1 May to 3 July 2013 involving children with epilepsy aged 6 months to 18 years who were attending pediatric outpatient clinic of Dr. Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta. Neurologically normal children, individually matched by age and sex, visiting the same clinic were considered as controls. Exclusion criteria were children with structural brain abnormality, history of epilepsy in family, and who had history of neonatal seizure, intracranial infection, febrile seizure, and head trauma before onset of epilepsy. History of breastfeeding was obtained by interviewing the parents. The difference of exclusively breastfeeding proportion between cases and controls was analyzed by McNemar test. Results The total number of participants was 68 cases and controls each. Subjects with epilepsy had lower proportion of exclusively breastfed (48.5% compared with controls (54.4%, but the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.541. Exclusively breastfeeding showed no statistical significance in decreasing risk of epilepsy (OR=0.71; 95%CI 0.32 to 1.61. Conclusions Exclusive breastfeeding for 4-6 months has no effect against childhood epilepsy.

  11. Maternal knowledge, outcome expectancies and normative beliefs as determinants of cessation of exclusive breastfeeding: a cross-sectional study in rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewa, Constance A; Chepkemboi, Joan

    2016-03-09

    Despite the importance of multiple psychosocial factors on nutrition-related behavior, very few studies have explored beyond the role of mothers' knowledge and perception of child-focused outcomes on the duration of exclusive breastfeeding in Africa. Our objective was to determine the relationships among mothers' knowledge, outcome expectancies, normative beliefs, and cessation of exclusive breastfeeding in rural Kenya. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 400 mothers of children, 0-24 months old, in rural Kenya. Early child-feeding practices, knowledge of breastfeeding recommendations, beliefs associated with impact of exclusive breastfeeding on child- and mother-focused outcomes and perception of acceptability of exclusive breastfeeding by important others were examined. Cox regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between independent variables of interest and cessation of exclusive breastfeeding. Being knowledgeable of breastfeeding-related recommendations, positive beliefs on the impact of exclusive breastfeeding on child- focused outcomes, having a more positive perception of the impact of exclusive breastfeeding on mother-focused outcomes and a more positive perception of acceptability of exclusive breastfeeding by important others were associated with significantly lower risks of premature cessation of exclusive breastfeeding. In addition to knowledge levels, mothers' beliefs play an important role in mothers' decisions to practice exclusive breastfeeding. Mother's beliefs on the impact of exclusive breastfeeding on the mother's health, physical appearance and ability to engage in other activities were shown to have the strongest relationship with premature cessation of exclusive breastfeeding. Addressing these beliefs has the potential to contribute to more effective exclusive breastfeeding promotion efforts in rural Kenya.

  12. Maternal knowledge, outcome expectancies and normative beliefs as determinants of cessation of exclusive breastfeeding: a cross-sectional study in rural Kenya

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    Constance A. Gewa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the importance of multiple psychosocial factors on nutrition-related behavior, very few studies have explored beyond the role of mothers’ knowledge and perception of child-focused outcomes on the duration of exclusive breastfeeding in Africa. Our objective was to determine the relationships among mothers’ knowledge, outcome expectancies, normative beliefs, and cessation of exclusive breastfeeding in rural Kenya. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 400 mothers of children, 0-24 months old, in rural Kenya. Early child-feeding practices, knowledge of breastfeeding recommendations, beliefs associated with impact of exclusive breastfeeding on child- and mother-focused outcomes and perception of acceptability of exclusive breastfeeding by important others were examined. Cox regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between independent variables of interest and cessation of exclusive breastfeeding. Results Being knowledgeable of breastfeeding-related recommendations, positive beliefs on the impact of exclusive breastfeeding on child- focused outcomes, having a more positive perception of the impact of exclusive breastfeeding on mother-focused outcomes and a more positive perception of acceptability of exclusive breastfeeding by important others were associated with significantly lower risks of premature cessation of exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusion In addition to knowledge levels, mothers’ beliefs play an important role in mothers’ decisions to practice exclusive breastfeeding. Mother’s beliefs on the impact of exclusive breastfeeding on the mother’s health, physical appearance and ability to engage in other activities were shown to have the strongest relationship with premature cessation of exclusive breastfeeding. Addressing these beliefs has the potential to contribute to more effective exclusive breastfeeding promotion efforts in rural Kenya.

  13. Breastfeeding in Tigray and Gonder, Ethiopia, with special reference to exclusive/almost exclusive breastfeeding beyond six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getahun, Zewditu; Scherbaum, Veronika; Taffese, Yonas; Teshome, Beka; Biesalski, Hans Konrad

    2004-11-01

    This study assesses the initiation and duration of exclusive/almost exclusive breastfeeding (Ex/AEx-BF) versus partial breastfeeding (P-BF) and its relationship to infant growth and maternal body mass index (BMI) in Ethiopian infants up to 12 months of age (Tigray n = 471; Gonder n =596). Initiation of breastfeeding within 1 hr after birth was 1.7 times more common in Tigray. In Gonder 19% of the mothers started breastfeeding on the third day of delivery and consequently, a significant higher proportion of newborns were offered prelacteal feeds (Phigher in both regions compared to the Ex/AEx-BF group (in Gonder 25% vs 5.9%; in Tigray 42.9% vs 33.3%). Nutrition education to raise awareness of mothers regarding initiation of exclusive breastfeeding directly after birth, the value of colostrum and avoidance of pre-postlacteal feeds, needs to be implemented. A new health package to be implemented could be a proper vehicle to reach the rural population, which doesn't have access to health services. The relationship between infant growth, mode of feeding and mothers nutritional status should be further investigated, particularly in populations with a high prevalence of maternal and infant nutrition and where long term breastfeeding is practiced.

  14. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding practices among mothers in Goba district, south east Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

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    Setegn Tesfaye

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exclusive breastfeeding is defined as feeding infants only breast milk, be it directly from breast or expressed, with no addition of any liquid or solids apart from drops or syrups consisting of vitamins, mineral supplements or medicine, and nothing else. Several studies have shown that exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months plays a great role in preventing morbidity and mortality. However, in Ethiopia a large portion of infants are not exclusively breastfed according to the infant feeding recommendations. Understanding the factors that influence exclusive breastfeeding is crucial to promoting the practice. This study was carried out to identify factors predicting exclusive breastfeeding among mothers in Bale Goba district, south east Ethiopia. Methods A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to February 2010 involving both quantitative and qualitative data. A total of 608 mothers were selected randomly. A convenience sampling technique was used to generate the qualitative data. The qualitative data were analyzed using thematic frameworks. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of exclusive breastfeeding after controlling for background variables. Results The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding in the last 24 hours preceding the survey was 71.3%. The median duration of exclusive breastfeeding was three months and mean frequency of breastfeeding was six times per day. Being unemployed [AOR: 10.4 (95% CI: 1.51, 71.50] and age of infants of less than two months [AOR: 5.6 (95% CI: 2.28, 13.60] were independently associated with exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusions A large proportion of infants are not exclusively breastfed during the first 6 months, despite what is recommended in the national and global infant and young child feeding (IYCF guidelines. Employed mothers were less likely to practice exclusive breastfeeding, implying the need

  15. Maternal work and exclusive breastfeeding practice: a community based cross-sectional study in Efutu Municipal, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    %) and those who do not go to work with their infant (36%) ( p  = 0.000). Interventions to promote exclusive breastfeeding should include the use of existing family structures, supportive cultural beliefs, and practices and promotion of an infant-friendly work environment.

  16. What Do Women Really Want? Lessons for Breastfeeding Promotion and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy

    2016-04-01

    Promoting breastfeeding is a strategic priority, but breastfeeding rates remain low in the United Kingdom. Women value breastfeeding promotion and education, but a different strategy may be needed to continue to raise breastfeeding rates. New mothers, as the experts, are best placed to inform these changes. The current study explored new mothers' attitudes toward breastfeeding education and promotion, evaluating experiences and examining ideas for change. One thousand one hundred thirty mothers with a baby aged 0-2 years old who had planned to breastfeed at birth completed a questionnaire consisting of both closed and open-ended questions exploring their attitudes to breastfeeding promotion and support. Overall, the findings showed that mothers valued breastfeeding information, but believed that changes needed to be made to current messages. Key themes included a move away from the perception that breastfeeding is best (rather than normal), emphasis on wider values other than the health benefits of breastfeeding, and a message that every feed, rather than just 6 months exclusive breastfeeding, matters. Mothers also highlighted the need for promotion and education to target family members and wider society rather than simply mothers themselves, all of whom influenced both directly or indirectly maternal decision and ability to breastfeed. Mothers suggested ideas for promotional campaigns or how specific groups or methods could be used to increase support, including education for children, TV adverts, and using established online sources of breastfeeding information. The findings are important both for those supporting new mothers to breastfeed and those involved in breastfeeding policy and promotional messages.

  17. Improving Exclusive Breastfeeding in an Urban Academic Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Laura P; Williamson, Susan; Burke, Stephanie; Crawford-Hemphill, Ruby; Thompson, Amy M

    2017-02-01

    Breastfeeding has many well-established health benefits for infants and mothers. There is greater risk reduction in health outcomes with exclusive breastfeeding (EBF). Our urban academic facility has had long-standing low EBF rates, serving a population with breastfeeding disparities. We sought to improve EBF rates through a Learning Collaborative model by participating in the Best Fed Beginnings project. Formal improvement science methods were used, including the development of a key driver diagram and plan-do-study-act cycles. Improvement activities followed the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. We demonstrated significant improvement in the median adherence to 2 process measures, rooming in and skin-to-skin after delivery. Subsequently, the proportion of infants exclusively breastfed at hospital discharge in our facility increased from 37% to 59%. We demonstrated an increase in sustained breastfeeding in a subset of patients at a postpartum follow-up visit. These improvements led to Baby-Friendly designation at our facility. This quality improvement initiative resulted in a higher number of infants exclusively breastfed in our patient population at "high risk not to breastfeed." Other hospitals can use these described methods and techniques to improve their EBF rates. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Exclusive breastfeeding duration and determinants among Brazilian children under two years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Warkentin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study described the duration and identified the determinants of exclusive breastfeeding. METHODS: The study used data from the Pesquisa Nacional de Demografia e Saúde da Criança e da Mulher 2006 (National Demographic and Health Survey on Women and Children 2006. Data were collected using questionnaires administered by trained professionals and refer to a subsample of 1,704 children aged less than 24 months. The estimated durations of exclusive breastfeeding are presented according to socioeconomic, demographic and epidemiological variables. Kaplan Meier estimator curves were used to produce valid estimates of breastfeeding duration and the Cox's proportional hazards model was fitted to identify risks. RESULTS: The median estimated duration of exclusive breastfeeding was 60 days. The final Cox model consisted of mother's age <20 years (hazard ratio=1.53, 95% confidence interval=1.11-1.48, use of pacifier (hazard ratio=1.53, 95% confidence interval=1.37-1.71, not residing in the country's southeast region (hazard ratio=1.22, 95% confidence interval=1.07-1.40 and socioeconomic status (hazard ratio=1.28, 95% confidence interval=1.06-1.55. CONCLUSION: The Kaplan Meier estimator corrected the underestimated duration of breastfeeding in the country when calculated by the current status methodology. Despite the national efforts done in the last decades to promote breastfeeding, the results indicate that the duration of exclusive breastfeeding is still half of that recommended for this dietary practice to promote health. Ways to revert this situation would be ongoing educational activities involving the educational and health systems, associated with advertising campaigns on television and radio mainly targeting young mothers with low education level and low income, identified as those at high risk of weaning their children early.

  19. Benefits of a Dedicated Breastfeeding Facility and Support Program for Exclusive Breastfeeding among Workers in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basrowi, Ray W; Sulistomo, Astrid B; Adi, Nuri Purwito; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-06-01

    A mother's working environment is believed to be a major determinant of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) practice. We aimed to define the influence of a facility dedicated to breastfeeding and a breastfeeding support program at the workplace on breastfeeding practice. A cross-sectional study was performed in five workplaces. The inclusion criteria were female workers whose last child was between 6 and 36 months old. Observational data were obtained and a questionnaire was filled out. The World Health Organization definition for EBF was used. Data from 186 subjects (74 office workers and 112 factory workers) were collected. Just over half (52%) of the mothers were between 20 and 46 years old, 75.3% had graduated from high school and university, 12.9% had more than two children and 36.0% owned a house. The prevalence of EBF during the last 6 months was 32.3%. A proper dedicated breastfeeding facility was available for 21.5% of the mothers, but only 7.5% had been in contact with a breastfeeding support program. The presence of a dedicated breastfeeding facility increased EBF practice almost threefold, by an odds ratio (OR) of 2.74 and a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.34-5.64 (pdedicated breastfeeding facility at the workplace as these simple measures significantly increase EBF.

  20. The practice of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers attending a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-08-08

    Aug 8, 2012 ... Original Research: The practice of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers ... programme for the PMTCT of HIV, which aims to reduce ... Setting and subjects: This study was conducted among women over the age of 18 years attending their first six weeks ..... publications/2009/9789241598873_eng.pdf. 3.

  1. The effects of exclusive versus non-exclusive breastfeeding on specific infant morbidities in Conakry (Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Moutquin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:This study examines the effect of exclusive versus non-exclusive breastfeeding on specific infant morbidities from birth to nine months, in Conakry (Guinea. Methods:A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1,167 mother-infant pairs who visited one of 20 immunization centres in Conakry for vaccination between the 45th and 270th days of the child’s life. Two data sources were used: the infant health book and an orally administered questionnaire completed with the mother. Data analyses included univariate cross-tabulations and multivariate logistic regression models to estimate the effect of breastfeeding on infant morbidity. Results:Exclusive breastfeeding decreased with the infant’s age. At six months of age, the proportion of infants who were exclusively breastfed was only 15.5%. After adjusting for the infant’s age, and the interaction between the type of breastfeeding and the infant’s age, exclusive breastfeeding significantly protected the infants against many of the studied morbidities (OR: 0.28, CI: 0.15-0.51 and specifically against diarrhoea (OR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.17 – 0.86, respiratory infections (OR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.14 – 0.50, and low growth rate (OR: 0.11; 95% CI: 0.02 – 0.46, but not for otitis, urinary infection, or meningitis. Conclusion:This investigation confirmed the protective effects of exclusive breastfeeding on some specific infant’s morbidities during the first nine months of life. The results of this study are of great importance for the development of an information program designed to encourage the exclusive breastfeeding among the mothers of Conakry, Guinea.

  2. [The impact of breastfeeding promotion in women with formal employment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro, Aline Alves; Possobon, Rosana de Fátima; Carrascoza, Karina Camilo; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Moraes, Antônio Bento Alves de

    2010-09-01

    This study focused on programs to promote breastfeeding in order to prevent early weaning of working mothers' infant children. A non-randomized intervention study was conducted using a survey of mothers who had returned to work after childbirth, including both participants and non-participants in a program to promote breastfeeding. The sample consisted of 200 mothers of infants ranging from 6 to 10 months of age. Factors associated with early weaning were analyzed with the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests and multiple logistic regression (α = 0.05). The results showed statistical differences between the groups in relation to exclusive breastfeeding (p work. There was no difference between the end of maternity leave and weaning time. Mothers that were unable to nurse their infants during the work shift showed 4.98 times higher odds (95%CI: 1.27-19.61) of weaning them before the fourth month of age.

  3. Mother and Family’s View on Exclusive Breastfeeding in Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Pramukti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exclusive breastfeeding is something which has a lot of benefit both for mother and baby. It is recommended by WHO at let for the first six months. Then it also recommended until two years and beyond. In fact, mostly mother only gave their breastmilk to their babies until two months. The method of this study using systematic review-metasynthesize which an extensive of the literature was undertaken. Database searched were: MEDLINE, CINAHL, BioMed Central, Wiley, and EMBASE. Result shown that mother’s view on exclusive breast is an important part in an attempt to promote breastfeeding desire. Even though their view is influenced by her family and surroundings, but finally the decision is on her. This concurs with finding of some researcher who found women who have the experience of breastfeeding, especially within the family, are more likely to choose to breastfeed heir child.

  4. Integrating health care practices with the promotion of breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Davanzo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although breastfeeding is the normative standards for infant nutrition, exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge in the general population of newborns are still suboptimal. Besides many other psychological, social, economical, cultural factors, breastfeeding success is also significantly influenced by maternity practices that have the potential to foster or otherwise to hinder breastfeeding physiology during postpartum hospital stay. On their part, health professionals need to improve their knowledge on lactation, to acquire better skills to manage breastfeeding problems and to commit themselves to prepare evidence based clinical protocols that support breastfeeding and the use of human milk. At the Institute for Maternal and Child Health in Trieste (Italy, we have developed two surveillance protocols related to situations that commonly challenge health professionals to give their qualified advice to the breastfeeding dyad. Particularly, we have documented the feasibility of a protocol on the management of skin to skin contact between mother and his/her newborn infant. This protocol is applied in the delivery room in the context of the prevention of sudden unexpected postnatal collapse. The second protocol refers to the management of early neonatal weight loss. Finally, we believe that combining an effective promotion of breastfeeding with good clinical practice is appropriated and safe and we recognize that both the competence and the attitude of staff have an essential role in the success of the initiation of breastfeeding. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  5. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding of preterm infants. Results from a prospective national cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild Maastrup

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Evidence-based knowledge of how to guide the mothers of preterm infants in breastfeeding establishment is contradictive or sparse. The aim was to investigate the associations between pre-specified clinical practices for facilitating breastfeeding, and exclusive breastfeeding at discharge as well as adequate duration thereof. METHODS: A prospective survey based on questionnaires was conducted with a Danish national cohort, comprised of 1,221 mothers and their 1,488 preterm infants with a gestational age of 24-36 weeks. Adjusted for covariates, the pre-specified clinical practices were analysed by multiple logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: At discharge 68% of the preterm infants were exclusively breastfed and 17% partially. Test-weighing the infant, and minimizing the use of a pacifier, showed a protective effect to exclusive breastfeeding at discharge (OR 0.6 (95% CI 0.4-0.8 and 0.4 (95% CI 0.3-0.6, respectively. The use of nipple shields (OR 2.3 (95% CI 1.6-3.2 and the initiation of breast milk expression later than 48 hours postpartum (OR 4.9 (95% CI 1.9-12.6 were associated with failure of exclusive breastfeeding at discharge. The clinical practices associated with an inadequate breastfeeding duration were the initiation of breast milk expression at 12-24 hours (OR 1.6 (95% CI 1.0-2.4 and 24-48 hours (OR 1.8 (95% CI 1.0-3.1 vs. before six hours postpartum, and the use of nipple shields (OR 1.4 (95% CI 1.1-1.9. CONCLUSION: Early initiation of breast milk pumping before 12 hours postpartum may increase breastfeeding rates, and it seems that the use of nipple shields should be restricted. The use of test-weighing and minimizing the use of a pacifier may promote the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding, but more research is needed regarding adequate support to the mother when test-weighing is ceased, as more of these mothers ceased exclusive breastfeeding at an early stage after discharge.

  6. THE EFFECT OF THE ATTITUDE TOWARD BREASTFEEDING CONCEPT BASED COMIC ON THE ADOLESCENCE'S ATTITUDE TOWARD EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mekar dwi anggraeni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The earlier development of the attitude toward exclusive breastfeeding produces the longer exclusive breastfeeding duration. Considering the first marriage age among Indonesian, the attitude toward exclusive breastfeeding should be developed at the adolescence age. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the attitude toward breastfeeding concept based comic on the adolescent's attitude toward exclusive breastfeeding. Method: This was a quasy experimental posttest only with control group study. The respondents were provided an comic. The respondent's attitude toward exclusive breastfeeding was measured using The Breastfeeding Attitude Questionnaire. Data were analyzed using independent and dependent t test. Results: The majority of respondents were aged 17 years old in both intervention (70% and control grup (63%, first child in both intervention (23,3% and control grup (26,7%, and had a nuclear family in both intervention (80% and control grup (90%. The independent t test showed that there was a significant difference between post-test scores among the intervention and control groups (t = 5,602, p < 0,01. Conclusion and recommendation: Nurses may use the Attitude Toward Breastfeeding based comic to increase the Adolescence's attitude toward breastfeeding. Keywords: Comic, Attitudes Toward Exclusive Breastfeeding, Adolescence

  7. Differences in the emotional and practical experiences of exclusively breastfeeding and combination feeding mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komninou, Sophia; Fallon, Victoria; Halford, Jason Christian Grovenor; Harrold, Joanne Alison

    2017-07-01

    The majority of research examining the barriers to breastfeeding focuses on the physical challenges faced by mothers rather than the risks of encountering negative emotional and practical feeding experiences. We aimed to quantify the emotional and practical experiences of the overall sample of breastfeeding mothers and identify the differences in the emotional and practical experiences of exclusively breastfeeding mothers and combination feeding mothers, by feeding type and intention. Eight hundred forty-five mothers with infants up to 26 weeks of age and who had initiated breastfeeding were recruited through relevant social media via advertisements providing a link to an online survey. Predictors of emotional experiences included guilt, stigma, satisfaction with feeding method, and the need to defend themselves due to infant feeding choices. Practical predictors included perceived support from health professionals, main sources of infant feeding information, and respect from their everyday environment, workplace, and when breastfeeding in public. Current feeding type and prenatal feeding intention. In the overall sample, 15% of the mothers reported feeling guilty, 38% stigmatized, and 55% felt the need to defend their feeding choice. Binary logit models revealed that guilt and dissatisfaction were directly associated with feeding type, being higher when supplementing with formula. No associations with feeding intention were identified. This study demonstrates a link between current breastfeeding promotion strategies and the emotional state of breastfeeding mothers who supplement with formula to any extent. To minimize the negative impact on maternal well-being, it is important that future recommendations recognize the challenges that exclusive breastfeeding brings and provide a more balanced and realistic target for mothers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Predictors of exclusive breastfeeding: observations from the Alberta pregnancy outcomes and nutrition (APrON) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessri, Mahsa; Farmer, Anna P; Maximova, Katerina; Willows, Noreen D; Bell, Rhonda C

    2013-05-16

    Despite growing evidence that supports the importance of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding, few Canadian mothers adhere to this, and early weaning onto solids is a common practice. This study assessed infant feeding transitions during the first 6 months postpartum and factors that predicted exclusive breastfeeding to 3 and 6 months. This prospective cohort study was part of the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition study (APrON). From an initial sample of 600 pregnant women recruited from Edmonton and Calgary, 402 mothers provided complete details at 3 months postpartum; 300 stayed on to provide information at 6 months postpartum. During pregnancy and at 3 and 6 months postpartum, data on maternal and infant socio-demographic, behavior, and feeding were collected. Even though there was a high rate of "ever having breastfed" (98.6%), exclusive breastfeeding rates for 3 and 6 months were 54.0% and 15.3%, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, the study showed that mothers who held post-graduate university degrees were 3.76 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months than those without a university degree (95% CI: 1.30-10.92; p = 0.015). In addition, mother of previous children were more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months (OR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.08-4.52; p = 0.031). Mothers who were in the highest quartile of the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Score were 4.29 and 5.40 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 3 months (95% CI: 1.31-14.08; p-trend < 0.001) and 6 months (95% CI: 2.75-10.60; P-trend < 0.001), respectively. The 6-month exclusive breastfeeding rate in Alberta is considerably below national and international breastfeeding recommendations. Professional advice that focuses on prenatal maternal knowledge, attitudes, and misperceptions may promote adherence to World Health Organization breastfeeding guidelines. Knowing that exclusive breastfeeding is less likely to take place among lower

  9. Determinants of exclusive breastfeeding in Nigeria

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    Odiase Justice I

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exclusive breast feeding (EBF has important protective effects on the survival of infants and decreases risk for many early-life diseases. The purpose of this study was to assess the factors associated with EBF in Nigeria. Methods Data on 658 children less than 6 months of age were obtained from the Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS 2003. The 2003 NDHS was a multi-stage cluster sample survey of 7864 households. EBF rates were examined against a set of individual, household and community level variables using a backward stepwise multilevel logistic regression method. Results The average EBF rate among infants younger than 6 months of age was 16.4% (95%CI: 12.6%-21.1% but was only 7.1% in infants in their fifth month of age. After adjusting for potential confounders, multivariate analyses revealed that the odds of EBF were higher in rich (Adjusted Odds Ratios (AOR = 1.15, CI = 0.28-6.69 and middle level (AOR = 2.45, CI = 1.06-5.68 households than poor households. Increasing infant age was associated with significantly less EBF (AOR = 0.65, 95%CI: 0.51-0.82. Mothers who had four or more antenatal visits were significantly more likely to engage in EBF (AOR = 2.70, 95%CI = 1.04-7.01. Female infants were more likely to be exclusively breastfed than male infants (AOR = 2.13, 95%CI = 1.03-4.39. Mothers who lived in the North Central geopolitical region were significantly more likely to exclusively breastfeed their babies than those mothers who lived in other geopolitical regions. Conclusions The EBF rate in Nigeria is low and falls well short of the expected levels needed to achieve a substantial reduction in child mortality. Antenatal care was strongly associated with an increased rate of EBF. Appropriate infant feeding practises are needed if Nigeria is to reach the child survival Millennium Development Goal of reducing infant mortality from about 100 deaths per 1000 live births to a target of 35 deaths per 1000 live

  10. Determinants of exclusive breastfeeding practices in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACIPH_Admin

    Actions to empower women and promotion of EBF campaign are recommended to achieve the ..... eminent and thus the opportunity to stay at home and practice EBF is ... breast milk substitutes meant that women of higher status chose not to ...

  11. Predictors of exclusive breastfeeding: observations from the Alberta pregnancy outcomes and nutrition (APrON) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite growing evidence that supports the importance of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding, few Canadian mothers adhere to this, and early weaning onto solids is a common practice. This study assessed infant feeding transitions during the first 6 months postpartum and factors that predicted exclusive breastfeeding to 3 and 6 months. Methods This prospective cohort study was part of the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition study (APrON). From an initial sample of 600 pregnant women recruited from Edmonton and Calgary, 402 mothers provided complete details at 3 months postpartum; 300 stayed on to provide information at 6 months postpartum. During pregnancy and at 3 and 6 months postpartum, data on maternal and infant socio-demographic, behavior, and feeding were collected. Results Even though there was a high rate of “ever having breastfed” (98.6%), exclusive breastfeeding rates for 3 and 6 months were 54.0% and 15.3%, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, the study showed that mothers who held post-graduate university degrees were 3.76 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months than those without a university degree (95% CI: 1.30-10.92; p = 0.015). In addition, mother of previous children were more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months (OR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.08-4.52; p = 0.031). Mothers who were in the highest quartile of the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Score were 4.29 and 5.40 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 3 months (95% CI: 1.31-14.08; p-trend breastfeeding rate in Alberta is considerably below national and international breastfeeding recommendations. Professional advice that focuses on prenatal maternal knowledge, attitudes, and misperceptions may promote adherence to World Health Organization breastfeeding guidelines. Knowing that exclusive breastfeeding is less likely to take place among lower-educated, primiparous women may help health practitioners focus their

  12. The Effects of Mild Gestational Hyperglycemia on Exclusive Breastfeeding Cessation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Verd

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes increases the risk of a range of adverse perinatal outcomes, including breastfeeding failure, but the best cut-off point for gestational diabetes is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between mild gestational glucose tolerance impairment and the early cessation of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF. This is an observational study of 768 women with full term pregnancies that were screened for gestational diabetes at 24–28 weeks gestation. Subjects were divided into two groups: those with a normal 1-h glucose challenge test and those with an elevated 1-h glucose challenge test but still did not qualify for gestational diabetes. We constructed multivariable logistic regression models using data from 616 women with normal gestational glucose tolerance and 152 women with an isolated positive 1-h glucose challenge test. The risk of early exclusive breastfeeding cessation was found to increase in women with mildly impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy (adjusted OR, 1.65; 95% CI: 1.11, 2.45. Risks of early EBF cessation were also independently associated with the amount of neonatal weight loss and admission to the neonatal ward. Instead, parity was associated with a decreased risk for shorter EBF duration. Insulin resistance—even in the absence of gestational diabetes mellitus—may be an impeding factor for EBF.

  13. Breastfeeding trends and updated national health objectives for exclusive breastfeeding--United States, birth years 2000-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-03

    Breastfeeding is associated with decreased risk for many early-life diseases and conditions, including otitis media, respiratory tract infections, atopic dermatitis, gastroenteritis, type 2 diabetes, sudden infant death syndrome, and obesity. Breastfeeding also is associated with health benefits to women, including decreased risk for type 2 diabetes, ovarian cancer, and breast cancer. Exclusive breastfeeding is defined as an infant receiving only breast milk and no other liquids or solids except for drops or syrups consisting of vitamins, minerals, or medicines. In 2007, Healthy People 2010 (HP2010) objectives for breastfeeding initiation and duration were updated to include two new objectives on exclusive breastfeeding (i.e., to increase the proportion of mothers who exclusively breastfeed their infants through age 3 months to 60% and through age 6 months to 25% [objectives 16-19d and 16-19e]). To monitor progress toward achieving HP2010 breastfeeding objectives, CDC analyzed data from the National Immunization Survey (NIS). This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that rates for breastfeeding initiation and duration increased among infants born during 2000-2004. Rates for exclusive breastfeeding through ages 3 months and 6 months among infants born in 2004 were 30.5% and 11.3%, respectively, below targets set by HP2010. Rates of exclusive breastfeeding were significantly lower among black infants (compared with white infants) and infants born to unmarried mothers (compared with married mothers). Additionally, older age, urban residence, higher education, and higher income of mothers all were positively associated with exclusive breastfeeding. Further research is needed to identify successful programs and policies to support exclusive breastfeeding, especially among subgroups with the lowest rates.

  14. A Social Media Campaign to Promote Breastfeeding among Saudi Women: A Web-based Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahkali, Salwa; Alkharjy, Nora; Alowairdy, Maryam; Househ, Mowafa; Da'ar, Omar; Alsurimi, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged breastfeeding can prevent or limit the severity of a variety of diseases and conditions. Although evidence clearly shows that there are health benefits for breastfeeding, adherence to breastfeeding remains a key challenge facing maternal health providers in Saudi Arabia. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impacts of a social media platform (Twitter) to promote breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia. Between February 10 and March 25, 2015, a web-based questionnaire was administered to evaluate the impacts of a Twitter based educational campaign on the awareness, knowledge, and adherence to breastfeeding behavior for women in Saudi Arabia. The overall response rate among mothers with a newborn child was 83% (n=484). The results showed an increase in the knowledge and awareness of breastfeeding practices and adherence among Twitter followers. The initiation rate of breastfeeding had slightly increased among women who never had previously breastfed. More women reported their willingness to continue exclusive breastfeeding and to stop bottle-feeding. Results also show that an integration of professional breastfeeding support, public health education programs through social media could be an effective tool in promoting breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia. There is a need for further research on designing and implementing a social media based educational outreach program to increase women's awareness, knowledge, and adherence to breastfeeding behavior in Saudi Arabia.

  15. South Africa improves exclusive breastfeeding monitoring using nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    Babies in South Africa that would once be at high risk of malnutrition, disease and even death, now have brighter futures as nuclear techniques help mothers become more diligent about exclusive breastfeeding for the baby’s first six months. Breastfed children are more resistant to disease and infection compared to formula-fed children, points out the World Health Organization, which recommends that from birth up to six months of age babies should drink only breast milk. Research indicates that breastfed babies are less likely to develop diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer later in life.

  16. Time to Consider Moving Beyond Exclusive Breastfeeding in Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M. Wojcicki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While there have been considerable advances in the reduction of mother to child transmission of HIV (MTCT in sub-Saharan Africa with the advance of anti-retroviral therapies (ART, there remain challenges in the late postpartum period.  Structural issues including food insecurity and stigma make better maternal ART adherence and exclusive breastfeeding unreachable for some women. There are no other scientifically researched feeding options as there have been few studies on different types of mixed feeding practices and risk of HIV infection. Additional studies are warranted to assess detailed feeding practices in HIV exposed infants in relation to clinical outcomes.

  17. A Review of the Factors Associated With the Timely Initiation of Breastfeeding and Exclusive Breastfeeding in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzaheb, Riyadh A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Breastfeeding supplies all the nutrients that infants need for their healthy development. Breastfeeding practice is multifactorial, and numerous variables influence mothers’ decisions and ability to breastfeed. This review identifies the factors potentially affecting the timely initiation of breastfeeding within an hour after birth and exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months in Middle Eastern countries. Methods: The Medline, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science databases were keyword-searched for primary studies meeting the following inclusion criteria: (1) publication in the English language between January 2001 and May 2017, (2) original research articles reporting primary data on the factors influencing the timely initiation of breastfeeding and/or exclusive breastfeeding, (3) the use of World Health Organization definitions, and (4) Middle Eastern research contexts. A random effect model was used to establish the average prevalence of the timely initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding in the Middle East. Results: The review identified 19 studies conducted in Saudi Arabia (7), Iran (3), Egypt (2), Turkey (2), Kuwait (1), the United Arab Emirates (1), Qatar (1), Lebanon (1), and Syria (1). The meta-analysis established that 34.3% (confidence interval [CI]: 20.2%-51.9%) of Middle Eastern newborns received breastfeeding initiated within an hour of birth, and only 20.5% (CI: 14.5%-28.2%) were fed only breast milk for the first 6 months. The 8 studies exploring breastfeeding initiation most commonly associated it with the following: delivery mode, maternal employment, rooming-in, and prelacteal feeding. The 17 studies investigating exclusive breastfeeding most frequently linked it to the following: maternal age, maternal education, maternal employment, and delivery mode. Conclusions: Middle Eastern health care organizations should fully understand all the determinants of breastfeeding identified by this review to provide suitable

  18. A Review of the Factors Associated With the Timely Initiation of Breastfeeding and Exclusive Breastfeeding in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyadh A Alzaheb

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breastfeeding supplies all the nutrients that infants need for their healthy development. Breastfeeding practice is multifactorial, and numerous variables influence mothers’ decisions and ability to breastfeed. This review identifies the factors potentially affecting the timely initiation of breastfeeding within an hour after birth and exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months in Middle Eastern countries. Methods: The Medline, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science databases were keyword-searched for primary studies meeting the following inclusion criteria: (1 publication in the English language between January 2001 and May 2017, (2 original research articles reporting primary data on the factors influencing the timely initiation of breastfeeding and/or exclusive breastfeeding, (3 the use of World Health Organization definitions, and (4 Middle Eastern research contexts. A random effect model was used to establish the average prevalence of the timely initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding in the Middle East. Results: The review identified 19 studies conducted in Saudi Arabia (7, Iran (3, Egypt (2, Turkey (2, Kuwait (1, the United Arab Emirates (1, Qatar (1, Lebanon (1, and Syria (1. The meta-analysis established that 34.3% (confidence interval [CI]: 20.2%-51.9% of Middle Eastern newborns received breastfeeding initiated within an hour of birth, and only 20.5% (CI: 14.5%-28.2% were fed only breast milk for the first 6 months. The 8 studies exploring breastfeeding initiation most commonly associated it with the following: delivery mode, maternal employment, rooming-in, and prelacteal feeding. The 17 studies investigating exclusive breastfeeding most frequently linked it to the following: maternal age, maternal education, maternal employment, and delivery mode. Conclusions: Middle Eastern health care organizations should fully understand all the determinants of breastfeeding identified by this review to provide

  19. Effects of an educational technology on self-efficacy for breastfeeding and practice of exclusive breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorski, Marly; Rodrigues, Andreyna Javorski; Dodt, Regina Cláudia Melo; Almeida, Paulo César de; Leal, Luciana Pedrosa; Ximenes, Lorena Barbosa

    2018-06-11

    To evaluate the effects of using a flipchart (serial album) on maternal self-efficacy in breastfeeding and its effects on exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) in children's first two months of life. Clinical trial in Recife, Northeastern Brazil, with 112 women in the third trimester of gestation, randomly distributed in intervention group (IG) and control group (CG). The intervention was the use of the flipchart in IG. Data collection was performed through interviews in the prenatal period, and telephone contact at second, fourth and eighth weeks postpartum. The Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short-Form (BSES-SF) was used to measure self-efficacy scores. In the analysis, was used descriptive, bivariate statistics through tests of comparisons of proportions and means, and relative risk assessment. There was a statistically significant difference in mean values of self-efficacy scores between women in the IG and CG (peducational tool had positive effects on self-efficacy scores for breastfeeding and in maintenance of EBF in the IG. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: RBR-5N7K99.

  20. Prevalence and predictors of exclusive breastfeeding at hospital discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sarah D; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Chapman, Barbara; Vera, Claudio; Giglia, Lucia; Fusch, Christoph; Foster, Gary

    2012-06-01

    To estimate the population-based prevalence and predictors of exclusive breastfeeding at hospital discharge in singleton and twin term newborns. We studied all hospital births in the province of Ontario, Canada, between April 1, 2009, and March 31, 2010, to perform a retrospective cohort study. We included live singleton and twin births, at term (37 0/7 weeks of gestation to 41 6/7 weeks of gestation), with information about feeding at maternal-newborn discharge. Descriptive statistics were performed and logistic regression was used to identify factors related to exclusive breastfeeding. Our study population consisted of 92,364 newborns, of whom 56,865 (61.6%) were exclusively breastfed at discharge. Older, nonsmoking, higher-income mothers with no pregnancy complications or reproductive assistance were more likely to breastfeed. Mothers of twins were less likely to exclusively breastfeed (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25-0.36) as were women who did not attend prenatal classes (adjusted OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.76-0.83). Compared with patients of obstetricians (57%), women cared for by midwives (87%, adjusted OR 4.49, 95% CI 4.16-4.85) and family physicians (67%, adjusted OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.47-1.61) were more likely to exclusively breastfeed. Breastfeeding after a planned (50%, adjusted OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.52-0.60) or unplanned (48%, adjusted OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.44-0.51) cesarean delivery was less common than after a spontaneous vaginal birth (68%). Neonates born at 39, 38, and 37 weeks of gestation (compared with 41 weeks of gestation) were increasingly less likely to breastfeed (adjusted ORs 0.93, 95% CI 0.89-0.98; 0.84, 95% CI 0.80-0.88; and 0.71, 95% CI 0.67-0.76). This large population-based study found that fewer than two thirds of term newborns are exclusively breastfed at hospital discharge, substantially lower than previously reported. II.

  1. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding among infants under six months of age in peninsular malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Kok

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breastfeeding is accepted as the natural form of infant feeding. For mothers to be able to breastfeed exclusively to the recommended six months, it is important to understand the factors that influence exclusive breastfeeding. The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding in Peninsular Malaysia. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 682 mother-infant pairs with infants up to six months attending maternal and child health section of the government health clinics in Klang, Malaysia. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews using a pre-tested structured questionnaire over 4 months in 2006. Data on breastfeeding were based on practice in the previous one month period. Logistic regression was used to assess the independent association between the independent variables and exclusive breastfeeding adjusting for infant age. Results The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers with infants aged between one and six months was 43.1% (95% CI: 39.4, 46.8. In the multivariate model exclusive breastfeeding was positively associated with rural residence, Malay mothers, non-working and non-smoking mothers, multiparous mothers, term infants, mothers with husbands who support breastfeeding and mothers who practice bed-sharing. Conclusions Interventions that seek to increase exclusive breastfeeding should focus on women who are at risk of early discontinuation of breastfeeding.

  2. Economic determinants of breastfeeding in Haiti: The effects of poverty, food insecurity, and employment on exclusive breastfeeding in an urban population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesorogol, Carolyn; Bond, Caitlin; Dulience, Sherlie Jean Louis; Iannotti, Lora

    2018-04-01

    There is limited and inconsistent empirical evidence regarding the role of economic factors in breastfeeding practices, globally. Studies have found both negative and positive associations between low income and exclusive breastfeeding (EBF). Employment, which should improve household income, may reduce EBF due to separation of mother and infant. In the context of a randomized controlled study of lipid-based complementary feeding in an urban slum in Cap Haitien, Haiti, we examined the economic factors influencing breastfeeding practices using mixed methods. Findings demonstrate relationships between urban context, economic factors, and breastfeeding practices. Poverty, food insecurity, time constraints, and limited social support create challenges for EBF. Maternal employment is associated with lower rates of EBF and less frequent breastfeeding. Extreme food insecurity sometimes leads to increased exclusive breastfeeding among Haitian mothers, what we call "last resort EBF." In this case, women practice EBF because they have no alternative food source for the infant. Suggested policies and programs to address economic constraints and promote EBF in this population include maternal and child allowances, quality child care options, and small-scale household urban food production. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Development of environmentally friendly messages to promote longer durations of breastfeeding for already breastfeeding mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Amanda E

    2015-01-01

    Durations of breastfeeding activity in the United States fall short of established recommendations by leading public health institutions. In response to this problem, this study sought to develop environmentally friendly messages to promote continued breastfeeding for moms already breastfeeding in order to help them reach recommended breastfeeding durations. Messages were successfully cultivated to encourage moms already breastfeeding to meet recommended breastfeeding durations. In addition, this study cultivated strategies by which to use environmentally friendly messages to urge mothers who still need to decide whether to breastfeed or formula feed to breastfeed, although this was not the purpose of the research. Avenues for future communication-based breastfeeding research were also elucidated. The Elaboration Likelihood Model serves as useful theory to assess the role of environmentally friendly messages in the promotion of continued breastfeeding.

  4. A Concept Analysis of Fully Informed: Breastfeeding Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-21

    updated breastfeeding policy statement, the American Academy of Pediatrics 3 ( AAP , 2005) identified the compelling advantages of breastfeeding and urged...healthcare 4 professionals to implement principles to promote breastfeeding . The AAP cited obstacles 5 to the initiation and continuation of...Analysis of Fully Informed 2 14 A Concept Analysis of Fully Informed: Breastfeeding Promotion 15 In February 2005, the American Academy of Pediatrics ( AAP

  5. Frequency of exclusive breastfeeding and its affecting factors in Tehran, 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dalili

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to assess the frequency of exclusive breastfeeding in two health centers of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical sciences in Khak Sefid, Tehran, Iran. A total of 175 mothers, referred for the third dose of their infants' DPT vaccination program participated in the study by completing a questionnaire regarding characteristics of their pregnancy, delivery and exclusive breastfeeding within the first six months of birth. Two-variable analysis and logistic regression test were applied to evaluate factors influencing exclusive breastfeeding. Results indicated that the frequency of exclusive breastfeeding, i.e., breastfeeding within the first six months of birth without the use of any other food with or without vitamin supplementation, was 31.17% (95% CI=23.77%-38.57%, which means 48 infants of 154<179 days old Among 154 infants (<179 days old 48 did not have a history of being separated from their mothers. In logistic regression analysis, the variables which were directly associated with exclusive breastfeeding, with 0.05 significance level of alpha, included breastfeeding within the first hour of birth, eight times or more breastfeeding per day and receiving breastfeeding education during pregnancy. Variables with a negative association with breastfeeding included lack of breast milk, presence of a breast problem that could hinder breastfeeding, bottle feeding, physician or family's advice not to breastfeed and infant's refusal to breastfeed. Frequency of breastfeeding within the six months of birth is less than similar frequencies which are obtained by asking about breastfeeding on the day of the interview. It is recommended to apply real frequency for assessment, evaluation and programming of exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months of birth.

  6. A complex breastfeeding promotion and support intervention in a developing country: study protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabulsi, Mona; Hamadeh, Haya; Tamim, Hani; Kabakian, Tamar; Charafeddine, Lama; Yehya, Nadine; Sinno, Durriyah; Sidani, Saadieh

    2014-01-15

    Breastfeeding has countless benefits to mothers, children and community at large, especially in developing countries. Studies from Lebanon report disappointingly low breastfeeding exclusivity and continuation rates. Evidence reveals that antenatal breastfeeding education, professional lactation support, and peer lay support are individually effective at increasing breastfeeding duration and exclusivity, particularly in low-income settings. Given the complex nature of the breastfeeding ecosystem and its barriers in Lebanon, we hypothesize that a complex breastfeeding support intervention, which is centered on the three components mentioned above, would significantly increase breastfeeding rates. A multi-center randomized controlled trial. 443 healthy pregnant women in their first trimester will be randomized to control or intervention group. A "prenatal/postnatal" professional and peer breastfeeding support package continuing till 6 months postpartum, guided by the Social Network and Social Support Theory. Control group will receive standard prenatal and postnatal care. Mothers will be followed up from early pregnancy till five years after delivery. Total and exclusive breastfeeding rates, quality of life at 1, 3 and 6 months postpartum, maternal breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes at 6 months postpartum, maternal exclusive breastfeeding rates of future infants up to five years from baseline, cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses of the intervention. Descriptive and regression analysis will be conducted under the intention to treat basis using the most recent version of SPSS. Exclusive breastfeeding is a cost-effective public health measure that has a significant impact on infant morbidity and mortality. In a country with limited healthcare resources like Lebanon, developing an effective breastfeeding promotion and support intervention that is easily replicated across various settings becomes a priority. If positive, the results of this study would provide

  7. Fathers' experiences of supporting breastfeeding: challenges for breastfeeding promotion and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy; Davies, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Increasing breastfeeding rates is a strategic priority in the UK and understanding the factors that promote and encourage breastfeeding is critical to achieving this. It is established that women who have strong social support from their partner are more likely to initiate and continue breastfeeding. However, little research has explored the fathers' role in breastfeeding support and more importantly, the information and guidance he may need. In the current study, 117 men whose partner had given birth in the previous 2 years and initiated breastfeeding at birth completed an open-ended questionnaire exploring their experiences of breastfeeding, the information and support they received and their ideas for future breastfeeding education and promotion aimed at fathers and families. Overall, the findings showed that fathers were encouraging of breastfeeding and wanted to be able to support their partner. However, they often felt left out of the breastfeeding relationships and helpless to support their partner at this time. Many reported being excluded from antenatal breastfeeding education or being considered unimportant in post-natal support. Men wanted more information about breastfeeding to be directed towards them alongside ideas about how they could practically support their partner. The importance of support mechanisms for themselves during this time was also raised. The results highlight the need for health professionals to direct support and information towards fathers as well as the mother–infant dyad and to recognise their importance in promoting and enabling breastfeeding. PMID:24720518

  8. Interventions for promoting the initiation of breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Dyson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the widely documented health advantages of breastfeeding over formula feeding, initiation rates remain relatively low in many high-income countries, particularly among women in lower income groups. OBJECTIVE : To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions which aim to encourage women to breastfeed in terms of changes in the number of women who start to breastfeed. METHODS : Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (July 2007, handsearched the Journal of Human Lactation, Health Promotion International and Health Education Quarterly from inception to 15 August 2007, and scanned reference lists of all articles obtained. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled trials, with or without blinding, of any breastfeeding promotion intervention in any population group except women and infants with a specific health problem. Data collection and analysis: One review author independently extracted data and assessed trial quality, checked by a second author. We contacted investigators to obtain missing information. MAIN RESULTS: Main results: Eleven trials were included. Statistical analyses were conducted on data from eight trials (1553 women. Five studies (582 women on low incomes in the USA with typically low breastfeeding rates showed breastfeeding education had a significant effect on increasing initiation rates compared to standard care (risk ratio (RR 1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.15 to 2.15, P = 0.005. Subgroup analyses showed that one-to-one, needs-based, informal repeat education sessions and generic, formal antenatal education sessions are effective in terms of an increase in breastfeeding rates among women on low incomes regardless of ethnicity and feeding intention. Needs-based, informal peer support in the antenatal and postnatal periods was also shown to be effective in one study conducted among Latina women who were considering breastfeeding in the USA (RR 4.02, 95% CI

  9. Breastfeeding Promotion, Support and Protection: Review of Six Country Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Rudert

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Reviews of programmes in Bangladesh, Benin, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Uganda, and Uzbekistan sought to identify health policy and programmatic factors that influenced breastfeeding practices during a 10 to 15 year period. Exclusive breastfeeding rates and trends were analysed in six countries in general and from an equity perspective in two of them. Success factors and challenges were identified in countries with improved and stagnated rates respectively. The disaggregated data analysis showed that progress may be unequal in population subgroups, but if appropriately designed and implemented, a programme can become a “health equalizer” and eliminate discrepancies among different subgroups. Success requires commitment, supportive policies, and comprehensiveness of programmes for breastfeeding promotion, protection and support. Community-based promotion and support was identified as a particularly important component. Although health workers’ training on infant feeding support and counselling was prioritized, further improvement of interpersonal counselling and problem solving skills is needed. More attention is advised for pre-service education, including a stronger focus on clinical practice, to ensure knowledge and skills among all health workers. Large-scale communication activities played a significant role, but essential steps were often underemphasized, including identifying social norms and influencing factors, ensuring community participation, and testing of approaches and messages.

  10. Breastfeeding promotion, support and protection: review of six country programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangasaryan, Nune; Martin, Luann; Brownlee, Ann; Ogunlade, Adebayo; Rudert, Christiane; Cai, Xiaodong

    2012-08-01

    Reviews of programmes in Bangladesh, Benin, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Uganda, and Uzbekistan sought to identify health policy and programmatic factors that influenced breastfeeding practices during a 10 to 15 year period. Exclusive breastfeeding rates and trends were analysed in six countries in general and from an equity perspective in two of them. Success factors and challenges were identified in countries with improved and stagnated rates respectively. The disaggregated data analysis showed that progress may be unequal in population subgroups, but if appropriately designed and implemented, a programme can become a "health equalizer" and eliminate discrepancies among different subgroups. Success requires commitment, supportive policies, and comprehensiveness of programmes for breastfeeding promotion, protection and support. Community-based promotion and support was identified as a particularly important component. Although health workers' training on infant feeding support and counselling was prioritized, further improvement of interpersonal counselling and problem solving skills is needed. More attention is advised for pre-service education, including a stronger focus on clinical practice, to ensure knowledge and skills among all health workers. Large-scale communication activities played a significant role, but essential steps were often underemphasized, including identifying social norms and influencing factors, ensuring community participation, and testing of approaches and messages.

  11. Breastfeeding Promotion, Support and Protection: Review of Six Country Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangasaryan, Nune; Martin, Luann; Brownlee, Ann; Ogunlade, Adebayo; Rudert, Christiane; Cai, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Reviews of programmes in Bangladesh, Benin, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Uganda, and Uzbekistan sought to identify health policy and programmatic factors that influenced breastfeeding practices during a 10 to 15 year period. Exclusive breastfeeding rates and trends were analysed in six countries in general and from an equity perspective in two of them. Success factors and challenges were identified in countries with improved and stagnated rates respectively. The disaggregated data analysis showed that progress may be unequal in population subgroups, but if appropriately designed and implemented, a programme can become a “health equalizer” and eliminate discrepancies among different subgroups. Success requires commitment, supportive policies, and comprehensiveness of programmes for breastfeeding promotion, protection and support. Community-based promotion and support was identified as a particularly important component. Although health workers’ training on infant feeding support and counselling was prioritized, further improvement of interpersonal counselling and problem solving skills is needed. More attention is advised for pre-service education, including a stronger focus on clinical practice, to ensure knowledge and skills among all health workers. Large-scale communication activities played a significant role, but essential steps were often underemphasized, including identifying social norms and influencing factors, ensuring community participation, and testing of approaches and messages. PMID:23016128

  12. Predictors of exclusive breast-feeding in early infancy: a survey report from Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yuri; Ali, Moazzam; Kakimoto, Kazuhiro; Saroeun, Ou; Kanal, Koum; Kuroiwa, Chushi

    2010-12-01

    Exclusive breast-feeding (EBF) is recommended in the first 6 months of an infant's life. This study aims to investigate the present status of infant feeding practices and identify factors that affect EBF practices during the first 6 months following infant birth in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. A cross-sectional survey with a semistructured questionnaire was given to 312 mothers with children aged 6 to 24 months who visited the immunization clinic in the National Maternal and Child Health Centre in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, from December 2005 to February 2006. Eighty-three percent of mothers fed breast milk exclusively in the first month, whereas only 51.3% continued EBF in the first 6 months. Within 30 minutes after delivery, 39% of mothers began breast-feeding. Results from logistic regression analysis indicate that the lack of a maternal antenatal EBF plan (odds ratio [OR] = 10.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.68-27.24, p feeding classes (OR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.13-3.28, p feed their babies, keeping in mind the benefits it may yield. Paternal involvement in breast-feeding classes may increase their awareness and consequently complement EBF practices. Finally, development of conducive working environments and policies for working mothers should be carefully explored because it could have positive influence in better care and promotion of EBF. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reasons for Stopping Exclusive Breastfeeding Between Three and Six Months: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alianmoghaddam, Narges; Phibbs, Suzanne; Benn, Cheryl

    Scant published qualitative literature exists focusing on why exclusive breastfeeding rates decline between three and six months. This study aims to develop an understanding of why exclusive breastfeeding tails off so dramatically between three and six months after birth in New Zealand. A generic qualitative methodology was employed in this study and social constructionism selected as the main epistemological framework underpinning the research. This study was carried out between September 2013 and July 2014, involving face-to-face interviews with 30 women who were characterised as highly motivated to complete six months exclusive breastfeeding prior to the birth of their child. In order to gain an in-depth understanding of the research material, thematic analysis of the interview transcripts was completed using manual coding techniques. After thematic analysis of the data four key themes were identified: 1) The good employee/good mother dilemma. 2) Breastfeeding is lovely, but six months exclusively is demanding. 3) Exclusive breastfeeding recommendations should be individualised. 4) Introducing solids early as a cultural practice. Most studies have linked barriers to six months exclusive breastfeeding to difficulties within the mother-infant dyad, as well as negative maternal socioeconomic and socio-demographic characteristics. However, this study has shown that the maintenance of six months exclusive breastfeeding is also challenging for this group of mothers who were socially advantaged, well-educated and highly motivated to breastfeed their babies exclusively for six months. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. From bioactive substances to research on breast-feeding promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, A L; Guerrero, M L

    2001-01-01

    Despite known health benefits, exclusive breast-feeding for at least 4 months is uncommon in many countries. In Mexico, most mothers initiate breast-feeding but few breast-feed exclusively. The objective was to examine the effectiveness of home visits by lay peer counselors to increase exclusive breast-feeding among mothers in a periurban area of Mexico. An ethnographic assessment conducted in 1994 that identified key maternal beliefs, practices, and needs was used to guide educational strategies. Lay counselors were recruited from the same community and trained by La Leche League. From March 1995 through September 1996, pregnant women were identified by community census and invited to participate. Women were enrolled into a randomized, controlled study of 3 groups: no intervention (control), 3 visits, and 6 visits during pregnancy and early postpartum. Data collection was performed by a social worker apart from the counselors. Exclusive breast-feeding was defined by WHO criteria. The study enrolled 130 women; 52 were in the 3-visit group, 44 in the 6-visit group, and 34 in the control group. Study groups did not differ in the maternal characteristics or initiation of breast-feeding (96%). At 3 months postpartum, exclusive breast-feeding was practiced by only 12% of controls vs. 52% in the 3-visit group and 67% in the 6-visit group (P exclusive breast-feeding and a significant reduction in infant illness in an urban community through well-designed maternal support including early intervention and repeated contact.

  15. Factors Associated with Exclusive Breastfeeding of Preterm Infants. Results from a Prospective National Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Hansen, Bo Moelholm; Kronborg, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Evidence-based knowledge of how to guide the mothers of preterm infants in breastfeeding establishment is contradictive or sparse. The aim was to investigate the associations between pre-specified clinical practices for facilitating breastfeeding, and exclusive breastfeeding...... were analysed by multiple logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: At discharge 68% of the preterm infants were exclusively breastfed and 17% partially. Test-weighing the infant, and minimizing the use of a pacifier, showed a protective effect to exclusive breastfeeding at discharge (OR 0.6 (95% CI 0.......4-0.8) and 0.4 (95% CI 0.3-0.6), respectively). The use of nipple shields (OR 2.3 (95% CI 1.6-3.2)) and the initiation of breast milk expression later than 48 hours postpartum (OR 4.9 (95% CI 1.9-12.6)) were associated with failure of exclusive breastfeeding at discharge. The clinical practices associated...

  16. The Sharjah Baby-Friendly Campaign: A Community-Based Model for Breastfeeding Promotion, Protection, and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghazal, Hessa; Rashid, Shehnaz; Ruf, Evelyne

    2015-11-01

    Breastfeeding promotion, protection, and support are one of the most cost-effective public health interventions to advance maternal and child health. The World Health Organization, the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund, and numerous health organizations have recommended exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life, which is a key indicator of breastfeeding promotion programs worldwide. Despite the recommendations and various initiatives to promote breastfeeding, most women do not reach the exclusive breastfeeding target in both developed and developing countries. Such has been the case in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Therefore, based on the decree for breastfeeding promotion, protection, and support by the ruler of the Emirate of Sharjah, UAE, H.H. Sheikh Doctor Sultan Al Qasimi, a multisectorial, multidirectional breastfeeding campaign--the Sharjah Baby-Friendly Campaign--was launched in March 2012 by H.E. Sheikha Bodour Al Qasimi, under her patronage. It consisted of four initiatives-namely, Baby-Friendly Health Facility, Mother-Friendly Workplace, Breastfeeding-Friendly Nursery, and Mother-Baby Friendly Public Place. Once an organization met the criteria for any of these initiatives, it was awarded the designation or accreditation of that initiative. The campaign initiatives worked through capacity building of healthcare workers, provided professional support and facilitation for the accreditation process, developed breastfeeding education content and resources, and organized and conducted breastfeeding promotion seminars in health facilities and community, as well as community outreach through social media and an innovative mobile mother' room. The positive impact of the campaign on breastfeeding promotion, protection, and support is evident by the increased exclusive breastfeeding rate at 6 months and decreased bottle feeding rates at both 4 and 6 months.

  17. Promoting breastfeeding through health education at the time of immunizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, M S; Sodemann, Morten; Mølbak, Kare

    1999-01-01

    into two groups. Mothers in the intervention group were given health education according to WHO's recommendations; about exclusive breastfeeding for at least the first 4 mo, prolonged breastfeeding and family planning methods. At 4 mo of age introduction of weaning food was delayed in the intervention...

  18. Exclusive breastfeeding rate and factors associated with infant feeding practices in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yovita Ananta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Breast milk is the ideal food for infants. According to the 2007 Indonesian National Household Health Survey, only 23% of mothers exclusively breastfeed for six months. Objectives To determine the rate of exclusive breastfeeding in Indonesia, to evaluate factors associated with infant feeding practices, and to compare the nutritional and developmental status between exclusively-breastfed and formula-fed infants. Methods A survey was conducted in hospitals located in 17 provinces in Indonesia. The rate of exclusive breastfeeding was calculated. Many variables were investigated as potential predictors for exclusive breastfeeding using a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Further analysis was performed to compare the nutritional and developmental status between exclusively breastfed and formula-fed infants at the time of survey. Results From 1,804 infant subjects, the overall rate of exclusive breastfeeding was 46.3%, ranging from 10.5% in East Java to 66.9% in Jambi. Predominant breastfeeding, complementary feeding, and formula feeding rates were 14.3%, 8.6%, and 30.7%, respectively. Maternal unemployment was associated with a longer duration of breastfeeding (P=0.000. There were significantly more formula-fed infants who were undernourished compared to exclusively-breastfed infants (14% vs. 8%, P=0.001. There were also significantly more infants in the formula-fed group who had abnormal head circumference compared to those in the exclusively-breastfed group (9% vs. 6%, P=0.031. Child development, as assessed by the Pre-screening Developmental Questionnaire, was similar between the two groups (P=0.996. Conclusion The overall rate of exclusive breastfeeding in Indonesia is 46.3%. Maternal unemployment is associated with longer duration of breastfeeding. Exclusive breastfed infants have significant better growth and head circumference compared to formula fed infants, while the development is similar between the two groups.

  19. Monitoring the World Health Organization Global Target 2025 for Exclusive Breastfeeding: Experience From the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priya M; Perrine, Cria G; Chen, Jian; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Flores-Ayala, Rafael

    2017-08-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months, calculated from a single 24-hour recall among mothers of children 0 to 5 months of age, is a World Health Organization (WHO) indicator used to monitor progress on the 2025 global breastfeeding target. Many upper-middle-income and high-income countries, including the United States, do not have estimates for this indicator. Research aim: To describe the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months in the United States. We used a single 24-hour dietary recall from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2012 to calculate the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months. We discuss our results in the context of routine breastfeeding surveillance, which is reported from a national survey with different methodology. Among children younger than 6 months, 24.4%, 95% confidence interval [17.6, 31.1], were exclusively breastfed the previous day. To our knowledge, this is the first estimate of the WHO indicator of exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months for the United States. This study supports the global surveillance and data strategy for reporting to the WHO on the 2025 target for exclusive breastfeeding.

  20. Evidence based workplace interventions to promote breastfeeding practices among Pakistani working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Shela Akbar Ali; Karmaliani, Rozina

    2013-03-01

    Breastfeeding is an essential source of nutrition for young babies; however, it is challenging for employed mothers to continue breastfeeding with employment, especially if workplace support is minimal or missing. In Pakistan, from 1983 to 2008, the prevalence of breastfeeding at 6 months has decreased from 96% to 31%. In this region, workplace barriers have been reported as one of the reasons that result in early cessation of breastfeeding among working mothers. This paper aims at reviewing global literature to explore workplace interventions that can promote the breastfeeding practices among working mothers in Pakistan. A literature search of peer reviewed databases, including CINHAL (1980-2009), MEDLINE (1980-2009), Pub Med (1980-2009), Springer Link (1980-2008), and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (3rd quarter, 2008), was undertaken. Considering the pre-set inclusion and exclusion criteria, out of more than 500 literature sources, 50 were shortlisted and reviewed. A review of global literature revealed that in order to promote breastfeeding practices among employed mothers, the most powerful workplace interventions include: educating working mothers about management of breastfeeding with employment; enhancing employers' awareness about benefits of breastfeeding accommodation at workplace; arranging physical facilities for lactating mothers (including privacy, childcare facilities, breast pumps, and breast milk storage facilities); providing job-flexibility to working mothers; and initiating mother friendly policies at workplace that support breastfeeding. In Pakistani workplace settings, where little attention is paid to sustain breastfeeding practices among working mothers, there is a need to initiate lactation support programmes. These programmes can be made effective by implementing composite interventions at the level of breastfeeding working mothers, employers, and workplace. Copyright © 2012 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier

  1. Mother chair reparation to decrease subjective disorders in exclusive breast-feeding period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiana, M. A.; Yusuf, M.; Lokantara, W. D.

    2018-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is the responsibility of the mother after childbirth. A specific constraint arise for the mother when during the breastfeeding process, the place is not in accordance with the physiological condition of the mother's body. A not physiologically corrected lactation place will cause subjective disorders for breastfeeding mothers. Complaints that arise include quick tiredness, with certain muscles sore and pain, which will ultimately decrease the motivation of the mothers to perform exclusive breastfeeding especially in the first six months of the baby's birth. An improved ergonomic designed chair, this research used experimental method with group within treatment (treatment by subject) to solve the problem. The study took place in Maternity Clinic “CB” Badung regency, Bali. Subjective disorders are measured based on general fatigue and musculoskeletal disorders mothers breastfeeding. Fatigue is predicted using 30 items of questionnaires while musculoskeletal compaints are predicted from the Nordic Body Map questionnaire. Data were analyzed descriptively and inferentially in an experiment condition using using t-pair test. The results showed that there were significant differences in fatigue in general and skeletal musculoskeletal disorders between treatment 1 (using old chair) with treatment 2 (using repaired seats) in breastfeeding mothers. Fatigue in general decreased by 35.6% and skeletal musculoskeletal disorders decreased by 26.8%. It was concluded that improved breastfeeding mothers' seats may decrease subjective disorders during exclusive breastfeeding. It is therefore advisable for breastfeeding mothers to use seats that match their anthropometry.

  2. Low rates of exclusive breastfeeding are still evident in four South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Breastfeeding is one of the primary strategies used to enhance infant nutrition and improving child survival worldwide. The intention of globally increasing the rate of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) to at least 50% of infants in the first six months of life was stated in the 2014 International Conference on Nutrition ...

  3. Mothers' attitudes and beliefs about infant feeding highlight barriers to exclusive breastfeeding in American Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Nicola L; Rosen, Rochelle K; Strait, E Ashton; Raffucci, Gabriela; Holmdahl, Inga; Freeman, Joshua R; Muasau-Howard, Bethel T; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2015-09-01

    In American Samoa, initiation of breastfeeding is almost universal but exclusive breastfeeding, a promising target for obesity prevention, is short in duration. (1) To examine American Samoan mothers' feeding experiences and attitudes and beliefs about infant feeding and (2) to identify potential barriers to exclusive breastfeeding. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with American Samoan mothers at 16-32 days postpartum. Interviews focused on mother's knowledge and beliefs about infant feeding, how their infants were fed, why the mother had chosen this mode of infant feeding, and how decisions about feeding were made within her social surroundings. A thematic qualitative analysis was conducted to identify salient themes in the data. Intention to exclusively breastfeed did not predict practice; most women supplemented with formula despite intending to exclusively breastfeed. The benefits of breastfeeding were well-recognized, but the importance of exclusivity was missed. Formula-use was not preferred but considered an innocuous "back-up option" where breastfeeding was not possible or not sufficient for infant satiety. Identified barriers to exclusive breastfeeding included: the convenience of formula; perceptions among mothers that they were not producing enough breast milk; and pain while breastfeeding. The important support role of family for infant feeding could be utilized in intervention design. This study identified barriers to exclusive breastfeeding that can be immediately addressed by providers of breastfeeding support services. Further research is needed to address the common perception of insufficient milk in this setting. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Exclusive breastfeeding – what is its place in HIV prevalent areas?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-04-11

    Apr 11, 2007 ... for overall child survival is exclusive breastfeeding (Table I) for ... the risks and benefits of different feeding modes is complex in many ... large cohort study examining the risks of postnatal HIV transmission and infant feeding, ...

  5. Relationship Between Exclusive Breastfeeding and Lower Risk of Childhood Obesity: A Narrative Review of Published Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Uwaezuoke, Samuel N; Eneh, Chizoma I; Ndu, Ikenna K

    2017-01-01

    Background: The pattern of infant feeding during the first 1000-day period—from conception to the second birthday—has a significant influence on the child’s growth trajectory. The relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and lower risk of childhood obesity has elicited much scientific interest, given the fact that this form of malnutrition is becoming a global epidemic. Aim: This narrative review aims to examine the evidence in the literature linking exclusive breastfeeding with reduction...

  6. Gendered perceptions on infant feeding in Eastern Uganda: continued need for exclusive breastfeeding support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamagi Charles A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In resource-poor settings, HIV positive mothers are recommended to choose between 'Exclusive breastfeeding' (EBF or 'Exclusive replacement feeding' (ERF. Acceptability, Feasibility, Affordability, Sustainability and Safety (AFASS has been the World Health Organization (WHO's a priori criteria for ERF the last ten years. 'AFASS' has become a mere acronym among many workers in the field of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, PMTCT. Thereby, non-breastfeeding has been suggested irrespective of social norms. EBF for the first half of infancy is associated with huge health benefits for children in areas where infant mortality is high. But, even if EBF has been recommended for a decade, few mothers are practicing it. We set out to understand fathers' and mothers' infant feeding perceptions and the degree to which EBF and ERF were 'AFASS.' Methods Eight focus groups with 81 informants provided information for inductive content analysis. Four groups were held by men among men and four groups by women among women in Mbale District, Eastern Uganda. Results Two study questions emerged: How are the different feeding options understood and accepted? And, what are men's and women's responsibilities related to infant feeding? A mother's commitment to breastfeed and the husband's commitment to provide for the family came out strongly. Not breastfeeding a newborn was seen as dangerous and as unacceptable, except in cases of maternal illness. Men argued that not breastfeeding could entail sanctions by kin or in court. But, in general, both men and women regarded EBF as 'not enough' or even 'harmful.' Among men, not giving supplements to breast milk was associated with poverty and men's failure as providers. Women emphasised lack of time, exhaustion, poverty and hunger as factors for limited breast milk production. Although women had attended antenatal teaching they expressed a need to know more. Most men felt left out from

  7. [Exclusive breastfeeding in <6mo is associated to a better weight for length in households with food insecurity in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-de Cossío, Teresita; Escobar-Zaragoza, Leticia; González-Castell, Dinorah; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Rivera-Dommarco, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of exclusive breastfeeding in ENSANUT 2012 (n = 4 022). Breastfeeding indicators from WHO-2008 were calculated. We estimated the effect modifier EBF<6mo of the relationship between FI and weight length (Z W/L) and length for age (Z L/A) Z score. The EBF<6mo was lower in households (hh) with moderate and severe FI than in those with food security (FS) or mild FI hh. Only EBF<6mo infants from hh with moderate and severe FI showed greater Z W/L (0.44) than those without EBF<6mo (p= 0.038, one-tailed). Score Z W/L of infants from hh FS did not vary according to EBF<6mo. EBF<6mo in Mexican infants is associated with better weight for length in households with moderate and severe FI. Breastfeeding promotion, protection and support must be targeted mainly at the most vulnerable, food insecure families.

  8. Profiles of eight working mothers who practiced exclusive breastfeeding in Depok, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Februhartanty, Judhiastuty; Wibowo, Yulianti; Fahmida, Umi; Roshita, Airin

    2012-02-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding practice is generally low because of multifaceted factors internally within mothers themselves and also the surroundings. In addition, studies have consistently found that maternal employment outside the home is related to shorter duration of exclusive breastfeeding. With all these challenges, it is interesting that there are some mothers who manage to exclusively breastfeed their infants. Therefore, this report aims at exploring the characteristics of working mothers who are able to practice exclusive breastfeeding. The original study population was non-working and working mothers who have infants around 1 to 6 months old. The study design is an observational study with a mixed methods approach using a quantitative study (survey) and qualitative methods (in-depth interview) in sequential order. In addition, in-depth interviews with family members, midwives, supervisors at work, and community health workers were also included to accomplish a holistic picture of the situation. The study concludes that self-efficacy and confidence of the breastfeeding mothers characterize the practice of exclusive breastfeeding. Good knowledge that was acquired way before the mothers got pregnant suggests a predisposing factor to the current state of confidence. Home support from the father enhances the decision to sustain breastfeeding.

  9. Exclusive breastfeeding among city-dwelling professional working mothers in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dun-Dery, Elvis J; Laar, Amos K

    2016-01-01

    In Ghana, periodic national surveys report the practice of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) in the general population to be over 50 %. However, little is known about EBF among professional working mothers, particularly its duration after maternity leave. Female workers are entitled to 12 weeks (84 days) of maternity leave with full pay in Ghana, and this can be extended by two additional weeks in case of a caesarean or abnormal delivery. This study assessed the prevalence of EBF, as well as factors associated with the practice among professional working mothers in one of the ten regional capitals of Ghana. The study was descriptive cross-sectional in design and employed a multi-stage sampling technique to sample 369 professional working mothers. The study was planned and implemented between January to July 2015. Study-specific structured questionnaires were used in the data collection over a period of one month. Some factors including demographic characteristics, types of facilities available at workplace to support breastfeeding, challenges to exclusive breastfeeding at the workplace and mother's knowledge base on EBF, were assessed. Exclusive breastfeeding is defined as feeding infants with only breast milk, without supplemental liquids or solids except for liquid medicine and vitamin or mineral supplements. There was a near universal awareness of exclusive breastfeeding among respondents (99 %). Even though most mothers initiated breastfeeding within an hour of delivery (91 %), the EBF rate at six months was low (10.3 %). The study identified three elements as determinants of EBF; Those who did not receive infant feeding recommendation from health workers were less likely to practice exclusive breastfeeding (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 0.45; 95 % Confidence Interval [CI] 0.27, 0.77), mothers who had shorter duration of maternity leave were less likely to practice exclusive breastfeeding (AOR 0.09; 95 % CI 0.02, 0.45), and those who had a normal delivery were

  10. Duration of exclusive breastfeeding and wheezing in the first year of life: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduci, Elvira; Banderali, Giuseppe; Peroni, Diego; Lassandro, Carlotta; Radaelli, Giovanni

    Wheezing is the most common symptom associated with asthma in young children. There is a lack of well-designed prospective studies on the relationship of exclusive breastfeeding with wheezing in infants. This prospective cohort study investigated whether a relationship exists of exclusive breastfeeding with wheezing at 12 months of age. A series of 1632 mother-infant pairs were sequentially recruited. Mothers were trained at hospital on breastfeeding practices and how to recognise wheezing. At hospital discharge they received a calendar-diary to record the date at stopping breastfeeding and at onset of wheezing. Data were collected by telephone interviews through 12 months post-delivery. Breastfeeding was in accordance with the World Health Organisation and wheezing with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10-CM code R06.2). At 12 months 1522 mother-infant pairs were participating. Breastfeeding started in 95.9% of them and was exclusive in 86.1%. The incidence of wheezing ever and recurrent wheezing at 12 months of age was 33.7% and 10.0%, respectively. Duration of exclusive breastfeeding was shorter in wheezing than non-wheezing infants (median 2.6 months vs. 4.1 months, Pever by 11% and of recurrent wheezing by 15%, at 12 months of age. Longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding reduces the risk of wheezing throughout the first 12 months of life. These findings would be relevant to all healthcare operators and mothers, also to improve their awareness about the best feeding practices for the infant's health. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Maternal and health care workers' perceptions of the effects of exclusive breastfeeding by HIV positive mothers on maternal and infant health in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafulafula, Ursula K; Hutchinson, Mary K; Gennaro, Susan; Guttmacher, Sally

    2014-07-25

    HIV-positive mothers are likely to exclusively breastfeed if they perceive exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) beneficial to them and their infants. Nevertheless, very little is known in Malawi about HIV-positive mothers' perceptions regarding EBF. In order to effectively promote EBF among these mothers, it is important to first understand their perceptions on benefits of exclusive breastfeeding. This study therefore, explored maternal and health care workers' perceptions of the effects of exclusive breastfeeding on HIV-positive mothers' health and that of their infants. This was a qualitative study within a larger project. Face-to-face in-depth interviews and focus group discussions using a semi- structured interview and focus group guide were conducted. Sixteen HIV-positive breastfeeding mothers, between 18 and 35 years old, were interviewed and data saturation was achieved. Two focus group discussions (FGDs) comprising of five and six adult women of unknown HIV status who were personal assistants to maternity patients, and one FGD with five nurse-midwives working in the maternity wards of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi, were also conducted. Thematic content data analysis was utilized. The study revealed more positive than negative perceived effects of exclusive breastfeeding. However, the fear of transmitting HIV to infants through breast milk featured strongly in the study participants' reports including those of the nurse-midwives. Only one nurse-midwife and a few HIV-positive mothers believed that EBF prevents mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Furthermore, participants, especially the HIV-positive mothers felt that exclusive breastfeeding leads to maternal ill- health and would accelerate their progression to full blown AIDS. While most participants considered exclusive breastfeeding as an important component of the wellbeing of their infants' health, they did not share the worldwide acknowledged benefits of exclusive breastfeeding in the

  12. The Short Form of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale as a Prognostic Factor of Exclusive Breastfeeding among Mandarin-Speaking Chinese Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Wan-Yim; Gao, Ling-Ling; Choi, Kai-Chow; Chau, Janita Pak-Chun; Xiao, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Little is known about the effect of maternal perceived breastfeeding self-efficacy on the exclusive breastfeeding rate at 6 months postpartum in mainland China. The aim of this study was to examine the relative effect of maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy and selected relevant factors on the exclusive breastfeeding rate at 6 months postpartum. The internal consistency and construct validity of the Chinese (Mandarin) version of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (BSES-SF) were also examined. This was a prospective cohort study conducted at a regional teaching hospital in Guangzhou, China. A total of 562 in-hospital mothers who were within 72 hours postpartum were recruited to the study and followed up by telephone for 6 months. Although all of the mothers breastfed their babies within 72 hours postpartum, only 25% of the mothers breastfed exclusively. The mean survival time of continuation of exclusive breastfeeding was 16.7 days. The proportion of mothers who breastfed exclusively after discharge was 14.8%, 2.0%, and 0.2% at 1, 4, and 6 months, respectively. Cox regression analysis revealed that the mothers who had a higher BSES-SF score at baseline, underwent cesarean section, and practiced exclusive breastfeeding within 72 hours after delivery were significantly associated with a lower hazard of discontinuation of exclusive breastfeeding before 6 months postpartum. The exclusive breastfeeding rate among Chinese women is far from satisfactory. The Chinese (Mandarin) version of the BSES-SF can help in identifying mothers who need more support for exclusive breastfeeding before 6 months postpartum.

  13. HEALTH SERVICES AND IT’S UTILIZATION RELATED TO EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING AND EARLY BREASTFEEDING INITIATION PROGRAM IN WEST JAVA PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Handayani Utami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDespite the essential benefit of early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breast feeding during the first six months, the practice was still low. Health services and personnel play important role have not optimal yet in breast feeding. The aim of this study was to review the provision of health services and it’s utilization related to early breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding practices in West Java province. This study was an analysis of the Indonesian Health Facility Survey (Rifaskes 2011 and the Basic Health Survey (Riskesdas 2010. It analyzed 45 public hospitals  and  997  primary  health  centers  in  West  Java  Province  from  HFS  and  285  infants (0-6 months in West Java province from Riskesdas. It supplemented with qualitative data that obtained from in-depth interviews with the representatives from central government, Provincial Health Office, District Health Office (DHO, public health centers and hospitals in Bandung city and Bogor district, West Java. This study revealed that a number of gaps related to breastfeeding services  in  PHC  and  hospitals  were  still  found.  One  of  the  influential  factors  that  hindering  the breastfeeding services in health services was the absence of local policy regarding early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding practices in West Java Province. The limitation of human resources, facilities and specific budget were also become the obstacles in the implementation of the breastfeeding program. This study implied that most of community already utilized the maternal and child’s heath care. This study indicated the importance of health services and support from health professionals for successful of breastfeeding. Thus the strong commitment of health personnels as well as the policy makers was really needed.Keywords : early initiation of breastfeeding; exclusive breastfeeding; health facilities; utilization

  14. Demands out of context: Tanzanian women combining exclusive breastfeeding with employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlay, Rose Shao; Keddy, Barbara; Stern, Phyllis Noerager

    2004-03-01

    This research, conducted in Tanzania, involved 6 women and their experiences as they combined exclusive breastfeeding with work outside their home. Additional data were collected at a conference in Tanzania and from women in North America. We found that while public health officials did a spectacular job of convincing the women of the advantages of exclusive breastfeeding in terms of their babies' health and their own, they then left the women to their own devises when it came to solving the practical problems of breastfeeding at the same time as holding down a full-time job. We found that the women had to deal with conditions such as no on-site child care, lack of expressing or breastfeeding rooms, and short maternity leave at most workplaces. In addition, the women suffered the embarrassment of dribbling breasts while working. It seems clear that while cultural norms persist, these women are victims who are taught the imperative of breastfeeding without being given societal and governmental support. Therefore, the obvious next step for health professionals is to work for sociopolitical action that will provide a context where breastfeeding can take its natural place in the growth and development of infants. While structural functionalists might insist that structures in place position breastfeeding as having no normal function in the workplace, the pressure of the World Health Organization, by the shear weight of its international influence, may force a change in structure of the workplace.

  15. Barriers to exclusive breastfeeding in the Ayeyarwaddy Region in Myanmar: Qualitative findings from mothers, grandmothers, and husbands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thet, May Me; Khaing, Ei Ei; Diamond-Smith, Nadia; Sudhinaraset, May; Oo, Sandar; Aung, Tin

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar has low rates of exclusive breastfeeding despite many decades of efforts to increase this practice. The purpose of this study is to examine the barriers to exclusive breastfeeding and how different household members participate in decision-making. We conducted semi-structured interviews with mothers with an infant 6-12 months (24), and a subset of their husbands (10) and their mothers/mothers-in-laws (grandmothers) (10) in rural and urban areas of Laputta, Myanmar. Respondents had high levels of knowledge about exclusive breastfeeding, but low adherence. One of the primary barriers to exclusive breastfeeding was that mothers, husbands, and grandmothers believed that exclusive breastfeeding was not sufficient for babies and solid foods and water were necessary. Water and mashed up rice were commonly introduced before 6 months of age. Mothers also faced barriers to exclusive breastfeeding due to the need to return to work outside the home and health related problems. Other family members provide support for mothers in their breastfeeding, however, most respondents stated that decisions about breastfeeding and child feeding were made by the mother herself. Mothers in this part of Myanmar know about exclusive breastfeeding, but need more knowledge about its importance and benefits to encourage them to practice it. More information for other family members could improve adherence to exclusive breastfeeding, as family members often provide food to children and support to breastfeeding mothers. Support for mothers to be able to continue breastfeeding once they return to work and in the face of health problems is also important. Finally, additional information about the types of foods that infants need once they cease breastfeeding could improve infant and child health. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship Between Exclusive Breastfeeding and Lower Risk of Childhood Obesity: A Narrative Review of Published Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel N Uwaezuoke

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pattern of infant feeding during the first 1000-day period—from conception to the second birthday—has a significant influence on the child’s growth trajectory. The relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and lower risk of childhood obesity has elicited much scientific interest, given the fact that this form of malnutrition is becoming a global epidemic. Aim: This narrative review aims to examine the evidence in the literature linking exclusive breastfeeding with reduction in obesity in children. Literature search: Using appropriate search terms, PubMed database was searched for relevant articles that met the review objective. Results: Evidence for the protective effect of exclusive breastfeeding against childhood obesity have been provided by studies which explored 5 physiologic mechanisms and those that established the causality between breastfeeding and lower risk of obesity. The few studies that disputed this relationship highlighted the influence of confounding factors. A new insight on molecular mechanisms, however, points to a direct and indirect effect of human milk oligosaccharides on the prevention of overweight and obesity. Conclusions: The preponderance of current evidence strongly suggests that exclusivity in breastfeeding can prevent the development of obesity in children.

  17. Relationship Between Exclusive Breastfeeding and Lower Risk of Childhood Obesity: A Narrative Review of Published Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwaezuoke, Samuel N; Eneh, Chizoma I; Ndu, Ikenna K

    2017-01-01

    The pattern of infant feeding during the first 1000-day period-from conception to the second birthday-has a significant influence on the child's growth trajectory. The relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and lower risk of childhood obesity has elicited much scientific interest, given the fact that this form of malnutrition is becoming a global epidemic. This narrative review aims to examine the evidence in the literature linking exclusive breastfeeding with reduction in obesity in children. Using appropriate search terms, PubMed database was searched for relevant articles that met the review objective. Evidence for the protective effect of exclusive breastfeeding against childhood obesity have been provided by studies which explored 5 physiologic mechanisms and those that established the causality between breastfeeding and lower risk of obesity. The few studies that disputed this relationship highlighted the influence of confounding factors. A new insight on molecular mechanisms, however, points to a direct and indirect effect of human milk oligosaccharides on the prevention of overweight and obesity. The preponderance of current evidence strongly suggests that exclusivity in breastfeeding can prevent the development of obesity in children.

  18. Exclusive Breastfeeding Rate and Complementary Feeding Indicators in China: A National Representative Survey in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Duan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate infant and young child feeding could reduce morbidity and mortality and could improve cognitive development of children. However, nationwide data on exclusive breastfeeding and complementary feeding status in China are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess current exclusive breastfeeding and complementary feeding status in China. A national representative survey (Chinese National Nutrition and Health Survey of children aged under 6 years was done in 2013. Stratified multistage cluster sampling was used to select study participants. World Health Organization (WHO infant and young child feeding indicators were firstly used to assess exclusive breastfeeding and complementary feeding practice nationwide. In total, 14,458 children aged under two years (0 to <730 days were studied from 55 counties in 30 provinces in China. The crude exclusive breastfeeding rate under 6 months was 20.7% (908/4381 and the weighted exclusive breastfeeding rate was 18.6%. The crude prevalence of minimum dietary diversity, minimum meal frequency and minimum acceptable diet were 52.5% (5286/10,071, 69.8% (7027/10,071, and 27.4% (2764/10,071 among children aged 6–23 months, respectively. The weighted rate was 53.7%, 69.1%, and 25.1%, respectively. Residential area, household income and maternal education were positively associated with the three complementary feeding indicators. The exclusive breastfeeding rate under 6 months was low and complementary feeding practice was not optimal in China. Residential area, household income and maternal education might be used to target infants and young children to improve complementary feeding practice.

  19. Integrating quality improvement and translational research models to increase exclusive breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peggy A; Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Nailon, Regina E

    2014-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF), a perinatal core measure, is associated with a longer duration of breastfeeding. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to increase the percent of healthy term singleton newborns who were exclusively breastfed at an academic medical center in the Midwest. Implementation of skin-to-skin contact between mother and newborn immediately following birth resulted in an increase in the percent of healthy term singleton newborns who were EBF from 55% to 64%. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  20. Promotion of breastfeeding in Poland: the current situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Królak-Olejnik, Barbara; Błasiak, Ilona; Szczygieł, Anna

    2017-12-01

    Objective Exclusive breastfeeding is safe and beneficial for healthy infants; it is the optimal feeding method during the first 6 months of life. Infants should be complementary fed in conjunction with breastfeeding until 12 months of age or longer. The aim of the present study was to analyse the duration of breastfeeding through 12 months of age. Methods Participants were 1679 women from 42 randomly selected hospitals in Poland. The data were obtained from surveys, including a paper and pencil interview that was conducted after mothers delivered in the hospital and before discharge. Computer aided telephone interviews were administered at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months. Results There was a high rate of initiating breastfeeding after birth (97%), a rapid abandonment of exclusive breastfeeding (43.5% at 2 months, 28.9% at 4 months and 4% at 6 months) and an onset of formula feeding during the first days of life, which is contrary to current recommendations. Conclusions It is necessary re-educate mothers, medical staff who care for mothers and children during the perinatal period, and other specialists.

  1. Factors associated with breastfeeding duration and exclusivity in mothers returning to paid employment postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Dorothy Li; Fong, Daniel Yee Tak; Tarrant, Marie

    2015-05-01

    Mothers who are employed postpartum are less likely to continue breastfeeding than mothers who are not formally employed. However, as postpartum employment is increasingly necessary for the majority of new mothers, it is important to investigate factors that influence the continuation of breastfeeding in employed mothers. A sample of 1,738 mothers who returned to paid employment postpartum were recruited from the obstetric units of four public hospitals in Hong Kong, and prospectively followed for 12 months or until their infant was weaned. More than 85 % of participants returned to formal employment within 10 weeks postpartum, with over 90 % of these employed full-time. About one-third of the participants (32 %) were able to combine breastfeeding and employment, with breastfeeding defined as continuing for more than 2 weeks after returning to work postpartum. Later return to work and higher maternal education were associated with new mothers being able to combine breastfeeding and employment. Later return to work, shorter working hours, parental childcare, and higher maternal education were also associated with less likelihood of weaning from any or exclusive breastfeeding. Improvements in employment-related conditions for mothers and additional support for lower educated mothers may be effective strategies to enable employed women to continue breastfeeding after their return to work.

  2. Infant weight gain, duration of exclusive breast-feeding and childhood BMI - two similar follow-up cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg; Schack-Nielsen, Lene; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2010-01-01

    To describe the association between duration of exclusive breast-feeding (EBF), weight gain in infancy and childhood BMI in two populations with a long duration of EBF.......To describe the association between duration of exclusive breast-feeding (EBF), weight gain in infancy and childhood BMI in two populations with a long duration of EBF....

  3. Exclusive Breastfeeding Practice and Its Association among Mothers of under 5 Children in Kwango District, DR Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Sarita; Lee, Tae Ho; Nam, Eun Woo

    2017-04-25

    The benefit of the breastfeeding has been well-established. In comparison to partial breast feeding, exclusive breastfeeding has even more benefits. The aim of this study was to identify the factors associated with breastfeeding exclusivity during the first 6 months of life in order to better target public health interventions in this community towards healthier infant nutrition and address child mortality in this population. A cross-sectional survey among 1145 random households was conducted in the Kwango district of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) during 2 November 2015 to 13 November 2015. Women of reproductive age from 15-49 years and having less than 5 years old child were selected for the study. Chi-squared test and bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed using SPSS. A major finding of this study is 49.2% of the mothers are exclusively breastfeeding their children, and marital status, literacy, place of delivery, knowledge of exclusive breastfeeding and access to radio are the key indicators for exclusive breastfeeding. Exclusive breastfeeding rate is almost equivalent to the national prevalence rate for the DRC. Providing adequate knowledge to raise awareness of exclusive breast feeding and increase involvement of health care providers in enhancing knowledge through antenatal care and during delivery and postnatal care will be the best approaches to increase exclusive breastfeeding practice.

  4. Exclusive Breastfeeding Practice and Its Association among Mothers of under 5 Children in Kwango District, DR Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Dhakal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The benefit of the breastfeeding has been well-established. In comparison to partial breast feeding, exclusive breastfeeding has even more benefits. The aim of this study was to identify the factors associated with breastfeeding exclusivity during the first 6 months of life in order to better target public health interventions in this community towards healthier infant nutrition and address child mortality in this population. A cross-sectional survey among 1145 random households was conducted in the Kwango district of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC during 2 November 2015 to 13 November 2015. Women of reproductive age from 15–49 years and having less than 5 years old child were selected for the study. Chi-squared test and bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed using SPSS. A major finding of this study is 49.2% of the mothers are exclusively breastfeeding their children, and marital status, literacy, place of delivery, knowledge of exclusive breastfeeding and access to radio are the key indicators for exclusive breastfeeding. Exclusive breastfeeding rate is almost equivalent to the national prevalence rate for the DRC. Providing adequate knowledge to raise awareness of exclusive breast feeding and increase involvement of health care providers in enhancing knowledge through antenatal care and during delivery and postnatal care will be the best approaches to increase exclusive breastfeeding practice.

  5. Why do mothers use nipple shields and how does this influence duration of exclusive breastfeeding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Hanne; Foverskov, Else; Nilsson, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    with introducing nipple shields were lower- gestational age and birthweight. The use of nipple shields was furthermore found to be associated with a threefold increased risk of earlier cessation of exclusive breastfeeding: among primiparae odds ratio = 3.80 (confidence interval 2.61–5.53); among multiparae odds......The present study addressed the contentious discussions about the benefits and risks of nipple shield use. The objective was to explore self-reported reasons for using a nipple shield and examine associations pertaining to the mother, the infant and duration of breastfeeding. Data were collected...... breastfeeding period. Primiparae used nipple shields more often than multiparae, and early breastfeeding problems as well as background factors like lower age, education and higher body mass index were associated with a higher likelihood of using nipple shields. Characteristics of infants associated...

  6. Social-Cognitive Predictors of Exclusive Breastfeeding among Primiparous Mothers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anteneh Girma Minas

    Full Text Available Despite the presence of high impact interventions to improve infant and young child feeding, only about 52% of mothers in Ethiopia exclusively breastfeed their child for the first six months after delivery. Although the decision to breastfeed a child is ultimately that of the mother, this decision could be influenced by a variety of factors including social-cognitive ones.The objectives of the study were to describe the breastfeeding behaviour of primiparous mothers during their prenatal period in terms of intentions/goals, outcome expectancies, self-efficacy, and socio-structural factors and assess their exclusive breastfeeding (EBF practices as well as identify the social-cognitive predictors of EBF practices among these mothers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.A prospective follow up health facility-based study with quantitative methods was used with a sample of 233 primiparous women. Both structured and semi-structured questions were used for collection of data. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 21 was used for data analysis. Findings at the 95% confidence interval and P-value of 5% were reported as statistically significant.39.1% (n = 59 of the respondents were found to have high breastfeeding self-efficacy, 51.4% (n = 71 have good breastfeeding outcome expectancies, and 6.5% (n = 9 respondents had supportive breastfeeding socio-structural factors. Bivariate correlation analysis showed positive and statistically significant correlation between each of breastfeeding self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and socio-structural factors, with EBF practice. However, only breastfeeding self-efficacy and outcome expectancies were statistically significant predictors of EBF among the primiparous women when controlling for confounding variables.Health programmes aimed at improving EBF among primiparous mothers should look beyond providing health information alone. Rather improving primiparous women's breastfeeding self-efficacy and

  7. Low rates of exclusive breastfeeding are still evident in four South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-15

    May 15, 2015 ... percentage of all children aged ≤ 6 months who are exclusively breastfed at a point in ... Objectives: Breastfeeding is one of the primary strategies used to enhance infant nutrition and improving child survival worldwide. The intention of ...... that infants who are introduced to complementary feeding too early.

  8. The extended Theory of Planned Behavior in explaining exclusive breastfeeding intention and behavior among women in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengku Ismail, Tengku Alina; Wan Muda, Wan Abdul Manan; Bakar, Mohd Isa

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to utilize an extended Theory of Planned Behavior in identifying predictors of exclusive breastfeeding intention and behavior among women in Kelantan, Malaysia. A prospective cohort study was conducted, recruiting pregnant womenthrough two-stage cluster sampling. Their exclusive breastfeeding intention, attitude, perceived norm, perceived behavioral control and past behavior were obtained at baseline through interviewer-guided questionnaire. At one month after delivery, another interview was conducted to determine the two additional variables in the extended theory, which were their postpartum support and breastfeeding difficulty. The behavior, which was the actual duration of exclusive breastfeeding, was obtained from the second follow-up at six months. Pearson correlation and two hierarchical regression analyses were conducted. A total of 200 women completed the study follow-up. Their median intended exclusive breastfeeding duration was 4.0 (IQR 5) months, and the median actual duration was 1.0 (IQR 4) month. The Theory of Planned Behavior explained 51.0% of the variance in intention, with perceived behavioral control and attitude were the significant predictors. It also explained 10.0% of the variance in behavior, but the addition of postpartum support and breastfeeding difficulty increased the amount of explained variance in behavior by 6.0%. The significant predictors of exclusive breastfeeding behavior were intention, postpartum support and breastfeeding difficulty. The extended Theory of Planned Behaviorhad a good predictive ability in explaining exclusive breastfeedingintention and behavior. The women's intention to practice exclusive breastfeeding may be improved by improving their perceived behavioral control and attitude. Providing correct postpartum support and skills to handle breastfeeding difficulties after delivery will improve their exclusive breastfeeding behavior.

  9. Prevalence and Demographics of Exclusive Breastfeeding in Turkish Women in Ankara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Erkuran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF is strongly recommended by the World Health Organization during the first six months of life. Breastfeeding should continue up to two years or more for optimal growth, development and health while it is suggested to start supplementary foods beginning from seventh month. The study aimed to determine frequency and examine the affecting factors of EBF in infants who were admitted to a pediatric outpatient clinic in Ankara, Turkey.Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in six months period among 603 breastfeeding mothers, with infants aged 6–24 months, who attended to the well-baby clinic. Mothers’ perceptions about breastfeeding, complementary feeding practices and demographic characteristics were collected by interviewing with mothers.Results: Six months EBF rate was 38%. Median week of EBF was 16 weeks (1-40 weeks. Mothers giving birth at younger (≤19 or older (≥35 ages, and mothers having chronic diseases had shorter median week of EBF (p<0.05. Median duration of breastfeeding was 9 months (0-24 months. When mothers who interrupted EBF were asked why they had introduced supplementary foods early, the most frequent reason was mother’s perceptions of having inadequate breast milk (42.5%.Conclusions: The study indicates that frequency of 6 month EBF (38% and median duration of breastfeeding (16 weeks are low in our region, in Ankara. We must develop a local strategy to overcome mothers’ negative perceptions about EBF.

  10. Breastfeeding practices and determinants of exclusive breastfeeding in a cross-sectional study at a child welfare clinic in Tema Manhean, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Bernard Yeboah-Asiamah; Preko, Joyce Veronica; Baafi, Diana; Dwumfour-Asare, Bismark

    2018-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is important for child health and growth, but its practice is low in many developing countries. This study aimed at determining the breastfeeding practices and examining the sociodemographic characteristics that influence exclusive breastfeeding among mothers attending child welfare clinic at Manhean, in the Tema East Sub-Meteropolitan area of Greater Accra region of Ghana. This was a cross-sectional study that employed a structured questionnaire to collect data among 355 mothers of children aged 0-24 months selected through simple random sampling, attending a child welfare clinic from May to June, 2016. Breastfeeding practices were assessed based on the practices in the last 24 h prior to the study as defined by the World Health Organization. There was a universal awareness and high knowledge about exclusive breastfeeding among mothers, but prevalence among infants less than 6 months was 66.0% ( n  = 138/209). Mothers currently breastfeeding were 263 (74.0%); 225 (63.4%) initiated breastfeeding within the first hour after delivery and 289 (81.0%) of the mothers offered colostrum to babies after delivery. Continued breastfeeding rate at 1 year was 77.3% ( n  = 17/22). Only 33.7% ( n  = 31/92) of infants aged 6-8 months had started receiving complementary foods. For infants aged less than 24 months, 30.1% ( n  = 98/326) were bottle feeding. Mothers aged 20-24 (Adjusted odd ratio [AOR] 9.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.11, 45.46), 25-29 (AOR 9.49; 95% CI 2.07, 43.47) and 30-34 (AOR 6.02; 95% CI 1.41, 25.65) were more likely to practice exclusive breastfeeding. Mothers who had tertiary education were less likely to practice EBF than those with no education (AOR 0.18; 95% CI 0.36, 0.85). Mothers from ethnic groups in northern Ghana were less likely to exclusively breastfeed their infants compared to those of Ghanaian (Ga) ethnicity (AOR 0.29; 95% CI 0.09, 0.96). Exclusive breastfeeding and timely complementary feeding

  11. "She would sit with me": mothers' experiences of individual peer support for exclusive breastfeeding in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nankabirwa Victoria

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different strategies have been used to improve the initiation and duration of breastfeeding. Peer counsellors are reported to improve exclusive breastfeeding levels, but few studies have assessed the satisfaction of women with the support given, especially in Africa. In this paper we describe women's experiences of peer counselling for exclusive breastfeeding in an East African setting. Methods In the Ugandan site of PROMISE-EBF, a multi-centre community randomised trial to evaluate the effect of peer counselling for exclusive breastfeeding on infant health, 370 women in the intervention arm participated in a study exit interview. Individual peer counselling was offered to women in 12 of the 24 study clusters, scheduled as five visits: before childbirth and during weeks 1, 4, 7 and 10 after childbirth. During the visits, the women were given information and skills to help them breastfeed exclusively. After the 10-week visit, they were interviewed about their feelings and experiences related to the peer counselling. Results Overall, more than 95% of the women expressed satisfaction with the various aspects of peer counselling offered. Those who had received five or more visits were more likely to give positive responses about their experience with peer counselling than those who had received fewer visits. They explained their satisfaction with time spent with the peer counsellor in terms of how much she discussed with them. Most women felt their knowledge needs about breastfeeding were covered by the peer counsellors, while others expressed a desire to learn about complementary feeding and family planning. Attributes of the peer counsellors included their friendliness, being women and giving support in a familiar and relaxed way. Women were positive about the acquisition of knowledge and the benefit to their babies from the peer counselling. They preferred a peer counsellor to a health worker for support of exclusive

  12. Utilizing a Newly Designed Scale for Evaluating Family Support and Its Association with Exclusive Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiu; Liu, Luyan; Wang, Yan

    2016-12-01

    Although a woman's perception of her family members' support has long been established to be an influential factor on exclusive breastfeeding (EBF), it still has not been specified and quantified as a facilitator and guidance for practice. To investigate in new mothers the association between EBF and maternal perception of family support with a standardized scale that classified support into nine items of behavioral or psychological support. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 655 new mothers to collect information on their breastfeeding behavior and their corresponding family support at a baby-friendly hospital in Beijing, China. Additionally, a nine-item standardized scale was used to explore the perceived family support for breastfeeding by new mothers. Breastfeeding behaviors were investigated using the indicators recommended by the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys. The EBF rate was 37.9%. The average score on the family perception scale reported by respondents was 28.34 ± 3.84. The new mothers who performed EBF and who predominantly breastfed perceived greater family support (29.55 ± 3.53; 29.36 ± 4.09) compared with those who performed complementary feeding or mixed feeding (26.69 ± 3.33) and those who performed artificial feeding (26.17 ± 3.14) (F = 30.296, p family support were more likely to practice EBF than those with a negative perception (adjusted odds ratio = 3.971; 95% confidence interval 2.62-6.01; p Family support for breastfeeding could be evaluated by a scale, and new mothers' breastfeeding behaviors were strongly associated with their perceived family support for breastfeeding. Community healthcare providers should play a more important role in issues regarding breastfeeding among new mothers, and family support should be encouraged by health workers.

  13. Prevalence and associated factors for early interruption of exclusive breastfeeding: meta-analysis on Brazilian epidemiological studies

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    Marcos Pereira-Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: to summarize Brazilian studies that analyzed the risk factors for Exclusive Breastfeeding (EBF interruption before the child's six months of life. Methods: systematic review and meta-analysis indexed articles from Bireme, Scielo and Pubmed databases published in the period of January 2000 to December 2015. Results: 22 articles were included in the meta-analysis. The factors related to newborns were observed, such as birth weight (OR= 1.17; CI 95%: 1.05-1.29, female gender (OR= 1,09; CI 95%: 1.04-1.13 and the use of pacifier (OR= 2.29; CI 95%: 1.68-2.91 were the main factors responsible for the increase in the occurrence of EBF interruption. The factors were related to the mother, maternal age below twenty years old (OR= 1.22; CI 95%: 1.12-1.33 low schooling level (OR=1.28; CI 95%: 1.11-1.45, primiparity (OR= 1.17; CI 95%: 1.02-1.32 maternal employment during the postpartum period (OR= 1.26; CI 95%: 1.11-1.41, and low family income (OR= 1.22; CI 95%: 1.08-1.37 contributed significantly to the EBF interruption . Conclusions: the meta-analysis of Brazilian epidemiological studies demonstrated evidences to conclude that below the age of twenty, low schooling, primiparity, maternal employment in the postpartum period and low family income are associated to the interruption of exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months of age. Children with low birth weight, female gender and used a pacifier had greater vulnerability to not be exclusively breastfed. In conclusion, most of these factors can be modified through appropriate public policies throughout the adequate prenatal period to promote exclusive breastfeeding.

  14. Determinantes do abandono do aleitamento materno exclusivo em crianças assistidas por programa interdisciplinar de promoção à amamentação Determinants of the exclusive breastfeeding abandonment in children assisted by interdisciplinary program on breast feeding promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Camilo Carrascoza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar as variáveis potencialmente relacionadas ao abandono da amamentação exclusiva entre crianças participantes de um programa interdisciplinar de incentivo ao aleitamento materno. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo longitudinal, por meio de acompanhamento clínico de 111 díades mãe-bebê, durante os seis primeiros meses de vida da criança. Para a avaliação de fatores associados à interrupção do aleitamento exclusivo, realizou-se análise univariada e regressão logística múltipla. RESULTADOS: As díades participantes foram divididas em dois grupos, segundo o tipo de alimentação recebida pela criança aos seis meses de vida: um composto por 57 crianças em aleitamento materno exclusivo e outro por 54 crianças em aleitamento materno complementado ou predominante. Após análise de regressão logística, as variáveis uso de chupeta (OR 4,65; IC95% 1,66-12,99, alto nível socioeconômico (OR 11,46; IC95% 3,09-42,37 e trabalho materno (OR 2,44; IC95% 0,91-5,62 comportarem-se como fatores associados ao abandono do aleitamento exclusivo. CONCLUSÕES: O uso de chupeta pela criança, alto nível socioeconômico e trabalho materno estão associados à interrupção do aleitamento exclusivo.OBJECTIVES: To identify variables potentially related with the exclusive breastfeeding abandonment in children assisted by interdisciplinary program on breast feeding promotion. METHODS: Data were collected by a longitudinal study with 111 mothers who breastfeed their children until six months of age. Univariate analyses were used to assess factors associated with the exclusive breastfeeding abandonment, and also multiple regression analyses. RESULTS: The mothers were divided in two groups: 57 mothers breastfeed, exclusively, their children until six months of age and 54 mothers introduced other kinds of food before this age. The following variables were found to be factors associated with the exclusive breastfeeding abandonment

  15. Exclusive breastfeeding practices among women attending a private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the contrary there was an association with following variables: birth order among mother siblings, prenatal and postnatal feeding advice. Conclusion: The rate of exclusive breast feeding among mothers for the recommended six months was very low (3.6%). Antenatal and postnatal programmes that will encourage ...

  16. A complex breastfeeding promotion and support intervention in a developing country: study protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Nabulsi, Mona; Hamadeh, Haya; Tamim, Hani; Kabakian, Tamar; Charafeddine, Lama; Yehya, Nadine; Sinno, Durriyah; Sidani, Saadieh

    2014-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding has countless benefits to mothers, children and community at large, especially in developing countries. Studies from Lebanon report disappointingly low breastfeeding exclusivity and continuation rates. Evidence reveals that antenatal breastfeeding education, professional lactation support, and peer lay support are individually effective at increasing breastfeeding duration and exclusivity, particularly in low-income settings. Given the complex nature of the breastfeed...

  17. Intention to Breastfeed as a Predictor of Initiation of Exclusive Breastfeeding in Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Ana M; Rayens, Mary K; Gomez, Maria L; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Dignan, Mark B

    2015-08-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) is the most efficacious form of infant feeding and nutrition. Hispanic mothers in the US are more likely than mothers of other racial/ethnic groups to supplement with formula in the first 2 days of life. The purpose of this study was to explore infant feeding intentions during the prenatal period as a predictor of EBF at postpartum discharge in a sample of Hispanic women (n = 99). At discharge, 51 % of the women were EBF, 44 % were breastfeeding and supplementing with formula, and 5 % were feeding only formula. Intention to breastfeed was found to be a strong and potentially modifiable predictor of breastfeeding behavior, showing a significant association with EBF upon discharge from the hospital after birth when linked with acceptance of pregnancy and method of delivery. Prenatal care offers a unique opportunity to enhance intentions to breastfeed that may lead to improved EBF in this health vulnerable population.

  18. Breastfeeding in China: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binns Colin W

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review aims to describe changes in breastfeeding and summarise the breastfeeding rates, duration and reasons of discontinuing 'any breastfeeding' or 'exclusive breastfeeding' in P.R. China. Breastfeeding rates in China fell during the 1970s when the use of breast milk substitutes became widespread, and reached the lowest point in the 1980s. As a result many efforts were introduced to promote breastfeeding. The breastfeeding rate in China started to increase in the 1990s, and since the mid-1990s 'any breastfeeding' rates in the majority of cities and provinces, including minority areas, have been above 80% at four months. But most cities and provinces did not reach the national target of 'exclusive breastfeeding' of 80%. The 'exclusive breastfeeding' rates in minority areas were relatively lower than comparable inland provinces. The mean duration of 'any breastfeeding' in the majority of cities or provinces was between seven and nine months. The common reasons for ceasing breastfeeding, or introducing water or other infant food before four months, were perceived breast milk insufficiency, mother going to work, maternal and child illness and breast problems. Incorrect traditional perceptions have a strong adverse influence on 'exclusive breastfeeding' in less developed areas or rural areas. China is a huge country, geographically and in population size, and there is considerable ethnic diversity. Therefore breastfeeding rates in different parts of China can vary considerably.

  19. Maternal Knowledge and Attitude toward Exclusive Breastfeeding in Six Months after Birth in Shiraz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Haghighi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background To develop the culture of breastfeeding, it is needed to know the level of maternal knowledge. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate maternal knowledge and attitude toward exclusive breastfeeding in six months after birth in Shiraz, Iran. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study carried out on mothers who referred to health centers. Four health centers were selected from four geographic areas of Shiraz city; finally, 201 mothers was selected and their demographic information and knowledge and attitude toward exclusive breastfeeding were gathered through a researcher made questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 14.0.  Results 201 mothers who were 18-45 years old were studied. 43% of them were 30-34 years old. 46% of maternal education level was bachelor andMaster of Science or more and 80% of them were housewives. Their level of knowledge was low (69.2%, moderate (11.4% and high (19.4% respectively. Regarding the level of attitude 11.4% of them were low, 15.4% of them were moderate and the others were high. There was a significant relationship between maternal knowledge with parents’ education and infants’ nutrition (breastfeeding (P

  20. A systematic review of structured versus non-structured breastfeeding programmes to support the initiation and duration of exclusive breastfeeding in acute and primary healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beake, Sarah; Pellowe, Carol; Dykes, Fiona; Schmied, Virginia; Bick, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Background: Breastfeeding has many important health benefits for the woman and her baby. Despite evidence of benefit from a large number of well conducted studies, breastfeeding uptake and the duration of exclusive breastfeeding remain low in many countries. In order to improve breastfeeding rates, policy and guidelines at global, individual country level and in local healthcare settings have recommended that structured programmes to support breastfeeding should be introduced. The objective of this review was to consider the evidence of outcomes of structured compared with non-structured breastfeeding programmes in acute maternity care settings to support initiation and duration of exclusive breastfeeding. The definition of structured programme used included a multi-faceted or single intervention approach to support breastfeeding; definition of non-structured included support offered within standard care. The review considered quantitative and qualitative studies which addressed outcomes following the introduction of a structured programme in acute healthcare settings to support breastfeeding compared with no programme. The primary outcomes of interest were uptake of breastfeeding and duration of exclusive breastfeeding (only breast milk, including milk expressed). Studies which only considered community based interventions were not included. A search of the literature published between 1992 and 2010 was conducted, which followed a four step process. After a limited search of MEDLINE and CINAHL to identify key words contained in the title or abstract and index terms to describe relevant interventions, a second extensive search was undertaken using identified key words and index terms. The third step included a search of reference lists and bibliographies of relevant articles and the fourth step included a search of grey and unpublished literature and national databasesMethodological quality: Methodological quality was assessed using checklists developed by the

  1. Modeling the Influence of Early Skin-to-Skin Contact on Exclusive Breastfeeding in a Sample of Hispanic Immigrant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Ana M; Wambach, Karen; Rayens, Mary K; Wiggins, Amanda; Coleman, Elizabeth; Dignan, Mark B

    2017-10-01

    Using data from a longitudinal study of breastfeeding in Hispanics, this study evaluated the influence of early skin-to-skin contact (SSC) on initiation and sustained exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) at 1 month postpartum. Two-thirds of the women in the sample participated in early SSC. At discharge, over half of the women were EBF; this proportion decreased to one-third at 1 month postpartum. Controlling for demographic and clinical variables in the model, participation in early SSC was associated with a greater than sevenfold increase in the odds of EBF at discharge (p = .005) but was not predictive of EBF at 1 month post-discharge (p = .7). Younger maternal age and increased prenatal infant feeding intention were associated with an increased likelihood of EBF across both timepoints. Promoting early SSC may help with initiation of EBF, while further breastfeeding support may be needed to maintain EBF following discharge for this vulnerable population.

  2. Exclusive 6 month-breastfeeding and associated factors among healthy newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Cairo Lavado, Javier

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine if factors such as maternal characteristics, hospital procedures and neonatal weight loss, were related to exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) up to 6 months among healthy newborns at the Navy Medical Center (NMC) in 1998. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical histories of infants born in 1998 were reviewed, and was assessed the existence of a relationship between the up-to-6-month EBF and mother's parity and age, military rank of the navy member relative, infant gender, neonatal...

  3. Promote Breastfeeding in the Outpatient Setting: It's Easy!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraman, Natasha K

    2017-12-01

    The numerous benefits for both mother and baby of breastfeeding are evidence-based and well-defined. Breastmilk is the physiologic norm for infant nutrition, offering multiple health benefits and protections for mothers and babies. Although major medical and health organizations, which represent the health of women and children, such as the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG), American Academy of Family Practice (AAFP), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), UNICEF, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Public Health Service (NPHS), all recommend exclusive breastfeeding, few women meet the recommended goals for duration and exclusivity, despite high initiation rates. This article will discuss the barriers women face when breastfeeding. Strategies will be discussed on how physicians and health care providers can assist and advocate for their mothers while helping to improve the health of women and children. Physicians/pediatricians can support women and design interventions that can help patients' mothers overcome these challenges. Copyright © 2016 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A community-based approach to the promotion of breastfeeding in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Garcia, R; Aumack, K J; Ramos, A

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive education strategy is presented that links training, community education, research, and mass-media efforts to enhance breastfeeding practices. Breastfeeding promotion models, an administrative system, and lessons learned during the project are described. The keys to effective breastfeeding promotion are shown to be accurate information; appropriate education, training, and follow-up; and a supportive administrative system.

  5. The Effect of Breast Pump Use on Exclusive Breastfeeding at 2 Months Postpartum in an Inner-City Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bream, Elise; Li, Hong; Furman, Lydia

    2017-04-01

    Breastfeeding is the optimal form of infant nutrition, yet national rates are below recommendations with persistent disparities. Breast pumps may address the reasons that mothers discontinue breastfeeding. To determine whether breast pump use increases exclusive breastfeeding at 1.5-3.5 months postpartum. We reviewed charts for maternal-infant descriptors and feeding type for infants born between November 2013 and June 2014 who received any breast milk at a visit breastfeeding (93.8% vs. 38.9%) and exclusive breastfeeding (50.0% vs. 17.8%) were significantly higher in non-AAs than in AAs. Due to small numbers of non-AAs, further analyses were conducted for AAs only. The rate of exclusive breastfeeding at 1.5-3.5 months (19.4% vs. 16.3%) was similar between those with a breast pump and those without a breast pump, whereas rates of any breastfeeding were higher among those with no breast pump (46.9% vs. 31.4%, p = 0.004). Also, among AA mothers, rates of feeding at the breast were lower (21.5% vs. 44.4%, p breastfeeding at 1.5-3.5 months postpartum.

  6. [Association of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin in breast milk with the growth of infants with exclusive breastfeeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Li; Yang, Fan; Xiong, Fei

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the association of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin in breast milk with the weight growth velocity of infants with exclusive breastfeeding. A total of 67 full-term singleton infants who received regular child care and exclusive breastfeeding and their mothers were enrolled. The nutritional status was evaluated based on the measurements of body weight and body length (underweight, growth retardation, emaciation, overweight, and obesity). Z score was used to calculate growth velocity, and according to the ΔZ score, the infants were divided into poor growth group, low growth velocity group, and normal growth velocity group. Mature breast milk samples were collected from their mothers, and ELISA was used to measure the levels of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin. The emaciation group had a significantly lower level of leptin in breast milk than the non-emaciation group (Pobesity group had a significantly lower level of adiponectin than the non-overweight/obesity group (Pmilk was positively correlated with Z score of current body weight and ΔZ score compared with birth weight (r s =0.280 and 0.290 respectively; Pmilk was an important influencing factor for the Z score of body weight (β=0.161, Pmilk, including leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin, may regulate the growth and development of infants to a certain degree, but long-term studies and observation are needed to investigate their association with offspring growth and development and the health-promoting effect of breast milk on offspring.

  7. Assessing exclusive breastfeeding practices, dietary intakes and body mass index (BMI) of nursing mothers in Ekiti State of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijarotimi, Oluwole Steve

    2010-06-01

    Breastfeeding is an unequalled way of providing ideal food for the infants. The benefits of breastfeeding practices to infants and mothers are well documented. However, information on breastfeeding practices and its effect on body mass index (BMI) of mothers are scarce, particularly in Ekiti State of Nigeria. Therefore, the present study is designed to assess breastfeeding practices and its association with BMI of mothers. A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted among breastfeeding mothers that attended postnatal clinic of the state specialist hospitals and maternity centers in the study location. The specialist hospital and two-third of the nine maternity centers were purposively selected because of their health facilities and personnel. The mother-child pairs (200 respondents) were randomly selected from the study locations. Information on demographic characteristic, socio-economic parameters, nutritional knowledge of breastfeeding and dietary intakes of mothers were collected using questionnaires. BMI of mothers was determined as described by World Health Organization. Age distribution of mothers was between 25-34 years; and almost half of respondents had good educational background and were engaged in different occupations. The respondent monthly income ranged between = N = 3500 - 26000 ($26.92 - $200); and their dietary intakes varied between starchy and protein-based food. The result also showed that the respondent consumed enough nutrients to meet up the recommended daily allowance for protein, carbohydrate, fat, zinc, magnesium, sodium and phosphorous requirements. The BMI classifications showed that over three-fifth of respondents were normal, while the remaining were underweight (6%) and overweight/obese (26.5%). Also, large proportion of respondents engaged in exclusive breastfeeding and with good knowledge of breastfeeding practices. Statistically, exclusive breastfeeding practices had no correlation between the BMI and frequency of

  8. Mobile Phone Short Messages to Improve Exclusive Breastfeeding and Reduce Adverse Infant Feeding Practices: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial in Yangon, Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmone, Myat Pan; Li, Mu; Alam, Ashraful; Dibley, Michael J

    2017-06-28

    Myanmar has a high burden of mortality for children aged younger than 5 years in which undernutrition plays a major role. Despite current efforts, the exclusive breastfeeding rate for children under 6 months is only 24%. To date there have been no interventions using mobile phones to improve breastfeeding and other feeding practices in Myanmar. This study aims to implement a breastfeeding promotion intervention using mobile phone text messages in Yangon, Myanmar, and evaluate its impact on breastfeeding practices. M528 is a 2-group parallel-arm randomized controlled trial with 9 months follow-up from recruitment until 6 months post-delivery. A total of 353 pregnant women between 28 and 34 weeks' gestation who had access to a mobile phone and were able to read and write have been recruited from the Central Women's Hospital, Yangon, and allocated randomly to an intervention or control group in a 1:1 ratio. The intervention group received breastfeeding promotional SMS messages 3 times a week while the control group received maternal and child health care messages (excluding breastfeeding-related messages) once a week. The SMS messages were tailored for the women's stage of gestation or the child's age. A formative qualitative study was conducted prior to the trial to inform the study design and text message content. We hypothesize that the exclusive breastfeeding rate in the intervention group will be double that in the control group. The primary outcome is exclusive breastfeeding from birth to 6 months and secondary outcomes are median durations of exclusive breastfeeding and other infant feeding practices. Both primary and secondary outcomes were assessed by monthly phone calls at 1 to 6 months postdelivery in both groups. Participants' delivery status was tracked through text messages, phone calls, and hospital records, and delivery characteristics were assessed 1 month after delivery. Child morbidity and breastfeeding self-efficacy scores were assessed at 1, 3

  9. Effect of Exclusive Breastfeeding Among Overweight and Obese Mothers on Infant Weight-for-Length Percentile at 1 Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Hui; Leff, Michelle; Rhee, Kyung E

    Breastfeeding is associated with decreased risk of childhood obesity. However, there is a strong correlation between maternal weight status and childhood obesity, and it is unclear whether or not breastfeeding among overweight mothers could mitigate this risk. Our goal was to examine whether or not exclusive breastfeeding (compared to formula feeding) among overweight and obese mothers is associated with lower weight-for-length (W/L) percentile at 1 year. Data from the Infant Feeding Practices II study were used. Infants who were preterm or underweight at 1 year, and mothers who were underweight before pregnancy, were excluded from analysis. There was a significant interaction between exclusive breastfeeding for 4 months and maternal prepregnancy weight status (normal weight, overweight, obese) on infant W/L percentile at 1 year. Stratified linear mixed-effects growth modeling controlling for covariates was created to test the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and infant W/L percentile within each maternal weight category. A total of 915 subjects met inclusion criteria. Normal weight and obese mothers who exclusively breastfed for 4 months had infants with a smaller rate of increase in W/L percentile during the first year compared with those who used formula. Infants of overweight and obese mothers who exclusively breastfed for 4 months had lower W/L percentile at 1 year than those who used formula. Exclusive breastfeeding for 4 months among normal weight and obese mothers resulted in less increase in W/L percentiles in the first year. Obese mothers often have a difficult time initiating and maintaining breastfeeding. Concerted efforts are needed to support this population with breastfeeding.

  10. Effectiveness of structured nutrition education on maternal breastfeeding self‐efficacy and exclusive breastfeeding duration in Kiandutu health centre, Thika – Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mituki D.M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Optimal breastfeeding practices can help prevent under‐nutrition among under five children and WHO recommends Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF for the first half of infancy. Rates of EBF are however low globally with Kenya at 61.2% against the projected rate of 80% by end of 2017. Aims Factors that may influence the success of EBF interventions are unclear. The study aimed at assessing the effect of a structured nutrition education intervention (SNEI on maternal breastfeeding self‐efficacy (BSE and EBF. Methods A cluster randomized study in which pregnant mothers attending two health facilities (Mangongeni and Kiandutu in a resource restricted urban area of Thika –West, Kenya were randomized into either intervention or comparison groups. Maternal BSE was assessed at baseline (34 weeks at midline (37 weeks and at 6 months post‐partum using the Dennis cindy breastfeeding self‐efficacy scale‐short form (BSES‐SF.Those in the intervention went through four sessions of a structured nutrition education intervention (SNEI that sought to improve BSE and taught the importance of EBF. Results There were no significant differences at 34th weeks gestation between the intervention versus comparison groups in the BSE scores but the findings were significant at midline and end‐line (t=3.816, df 351 p=0.001, t=4.095, df 316 p=0.001 respectively. The intervention had an effect on BSE. p=0.001 (log odds 2.089 and 95% CI of 0.823‐3.356. The survival distributions for the two groups were significantly different, log rank 20.277, (1, n=314 p < 0.001 for duration of EBF at 6 months post‐partum. Those in the intervention were more likely to EBF, p=0.008 (OR 0.17 95% CI of 0.05‐0.62. Conclusions and Recommendations A SNEI can improve BSE scores during anti‐natal clinics and BSE is predictive of EBF duration. Health care providers can use the BSES‐SF to identify mothers with low BSE scores and design interventions to assist in promoting

  11. Exclusive Breastfeeding among Women in Rural Suburbs of Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, Nigeria

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    Egenti NB

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The feeding of an infant with breast milk only, to the exclusion of all other feeds - liquids or solids, including water - except prescribed medications; within the first half year of life is referred to as exclusive breastfeeding (EBF. Despite its numerous benefits, not many mothers practiced it because of one barrier or the other. This study estimated the prevalence of EBF established the major barriers thereof and determined the link between socio-demographic characteristics and the practice of EBF among women living in the rural suburbs of Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, Nigeria. Methodology: This study was descriptive cross-sectional in design. Results: Among the 370 subjects, 49% practiced EBF. None of the respondents made PNC visit specifically for the purpose of learning or asking questions about breastfeeding. Nonetheless, 18.5% received breastfeeding education during PNC visit. A large proportion of the subjects did not practice EBF because they were not aware (21.1% of it. Medical reasons, which included HIV positive mothers and those with breast disease constituted the least barriers (1.3%. EBF was prominently linked with maternal education, type of work, delivery place, skilled attendance at birth, husband’s education, and occupation (p<0.05. Conclusion: Capacity building for healthcare personnel on breast feeding, establishment of facilities as close to the communities as possible with their active participation in the planning, implementation and monitoring of EBF practice is recommended. Emphasis should be laid on the need for breastfeeding during antenatal period and then postnatal just before discharge.

  12. Effectiveness of Baby‐friendly community health services on exclusive breastfeeding and maternal satisfaction: a pragmatic trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsrud, Øyvind; Løland, Beate F.; Tufte, Elisabeth; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Fretheim, Atle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The WHO/UNICEF Baby‐friendly Hospital Initiative has been shown to increase breastfeeding rates, but uncertainty remains about effective methods to improve breastfeeding in community health services. The aim of this pragmatic cluster quasi‐randomised controlled trial was to assess the effectiveness of implementing the Baby‐friendly Initiative (BFI) in community health services. The primary outcome was exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months in healthy babies. Secondary outcomes were other breastfeeding indicators, mothers' satisfaction with the breastfeeding experience, and perceived pressure to breastfeed. A total of 54 Norwegian municipalities were allocated by alternation to the BFI in community health service intervention or routine care. All mothers with infants of five completed months were invited to participate (n = 3948), and 1051 mothers in the intervention arm and 981 in the comparison arm returned the questionnaire. Analyses were by intention to treat. Women in the intervention group were more likely to breastfeed exclusively compared with those who received routine care: 17.9% vs. 14.1% until 6 months [cluster adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.33; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.72; P = 0.03], 41.4% vs. 35.8% until 5 months [cluster adjusted OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.77; P = 0.01], and 72.1% vs. 68.2% for any breastfeeding until 6 months [cluster adjusted OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.54; P = 0.06]. The intervention had no effect on breastfeeding until 12 months. Maternal breastfeeding experience in the two groups did not differ, neither did perceived breastfeeding pressure from staff in the community health services. In conclusion, the BFI in community health services increased rates of exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months. © 2015 Blackwell Publishing Ltd PMID:27062084

  13. Early exclusive breastfeeding and maternal attitudes towards infant feeding in a population of new mothers in San Francisco, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcicki, Janet M; Gugig, Roberto; Tran, Cam; Kathiravan, Suganya; Holbrook, Katherine; Heyman, Melvin B

    2010-02-01

    Positive parental attitudes towards infant feeding are an important component in child nutritional health. Previous studies have found that participants in the Special Supplemental Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program have lower breastfeeding rates and attitudes that do not contribute towards healthy infant feeding in spite of breastfeeding and nutrition education programs targeting WIC participants. The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of exclusive breastfeeding in the early postpartum period and maternal attitudes towards breastfeeding in a population of mothers at two San Francisco hospitals and in relation to WIC participation status. We interviewed women who had recently delivered a healthy newborn using a structured interview. A high percentage (79.8%) of our sample was exclusively breastfeeding at 1-4 days postpartum. We did not find any significant differences in rates of formula or mixed feeding by WIC participant status. Independent risk factors for mixed or formula feeding at 1-3 days postpartum included Asian/Pacific Islander ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] 2.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-7.19). Being a college graduate was associated with a decreased risk of formula/mixed feeding (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.10-0.79). We also found that thinking breastfeeding was physically painful and uncomfortable was independently associated with not breastfeeding (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.06-1.89). Future studies should be conducted with Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders to better understand the lower rates of exclusive breastfeeding in this population and should address negative attitudes towards breastfeeding such as the idea that breastfeeding is painful or uncomfortable.

  14. The Role of Early Maternal Support in Balancing Full-Time Work and Infant Exclusive Breastfeeding: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounds, Lea; Fisher, Christopher M; Barnes-Josiah, Debora; Coleman, Jason D; Lefebvre, R Craig

    Support of others is a key factor for mothers who choose to breastfeed their infants, including those who balance work outside the home and breastfeeding. However, little research has been done to understand how maternal support during the postpartum period impacts mothers' ability to later balance work and breastfeeding, in particular full-time work and exclusive breastfeeding. The results of this qualitative study indicate that the timing of support plays a key role in mothers' ability to successfully overcome barriers during the early postpartum period, thus building maternal self-efficacy in addressing problems encountered when they return to work. To understand the experience of low-income women who successfully balance full-time work and exclusive breastfeeding for the recommended 6 months, interviews were conducted with women who met study criteria for income level, work status, and exclusive breastfeeding. Breastfeeding peer counselors were also interviewed as key informants. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes. The results of both sets of interviews were triangulated with a focused literature review to assure the soundness of the qualitative analysis. Timing of support included acute support, such as help establishing a successful latch needed during the first 2 weeks after delivery, to deal with breastfeeding problems that mothers perceived as being mentally and emotionally overwhelming and longer-term support needed to overcome problems perceived as being less intense. The research invites further exploration into the relationship between breastfeeding support provided by mothers' support system, including healthcare professionals, during the postpartum period and rates of breastfeeding duration and exclusivity.

  15. Factors associated with not breastfeeding exclusively among mothers of a cohort of Pacific infants in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Sarnia; Williams, Maynard; Tukuitonga, Colin; Paterson, Janis

    2004-06-04

    This study investigated the association between not breastfeeding exclusively (among mothers of a cohort of Pacific infants in New Zealand) and several maternal, sociodemographic, and infant care factors. The data were gathered as part of the Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study. Infant feeding information was obtained through interviews with mothers (6 weeks post-birth) and from hospital records for 1247 of the 1365 biological mothers. Factors significantly associated with not exclusively breastfeeding at hospital discharge included smoking, unemployment prior to pregnancy, years in New Zealand, not seeing a midwife during pregnancy, caesarean delivery, and twin birth status. Factors significantly associated with cessation (before 6 weeks post-birth) of exclusive breastfeeding (for mothers who initially breastfed exclusively) included smoking, employment prior to pregnancy, being in current employment, high parity, dummy use, not receiving a visit from Plunket, infant not discharged at the same time as the mother, infant not sharing the same room as the parent(s) at night, regular childcare, and having a home visit for the infant from a traditional healer. Aside from smoking, different factors were associated with initiation and maintenance of exclusive breastfeeding. Identification of risk factors should assist targeting women who are at heightened risk of not breastfeeding exclusively.

  16. Ten steps for promoting and protecting breastfeeding for vulnerable infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatz, Diane L

    2004-01-01

    Human milk is the preferred food for infants, including ill and preterm infants. Ensuring skilled and comprehensive breastfeeding support for these vulnerable infants requires a specialized approach. The author outlines 10 steps for promoting and protecting breastfeeding in vulnerable infants. The steps include providing the parents with information necessary to make an informed decision to breastfeed; assisting the mother with the establishment and maintenance of a milk supply; ensuring correct breast milk management (storage and handling) techniques; developing procedures and approaches to feeding the infant breast milk; providing skin-to-skin care (kangaroo care) and opportunities for non-nutritive sucking at the breast; managing the transition to the breast; measuring milk transfer; preparing the infant and the family for infant hospital discharge; and providing appropriate follow-up care. Material and examples are drawn from the author's research and clinical work at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Current research is utilized, and the role of the nurse is emphasized throughout.

  17. Protection, promotion and support of breast-feeding in Europe: progress from 2002 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Adriano; Burmaz, Tea; Arendt, Maryse; Nilsson, Ingrid; Mikiel-Kostyra, Krystyna; Kondrate, Irena; Communal, Marie José; Massart, Catherine; Chapin, Elise; Fallon, Maureen

    2010-06-01

    To assess progress in the protection, promotion and support of breast-feeding in Europe. Data for 2002 and 2007 were gathered with the same questionnaire. Of thirty countries, twenty-nine returned data for 2002, twenty-four for 2007. The number of countries with national policies complying with WHO recommendations increased. In 2007, six countries lacked a national policy, three a national plan, four a national breast-feeding coordinator and committee. Little improvement was reported in pre-service training; however, the number of countries with good coverage in the provision of WHO/UNICEF courses for in-service training increased substantially, as reflected in a parallel increase in the number of Baby Friendly Hospitals and the proportion of births taking place in them. Little improvement was reported as far as implementation of the International Code on Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes is concerned. Except for Ireland and the UK, where some improvement occurred, no changes were reported on maternity protection. Due to lack of standard methods, it was difficult to compare rates of breast-feeding among countries. With this in mind, slight improvements in the rates of initiation, exclusivity and duration were reported by countries where data at two points in time were available. Breast-feeding rates continue to fall short of global recommendations. National policies are improving slowly but are hampered by the lack of action on maternity protection and the International Code. Pre-service training and standard monitoring of breast-feeding rates are the areas where more efforts are needed to accelerate progress.

  18. Differences in the Protective Effect of Exclusive Breastfeeding on Child Overweight and Obesity by Mother's Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenthal, Deborah B; Wu, Pan; Trabulsi, Jillian

    2016-09-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between infant feeding and risk of child overweight and obesity across race and ethnicity in a diverse community-based cohort. Methods 2172 mother baby dyads were drawn from a prospective cohort constructed using data from electronic medical records linked to birth records. The primary exposure was exclusive breastfeeding at 2 months of age; outcome was BMI Z-score and BMI ≥ 85th percentile (overweight and obese) at 4 years of age. Regression models were adjusted for confounding using covariance balanced propensity score and inverse probability weighting. Results At age 4, exclusively breast fed children had lower BMI Z-score (-0.109, SE = 0.048) and a decreased odds of a BMI ≥ 85th percentile (0.832; 95 % CI 0.792, 0.994), when compared to those exclusively formula-fed or had mixed feeding. Race and ethnicity significantly moderated these associations. Sub-population analysis showed the effect was significant for BMI Z-score (p = 0.0002) and BMI ≥ 85th percentile (p difference in BMI Z-score, however there was an increased odds of overweight or obesity (p = 0.0145). Conclusions The protective effect of breastfeeding against early childhood overweight and obesity may differ by race and ethnicity. This suggests that programs aiming to reduce obesity by increasing rates of breastfeeding may have limited impact for some groups and should be coupled with other racially and ethnically focused efforts to encourage healthy feeding practices in infancy and early childhood.

  19. Scaling-up exclusive breastfeeding support programmes: the example of KwaZulu-Natal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Desmond

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF for six months is the mainstay of global child health and the preferred feeding option for HIV-infected mothers for whom replacement feeding is inappropriate. Promotion of community-level EBF requires effective personnel and management to ensure quality counselling and support for women. We present a costing and cost effectiveness analysis of a successful intervention to promote EBF in high HIV prevalence area in South Africa, and implications for scale-up in the province of KwaZulu-Natal.The costing of the intervention as implemented was calculated, in addition to the modelling of the costs and outcomes associated with running the intervention at provincial level under three different scenarios: full intervention (per protocol, simplified version (half the number of visits compared to the full intervention; more clinic compared to home visits and basic version (one third the number of visits compared to the full intervention; all clinic and no home visits. Implementation of the full scenario costs R95 million ($14 million per annum; the simplified version R47 million ($7 million and the basic version R4 million ($2 million. Although the cost of the basic scenario is less than one tenth of the cost of the simplified scenario, modelled effectiveness of the full and simplified versions suggest they would be 10 times more effective compared to the basic intervention. A further analysis modelled the costs per increased month of EBF due to each intervention: R337 ($48, R206 ($29, and R616 ($88 for the full, simplified and basic scenarios respectively. In addition to the average cost effectiveness the incremental cost effectiveness ratios associated with moving from the less effective scenarios to the more effective scenarios were calculated and reported: Nothing-Basic R616 ($88, Basic-Simplified R162 ($23 and Simplified-Full R879 ($126.The simplified scenario, with a combination of clinic and home visits, is the most

  20. Participation of pregnant women in a community-based nutrition program in Mumbai's informal settlements: Effect on exclusive breastfeeding practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanani, Sheila; Waingankar, Anagha; Shah More, Neena; Pantvaidya, Shanti; Fernandez, Armida; Jayaraman, Anuja

    2018-01-01

    In urban Maharashtra, India, approximately half of mothers exclusively breastfeed. For children residing in informal settlements of Mumbai, this study examines factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding, and whether exclusive breastfeeding, in a community-based nutrition program to prevent and treat wasting among children under age three, is associated with enrolment during the mother's pregnancy. The nutrition program conducted a cross-sectional endline survey (October-December 2015) of caregivers in intervention areas. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding for infants under six months of age were explored using multi-level logistic regressions. Additionally, program surveillance data collected during home-based counselling visits documented breastfeeding practices for children under six months of age. Using the surveillance data (January 2014-March 2016), exclusive breastfeeding status was regressed adjusting for child, maternal and socioeconomic characteristics, and whether the child was enrolled in the program in utero or after birth. The community-based endline survey included 888 mothers of infants. Mothers who received the nutrition program home visits or attended group counselling sessions were more likely to exclusively breastfeed (adjusted odds ratio 1.67, 95% CI 1.16, 2.41). Having a normal weight-for-height z-score (adjusted odds ratio 1.57, 95% CI 1.00, 2.45) was associated positively with exclusive breastfeeding. As expected, being an older infant aged three to five months (adjusted odds ratio 0.34, 95% CI 0.25, 0.48) and receiving a prelacteal feed after birth (adjusted odds ratio 0.57, 95% CI 0.41, 0.80) were associated with lower odds of exclusively breastfeeding. Surveillance data (N = 3420) indicate that infants enrolled in utero have significantly higher odds of being exclusively breastfed (adjusted odds ratio 1.55, 95% CI 1.30, 1.84) than infants enrolled after birth. Prenatal enrolment in community-based programs working on

  1. [Maintenance of exclusive breastfeeding after three months postpartum: An experience in a health department of a Valencian Community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Candel, Rafael; Soriano-Vidal, Francisco J; Murillo-Llorente, Mayte; Pérez-Bermejo, Marcelino; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique

    2018-02-14

    To investigate the prevalence of EBF at 3-months postpartum, and the early factors for discontinuation. Observational, retrospective study. Health department of La Ribera, Valencia, Spain. Newborns between December 2012 to January 2017. Pregnant women were interviewed at postpartum and at 3 months regarding variables associated with breastfeeding initiation and continuation, matched with socio-demographic and obstetric-neonatal information. Prevalence of breastfeeding at discharge and exclusive breastfeeding at 3 months. Reasons for interrupt exclusive breastfeeding. Chi-square determination between qualitative variables. One thousand three hundred and thirty-eighth women were recruited. EBF at discharge was 68.2% (913) and at 3 months 46.7% (625). EBF duration was 68.7±32.7 days (95% CI: 66.9-71.2). We found statistically significant differences between the type of breastfeeding and the variables, year of study, country of origin and parity (P<0.001, P=0.005 and P=0.05 respectively). Hypogalactia (21.8%) and lower than recommended increase in newborn weight gain (14.9%) were most frequent factors for discontinuation. The prevalence of EBF at 3 months is low compared to other similar studies, although we see an upward trend. Belief in hypogalactia influenced the maintenance of exclusive breastfeeding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Using a Music Video Parody to Promote Breastfeeding and Increase Comfort Levels Among Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austen, Erin L; Beadle, Julie; Lukeman, Sionnach; Lukeman, Ellen; Aquino, Nicola

    2017-08-01

    North Americans are not meeting the World Health Organization's breastfeeding recommendations. Young adults understand that breastfeeding is healthy but are uncomfortable seeing breastfeeding. Research aim: The aim of the current project was to determine if a music video parody promoting breastfeeding is perceived by young adults to be an effective means of promotion and if exposure to such a video could increase comfort levels. Young adults rated how comfortable they felt looking at breastfeeding and bottle-feeding images (pretest). Two months later, a subset of participants watched the music video parody "Breastfeeding My Baby." In Phase 1, participants completed the picture-rating task again (posttest) after a 2-month delay, plus a survey to assess memory and perception of the video. In Phase 2, participants were reminded of the video before completing the comfort ratings, and in the final phase, posttest measures were administered only 1 week after exposure to the video. Across all phases, the video was perceived to be effective and was memorable. Breastfeeding comfort ratings were comparable at pretest across participant groups; comfort ratings improved at posttest for participants who saw the video but only if they were reminded of seeing it before providing their ratings. At shorter intervals between seeing the video and completing the posttests, comfort ratings for breastfeeding images increased for all participants, highlighting the general importance of exposure to breastfeeding. Young adults are receptive to using a music video parody to promote breastfeeding, which can help to increase comfort levels with breastfeeding.

  3. Efficacy of early skin-to-skin contact on the rate of exclusive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of early skin-to-skin contact on the rate of exclusive breastfeeding in term neonates: A ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Background: Despite multiple benefits of breast milk, the rates of exclusive breastfeeding in ...

  4. The Relationship between Exclusive Breastfeeding and Mental Concentration in First and Second Grade Primary School Children of Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Sadat Bahrami

    2018-05-01

    was 51.2 ± 32.44 for Toulouse Pieron test and 8.57 ± 6.52 for Digit learning test in all participants. The correlation between the Toulouse Pieron and Digit learning test, and breastfeeding history indicated that exclusive breast-fed children showed higher test results and therefore, better mental concentration and short term memory (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Based on the findings, exclusive breastfeeding has a positive effect on mental concentration and short term memory with respect to its duration.

  5. Intervening to promote early initiation of breastfeeding in the LDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komara, Carol; Simpson, Diana; Teasdale, Carla; Whalen, Gaye; Bell, Shay; Giovanetto, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an interventional protocol for the early initiation of breastfeeding that would remove barriers in the labor, delivery, recovery (LDR) unit. Descriptive design using 100 postpartum mothers who were interviewed before discharge at a large university hospital in the south-central United States. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis. The protocol was effective for initiating breastfeeding, and breastfeeding increased from 53% to 66%. When barriers to breastfeeding are reduced in the LDR setting, women will breastfeed. It is possible that reducing hospital barriers to breastfeeding in the LDR can also set the stage for sustained breastfeeding during hospitalization and for less supplementation with formula.

  6. Breast-feeding trends and the breast-feeding promotion programme in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, N E

    1990-03-01

    Breastfeeding (BF) duration and incidence have declined in the Philippines since 1973, particularly among urban, better-educated and higher income groups. As more and more women move into these modern groups, BF may continue to decline, making attempts to decrease fertility more difficult. The National Movement for the Promotion of Breastfeeding (NMPB) seeks to overcome the declines by encouraging a wide range of BF promotion activities including improving hospital practices and implementing a 5-year plan. In 1988, the 2nd 5 years of the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund support for BF promotion started as part of a program to strengthen health services for child survival. Also in 1988, the Ministry of Health directed private hospitals to have rooming-in. In 1984, BF promotion messages began in the mass media. In 1983, NMPB was set up. The NMPB is housed in the Department of Public Health and has 30 member agencies: 14 governmental organizations and 25 nongovernmental agencies/institutions. From 1982-84 a longitudinal study on decision making regrading infant feeding practices was started. A hospital-based BF promotion program was started in the city of Baguio in the 70s. "Rooming-in" is required in government facilities, but there is a need for education programs for women so that they will continue their healthy practices at home. Challenges of the Philippines BF promotion program corner 4 areas: 1) health facilities; 2) information, education, and communication; 3) training; and 4) outreach. Research activities for the future include: 1) continued monitoring of patterns and trends of BF, including evaluation of the 1988 national survey; 2) analysis of the impact of "rooming-in" programs; 3) studies on the cost effectiveness of different strategies for increasing BF incidence and length and modifying BF practices and beliefs; 4) testing of strategies for helping working women to breastfeed; 5) research on obstacles to BF in private hospitals

  7. Association between postpartum depression and the practice of exclusive breastfeeding in the first three months of life,

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    Catarine S. Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To investigate the association between postpartum depression and the occurrence of exclusive breastfeeding. Method: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in the states of the Northeast region, during the vaccination campaign in 2010. The sample consisted of 2583 mother-child pairs, with children aged from 15 days to 3 months. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used to screen for postpartum depression. The outcome was lack of exclusive breastfeeding, defined as the occurrence of this practice in the 24 h preceding the interview. Postpartum depression was the explanatory variable of interest and the covariates were: socioeconomic and demographic conditions; maternal health care; prenatal, delivery, and postnatal care; and the child's biological factors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to control for possible confounding factors. Results: Exclusive breastfeeding was observed in 50.8% of the infants and 11.8% of women had symptoms of postpartum depression. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, a higher chance of exclusive breastfeeding absence was found among mothers with symptoms of postpartum depression (OR = 1.67; p < 0.001, among younger subjects (OR = 1.89; p < 0.001, those who reported receiving benefits from the Bolsa Família Program (OR = 1.25; p = 0.016, and those started antenatal care later during pregnancy (OR = 2.14; p = 0.032. Conclusions: Postpartum depression contributed to reducing the practice of exclusive breastfeeding. Therefore, this disorder should be included in the prenatal and early postpartum support guidelines for breastfeeding, especially in low socioeconomic status women.

  8. Exclusive breastfeeding-Does it make a difference? : A longitudinal, prospective study of daily feeding practices, health and growth in a sample of Swedish infants

    OpenAIRE

    Aarts, Clara

    2001-01-01

    The concept of exclusive breastfeeding in relation to daily feeding practices and to health and growth of infants in an affluent society was examined. In a descriptive longitudinal prospective study 506 mother-infant pairs were followed from birth through the greater part of the first year. Feeding was recorded daily, and health and growth were recorded fortnightly. Large individual variations were seen in breastfeeding patterns. A wide discrepancy between the exclusive breastfeeding rates o...

  9. Breast-feeding counselling mitigates the negative association of domestic violence on exclusive breast-feeding duration in rural Bangladesh. The MINIMat randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Amy L; Ziaei, Shirin; Naved, Ruchira Tabassum; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Kabir, Iqbal; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte

    2017-10-01

    To determine if exclusive breast-feeding counselling modifies the association of experience of any lifetime or specific forms of domestic violence (DV) on duration of exclusive breast-feeding (EBF). In the MINIMat trial pregnant women were randomized to receive either usual health messages (UHM) or usual health messages with breast-feeding counselling (BFC) in eight visits. During pregnancy (30 weeks), lifetime experience of any or specific forms of DV was measured. Infant feeding practice information was collected from 0 to 6 months at 15 d intervals. Matlab, Bangladesh. Pregnant and postpartum women (n 3186) and their infants. Among women in the UHM group, those who had experienced any lifetime DV exclusively breast-fed for a shorter duration than women who did not experience any lifetime DV (P=0·02). There was no difference, however, in duration of EBF among women in the BFC group based on their experience of any lifetime DV exposure (P=0·48). Using Cox regression analysis, there was an interaction of exposure to any lifetime DV, sexual violence and controlling behaviour, and counselling group with duration of breast-feeding at or before 6 months (P-interaction≤0·08). Among the UHM group, experience of any lifetime DV, sexual violence or controlling behaviour was associated with fewer days of EBF (Pgroup, experience of DV was not associated with duration of EBF. The experience of DV compromises EBF and the support of breast-feeding counselling programmes could assist this vulnerable group towards better infant feeding practices.

  10. Actual exclusive breastfeeding rates and determinants among a cohort of children living in Gampaha district Sri Lanka: A prospective observational study

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    Perera Priyantha J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF during the early months of life reduce infant morbidity and mortality. Current recommendation in Sri Lanka is to continue exclusive breastfeeding up to six months of age. Exclusive breastfeeding rates are generally assessed by the 24 recall method which overestimates the actual rates. The objective of this study was to determine actual exclusive breast feeding rates in a cohort of Sri Lankan children and to determine the reasons that lead to cessation of breastfeeding before six months of age. Methods From a cohort of 2215 babies born in Gampaha district, 500 were randomly selected and invited for the study. They were followed up at two (n = 404, four (n = 395 and six (n = 286 months. An interviewer administered questionnaire asked about feeding history and socio-demographic characteristics. Child health development record was used to assess the growth. Results Exclusive breastfeeding rates at two, four and six months were 98.0%, 75.4% and 71.3% respectively. The main reasons to stop exclusive breastfeeding between two to four months was concerns regarding weight gain and between four to six months were mothers starting to work. Majority of the babies that were not exclusively breastfed still continued to have breast milk. Mothers above 30 years had lower exclusive breastfeeding rates compared to younger mothers. Second born babies had higher rates than first borns. There was no significant association between maternal education and exclusive breastfeeding rates. Conclusions Exclusive breastfeeding rates were high among this cohort of children. A decrease in EBF was noted between two and four months. EBF up to six months does not cause growth failure. Mothers starting to work and concerns regarding adequacy of breast milk were the major reasons to cease EBF. The actual exclusive breastfeeding rates up to six months was 65.9%.

  11. Influences of Non-Accession to Exclusive Breastfeeding: Understanding of Feminine Subjectivity

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    Tássia Regine de Morais Alves

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the difficulties experienced by mothers, that influence the failure of Exclusive Breast Feeding. Method: qualitative study, exploratory and descriptive. There were semi-structured interviews with 14 women. The data treatment occurred by means of the content analysis, in the form of thematic analysis. Results: Mammary complications; negative influences of familiar; job out of home and various household duties; insufficient information and weaknesses in communication among professionals of prenatal care; insertion of artificial teats (bottles in the hospital. Conclusions: it was found that breastfeeding transcends biological concept, because it suffers social and cultural interference. Furthermore, woman as a social being is inserted in a context permeated by values which directly interfere in their attitudes.

  12. Rates and determinants of early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breast feeding at 42 days postnatal in six low and middle-income countries: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Archana; Bucher, Sherri; Pusdekar, Yamini; Esamai, Fabian; Krebs, Nancy F; Goudar, Shivaprasad S; Chomba, Elwyn; Garces, Ana; Pasha, Omrana; Saleem, Sarah; Kodkany, Bhalachandra S; Liechty, Edward A; Kodkany, Bhala; Derman, Richard J; Carlo, Waldemar A; Hambidge, K; Goldenberg, Robert L; Althabe, Fernando; Berrueta, Mabel; Moore, Janet L; McClure, Elizabeth M; Koso-Thomas, Marion; Hibberd, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    Early initiation of breastfeeding after birth and exclusive breastfeeding through six months of age confers many health benefits for infants; both are crucial high impact, low-cost interventions. However, determining accurate global rates of these crucial activities has been challenging. We use population-based data to describe: (1) rates of early initiation of breastfeeding (defined as within 1 hour of birth) and of exclusive breastfeeding at 42 days post-partum; and (2) factors associated with failure to initiate early breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding at 42 days post-partum. Prospectively collected data from women and their live-born infants enrolled in the Global Network's Maternal and Newborn Health Registry between January 1, 2010-December 31, 2013 included women-infant dyads in 106 geographic areas (clusters) at 7 research sites in 6 countries (Kenya, Zambia, India [2 sites], Pakistan, Argentina and Guatemala). Rates and risk factors for failure to initiate early breastfeeding were investigated for the entire cohort and rates and risk factors for failure to maintain exclusive breastfeeding was assessed in a sub-sample studied at 42 days post-partum. A total of 255,495 live-born women-infant dyads were included in the study. Rates and determinants for the exclusive breastfeeding sub-study at 42 days post-partum were assessed from among a sub-sample of 105,563 subjects. Although there was heterogeneity by site, and early initiation of breastfeeding after delivery was high, the Pakistan site had the lowest rates of early initiation of breastfeeding. The Pakistan site also had the highest rate of lack of exclusive breastfeeding at 42 days post-partum. Across all regions, factors associated with failure to initiate early breastfeeding included nulliparity, caesarean section, low birth weight, resuscitation with bag and mask, and failure to place baby on the mother's chest after delivery. Factors associated with failure to achieve exclusive breastfeeding

  13. Factors influencing exclusive breastfeeding at 4 months postpartum in a sample of urban Hispanic mothers in Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Ana Maria; Rayens, Mary K; Dozier, Ann; Wiggins, Amanda; Dignan, Mark B

    2015-05-01

    Although Hispanic mothers in the United States have slightly higher rates of breastfeeding initiation than the national average, they are more likely to supplement with formula. To describe infant feeding decisions in a sample of 72 urban Hispanic mothers and assess whether demographic and personal factors influence exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) status at 4 months postpartum. The study was longitudinal and included assessments during pregnancy, in the hospital following childbirth, and monthly up to 4 months following birth. Nearly all of the 72 mothers were breastfeeding at discharge after the birth of their infant (94%); half of these were EBF. By 2 months postpartum, the rate of EBF had declined to 26%, dropping to 22% by 4 months. Significant predictors of EBF status at 4 months included the baseline indicator for mother's partner as the most important person in life (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 5.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-28.66) and breastfeeding self-efficacy score at 1 month (AOR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07-1.34). These findings have particular relevance in this population, given the high rate of breastfeeding initiation coupled with breastfeeding self-efficacy being a modifiable factor. Support during pregnancy and postpartum, including consultation with a lactation consultant, may increase the self-efficacy of EBF in this low-income population, leading to higher rates of extended EBF among Hispanics. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Group cell phones are feasible and acceptable for promoting optimal breastfeeding practices in a women's microcredit program in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Valerie L; Ibrahim, Alawiyatu Usman; Negerie, Mekebeb; Yakubu, Danjuma; Leatherman, Sheila; Bentley, Margaret E

    2017-01-01

    As part of a breastfeeding promotion intervention trial in Nigeria, we provided one cell phone per group of 5-7 microcredit clients and instructed the group's cell phone recipient to share weekly breastfeeding voice and text messages with group members. We measured the feasibility and acceptability of using group cell phones by conducting semi-structured exit interviews with 195 microcredit clients whose babies were born during the intervention (target group), in-depth interviews with eight phone recipients and nine non-phone recipients, and 16 focus group discussions with other microcredit clients. Women in the target group said the group phone worked well or very well (64%). They were motivated to try the recommended practices because they trusted the information (58%) and had support from others (35%). Approximately 44% of target women reported that their groups met and shared messages at least once a week. Women in groups that met at least weekly had higher odds of exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months (OR 5.6, 95% CI 1.6, 19.7) than women in groups that never met. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions indicated that non-phone recipients had positive feelings towards phone recipients, the group phone met participants' needs, and messages were often shared outside the group. In conclusion, group cell phone messaging to promote breastfeeding among microcredit clients is feasible and acceptable and can be part of an effective behaviour change package. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Analysis of the Factors Relating to the Granting of Exclusive Breastfeeding at Dempo Health Centres Palembang and Simpang Timbangan Health Centres Ogan Ilir 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Dwiani, Arvi; Destriatania, Suci; Mutahar, Rini

    2014-01-01

    Background : Breast milk is the best and the perfect food for babies because it contains all the nutrients a baby needs and developments. Breast-feeding exclusively given to infants without any additional food until the baby is 6 months old. Exclusive breastfeeding is very beneficial for the baby's immune system, growth, and development. But many mothers are not exclusively breastfed. Methods : This study uses cross sectional analytic approach, where samples in this study were mothers with b...

  16. Exposure to secondhand smoke, exclusive breastfeeding and infant adiposity at age 5 months in the Healthy Start study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B F; Sauder, K A; Starling, A P; Ringham, B M; Glueck, D H; Dabelea, D

    2017-08-01

    Infant adiposity may be influenced by several environmental risk factors, but few studies have explored these interactions. To examine the interaction between exposure to secondhand smoke and breastfeeding exclusivity on adiposity at age 5 months. We studied 813 mother-offspring pairs from the longitudinal Healthy Start study. Fat mass and fat-free mass were measured by air displacement plethysmography. Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the association between household smokers (none, any) with fat mass, fat-free mass, percent fat mass, weight-for-age z-score, weight-for-length z-score and BMI-for-age z-score as separate outcomes. Interaction terms between household smokers and breastfeeding exclusivity (secondhand smoke and a lack of exclusive breastfeeding was associated with increased adiposity at age 5 months. For example, within the not exclusively breastfed strata, exposure to secondhand smoke was associated with increased fat mass (0.1 kg; 95% CI: 0.0-0.2; P = 0.05). Conversely, within the exclusively breastfed strata, there was virtually no difference in fat mass between exposed and non-exposed infants (coefficient: -0.1; 95% CI: -0.3-0.1; P = 0.25). Our findings may inform new public health strategies with potential relevance for both smoking cessation and obesity prevention. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  17. Length of time in Ghana is associated with the likelihood of exclusive breastfeeding among Liberian refugees living in Buduburam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldeghebriel, Meley; Hromi-Fiedler, Amber; Lartey, Anna; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Sandow, Adam; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2017-07-01

    While literature describing immigrant's breastfeeding practices exists, especially among those living within developed countries, there is a significant gap in knowledge on how the host culture may influence the EBF behaviors of refugees, especially those living in protracted situations within sub-Saharan Africa. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Buduburam Refugee Settlement in Ghana from July-August 2008 to explore the association between the amount of time living in Ghana and exclusive breastfeeding practices among Liberian refugees and Ghanaians in surround villages. The study included 480 women: 239 Liberians living in 12 settlement zones (in two of which Liberians and Ghanaians co-exist), 121 Ghanaians living in two settlement zones, and 120 Ghanaians living in nearby urban village of Awutu. Liberian mothers who lived in Ghana at least eight years were significantly more likely to exclusively breastfeed (OR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.02, 3.09) compared to Ghanaian mothers living in Awutu. These findings suggest that increased time living in Buduburam improved the chances of EBF success among Liberians, perhaps as a result of unique EBF education/support opportunities offered in the settlement to Liberian refugees that were not readily available to Ghanaians. Further research to understand the "mechanisms" explaining exclusive breastfeeding differences as a function of time spent in host country is needed for improving breastfeeding support in refugee settlements and host communities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. "But Is It a Normal Thing?" Teenage Mothers' Experiences of Breastfeeding Promotion and Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, L.; Rhodes, C.; Warren, S.; Withall, J.; Tapp, A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To explore teenagers experiences of the breastfeeding promotion and support delivered by health professionals. Design: A qualitative study conducted in an English city. Methods: Pregnant teenagers and teenage mothers (n = 29) took part in semi-structured interviews and focus groups between March and July 2009. Results: Breastfeeding is…

  19. Factors affecting exclusive breastfeeding of healthy babies aged zero to four months: a community-based study of Turkish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaçam, Zekiye

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that affect exclusive breastfeeding of healthy babies aged 0-4 months. Both the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF recommend feeding babies of 0-6 months exclusively with breast milk and starting complementary foods after the sixth month. In Turkey, however, a vast majority of babies 1-5 months of age (89.4%) are given complementary foods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in central Ankara province, with a sampling of 514 individuals who were selected using the convenience sampling method. Of the 514 mothers who participated in my research, 260 (50.6%) were found to be feeding their babies exclusively with breast milk; 77 (15.0%), with breast milk + water; 87 (16.9%), with breast milk + baby formula; 70 (13.6%), with breast milk + baby formula + other foods; and 20 (3.9%), baby formula + other foods. Based on multivariate logistic regression analysis results, the mother's employment [odds ratio (OR) = 0.488; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.288-0.827) considerably reduced the incidence of complementary foods, while frequent crying of the baby (OR = 1.687; 95% CI = 1.125-2.530) significantly increased the use of supplementary foods in infant nutrition. This study concluded that frequent crying of the baby increases the likelihood of giving the baby complementary foods. Midwives and nurses can encourage exclusive breastfeeding behaviour by providing individual education and counselling to women whose babies cry frequently. Exclusive breastfeeding of babies aged 0-6 months is crucial for the development and growth of the baby and instrumental in reducing infant morbidities and mortalities. One factor that increases the likelihood of provision of complementary foods is frequent crying of the baby. Midwives and nurses can encourage exclusive breastfeeding behaviour by providing individual education and counselling to women whose babies cry frequently.

  20. Aleitamento materno exclusivo e adiposidade Amamantamiento materno exclusivo y adiposidad Exclusive breastfeeding and adiposity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando V. N. Moraes

    2011-06-01

    ón transversal, en la que 134 pre-escolares entre 3 y 5 años de edad de una escuela privada de Brasilia, Brasil, fueron evaluados respecto a: masa corporal, estatura, perímetros del brazo y de la cintura, pliegues cutáneos tricipital y subescapular. Los padres de los niños contestaron a un cuestionario sobre el tiempo de amamantamiento. El diagnóstico de sobrepeso y obesidad fue realizado conforme a la clasificación de la Organización Mundial de la Salud para el índice de masa corporal por edad. RESULTADOS: Las niñas tuvieron mayor concentración adiposa en el pliegue cutáneo tricipital (p=0,001, subescapular (p=0,044 y en la suma de éstos (p=0,003 respecto a los niños. La prevalencia de sobrepeso y obesidad fue similar en los dos sexos (25,4% en los niños y 22,6% en las niñas, así como el tiempo mediano de amamantamiento exclusivo (4,3 meses para niños y 4,6 meses para niñas. Se notó correlación inversa significativa entre tiempo de amamantamiento exclusivo y perímetro de la cintura (r=-0,166; p=0,05. Las otras variables también mostraron tendencia de correlación inversa con el tiempo de amamantamiento materno exclusivo, pero sin valores significativos. CONCLUSIONES: La asociación inversa entre el tiempo de amamantamiento y el perímetro de la cintura muestra un posible efecto del amamantamiento materno sobre la distribución de grasa corporal en el pre-escolar.OBJECTIVE: To associate exclusive breastfeeding with central and peripheral adiposity measured by body mass index, waist and arm circumferences, triceps and subscapular skinfolds and their sum in preschool children. METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled 134 preschool children aged 3-5 years from a private school in Brasília, Brazil. All children had their body weight, height, waist and arm circumferences, and triceps and subscapular skinfolds measured. Children's parents an-swered a questionnaire about breastfeeding duration. Overweight and obesity were diagnosed based on the World Health

  1. Social Justice at the Core of Breastfeeding Protection, Promotion and Support: A Conceptualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paige Hall

    2018-05-01

    Despite widespread awareness of the health benefits for both mothers and babies we are far from achieving universal breastfeeding. Breastfeeding rates globally are lower than recommended levels and there are concerns that some global breastfeeding efforts have stalled (1, 2). In addition, we see persistent disparities in breastfeeding rates by race, ethnicity, class and status (3). A growing literature documents how a range of injustices, including gender inequality (7), racism (8), poverty (9), and violence (10, 11) shape whether, how exclusive, and for how long mothers and others will be able to breastfeed or feed their infants human milk. These social injustices and inequities work to privilege breastfeeding even as the health message becomes more mainstreamed and human milk more desirable. A social justice approach could help us address the gender, race, and sexuality-based inequities and injustices in opportunities, resources, status, and power that are influencing the patterns of breastfeeding we see today. The 12th Breastfeeding and Feminism International Conference held in 2017 took as its theme Breastfeeding as Social Justice: From Crucial Conversation to Inspired Action. The planning team for that conference identified seven core domains that could help us conceptualize a framework for placing social justice at the core of our work. This paper presents this framework and suggestions for policy and practice that follow.

  2. How can a multilevel promotion of breastfeeding reduce the required budget for rotavirus vaccination in Indonesia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakiyah, N.; Suwantika, A.A.; Postma, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Breast milk is considered to give protection against rotavirus infection since it contains anti-rotavirus maternal antibodies and other nonspecific inhibitors. Multilevel promotion of breastfeeding is a complex intervention that modifies behavioral determinants through multiple levels of

  3. Study on the effect of exclusive breastfeeding education on breastfeeding self-efficacy in mothers referring to affiliated hospitals of Medical Sciences Universities in Tehran during 2010-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Mirshekari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding saves the lives of more than half a million infants in a year and cause strong emotional relationship between mother and child and their psychosocial development of personality. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of exclusive breastfeeding education on mothers' breastfeeding self-efficacy and stress. This experimental study with clinical trial has randomly selected three hospitals from hospitals affiliated to medical sciences universities of Tehran with intensive care units for premature infants, and 100 eligible nulliparous mothers were sampled during three months. Mothers are randomly classified into case and control groups (each group with 50 samples. The case group received breastfeeding education and educational booklet, but control group received no education. A month later, the samples reanswered to questionnaires. Data is collected through questionnaires and analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics, T-test, paired-t, and Chi-Square tests. The results indicate that there is a significant difference between breastfeeding self-efficacy in pre and posteducational case group, so that education has significant effect on breastfeeding self-efficacy (t=10.7, p<0.01. Breastfeeding education especially in premature infants increases the mothers' breastfeeding self-efficacy, and thus the mothers with premature infants require special breastfeeding education.

  4. Breastfeeding promotion and support strategies based on Paulo Freire's epistemological categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Márcia Pereira Linhares

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study identified strategies for promoting breastfeeding involving pregnant women, breastfeeding women and actors of the social support network for the breastfeeding process. METHODS: This qualitative study was guided by action research and the focal group technique to collect data. Focal Group 1 consisted of four pregnant and six breastfeeding women; Focal Group 2 consisted of six family members; and Focal Group 3 consisted of thirteen health professionals. The focal groups were guided by the following questions: What breastfeeding promotion and support actions should be done? How should they be performed? Who should perform them? The conversation sunder went thematic content analysis and were interpreted in the light of Paulo Freire's theoretical constructs: dialogue, ethics and problematization. RESULTS: Four themes were emerged from the conversations: dialogue-based educational actions involving the social support network during the vital cycle; educational actions in schools; educational actions in the media; ongoing counseling at Family Health Units. CONCLUSION: The constructed strategies were centered on dialogue and active listening. Both should be present during the entire vital cycle and in the Family Health Strategy, and involve all actors of the social support network. These strategies may disrupt the unidirectional transmission of the educational practices that promote breastfeeding.

  5. Promotion and advocacy for improved complementary feeding: can we apply the lessons learned from breastfeeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwoz, Ellen G; Huffman, Sandra L; Quinn, Victoria J

    2003-03-01

    Although many successes have been achieved in promoting breastfeeding, this has not been the case for complementary feeding. Some successes in promoting complementary feeding at the community level have been documented, but few of these efforts have expanded to a larger scale and become sustained. To discover the reasons for this difference, the key factors for the successful promotion of breastfeeding on a large scale were examined and compared with the efforts made in complementary feeding. These factors include definition and rationale, policy support, funding, advocacy, private-sector involvement, availability and use of monitoring data, integration of research into action, and the existence of a well-articulated series of steps for successful implementation. The lessons learned from the promotion of breastfeeding should be applied to complementary feeding, and the new Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding provides an excellent first step in this process.

  6. Exclusive breastfeeding plan of pregnant Southeast Asian women: what encourages them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Nikmah Salamia; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Hidayati, Fatimah; Sapriani, Irma; Suradi, Rulina; Grobbee, Diederick E; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated factors involved in breastfeeding planning of pregnant Asian women. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 207 pregnant women visiting the Budi Kemuliaan Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia, between June and August 2011. The planned breastfeeding duration and determinants were sought using a standardized self-reported questionnaire. Most subjects had low income (84.1%) and education (79.7%). Women who had been informed about breastfeeding had a higher likelihood to plan longer (≥6 months) breastfeeding (odds ratio [OR] 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-3.75; p=0.04), whereas women who had breastfed previous children over a shorter period had a lower likelihood (OR 0.26; 95% CI 0.11-0.59; p=0.001). Age, low education level, first pregnancy, and low income had no association with breastfeeding plans. Working mothers who had to return to work before 6 months and worked for >8 hours/day were less likely to plan longer breastfeeding (OR 0.14; 95% CI 0.02-0.83; p=0.03 vs. OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.17-1.63; p=0.27), whereas those intending to express their milk were more likely to breastfeed longer (OR 16.85; 95% CI 4.21-67.48; pwork, who had previously breastfed for a short period, and who are not well informed about breastfeeding tend to plan shorter breastfeeding. Among mothers who work, it is the length of maternal leave and required working hours that determine the plans.

  7. Factors influencing the practice of exclusive breastfeeding among nursing mothers in a peri-urban district of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, Kofi Akohene; Acheampong, Enoch; Anokye, Francis Owusu; Okyere, Paul; Appiah-Brempong, Emmanuel; Adjei, Rose Odotei

    2017-09-07

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) is one of the optimal infant and young child feeding practices. Globally, district. A cross-sectional quantitative study was conducted using structured questionnaires. A convenience sampling technique was employed to select 380 nursing mothers who attended postnatal care at the postnatal clinic in all the 13 health facilities with child welfare clinics (both public and private) and were available on the day of data collection. Data were analysed using frequency and CHISQ tables. There was a significant association between socio-demographic characteristics of mothers such as age (p = 0.129), religion (p = 0.035) type of employment (p = 0.005) and the practice of exclusive breastfeeding. Again, there was significant relationship between mothers' knowledge on EBF in terms of sources of information about EBF (p = 0.000), steps taken by mothers who perceived not to have breast milk (p = 0.000), some medical conditions of nursing mothers (p = 0.000) and the practice of EBF. Most nursing mothers use infant formula feeds as either supplement or substitute for breast milk based on their perception that breast milk may not be sufficient for the babies despite the high cost of these artificial milk. This puts the babies at a higher risk of compromised health and malnutrition which has the potential of increasing infant mortality. Most mothers are not practicing exclusive breastfeeding because their spouses and family members do not allow them.

  8. Working mothers of the World Health Organization Western Pacific offices: lessons and experiences to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iellamo, Alessandro; Sobel, Howard; Engelhardt, Katrin

    2015-02-01

    Optimal breastfeeding saves lives. However, suboptimal breastfeeding is prevalent, primarily resulting from inappropriate promotion of infant formula and challenges of working mothers to continue breastfeeding. The article aims to determine the extent to which World Health Organization (WHO) policies protect, promote, and support breastfeeding women working at the WHO, Western Pacific Region. An online survey targeted all female WHO and contractual staff in all country and regional offices, who delivered a baby between July 24, 2008 and July 24, 2013. Respondents advised on how the worksite could better support breastfeeding. Thirty-two female staff from 11 of the 12 WHO offices within the Western Pacific Region responded. "Returning to work" (44%) and "not having enough milk" (17%) were the most commonly reported reasons for not breastfeeding. Eighteen (56%) reported using infant formula and 8 (44%) reported that the product was prescribed. Among the suggestions given to better support breastfeeding, 10 (32%) recommended having a private room with a chair, table, electric outlet, and refrigerator. The findings show that women working at the WHO face similar challenges to mothers outside the WHO. Based on the findings, we recommend the following: (1) provide prenatal/postpartum breastfeeding counseling services for employees; (2) establish breastfeeding rooms in country offices and regularly orient staff on agency policies to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding; (3) annually celebrate World Breastfeeding Week with employees; (4) encourage other public and private institutions to conduct online surveys and elicit recommendations from mothers on how their workplace can support breastfeeding; and (5) conduct a larger survey among UN agencies on how to better protect, promote, and support breastfeeding. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Correlation between hemoglobin levels of mothers and children on exclusive breastfeeding in the first six months of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa de Fátima da Silva Vieira Marques

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the correlation between hemoglobin levels of mothers and their children on exclusive breastfeeding in the first six months of life. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 221 binomials (mother-child enrolled in a breastfeeding support program, who were stratified into six groups according to the children's age group. The sample consisted of children born at term with normal weight, with no neonatal complications and whose mothers did not have anemia or infectious disease at the time of data collection. Interviews were carried out with the mothers, blood was collected by peripheral venipuncture from mothers and children, and children's anthropometric data were assessed. Pearson's correlation coefficients between the hemoglobin levels of mothers and children were calculated. Six multiple linear regression models were adjusted with regression coefficient estimates, considering as statistically significant associations with p ≤ 0.05. Results: The correlation coefficients of hemoglobin levels of mothers and children ranged from 0.253, at three months, to 0.601, at five months. The hemoglobin level of mothers was correlated with the hemoglobin level of their children at four months (r = 0.578 and at five months (r = 0.601. In the adjusted multiple linear regression, the regression coefficients were higher at four months (β = 1.134; p = 0.002 and at five months (β = 0.845; p < 0.001. Conclusion: These findings allow for the conclusion that there is a correlation between the hemoglobin of mothers and the hemoglobin of their children on exclusive breastfeeding in the first six months of life.

  10. Tensions and contradictions in government interventions for the promotion of breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Ramos Rodríguez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of shedding light on the decrease in the practice of breastfeeding in rural areas of Mexico, this article looks at the current biomedical model and the policies and actions to promote breastfeeding derived from the model’s theoretical approach. The article also discusses operational strategies of the governmental social welfare program Oportunidades. For this purpose, the study utilizes the testimonies of 39 young breastfeeding mothers, 11 mothers and grandmothers and 12 members of the health staff in the Nahuatl population of Cuentepec, Morelos, Mexico, which were collected during a previous study in 2008 and 2009. It was found that the biomedical model, which permeates all actions to promote breastfeeding, reifies people, limits communication, devaluates women’s traditional knowledge and imposes a discourse that gradually discourages the practice of breastfeeding. The article’s proposal is to adopt an epistemic change in biomedical thought that shifts from a paradigm of simplicity to one of complexity, with the purpose of achieving a greater understanding of the bio-psycho-socio-cultural processes of human beings.

  11. The Effect of Interactive Web-Based Monitoring on Breastfeeding Exclusivity, Intensity, and Duration in Healthy, Term Infants After Hospital Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Azza H; Roumani, Ali M; Szucs, Kinga; Zhang, Lingsong; King, Demetra

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether a Web-based interactive breastfeeding monitoring system increased breastfeeding duration, exclusivity, and intensity as primary outcomes and decreased symptoms of postpartum depression as a secondary outcome. Two-arm, randomized controlled trial. Three hospitals in the Midwestern United States. One hundred forty one (141) mother-newborn dyads were recruited before discharge. Postpartum women were randomly assigned to the control or intervention groups. Women in the control group (n = 57) followed the standard hospital protocol, whereas women in the intervention group (n = 49) were given access to an online interactive breastfeeding monitoring system and were prompted to record breastfeeding and infant output data for 30 days. A follow-up online survey was sent to both groups at 1, 2, and 3 months to assess breastfeeding outcomes and postpartum depression. For mothers and infants, there were no significant differences in demographics between groups. No significant differences in breastfeeding outcomes were found between groups at discharge (p = .707). A significant difference in breastfeeding outcomes was found between groups at 1, 2, and 3 months (p = .027, p 3.0 ± 3.4, and 2.8 ± 3.6, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between groups at 1, 2, and 3 months (p = .389, .170, and .920, respectively) for depression. The Web-based interactive breastfeeding monitoring system may be a promising intervention to improve breastfeeding duration, exclusivity, and intensity. Copyright © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pathways of equality through education: impact of gender (in)equality and maternal education on exclusive breastfeeding among natives and migrants in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinden, Karen; Van de Putte, Bart

    2017-04-01

    Even though breastfeeding is typically considered the preferred feeding method for infants worldwide, in Belgium, breastfeeding rates remain low across native and migrant groups while the underlying determinants are unclear. Furthermore, research examining contextual effects, especially regarding gender (in)equality and ideology, has not been conducted. We hypothesized that greater gender equality scores in the country of origin will result in higher breastfeeding chances. Because gender equality does not operate only at the contextual level but can be mediated through individual level resources, we hypothesized the following for maternal education: higher maternal education will be an important positive predictor for exclusive breastfeeding chances in Belgium, but its effects will differ over subsequent origin countries. Based on IKAROS data (GeÏntegreerd Kind Activiteiten en Regio Ondersteunings Systeem), we perform multilevel analyses on 27 936 newborns. Feeding method is indicated by exclusive breastfeeding 3 months after childbirth. We measure gender (in)equality using Global Gender Gap scores from the mother's origin country. Maternal education is a metric variable based on International Standard Classification of Education indicators. Results show that 3.6% of the variation in breastfeeding can be explained by differences between the migrant mother's country of origin. However, the effect of gender (in)equality appears to be non-significant. After adding maternal education, the effect for origin countries scoring low on gender equality turns significant. Maternal education on its own shows strong positive association with exclusive breastfeeding and, furthermore, has different effects for different origin countries. Possible explanations are discussed in-depth setting direction for further research regarding the different pathways gender (in)equality and maternal education affect breastfeeding. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons

  13. Breastfeeding Duration and Primary Reasons for Breastfeeding Cessation among Women with Postpartum Depressive Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascom, Erin McElderry; Napolitano, Melissa A

    2016-05-01

    Although postpartum depression is associated with lower breastfeeding initiation rates and shorter breastfeeding duration, the potential mechanisms through which this relationship functions are not well understood. This study examined the breastfeeding behaviors of women with postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS) to identify potential motivations for early breastfeeding cessation. An analysis of quantitative data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II examined the relationship between PDS and breastfeeding behaviors, including breastfeeding duration and primary reasons for early breastfeeding cessation. Of the women in the sample, 30.9% met criteria for mild PDS. Women with PDS had shorter overall (18.4 vs 21.8 weeks, P = .001) and exclusive breastfeeding duration (3.6 vs 4.7 weeks, P = .012) than women without PDS. A larger proportion of women with PDS stopped breastfeeding before 6 months (68.7% vs 57.2%, P household duties" (OR = 1.90, P = .011) as a primary reason for breastfeeding cessation among women who stopped breastfeeding before 6 months. After controlling for these same covariates, women with PDS had, on average, 2.4 weeks shorter breastfeeding duration than women without PDS (P = .025). There is a high prevalence of depressive symptoms among new mothers, and most do not breastfeed for recommended time periods. Increased PDS screening during prenatal and postpartum visits and promotion of lactation support services may better address the high rates of PDS and suboptimal breastfeeding behavior. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Effect of breastfeeding promotion interventions on cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, Auliya A.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rotavirus infection has been reported to be responsible for the majority of severe diarrhea in children under-5-years-old in Indonesia. Breast milk is considered to give protection against rotavirus infection. Increasing breastfeeding promotion programs could be an alternative target to

  15. Exclusive Breastfeeding and the Acceptability of Donor Breast Milk for Sick, Hospitalized Infants in Kupang, Nusa Tenggara Timur, Indonesia: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Linda; Anggrahini, Simplicia Maria; Woda, Rahel Rara; Ayton, Jennifer E; Beggs, Sean

    2016-08-01

    The eastern Indonesian province of Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT) has an infant mortality rate of 45 per 1000, higher than the national average (28/1000). Exclusive breastfeeding, important for improving newborn and infant survival, is encouraged among hospitalized infants in Kupang, the provincial capital of NTT. However, barriers to hospitalized infants receiving breast milk may exist. This study explored the barriers and enablers to exclusive breastfeeding among sick and low birth weight hospitalized infants in Kupang, NTT. The attitudes and cultural beliefs of health workers and mothers regarding the use of donor breast milk (DBM) were also explored. A mixed-methods study using a convergent parallel design was conducted. A convenience sample of 74 mothers of hospitalized infants and 8 hospital staff participated in semi-structured interviews. Facility observational data were also collected. Analysis was conducted using Davis's barrier analysis method. Of the 73 questionnaires analyzed, we found that 39.7% of mothers retrospectively reported exclusively breastfeeding and 37% of mothers expressed breast milk. Expressing was associated with maternal reported exclusive breastfeeding χ(2) (1, N = 73) = 6.82, P = .009. Staff supported breastfeeding for sick infants, yet mothers could only access infants during set nursery visiting hours. No mothers used DBM, and most mothers and staff found the concept distasteful. Increasing mothers' opportunities for contact with infants is the first step to increasing exclusive breastfeeding rates among hospitalized infants in Kupang. This will facilitate mothers to express their breast milk, improve the acceptability of DBM, and enhance the feasibility of establishing a DBM bank. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Exclusive Breastfeeding among Preterm Low Birth Weight Infants at One Month Follow-up after Hospital Discharge

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    Ishrat Jahan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Establishment and maintenance of breastfeeding in preterm low birth weight (PT LBW neonates after discharge from hospital is challenging and may be affected by multiple factors. We designed this study to find out the association of these factors with breastfeeding in our population. Objectives: To observe the rate of exclusive breasrfeeding (EBF among the PT LBW neonates at one month follow up and to identify the factors that are related with the maintenance of EBF. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted during the period from July 2009 to October 2011 in Enam Medical College Hospital (EMCH. Preterm infants ≤ 34 wks gestation, stayed in the NICU for >3 days and discharged home were eligible. Mothers were interviewed at one month follow-up after discharge. Infants who were given only breast milk up to 4 weeks were termed as “Exclusively breastfed (EBF” and who were given formula milk in addition were labeled as “Nonexclusively breastfed (NEBF”. Baseline information regarding maternal demography, delivery of the baby, feeding during discharge was taken from database of neonatal ward. Results: Among 89 infants, 37 (42% were female and 52 (58% were male, including 5 twins. Gestational age ranged from 29 to 34 weeks (mean 32±2, and birth weight ranged from 1100 to 2200 grams (mean 1763±20 g. At one month follow up visit 19% (17/89 were found to be NEBF and 81% were EBF. Factors significantly associated with EBF were shorter duration of hospital stay (p=0.001, method of feeding at discharge (p=0.001, mode of delivery (p=0.004, below average socio-economic status (p=0.03, maternal education (p=0.02, number of antenatal visits (p=0.02 and larger birth weight (p=0.038. Conclusion: A variety of factors may affect EBF in PT LBW babies. Extensive counseling of the mothers during antenatal visits, counseling of the family members regarding the advantages of exclusive breastfeeding is necessary. Support should be

  17. Using a wellness program to promote a culture of breastfeeding in the workplace: Oregon Health & Science University's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, Antoinette; Phillipi, Carrie Anne

    2015-02-01

    In the United States, many women stop breastfeeding within the first month that they return to work. Working mothers experience challenges in maintaining milk supply and finding the time and space to express breast milk or feed their babies in workplace settings. Changing attitudes and culture within the workplace may be accomplished in conjunction with ensuring compliance with state and federal laws regarding breastfeeding to improve breastfeeding rates after return to work. Employee wellness programs can be 1 avenue to promote breastfeeding and human milk donation as healthy behaviors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Communicating human biomonitoring results to ensure policy coherence with public health recommendations: analysing breastmilk whilst protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding

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    Arendt Maryse

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article addresses the problem of how to ensure consistency in messages communicating public health recommendations on environmental health and on child health. The World Health Organization states that the protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding rank among the most effective interventions to improve child survival. International public health policy recommends exclusive breastfeeding for six months, followed by continued breastfeeding with the addition of safe and adequate complementary foods for two years and beyond. Biomonitoring of breastmilk is used as an indicator of environmental pollution ending up in mankind. This article will therefore present the biomonitoring results of concentrations of residues in breastmilk in a wider context. These results are the mirror that reflects the chemical substances accumulated in the bodies of both men and women in the course of a lifetime. The accumulated substances in our bodies may have an effect on male or female reproductive cells; they are present in the womb, directly affecting the environment of the fragile developing foetus; they are also present in breastmilk. Evidence of man-made chemical residues in breastmilk can provide a shock tactic to push for stronger laws to protect the environment. However, messages about chemicals detected in breastmilk can become dramatized by the media and cause a backlash against breastfeeding, thus contradicting the public health messages issued by the World Health Organization. Analyses of breastmilk show the presence of important nutritional components and live protective factors active in building up the immune system, in gastro intestinal maturation, in immune defence and in providing antiviral, antiparasitic and antibacterial activity. Through cohort studies researchers in environmental health have concluded that long-term breastfeeding counterbalances the effect of prenatal exposure to chemicals causing delay in mental and

  19. AWARENESS OF THE BENEFITS OF BREASTFEEDING AMONG ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    The aim of this study therefore was to determine awareness of breastfeeding benefits ... benefits of breastfeeding are important factors for breastfeeding practices. Awareness .... practicing Exclusive Breastfeeding in the first six months of ...

  20. Mothers' education and ANC visit improved exclusive breastfeeding in Dabat Health and Demographic Surveillance System Site, northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariku, Amare; Alemu, Kassahun; Gizaw, Zemichael; Muchie, Kindie Fentahun; Derso, Terefe; Abebe, Solomon Mekonnen; Yitayal, Mezgebu; Fekadu, Abel; Ayele, Tadesse Awoke; Alemayehu, Geta Asrade; Tsegaye, Adino Tesfahun; Shimeka, Alemayehu; Biks, Gashaw Andargie

    2017-01-01

    Despite its proven benefit in reducing child mortality and morbidity, the coverage of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) remains sub-optimal. In Ethiopia, about 52% of infants under six months of age were exclusively breastfed, implying the need for further identification of the barriers to optimal EBF practice. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate EBF and its determinants in the predominantly rural northwest Ethiopia. The study was conducted at the Dabat Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) site, which is located in Dabat District, northwest Ethiopia. A total of 5,227 mothers with children under five years of age were included for analysis. Multivariable binary logistic regression analysis was employed to identify factors associated with EBF. The Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) with a 95% Confidence Interval (CI) was estimated to show the strength of association. A P-value of ANC visit [AOR = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.23,1.61], initiation of breastfeeding within one hour of birth [AOR = 1.32; 95% CI: 1.15,1.50], richer household [AOR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.65], and withholding prelacteal feeds [AOR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.17, 1.53] were found important determinants of EBF. In this study area, the prevalence of EBF is lower than the national as well as the global recommendation for universal coverage of EBF. Therefore, strengthening the implementation of Infant and Young Child Feeding strategy (IYCF) and maternal health care utilization are essential for stepping up EBF coverage. Moreover, attention should be given to uneducated, rural resident, and adolescent mothers.

  1. Breastfeeding practices in urban and rural Vietnam

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    Thu Huong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to describe and compare breastfeeding practices in rural and urban areas of Vietnam and to study associations with possibly influencing person and household factors. This type of study has not been conducted in Vietnam before. Methods Totally 2,690 children, born from 1st March 2008 to 30th June 2010 in one rural and one urban Health and Demographic Surveillance Site, were followed from birth to the age of 12 months. Information about demography, economy and education for persons and households was obtained from household surveys. Standard statistical methods including survival and regression analyses were used. Results Initiation of breastfeeding during the first hour of life was more frequent in the urban area compared to the rural (boys 40% vs. 35%, girls 49% vs. 40%. High birth weight and living in households with large number of assets significantly increased the probability for early initiation of breastfeeding. Exclusive breastfeeding at three months of age was more commonly reported in the rural than in the urban area (boys 58% vs. 46%, girls 65% vs. 53%. The duration of exclusive breastfeeding as well as of any breastfeeding was longer in the rural area than in the urban area (medians for boys 97 days vs. 81 days, for girls 102 days vs. 91 days. The percentages of children with exclusive breastfeeding lasting at least 6 months, as recommended by WHO, were low in both areas. The duration of exclusive breastfeeding was significantly shorter for mothers with three or more antenatal care visits or Caesarean section in both areas. High education level of mothers was associated with longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding in the rural area. No significant associations were found between duration of exclusive breastfeeding and mother’s age, household economy indicators or household size. Conclusion Intervention programs with the aim to promote breastfeeding are needed. Mothers should

  2. Impacto do incentivo ao aleitamento materno entre mulheres trabalhadoras formais The impact of breastfeeding promotion in women with formal employment

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    Aline Alves Brasileiro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigar se programas de incentivo ao aleitamento materno ajudam a prevenir o desmame precoce entre filhos de mães trabalhadoras. Foi realizado um estudo de intervenção não randomizado, por meio de inquérito entre mães que voltaram a trabalhar após o parto, participantes e não-participantes de um programa de incentivo ao aleitamento. A amostra consistiu de 200 mães de filhos com idades entre 6 e 10 meses. Para avaliar fatores associados ao desmame precoce, os resultados foram analisados por meio dos testes estatísticos de qui-quadrado, exato de Fisher e análise de regressão logística múltipla (α = 0,05. Os resultados mostraram que houve diferença estatística nas taxas de aleitamento materno exclusivo (p This study focused on programs to promote breastfeeding in order to prevent early weaning of working mothers' infant children. A non-randomized intervention study was conducted using a survey of mothers who had returned to work after childbirth, including both participants and non-participants in a program to promote breastfeeding. The sample consisted of 200 mothers of infants ranging from 6 to 10 months of age. Factors associated with early weaning were analyzed with the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests and multiple logistic regression (α = 0.05. The results showed statistical differences between the groups in relation to exclusive breastfeeding (p < 0.0001 and breastfeeding (p < 0.0001. There was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0056 between the groups in relation to time between childbirth and return to work. There was no difference between the end of maternity leave and weaning time. Mothers that were unable to nurse their infants during the work shift showed 4.98 times higher odds (95%CI: 1.27-19.61 of weaning them before the fourth month of age.

  3. Predictors of exclusive breastfeeding across three time points in Bangladesh: an examination of the 2007, 2011 and 2014 Demographic and Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Sarah R; Sanghvi, Tina

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this study was to explore predictors of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) in Bangladesh using data from 2007, 2011 and 2014, specifically focusing on potential reasons why rates of EBF changed over those time periods. Data on mother/infant pairs with infants <6 months of age were examined at the three time points using the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey. The EBF prevalence, changes in EBF since the previous survey and determinants of EBF at each time period were examined using t-tests, χ2 and multilevel logistic regression. The prevalence of EBF was 42.5, 65 and 59.4% in 2007, 2011 and 2014, respectively. The age of the child was significantly associated with EBF across all time points. The largest changes in EBF occurred in the 3- to 5-month age group. Predictors of EBF in this specific age group were similar to overall predictors (e.g. age of the child and region). Participation of the mother in household decisions was a significant predictor in 2014. EBF prevalence in Bangladesh increased between 2007 and 2011 and then decreased between 2011 and 2014. The increase in 2011 may have been the result of widespread initiatives to promote EBF in that time frame. Due to the unexplained decrease in EBF between 2011 and 2014, there is still a need for interventions such as peer counselling, antenatal education and community awareness to promote EBF.

  4. Incorporating breastfeeding education into prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Adrienne; Faucher, Mary Ann; Spencer, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    Prenatal breastfeeding education increases breastfeeding initiation, exclusivity, and duration. Current research regarding antenatal breastfeeding education suggests that recurrent, individual, and technology-based education programs are effective in providing women with evidence-based breastfeeding information and guidance. This project was implemented at an obstetrical practice in the northeast United States. Pregnant women between 32 weeks of gestation and birth, receiving care from certified nurse-midwives, were the targeted population. Three breastfeeding modules were created and offered to women at the 32-, 34-, and 36-week prenatal visit via computer tablets. Women answered questionnaires at the end of each module, serving as a measure for participation and content learning. Women also completed a questionnaire at the 6-week postpartum visit to assess summative perceptions. Twenty-three women participated, and 21 women completed questionnaires at 6 weeks postpartum. All women answered the content questions at the end of the modules correctly. Sixty-seven percent reported prior breastfeeding experience, 95% initiated breastfeeding, 86% were exclusively breastfeeding at 6 weeks postpartum, and 71% of the women planned to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months. Sixty-seven percent reported the modules promoted or affirmed their decision to breastfeed, whereas 5% would have preferred group-based education. Providers documented breastfeeding education 52% of the time. The results of this project indicate that women successfully learned breastfeeding content via the tablet methodology. The results confirm that prenatal breastfeeding education, in the office setting, is well accepted by women. In order to assess the impact of the program on breastfeeding success, further study is needed.

  5. Tempo de aleitamento materno exclusivo em recém-nascidos prematuros e a termo Time of exclusive breastfeeding of preterm and term newborn babies

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    Waléria Ferreira da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: determinar o tempo de aleitamento materno exclusivo de recém nascidos prematuros e observar se estes apresentam um índice de aleitamento materno exclusivo diferente do apresentado pelo município de Maceió, na I e II Pesquisa de Prevalência de Aleitamento Materno nas Capitais Brasileiras e no Distrito Federal. Além de comparar o tempo de aleitamento materno e aleitamento materno exclusivo de recém nascidos prematuros e a termo e verificar as causas do desmame precoce e suas consequências. MÉTODO: trata-se de uma investigação de campo, de caráter exploratório e longitudinal da prevalência do aleitamento materno exclusivo de recém nascidos prematuro e à termo. RESULTADOS: o percentual de aleitamento materno e de aleitamento materno exclusivo de prematuros aos 6 meses. Houve diferença significante para a variável peso ao nascimento. Dentre as causas do desmame precoce, os fatores educacionais seguidos dos fatores culturais apareceram em maior porcentagem. Como consequência do desmame precoce a prática de hábitos orais ocorreu em 98,1% das crianças. CONCLUSÃO: as crianças prematuras permaneceram mais tempo em aleitamento materno e em aleitamento materno exclusivo que as nascidas a termo. Os fatores educacionais e culturais foram as principais causas do desmame precoce e sua consequência foi o uso de chupeta e mamadeira.PURPOSE: to determine the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding. However, only a minority of women engage in breastfeeding practices. This research is aimed to establish the time of exclusive breastfeeding as for preterm babies and observe whether they have a different level of exclusive breastfeeding in relation to the level achieved by the city of Maceió at the I and II PPAM-CDF. Additionally, other goals are to compare the breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding types of preterm and term newborns and determine the causes of early weaning and its consequences. METHOD: this is a field investigation

  6. Tempo de aleitamento materno exclusivo em recém-nascidos prematuros e a termo Time of exclusive breastfeeding of preterm and term newborn babies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waléria Ferreira da Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: determinar o tempo de aleitamento materno exclusivo de recém nascidos prematuros e observar se estes apresentam um índice de aleitamento materno exclusivo diferente do apresentado pelo município de Maceió, na I e II Pesquisa de Prevalência de Aleitamento Materno nas Capitais Brasileiras e no Distrito Federal. Além de comparar o tempo de aleitamento materno e aleitamento materno exclusivo de recém nascidos prematuros e a termo e verificar as causas do desmame precoce e suas consequências. MÉTODO: trata-se de uma investigação de campo, de caráter exploratório e longitudinal da prevalência do aleitamento materno exclusivo de recém nascidos prematuro e à termo. RESULTADOS: o percentual de aleitamento materno e de aleitamento materno exclusivo de prematuros aos 6 meses. Houve diferença significante para a variável peso ao nascimento. Dentre as causas do desmame precoce, os fatores educacionais seguidos dos fatores culturais apareceram em maior porcentagem. Como consequência do desmame precoce a prática de hábitos orais ocorreu em 98,1% das crianças. CONCLUSÃO: as crianças prematuras permaneceram mais tempo em aleitamento materno e em aleitamento materno exclusivo que as nascidas a termo. Os fatores educacionais e culturais foram as principais causas do desmame precoce e sua consequência foi o uso de chupeta e mamadeira.PURPOSE: to determine the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding. However, only a minority of women engage in breastfeeding practices. This research is aimed to establish the time of exclusive breastfeeding as for preterm babies and observe whether they have a different level of exclusive breastfeeding in relation to the level achieved by the city of Maceió at the I and II PPAM-CDF. Additionally, other goals are to compare the breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding types of preterm and term newborns and determine the causes of early weaning and its consequences. METHOD: this is a field investigation

  7. Assessing exclusive breastfeeding practices, dietary intakes and body mass index (BMI) of nursing mothers in Ekiti State of Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ijarotimi, Oluwole Steve

    2010-01-01

    Breastfeeding is an unequalled way of providing ideal food for the infants. The benefits of breastfeeding practices to infants and mothers are well documented. However, information on breastfeeding practices and its effect on body mass index (BMI) of mothers are scarce, particularly in Ekiti State of Nigeria. Therefore, the present study is designed to assess breastfeeding practices and its association with BMI of mothers. A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted among breastfeed...

  8. Promoting Sustained Breastfeeding of Infants at Risk for Asthma: Explaining the "Active Ingredients" of an Effective Program Using Intervention Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesters, Ilse; Gijsbers, Barbara; Bartholomew, L Kay

    2018-01-01

    Infants whose parents and/or siblings have a history of asthma or allergy may profit from receiving exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life. This is expected to diminish the chance of developing childhood asthma and/or atopic disease. Ongoing breastfeeding for 6 months seems challenging for many women. An educational program was developed using Intervention Mapping as a logic model to guide development and was found successful in improving breastfeeding rates at 6 months postpartum, improving knowledge and beliefs about breastfeeding for 6 months, after exposure to the program compared to controls. Intervention elements included an evidence- and theory-based booklet addressed during pre- and postnatal home visits by trained assistants. This paper elucidates the inner workings of the program by systematically describing and illustrating the steps for intervention development.

  9. Breastfeeding Practices, Demographic Variables, and Their Association with Morbidities in Children

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    Dipen V. Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate feeding practices are the key contributor to reducing morbidities and mortalities in under-five children. A cross-sectional questionnaire based survey of mothers of children aged less than 5years was conducted in 781 mothers. More than half of mothers (57.5% started feeding within an hour of birth, 55.9% gave exclusive breastfeeding for six months, 89.1% of the mothers stopped breastfeeding before two years of age, 18.2% of the mothers bottle-fed the babies, and 15.6% had problems during breastfeeding in first 6 months. Early initiation of breastfeeding within one hour of birth promoted exclusive breastfeeding, and breastfeeding for longer duration. Exclusive breastfeeding increased frequency of feeds. Multivariable logistic regression showed that initiation of breastfeeding after an hour of birth (p = 0.035, not providing exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months (p < 0.0001, unemployed mothers (p = 0.035, having two or more kids (p = 0.001, and complementary feeds given by person other than mother (p = 0.007 increased hospitalization. Starting breastfeeding after an hour of birth (p = 0.045, severe malnutrition (p = 0.018, and breastfeeding for < two years (p = 0.026 increased rates of diarrhea. Breastfeeding practices were not optimum and interventions to improve these practices need to be strengthened.

  10. Mothers' education and ANC visit improved exclusive breastfeeding in Dabat Health and Demographic Surveillance System Site, northwest Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amare Tariku

    Full Text Available Despite its proven benefit in reducing child mortality and morbidity, the coverage of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF remains sub-optimal. In Ethiopia, about 52% of infants under six months of age were exclusively breastfed, implying the need for further identification of the barriers to optimal EBF practice. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate EBF and its determinants in the predominantly rural northwest Ethiopia.The study was conducted at the Dabat Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS site, which is located in Dabat District, northwest Ethiopia. A total of 5,227 mothers with children under five years of age were included for analysis. Multivariable binary logistic regression analysis was employed to identify factors associated with EBF. The Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR with a 95% Confidence Interval (CI was estimated to show the strength of association. A P-value of <0.05 was used to declare statistical significance.About 54.5% [95% CI: 51.9, 57.1] of the mothers practiced EBF. Mothers' education [AOR = 2.10; 95% CI: 1.63, 2.71], age (20-35 years [AOR = 1.39; CI: 1.07, 1.80], urban residence [AOR = 1.28; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.54], at least one ANC visit [AOR = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.23,1.61], initiation of breastfeeding within one hour of birth [AOR = 1.32; 95% CI: 1.15,1.50], richer household [AOR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.65], and withholding prelacteal feeds [AOR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.17, 1.53] were found important determinants of EBF.In this study area, the prevalence of EBF is lower than the national as well as the global recommendation for universal coverage of EBF. Therefore, strengthening the implementation of Infant and Young Child Feeding strategy (IYCF and maternal health care utilization are essential for stepping up EBF coverage. Moreover, attention should be given to uneducated, rural resident, and adolescent mothers.

  11. Role of the pediatric nurse practitioner in promoting breastfeeding for late preterm infants in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Azza H

    2010-01-01

    The preterm birth rate has been increasing steadily during the past two decades. Up to two thirds of this increase has been attributed to the increasing rate of late preterm births (34 to stamina; difficulty with latch, suck, and swallow; temperature instability; increased vulnerability to infection; hyperbilirubinemia, and more respiratory problems than the full-term infant. Late preterm infants usually are treated as full term and discharged within 48 hours of birth, so pediatric nurse practitioners in primary care settings play a critical role in promoting breastfeeding through early assessment and detection of breastfeeding difficulties and by providing anticipatory guidance related to breastfeeding and follow-up. The purpose of this article is to describe the developmental and physiologic immaturity of late preterm infants and to highlight the role of pediatric nurse practitioners in primary care settings in supporting and promoting breastfeeding for late preterm infants.

  12. Facilitators for Empowering Women in Breastfeeding: a Qualitative Study

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    Shahnaz Kohan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background  Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months and continued breastfeeding up to 2 years or more is a desirable approach for infant’s nutrition. A mother's breastfeeding empowerment is considered an important factor in promoting breastfeeding and identifying its facilitating factors can contribute to the development of effective policies and intervention. This study with a qualitative approach carried out aiming to exploring the facilitators for women’s empowerment in breastfeeding. Material and Methods This study conducted by content analysis method. Thirty-four semi-structured individual interviews with 20 mothers having breastfeeding experience, 4 key family members, and 10 personnel involved in breastfeeding services were carried out. Data analysis was simultaneously performed with data collection. Results Three main categories of "Health system factors", "Family and personal factors" and "Social and cultural factors" were extracted from the participants' explanations, indicating the dimensions of facilitators for empowering women in breastfeeding. Conclusion Participants regarded the acquisition of breastfeeding skills in hospitals and breastfeeding counseling in health centers as important factors in facilitating their empowerment to early initiation of breastfeeding and its continuity. Further analysis showed "a mother's decision to breastfeed" along with her understanding of "positive attitude and her husband and family's participation in breastfeeding" boosts the breastfeeding ability and the support of the community through "positive cultural belief in breastfeeding" and" public education and information" provides an appropriate ground for the continuity of breastfeeding. In order to improve breastfeeding, a comprehensive planning with regard to women's empowerment in breastfeeding should be considered.

  13. Aleitamento materno exclusivo entre trabalhadoras com creche no local de trabalho Exclusive breastfeeding among working women with free daycare available at workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Duarte Osis

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar os fatores relacionados à decisão das mulheres em amamentar e a duração planejada e, de fato observada, do aleitamento exclusivo entre trabalhadoras que dispõem de creche na empresa. MÉTODOS: Estudo qualitativo no qual se comparou um grupo de 15 trabalhadoras cujos bebês estavam sendo alimentados apenas com leite materno quando começaram a freqüentar a creche da empresa com outro similar que incluía mulheres cujos bebês que, ao ingressar, já estavam recebendo, além do leite materno, outros alimentos. Foram realizadas entrevistas semi-estruturadas e grupos focais. RESULTADOS: Evidenciaram-se como fatores relacionados à decisão de iniciar a amamentação e mantê-la ao retornar ao trabalho: o desejo de amamentar, embasado no valor que as mulheres dos dois grupos atribuíam ao aleitamento materno, bem como seus maridos e outras pessoas significativas (por exemplo: mãe, irmã, amigas. A duração do aleitamento exclusivo relacionou-se principalmente à orientação do pediatra que cuidava do bebê, que foi distinta em cada um dos grupos estudados. CONCLUSÃO: A existência da creche no local de trabalho aparece como elemento relevante para a manutenção do aleitamento após a licença de maternidade, especialmente o materno exclusivo. A decisão sobre quanto tempo amamentar de forma exclusiva esteve relacionada às informações recebidas acerca do assunto antes e durante a gestação, e no pós-parto. A diferença entre os dois grupos estudados foi que as mulheres que mantiveram o aleitamento exclusivo por quase seis meses acreditavam que quanto mais tempo dessem somente o leite materno, mais benefícios o bebê teria, enquanto as mulheres do outro grupo acreditavam que três meses de aleitamento exclusivo eram suficientes.OBJECTIVE: To investigate factors related to the decision of exclusive breastfeeding, and the planned and the actual duration among working women with free daycare available at workplace

  14. [How Italian midwives contribute to breastfeeding promotion: a national experience of "cascade" training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Angela; Conti, Stefania; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppina; Donati, Serena; Perra, Alberto; Grandolfo, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Social changes of the last century have increasingly transformed maternity and newborn care into a medical act and have greatly reduced the number of breastfeeding women. In Italy, the explicit aim of the Ministry of Health concerning mother and child health (Progetto-Obiettivo Materno-Infantile) is to bring this process back to a more natural activity. The prevalence of women who breastfed after the third month of life has been set as an indicator of the effectiveness of mother and child health services. However, the percentage of fully breastfeeding women at the fourth month of the newborn varies greatly among Italian regions, from 18 to 56%. As in many other Countries in the European Union, in Italy the initial education of the mother and child caregivers often lacks a specific formal training on breastfeeding promotion, as do academic midwife-training courses. In 2004 the Italian Federation of the Colleges of Midwives implemented a cascade training project in collaboration with the Istituto Superiore di Sanita, to train trainer-midwives who in turn would train midwives, either already working (Continuing Medical Education) or during their formal academic education. Contents, techniques and methods have been the same as those adopted for the World Health Organization's 40+40 hours course "Breastfeeding: counselling: a training course" for trainers. A total of 39 training coordinators and teachers of academic midwifery courses have participated, in two separate groups. In their turn, the trainers have trained 74 working midwives, from almost every Italian region. Throughout the training program, the trainers were supervised by two tutors who assessed their learning-teaching performance and provided a final certificate. The program allowed the trainers and the other participants to reach a standard level of knowledge on the issue, regardless of their initial knowledge. Moreover, it helped to build and share a common language and attitude on the protection

  15. Breastfeeding protection, promotion, and support in the United States: a time to nudge, a time to measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Chapman, Donna J

    2012-05-01

    Strong evidence-based advocacy efforts have now translated into high level political support and concrete goals for improving breastfeeding outcomes among women in the United States. In spite of this, major challenge remain for promoting, supporting and especially for protecting breastfeeding in the country. The goals of this commentary are to argue in favor of: A) Changes in the default social and environmental systems, that would allow women to implement their right to breastfeed their infants, B) A multi-level and comprehensive monitoring system to measure process and outcomes indicators in the country. Evidence-based commentary. Breastfeeding rates in the United States can improve based on a well coordinated social marketing framework. This approach calls for innovative promotion through mass media, appropriate facility based and community based support (e.g., Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, WIC-coordinated community based peer counseling), and adequate protection for working women (e.g., longer paid maternity leave, breastfeeding or breast milk extraction breaks during the working day) and women at large by adhering and enforcing the WHO ethics Code for the Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes. Sound infant feeding practices monitoring systems, which include WIC administrative food package data, are needed. Given the current high level of political support to improve breastfeeding in the United States, a window of opportunity has been opened. Establishing breastfeeding as the social norm in the USA will take time, but the global experience indicates that it can be done.

  16. Employer-Based Programs to Support Breastfeeding Among Working Mothers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinour, Lauren M; Szaro, Jacalyn M

    2017-04-01

    Many mothers experience barriers to maintaining a breastfeeding relationship with their infants upon returning to work and, consequently, terminate breastfeeding earlier than recommended or intended. As such, employers are in a unique position to help further increase breastfeeding rates, durations, and exclusivity. The purpose of this review is to examine the literature regarding employer-based programs, policies, and interventions to support breastfeeding among working mothers. A systematic literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published before April 2016. Studies were included if they focused on workplace-based lactation/breastfeeding support programs, policies, or interventions to promote breastfeeding among employees. For inclusion, articles must have measured at least one outcome, such as breastfeeding duration, breastfeeding exclusivity, or employee satisfaction. Twenty-two articles were included, representing 10 different countries and both public- and private-sector employers, including governmental offices, schools, hospitals, manufacturing/industrial companies, and financial settings, among others. Providing a lactation space was the most common employer-based support accommodation studied, followed by breastfeeding breaks and comprehensive lactation support programs. The majority of studies analyzing these three support types found at least one positive breastfeeding and/or nonbreastfeeding outcome. This review suggests that maintaining breastfeeding while working is not only possible but also more likely when employers provide the supports that women need to do so. Although some employers may have more extensive breastfeeding support policies and practices than others, all employers can implement a breastfeeding support program that fits their company's budget and resources.

  17. A Multilevel Approach to Breastfeeding Promotion: Using Healthy Start to Deliver Individual Support and Drive Collective Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leruth, Chelsey; Goodman, Jacqueline; Bragg, Brian; Gray, Dara

    2017-12-01

    Purpose Breastfeeding has been linked to a host of positive health effects for women and children. However, disparities in breastfeeding initiation and duration prevent many low-income and African-American women from realizing these benefits. Existing breastfeeding promotion efforts often do not reach women who need support the most. In response, the Westside Healthy Start program (WHS), located in Chicago, Illinois, developed an ongoing multilevel approach to breastfeeding promotion. Description Key elements of our WHS breastfeeding model include individual education and counseling from pregnancy to 6 months postpartum and partnership with a local safety-net hospital to implement the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and provide lactation support to delivering patients. Assessment In the year our model was implemented, 44.6% (49/110) of prenatal WHS participants reported that they planned to breastfeed, and 67.0% (183/273) of delivered participants initiated. Among participants reaching 6 months postpartum, 10.5% (9/86) were breastfeeding. WHS also had 2667 encounters with women delivering at our partner hospital during breastfeeding rounds, with 65.1% of contacts initiating. Community data was not available to assess the efficacy of our model at the local level. However, WHS participants fared better than all delivering patients at our partner hospital, where 65.0% initiated in 2015. Conclusion Healthy Start programs are a promising vehicle to improve breastfeeding initiation at the individual and community level. Additional evaluation is necessary to understand barriers to duration and services needed for this population.

  18. Determinants of breastfeeding pattern among nursing mothers in Anambra State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukegbu, A U; Ebenebe, E U; Ukegbu, P O; Onyeonoro, U U

    2011-09-01

    The practice of optimal breastfeeding including exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life is still rare among nursing mothers despite numerous benefits of breastfeeding. This study was aimed at identifying the factors influencing breastfeeding pattern among nursing mothers in Anambra State, Nigeria. A cross sectional study was carried out in three comprehensive health centres of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH) located at Neni, Ukpo and Nnewi communities of Anambra State. A semi structured questionnaire was interviewer administered on 228 nursing mothers consecutively selected by a systematic random sampling method as they visited the maternal and child welfare clinics. In addition, four sessions of focus group discussions (one in each centre) involving 8-10 nursing mothers were held. Most mothers 190 (83.3%) were aged between 20 and 34 years. About 152 (66.6%) had attended or completed secondary education and were mainly traders 86 (37.7%) and full time house wives 66 (29.0%). Majority 208 (91.2%) had at least good knowledge of breastfeeding. Their main source of breastfeeding education was government health facilities (80.85%). Only 85 (37.3%) breastfed exclusively. Exclusively breastfeeding was significantly associated with maternal older age, parity, delivery at government facility, positive family attitude towards exclusive breastfeeding and breastfeeding education from government health facility (p < 0.05). Focus group discussion showed that mothers believed that adequate nutrition, physical, financial and emotional support to them would increase exclusive breastfeeding practice. Exclusive breastfeeding rate was low among the mothers and the factors identified to influence its practice have important implications to breastfeeding intervention programmes. Activities to promote exclusive breastfeeding should be focused on the group of women and location in which it was poorly practiced. In addition, support to the mothers would

  19. The role of early life growth development, the FTO gene and exclusive breastfeeding on child BMI trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan Yan; Lye, Stephen; Briollais, Laurent

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have implicated the FTO gene in child and adult obesity. A longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding (EXBF) has been shown to reduce body mass index (BMI) and the risk of being overweight in the general population and among FTO gene carriers. However, it remains unclear whether the preventive effect of EXBF could be explained by its impact on early life growth development, e.g. ages at adiposity peak (AP) and adiposity rebound (AR) and BMI velocities in the first years of life, which are major determinants of overweight and obesity later in life. We studied 5590 children from the British Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort and modelled their longitudinal BMI profiles with mixed effects models from birth to 16 years of age, as well as their ages at AP, AR and BMI velocities in relation to the FTO gene variant and EXBF. A longer duration of EXBF (i.e. at least 5 months) has substantial impact on BMI growth trajectories among children carrying the FTO adverse variant by modulating the age at AP, age at AR and BMI velocities. EXBF acts antagonistically to the FTO rs9939609 risk allele and by the age of 15, the predicted reduction in BMI after 5 months of EXBF is 0.56 kg/m2 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11-1.01; P = 0.003] and 1.14 kg/m2 (95% CI 0.67-1.62; P < 0.0001) in boys and girls, respectively. EXBF influences early life growth development and thus plays a critical role in preventing the risks of overweight and obesity even when those are exacerbated by genetic factors. © The Author 2017; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  20. Why are breastfeeding rates low in Lebanon? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabulsi, Mona

    2011-08-30

    Breastfeeding is a cost-effective public health intervention that reduces infant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In Lebanon, breastfeeding exclusivity and continuation rates are disappointingly low. This qualitative study aims at identifying barriers and promoters of breastfeeding in the Lebanese context by exploring mothers' perceptions and experiences in breastfeeding over a one year period. We conducted focus group discussions in three hospitals in Beirut, Lebanon, and followed up 36 breastfeeding mothers with serial in-depth interviews for one year post-partum or until breastfeeding discontinuation. Themes generated from baseline interviews revealed several positive and negative perceptions of breastfeeding. Longitudinal follow up identified insufficient milk, fear of weight gain or breast sagging, pain, sleep deprivation, exhaustion, or maternal employment, as reasons for early breastfeeding discontinuation. Women who continued breastfeeding for one year were more determined to succeed and overcome any barrier, relying mostly on family support and proper time management. Increasing awareness of future mothers about breast feeding difficulties, its benefits to children, mothers, and society at large may further promote breastfeeding, and improve exclusivity and continuation rates in Lebanon. A national strategy for early intervention during school years to increase young women's awareness may improve their self-confidence and determination to succeed in breastfeeding later. Moreover, prolonging maternity leave, having day-care facilities at work, creation of lactation peer support groups and hotlines, and training of doctors and nurses in proper lactation support may positively impact breastfeeding exclusivity and continuation rates. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of proposed interventions in the Lebanese context.

  1. Why are breastfeeding rates low in Lebanon? a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabulsi Mona

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breastfeeding is a cost-effective public health intervention that reduces infant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In Lebanon, breastfeeding exclusivity and continuation rates are disappointingly low. This qualitative study aims at identifying barriers and promoters of breastfeeding in the Lebanese context by exploring mothers' perceptions and experiences in breastfeeding over a one year period. Methods We conducted focus group discussions in three hospitals in Beirut, Lebanon, and followed up 36 breastfeeding mothers with serial in-depth interviews for one year post-partum or until breastfeeding discontinuation. Results Themes generated from baseline interviews revealed several positive and negative perceptions of breastfeeding. Longitudinal follow up identified insufficient milk, fear of weight gain or breast sagging, pain, sleep deprivation, exhaustion, or maternal employment, as reasons for early breastfeeding discontinuation. Women who continued breastfeeding for one year were more determined to succeed and overcome any barrier, relying mostly on family support and proper time management. Conclusions Increasing awareness of future mothers about breast feeding difficulties, its benefits to children, mothers, and society at large may further promote breastfeeding, and improve exclusivity and continuation rates in Lebanon. A national strategy for early intervention during school years to increase young women's awareness may improve their self-confidence and determination to succeed in breastfeeding later. Moreover, prolonging maternity leave, having day-care facilities at work, creation of lactation peer support groups and hotlines, and training of doctors and nurses in proper lactation support may positively impact breastfeeding exclusivity and continuation rates. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of proposed interventions in the Lebanese context.

  2. Exclusive breastfeeding, diarrhoeal morbidity and all-cause mortality in infants of HIV-infected and HIV uninfected mothers: an intervention cohort study in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel C Rollins

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Antiretroviral drug interventions significantly reduce the risk of HIV transmission to infants through breastfeeding. We report diarrhoea prevalence and all-cause mortality at 12 months of age according to infant feeding practices, among infants born to HIV-infected and uninfected mothers in South Africa. METHODS: A non-randomised intervention cohort study that followed both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers and their infants until 18 months of age. Mothers were supported in their infant feeding choice. Detailed morbidity and vital status data were collected over the first year. At the time, only single dose nevirapine was available to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. RESULTS: Among 2,589 infants, detailed feeding data and vital status were available for 1,082 HIV-exposed infants and 1,155 HIV non-exposed infants. Among exclusively breastfed (EBF infants there were 9.4 diarrhoeal days per 1,000 child days (95%CI. 9.12-9.82 while among infants who were never breastfed there were 15.6 diarrhoeal days per 1,000 child days (95%CI. 14.62-16.59. Exclusive breastfeeding was associated with fewer acute, persistent and total diarrhoeal events than mixed or no breastfeeding in both HIV-exposed infants and also infants of HIV uninfected mothers. In an adjusted cox regression analysis, the risk of death among all infants by 12 months of age was significantly greater in those who were never breastfed (aHR 3.5, p<0.001 or mixed fed (aHR 2.65, p<0.001 compared with those who were EBF. In separate multivariable analyses, infants who were EBF for shorter durations had an increased risk of death compared to those EBF for 5-6 months [aHR 2.18 (95% CI, 1.56-3.01; p<0.001]. DISCUSSION: In the context of antiretroviral drugs being scaled-up to eliminate new HIV infections among children, there is strong justification for financial and human resource investment to promote and support exclusive breastfeeding to improve HIV-free survival

  3. The application of autogenic training in counseling center for mother and child in order to promote breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidas, Mercedes; Folnegović-Smalc, Vera; Catipović, Marija; Kisić, Marko

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether mothers with newborn children, the usage of autogenic training with advice on breastfeeding effect on: the decision and the duration of breastfeeding, increase maternal confidence and support. It was assumed that the above result in a higher percentage of mothers who exclusively breastfed baby during the first six months of child's life. The survey was conducted in the Association "For a healthy and happy childhood"-Counseling center for mother and child, in Bjelovar in 2010. The Counseling center was attended by 100 nursing mothers with children aged up to two months. They randomly went to the study or control group. Mothers of both groups were advised to successful breastfeeding. Study group has practiced autogenic training until the child's age of six months. In parallel, by using psychotherapeutic interview and specific questionnaires we collected data on the somatic, psychological and social situation of the mother, discovered mother's mental changes (anxiety, depression) that were treated. The results at the end of the study confirm the initial expected benefits from the application of autogenic training. Mothers of the study group were significantly more emotionally balanced with a higher self-esteem. Autogenous training with the advices for successful breastfeeding conducted in this counseling center contributed in significantly higher rate of breastfeeding children up to six months of life, improved mental and physical health of mother and child and their peculiar relationship.

  4. Breastfeeding pattern and nutritional status of children under two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-26

    Apr 26, 2016 ... sis of Child Survival Strategies, exclusive breastfeeding. (EBF) in the first 6 months .... study were aware about Exclusive Breastfeeding (EBF). About 70% of mothers ..... benefits of breastfeeding: A sum- mary of the evidence.

  5. Exclusive breastfeeding practices in relation to social and health determinants: a comparison of the 2006 and 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Vishnu; Sauer, Kay; Zhao, Yun

    2013-10-14

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) for the first six months can have a significant impact on reducing child morbidity and mortality rates. The objective of this study was to compare the determinants of and trends in EBF in infants ≤ 5 months from the 2006 and 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Surveys. Data on mother/infant pairs having infants of ≤ 5 months from 2006 (n = 482) and 2011 (n = 227) were analysed. The EBF rate, determinants of EBF, and changes in EBF rates between the 2006 and 2011 surveys were examined using Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression. The EBF rate for ≤ 5 months in 2006 was 53.2% (95% CI, 47.1%-59.3%) and 66.3% (95% CI, 56.6%-74.8%) in 2011. In 2006, infants ≤ 4 months were more likely to be EBF [(aOR) 3.086, 95% CI (1.825-5.206)] after controlling for other factors. A geographic effect was also found in this study, with the odds of EBF higher for infants from the Hills [aOR 3.426, 95% CI (1.568-7.474)] compared to those form the mountains. The odds of EBF were also higher for higher order infants [aOR 1.968, 95% CI (1.020-3.799)]. Infants whose fathers belonged to non-agricultural occupation were less likely to be provided with EBF. Infants who were delivered in the home were more likely to experience EBF [aOR 1.886; 95% CI (1.044-3.407)]. In 2011, infants of age ≤ 4 months were more likely [aOR 4.963, 95% CI (2.317-10.629)] to have been breastfed exclusively. While there was an increase in the EBF rate between 2006 and 2011 surveys, the significant increase was noticed only among the infants of four months [32.0%; 95% CI (19.9%-47.0%)] in 2006 to [65.5%; 95% CI (48.1-79.6)] in 2011. The proportion of infants who were EBF was higher in Nepal in 2011survey compared to 2006 survey; however, this is still below the recommended WHO target of 90%. Infant's age, ecological region, parity and father's occupation were associated with EBF. Further interventions such as peer counselling, antenatal counselling and involving fathers

  6. Investigation of the Effect of Training on Promoting Breast-feeding at Baby-Friendly Hospital Case Study; Tohid Hospital in Jam, Bushehr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Nickkhaha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative was launched in 1989 by World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund for the promotion of breastfeeding. This program was implemented in many departments of gynecology and obstetrics and resulted in reduced malnutrition, infection, morbidity and mortality in children. This program has introduced 10 specific steps to support successful breastfeeding. For instance, in the fourth step, skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding are promoted since the time of birth, and in the fifth step, mothers are instructed on how to breastfeed or persist in breastfeeding. In these ten steps, mothers are trained in various fields. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a standardized questionnaire was used to collect data at baby-friendly hospitals. To assess the difference between multiple nominal variables, variance analysis was performed, using SPSS version 17. Results: Based on the analysis, mothers' awareness of the benefits of breast milk and breastfeeding was 83% in a baby-friendly hospital. Also, their awareness of proper breastfeeding was estimated at 78.5%. In addition, mothers' knowledge about the frequency of breastfeeding was 70%. Conclusion: Given the role of Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative in training mothers on the importance of breastfeeding and its persistence in future, careful monitoring of these hospitals, breastfeeding support services and breastfeeding training by midwives at healthcare centers are of great importance.

  7. Investing in breastfeeding - the world breastfeeding costing initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holla-Bhar, Radha; Iellamo, Alessandro; Gupta, Arun; Smith, Julie P; Dadhich, Jai Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Despite scientific evidence substantiating the importance of breastfeeding in child survival and development and its economic benefits, assessments show gaps in many countries' implementation of the 2003 WHO and UNICEF Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding (Global Strategy). Optimal breastfeeding is a particular example: initiation of breastfeeding within the first hour of birth, exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months; and continued breastfeeding for two years or more, together with safe, adequate, appropriate, responsive complementary feeding starting in the sixth month. While the understanding of "optimal" may vary among countries, there is a need for governments to facilitate an enabling environment for women to achieve optimal breastfeeding. Lack of financial resources for key programs is a major impediment, making economic perspectives important for implementation. Globally, while achieving optimal breastfeeding could prevent more than 800,000 under five deaths annually, in 2013, US$58 billion was spent on commercial baby food including milk formula. Support for improved breastfeeding is inadequately prioritized by policy and practice internationally. The World Breastfeeding Costing Initiative (WBCi) launched in 2013, attempts to determine the financial investment that is necessary to implement the Global Strategy, and to introduce a tool to estimate the costs for individual countries. The article presents detailed cost estimates for implementing the Global Strategy, and outlines the WBCi Financial Planning Tool. Estimates use demographic data from UNICEF's State of the World's Children 2013. The WBCi takes a programmatic approach to scaling up interventions, including policy and planning, health and nutrition care systems, community services and mother support, media promotion, maternity protection, WHO International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes implementation, monitoring and research, for optimal breastfeeding practices

  8. Maternal Infectious Diseases, Antimicrobial Therapy or Immunizations: Very few Contraindications to Breastfeeding

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The Canadian Paediatric Society recommends exclusive breastfeeding as the optimal method of infant feeding for the first six months of life for healthy, term infants (1). There are many benefits associated with breastfeeding, including nutritional, immunological, psychological, developmental, environmental, social, economic and health (eg, decrease in infectious diseases) (2-4). To promote, protect and support breastfeeding, every effort must be made to minimize contraindications to breastfee...

  9. Effective promotion of breastfeeding among Latin American women newly immigrated to the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman-Vitale, S; Murillo, E K

    1999-07-01

    Across the United States, advance practice nurses (APNs) are increasingly encountering recently immigrated Latin American populations. This article provides an overview of the situation of Latin Americans in the United States and discusses aspects of Latin American culture such as, respeto (respect), confianza (confidence), the importance of family, and the value of a personal connection. Strategies that will assist practitioners to incorporate culturally holistic principles in the promotion of breastfeeding among Latin American women who are new arrivals in the United States are described. If practitioners are to respond to the increasing numbers of Latin American women who need health care services, and also provide thorough, holistic health care then health care activities must be integrated with cultural competence.

  10. [Prevalence of factors associated with the duration of exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life in the INMA birth cohort in Gipuzkoa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oribe, Madalen; Lertxundi, Aitana; Basterrechea, Mikel; Begiristain, Haizea; Santa Marina, Loreto; Villar, María; Dorronsoro, Miren; Amiano, Pilar; Ibarluzea, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (EB) during the first 6 months of life in the Gipuzkoa birth cohort, identify the reasons for abandonment of EB, and establish the associated factors. The study population consisted of 638 pregnant women from the INMA-Gipuzkoa (Infancia y Medio Ambiente, www.proyectoinma.org) birth cohort, who were followed up from the third trimester of pregnancy until the child was aged 14 months. To determine the factors related to abandonment of EB, logistic regression models were used in two different stages (4 months or early stage and 6 months or late stage). The prevalence of EB within the Gipuzkoa cohort was 84.8% after hospital discharge, 53.7% at 4 months of life and 15.4% at 6 months of life. The reasons given by the mothers for early EB cessation were: breastfeeding problems, low weight gain and hypogalactia. Other factors influencing the early phase were the intention to provide EB, parity, area of residence and social class. Abandonment in the late stage was influenced by the length of maternity leave. From a public health perspective, the results of this study could help health professionals to develop strategies to support breastfeeding mothers, taking into account the main reasons for early and late abandonment. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. The Associations of Maternal Weight Change with Breastfeeding, Diet and Physical Activity During the Postpartum Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Olmedo, Nancy; Hernández-Cordero, Sonia; Neufeld, Lynnette M; García-Guerra, Armando; Mejía-Rodríguez, Fabiola; Méndez Gómez-Humarán, Ignacio

    2016-02-01

    To determine the association between breastfeeding practices, diet and physical activity and maternal postpartum weight. This was a secondary data analysis of a randomized community trial on beneficiaries of the Programa de Desarrollo Humano Oportunidades, recently renamed Prospera (n = 314 pregnant women), without any diseases that could affect body weight. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the association between postpartum weight change and changes in diet, physical activity and type of breastfeeding. The mean postpartum weight change from the first to the third month was 0.6 ± 2.2 kg. Women who breastfed exclusively for 3 months had a 4.1 (SE = 1.9) kg weight reduction in comparison with women who did not provide exclusive breastfeeding or who discontinued breastfeeding before 3 months (p = 0.04). There was no association between postpartum weight change and physical activity (p = 0.24) or energy intake (p = 0.06). Exclusive breastfeeding was associated with maternal postpartum weight reduction. These results reinforce the World Health Organization recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life in order to reduce the risk of weight retention or weight gain in postpartum women. It has been well established that exclusive breastfeeding is beneficial for both infants and mothers, but promoting breastfeeding as a strategy to promote postpartum weight loss is of paramount importance, especially in countries like Mexico where excessive weight in women of reproductive age is a public health problem.

  12. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Breastfeeding Among Working Mothers in South Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamimi, Eyad; Al Nsour, Reem; Al Dalaen, Duaa; Almajali, Neyaf

    2017-05-01

    Breast milk is the ideal food for human infants, with benefits to mothers and babies. However, working mothers are more likely to choose not to breastfeed or to interrupt breastfeeding prematurely. This study assessed breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes among working mothers in South Jordan. Four hundred cross-sectional, self-administered Arabic surveys were distributed to working mothers at their workplaces. In addition to measuring mothers' knowledge of and attitudes toward breastfeeding, barriers that prevented continuing breastfeeding beyond 6 months were also explored. Three hundred forty-four (80%) completed questionnaires were returned. The breastfeeding initiation rate was 72.4%, but only 20.9% were exclusively breastfeeding by 6 months. The participants showed satisfactory knowledge about breastfeeding and had positive attitudes toward breastfeeding. Most of the women who initiated breastfeeding reported ending breastfeeding prematurely. Approximately 30% of the mothers attributed premature cessation of breastfeeding to work. The results of this study could be useful for health care providers and policy makers when planning effective breastfeeding promotion programs and creating breastfeeding-friendly workplaces.

  13. Increased need to promote and support breastfeeding in the face of vertical transmission of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Promotion of breast-feeding among HIV-positive mothers must still be encouraged since the health and chances of survival of infants will be greatly improved by it. At the same time, attention has been focused on the regulation of breast milk substitutes (for HIV-positive mothers who choose not to breast-feed) by the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes. The Code aims to regulate the distribution of free and subsidized supplies of breast milk substitutes and to protect artificially fed children by ensuring that product labels contain necessary warnings and instructions for safe preparation and use and that choice is based on medical advice. In addition, the Code also aims to control promotional activities that would persuade mothers to utilize them, while it does not prevent the distribution of government-financed breast milk substitutes to HIV-positive mothers. Furthermore, the Code prevents the donation and provision of reduced-price breast milk substitutes to any health care system. Instead, donations must be given to orphanages or other social welfare institutions. This article lists practical considerations in the promotion of breast milk substitutes, which include 1) availability and accessibility of supplies, while maintaining confidentiality; 2) reliability of supplies in the short term; and 3) sustainability of supplies in the long term.

  14. Breastfeeding Duration: A Survival Analysis—Data from a Regional Immunization Survey

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    E. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To report the duration of and factors associated with exclusive and any breastfeeding among the French-speaking community of Belgium (Wallonia. Material and Methods. A two-stage cluster sample was drawn from the population of children aged 18–24 months living in the area in 2012. Anamnestic data on breastfeeding and sociodemographic information were collected from 525 mothers. Cox’s proportional hazards model was used to identify factors associated with discontinuing breastfeeding. Results and Discussion. Only 35.1% of the women were satisfied with their duration of any breastfeeding. At 3 months, 54.1% of the infants were breastfed, of which 40.6% exclusively, with these percentages falling to 29.1% and 12.6% at 6 months. Exclusive and any breastfeeding durations were independently positively associated (P3 months. Exclusive BF duration was associated with higher parental income and the prenatal decision to breastfeed. The duration of any breastfeeding was associated with the mothers’ age of ≥30 years and whether they were exclusively breastfeeding at discharge from the maternity unit. Conclusions. Programs promoting and supporting BF should concentrate on training prenatal health-care professionals. Prenatal professional advice may promote adherence to WHO BF guidelines. The benefits of exclusive BF should be emphasized. Pregnant women should be discouraged from introducing supplementary feeding in the maternity ward.

  15. Factores socioculturales y psicológicos vinculados a la lactancia materna exclusiva Sociocultural and psychological factors linked to exclusive breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regla Caridad Broche Candó

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la lactancia materna ha sido la forma de alimentación más segura para el ser humano en toda su historia. Esta leche es la única que asegura al niño pequeño una alimentación adecuada y le protege de las infecciones. Objetivo: determinar el comportamiento de los principales factores socioculturales y psicológicos vinculados a la práctica y abandono de la lactancia materna exclusiva y su repercusión en el estado de salud de los lactantes. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal, en el municipio Diego Ibarra, Estado de Carabobo, en el año 2008. La muestra estuvo conformada por 96 lactantes cuyas madres dieron su consentimiento informado para participar en este. Resultados: se observó un predominio de las madres adolescentes asociado al abandono de la lactancia materna antes de los 4 meses, la secundaria fue el nivel escolar más frecuente en la serie, sin embargo, el predominio de la categoría de obrera o técnica se asoció a una lactancia menor de 4 meses. Conclusiones: al nacimiento predominó la lactancia materna mixta, con una tendencia progresiva al uso de la lactancia artificial a partir del cuarto mes. Se encontró mayor frecuencia de madres con conocimientos deficientes sobre la lactancia materna, y fueron estas las que lactaron a sus bebés por menor tiempo. Más de las tres cuartas partes de las mujeres refirieron como causa de abandono de la lactancia materna exclusiva, que el niño se quedaba con hambre y la insuficiente disponibilidad de leche en las mamas.Introduction: the breastfeeding has been the more safe feeding way for human being in all its history. This type of milk is the only assuring the infant a proper feeding while protecting him of infections. Objective: to determine the behavior of main sociocultural and psychological factors linked to practice and giving up of the exclusive breastfeeding and its repercussion on infant health status. Methods: a cross-sectional and

  16. Promoting Sustained Breastfeeding of Infants at Risk for Asthma: Explaining the “Active Ingredients” of an Effective Program Using Intervention Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Ilse Mesters; Barbara Gijsbers; L. Kay Bartholomew

    2018-01-01

    Infants whose parents and/or siblings have a history of asthma or allergy may profit from receiving exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life. This is expected to diminish the chance of developing childhood asthma and/or atopic disease. Ongoing breastfeeding for 6 months seems challenging for many women. An educational program was developed using Intervention Mapping as a logic model to guide development and was found successful in improving breastfeeding rates at 6 months pos...

  17. Maternal Infectious Diseases, Antimicrobial Therapy or Immunizations: Very few Contraindications to Breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noni E Macdonald

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Paediatric Society recommends exclusive breastfeeding as the optimal method of infant feeding for the first six months of life for healthy, term infants (1. There are many benefits associated with breastfeeding, including nutritional, immunological, psychological, developmental, environmental, social, economic and health (eg, decrease in infectious diseases (2-4. To promote, protect and support breastfeeding, every effort must be made to minimize contraindications to breastfeeding, particularly unnecessary ones. The present article summarizes the maternal infectious diseases in which continuing breastfeeding is recommended, the very few infectious diseases in which it is not recommended, the rare instances in which maternal antimicrobial therapy indicates a caution for breastfeeding, and the continuation of breastfeeding when a mother or her infant is receiving a routine recommended immunization.

  18. Breastfeeding and weaning practices among Hong Kong mothers: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Marie; Fong, Daniel Y T; Wu, Kendra M; Lee, Irene L Y; Wong, Emmy M Y; Sham, Alice; Lam, Christine; Dodgson, Joan E

    2010-05-29

    Breastfeeding provides optimal and complete nutrition for newborn babies. Although new mothers in Hong Kong are increasingly choosing to breastfeed their babies, rates of exclusive breastfeeding are low and duration remains short. The purpose of this study was to describe the breastfeeding and weaning practices of Hong Kong mothers over the infant's first year of life to determine the factors associated with early cessation. A cohort of 1417 mother-infant pairs was recruited from the obstetric units of four public hospitals in Hong Kong in the immediate post-partum period and followed prospectively for 12 months or until weaned. We used descriptive statistics to describe breastfeeding and weaning practices and multiple logistic regression to investigate the relationship between maternal characteristics and breastfeeding cessation. At 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months only 63%, 37.3%, 26.9%, and 12.5% of the infants respectively, were still receiving any breast milk; approximately one-half of breastfeeding mothers were exclusively breastfeeding. Younger mothers, those with a longer duration of residence in Hong Kong, and those returning to work postpartum were more likely to wean before 1 month. Mothers with higher education, previous breastfeeding experience, who were breastfed themselves and those who were planning to exclusively breastfeed and whose husbands preferred breastfeeding were more likely to continue breastfeeding beyond 1 month. The introduction of infant formula before 1 month and returning to work postpartum were predictive of weaning before 3 months. Breastfeeding promotion programs have been successful in achieving high rates of breastfeeding initiation but the focus must now shift to helping new mothers exclusively breastfeed and sustain breastfeeding for longer.

  19. Breastfeeding in Iran: prevalence, duration and current recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strandvik Birgitta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need to promote breastfeeding is unquestionable for the health and development of infants. The aim of this study was to investigate prevalence, duration and promotion of breastfeeding status in Iran with respect to the Baby Friendly Hospital, government actions and activities by the Breastfeeding Promotion Society including comparison with European countries. Methods This retrospective study is based on data from 63,071 infants less than 24 months of age in all the 30 urban and rural provinces of Iran. The data of breastfeeding rates were collected in 2005–2006 by trained health workers in the Integrated Monitoring Evaluation System in the Family Health Office of the Ministry of Health to evaluate its subordinate offices. A translated version of a questionnaire, used to assess the current breastfeeding situation in Europe, was used. Results At a national level, 90% and 57% of infants were breastfed at one and two-years of age, respectively. Exclusive breastfeeding rates at 4 and 6 months of age at national level averaged 56.8% and 27.7%. Exclusive breastfeeding rates at 4 and 6 months of age in rural areas were 58% and 29%, and in urban areas 56% and 27%, respectively. The policy questionnaire showed that out of the 566 hospitals across the country 466 hospitals were accredited as Baby Friendly Hospitals, covering more than 80% of the births in 2006. A national board set standards and certified pre-service education at the Ministry of Health. Iran officially adopted the WHO International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes in 1991. The legislation for working mothers met the International Labour Organization standards that cover women with formal employment. The Ministry of Health and Breastfeeding Promotion Society were responsible for producing booklets, pamphlets, breastfeeding journal, CD, workshops and websites. Monitoring of breastfeeding rates was performed every four years and funded by the Ministry of

  20. Breastfeeding performance in Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridvand, Fatemeh; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh; Malakouti, Jamileh

    2018-04-20

    Studies have shown that breastfeeding has both short-term and long-term useful effects on mother's and newborn's health. This study was conducted with the aim of determining predictors of breastfeeding performance in women who were referred to health centres in Tabriz City, Iran, in 2014 to 2015. This cross-sectional study cluster-sampled 220 breastfeeding women with infants aged 4 to 6 months. The Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale, the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale, the personal resource questionnaire-85, and a researcher-developed knowledge questionnaire were used to collect data. Multivariate linear regression model was used to determine predictors of breastfeeding performance. The results showed that participants' breastfeeding performance mean (SD) value was 3.6 (1.2) of 6. There were significant relationships between breastfeeding performance and breastfeeding self-efficacy (P = .033) but not between social support, knowledge, attitudes, and breastfeeding performance (P > .05). Breastfeeding self-efficacy, occupation, family income sufficiency, and living with the family were identified as predictors of breastfeeding performance. Given the relationship between breastfeeding self-efficacy and breastfeeding performance, strengthening mothers' self-efficacy should be considered, especially when compiling programs to promote breastfeeding. Increasing breastfeeding self-efficacy in women improves their breastfeeding performance: In developing programs to promote breastfeeding culture, women's self-efficacy should be considered. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Infant feeding practices and maternal socio-demographic factors that influence practice of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers in Nnewi South-East Nigeria: a cross-sectional and analytical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onah, Stanley; Osuorah, Donatus Ignatius Chidiebere; Ebenebe, Joy; Ezechukwu, Clement; Ekwochi, Uchenna; Ndukwu, Ifeyinwa

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is an underlying factor in more than 50% of the major cause of infant mortality-Pneumonia, diarrhoeal disease and measles which account for 70% of infant mortality. Therefore, programs to promote adequate nutrition for age can help reduce mortality from these disease conditions and indispensible to achievement of MDG 4. To describe the feeding practices of infants below six months of age and determine maternal socio-demographic factors that influences the practice of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) among mothers in Nnewi, south-east Nigeria. Four hundred mother-infant pairs attending the infant welfare clinic of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University teaching hospital (NAUTH) during 2012 were consecutively recruited after meeting the study inclusion criteria. Data on breastfeeding were based on infant feeding practice in the previous 24 hours. Exclusive breastfeeding was defined as infant feeding with only breast milk. Awareness (95.3%) and knowledge (82.0%) of EBF was high among surveyed mother but the practice of EBF (33.5%) was very low. Positive attitude towards EBF practice was shown by many (71.0%) of surveyed mothers. EBF practice decreased with increasing infant age, OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.34, 1.51) for 1-2 months, OR 0.58 (95% CI 0.23, 1.44) for 3-4 months and OR 0.20 (95% CI 0.06, 0.73) for 5-6 months compared to infants < 1 month old. Maternal education, socioeconomic class, mode of delivery and infants first feed were retained as important maternal predictors of EBF practice after adjustment for confounders. Decreased likelihood of EBF practice was found among mothers of lower educational attainment, OR 0.33 (95% CI 0.13, 0.81), mothers who delivered through caesarean section, OR 0.38 (95% CI 0.18, 0.84), mothers of higher socio-economic status [(middle class, OR 0.46 (95% CI 0.22, 0.99) and upper class, OR 0.32 (95% CI 0.14, 0.74)] while increased likelihood of EBF practice was seen in mothers who gave their infants breast milk as their first feed

  2. Promoting Breastfeeding-Friendly Hospital Practices: A Washington State Learning Collaborative Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freney, Emily; Johnson, Donna; Knox, Isabella

    2016-05-01

    Hospital breastfeeding support practices can affect breastfeeding outcomes. Learning collaboratives are an increasingly common strategy to improve practices in health care and have been applied to breastfeeding in many cases. The aims of this study of the Evidence-Based Hospital Breastfeeding Support Learning Collaborative (EBBS LC) were to describe the perceptions of participants regarding the process and effectiveness of the EBBS LC, describe perceived barriers and facilitators to implementing the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, and identify additional actions and resources needed in future learning collaboratives. Qualitative, semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 13 key staff who represented 16 of the 18 participating hospitals. The learning collaborative was perceived positively by participants, meeting the expectations of 9 and exceeding the expectations of 4 persons interviewed. The most beneficial aspect of the program was its collaborative nature, and the most difficult aspect was the time required to participate as well as technological difficulties. The key barriers were staff time, staff changes, cost, and the difficulty of changing the existing practices of hospitals and communities. The key facilitating factors were supportive management, participation in multiple breastfeeding quality improvement projects, collecting data on breastfeeding outcomes, tangible resources regarding the Ten Steps, and positive community response. Participants in the EBBS LC stated that they would like to see the Washington State Department of Health create a resource-rich, centralized source of information for participants. This learning collaborative approach was valued by participants. Future efforts can be guided by these evaluation findings. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Selling a service: experiences of peer supporters while promoting exclusive infant feeding in three sites in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkonki Lungiswa L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though it has been shown that peer support to mothers at home helps to increase exclusive breastfeeding, little is known about the experiences of peer supporters themselves and what is required of them to fulfil their day-to-day tasks. Therefore, a community-based randomised control trial using trained "lay" women to support exclusive infant feeding at home was implemented in three different sites across South Africa. The aim of this paper is to describe the experiences of peer supporters who promote exclusive infant feeding. Methods Three focus group discussions were held, in a language of their choice, with peer supporters. These meetings focused on how the peer educators utilised their time in the process of delivering the intervention. Data from the discussions were transcribed, with both verbatim and translated transcripts being used in the analysis. Results Unlike the services provided by mainstream health care, peer supporters had to market their services. They had to negotiate entry into the mother's home and then her life. Furthermore, they had to demonstrate competence and come across as professional and trustworthy. An HIV-positive mother's fear of being stigmatised posed an added burden - subsequent disclosure of her positive status would lead to an increased workload and emotional distress. Peer supporters spent most of their time in the field and had to learn the skill of self-management. Their support-base was enhanced when supervision focused on their working conditions as well as the delivery of their tasks. Despite this, they faced other insurmountable issues, such as mothers being compelled to offer their infants mixed feeding simultaneously due to normative practices and working in the fields postpartum. Conclusion Designers of peer support interventions should consider the skills required for delivering health messages and the skills required for selling a service. Supportive supervision should be

  4. Selling a service: experiences of peer supporters while promoting exclusive infant feeding in three sites in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkonki, Lungiswa L; Daniels, Karen L

    2010-10-26

    Even though it has been shown that peer support to mothers at home helps to increase exclusive breastfeeding, little is known about the experiences of peer supporters themselves and what is required of them to fulfil their day-to-day tasks. Therefore, a community-based randomised control trial using trained "lay" women to support exclusive infant feeding at home was implemented in three different sites across South Africa. The aim of this paper is to describe the experiences of peer supporters who promote exclusive infant feeding. Three focus group discussions were held, in a language of their choice, with peer supporters. These meetings focused on how the peer educators utilised their time in the process of delivering the intervention. Data from the discussions were transcribed, with both verbatim and translated transcripts being used in the analysis. Unlike the services provided by mainstream health care, peer supporters had to market their services. They had to negotiate entry into the mother's home and then her life. Furthermore, they had to demonstrate competence and come across as professional and trustworthy. An HIV-positive mother's fear of being stigmatised posed an added burden - subsequent disclosure of her positive status would lead to an increased workload and emotional distress. Peer supporters spent most of their time in the field and had to learn the skill of self-management. Their support-base was enhanced when supervision focused on their working conditions as well as the delivery of their tasks. Despite this, they faced other insurmountable issues, such as mothers being compelled to offer their infants mixed feeding simultaneously due to normative practices and working in the fields postpartum. Designers of peer support interventions should consider the skills required for delivering health messages and the skills required for selling a service. Supportive supervision should be responsive both to the health care task and the challenges faced in

  5. Managing breastfeeding and work: a Foucauldian secondary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Deborah; Nicholls, David A

    2010-08-01

    This paper is a report of a secondary analysis of the experiences of employed breastfeeding mothers. Health promotion policies exhort mothers to feed their infants breastmilk exclusively for the first 6 months and partially until the age of 2 years. More mothers are returning to paid employment less than a year after having a baby. Combining breastfeeding and paid work is an issue for nursing and midwifery as predominantly female professions caring for women and their children. Foucauldian discourse analysis was used for a secondary analysis of interviews performed in 2005 with 20 women who continued to breastfeed on their return to work. The discursive positions and disciplinary practices were identified and analysed. Combining breastfeeding and paid work required negotiating the positions of good mother and good worker. Being a good mother conferred health benefits on infants. Being a good worker required the mothers to constrain their breastfeeding practices. The practices performed by the mothers involved stockpiling breastmilk, maintaining milk supply, preparing the baby ready for absence, making sacrifices and remaining silent and invisible as a breastfeeding worker. Breastfeeding workers have the potential to threaten the focus of the workplace. They discipline themselves to minimize their disruptive potential. Such strategies serve to maintain the marginalization of breastfeeding in the workplace and to keep women's efforts to continue breastfeeding invisible. The work of breastfeeding workers needs to be better recognized and supported.

  6. [Breastfeeding (part one): Frequency, benefits and drawbacks, optimal duration and factors influencing its initiation and prolongation. Clinical guidelines for practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantry, A A; Monier, I; Marcellin, L

    2015-12-01

    The objectives were to on assess the frequency and the duration of breastfeeding in France. On the other hand, the objectives were to identify its benefits and drawbacks, and to study the factors influencing its initiation and its extension. Bibliographic research in Medline, Google Scholar and in the Cochrane Library. Breastfeeding concerns in France about 70% of children at birth (EL2). Its median duration is about 15 weeks and 3 weeks ½ for exclusive breastfeeding. At three months, only one third of children breastfed at birth are still being breastfed (EL2). Whether this is due to the composition of breast milk or the behavior of mothers with their children or their socio-cultural level, or even by all these components at once, breastfeeding is associated with better cognitive development children (EL2). This effect is even more reinforced that mothers breastfeed exclusively and prolonged (EL2). As part of the prevention of many diseases (ear infections, gastrointestinal infections, atopic diseases, obesity and cardiovascular diseases…), exclusive and prolonged breastfeeding (grade B) between 4 to 6 months is recommended (professional consensus). Breastfeeding is not a means of preventing postpartum depression (professional consensus). To reduce the incidence of breast cancer, prolonged breastfeeding is recommended (grade B). In order to increase the rate of initiation of breastfeeding as well as its duration, it is recommended that health professionals work closely with mothers in their project (grade A), the breastfeeding promotion messages include message to husbands (grade B), and to promote breastfeeding on demand without fixed interval between feedings (grade B). However, there is not enough data to recommend the use of a specific position during breastfeeding, or the use of one or two breast or to early start breastfeeding or not (professional consensus). Exclusive and extended breastfeeding is recommended (grade B) between 4 to 6 months (professional

  7. Breastfeeding social marketing: lessons learned from USDA's "Loving Support" campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    Social marketing involves the application of commercial marketing principles to advance the public good. Social marketing calls for much more than health communications campaigns. It involves four interrelated tasks: audience benefit, target behavior, essence (brand, relevance, positioning), and developing the "4Ps" (product, price, place, promotion) marketing mix. The ongoing U.S. Department of Agriculture "Loving Support Makes Breastfeeding Work" campaign was launched in 1997 based on social marketing principles to increase breastfeeding initiation rates and breastfeeding duration among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) participants. Since then there have been improvements in breastfeeding duration in the country, and the majority of WIC women now initiate breastfeeding. Breastfeeding in public places is still not well accepted by society at large, and any and exclusive breastfeeding durations remain exceedingly low. Lessons learned from "Loving Support" and other campaigns indicate that it is important to design social marketing campaigns to target the influential societal forces (e.g., family and friends, healthcare providers, employers, formula industry, legislators) that affect women's decision and ability to breastfeed for the recommended amount of time. This will require formative research that applies the social-ecological model to different population segments, taking and identifying the right incentives to nudge more women to breastfeed for longer. Any new breastfeeding campaign needs to understand and take into account the information acquisition preferences of the target audiences. The vast majority of WIC women have mobile devices and are accessing social media. The Brazilian experience indicates that making breastfeeding the social norm can be done with a solid social marketing strategy. This is consistent with the recently released "Six Steps to Achieve Breastfeeding Goals for WIC Clinics," which identifies

  8. Developmental Readiness of Normal Full Term Infants To Progress from Exclusive Breastfeeding to the Introduction of Complementary Foods: Reviews of the Relevant Literature Concerning Infant Immunologic, Gastrointestinal, Oral Motor and Maternal Reproductive and Lactational Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Audrey J., Ed.; Morrow, Ardythe L., Ed.

    This review of the developmental readiness of normal, full-term infants to progress from exclusive breastfeeding to the introduction of complementary foods is the result of the international debate regarding the best age to introduce complementary foods into the diet of the breastfed human infant. After a list of definitions, four papers focus on:…

  9. Promoting Sustained Breastfeeding of Infants at Risk for Asthma: Explaining the “Active Ingredients” of an Effective Program Using Intervention Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Mesters

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Infants whose parents and/or siblings have a history of asthma or allergy may profit from receiving exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life. This is expected to diminish the chance of developing childhood asthma and/or atopic disease. Ongoing breastfeeding for 6 months seems challenging for many women. An educational program was developed using Intervention Mapping as a logic model to guide development and was found successful in improving breastfeeding rates at 6 months postpartum, improving knowledge and beliefs about breastfeeding for 6 months, after exposure to the program compared to controls. Intervention elements included an evidence- and theory-based booklet addressed during pre- and postnatal home visits by trained assistants. This paper elucidates the inner workings of the program by systematically describing and illustrating the steps for intervention development.

  10. Promoting Sustained Breastfeeding of Infants at Risk for Asthma: Explaining the “Active Ingredients” of an Effective Program Using Intervention Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesters, Ilse; Gijsbers, Barbara; Bartholomew, L. Kay

    2018-01-01

    Infants whose parents and/or siblings have a history of asthma or allergy may profit from receiving exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life. This is expected to diminish the chance of developing childhood asthma and/or atopic disease. Ongoing breastfeeding for 6 months seems challenging for many women. An educational program was developed using Intervention Mapping as a logic model to guide development and was found successful in improving breastfeeding rates at 6 months postpartum, improving knowledge and beliefs about breastfeeding for 6 months, after exposure to the program compared to controls. Intervention elements included an evidence- and theory-based booklet addressed during pre- and postnatal home visits by trained assistants. This paper elucidates the inner workings of the program by systematically describing and illustrating the steps for intervention development. PMID:29616209

  11. In practice, the theory is different: a processual analysis of breastfeeding in northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavenius, Michael; van Hulsel, Lonneke; Meijer, Julia; Wendte, Hans; Gurgel, Ricardo

    2007-02-01

    'Na prática, a teoria è outra' (in practice, the theory is different) is an old Brazilian saying. This phrase summarizes well the general practice of breastfeeding in Brazil: 'Breast is best' is central in the pregnant women's future oriented 'theory' of how their infant should be fed. In the subsequent weeks after delivery, however, in the daily practicalities of feeding their infant, this theory is, to a large extent, abandoned. The present study is based on a sample of 300 mothers in the city of Aracaju in the Northeast of Brazil. Through interviews, the differences and similarities between knowledge and practice with respect to infant feeding were established. An explanation of these differences is developed on the basis of a processual analysis of the qualitative and quantitative results of the interview data. Nearly all mothers were knowledgeable of the need to breastfeed, and nearly all mothers had initiated breastfeeding. However, only a minority was exclusively breastfeeding at the time of the interview. A distinction is made between a breastfeeding process and a de-breastfeeding process. The data suggest that mothers, in general, start the de-breastfeeding process with the positive intention of ameliorating the infant's situation without realizing the negative processual consequences that most likely ends in a cessation of breastfeeding. The study supports the view that health policy should underline the processual character of both breastfeeding and de-breastfeeding when promoting the importance of exclusive breastfeeding.

  12. Promoting and Supporting Breastfeeding Among Active Duty Women: An Education Module for Health Professionals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedline, Donna

    2004-01-01

    .... While it is well known that full-time employment decreases the incidence and duration of breastfeeding, active duty women may face additional obstacles such as potential deployment, body weight...

  13. Breastfeeding practices, beliefs, and social norms in low-resource communities in Mexico: Insights for how to improve future promotion strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swigart, Tessa M.; Bonvecchio, Anabelle; Théodore, Florence L.; Zamudio-Haas, Sophia; Villanueva-Borbolla, Maria Angeles; Thrasher, James F.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Breastfeeding is recommended exclusively for the first 6 months after birth, with continued breastfeeding for at least 2 years. Yet prevalence of these recommendations is low globally, although it is an effective and cost-effective way to prevent serious infections and chronic illness. Previous studies have reported that social support greatly influences breastfeeding, but there is little evidence on perceived social norms in Mexico and how they affect actual behavior. Objective Our objective was to investigate breastfeeding intention, practices, attitudes, and beliefs, particularly normative, among low-resource communities in central and southern Mexico. Methods We performed a secondary analysis using the theory of planned behavior with cross-sectional data, which included semi-structured individual interviews with fathers (n 10), 8 focus groups with mothers (n 50), and 8 focus groups with women community leaders (n 44) with a total of 104 participants. Our data also included a quantitative survey among pregnant women and mothers (n 321). Results Women reported supplementing breast milk with water and teas soon after birth, as well as introducing small bites of solid food a few months after birth. Social norms appeared to support breastfeeding, but not exclusive breastfeeding or breastfeeding for periods longer than about a year. This may be partially explained by: a) behavioral beliefs that for the first 6 months breast milk alone is insufficient for the baby, and that water in addition to breast milk is necessary to hydrate an infant and b) normative beliefs related to the appropriateness of breastfeeding in public and as the child gets older. Conclusions Future strategies should focus on positively influencing social norms to support recommended practices, and emphasize the specific reasons behind the recommendations. Future efforts should take a multi-pronged approach using a variety of influences, not only directed at healthcare providers but

  14. The Impact of the Professional Qualifications of the Prenatal Care Provider on Breastfeeding Duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenborn, Jordyn T; Lu, Juan; Perera, Robert A; Wheeler, David C; Masho, Saba W

    2018-03-01

    A prenatal commitment to breastfeed is a strong predictor for breastfeeding success. Prenatal care providers have the opportunity to educate and promote breastfeeding. However, differences in education and training between healthcare providers such as physicians and midwives may result in differing breastfeeding outcomes. This study explores whether breastfeeding initiation and duration differ by prenatal care provider. Longitudinal data from the Infant Feeding Practices Survey II were analyzed (N = 2,832 women). Prenatal care providers were categorized as obstetrician, family/other physician, and midwife/nurse-midwife. Breastfeeding initiation was dichotomized (yes; no). Breastfeeding duration and exclusive breastfeeding duration were reported in weeks. Logistic regression was used to investigate the relationship between prenatal care provider and breastfeeding initiation. Cox proportional hazard models provided crude and adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence limits to determine the relationship between type of prenatal care provider and breastfeeding duration. After adjusting for confounders, women who received care from a midwife were 68% less likely to never breastfed than women whose prenatal care was provided by an obstetrician. Women whose prenatal care was provided by a midwife had 14% lower risk of discontinuing breastfeeding and 23% lower risk of discontinuing exclusive breastfeeding. No significant association was found between women whose prenatal care was provided by a family physician or other type of physician and breastfeeding initiation and duration. Findings highlight the importance of prenatal care providers on breastfeeding duration. Future studies should examine factors (i.e., training, patient-provider interaction) that contribute to differences in breastfeeding outcomes by type of prenatal care provider.

  15. Where and how breastfeeding promotion initiatives should focus its attention? A study from rural Wardha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongre A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, the practice of breastfeeding is almost universal, but initiation of breastfeeding is generally quite late and colostrum is discarded. Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI strategy recommended systematic assessment of breastfeeding and emphasized counseling of the mother on proper positioning and attachment of infant to the breast. Objective: To assess breastfeeding among mothers of below six months children in rural Wardha. Materials and Methods: The present cross-sectional study was undertaken in surrounding 23 villages of Kasturba Rural Health Training Center (KRHTC, Anji. Two Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs trained in IMNCI paid house visits to 99 mothers during the study period and undertook the assessment of breastfeeding using IMNCI assessment form for young infants. Auxiliary Nurse Midwives observed and recorded the positioning and attachment of infant to the breast as per IMNCI guidelines. The data were entered and analyzed using Epi_Info (version 6.04d software package. Results: Most of the deliveries 94 (94.9% took place in the healthcare facilities. Majority 61 (61.6% newborn babies had received breastfeeding within half an hour. About half of the mothers had any of the feeding problems like feeding less than eight times in 24 h, giving any other food or drinks or is low weight for age. Significantly more mothers with feeding problems had problems in positioning and attachment of infant to the breast as compared with those mothers who did not have any feeding problems. Conclusions: In the settings, where practice of institutional delivery is high, the staff of healthcare facility should ensure education of the mothers regarding position and attachment of infant to the breast before discharge from the healthcare facility. At the village level, Village Health Nutrition Day (VHND can be utilized for health education of future mothers and support for the breastfeeding mothers. The IMNCI

  16. Efficacy of Chinese herbal medicine Zengru Gao to promote breastfeeding: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuaishuai; Zhang, Chi; Li, Cuishan; Li, Daocheng; He, Ping; Su, Zhaojuan; Li, Yanling; Ding, Yiling; Lu, Aiping

    2018-02-06

    Breastfeeding is recommended worldwide but not fully practiced. The first week after childbirth is regarded as a critical period for increasing breast milk production. The aim of the study was to investigate whether Chinese herbal medicine Zengru Gao would result in more women breastfeeding in the first week after childbirth. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted of 588 mothers considering breastfeeding in China. Among the mothers of the intervention group, the intervention included Chinese herbal medicine Zengru Gao; among those of the control group, it did not. Primary outcomes were the percentages of fully and partially breastfeeding mothers. Secondary outcome was baby's daily formula intake. At 3 d and 7 d after delivery, significant differences were found in favour of Zengru Gao group on the percentage of full/ partial breastfeeding (Z = - 3.0037, p = 0.0027). At day 7, the percentage of full/ partial breastfeeding of the active group increased to 71.48%/20.70% versus 58.67%/30.26% in the control group, the differences remained significant (Z = - 3.0037, p = 0.0027). No statistically significant differences were detected on primary measures at 1 d. While intake of formula differed between groups at 1 d and 3 d, this difference did not achieve statistical significance, but this difference was apparent by 7 d (55.45 ± 115.39 ml/day vs 90.66 ± 153.89 ml/day). In conclusion, Chinese Herbal medicine Zengru Gao enhanced breastfeeding success during one week postpartum. The approach is acceptable to participants and merits further evaluation. ChiCTR-IPR-15007376 , December 11, 2015.

  17. The bonding circle of breastfeeding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murch, Ken

    1991-01-01

    This is a promotional video made to encourage breastfeeding among Native people. Breastfeeding is presented as a positive experience which includes not only the mother and child, but also the whole family...

  18. Effectiveness of home-based nutritional counselling and support on exclusive breastfeeding in urban poor settings in Nairobi: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth W; Griffiths, Paula L; Wekesah, Frederick Murunga; Wanjohi, Milka; Muhia, Nelson; Muriuki, Peter; Egondi, Thaddaeus; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Ezeh, Alex C; McGarvey, Stephen T; Musoke, Rachel N; Norris, Shane A; Madise, Nyovani J

    2017-12-19

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) improves infant health and survival. We tested the effectiveness of a home-based intervention using Community Health Workers (CHWs) on EBF for six months in urban poor settings in Kenya. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial in Korogocho and Viwandani slums in Nairobi. We recruited pregnant women and followed them until the infant's first birthday. Fourteen community clusters were randomized to intervention or control arm. The intervention arm received home-based nutritional counselling during scheduled visits by CHWs trained to provide specific maternal infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN) messages and standard care. The control arm was visited by CHWs who were not trained in MIYCN and they provided standard care (which included aspects of ante-natal and post-natal care, family planning, water, sanitation and hygiene, delivery with skilled attendance, immunization and community nutrition). CHWs in both groups distributed similar information materials on MIYCN. Differences in EBF by intervention status were tested using chi square and logistic regression, employing intention-to-treat analysis. A total of 1110 mother-child pairs were involved, about half in each arm. At baseline, demographic and socioeconomic factors were similar between the two arms. The rates of EBF for 6 months increased from 2% pre-intervention to 55.2% (95% CI 50.4-59.9) in the intervention group and 54.6% (95% CI 50.0-59.1) in the control group. The adjusted odds of EBF (after adjusting for baseline characteristics) were slightly higher in the intervention arm compared to the control arm but not significantly different: for 0-2 months (OR 1.27, 95% CI 0.55 to 2.96; p = 0.550); 0-4 months (OR 1.15; 95% CI 0.54 to 2.42; p = 0.696), and 0-6 months (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.61 to 2.02; p = 0.718). EBF for six months significantly increased in both arms indicating potential effectiveness of using CHWs to provide home-based counselling to

  19. Pandangan Sosial Budaya terhadap ASI Eksklusif di Wilayah Panarung Palangkaraya (Social and Cultural Aspect toward Exclusive Breastfeeding in Panarung Palangkaraya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwirina Hervilia

    2016-07-01

    Socio-cultural factors is an adequately strong driving factor towards someone to behave. This socio-cultural factors shape a mother’s willingness to give breast feeding exclusively. A mother who supports her neighborhood to do exclusive breast feeding will also affect the attitude of the mother to give breast feeding exclusively. According to the monthly reports on the number of Puskesmas Panarung coverage exclusive breast feeding figures was 5,81%. The purpose of this research is to know the attitudes and socio-cultural factors of the mother toward  exclusive breast feeding The method used was a qualitative approach by exploring the sources of information through in-depth interviews to mothers and health workers in Puskesmas as informants as many as 28 people. Participatory observation was also performed to mothers and babies. The research results obtained by all informants argued that most good food given to infants is breast feeding. But in practice the mother feels that there are still many difficulties. Health workers had positif minds and assumed that the mother's willingness to provide exclusive breast feeding is a key to success. The informant believed the presence of food that can increase the production of breastmilk such as green vegetables including katuk leaves, cassava leaves, and beans. Prelacteal food was  given in the form of forest honey, coffee, thick coconut milk, brown sugar liquid, and infant formula. Prelacteal food was culturally trusted among generations for example, by giving the forest honey because of its sweetness, coffee drink due to its property to prevent from seizures, thick coconut milk to cleanse the stomach. Baby feeding administration conducted by informants were heavily influenced by parents. There is also midwife, neighbors, Posyandu’s role as well as the effort of individual information . It was then concluded from this study that social and cultural aspects are heavily influential in which mothers are very obedient

  20. The Terneuzen Birth Cohort. Longer exclusive breastfeeding duration is associated with leaner body mass and a healthier diet in young adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Buuren Stef

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breastfeeding (BF is protective against overweight and is associated with dietary behaviour. The aims of our study were to assess the relationship between exclusive BF duration and BMI, waist circumference (WC and waist-hip ratio (WHR at adulthood, and to study whether dietary behaviour could explain the relationship between BF duration and the proxies of fat mass. Methods In 2004-2005, 822 subjects from the Terneuzen Birth Cohort (n = 2,604, aged 18-28 years, filled in postal questionnaires including sociodemographic factors and aspects of dietary behaviour (dietary pattern, and consumption of fruit and vegetables, snacks, sweetened beverages and alcohol; 737 subjects also underwent anthropometric measurements of weight, height, and waist and hip circumference. The relationship between exclusive BF duration and dietary outcomes was investigated by logistic regression analysis. The relationships of BF duration with the anthropometric measures were investigated by linear regression analyses. All results were corrected for age, gender and possible confounders. Finally, regression analyses were performed to investigate if diet factors had a mediating effect on the relationship between BF duration and fat mass. Results A significant inverse dose-response relationship of BF duration was found for BMI (β-0.13, SE 0.06, WC (β-0.39, SE 0.18 and WHR (β-0.003, SE 0.001, after correction for age, gender and confounders. The odds ratio (OR of exclusive BF duration in months for a breakfast frequency of at least 5 times a week was 1.16 (95%CI 1.06-1.27, and for snack consumption of less than twice a week was 1.15 (95%CI 1.06-1.25. Both ORs were corrected for age, gender and confounders. For other dietary outcomes, the results point in the same direction, i.e. a positive relationship with BF duration, but these were not statistically significant. A mediating effect of the diet factors on the association between BF and anthropometric

  1. Factors influencing knowledge and practice of exclusive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors influencing knowledge and practice of exclusive breastfeeding in Nyando ... The overall objective of this study was to determine factors influencing the ... EBF and its benefits), pre lacteal feeds and exclusive breastfeeding consistency.

  2. Paid maternity leave and breastfeeding practice before and after California's implementation of the nation's first paid family leave program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Yang, Muzhe

    2015-01-01

    California was the first state in the United States to implement a paid family leave (PFL) program in 2004. We use data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study to examine the changes in breastfeeding practices in California relative to other states before and after the implementation of PFL. We find an increase of 3-5 percentage points for exclusive breastfeeding and an increase of 10-20 percentage points for breastfeeding at several important markers of early infancy. Our study supports the recommendation of the Surgeon General to establish paid leave policies as a strategy for promoting breastfeeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Maternal Perceptions and Views About Breastfeeding Practices Among Emirati Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Hadia; Sapsford, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Understanding women's breastfeeding perceptions and experiences is increasingly recognized as a vital tool to provide effective support that would encourage the extension of the breastfeeding period. To identify and explore the perceptions and views that influence the feeding and weaning decisions of Emirati mother. A qualitative study using indepth interviews was undertaken with a convenience sample of 45 Emirati mothers who had infants aged between 6 months and 2 years. Participants were interviewed in the health centers in 3 cities in United Arab Emirates. Data were recorded through field notes and analyzed thematically using grounded theory analysis. The following themes emerged: influences of others on the decisions to breastfeed, sources of information, infants' behavior and participants' views and decisions about when to introduce supplementary feeding, knowledge of and attitudes toward current World Health Organization recommendations, and mothers' perception of the benefits of breastfeeding. Grandmothers in this study played an important role in the breastfeeding practices of Emirati mothers. They supported breastfeeding, however, some encouraged giving the infants prelacteal feeds for a variety of reasons: colic, hunger, promoting growth, and hydration. Fathers, according to the mothers, either supported or ignored breastfeeding practices. Health promotions and health care facilities failed to deliver the message of exclusive breastfeeding. Mothers in our study were resorting to the expertise of the grandmothers and receiving information and advice about child feeding from them. The findings highlight the need for successful intervention programs to be implemented for mothers and grandmothers through health care providers. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Mental health predictors of breastfeeding initiation and continuation among HIV infected and uninfected women in a South African birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Eileen; Kuo, Caroline; Cohen, Sophie; Hoare, Jacqueline; Koen, Natassja; Barnett, Whitney; Zar, Heather J; Stein, Dan J

    2017-09-01

    Breastfeeding is a cost-effective, yet underutilized strategy to promote maternal and infant health in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Breastfeeding remains challenging for mothers living with HIV in LMICs, yet few studies have examined mental health predictors of breastfeeding initiation and continuation. We investigated breastfeeding among mothers by HIV status in South Africa, evaluating predictors of breastfeeding initiation and continuation to identify intervention-targets. Breastfeeding patterns were investigated in a subsample of 899 breastfeeding mothers from the Drakenstein Child Health Study; a prospective birth cohort of 1225 pregnant women, between March 2012 and March 2015 in a peri-urban area. Breastfeeding was assessed at 5 time-points between 6weeks and 24months' infant age. Cox proportional hazard models evaluated breastfeeding initiation and duration. Logistic regression models with breastfeeding non-initiation as the outcome parameter were performed to determine associations with maternal sociodemographic, psychosocial factors and gestational outcomes. More HIV-uninfected mothers initiated breastfeeding (n=685, 97%) than HIV-infected mothers (n=87, 45%). Median duration of exclusive breastfeeding was short (2months), but HIV-infected mothers engaged in exclusive breastfeeding for longer duration than uninfected mothers (3 vs 2months). Despite concerning high rates, mental disorders were not significant predictors of breastfeeding behaviour. Employment and HIV diagnosis during pregnancy predicted a lower likelihood of breastfeeding initiation among HIV-infected mothers, while employment was associated with earlier breastfeeding-discontinuation in HIV-uninfected mothers. Findings indicate that future interventions should target sub-populations such as HIV-infected women because of distinct needs. Workplace interventions appear particularly key for mothers in our study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Breastfeeding, Childhood Asthma, and Allergic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddy, Wendy H

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of childhood asthma has been increasing considerably, and the protection afforded by breastfeeding in its development has been the subject of controversy for more than 80 years. Previous systematic reviews have generally found a protective effect of breastfeeding on allergic outcomes, although many studies have methodological limitations. Although breastfeeding is protective against lower respiratory tract infection during infancy, such protection has not been demonstrated for asthma in all studies. Breastfeeding has health benefits for the mother and child. Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of an infant's life, with continued breastfeeding for up to 2 years or longer, is recognized as the "gold" standard for infant feeding because human milk is uniquely suited to the human infant, and its nutritional content and bioactivity promote a healthy development. There is increasing concern that the practice of delaying complementary foods until 6 months may exacerbate the risk of allergic disease. Breast milk contains immunological components that protect against infections and allergic disease in infancy. The composition of human breast milk is complex, containing factors that interact with the infant immune system and intestinal milieu including allergens, cytokines, immunoglobulins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and chemokines. Transforming growth factor β is a cytokine in human milk involved in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, inflammation regulation, and oral tolerance development. Modern day society, with increased standards of hygiene, has changed the gut flora of Western infants, potentially impacting the risk of developing immune-mediated diseases including allergic disease and asthma. Microbial diversity is intrinsic to healthy immune maturation and function. Compared to breastfed infants, formula-fed infants had lower bacterial diversity and an altered intestinal microbiota in the first few weeks of life associated with

  6. [Infant feeding practices and deterioration of breastfeeding in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de Cosío, Teresita; Escobar-Zaragoza, Leticia; González-Castell, Luz Dinorah; Rivera-Dommarco, Juan Ángel

    2013-01-01

    To present data on infant and young child feeding practices (IYCFP) in Mexico from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT 2012) to support the development of public policy. Women 12-49y and children <2y. Indicators of IYCFP suggested by WHO were analyzed by geographic, socioeconomic, participation in food programs and health insurance variables. Median duration of breast-feeding: 10.2mo and 14.4% with exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) <6m. Breastfeeding deteriorated in most vulnerable groups. Decline in EBF<6m 2006-2012 was explained by increases in consumption of formula and other milks (4%) and water (4%). Three-quarters (74%) of 6-11mo infants had minimum food diversity, and it was lower in the most vulnerable. Complementary feeding improved but breastfeeding declined in Mexico. Promotion actions must be integral, coordinated, financed and evaluated, with Federal government leadership and should include the participation of various stakeholders.

  7. Sub-optimal breastfeeding and its associated factors in rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Similarly, not attending formal education, low birth order and lack of knowledge about exclusive breastfeeding were also negatively associated with exclusive breastfeeding practice. Conclusion: In this study, sub-optimal breast feeding was found to be high. Delayed initiation and non-exclusive breastfeeding practices were ...

  8. Breastfeeding : Gender and Socio-Economic Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogi Pasca Pratama

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine breastfeeding behavior from a gender perspective and socio-economic dimension. The legal basis and internal and external factors of breastfeeding behavior are the main issues. Breastfeeding views are also studied in terms of working women, in response to the increasingly expensive economic needs of women to help the family economy by entering the labor market, while women also have an obligation to engage in breastfeeding activities. This study uses literature method, by collecting all the literature related to the breastfeeding process, the legal basis that supports, and the factors that can inhibit and the way to succeed exclusive breastfeeding issues. This study found the fact that there is a misconception of society about breastfeeding that the breastfeeding process is not optimal, the modernization also makes women who should breastfeed to make new choices instead of breastfeeding obligations for their children.   Keywords: breastfeeding, gender, socio-economic JEL Classification: I15, Z10

  9. The relationship between family structure and exclusive breastfeeding prevalence in Nicaragua La relación existente entre las prácticas de lactancia materna exclusiva y la estructura de la familia nicaragüense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Espinoza

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the relationship between family structure and the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF in Nicaragua. Material and Methods. A subset of the Nicaraguan Demographic and Health Survey conducted in 1998 was obtained by selecting all last-born infants less than 4 months old at the time of the survey. Weighted chi-squared and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association. Results. Interviewee women heads of household and interviewee women whose husbands were the heads of the household had a significantly lower prevalence of EBF. Exposure to the health care system was not related to EBF. Conclusions. New approaches are needed to promote that men support women's decisions to breastfeed. Health institutions should effectively communicate the benefits of breastfeeding on both the mother and the child.Objetivo. Examinar la relación existente entre la estructura de la familia y la prevalencia de la práctica de lactancia materna exclusiva (LME en Nicaragua. Material y métodos. Se tomó una submuestra de la Encuesta Nicaragüense de Demografía y Salud de 1998, seleccionando a todos los infantes últimos nacidos menores de cuatro meses al momento de la encuesta. Se procedió a hacer un análisis bivariado con la prueba estadística de ji cuadrada y multivariado a través de regresión logística. Resultados. Se encontró que la prevalencia de LME es más baja entre las mujeres jefas de hogar y entre las que vivían en hogares cuyo jefe era el esposo de la entrevistada. El contacto con los servicios de salud no se relacionó con la LME. Conclusiones. La promoción de las prácticas de alimentación infantil debería dirigirse también a los hombres, para que las mujeres que amamantan puedan ser apoyadas por sus parejas. Las instituciones de salud deben comunicar efectivamente a las mujeres los beneficios de la lactancia exclusiva al seno materno.

  10. Conduct of breastfeeding among young Tunisian Mothers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniaoui, Rim; Zediri, Manel; Mankai, Amani; Aouidet, Abdallah; Hamoudia, Faouzia

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Breastfeeding is a natural phenomenon that reflects reality and occupies an important space in the life of all human beings. It is the reference for infant feeding since it is the food better tailored to his needs as its capabilities. The decision to make this practice is the responsibility of each parent. However, it is found that although mothers in particular young age properly begin the practice of breastfeeding, they end, for various reasons by early introduction of other foods or even stop breastfeeding few weeks after the delivery. Objectives: We aim from this study to examine the behavior of young mothers in breastfeeding, determine the impact of attitudes of mothers on the nutritional status of infants and encourage policymakers health to establish a line of action to initiate future and young mothers to breastfeed. Methods: This is a prospective study of 50 young mothers coming to consult or to vaccinate their children aged 2 to 23 months at the center of maternal and child of El Zouhour. Results: The analysis of our results showed that 76% of surveyed mothers have a high level of education, half primiparous and 64% are housewives. Concerning the practice of breastfeeding, we found that 42% of surveyed mothers have weaned their children and only 26% of them believe breastfeeding or breast-feed their infants exclusively for the first six months. Moreover, we noted That among children suffering from obesity 2nd degree be 16% of the total population , 87.5% of them were not (or are not) exclusively breastfed for the first six month of life. However, this relationship is not statistically significant. Conclusion: The evolution of knowledge of young mothers has not influenced their practices in breastfeeding. This requires the establishment of a line of action to promote breastfeeding based on the evaluation of implemented national programs in recent years, the update of their content and the improvement of training of personnel of

  11. Interactive Effects of Early Exclusive Breastfeeding and Pre-Pregnancy Maternal Weight Status on Young Children's BMI - A Chinese Birth Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Mei

    Full Text Available To assess if the maternal pre-pregnancy weight status (MPWS alters the association of early infant feeding pattern (at one and third months with infant body mass index (BMI in the first two years of life.A cohort of 2,220 neonates were recruited in a community-based study conducted in China. Body weight and length were measured at birth, at age one and two, with BMI calculated accordingly. The BMI z-scores (BMI-Z were computed according to the World Health Organization Growth Standard (2006. Feeding patterns were classified as exclusive breastfeeding (EBF, mixed feeding (MF, and formula feeding (FF. General linear models (GLM were employed to estimate main and interaction effects of EBF and MPWS on children's BMI-Z.No main effect of MPWS was found on child BMI-Z at ages one and two, nor the feeding patterns. An interaction between MPWS and feeding patterns was detected (p<0.05. For children who were formula fed during the first month, those who were born to overweight/obesity (OW/OB mothers had a significantly greater BMI-Z at ages one and two, compared with those with underweight/normal weight (UW/NW mothers. FF children had greater BMI-Z at ages one and two compared with their EBF and MF counterparts, when they were born to OW/OB mothers.Maternal pre-pregnancy weight control and early initiation of EBF for children are essential for healthy development in children's BMI, hence the prevention of early life obesity.

  12. Breastfeeding practices and growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-10

    Aug 10, 2015 ... Federal Medical Centre Asaba. Nigeria. ( ) ... selling and health promotion. Conclusion: ... among children in West African sub region could be averted if ... breastfeeding within one hour of life are more likely to have longer ...

  13. Facilitators and Barriers for Successful Breastfeeding Among Migrant Chuukese Mothers on Guam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Wood PhD, RNC-OB

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify factors that serve as facilitators and barriers for breastfeeding among Chuukese immigrant women living in Guam. Traditionally, Chuukese women exclusively breastfeed their babies; however, it is reported that breastfeeding decreases among these women when they migrate to Guam. Little is known about why this happens. A qualitative approach that included key informant interviews and focus groups of Chuukese women ( N  = 24 who had migrated to Guam and delivered a baby on Guam within the past 5 years was completed. The project interview or discussion guides were guided by the Theory of Reasoned Action and explored facilitators and barriers for successful breastfeeding among these Chuukese immigrant women. Among this population, key facilitators for breastfeeding included high levels of self-confidence, family support, knowledge about breastfeeding, and the existence of strong traditional Chuukese cultural values. Key barriers included experiences of cultural conflict or social change, lack of support from their local community, family and health-care staff, as well as limited self-knowledge about how to manage common breastfeeding problems. Where more facilitators were reported, breastfeeding was more often practiced, and where more barriers were reported, formula feeding was more likely. Social factors, health system policies, and proactive nursing support are important influencing factors for breastfeeding among the Chuukese immigrant population on Guam. Nursing can play key roles in policy, professional leadership and practice, and social advocacy to support breastfeeding promotion and maintenance on Guam.

  14. Infant Sleep Location and Breastfeeding Practices in the United States, 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren A; Geller, Nicole L; Kellams, Ann L; Colson, Eve R; Rybin, Denis V; Heeren, Timothy; Corwin, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    To describe the prevalence of breastfeeding and sleep location practices among US mothers and the factors associated with these behaviors, including advice received regarding these practices. A nationally representative sample of 3218 mothers who spoke English or Spanish were enrolled at a sample of 32 US birth hospitals between January 2011 and March 2014. Exclusive breastfeeding was reported by 30.5% of mothers, while an additional 29.5% reported partial breastfeeding. The majority of mothers, 65.5%, reported usually room sharing without bed sharing, while 20.7% reported bed sharing. Compared to mothers who room shared without bed sharing, mothers who bed shared were more likely to report exclusive breastfeeding (adjusted odds ratio 2.46, 95% confidence interval 1.76, 3.45) or partial breastfeeding (adjusted odds ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.33, 2.31). The majority of mothers reported usually room sharing without bed sharing regardless of feeding practices, including 58.2% of exclusively breastfeeding mothers and 70.0% of nonbreastfeeding mothers. Receiving advice regarding sleep location or breastfeeding increased adherence to recommendations in a dose response manner (the adjusted odds of room sharing without bed sharing and exclusive breastfeeding increased as the relevant advice score increased); however, receiving advice regarding sleep location did not affect feeding practices. Many mothers have not adopted the recommended infant sleep location or feeding practices. Receiving advice from multiple sources appears to promote adherence in a dose response manner. Many women are able to both breastfeed and room share without bed sharing, and advice to adhere to both of these recommendations did not decrease breastfeeding rates. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An evaluation of two guidance programmes to promote breast-feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Steyn

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available During the past ten years a comprehensive research project has been undertaken to develop a guidance programme in three adjacent communities in the South- Western Cape with the aim o f lowering the high incidence o f coronary heart disease. The purpose o f this substudy was to determine whether the guidance provided in the different communities had any influence on the knowledge o f and attitudes towards the nutrition o f pregnant women, babies and infants as well as breast-feeding practices o f the women who gave birth during the period 1980 to 1986. In the first community guidance was provided by means o f small mass media and interpersonal communication whereas only the small mass media were employed in the second. The third served as the control community. The findings suggest that the combined interpersonal and mass media programme was more successful than the mass media programme alone.

  16. Breastfeeding Patterns in the Rural Community of Hilo, Hawai‘i: An Exploration of Existing Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Before any breastfeeding promotion effort, an understanding of the existing breastfeeding patterns is essential. Hawai‘i County is a rural, ethnically diverse, medically underserved community. The purpose of this study was to describe the breastfeeding patterns of women living in Hilo, Hawai‘i. Data from several existing national, state, and local data sets were accessed to identify and describe the breastfeeding patterns of women in this community. Available breastfeeding data about women in Hilo was obtained from the Hawai‘i WIC program and includes initiation, duration, exclusivity of breastfeeding, and reasons for not breastfeeding. These data were compared to data from published reports available at the county, state, and national level. The State of Hawai‘i and Hilo exceed national targets for breastfeeding initiation; however, rates soon drop following delivery, and mixed feedings of infants is common. The highest percentage of mothers weaned their infants within the first four weeks postpartum. The reasons the majority of the mothers gave for weaning were tied to breastfeeding situations that are amenable to skilled lactation support (eg, milk supply issues and latch or sucking problems). While available data sets offer valuable information on the breastfeeding patterns in this rural community, there are limitations to their usefulness, primarily due to the inconsistent operational definitions of infant feeding variables used in the surveys, and the lack of availability of community level data. PMID:23520565

  17. Breastfeeding patterns in the rural community of Hilo, Hawai'i: an exploration of existing data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Jeanie L

    2013-03-01

    Before any breastfeeding promotion effort, an understanding of the existing breastfeeding patterns is essential. Hawai'i County is a rural, ethnically diverse, medically underserved community. The purpose of this study was to describe the breastfeeding patterns of women living in Hilo, Hawai'i. Data from several existing national, state, and local data sets were accessed to identify and describe the breastfeeding patterns of women in this community. Available breastfeeding data about women in Hilo was obtained from the Hawai'i WIC program and includes initiation, duration, exclusivity of breastfeeding, and reasons for not breastfeeding. These data were compared to data from published reports available at the county, state, and national level. The State of Hawai'i and Hilo exceed national targets for breastfeeding initiation; however, rates soon drop following delivery, and mixed feedings of infants is common. The highest percentage of mothers weaned their infants within the first four weeks postpartum. The reasons the majority of the mothers gave for weaning were tied to breastfeeding situations that are amenable to skilled lactation support (eg, milk supply issues and latch or sucking problems). While available data sets offer valuable information on the breastfeeding patterns in this rural community, there are limitations to their usefulness, primarily due to the inconsistent operational definitions of infant feeding variables used in the surveys, and the lack of availability of community level data.

  18. Clinical practice breastfeeding recommendations for primary care: applying a tri-core breastfeeding conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Deborah W; Logan, Kathleen; Wilkinson, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Promotional practice efforts are needed in primary care to support and foster breastfeeding as the first and natural choice of nutrition for all infants regardless of race, ethnicity, educational, or income demographics in the United States. Societal awareness is increasing with regard to the significant protective qualities that human milk bestows upon public health. An estimated 75% of American mothers attempt to breastfeed, but according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, just 13% are able to exclusively breastfeed by 6 months. Early identification of lactation issues is crucial to establishing and sustaining breastfeeding for the first 6 to 12 months of the child's life and beyond. We propose a set of primary care guidelines, applying a Tri-Core Model approach, to promote and foster breastfeeding efforts in the postpartum period. Breastfeeding promotion is a fundamental public health endeavor, and pediatric nurse practitioners and other advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are uniquely qualified to become specialists and experts in lactation care and management. Lactation support, which should be an integral facet of an APRN's practice and education, will aid in improving national breastfeeding rates and patient care outcomes. Application of the Tri-Core Model approach will help APRNs develop and implement evidence-based practice efforts that incorporate the mother-baby dyad and other multiprofessionals who are vested in successful breastfeeding outcomes. The goal of pediatric health care is provide safe and effective health care to all infants, children, and adolescents, and lactation care is an integral and crucial component of this effort. Copyright © 2014 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A decade of change in breastfeeding in China's far north-west

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Cuiqin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been considerable changes in breastfeeding practices in China over the past forty years. However China is a very large country, and breastfeeding rates in different parts of China vary considerably. The objective of this paper is to identify and compare breastfeeding types and rates between 1994–1996 and 2003–2004 in Shihezi, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, PR China. Methods In 1994–1996, a study of breastfeeding (n = 2197 was undertaken in Shihezi, Xinjiang, PR China. A decade later in 2003–2004, a longitudinal study (n = 545 of infant feeding practices was undertaken in the same area. Results The 'any breastfeeding' rates at 1, 4 and 6 months were 94%, 82% and 78% respectively in the early 1990s. A decade later, breastfeeding at 1 month was lower, but rates at 4 and 6 months remained the same. In 2004 the 'full breastfeeding' rate at one month was significantly higher (57% than a decade earlier (38%, but after 3 months there was a rapid decline. This reflected a shift in the way complementary foods are introduced: the initial introduction was later, but by a higher proportion of mothers. Conclusion The rate of breastfeeding at one month is significantly lower in 2003–2004 when compared to 1994–1996. The 'full breastfeeding' rates were initially higher, but after 3 months were then lower. The Chinese national breastfeeding targets were not reached in either period of the study. These studies show the need to further promote full or exclusive breastfeeding and further longitudinal studies are necessary to provide the detailed knowledge about risk factors required for health promotion programs.

  20. Nutritional status, exclusive breastfeeding and management of acute respiratory illness and diarrhea in the first 6 months of life in infants from two regions of Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktaria, V; Lee, K J; Bines, J E; Watts, E; Satria, C D; Atthobari, J; Nirwati, H; Kirkwood, C D; Soenarto, Y; Danchin, M H

    2017-12-21

    Infant morbidity and mortality rates remain high in Indonesia, with acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) and diarrhea the leading two health problems in children under 5 years. We aimed to describe the nutritional status, feeding practice and case management of ARI and diarrhea of infants from two regions of Indonesia during the first 6 months of life. This study was an observational study conducted in parallel to an immunogenicity and efficacy trial of an oral rotavirus vaccine (RV3-BB) in the Klaten and Yogyakarta regions, Indonesia. Mothers were interviewed at 3 time points: within the first 6 days of their infant's life, and at 8-10 and 22-24 weeks of age. Questions asked included pregnancy history, infant nutritional status, feeding status and health of infants within up to 2 weeks prior to the assessment. Between February 2013 and January 2014, 233 mother-infant pairs were recruited. 60% (136/223) of infants were exclusively breastfed (EBF) until 6 months of age with the strongest support for EBF reported by mothers themselves 70% (101/223) and 25% (36/223) from their partners. At 6 months, 6% (14/223) of infants were underweight and severely underweight; 4% (8/ 223) wasted and severely wasted; and 12% (28/223) were stunted and severely stunted. Non-recommended medication use was high, with 54% (21/39) of infants with reported cough within 2 weeks of an assessment receiving cough medication, 70% (27 /39) an antihistamine, 26% (10/39) a mucolytic and 15% (6 /39) an oral bronchodilator. At age 22-24 week, infants with reported diarrhea within 2 weeks of an assessment had low use of oral rehydration solutions (ORS) (3/21;14%) and zinc therapy (2/ 21;10%). In this unique observational study, breastfeeding rates of 60% at 6 months were below the Indonesian national target of >75%. Adherence to WHO guidelines for management of ARI and diarrhea was poor, with high use of non-recommended cough medications and oral bronchodilators in the first 6 months of life

  1. Relationship between breastfeeding practices and nutritional status ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    compliant with the recommended breastfeeding practices. Complementary feeding was introduced too early in life in several cases. Health care workers should emphasise the importance of exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months and the dangers of early complementary feeding. Key words: Exclusive Breast feeding, ...

  2. Breastfeeding - good for both of us

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2010-01-01

    This poster promotes breastfeeding and highlights the fact that it has health benefits for both mother and baby. It also provides contact details of local organisations that can offer help and advice on breastfeeding.

  3. Exclusive Breastfeeding and Cognition, Executive Function, and Behavioural Disorders in Primary School-Aged Children in Rural South Africa: A Cohort Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamsen J Rochat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF is associated with early child health; its longer-term benefits for child development remain inconclusive. We examine the associations between EBF, HIV exposure, and other maternal/child factors and the cognitive and emotional-behavioural development of children aged 7-11 y.The Vertical Transmission Study (VTS supported EBF in HIV-positive and HIV-negative women; between 2012 and 2014, HIV-negative VTS children (332 HIV exposed, 574 HIV unexposed were assessed in terms of cognition (Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children Second Edition [KABC-II], executive function (Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment Second Edition [NEPSY-II], and emotional-behavioural functioning (parent-reported Child Behaviour Checklist, [CBCL]. We developed population means by combining the VTS sample with 629 same-aged HIV-negative children from the local demographic platform. For each outcome, we split the VTS sample into scores above or at/below each population mean and modelled each outcome using logistic regression analyses, overall and stratified by child sex. There was no demonstrated effect of EBF on overall cognitive functioning. EBF was associated with fewer conduct disorders overall (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.44 [95% CI 0.3-0.7], p ≤ 0.01, and there was weak evidence of better cognition in boys who had been exclusively breastfed for 2-5 mo versus ≤1 mo (Learning subscale aOR 2.07 [95% CI 1.0-4.3], p = 0.05. Other factors associated with better child cognition were higher maternal cognitive ability (aOR 1.43 [95% CI 1.1-1.9], p = 0.02, Sequential; aOR 1.74 [95% CI 1.3-2.4], p < 0.001, Planning subscales and crèche attendance (aOR 1.96 [95% CI 1.1-3.5], p = 0.02, Sequential subscale. Factors positively associated with executive function were home stimulation (aOR 1.36 [95% CI 1.0-1.8], p = 0.04, Auditory Attention; aOR 1.35 [95% CI 1.0-1.8], p = 0.05, Response Set and crèche (aOR 1.74 [95% CI 1.0-3.0], p = 0.05, Animal

  4. The National Breastfeeding Policy in Nigeria: the working mother and the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worugji, I N E; Etuk, S J

    2005-08-01

    In this article, we examine the National Breastfeeding Policy in Nigeria, the extent to which the law guarantees and protects the maternity rights of the working mother, and the interplay between the law and the National Breastfeeding Policy. Our aim is to make people aware of this interplay to lead to some positive efforts to sanitize the workplace and shield women from some of the practices against them in employment relations in Nigeria as well as encourage exclusive breastfeeding by employed mothers.We conclude that the provisions of the law in this regard are not in accord with the contemporary international standards for the protection of pregnancy and maternity. It does not guarantee and protect the freedom of the nursing mother to exclusively breastfeed the child for at least the 6 months as propagated by Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) and the National Breastfeeding Policy. Moreover, there is no enabling law to back up the National Policy Initiative as it affects employer and employee relations. We, therefore, suggest a legal framework for effective implementation of the National Breastfeeding Policy for women in dependent labour relations. It is hoped that such laws will not only limit some of the practices against women in employment but also will encourage and promote exclusive breastfeeding behaviour by employed mothers.

  5. Commitment and capacity for the support of breastfeeding in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-12

    Apr 12, 2013 ... exclusive and continued breastfeeding as the ultimate source of infant nutrition. .... Milestone events for breastfeeding in South. Africa. On a global level, ... well as government officials and independent experts. This landmark ...

  6. Factors influencing breastfeeding practices in Edo state, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Nigeria however, young infants may not benefit from such a practice as a ... The purpose of this study was to determine factors influencing breastfeeding practices in Edo State, Nigeria. ... Only 20 per cent practiced exclusive breastfeeding.

  7. There Is More to Transparency than Meets the Eye: The Impact of Mandatory Disclosure Laws Aimed at Promoting Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytton, Timothy D; Dennison, Barbara A; Nguyen, Trang Q; Jurkowski, Janine M

    2014-01-01

    Requiring hospitals to inform patients of clinical best practices and to disclose performance data are two common regulatory strategies for improving healthcare. Proponents of such mandatory disclosure laws--sometimes referred to as "targeted transparency "--argue that they increase patient awareness and thereby create reputational incentives for hospitals to improve their performance. Evaluation of targeted transparency typically focuses on patient responses to information and changes in hospital behavior based on reputational concerns. This standard account, however, overlooks other important ways targeted transparency can influence hospital performance. This article presents a case study of disclosure laws designed to promote breastfeeding to illustrate how targeted transparency can influence hospitals independently of its effects on patients' choice of provider or hospitals' fear of losing business. We found that mandatory disclosure laws emboldened state regulators to take a more aggressive approach to enforcement of hospital regulations, empowered nurse managers to advocate more effectively within hospitals for changes in hospital policies, and enabled nurse managers to implement verifiable performance goals for clinical staff under their supervision. These findings suggest that the study of mandatory disclosure more generally--in areas such as financial regulation, environmental protection, food labeling, and workplace safety--would benefit by analyzing not only its influence on public awareness and its reputational effects but also how regulators use transparency laws and how managers within regulated entities employ the information that the laws provide.

  8. Legislation, women, and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, G

    1987-01-01

    Governmental policies and legislation aimed at validating the dual role of women as mothers and wage earners can significantly strengthen breastfeeding promotion efforts. Examples of such laws and policies are maternity leave, breastfeeding breaks at the workplace, allowances for pregnant women and new mothers, rooming-in at hospitals, child care at the worksite, flexible work schedules for new mothers, and a national marketing code for breastmilk substitutes. The International labor Organization (ILO) has played an important role in setting international standards to protect working mothers. The ILO defines minimal maternity protection as encompassing: a compulsory period of 6 weeks' leave after delivery; entitlement to a further 6 weeks of leave; the provision during maternity leave of benefits sufficient for the full and healthy maintenance of the child; medical care by a qualified midwife or physician; authorization to interrupt work for the purpose of breastfeeding; and protection from dismissal during maternity leave. In many countries there is a lack of public awareness of existing laws or policies; i.e., working women may not know they are entitled to maternity leave, or pediatricians may not know that the government has developed a marketing code for breastmilk substitutes. Overall, the enactment and enforcement of legislation can ensure the longterm effectiveness of breastfeeding promotion by raising the consciousness of individuals and institutions, putting breastfeeding activities in the wider context of support for women's rights, recognizing the dual roles of women, and institutionalizing and legitimating support for breastfeeding.

  9. Knowledge and Practice of Exclusive Breast Feeding: Effects of Health Promotion Intervention in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UDOCHI M NWOSU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Low level of knowledge and practice of exclusive breast feeding have been reported in Nigeria especially in rural communities. The purpose of this study is to identify factors contributing to low knowledge and practice of exclusive breast feeding (E B F in rural communities of Abia State, Nigeria and apply health promotion intervention (H P I to address these factors in order to increase knowledge and practice of E B F. METHOD: A quasi-experimental study design was used. Four communities formed the unit of allocation to experimental and control groups for the purpose of introducing health promotion intervention. A multi-stage sampling procedure was used in selecting the study sample. A sample size of 400 households out of 1978 enumerated from the four communities was used for the survey, two as experimental and two as control. Data were collected using a pretested structured questionnaire that was interviewer administered. Data were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Chi-square statistic was used in determining statistical significance. Analysis of knowledge and practice of EBF was taken before and after H P I and compared in both experimental and control groups.\\ RESULT: The results indicated increase in knowledge of E B F from 28(14% to 200(98.5%. Correspondingly, practice of E B F increased from 21 (10% to 162(80% in the experimental group. No significant increase was made in the control group both in knowledge and practice of EBF. Factors contributing to low level of practice of EBF in the study area included low level of knowledge about ten steps to successful breast feeding, illusory fears about EBF, ignorance, resistance to change, cultural imperatives and medical reasons. Health promotion intervention directed at the rural women helped to scale up the practice of EBF to 70% within nine months. CONCLUSION: The study recommends health promotion intervention as a proven method for scaling up knowledge and practice of EBF in

  10. Mothers' Concerns for Personal Safety and Privacy While Breastfeeding: An Unexplored Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen-Carole, Casey; Allen, Katherine; Fagnano, Maria; Dozier, Ann; Halterman, Jill

    2018-04-01

    Preliminary qualitative research in upstate NY shows new mothers are worried about safety while breastfeeding. Little is known regarding prevalence of these concerns and their effect on breastfeeding outcomes. (1) Determine frequency of breastfeeding safety and privacy concerns; (2) Explore their association with breastfeeding outcomes. Mothers were surveyed immediately and 1-month postpartum about breastfeeding goals; both surveys addressed privacy and safety concerns at home, work, and in public. Outcome data included breastfeeding intent, exclusivity, and duration. Breastfeeding/non-breastfeeding mothers were compared using Chi-square and multivariate analyses. A total of 279 women enrolled. Of these 82.8% initiated breastfeeding; at 1-month 72% provided any breast milk, and 44% were exclusively breastfeeding. About 99% felt safe breastfeeding at home; 25% reported privacy concerns; and 5% felt "vulnerable or unsafe" while breastfeeding. At 1-month, 49% agreed there was a safe place to breastfeed/express milk at work (20% unsure). Non-breastfeeding mothers expressed more safety concerns outside home/at work: 18% breastfeeding versus 28% non-breastfeeding outside home; 27% breastfeeding versus 40% non-breastfeeding at work. Nearly 54% who reported feeling vulnerable/unsafe with breastfeeding initiated breastfeeding, compared with 86% not reporting this concern (p = 0.008). Fewer women initiating breastfeeding reported vulnerability/safety (3% breastfeeding versus 14% non-breastfeeding, p = 0.008) or privacy (22% breastfeeding versus 40% non-breastfeeding, p = 0.19) concerns. Associations held after controlling for age, race, parity, insurance, geography, and marital-status. Significant associations between initiation, privacy, and safety concerns did not extend to duration or exclusivity. Many breastfeeding women reported safety and privacy concerns, especially outside the home and at work, which may influence breastfeeding initiation. Further study

  11. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding myths Overcoming challenges Finding support Fitting breastfeeding into your life Partner resources Subscribe To receive Breastfeeding email updates ...

  12. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... It's Only Natural Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding myths Overcoming challenges Finding support Fitting breastfeeding into your life Partner resources Subscribe To receive Breastfeeding email updates ...

  13. Breastfeeding knowledge among health workers in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sonal; Rollins, Nigel C; Bland, Ruth

    2005-02-01

    respondents suggested taking a feeding history or observing a breastfeed in response to the problem scenarios. The most commonly given responses to problems of babies who were perceived to be thirsty, unsatisfied, or crying after feeds was to supplement with other fluids or feeds. There is a need for systematic and ongoing training in breastfeeding and infant feeding counselling in the context of HIV, so that breastfeeding is not undermined by the current HIV pandemic, and exclusive breastfeeding continues to be promoted for all HIV-uninfected women, women of unknown status, and HIV-infected women who choose to breastfeed.

  14. Role of breast-feeding in the prevention and treatment of diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, S L; Combest, C

    1990-09-01

    Recent studies have again shown the beneficial effects of breast-feeding in preventing morbidity and mortality from diarrhoea in infants. A case-control study in Brazil has shown that young infants who are not breast-fed have a 25-time greater risk of dying of diarrhoea than those who are exclusively breast-fed. A longitudinal study in the urban slums of Lima, Peru found that exclusively breast-fed infants have a reduced risk of diarrhoeal morbidity when compared with infants receiving only water in addition to breast-milk. Both these studies, along with numerous others in developing countries, point to the need to extend the duration of exclusive breast-feeding to at least 4-6 months. A review of concerned studies throughout the world shows that even in malnourished women, breast-milk output is sufficient to maintain growth of infants up to this age. The addition of early food supplements to infants fed under prevailing environmental conditions in developing countries leads to their increased diarrhoeal attacks and associated reduced food intake. This results in worsened nutritional status of the affected infants. Breast-feeding helps maintain hydration status during diarrhoeal episodes. Studies in Peru, India, and Nigeria have shown that breast-feeding can be continued during diarrhoea when the infants often refuse other foods, specially non-human milk. Thus, breast-feeding is important in providing necessary calories and protein during a time when a loss of appetite for other foods is common. Diarrhoeal disease control programmes need to modify service delivery to ensure that breast-feeding mothers are not separated from their infants while being treated with oral rehydration therapy (ORT) as inpatients or outpatients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) should be given to infants with cup and spoon rather than bottles, in order not to interfere with suckling. When in a health system bottles are used for treatment, an implicit credibility is given to their role in

  15. Addressing social barriers and closing the gender knowledge gap: exposure to road shows is associated with more knowledge and more positive beliefs, attitudes and social norms regarding exclusive breastfeeding in rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alison L; Tavengwa, Naume V; Chasekwa, Bernard; Chatora, Kumbirai; Taruberekera, Noah; Mushayi, Wellington; Madzima, Rufaro C; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N

    2012-10-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) is rarely practiced despite its significant child survival benefits. A key constraint to increasing EBF rates in Zimbabwe and most of the developing world is that key decision makers (fathers/partners and other family members) are often poorly informed about EBF and do not attend antenatal clinics where health information is routinely provided. Informed by formative research, a district-wide campaign was conducted in rural Zimbabwe to encourage EBF and expressing and heat treating (EHT) breast milk as a means to maintain EBF. The campaign combined traditional strategies of education, counselling and outreach through health service delivery with a novel road show 'edutainment' intervention to reach men and other community members. A post campaign evaluation measured the association of road show exposure with 20 knowledge items and summative scores of social norms, beliefs and attitudes obtained through exploratory factor analysis. In adjusted models, road show exposure was associated with correct EBF knowledge (β=1.0, 0.001), EHT knowledge (β=1.3, Pbenefits of condom use during pregnancy and breastfeeding (β=0.5, P<0.001), and more positive EBF social norms (β=0.6, P<0.001), EBF beliefs and attitudes (β=1.0, P<0.001) and attitudes towards condom use during breastfeeding (β=0.6, P<0.001). Road show exposure was more strongly associated with EBF knowledge among men (P-value for gender×exposure group interaction=0.03), suggesting that it also closed the knowledge gap between men and women. Longitudinal studies will determine whether road shows were associated with changes in EBF practices. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. In-hospital Breastfeeding and Intention to Return to Work Influence Mothers' Breastfeeding Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Jackson, Shera C; Bentley, Gail E; Keyton, Kristina; Reifman, Alan; Boylan, Mallory; Hart, Sybil L

    2016-11-01

    Research continues to demonstrate that formula feeding is associated with numerous long-term negative outcomes for a mother and her infant. However, many women cease breastfeeding sooner than intended and recommended. Breastfeeding has been found to be related to demographics, maternal mood, and returning to work outside the home. This study aimed to shed light on the woman's perception of the effect of working on intended breastfeeding duration. This study used intentions to return to work and in-hospital breastfeeding to predict breastfeeding intentions. Women (N = 160) were surveyed during the first 48 hours postdelivery of healthy, full-term infants. Survey instruments included demographics (socioeconomic status, maternal age, education, and marital status), depression, fetal attachment, current exclusive breastfeeding status, as well as breastfeeding and return-to-work intentions for the next year. A path analysis was used to explore relationships and predictors of breastfeeding intentions. The model had a good fit and breastfeeding intentions were predicted by exclusive breastfeeding in the hospital (β = 0.21, P work (β = -0.18, P work influence how long a mother intends to breastfeed. Attention to these areas can be provided immediately postpartum to support exclusive breastfeeding and provide informational support on continuing to breastfeed/express milk upon return to work if the mother intends to return to work.

  17. Breastfeeding rates in central and western China in 2010: implications for child and population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sufang; Fu, Xulan; Scherpbier, Robert W; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Xiaoli; Hipgrave, David B

    2013-05-01

    To describe breastfeeding practices in rural China using globally recommended indicators and to compare them with practices in neighbouring countries and large emerging economies. A community-based, cross-sectional survey of 2354 children younger than 2 years in 26 poor, rural counties in 12 central and western provinces was conducted. Associations between indicators of infant and young child feeding and socioeconomic, demographic and health service variables were explored and rates were compared with the most recent data from China and other nations. Overall, 98.3% of infants had been breastfed. However, only 59.4% had initiated breastfeeding early (i.e. within 1 hour of birth); only 55.5% and 9.4% had continued breastfeeding for 1 and 2 years, respectively, and only 28.7% of infants younger than 6 months had been exclusively breastfed. Early initiation of breastfeeding was positively associated with at least five antenatal clinic visits (adjusted odds ratio, aOR: 3.48; P wealth. Surveyed rates of exclusive and continued breastfeeding were mostly lower than in other nations. Despite efforts to promote breastfeeding in China, rates are very low. A commitment to improve infant and young child feeding is needed to reduce mortality and morbidity.

  18. Exploring Middle-Eastern mothers' perceptions and experiences of breastfeeding in Canada: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessri, Mahsa; Farmer, Anna P; Olson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore from the Middle-Eastern mothers' perspective, the experience of breastfeeding and their perceptions of attributes of the health care system, community and society on their feeding decisions after migration to Canada. New immigrant mothers from the Middle East (n = 22) were recruited from community agencies in Edmonton, Canada. Qualitative data were collected through four focus groups using an ethnographic approach to guide concurrent data collection and analysis. Survey data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics via pre-tested questionnaires. All mothers, but one who was medically exempt, breastfed their infants from birth and intended to continue for at least 2 years. Through constant comparison of data, five layers of influence emerged which described mothers' process of decision making: culture/society, community, health care system, family/friends and mother-infant dyad. Religious belief was an umbrella theme that was woven throughout all discussions and it was the strongest determining factor for choosing to breastfeed. However, cultural practices promoted pre-lacteal feeding and hence, jeopardising breastfeeding exclusivity. Although contradicted in Islamic tradition, most mothers practised fasting during breastfeeding because of misbeliefs about interpretations regarding these rules. Despite high rates of breastfeeding, there is a concern of lack of breastfeeding exclusivity among Middle-Eastern settlers in Canada. To promote successful breastfeeding in Muslim migrant communities, interventions must occur at different levels of influence and should consider religious beliefs to ensure cultural acceptability. Practitioners may support exclusive breastfeeding through cultural competency, and respectfully acknowledging Islamic beliefs and cultural practices. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Breastfeeding, introduction of other foods and effects on health: a systematic literature review for the 5th Nordic Nutrition Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnell, Agneta; Lagström, Hanna; Lande, Britt; Thorsdottir, Inga

    2013-01-01

    The present systematic literature review is part of the 5th revision of the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. The overall aim was to review recent scientific data valid in a Nordic setting on the short- and long-term health effects of breastfeeding (duration of both any and exclusive breastfeeding) and introduction of foods other than breast milk. The initial literature search resulted in 2,011 abstracts; 416 identified as potentially relevant. Full paper review resulted in 60 quality assessed papers (6A, 48B, and 6C). A complementary search found some additional papers. The grade of evidence was classified as convincing, probable, limited-suggestive, and limited-no conclusion. The evidence was convincing of a protective dose/duration effect of breastfeeding against overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence, overall infections, acute otitis media, and gastrointestinal and respiratory tract infections. The evidence was probable that exclusive breastfeeding for longer than 4 months is associated with slower weight gain during the second half of the first year which could be part of the reason behind the reduced risk of later overweight or obesity. There was also probable evidence that breastfeeding is a protective factor against inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and diabetes (type 1 and 2), provides beneficial effects on IQ and developmental scores of children as well as a small reductive effect on blood pressure and blood cholesterol levels in adulthood. Other associations explored were limited-suggestive or inconclusive. In conclusion, convincing and probable evidence was found for benefits of breastfeeding on several outcomes. The recommendation in NNR2004 about exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months and continued partial breastfeeding thereafter can stand unchanged. The relatively low proportion of infants in the Nordic countries following this recommendation indicates that strategies that protect, support and promote breastfeeding should be

  20. Breastfeeding, introduction of other foods and effects on health: a systematic literature review for the 5th Nordic Nutrition Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Hörnell

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present systematic literature review is part of the 5th revision of the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. The overall aim was to review recent scientific data valid in a Nordic setting on the short- and long-term health effects of breastfeeding (duration of both any and exclusive breastfeeding and introduction of foods other than breast milk. The initial literature search resulted in 2,011 abstracts; 416 identified as potentially relevant. Full paper review resulted in 60 quality assessed papers (6A, 48B, and 6C. A complementary search found some additional papers. The grade of evidence was classified as convincing, probable, limited-suggestive, and limited-no conclusion. The evidence was convincing of a protective dose/duration effect of breastfeeding against overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence, overall infections, acute otitis media, and gastrointestinal and respiratory tract infections. The evidence was probable that exclusive breastfeeding for longer than 4 months is associated with slower weight gain during the second half of the first year which could be part of the reason behind the reduced risk of later overweight or obesity. There was also probable evidence that breastfeeding is a protective factor against inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and diabetes (type 1 and 2, provides beneficial effects on IQ and developmental scores of children as well as a small reductive effect on blood pressure and blood cholesterol levels in adulthood. Other associations explored were limited-suggestive or inconclusive. In conclusion, convincing and probable evidence was found for benefits of breastfeeding on several outcomes. The recommendation in NNR2004 about exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months and continued partial breastfeeding thereafter can stand unchanged. The relatively low proportion of infants in the Nordic countries following this recommendation indicates that strategies that protect, support and promote

  1. Breastfeeding knowledge and practice of mothers with infants less ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Exclusive breastfeeding is the ideal for infants in the first six months, however the practice is low. The role of mothers' knowledge of breastfeeding on practise is not clear.This study was designed to assess knowledge and practice of nursing mothers concerning breastfeeding in the selected Local Government ...

  2. Infant feeding practices and determinants of poor breastfeeding behavior in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotebieng, Marcel; Chalachala, Jean Lambert; Labbok, Miriam; Behets, Frieda

    2013-10-01

    Although breastfeeding is almost universally accepted in the Democratic Republic (DR) of Congo, by the age of 2 to 3 months 65% of children are receiving something other than human milk. We sought to describe the infant feeding practices and determinants of suboptimal breastfeeding behaviors in DR Congo. Survey questionnaire administered to mothers of infants aged ≤ 6 months and healthcare providers who were recruited consecutively at six selected primary health care facilities in Kinshasa, the capital. All 66 mothers interviewed were breastfeeding. Before initiating breastfeeding, 23 gave their infants something other than their milk, including: sugar water (16) or water (2). During the twenty-four hours prior to interview, 26 (39%) infants were exclusively breastfed (EBF), whereas 18 (27%), 12 (18%), and 10 (15%) received water, tea, formula, or porridge, respectively, in addition to human milk. The main reasons for water supplementation included "heat" and cultural beliefs that water is needed for proper digestion of human milk. The main reason for formula supplementation was the impression that the baby was not getting enough milk; and for porridge supplementation, the belief that the child was old enough to start complementary food. Virtually all mothers reported that breastfeeding was discussed during antenatal clinic visit and half reported receiving help regarding breastfeeding from a health provider either after birth or during well-child clinic visit. Despite a median of at least 14 years of experience in these facilities, healthcare workers surveyed had little to no formal training on how to support breastfeeding and inadequate breastfeeding-related knowledge and skills. The facilities lacked any written policy about breastfeeding. Addressing cultural beliefs, training healthcare providers adequately on breastfeeding support skills, and providing structured breastfeeding support after maternity discharge is needed to promote EBF in the DR Congo.

  3. Integrating Group Counseling, Cell Phone Messaging, and Participant-Generated Songs and Dramas into a Microcredit Program Increases Nigerian Women’s Adherence to International Breastfeeding Recommendations123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Valerie L.; Negerie, Mekebeb; Ibrahim, Alawiyatu Usman; Leatherman, Sheila; Daza, Eric J.; Bentley, Margaret E.

    2014-01-01

    In northern Nigeria, interventions are urgently needed to narrow the large gap between international breastfeeding recommendations and actual breastfeeding practices. Studies of integrated microcredit and community health interventions documented success in modifying health behaviors but typically had uncontrolled designs. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial in Bauchi State, Nigeria, with the aim of increasing early breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding among female microcredit clients. The intervention had 3 components. Trained credit officers led monthly breastfeeding learning sessions during regularly scheduled microcredit meetings for 10 mo. Text and voice messages were sent out weekly to a cell phone provided to small groups of microcredit clients (5–7 women). The small groups prepared songs or dramas about the messages and presented them at the monthly microcredit meetings. The control arm continued with the regular microcredit program. Randomization occurred at the level of the monthly meeting groups. Pregnant clients were recruited at baseline and interviewed again when their infants were aged ≥6 mo. Logistic regression models accounting for clustering were used to estimate the odds of performing recommended behaviors. Among the clients who completed the final survey (n = 390), the odds of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 mo (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.0) and timely breastfeeding initiation (OR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.6, 4.1) were increased in the intervention vs. control arm. Delayed introduction of water explained most of the increase in exclusive breastfeeding among clients receiving the intervention. In conclusion, a breastfeeding promotion intervention integrated into microcredit increased the likelihood that women adopted recommended breastfeeding practices. This intervention could be scaled up in Nigeria, where local organizations provide microcredit to >500,000 clients. Furthermore, the intervention could be adopted more widely

  4. Integrating group counseling, cell phone messaging, and participant-generated songs and dramas into a microcredit program increases Nigerian women's adherence to international breastfeeding recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Valerie L; Negerie, Mekebeb; Ibrahim, Alawiyatu Usman; Leatherman, Sheila; Daza, Eric J; Bentley, Margaret E

    2014-07-01

    In northern Nigeria, interventions are urgently needed to narrow the large gap between international breastfeeding recommendations and actual breastfeeding practices. Studies of integrated microcredit and community health interventions documented success in modifying health behaviors but typically had uncontrolled designs. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial in Bauchi State, Nigeria, with the aim of increasing early breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding among female microcredit clients. The intervention had 3 components. Trained credit officers led monthly breastfeeding learning sessions during regularly scheduled microcredit meetings for 10 mo. Text and voice messages were sent out weekly to a cell phone provided to small groups of microcredit clients (5-7 women). The small groups prepared songs or dramas about the messages and presented them at the monthly microcredit meetings. The control arm continued with the regular microcredit program. Randomization occurred at the level of the monthly meeting groups. Pregnant clients were recruited at baseline and interviewed again when their infants were aged ≥6 mo. Logistic regression models accounting for clustering were used to estimate the odds of performing recommended behaviors. Among the clients who completed the final survey (n = 390), the odds of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 mo (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.0) and timely breastfeeding initiation (OR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.6, 4.1) were increased in the intervention vs. control arm. Delayed introduction of water explained most of the increase in exclusive breastfeeding among clients receiving the intervention. In conclusion, a breastfeeding promotion intervention integrated into microcredit increased the likelihood that women adopted recommended breastfeeding practices. This intervention could be scaled up in Nigeria, where local organizations provide microcredit to >500,000 clients. Furthermore, the intervention could be adopted more widely

  5. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information Breastfeeding Pregnancy Resources Your Guide to Breastfeeding Support for Nursing Moms in the Workplace: Employer Solutions Blog topics Breastfeeding: Natural Doesn’t ...

  6. Knowledge and compliance of lactating mothers on exclusive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months of life for optimal growth, development and health. Breastfeeding initiation rates are reportedly high in South Africa, however, a dramatic drop in exclusive breastfeeding rates was reported in infants aged 4 to 6 months, where ...

  7. Shorter duration of breastfeeding at elevated exposures to perfluoroalkyl substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Petersen, Maria Skaalum

    2017-01-01

    . Duration of breastfeeding was assessed by questionnaire and clinical interview. In adjusted linear regression models, a doubling of maternal serum PFASs was associated with a reduction in duration of both total and exclusive breastfeeding, most pronounced for perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) where...... a doubling was associated with a reduction in total breastfeeding of 1.4 (95% CI: 0.6; 2.1) months and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) where a doubling was associated with a reduction in exclusive breastfeeding of 0.5 (0.3; 0.7) months. The associations were evident among both primiparous and multiparous women......, and thus cannot be explained by confounding from previous breastfeeding....

  8. Increasing loyalty to breastfeeding: investigating a product development strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Joy; Russell-Bennett, Rebekah; Previte, Josephine

    2012-01-01

    This article demonstrates how social marketing insights were used to influence women's loyalty to breastfeeding. The article reports on a social marketing campaign undertaken by the Australian Breastfeeding Association and a government health department, which used a product development strategy in order to increase breastfeeding loyalty. Seeking new approaches to support breastfeeding behaviors is critical and timely, because while initiation rates of breastfeeding are high in developed countries such as the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and the United States, duration rates are significantly lower. Results indicate that a product- focused strategy influences pregnant women's loyalty to exclusively breastfeeding.

  9. The burden of suboptimal breastfeeding in the United States: a pediatric cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartick, Melissa; Reinhold, Arnold

    2010-05-01

    A 2001 study revealed that $3.6 billion could be saved if breastfeeding rates were increased to levels of the Healthy People objectives. It studied 3 diseases and totaled direct and indirect costs and cost of premature death. The 2001 study can be updated by using current breastfeeding rates and adding additional diseases analyzed in the 2007 breastfeeding report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Using methods similar to those in the 2001 study, we computed current costs and compared them to the projected costs if 80% and 90% of US families could comply with the recommendation to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months. Excluding type 2 diabetes (because of insufficient data), we conducted a cost analysis for all pediatric diseases for which the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality reported risk ratios that favored breastfeeding: necrotizing enterocolitis, otitis media, gastroenteritis, hospitalization for lower respiratory tract infections, atopic dermatitis, sudden infant death syndrome, childhood asthma, childhood leukemia, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and childhood obesity. We used 2005 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention breastfeeding rates and 2007 dollars. If 90% of US families could comply with medical recommendations to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months, the United States would save $13 billion per year and prevent an excess 911 deaths, nearly all of which would be in infants ($10.5 billion and 741 deaths at 80% compliance). Current US breastfeeding rates are suboptimal and result in significant excess costs and preventable infant deaths. Investment in strategies to promote longer breastfeeding duration and exclusivity may be cost-effective.

  10. Interventions in the workplace to support breastfeeding for women in employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulwadud, Omar A; Snow, Mary Elizabeth

    2012-10-17

    In recent years there has been a rise in the participation rate of women in employment. Some may become pregnant while in employment and subsequently deliver their babies. Most may decide to return early to work after giving birth for various reasons. Unless these mothers get support from their employers and fellow employees, they might give up breastfeeding when they return to work. As a result, the duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding to the recommended age of the babies would be affected.Workplace environment can play a positive role to promote breastfeeding. For women going back to work, various types of workplace support interventions are available and this should not be ignored by employers. Notably, promoting breastfeeding in a workplace may have benefits for the women, the baby and also the employer. To assess the effectiveness of workplace interventions to support and promote breastfeeding among women returning to paid work after the birth of their children, and its impact on process outcomes pertinent to employees and employers. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (2 August 2012). Two authors independently assessed all identified studies for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared workplace interventions with no intervention or two or more workplace interventions against each other. Two authors planned to evaluate the methodological quality of the eligible trials and extract data. There were no randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials identified. No trials have evaluated the effectiveness of workplace interventions in promoting breastfeeding among women returning to paid work after the birth of their child. The impact of such intervention on process outcomes is also unknown. Randomised controlled trials are required to establish the benefits of various types of workplace interventions to support, encourage and promote breastfeeding among working

  11. Breastfeeding Counseling, Barriers and Facilitators of Lactation in the Military Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    recommended exclusive breastfeeding for the first four to six months of an infant s life ( AAP , 1978; ADA, 1993). Breastfeeding offers advantages to both...women. Nurse practitioners should be familiar with the recommended breastfeeding practices set forth by the AAP (see Appendix C). Nurse practitioners... BREASTFEEDING COUNSELING, BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS OF LACTATION IN THE MILITARY COMMUNITY Captain Bernadette Ann Harlow APPROVED

  12. First time mothers' experiences of breastfeeding their newborns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Hanne; Harder, Ingegerd; Hall, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite efforts to improve continued breastfeeding, the percentages of exclusively breastfeeding remain low. To help the breastfeeding mother and reshape professional practice, we need more knowledge of maternal experiences of breastfeeding in the first months. The objective...... was to explore mothers' early breastfeeding experiences. Method Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse data from 108 Danish first time mothers who had answered an open-ended question 6 months after birth. Results All the mothers started breastfeeding. We identified three overlapping phases presented...... as dominant themes: (1) on shaky ground, characterised by breastfeeding interwoven with mothering, painful breastfeeding, and conflicting advice, (2) searching for a foothold, characterised by reading the baby's cues, concerns about milk production, for or against breastfeeding, and looking for professional...

  13. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... you Addressing breastfeeding myths Breastfeeding myths in the African-American community Incredible facts about babies, breastmilk, and ... to get your family on board with breastfeeding African-American celebrity moms who breastfeed Fitting breastfeeding into ...

  14. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding Overcoming challenges Common questions about breastfeeding and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch Finding ... and Shareables Browse by health topic Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer ... Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually Transmitted Infections ...

  15. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... menu It's Only Natural Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding ... in the African-American community Incredible facts about babies, breastmilk, and breastfeeding Overcoming challenges Common questions about ...

  16. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... we are What we do Programs and activities Work with us Contact Us Blog Popular topics Vision ... Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding myths Breastfeeding myths in ...

  17. Trends in breastfeeding research by Brazilian nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Oliveira B. Oriá

    Full Text Available Exclusive breastfeeding is acknowledged as important for survival, optimal growth, and development of infants. The current review presents a synthesis of research output by Brazilian nurses on breastfeeding over the last 20 years, analyzes the theoretical and methodological issues emerging from studies on breastfeeding in Brazil, and provides directions for future research and practice by nurses in the area breastfeeding. Studies included in this review were identified through LILACS searches of Portuguese-language sources. Articles were organized and analyzed chronologically by comparing the evolution of the Brazilian Breastfeeding Program. The incomplete research output of the Brazilian nursing profession in regard to breastfeeding research needs to be addressed. In addition, specific cultural, sociological, and anthropological characteristics of Brazilian regional settings remain to be explored. Emphasis on potential confounders and critical interrelations is warranted.

  18. Six-Month Market Exclusivity Extensions To Promote Research Offer Substantial Returns For Many Drug Makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Rome, Benjamin N; Sarpatwari, Ameet; Avorn, Jerry

    2017-02-01

    To incentivize pharmaceutical manufacturers to invest in areas of unmet medical need, policy makers frequently propose extending the market exclusivity period of desired drugs. Some such proposals are modeled after the pediatric exclusivity patent extension program, which since 1997 has provided six additional months of market exclusivity for drugs studied in children. The most recent proposal would encourage rare disease research by providing six months of extended exclusivity for any existing drug that is granted subsequent FDA approval for a new rare disease indication. Yet the economic impact of such proposals is rarely addressed. We found that for the thirteen FDA-approved drugs that gained supplemental approval for a rare disease indication from 2005 through 2010, the median projected cost of clinical trials leading to approval was $29.8 million. If the exclusivity extension had been in place, the median discounted financial gain to manufacturers would have been $94.6 million. Median net returns would have been $82.4 million, with higher returns for drugs with higher annual sales. Extending market exclusivity would provide substantial compensation to many manufacturers, particularly for top-selling products, far in excess of the cost of conducting these trials. Alternative strategies to incentivize the study of approved drugs for rare diseases may offer similar benefits at a lower cost. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  19. [Breastfeeding: health benefits for child and mother].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turck, D; Vidailhet, M; Bocquet, A; Bresson, J-L; Briend, A; Chouraqui, J-P; Darmaun, D; Dupont, C; Frelut, M-L; Girardet, J-P; Goulet, O; Hankard, R; Rieu, D; Simeoni, U

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of breastfeeding in France is one of the lowest in Europe: 65% of infants born in France in 2010 were breastfed when leaving the maternity ward. Exclusive breastfeeding allows normal growth until at least 6 months of age, and can be prolonged until the age of 2 years or more, provided that complementary feeding is started after 6 months. Breast milk contains hormones, growth factors, cytokines, immunocompetent cells, etc., and has many biological properties. The composition of breast milk is influenced by gestational and postnatal age, as well as by the moment of the feed. Breastfeeding is associated with slightly enhanced performance on tests of cognitive development. Exclusive breastfeeding for at least 3 months is associated with a lower incidence and severity of diarrhoea, otitis media and respiratory infection. Exclusive breastfeeding for at least 4 months is associated with a lower incidence of allergic disease (asthma, atopic dermatitis) during the first 2 to 3 years of life in at-risk infants (infants with at least one first-degree relative presenting with allergy). Breastfeeding is also associated with a lower incidence of obesity during childhood and adolescence, as well as with a lower blood pressure and cholesterolemia in adulthood. However, no beneficial effect of breastfeeding on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has been shown. Maternal infection with hepatitis B and C virus is not a contraindication to breastfeeding, as opposed to HIV infection and galactosemia. A supplementation with vitamin D and K is necessary in the breastfed infant. Very few medications contraindicate breastfeeding. Premature babies can be breastfed and/or receive mother's milk and/or bank milk, provided they receive energy, protein and mineral supplements. Return to prepregnancy weight is earlier in breastfeeding mothers during the 6 months following delivery. Breastfeeding is also associated with a decreased risk of breast and ovarian cancer in the

  20. Are fathers underused advocates for breastfeeding?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenosi, M

    2011-11-01

    Fathers\\' knowledge base and attitudes influence breastfeeding practice. We aimed to evaluate if Irish fathers felt included in the breastfeeding education and decision process. 67 fathers completed questionnaires, which assessed their role in the decision to breastfeed, knowledge regarding the benefits of breastfeeding and attitude towards breastfeeding.Forty-two (62.7%) of their partners were breastfeeding. Antenatal classes were attended by 38 (56.7%); 59 (88.1%) discussed breastfeeding with their partners and 26 (38.8%) felt that the decision was made together. Twelve (48%) fathers of formula fed infants were unaware that breastfeeding was healthier for the baby. Most fathers (80.6%) felt that breastfeeding was the mother\\'s decision and most (82.1%) felt that antenatal information was aimed at mothers only. Irish fathers remain relatively uninformed regarding the benefits of breastfeeding. This may contribute to their exclusion from the decision to breastfeed. Antenatal education should incorporate fathers more, and this may result in an improvement in our breastfeeding rates.

  1. Reversal of the decline in breastfeeding in Peninsular Malaysia? Ethnic and educational differentials and data quality issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaVanzo, J; Sine, J; Peterson, C; Haaga, J

    1994-01-01

    Data from the First and Second Malaysian Family Life Surveys in 1976 and 1988, respectively, are analyzed to examine long-term trends in breastfeeding in Peninsular Malaysia, educational and ethnic differences therein, and the quality of retrospective data on infant feeding. The steady decrease between the mid-1950's and mid-1970's in breastfeeding was reversed to become a nearly monotonic increase since 1975. Part of the change is attributable to the changing composition of the Malaysian population. Over time, the percentages of births to subgroups with higher rates of breastfeeding--particularly Malays and more highly educated women--have increased. However, there is also evidence of changes in rates of breastfeeding within these subgroups. Many Malaysian infants have a total duration of breastfeeding (including with supplementation) considerably shorter than WHO's recommended four months of exclusive (unsupplemented) breastfeeding. Moreover, nearly all breastfed infants are first given supplementary food or beverage shortly after birth. Breastfeeding promotion efforts in Malaysia need to emphasize the appropriate timing of and types of supplementary feeding.

  2. Use of Donor Human Milk and Maternal Breastfeeding Rates: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas; Nair, Harish; Simpson, Judith; Embleton, Nicholas

    2016-05-01

    The number of human milk banks is growing worldwide. The introduction of donor human milk (DHM) to neonatal units has been advocated as a strategy to promote maternal breastfeeding. However, concern has been raised that the introduction of DHM may actually lead to a decrease in maternal breastfeeding. To address this question, we conducted a systematic literature review of studies that assessed maternal breastfeeding rates before and after the introduction of DHM. We searched 7 electronic databases, carried out citation tracking, and contacted experts in the field. Where data for breastfeeding rates before and after the introduction of DHM were directly comparable, a relative risk was calculated. Our search identified 286 studies, of which 10 met the inclusion criteria. Definitions of patient populations and study outcomes varied, limiting meaningful comparison. Where possible, relative risks (RR) were calculated on aggregated data. The introduction of DHM had a significant positive impact on any breastfeeding on discharge (RR, 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.35;P= .005) but none on exclusive maternal breastfeeding on discharge (RR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.91-1.40;P= .27) or on exclusive administration of own mother's milk (OMM) days 1 to 28 of life (RR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.78-1.49; P= .65). A single-center study demonstrated a significant decrease in the percentage of feeds that were OMM after the introduction of DHM. In conclusion, the available data demonstrate some evidence of positive and negative effects on measures of maternal breastfeeding when DHM is introduced to a neonatal unit. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. [Implementation of a health promotion programme for women in social exclusion in the city of Seville (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Fernández-Viagas, Cristina; García Gil, Carmen; Bayo Barroso, Nora; Villalba Quesada, Cristina; Álvarez Girón, Manuela

    2018-01-09

    Health promotion can contribute towards reducing inequality and ensuring equal opportunities, providing the means to enable the entire population to develop its maximum health possibilities. Women living in areas with social transformation needs (ASTN) are an especially vulnerable group due to the situation of material deprivation and social exclusion in which they live. Health promotion programmes for this group can bring about an improvement in their health. This paper describes the health promotion programme Socio-educational Groups of Primary Care for Women (SEGPC-W), and evaluates its implementation in ASTN in the city of Seville (Spain), as well as the benefits and difficulties of its development through a documentary analysis and interviews with participating professionals. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Cesarean Delivery on Breastfeeding Practices and Duration: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Yan, Yan; Gao, Xiao; Xiang, Shiting; He, Qiong; Zeng, Guangyu; Liu, Shiping; Sha, Tingting; Li, Ling

    2018-01-01

    Mothers are encouraged to exclusively breastfeed for the first 6 months. However, cesarean delivery rates have increased worldwide, which may affect breastfeeding. Research aim: This study aimed to determine the potential effects of cesarean delivery on breastfeeding practices and breastfeeding duration. This was a 6-month cohort study extracted from a 24-month prospective cohort study of mother-infant pairs in three communities in Hunan, China. Data about participants' characteristics, delivery methods, breastfeeding initiation, use of formula in the hospital, exclusive breastfeeding, and any breastfeeding were collected at 1, 3, and 6 months following each infant's birth. The chi-square test, logistic regression model, and Cox proportional hazard regression model were used to examine the relationship between breastfeeding practices and cesarean delivery. The number of women who had a cesarean delivery was 387 (40.6%), and 567 (59.4%) women had a vaginal delivery. The exclusive breastfeeding rates at 1, 3, and 6 months were 80.2%, 67.4%, and 21.5%, respectively. Women who had a cesarean delivery showed a lower rate of exclusive breastfeeding and any breastfeeding than those who had a vaginal delivery ( p cesarean delivery was related with using formula in the hospital and delayed breastfeeding initiation. Cesarean delivery also shortened the breastfeeding duration (hazard ratio = 1.40, 95% confidence interval [1.06, 1.84]). Healthcare professionals should provide more breastfeeding skills to women who have a cesarean delivery and warn mothers about the dangers of elective cesarean section for breastfeeding practices.

  5. Do Hostile School Environments Promote Social Deviance by Shaping Neural Responses to Social Exclusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriber, Roberta A; Rogers, Christina R; Ferrer, Emilio; Conger, Rand D; Robins, Richard W; Hastings, Paul D; Guyer, Amanda E

    2018-03-01

    The present study examined adolescents' neural responses to social exclusion as a mediator of past exposure to a hostile school environment (HSE) and later social deviance, and whether family connectedness buffered these associations. Participants (166 Mexican-origin adolescents, 54.4% female) reported on their HSE exposure and family connectedness across Grades 9-11. Six months later, neural responses to social exclusion were measured. Finally, social deviance was self-reported in Grades 9 and 12. The HSE-social deviance link was mediated by greater reactivity to social deviance in subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, a region from the social pain network also implicated in social susceptibility. However, youths with stronger family bonds were protected from this neurobiologically mediated path. These findings suggest a complex interplay of risk and protective factors that impact adolescent behavior through the brain. © 2018 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  6. Breastfeeding Progression in Preterm Infants Is Influenced by Factors in Infants, Mothers and Clinical Practice: The Results of a National Cohort Study with High Breastfeeding Initiation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Hansen, Bo Moelholm; Kronborg, Hanne; Bojesen, Susanne Norby; Hallum, Karin; Frandsen, Annemi; Kyhnaeb, Anne; Svarer, Inge; Hallström, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Many preterm infants are not capable of exclusive breastfeeding from birth. To guide mothers in breastfeeding, it is important to know when preterm infants can initiate breastfeeding and progress. The aim was to analyse postmenstrual age (PMA) at breastfeeding milestones in different preterm gestational age (GA) groups, to describe rates of breastfeeding duration at pre-defined times, as well as analyse factors associated with PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Methods The study was part of a prospective survey of a national Danish cohort of preterm infants based on questionnaires and structured telephone interviews, including 1,221 mothers and their 1,488 preterm infants with GA of 24–36 weeks. Results Of the preterm infants, 99% initiated breastfeeding and 68% were discharged exclusively breastfed. Breastfeeding milestones were generally reached at different PMAs for different GA groups, but preterm infants were able to initiate breastfeeding at early times, with some delay in infants less than GA 32 weeks. Very preterm infants had lowest mean PMA (35.5 weeks) at first complete breastfeed, and moderate preterm infants had lowest mean PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding (36.4 weeks). Admitting mothers to the NICU together with the infant and minimising the use of a pacifier during breastfeeding transition were associated with 1.6 (95% CI 0.4–2.8) and 1.2 days (95% CI 0.1–2.3) earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding respectively. Infants that were small for gestational age were associated with 5.6 days (95% CI 4.1–7.0) later establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusion Breastfeeding competence is not developed at a fixed PMA, but is influenced by multiple factors in infants, mothers and clinical practice. Admitting mothers together with their infants to the NICU and minimising the use of pacifiers may contribute to earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. PMID:25251690

  7. Prevalence of Breastfeeding: Findings from the First Health Service Household Interview in Hunan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the development of economy and urbanization, methods of child-feeding have significantly changed in China over the past three decades. However, little is known about breastfeeding in China since 2009. This study aims to update information on the prevalence of breastfeeding in China. Methods: Data were obtained from the first Health Service Household Interview Survey of Hunan Province, China. Of 24,282 respondents, 1659 were aged five years or younger. We ran multivariable logistic regression to examine the impact of urban/rural setting, gender, age and household income per capita on the use of breastfeeding. Results: A total of 79.4% of children aged 5 years or younger had been breastfed at some point and 44.9% been breastfed exclusively in the first 6 months of life. After controlling for setting urban/rural setting, gender and child age, children from households with average family income were more likely to be breastfed than those from households with the lowest family income (adjusted odds ratio: 2.28. Children from households with higher and the highest family income were less likely to be exclusively breastfed in the first 6 months of life compared to those from households with the lowest family income (adjusted odds ratio: 0.51 and 0.68, respectively. Conclusions: It is encouraging that the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding for infants in the first 6 months of life in Hunan Province, China is approaching the goal of 50% proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO. Nevertheless, more efforts are needed to further promote exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months after birth.

  8. A qualitative study investigating the barriers to returning to work for breastfeeding mothers in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Deirdre; Meaney, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that mothers exclusively breastfeed for the first 6 months of an infant's life. In Ireland, currently paid maternity leave is 26 weeks and the expectant mother is required by law to finish work 2 weeks before her expected delivery date. Mothers wishing to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months or longer find themselves having to take holiday leave or unpaid leave from work in order to meet the WHO's guidelines. The aim of this study is to explore women's experiences of breastfeeding after their return to work in Ireland. This study was carried out utilizing a qualitative design. Initially 25 women who returned to the workforce while continuing to breastfeed were contacted, 16 women returned consent forms and were subsequently contacted to take part in an interview. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was employed to establish recurring patterns and themes throughout the interviews. Women noted that cultural attitudes in Ireland coupled with inadequate or inconsistent advice from health professionals posed the biggest challenge they had to overcome in order to achieve to 6 months exclusive breastfeeding. The findings of this study illustrate that mothers with the desire to continue to breastfeed after their return to work did so with some difficulty. Many did not disclose to their employers that they were breastfeeding and did not make enquiries about being facilitated to continue to breastfeed after their return to the workplace. The perceived lack of support from their employers as well as embarrassment about their breastfeeding status meant many women concealed that they were breastfeeding after their return to the workplace. While it has been suggested that WHO guidelines for exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months may be unattainable for many women due to work commitments, a different problem exists in Ireland. Mothers struggle to overcome cultural and societal obstacles coupled

  9. THE REGULATIONS RELATING TO FOODSTUFFS FOR INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN (R 991: A FORMULA FOR THE PROMOTION OF BREASTFEEDING OR CENSORSHIP OF COMMERCIAL SPEECH?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lize Mills

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of commercial speech in the interests of public health is an issue which recently has become the topic of numerous debates. Two examples of such governmental regulation are the subjects of discussion in this article, namely the prohibition on the advertising and promotion of tobacco products, as well as the proposed prohibition on the advertising and promotion of infant formulae and other foods and products marketed as being suitable for infants or young children. The article seek to evaluate the recently proposed regulations published in terms of the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act in the light of the reasoning by the Supreme Court of Appeal in the British American Tobacco South Africa (Pty Limited v Minister of Health 463/2011 [2012] ZASCA 107 (20 June 2012 decision, and in particular in terms of the section 36 test of reasonableness and proportionality found in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996. It argues that, although the South African Department of Health must be applauded for its attempt at improving public health in the country, some of the provisions of the proposed regulations are not constitutionally sound. It will be contended that, despite the fact that the promotion of breastfeeding is a laudable goal, the introduction only of measures which restrict the right to advertise these types of products will not necessarily achieve this objective.

  10. Ten steps or climbing a mountain: a study of Australian health professionals' perceptions of implementing the baby friendly health initiative to protect, promote and support breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Virginia; Gribble, Karleen; Sheehan, Athena; Taylor, Christine; Dykes, Fiona C

    2011-08-31

    The Baby Friendly Hospital (Health) Initiative (BFHI) is a global initiative aimed at protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding and is based on the ten steps to successful breastfeeding. Worldwide, over 20,000 health facilities have attained BFHI accreditation but only 77 Australian hospitals (approximately 23%) have received accreditation. Few studies have investigated the factors that facilitate or hinder implementation of BFHI but it is acknowledged this is a major undertaking requiring strategic planning and change management throughout an institution. This paper examines the perceptions of BFHI held by midwives and nurses working in one Area Health Service in NSW, Australia. The study used an interpretive, qualitative approach. A total of 132 health professionals, working across four maternity units, two neonatal intensive care units and related community services, participated in 10 focus groups. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified: 'Belief and Commitment'; 'Interpreting BFHI' and 'Climbing a Mountain'. Participants considered the BFHI implementation a high priority; an essential set of practices that would have positive benefits for babies and mothers both locally and globally as well as for health professionals. It was considered achievable but would take commitment and hard work to overcome the numerous challenges including a number of organisational constraints. There were, however, differing interpretations of what was required to attain BFHI accreditation with the potential that misinterpretation could hinder implementation. A model described by Greenhalgh and colleagues on adoption of innovation is drawn on to interpret the findings. Despite strong support for BFHI, the principles of this global strategy are interpreted differently by health professionals and further education and accurate information is required. It may be that the current processes used to disseminate and implement BFHI need to be

  11. Ten steps or climbing a mountain: A study of Australian health professionals' perceptions of implementing the baby friendly health initiative to protect, promote and support breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheehan Athena

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Baby Friendly Hospital (Health Initiative (BFHI is a global initiative aimed at protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding and is based on the ten steps to successful breastfeeding. Worldwide, over 20,000 health facilities have attained BFHI accreditation but only 77 Australian hospitals (approximately 23% have received accreditation. Few studies have investigated the factors that facilitate or hinder implementation of BFHI but it is acknowledged this is a major undertaking requiring strategic planning and change management throughout an institution. This paper examines the perceptions of BFHI held by midwives and nurses working in one Area Health Service in NSW, Australia. Methods The study used an interpretive, qualitative approach. A total of 132 health professionals, working across four maternity units, two neonatal intensive care units and related community services, participated in 10 focus groups. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Three main themes were identified: 'Belief and Commitment'; 'Interpreting BFHI' and 'Climbing a Mountain'. Participants considered the BFHI implementation a high priority; an essential set of practices that would have positive benefits for babies and mothers both locally and globally as well as for health professionals. It was considered achievable but would take commitment and hard work to overcome the numerous challenges including a number of organisational constraints. There were, however, differing interpretations of what was required to attain BFHI accreditation with the potential that misinterpretation could hinder implementation. A model described by Greenhalgh and colleagues on adoption of innovation is drawn on to interpret the findings. Conclusion Despite strong support for BFHI, the principles of this global strategy are interpreted differently by health professionals and further education and accurate information is required. It may be that the

  12. AWARENESS OF THE BENEFITS OF BREASTFEEDING AMONG ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    Breastfeeding is a cultural practice conferring important health and development benefits to. 1,2 children, families, communities and the nation. It is the fundamental component of the child-survival strategy. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative. (BFHI) was designed to support, protect and promote breastfeeding practices.

  13. Breastfeeding and the risk for diarrhea morbidity and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victora Cesar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of exclusive breastfeeding among infants 0-5 months of age and no breastfeeding among children 6-23 months of age are associated with increased diarrhea morbidity and mortality in developing countries. We estimate the protective effects conferred by varying levels of breastfeeding exposure against diarrhea incidence, diarrhea prevalence, diarrhea mortality, all-cause mortality, and hospitalization for diarrhea illness. Methods We systematically reviewed all literature published from 1980 to 2009 assessing levels of suboptimal breastfeeding as a risk factor for selected diarrhea morbidity and mortality outcomes. We conducted random effects meta-analyses to generate pooled relative risks by outcome and age category. Results We found a large body of evidence for the protective effects of breastfeeding against diarrhea incidence, prevalence, hospitalizations, diarrhea mortality, and all-cause mortality. The results of random effects meta-analyses of eighteen included studies indicated varying degrees of protection across levels of breastfeeding exposure with the greatest protection conferred by exclusive breastfeeding among infants 0-5 months of age and by any breastfeeding among infants and young children 6-23 months of age. Specifically, not breastfeeding resulted in an excess risk of diarrhea mortality in comparison to exclusive breastfeeding among infants 0-5 months of age (RR: 10.52 and to any breastfeeding among children aged 6-23 months (RR: 2.18. Conclusions Our findings support the current WHO recommendation for exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life as a key child survival intervention. Our findings also highlight the importance of breastfeeding to protect against diarrhea-specific morbidity and mortality throughout the first 2 years of life.

  14. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental Health Pain Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually Transmitted Infections ... breastfeeding Overcoming challenges Common questions about breastfeeding and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch ...

  15. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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  16. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... and mission Leadership Programs and activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages ... breastfeeding myths Breastfeeding myths in the African-American community Incredible facts about babies, breastmilk, and breastfeeding Overcoming ...

  17. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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  18. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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  19. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... Find out what worked for other breastfeeding moms. What breastfeeding means to me YouTube embed video: < ... you strong while breastfeeding. Learn more about the foods you should eat. Previous Page Next Page It's ...

  20. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... Page It's Only Natural resources Related information Breastfeeding Pregnancy Resources Your Guide to Breastfeeding Support for Nursing Moms in the Workplace: Employer Solutions Blog topics Breastfeeding: Natural Doesn’t ...

  1. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... public Laws that support breastfeeding 10 things moms can do while breastfeeding My breastfeeding story Partner resources ... a> Learn the unique ways that breastmilk can improve your child’s health and lower the risk ...

  2. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... facts about babies, breastmilk, and breastfeeding Overcoming challenges Common questions about breastfeeding and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch Finding support It takes a village: Building ...

  3. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... public Laws that support breastfeeding 10 things moms can do while breastfeeding My breastfeeding story Partner resources ... Folic acid Heart-healthy eating Iron-deficiency anemia ...

  4. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... and jobs View all pages in this section Home It's Only Natural Planning ahead It's Only Natural Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding myths Overcoming challenges Finding ...

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  6. Breastfeeding progression in preterm infants is influenced by factors in infants, mothers and clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Hansen, Bo Moelholm; Kronborg, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    . Infants that were small for gestational age were associated with 5.6 days (95% CI 4.1-7.0) later establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. CONCLUSION: Breastfeeding competence is not developed at a fixed PMA, but is influenced by multiple factors in infants, mothers and clinical practice. Admitting......BACKGROUND AND AIM: Many preterm infants are not capable of exclusive breastfeeding from birth. To guide mothers in breastfeeding, it is important to know when preterm infants can initiate breastfeeding and progress. The aim was to analyse postmenstrual age (PMA) at breastfeeding milestones...... in different preterm gestational age (GA) groups, to describe rates of breastfeeding duration at pre-defined times, as well as analyse factors associated with PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. METHODS: The study was part of a prospective survey of a national Danish cohort of preterm infants...

  7. A rapid ethnographic study of breastfeeding in the North and South of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passamonte Raquel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The past ten years have witnessed a rising trend in the prevalence and duration of breastfeeding in Italy, but breastfeeding rates increase in an unequal way; they are higher in the North of Italy than in the South. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences, expectations and beliefs of a sample of mothers, and to identify differences, if any, between the North and the South of Italy. Methods The study was conducted in two regions of Italy, Friuli Venezia Giulia in the Northeast and Basilicata in the South. Two hundred and seventy-nine mothers of infants and children 6 to 23 months of age were interviewed using an 85-item questionnaire including closed and open questions on infant feeding experiences and beliefs, sources of information and support, reasons for intended and actual choices and practices, and some demographic and social variables. Face-to-face interviews were conducted between May 2001 and September 2002. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used for data analysis. Results The distribution of the mothers by age, education, employment and parity did not differ from that of the general population of the two regions. The reported rates of initiation and duration of breastfeeding were also similar: 95% started breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding was 32% at three and 9% at six months, with 64% and 35% of any breastfeeding, respectively. Some differences were reported in the rates of full breastfeeding, reflecting different ages of introduction of non-nutritive fluids. These, as well as nutritive fluids – including infant formula – and complementary foods, were introduced far too early. Advice on infant feeding was generally provided by health professionals and often was not based on up-to-date recommendations. Mothers were generally aware of the advantages of breastfeeding, but at the same time reported problems that they were not able to solve alone or through social and health system

  8. Vivências maternas associadas ao aleitamento materno exclusivo mais duradouro: um estudo etnográfico Vivencias de madres asociadas a la lactancia materna exclusiva más duradera: un estudio etnográfico Maternal experiences associated with longer term exclusive breastfeeding: an ethnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Guizardi Polido

    2011-01-01

    . RESULTADOS: El amamantamiento se presentó como evento particular en los diferentes contextos de su ocurrencia, sin embargo fue posible identificar que la lactancia exclusiva estuvo ligado a la determinación materna, a pesar de las dificultades vividas. La lactancia materna exclusiva más duradera se relacionó a las madres que se mostraron motivadas con la práctica, concientes de sus beneficios y apoyadas por la familia, aun frente a la interferencia contraria de su medio cultural. CONCLUSIÓN: La ausencia de determinación materna para amamantar exclusivamente debe ser investigada y, cuando presente, recibir abordaje especial de los profesionales de salud.OBJECTIVE: To describe the experiences of breastfeeding mothers using the Unified Health System who were seeking to obtain knowledge, expectations, perceptions and feelings involved with identifying aspects relevant for more prolonged, exclusive breastfeeding. METHODS: A qualitative ethnographic study conducted with eight primiparas and family references, through observation and household interviews during the first semester of the infants' lives. The data were summarized in three categories: starting breastfeeding; experiencing the process of early weaning; maintaining exclusive breastfeeding. RESULTS: Breastfeeding appeared as a particular event in different contexts of occurrence, however, it was possible to identify that exclusive breastfeeding was linked to maternal determination, despite the difficulties experienced. Longer lasting exclusive breastfeeding was related to the mothers who were highly motivated to practice, those who were aware of its benefits and were supported by their family, even in the face of interference contrary to their culture. CONCLUSION: The lack of determination for exclusive maternal breastfeeding should be investigated and, when present, receive special consideration by health professionals.

  9. High initiation and long duration of breastfeeding despite absence of early skin-to-skin contact in Karen refugees on the Thai-Myanmar border: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Adrienne L; Carrara, Verena I; Paw, Moo Kho; Malika; Dahbu, Colleypaw; Gross, Mechthild M; Stuetz, Wolfgang; Nosten, Francois H; McGready, Rose

    2012-12-13

    Early skin-to-skin contact (SSC) after birth is recommended as part of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) baby friendly health initiative to promote optimum breastfeeding. This paper reports rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration in a low resource environment, where early SSC is not practised, and explores views of pregnant women and midwives surrounding breastfeeding and swaddling. Data from records from a single hospital on the Thai-Myanmar border where refugee women gave birth during a one-year period (2010) were used to determine breastfeeding initiation rates and the time of the first breastfeed, and duration of breastfeeding of the previous alive child in multigravidae. Focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted to obtain information from pregnant women attending antenatal care about their intended or previous duration of breastfeeding and views on breastfeeding. Interviews with local midwives explored reasons for high rates of breastfeeding in this setting and the practice of newborn swaddling. Of 1404 live births in 2010 in Maela refugee camp there were 982 evaluable mother-newborn pairs, including 80 infants born before 37 weeks gestation. Initiation of breastfeeding within the first hour after birth and exclusive breastfeeding at discharge in term mother-newborn pairs was 91.2% (823/902) and 99.3% (896/902); and before 37 weeks gestation, 48.8% (39/80) and 98.8% (79/80). Reported duration of previous breastfeeding was 19 (range 2 to 72) months.During FGD all primigravidae (n = 17) intended to breastfeed and all multigravidae (n = 33) had previously breastfed; expected or previous duration of feeding was for more than one year or longer. The major theme identified during FGD was breastfeeding is "good". Women stated their intention to breastfeed with certainty. This certainty was echoed during the interviews with midwifery staff. SSC requires a delay in early swaddling that in Karen people, with animistic beliefs, could risk loss

  10. Hospital discharge bags and breastfeeding at 6 months: data from the infant feeding practices study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadacharan, Radha; Grossman, Xena; Matlak, Stephanie; Merewood, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Distribution of industry-sponsored formula sample packs to new mothers undermines breastfeeding. Using data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II (IFPS II), we aimed to determine whether receipt of 4 different types of bags was associated with exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life. We extracted data from IFPS II questionnaires. Type of discharge bag received was categorized as "formula bag," "coupon bag," "breastfeeding supplies bag," or "no bag". We examined exclusive breastfeeding status at 10 weeks (post hoc) and at 6 months using univariate descriptive analyses and multivariate logistic regression models, controlling for sociodemographic and attitudinal variables. Overall, 1868 (81.4%) of women received formula bags, 96 (4.2%) received coupon bags, 46 (2.0%) received breastfeeding supplies bags, and 284 (12.4%) received no bag. By 10 weeks, recipients of breastfeeding supplies bags or no bag were significantly more likely to be exclusively breastfeeding than formula bag recipients. In the adjusted model, compared to formula bag/coupon bag recipients, recipients of breastfeeding supplies bag/no bag were significantly more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months (odds ratio = 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.36). The vast majority of new mothers received formula sample packs at discharge, and this was associated with reduced exclusive breastfeeding at 10 weeks and 6 months. Bags containing breastfeeding supplies or no bag at all were positively associated with exclusive breastfeeding at 10 weeks and 6 months.

  11. Does breastfeeding influence the risk of developing diabetes mellitus in children? A review of current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Feliciano Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to perform a review to investigate the influence of breastfeeding as a protective agent against the onset of diabetes in children. SOURCES: Non-systematic review of SciELO, LILACS, MEDLINE, Scopus, and VHL databases, and selection of the 52 most relevant studies. A total of 21 articles, specifically on the topic, were analyzed (nine related to type 1 diabetes and 12 to type 2 diabetes. DATA SYNTHESIS: The duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding, as well as the early use of cow's milk, have been shown to be important risk factors for developing diabetes. It is believed that human milk contains substances that promote the maturation of the immune system, which protect against the onset of type 1 diabetes. Moreover, human milk has bioactive substances that promote satiety and energy balance, preventing excess weight gain during childhood, thus protecting against the development of type 2 diabetes. Although the above mentioned benefits have not been observed by some researchers, inaccuracies on dietary habit reports during childhood and the presence of interfering factors have been considered responsible for the lack of identification of beneficial effects. CONCLUSION: Given the scientific evidence indicated in most published studies, it is believed that the lack of breastfeeding can be a modifiable risk factor for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Strategies aiming at the promotion and support of breastfeeding should be used by trained healthcare professionals in order to prevent the onset of diabetes.

  12. Perceived family perceptions of breastfeeding and Chinese new mothers' breastfeeding behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Li, Hongyan; Ma, Shuqin; Xia, Lijuan; Christensson, Kyllike

    2011-11-01

    To provide an understanding of Chinese new mothers' breastfeeding behaviors and especially to explore the relationship between the mothers perceived family perception about breastfeeding and the new mothers' breastfeeding behaviors. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in Beijing and Yinchuan, the capital of Ning Xia Province, China. 214 new mothers with a baby at the age of 4 months were recruited to the study. The family perception of breastfeeding scale and the new mothers' breastfeeding behavior record were used. The response rate was n=200, 94%. Most of the new mothers perceived positive family perceptions about breastfeeding with an average score of 23.13 using the family perception of breastfeeding scale. Nearly half of the respondents reported that they exclusively breastfed their infants (n=94, 47%). The main reason for breastfeeding difficulty was inadequate lactation (n=56, 69%). The new mothers who breastfed their infants mentioned significantly stronger family perceptions/support compared to those who used mixed feeding or artificial feeding (p0.05) in the types of mothers' feeding behaviors across the different age group, occupation, ethnicity, educational level, mode of delivery, the time of the baby's first suck, bottle feeding before the baby's first suck and the time of having colostrums. It is suggested to develop some strategies, such as family-centered antenatal and postnatal education programmes, to increase the rate of exclusive breastfeeding by influencing new mothers' families about breastfeeding. Further research is needed to explore socio-demographic variables associated with new-mothers' breastfeeding behaviors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Breastfeeding knowledge, attitude, perceived behavior, and intention among female undergraduate university students in the Middle East: the case of Lebanon and Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamade, Haya; Naja, Farah; Keyrouz, Sarah; Hwalla, Nahla; Karam, Jeanette; Al-Rustom, Lea; Nasreddine, Lara

    2014-06-01

    The Middle East has one of the lowest rates of exclusive breastfeeding in the world, highlighting the need to promote breastfeeding in this region. Young adults represent a key population of interest, since decisions about infant-feeding appear to be made before children are even conceived. To examine breastfeeding knowledge, attitude, and perceived behavior among female undergraduate students in Lebanon and Syria and determine factors associated with intention to breastfeed in this population. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2010/11 in Damascus and Beirut. Four universities were selected in each city. A multicomponent questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of participants (n = 194 from Beirut and n = 199 from Damascus). The questionnaire included breastfeeding knowledge (measured by the Infant Feeding Knowledge Test Form), attitude (Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale), perceived behavior (Breastfeeding Behavior Questionnaire), and intention (Infant Feeding Intention Scale). Factors associated with intention to breastfeed were examined by multivariate linear regression analysis. The participants had an average breastfeeding knowledge level (mean score, 10.39 +/- 2.09) and neutral perceived behavior (mean score, 22.00 +/- 3.68), while having relatively positive attitudes (mean score, 58.12 +/- 6.49). Knowledge gaps and negative perceptions were identified, particularly linked to breastfeeding in public and among working mothers. Breastfeeding intention was found to be significantly associated with knowledge and attitude in Lebanon (beta = 0.103 and beta = 0.230, respectively), and with perceived behavior in Syria (beta = -0.135). By revealing specific knowledge gaps and misconceptions and identifying country-specific disparities in the predictors of the intention to breastfeed, the findings of this study may provide a basis for devising culture-specific interventions aimed at promoting breastfeeding.

  14. Breastfeeding: guidance received in prenatal care, delivery and postpartum care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Caroline Barbieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the guidelines considering breastfeeding given by health professionals to women during prenatal care, delivery and postpartum care. Quantitative and descriptive work developed at Regional Pinheiros, Maringá-PR, from the registry in SisPreNatal, from May to August 2009. Data were collected through interviews conducted with parents at home, using a structured instrument. Participants were 36 mothers, most of whom received counseling for breastfeeding during prenatal (58.3%, maternity (87.6% and in nursing visits to newborn (84.6%. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding was 37.5%, even with the end of maternity leave. The rate is still below the recommended by the World Health Organization for exclusive breastfeeding. The present results may contribute to the monitoring of health actions and development of new strategies in the maintenance of exclusive breastfeeding.

  15. Workplace breastfeeding support for hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgson, Joan E; Chee, Yuet-Oi; Yap, Tian Sew

    2004-07-01

    Breastfeeding initiation rates have been steadily rising in Hong Kong, but most employed women wean prior to returning to work. While health care providers promote breastfeeding, women receive little support from employers. A few health care facilities offer some workplace breastfeeding support, but little is known about the specific types and amount of support that are offered. This paper reports a study whose aim was to describe workplace supports available to breastfeeding women employed by hospitals that provide maternity services in Hong Kong, and to determine if differences in workplace supports exist based on the hospitals' numbers of employees or funding source. In late 2001, a cross-sectional survey was completed by nurse managers or lactation consultants most knowledgeable about supports to breastfeeding employees in 19 hospitals. The number of workplace breastfeeding supports or Breastfeeding Support Score (M = 7.47; sd = 3.37) varied considerably. Mean Breastfeeding Support Score for government-funded hospitals was significantly higher (t = 2.31; P = 0.03) than for private hospitals. Of the 14 hospitals that had a designated space for using a breast pump, only five (26.3%) had a private room with a door that locked. Only two hospitals (11.1%) allowed employees to take breaks as needed to use a pump; employees in 10 (55.6%) had to use their meal and regular break times. Hospitals having a hospital-wide committee that addressed workplace breastfeeding issues had a more supportive environment for breastfeeding employees. Although all surveyed hospitals returned the questionnaire, the sample size was small. It was difficult to ensure accuracy and to differentiate subtle variations in the services provided using a self-report survey. Facilitating continued breastfeeding after employees' return to work requires that employers understand the needs of breastfeeding employees. Policy at the level of the employer and government is an essential component of

  16. Patterns and determinants of breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices of Emirati Mothers in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Hadia

    2013-02-25

    Breastfeeding is the preferred method of feeding for the infant. The present study aimed at investigating the different infant feeding practices and the influencing factors in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A convenient sample of 593 Emirati mothers who had infants up to 2 years of age was interviewed. The interviews included a detailed questionnaire and conducted in the Maternal and Child Health Centers (MCH) and Primary Health Centers (PHC) in three cities. Almost all the mothers in the study had initiated breastfeeding (98%). The mean duration of breastfeeding was 8.6 months. The initiation and duration of breastfeeding rates were influenced by mother's age (Pbreastfeeding practices. Among the 593 infants in the study, 24.1% had complementary feeding, 25% of the infants were exclusively breastfed, and 49.4% were predominantly breastfed since birth. About 30% of the infants were given nonmilk fluids such as: Anis seed drink (Yansun), grippe water and tea before 3 months of age. The majority of the infants (83.5%) in the three areas received solid food before the age of 6 months. A variety of reasons were reported as perceived by mothers for terminating breastfeeding. The most common reasons were: new pregnancy (32.5%), insufficient milk supply (24.4%) and infant weaned itself (24.4%). In conclusion, infant and young child feeding practices in this study were suboptimal. There is a need for a national community-based breastfeeding intervention programme and for the promotion of exclusive breastfeeding as part of a primary public health strategy to decrease health risks and problems in the UAE.

  17. Effectiveness of an implementation strategy for a breastfeeding guideline in Primary Care: cluster randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín-Iglesias Susana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protection and promotion of breastfeeding is considered a priority in Europe where only 22% of infants less than 6 months old are exclusively breastfed. In Spain this percentage reaches 24.8% but in our city it falls to 18.26%. Various studies emphasise that the improvement of these results should be based upon the training of health professionals. Following the recommendations of a breastfeeding guide can modify the practice of health professionals and improve results with respect to exclusively or predominatly breastfed children at 6 months of age. Method/Design This study involves a community based cluster randomized trial in primary healthcare centres in Leganés (Madrid, Spain. The project aims to determine whether the use of an implementation strategy (including training session, information distribution, opinion leader of a breastfeeding guideline in primary care is more effective than usual diffusion. The number of patients required will be 240 (120 in each arm. It will be included all the mothers of infants born during the study period (6 months who come to the health centre on the first visit of the child care programme and who give their consent to participate. The main outcome variable is the exclusive o predominant breastfeeding at 6 moths of age.. Main effectiveness will be analyzed by comparing the percentage of infants with exclusive or predominant breastfeeding at 6 months between the intervention group and the control group. All statistical tests will be performed with intention to treat. Logistic regression with random effects will be used to adjust for prognostic factors. Confounding factors or factors that might alter the effect recorded will be taken into account in this analysis. Discussion Strategies need to be found which facilitate the giving of effective advice on breastfeeding by professionals and which provide support to women during the breastfeeding period. By applying the guide

  18. Development of the breastfeeding quality improvement in hospitals learning collaborative in New York state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Eileen; Dennison, Barbara A; Welge, Sara Bonam; Hisgen, Stephanie; Boyce, Patricia Simino; Waniewski, Patricia A

    2013-06-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is a public health priority. A strong body of evidence links maternity care practices, based on the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, to increased breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. Despite having written breastfeeding policies, New York (NY) hospitals vary widely in reported maternity care practices and in prevalence rates of breastfeeding, especially exclusive breastfeeding, during the birth hospitalization. To improve hospital maternity care practices, breastfeeding support, and the percentage of infants exclusively breastfeeding, the NY State Department of Health developed the Breastfeeding Quality Improvement in Hospitals (BQIH) Learning Collaborative. The BQIH Learning Collaborative was the first to use the Institute for Health Care Improvement's Breakthrough Series methodology to specifically focus on increasing hospital breastfeeding support. The evidence-based maternity care practices from the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding provided the basis for the Change Package and Data Measurement Plan. The present article describes the development of the BQIH Learning Collaborative. The engagement of breastfeeding experts, partners, and stakeholders in refining the Learning Collaborative design and content, in defining the strategies and interventions (Change Package) that drive hospital systems change, and in developing the Data Measurement Plan to assess progress in meeting the Learning Collaborative goals and hospital aims is illustrated. The BQIH Learning Collaborative is a model program that was implemented in a group of NY hospitals with plans to spread to additional hospitals in NY and across the country.

  19. Social and institutional factors that affect breastfeeding duration among WIC participants in Los Angeles County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langellier, Brent A; Pia Chaparro, M; Whaley, Shannon E

    2012-12-01

    Hospital practices and early maternal return to work are associated with breastfeeding duration; however, research has not documented the long-term effects of many hospital policies or the effect of early return to work on breastfeeding outcomes of WIC participants. This study investigated the impact of in-hospital breastfeeding, receipt of a formula discharge pack, and maternal return to work on the long-term breastfeeding outcomes of 4,725 WIC participants in Los Angeles County, California. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess determinants of exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months and breastfeeding at 6, 12, and 24 months. In-hospital initiation of breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding in the hospital, receipt of a formula discharge pack, and maternal return to work before 3 months were all significantly associated with breastfeeding outcomes after controlling for known confounders. Mothers who exclusively breastfed in the hospital were eight times as likely as mothers who did not breastfeed in the hospital to reach the AAP recommendation of breastfeeding for 12 months or longer (P breastfeeding for 6 months or more, and just one-third reported any breastfeeding at 12 months. Nine in ten respondents received a formula discharge pack in the hospital. Mothers who received a discharge pack were half as likely to exclusively breastfeed at 6 months as those who did not receive one (P < .01). Medical providers should educate, encourage, and support WIC mothers to breastfeed in the hospital and refrain from giving formula discharge packs.

  20. Validity and reliability of breastfeeding attitude scale in Indonesian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lower levels of maternal confidence have been found to be associated with perception of insufficient milk supply and risk for premature discontinuation of breastfeeding. Current WHO/UNICEF recommendations for optimal infant feeding are exclusive breastfeeding for approximately the first 6 months postpartum, after which ...

  1. Commitment and capacity for the support of breastfeeding in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper aims to summarise current evidence and highlight best practices, in order to propose a paediatric food-based dietary guideline (FBDG) on exclusive breastfeeding for South Africa. A literature search was conducted to profile the current nutritional status of children and breastfeeding practices in South Africa, ...

  2. Breastfeeding practices of mothers of young children in Lagos, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-06-23

    Jun 23, 2013 ... Breastfeeding has many benefits both to mother and the child. It confers ... ies have shown that infants who are exclusively breast- fed for 6 months ... This study therefore, examines breast-feeding practices among mothers in ...

  3. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding was such a natural choice. Secrets to breastfeeding success YouTube embed video: breastfeeding. The benefits of breastfeeding YouTube embed video: Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... celebrity moms who breastfeed Fitting breastfeeding into your life Breastfeeding in daily life: At home and in public Laws that support ... Overcoming challenges Finding support Fitting breastfeeding into your life Partner resources Subscribe To receive Breastfeeding email updates ...

  4. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages in this section Back to section menu It's Only Natural Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding myths Breastfeeding myths in ...

  5. Variáveis que influenciam a manutenção do aleitamento materno exclusivo Variables que influencian la manutención del amamantamiento materno exclusivo Variables that influence the maintenance of exclusive breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Zanon Narchi

    2009-03-01

    la mujer durante el proceso de parto y nacimiento influye de forma directa en el amamantar.This is a descriptive, exploratory and retrospective study, with a quantitative approach, performed in a low-income community in São Paulo, with the purpose to identify whether the maintenance of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF in the first six months is influenced by the following variables: early contact in the first hour after birth, permanence in joint lodging, type of delivery and type of hospital. Data were collected from 75 medical records and analyzed with the methodology of generalized estimate equations. The results showed that the variables joint lodging, type of hospital and type of delivery interfered in the maintenance of EBF; however, that was not the case with early contact. It was concluded that the EBF indexes were higher in cases where the mother and the baby remained together after the birth, in baby-friendly hospitals and after normal deliveries. It was also observed that the care received by the mother during the process of delivery and birth influences breastfeeding directly.

  6. Breastfeeding (Un)Covered: Narratives of Public Breastfeeding on Romanian Discussion Forums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tăut, Diana

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the construction of breastfeeding in public, as depicted in the stories and the opinions of women participating in discussions on public forums. There were 8 discussion forums selected, from which 769 messages were subjected to a narrative analysis further informed by recurrent themes identified in the literature and across messages. The emerging narratives were grouped based on their valence, and three broader categories of themes were formed, highlighting the predominant tone towards breastfeeding in public. The three broader themes, 'public restraint of breast(feeding) as acknowledgement of the cultural status-quo', 'permission within boundaries' and 'breast(feeding) as a human right', depict various meanings and experiences associated with public breastfeeding. People seeing breasts as mainly a cultural symbol of sexuality were more against public breastfeeding and more in favour of covering up or striving to discretion. Those arguing that breastfeeding is no more than exercising a fundamental right and pleading for breast as a primary maternal symbol were more in favour of breastfeeding in public. Aiming to understand personal and social perspectives on public breastfeeding is informative for understanding cultural differences in breastfeeding rates but also for designing effective interventions to promote it.

  7. Breastfeeding Education: Where Are We Going? A Systematic Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Maria Adriana; Laganà, Antonio Simone; Sicilia, Angela; Prosperi Porta, Romana; Porpora, Maria Grazia; Ban Frangež, Helena; DI Venti, Giovanni; Triolo, Onofrio

    2016-08-01

    UNICEF (United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund) and WHO estimate that if all babies were breastfed for at least the first six months of their lives, the rate of morbidity and malnutrition would significantly decrease all over the world. In this view, these two organizations promoted a worldwide campaign for breastfeeding, creating the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) that encourages good practices for the promotion of breastfeeding in hospitals. The aim of our study was to review the available evidence regarding the positive effects of breastfeeding, in order to suggest to most appropriate strategy to support it. The main databases including Scopus, PubMed, MEDLINE, Google scholar and Science Direct were researched to obtain the original papers related to breastfeeding education. The main terms used to literature search were "Breastfeeding education", Breastfeeding support", and "Breastfeeding healthcare policy". The timeframe included the obtained articles was from 1980 to 2015. Our analysis confirms that healthcare providers play a pivotal role in education and encouraging mothers to begin and continue breastfeeding. In this view, the adequate training of healthcare providers seems to be mandatory in order to support this practice. Moreover, adequate facilities are needed in order to promote and support breastfeeding. Considering the available evidence, breastfeeding should be supported among all the mothers. Based on the positive data emerging from the public awareness campaign in different Countries of the world, we strongly encourage an accurate training for doctors and midwives and the implementation of adequate facilities in order to support breastfeeding.

  8. Attitude of Nursing Mothers In Edo State Towards Exclusive | Alutu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secondly, practice of exclusive breast-feeding adversely affected by the nursing mothers\\' nature of work. The nurses and teachers were more favourably disposed to exclusive breast-feeding than the bankers. There is therefore need to provide an enabling environment for working mothers to cope with infant feeding and ...

  9. [Breastfeeding: health, prevention, and environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of research in the field of neuroscience and human microbiome indicates the primal period (from preconceptional up to the early years of a child's life) as crucial to the future of the individual, opening new scenarios for the understanding of the processes underlying the human health. In recent decades, the social representation of infant feeding moved in fact from the normality of breastfeeding to the normal use of artificial formulas and bottle-feeding. Even the scientific thinking and the research production have been influenced by this phenomenon. In fact, a clear dominance of studies aimed to show the benefits of breast milk compared to formula milk rather than the risks of the latter compared to the biological norm of breastfeeding. Mother milk affects infant health also through his/her microbiome. Microbial colonisation startes during intrauterine life and continues through the vaginal canal at birth, during skin to skin contact immediately after birth, with colostrum and breastfeeding. The microbial exposure of infants delivered by the mother influences the development of the child microbiota, by programming his/her future health. However, rewriting the biological normality implies also a health professional paradigm shift such as departing from the systematic separation mother-child at birth, sticking at fixed schedules for breastfeeding time and duration, as it still happens in many birth centres. Breastfeeding has economic implications and the increase of its prevalence is associated with significant reduction of avoidable hospital admissions and medical care costs, both for the child and for the mother. Success in breastfeeding is the result of complex social interactions and not simply of an individual choice. However, any successful strategy must be oriented to the mother empowerment. Therefore, health professionals and community stakeholders have to learn and practice the health promotion approach, particularly avoiding

  10. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding among mothers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    work, family pressure and ignorance adversely affect the willingness of women to practise EBF.7,8 The need to return to work or school has also been .... apparently favours better EBF performance, especially among women with at least ...

  11. Breastfeeding Knowledge and Attitudes amongst Health Workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract This cross-sectional study was designed to assess the knowledge and ... exclusive breastfeeding and giving colostrum to newborns. However, 8.3% ... Beyond the immediate benefits for children, breastfeed- ing contributes to a ...

  12. Breastfeeding practices and determinants in infants from birth to six ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-26

    Apr 26, 2016 ... some West African countries exclusive breastfeeding rates are estimated at 20% ... was obtained from the Human Research and Ethics. Committee of the .... mothers. The benefits of breast milk known by different percentages ...

  13. Determinants of breastfeeding patterns among mothers in Anambra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life is still rare among nursing mothers. ... A prospective cohort study was conducted in three comprehensive health centres ... valuable benefits to the infants as well as to mothers and the nation.

  14. Body Shape and Weight Loss as Motivators for Breastfeeding Initiation and Continuation

    OpenAIRE

    Sophie C. Schalla; Gemma L. Witcomb; Emma Haycraft

    2017-01-01

    Breastfeeding rates in the UK are low. Efforts to promote breastfeeding typically include the known health benefits for mother and child, many of which are not immediate. Gaining immediate benefits can be effective motivators of behaviour. Body-related changes resulting from breastfeeding could be an immediate benefit. This study explored breastfeeding mothers? reports of body-related changes as benefits of breastfeeding. Mothers (N = 182) who currently, or had recently, breastfed an infant c...

  15. Health professionals' advice for breastfeeding problems: not good enough!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Lisa H; Ingram, Jennifer

    2008-09-11

    Jane Scott and colleagues have recently published a paper in the International Breastfeeding Journal showing that health professionals are still giving harmful advice to women with mastitis. We see the management of mastitis as an illustration of health professionals' management of wider breastfeeding issues. If health professionals don't know how to manage this common problem, how can they be expected to manage less common conditions such as a breast abscess or nipple/breast candidiasis? There is an urgent need for more clinical research into breastfeeding problems and to improve the education of health professionals to enable them to promote breastfeeding and support breastfeeding women.

  16. Health professionals' advice for breastfeeding problems: Not good enough!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Lisa H

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jane Scott and colleagues have recently published a paper in the International Breastfeeding Journal showing that health professionals are still giving harmful advice to women with mastitis. We see the management of mastitis as an illustration of health professionals' management of wider breastfeeding issues. If health professionals don't know how to manage this common problem, how can they be expected to manage less common conditions such as a breast abscess or nipple/breast candidiasis? There is an urgent need for more clinical research into breastfeeding problems and to improve the education of health professionals to enable them to promote breastfeeding and support breastfeeding women.

  17. Maternal breastfeeding and children's cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kanghyock

    2017-08-01

    Do children with lower test scores benefit more from breastfeeding than those with higher scores? In this paper, I examine the distributional effects of maternal breastfeeding on the cognitive test scores of 11,544 children who were born in 2000 and 2001 in the United Kingdom using a semiparametric quantile regression model. I find evidence that maternal breastfeeding has larger positive impacts on children with lower test scores. Effects for children below the 20th percentile are about 2-2.5 times greater than those for children above the 80 th percentile. I also find that these distributional effects are larger when the duration of breastfeeding is extended. One policy implication is that a public policy aims at promoting breastfeeding might narrow a disparity in children's cognition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Breastfeeding as an environment preserving facto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Amaral Martins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to determine the knowledge on breastfeeding acquired by women during the pregnant and puerperal period and to check if the breastfeeding benefits for the environment preservation were referred by the mothers. METHODS: this is a documental, descriptive and quantitative by nature research, with secondary data, collected from records of “Vamos amamentar, mamãe?” ("Let's breastfeed, mom?" extension project, resultant from the mothers monitoring during the 2008 year, with a total of 116 mothers. RESULTS: most mothers are in the age group from 14 to 18 years (31.89%; 57.75% have only primary level; 62.06% have stable relationship/married; 92.24% report having received information about breastfeeding during prenatal care, among which the highlights were: exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months (45.68%; pregnant women feeding (47.41%; breasts care 28 (24.13%, while: milking, myths’ clarification and non-use of bottles and pacifiers each submitted, only (0.86%, noting also that breastfeeding as an environment preservation factor was not mentioned. CONCLUSION: the mothers hold a reasonable knowledge of breastfeeding. Health professionals have an important role in stimulating and implementing new works focused on a practice that considers this subject from a multidimensional perspective, considering the complex bio-psycho-socio-cultural-environmental-emotional factors involving breastfeeding.

  19. Maternal Nonstandard Work Schedules and Breastfeeding Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilanawala, Afshin

    2017-06-01

    Objectives Although maternal employment rates have increased in the last decade in the UK, there is very little research investigating the linkages between maternal nonstandard work schedules (i.e., work schedules outside of the Monday through Friday, 9-5 schedule) and breastfeeding initiation and duration, especially given the wide literature citing the health advantages of breastfeeding for mothers and children. Methods This paper uses a population-based, UK cohort study, the Millennium Cohort Study (n = 17,397), to investigate the association between types of maternal nonstandard work (evening, night, away from home overnight, and weekends) and breastfeeding behaviors. Results In unadjusted models, exposure to evening shifts was associated with greater odds of breastfeeding initiation (OR 1.71, CI 1.50-1.94) and greater odds of short (OR 1.55, CI 1.32-1.81), intermediate (OR 2.01, CI 1.64-2.47), prolonged partial duration (OR 2.20, CI 1.78-2.72), and prolonged exclusive duration (OR 1.53, CI 1.29-1.82), compared with mothers who were unemployed and those who work other types of nonstandard shifts. Socioeconomic advantage of mothers working evening schedules largely explained the higher odds of breastfeeding initiation and duration. Conclusions Socioeconomic characteristics explain more breastfeeding behaviors among mothers working evening shifts. Policy interventions to increase breastfeeding initiation and duration should consider the timing of maternal work schedules.

  1. Breastfeeding and maternal health outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ranadip; Sinha, Bireshwar; Sankar, Mari Jeeva; Taneja, Sunita; Bhandari, Nita; Rollins, Nigel; Bahl, Rajiv; Martines, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effect of breastfeeding on long-term (breast carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus) and short-term (lactational amenorrhoea, postpartum depression, postpartum weight change) maternal health outcomes. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, Cochrane Library and CABI databases. Outcome estimates of odds ratios or relative risks or standardised mean differences were pooled. In cases of heterogeneity, subgroup analysis and meta-regression were explored. Results Breastfeeding >12 months was associated with reduced risk of breast and ovarian carcinoma by 26% and 37%, respectively. No conclusive evidence of an association between breastfeeding and bone mineral density was found. Breastfeeding was associated with 32% lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Exclusive breastfeeding and predominant breastfeeding were associated with longer duration of amenorrhoea. Shorter duration of breastfeeding was associated with higher risk of postpartum depression. Evidence suggesting an association of breastfeeding with postpartum weight change was lacking. Conclusion This review supports the hypothesis that breastfeeding is protective against breast and ovarian carcinoma, and exclusive breastfeeding and predominant breastfeeding increase the duration of lactational amenorrhoea. There is evidence that breastfeeding reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes. However, an association between breastfeeding and bone mineral density or maternal depression or postpartum weight change was not evident. PMID:26172878

  2. [Breastfeeding, complementary feeding and risk of childhood obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval Jurado, Luis; Jiménez Báez, María Valeria; Olivares Juárez, Sibli; de la Cruz Olvera, Tomas

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the pattern of breastfeeding and weaning as a risk of obesity in pre-school children from a Primary Care Unit. Cross-sectional analytical study LOCATION: Cancun, Quintana Roo (Mexico). Children from 2-4 years of age from a Primary Care Unit. Duration of total and exclusive breastfeeding, age and food utilized for complementary feeding reported by the mother or career of the child and nutritional status assessment evaluated by body mass index (BMI) ≥ 95 percentile. Determination of prevalence ratio (PR), odds ratio (OR), chi squared (x2), and binary logistic regression. The study included 116 children (55.2% girls) with a mean age of 3.2 years, with obesity present in 62.1%, Exclusive breastfeeding in 72.4% with mean duration of 2.3 months, and age at introducing solids foods was 5.0 months. There was a difference for breastfeeding and complementary feeding by gender sex (P<.05). A PR=3.9 (95% CI: 1.49-6.34) was calculated for exclusive breastfeeding and risk of obesity. The model showed no association between these variables and obesity in children CONCLUSIONS: Exclusive breastfeeding of less than three months is associated with almost 4 more times in obese children. There was a difference in age of complementary feeding, duration of breastfeeding, and formula milk consumption time for obese and non-obese children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of a peer-counseling intervention on breastfeeding practices in different socioeconomic strata: results from the equity analysis of the PROMISE-EBF trial in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Kristiane Tislevoll; Fadnes, Lars Thore; Engebretsen, Ingunn Marie Stadskleiv; Onarheim, Kristine Husøy; Wamani, Henry; Tumwine, James K; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2016-01-01

    Undernutrition is highly prevalent among infants in Uganda. Optimal infant feeding practices may improve nutritional status, health, and survival among children. Our study evaluates the socioeconomic distribution of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) and growth outcomes among infants included in a trial, which promoted EBF by peer counselors in Uganda. Twenty-four clusters comprising one to two communities in Uganda were randomized into intervention and control arms, including 765 mother-infant pairs (PROMISE-EBF trial, 200608, ClinicalTrials.gov no. NCT00397150). Intervention clusters received the promotion of EBF by peer counselors in addition to standard care. Breastfeeding and growth outcomes were compared according to wealth quintiles and intervention/control arms. Socioeconomic inequality in breastfeeding and growth outcomes were measured using the concentration index 12 and 24 weeks postpartum. We used the decomposition of the concentration index to identify factors contributing to growth inequality at 24 weeks. EBF was significantly concentrated among the poorest in the intervention group at 24 weeks postpartum, concentration index -0.060. The control group showed a concentration of breastfeeding among the richest part of the population, although not statistically significant. Stunting, wasting, and underweight were similarly significantly concentrated among the poorest in the intervention group and the total population at 24 weeks, but showing non-significant concentrations for the control group. This study shows that EBF can be successfully promoted among the poor. In addition, socioeconomic inequality in growth outcomes starts early in infancy, but the breastfeeding intervention was not strong enough to counteract this influence.

  4. The impact of prenatal employment on breastfeeding intentions and breastfeeding status at 1 week postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, Laura; Kozhimannil, Katy B; McGovern, Patricia; Gjerdingen, Dwenda; Johnson, Pamela Jo

    2013-11-01

    Postpartum employment is associated with non-initiation and early cessation of breastfeeding, but less is known about the relationship between prenatal employment and breastfeeding intentions and behaviors. This study aimed to estimate the relationship between prenatal employment status, a strong predictor of postpartum return to work, and breastfeeding intentions and behaviors. Using data from the Listening to Mothers II national survey (N = 1573), we used propensity score matching methods to account for non-random selection into employment patterns and to measure the impact of prenatal employment status on breastfeeding intentions and behaviors. We also examined whether hospital practices consistent with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI), assessed based on maternal perception, were differentially associated with breastfeeding by employment status. Women who were employed (vs unemployed) during pregnancy were older, were more educated, were less likely to have had a previous cesarean delivery, and had fewer children. After matching, these differences were eliminated. Although breastfeeding intention did not differ by employment, full-time employment (vs no employment) during pregnancy was associated with decreased odds of exclusive breastfeeding 1 week postpartum (adjusted odds ratio = 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.92; P = .028). Higher BFHI scores were associated with higher odds of breastfeeding at 1 week but did not differentially impact women by employment status. Women employed full-time during pregnancy were less likely to fulfill their intention to exclusively breastfeed, compared to women who were not employed during pregnancy. Clinicians should be aware that employment circumstances may impact women's breastfeeding decisions; this may help guide discussions during clinical encounters.

  5. Breast-feeding and human immunodeficiency virus infection: assessment of knowledge among clinicians in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murila, Florence; Obimbo, Moses M; Musoke, Rachel; Tsikhutsu, Isaac; Migiro, Santau; Ogeng'o, Julius

    2015-02-01

    In Kenya, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence ranks among the highest in the world. Approximately 60 000 infections yearly are attributed to vertical transmission including the process of labour and breast-feeding. The vast of the population affected is in the developing world. Clinical officers and nurses play an important role in provision of primary health care to antenatal and postnatal mothers. There are a few studies that have explored the clinicians' knowledge on breast-feeding in the face of HIV and in relation to vertical transmission this being a vital component in prevention of maternal-to-child transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinicians' knowledge on HIV in relation to breast-feeding in Kenya. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess knowledge of 161 clinical officers and nurses serving in the maternity and children' wards in various hospitals in Kenya. The participants were derived from all district and provincial referral facilities in Kenya. A preformatted questionnaire containing a series of questions on HIV and breast-feeding was administered to clinicians who were then scored and analyzed. All the 161 participants responded. Majority of clinicians (92%) were knowledgeable regarding prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Regarding HIV and breast-feeding, 49.7% thought expressed breast milk from HIV-positive mothers should be heated before being given. Majority (78.3%) thought breast milk should be given regardless of availability of alternatives. According to 74.5% of the participants, exclusive breast-feeding increased chances of HIV transmission. Two-thirds (66.5%) would recommend breast-feeding for mothers who do not know their HIV status (66.5%). This study observes that a majority of the clinicians have inadequate knowledge on breast-feeding in the face of HIV. There is need to promote training programmes on breast-feeding and transmission of HIV from mother to child. This can be done as in

  6. Strategically Positioned: Breastfeeding, Advocacy, and the Hands-On Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathron, Erika L

    2017-08-01

    Breastfeeding, a health behavior that provides well-known benefits for mothers, infants, and children, is an essential strategy to improve public health. Breastfeeding can reduce the incidence of infant illness and death and provides both short- and longterm physiological benefits to mothers. National and international government agencies and grassroots organizations supporting breastfeeding include the World Health Organization, the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund, the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the La Leche League. In the United States, breastfeeding of infants was the norm until the late 1890s when the Progressive Era's emphasis on science and modernity led to the transition of childbirth from residential in-home births to community-based hospital births and the aggressive rise of the baby formula industry. By 1966, only 18% of mothers were exclusively breastfeeding their infants at hospital discharge. This drastic decrease in breastfeeding reduced the percentage of mothers and grandmothers who could share their breastfeeding knowledge and experience. Nurses who provide care for women and infants are essential stakeholders in bridging the breastfeeding knowledge gap by offering education on the short- and long-term health benefits of breastfeeding to both mother and baby and timely encouragement to mothers during the most significant time for establishing lactation.

  7. Breastfeeding Reduces Breast Cancer Risk: A Case-Control Study in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Breastfeeding has a significant role in reducing breast cancer, and so information, education, and communication activities for the promotion of breastfeeding and creating awareness about this fatal disease are the need of the hour.

  8. Health Facility Staff Training for Improving Breastfeeding Outcome: A Systematic Review for Step 2 of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Olukunmi O; Dagvadorj, Amarjargal; Yourkavitch, Jennifer; da Silva Lopes, Katharina; Suto, Maiko; Takemoto, Yo; Mori, Rintaro; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Ota, Erika

    2017-11-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) implemented through the "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding" has been widely promoted as an intervention that improves breastfeeding rates. Step 2 requires the training of all healthcare staff in skills that are necessary to implement the policy. This systematic review provides evidence about the effect of training healthcare staff in hospitals and birth centers on breastfeeding outcomes. Randomized controlled trials (RCT), quasi-RCT, and controlled before and after (CBA) studies comparing training of healthcare staff on breastfeeding and supportive feeding practices with no training were included in this review. We searched CENTRAL PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and the British Nursing Index for studies. Studies were screened against predetermined criteria, and risk of bias of included studies was assessed using the Risk of Bias Assessment tool for Non-Randomized Studies for non-RCT studies and the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for RCT studies. Of the six studies included in this review, three were RCT whereas three were CBA studies. The studies were conducted in 5 countries and involved 390 healthcare staff. Provision of educational interventions aimed at increasing knowledge and practice of BFHI and support was found to improve health worker's knowledge, attitude, and compliance with the BFHI practices. In one study, the rate of exclusive breastfeeding increased at the intervention site but no differences were found for breastfeeding initiation rates. All included studies had methodological limitations, and study designs and methodologies lacked comparability.

  9. Relation between household food insecurity and breastfeeding in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Sarah K; Dachner, Naomi; Frank, Lesley; Tarasuk, Valerie

    2018-03-19

    Qualitative studies have suggested that food insecurity adversely affects infant feeding practices. We aimed to determine how household food insecurity relates to breastfeeding initiation, duration of exclusive breastfeeding and vitamin D supplementation of breastfed infants in Canada. We studied 10 450 women who had completed the Maternal Experiences - Breastfeeding Module and the Household Food Security Survey Module of the Canadian Community Health Survey (2005-2014) and who had given birth in the year of or year before their interview. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression to examine the relation between food insecurity and infant feeding practices, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, maternal mood disorders and diabetes mellitus. Overall, 17% of the women reported household food insecurity, of whom 8.6% had moderate food insecurity and 2.9% had severe food insecurity (weighted percentages). After adjustment for sociodemographic factors, women with food insecurity were no less likely than others to initiate breastfeeding or provide vitamin D supplementation to their infants. Half of the women with food insecurity ceased exclusive breastfeeding by 2 months, whereas most of those with food security persisted with breastfeeding for 4 months or more. Relative to women with food security, those with marginal, moderate and severe food insecurity had significantly lower odds of exclusive breastfeeding to 4 months, but only women with moderate food insecurity had lower odds of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 months, independent of sociodemographic characteristics (odds ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.92). Adjustment for maternal mood disorder or diabetes slightly attenuated these relationships. Mothers caring for infants in food-insecure households attempted to follow infant feeding recommendations, but were less able than women with food security to sustain exclusive breastfeeding. Our findings highlight the

  10. Factors associated with intention to exclusive breastfeed in central women's hospital, Yangon, Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmone, Myat Pan; Li, Mu; Agho, Kingsley; Alam, Ashraful; Dibley, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Under-nutrition is a public health problem in Myanmar. Despite current efforts, the exclusive breastfeeding rate (EBF) for children under six months is only 24%. Intention to breastfeed is a strong predictor for long-term breastfeeding, however, little is known about pregnant women's breastfeeding intentions in Myanmar. We, therefore, aimed to identify the factors associated with women's intention to EBF. Data in this article was collected in a baseline survey for a randomized controlled trial, which aimed to assess the impact of mobile text messages on the breastfeeding practices of women in Yangon, Myanmar. A total of 353 pregnant women at 28-34 weeks of gestation, recruited into the trial from the antenatal clinics of the Central Women's Hospital, Yangon, Myanmar, responded to the baseline survey questions, which included background information and breastfeeding related characteristics. To determine factors associated with women's intention to EBF logistic regression was used to analyse individual demographic, household economic and breastfeeding characteristics. In-depth interviews were performed with a sub-sample of 24 women who participated in the survey, to gain a further understanding of these associated factors. After adjusting for potential confounders, working women were less likely to intend to EBF (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.30, CI 0.17-0.53). Women from rich households (AOR = 2.43, CI 1.08-5.47) and middle income households (AOR = 1.79, CI 1.01-3.16); those who had high (AOR = 10.19, CI 3.43-30.23) and medium (AOR = 5.46, CI 1.79-16.72) breastfeeding knowledge levels, and received information from health professionals (AOR = 2.29, CI 1.29-4.03) and mobile internet (AOR 3.62, CI 2.04-6.41) had a higher intention to EBF. These findings were supported by qualitative analysis, which revealed that returning to work was the main barrier; health staff and printed media are reliable sources and; women with higher knowledge had high intentions

  11. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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  1. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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  2. Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding

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    ... for Educators Search English Español Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding KidsHealth / For Parents / Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding What's ... work with a lactation specialist. All About Formula Feeding Commercially prepared infant formulas are a nutritious alternative ...

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  9. The beneficial effects of breastfeeding on microvascular function in 11- to 14-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Faisel; Green, Fiona C; Forsyth, J Stewart; Greene, Stephen A; Newton, David J; Belch, Jill J F

    2009-05-01

    Infant feeding practices have an impact on health in later life, although the evidence for its effects on cardiovascular health is not so clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between breastfeeding in infancy and vascular function in later childhood. Infant feeding data, together with demographic and clinical information, were obtained prospectively from a cohort of children from birth until 2 years of age. Vascular function was assessed in 159 children, now aged 11-14 years, by measuring their skin microvascular responses to iontophoretic administration of the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine. Endothelial function was significantly better in children who had been breastfed than in those who had received infant milk formula (p = 0.001), after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Linear regression showed that acetylcholine responses were significantly related to the duration of breastfeeding (r = 0.30, p = 0.006). The risk of later cardiovascular disease may be reduced by exclusively breastfeeding during infancy. These findings have potential public health implications, and support policies aimed at promoting breastfeeding.

  10. Interactive weekly mobile phone text messaging plus motivational interviewing in promotion of breastfeeding among women living with HIV in South Africa: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunza, Moleen; Cotton, Mark F; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Lester, Richard; Thabane, Lehana

    2017-07-17

    South Africa recently phased out access to free formula milk in the public sector in support of breastfeeding for women living with HIV. Few women living with HIV in South Africa choose breastfeeding and among those who do, many stop breastfeeding early. We sought to explore the feasibility of using mobile phone text messaging coupled with motivational interviewing to enhance adherence to breastfeeding practices. A randomized, parallel group, single-center pilot trial. Electronic sequence generation and random allocation will be done centrally. Women of low socioeconomic status, from Cape Town, South Africa will be randomly assigned within 24 h of giving birth at a primary healthcare clinic to a structured weekly text message plus motivational interviewing and usual standard of care, using a permutation of different block sizes. Criteria for feasibility success will include: five participants recruited per week (over 12 weeks), about 75% of all eligible participants consent for study participation, complete evaluation of outcomes in at least 70% of all recruited participants, breastfeeding adherence rates of at least 70% in the intervention group, six months after delivery. Participants will be evaluated soon after giving birth and post-delivery at weeks 2, 6, 10, and 24. Primary analysis will follow the "intention-to-treat" principle. Sub-group analysis will be used to assess sub-group effects. This pilot trial will evaluate the feasibility of conducting a larger trial on communication and support approaches to improve adherence to breastfeeding by HIV-infected women. Text messaging and motivational interviewing are simple interventions which may allow participants to access personalized adherence advice and support. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02949713 . Registered on 26 October 2016; Pan African Clinical Trial Registry PACTR201611001855404 . Registered on 8 November 2016.

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  13. Early breastfeeding experiences of adolescent mothers: a qualitative prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Paige Hall

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teen mothers face many challenges to successful breastfeeding and are less likely to breastfeed than any other population group in the U.S. Few studies have investigated this population; all prior studies are cross-sectional and collect breastfeeding data retrospectively. The purpose of our qualitative prospective study was to understand the factors that contribute to the breastfeeding decisions and practices of teen mothers. Methods This prospective study took place from January through December 2009 in Greensboro, North Carolina in the U.S. We followed the cohort from pregnancy until two weeks after they ceased all breastfeeding and milk expression. We conducted semi-structured interviews at baseline and follow-up, and tracked infant feeding weekly by phone. We analyzed the data to create individual life and breastfeeding journeys and then identified themes that cut across the individual journeys. Results Four of the five teenagers breastfed at the breast for nine days: in contrast, one teen breastfed exclusively for five months. Milk expression by pumping was associated with significantly longer provision of human milk. Breastfeeding practices and cessation were closely connected with their experiences as new mothers in the context of ongoing multiple roles, complex living situations, youth and dependency, and poor knowledge of the fundamentals of breastfeeding and infant development. Breastfeeding cessation was influenced by inadequate breastfeeding skill, physically unpleasant and painful early experiences they were unprepared to manage, and inadequate health care response to real problems. Conclusions Continued breastfeeding depends on a complex interplay of multiple factors, including having made an informed choice and having the skills, support and experiences needed to sustain the belief that breastfeeding is the best choice for them and their baby given their life situation. Teenagers in the US context need to have

  14. The impact of immigration on the breastfeeding practices of Mainland Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Kris Yuet Wan; Bai, Dorothy Li; Chan, Noel P T; Wong, Janet Y H; Tarrant, Marie

    2018-03-01

    Researchers have found breastfeeding disparities between immigrant and native-born women in many countries. However, most studies on immigration and breastfeeding practices have been in Western countries. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of length of time since immigration on the breastfeeding practices of Mainland Chinese immigrants living in Hong Kong. We recruited 2704 mother-infant pairs from the postnatal wards of four public hospitals in Hong Kong. We examined the effect of migration status on the duration of any and exclusive breastfeeding. Breastfeeding duration was progressively shorter as the time since immigration increased. When compared with mothers who had lived in Hong Kong for Hong Kong-born participants had a 30% higher risk of stopping any breastfeeding (hazard ratio [HR] 1.34 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.10-1.63]) and exclusive breastfeeding (HR 1.33 [95% CI 1.11-1.58]). In both Hong Kong-born and immigrant participants, breastfeeding cessation was associated with return to work postpartum and the husband's preference for infant formula or mixed feeding. Intention to exclusively breastfeed and to breastfeed for >6 months, and previous breastfeeding experience substantially reduced the risk of breastfeeding cessation for both Hong Kong-born and immigrant participants. Health care professionals should consider immigration history in their assessment of pregnant women and provide culturally adapted breastfeeding support and encouragement to this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effect of restricted pacifier use in breastfeeding term infants for increasing duration of breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Sharifah Halimah; Ho, Jacqueline J; Jahanfar, Shayesteh; Angolkar, Mubashir

    2016-08-30

    To successfully initiate and maintain breastfeeding for a longer duration, the World Health Organization's Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding recommends total avoidance of artificial teats or pacifiers for breastfeeding infants. Concerns have been raised that offering the pacifier instead of the breast to calm the infant may lead to less frequent episodes of breastfeeding and as a consequence may reduce breast-milk production and shorten duration of breastfeeding. To assess the effect of restricted versus unrestricted pacifier use in healthy full-term newborns whose mothers have initiated breastfeeding and intend to exclusively breastfeed, on the duration of breastfeeding, other breastfeeding outcomes and infant health. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 June 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing restricted versus unrestricted pacifier use in healthy full-term newborns who have initiated breastfeeding. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. The quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. We found three trials (involving 1915 babies) for inclusion in the review, but have included only two trials (involving 1302 healthy full-term breastfeeding infants) in the analysis. Meta-analysis of the two combined studies showed that pacifier use in healthy breastfeeding infants had no significant effect on the proportion of infants exclusively breastfed at three months (risk ratio (RR) 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96 to 1.07, two studies, 1228 infants), and at four months of age (RR 1.01; 95% CI 0.94 to 1.09, one study, 970 infants, moderate-quality evidence), and also had no effect on the proportion of infants partially breastfed at three months (RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.98 to 1.02, two studies, 1228 infants), and at four months of age (RR 0.99; 95% CI 0

  16. Epilepsy and recommendations for breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiby, Gyri; Bjørk, Marte; Engelsen, Bernt A; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a synopsis of benefits and potential harmful effects of exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) via breastmilk, and present recommendations for breastfeeding in women with epilepsy. The article is based on a discretionary selection of English language articles retrieved by a literature search in the PubMed database, the LactMed database, and the authors' clinical experience. Breastfeeding is associated with benefits for the infant, including nutrition, protection against infectious and immunological disease, and promotion of development and psychological attachment. Exposure to AEDs via breastmilk could potentially produce side effects or negatively affect development. Most studies on AED transfer through breastmilk report infant serum levels well below the limit of an expected pharmacological effect. Some drugs have the potential to reach significant serum levels in breastfed infants, such as barbiturates, benzodiazepines, lamotrigine, and ethosuximide. Thus, breastfed infants should be monitored for side effects. Still, adverse symptoms are rarely reported in breastfed infants of mothers taking AEDs, and prospective studies have failed to demonstrate any negative developmental effects in children that have been exposed to AEDs via breastmilk. The nursing infant's degree of drug exposure can be minimized by breastfeeding when drug concentrations in the milk are low, reducing maternal AED dosage to prepregnancy levels, and administering mixed nutrition. Most AEDs are considered safe or moderately safe during breastfeeding. Mothers with epilepsy should be encouraged to breastfeed, provided careful monitoring of the infant. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Human milk benefits and breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fani Anatolitou

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Human milk is uniquely superior for infant feeding and represents the perfect example of individualization in Pediatrics. Human milk is not a uniform body fluid but a secretion of the mammary gland of changing composition. Foremilk differs from hindmilk, and colostrum is strikingly different from transitional and mature milk. Milk changes with time of day and during the course of lactation. Extensive research has demonstrated health, nutritional, immunologic, developmental, psychological, social, economic and environmental benefits of human milk. Breastfeeding results in improved infant and maternal health outcomes in both the industrialized and developing world. Some specific topics will be discussed such as the preventive effect of human milk on infections, overweight, obesity and diabetes, malignant disease, neurodevelopmental outcomes, reduction of necrotizing enterocolitis. Important health benefits of breastfeeding and lactation are also described for mothers. Finally, contraindications to breastfeeding and supplementation of breastfed infants are presented. Interventions to promote breastfeeding are relatively simple and inexpensive. Infant feeding should not be regarded as a lifestyle choice but rather as a basic health issue.

  18. Breastfeeding practices and policies in WHO European Region Member States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci Bosi, Ayse Tulay; Eriksen, Kamilla Gehrt; Sobko, Tanja; Wijnhoven, Trudy M A; Breda, João

    2016-03-01

    To provide an update on current practices and policy development status concerning breastfeeding in the WHO European Region. National surveys and studies conducted by national health institutions were prioritized. Sub-national data were included where no national data or studies existed. Information on national breastfeeding policies was collected mainly from the WHO Seventh Meeting of Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative Coordinators and European Union projects. Owing to the different data sources and methods, any comparisons between countries must be made with caution. WHO European Member States. Data from fifty-three WHO European Member States were investigated; however, a large proportion had not reported any data. Rates of early initiation of breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding and continued breastfeeding to 1 year all varied considerably within the WHO European Region. Exclusive breastfeeding rates declined considerably after 4 months, and were low in infants under 6 months and at 6 months of age. The majority of the countries with existing data reported having a national infant and young child feeding policy and the establishment of a national committee on breastfeeding or infant and young child feeding. The majority of the countries with existing data reported having baby-friendly hospitals, although the proportion of baby-friendly hospitals to the total number of national hospitals with maternity units was low in most countries. Breastfeeding practices within the WHO European Region, especially exclusive breastfeeding rates, are far from complying with the WHO recommendations. There are marked differences between countries in breastfeeding practices, infant and young child feeding policy adoption and proportion of baby-friendly hospitals.

  19. Reasons given by mothers for discontinuing breastfeeding in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olang Beheshteh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that in Iran, only 28% of infants were exclusively breastfed at six months, despite a high prevalence of breastfeeding at two years of age. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the reasons women discontinued exclusive breastfeeding. Method This retrospective study was based on questionnaires and interviews with 63,071 mothers of infants up to 24 months of age, divided into two populations: infants younger than six months and six months or older. The data were collected in 2005–2006 from all 30 provinces of Iran. Results Only 5.3% of infants less than six months of age stopped breastfeeding (mean age of 3.2 months; more commonly in urban than rural areas. The most frequently cited reasons mothers gave for discontinuing exclusive breastfeeding were physicians’ recommendation (54% and insufficient breast milk (self-perceived or true, 28%. Breastfeeding was common after six months of age: only 11% of infants discontinued breastfeeding, at a mean of 13.8 months. The most common reason for discontinuation at this age was insufficient breast milk (self-perceived or true, 45%. Maternal illness or medication (10%, infant illness (6%, and return to work (3% were uncommon causes. Use of a pacifier was correlated with breastfeeding discontinuation. Maternal age and education was not associated with duration of breastfeeding. Multivariate analysis showed that using a pacifier and formula or other bottle feeding increased the risk of early cessation of breastfeeding. Conclusions Physicians and other health professionals have an important role to play in encouraging and supporting mothers to maintain breastfeeding.

  20. Cultural factors and social support related to breastfeeding among immigrant mothers in Taipei City, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzu-Ling; Tai, Chen-Jei; Chu, Yu-Roo; Han, Kuo-Chiang; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Chien, Li-Yin

    2011-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify cultural factors (including acculturation and breastfeeding cultures in subjects' native countries and those in mainstream Taiwanese society) and social support related to breastfeeding among immigrant mothers in Taiwan. This study was a cross-sectional survey performed from October 2007 through January 2008. The study participants were 210 immigrant mothers living in Taipei City. The prevalence of exclusive and partial breastfeeding at 3 months postpartum was 59.0% and 14.3%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that breastfeeding experience among mothers-in-law and the perceived level of acceptance of breastfeeding in Taiwan were positively associated with breastfeeding at 3 months postpartum. Immigrant women with a higher level of household activity support were less likely to breastfeed. Immigrant mothers in Taiwan usually come from cultures with a higher acceptance level for breastfeeding; however, their breastfeeding practices are more likely to be influenced by the mainstream culture in Taiwan.

  1.  Breastfeeding Status and Some Related Factors in Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Abdollahi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Objectives: The main objective of this study is to assess the Breastfeeding Duration, Exclusive Breastfeeding Duration and other related factors among children aged less than 5 years old in rural areas of Northern Iran.Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional conducted on 2520 children aged 6-60 months (male: 1309, female: 1211 chosen by cluster random sampling from 20 out of 118 villages. Data were collected from mothers using a questionnaire. The duration of breastfeeding was computed only for children aged over 24 months old. Breastfeeding duration and Exclusive Breastfeeding Duration were classified based on WHO definition. SPSS Version 16 was used for data analysis.Results: The mean Exclusive Breastfeeding Duration was 5.59 months, while 66.4�0of children had exclusive breastfeeding for at least 6 months. The lowest Exclusive Breastfeeding Duration and the highest Breastfeeding Duration were observed among the Turkman ethnic group. Exclusive Breastfeeding duration of at least 5 months was 14.6�20thus the results were significantly higher than in the Turkman ethnic group (p=0.001. Meanwhile, the results showed that exclusive breastfeeding duration significantly increased with maternal education level (p=0.004. The study found that the mean breastfeeding duration was 20.6 months, and 89.3�0and 74.7�0of children were breastfed for at least 18 and 24 months, respectively. A positive correlation was reported between breastfeeding duration and family size, birth order, maternal age and children nutritional status, (p<0.05. Additionally, lactation period in underweight children was significantly higher than in obese children, (p=0.023.Conclusion: The study found that two-thirds of children exclusively breastfed during the first six months of life and the mean breastfeeding duration was 20.6 months. While both exclusive breastfeeding duration and breastfeeding duration were influenced by socio-demographic factors in the rural areas

  2. Do Breast Implants Influence Breastfeeding? A Meta-Analysis of Comparative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fengrui; Dai, Shuiping; Wang, Chiyi; Zeng, Shaoxue; Chen, Junjie; Cen, Ying

    2018-06-01

    Aesthetic breast implant augmentation surgery is the most popular plastic surgery worldwide. Many women choose to receive breast implants during their reproductive ages, although the long-term effects are still controversial. Research aim: We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the influence of aesthetic breast augmentation on breastfeeding. We also compared the exclusive breastfeeding rates of periareolar versus inframammary incision. A systematic search for comparative studies about breast implants and breastfeeding was performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science through May 2018. Meta-analysis was conducted with a random-effects model (or fixed effects, if heterogeneity was absent). Four cohorts and one cross-sectional study were included. There was a significant reduction in the exclusive breastfeeding rate for women with breast implants compared with women without implants, pooled relative risk = 0.63, 95% confidence interval [0.46, 0.86], as well as the breastfeeding rate, pooled relative risk = 0.88, 95% confidence interval [0.81, 0.95]. There was no evidence that periareolar incision was associated with a reduction in the exclusive breastfeeding rate, pooled relative risk = 0.84, 95% confidence interval [0.45, 1.58]. Participants with breast implants are less likely to establish breastfeeding, especially exclusive breastfeeding. Periareolar incision does not appear to reduce the exclusive breastfeeding rate.

  3. Can a text message a week improve breastfeeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Danielle; Russell-Bennett, Rebekah; Previte, Josephine; Parkinson, Joy

    2014-11-06

    Breastfeeding is recognised as the optimal method for feeding infants with health gains made by reducing infectious diseases in infancy; and chronic diseases, including obesity, in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Despite this, exclusivity and duration in developed countries remains resistant to improvement. The objectives of this research were to test if an automated mobile phone text messaging intervention, delivering one text message a week, could increase "any" breastfeeding rates and improve breastfeeding self-efficacy and coping. Women were eligible to participate if they were: over eighteen years; had an infant less than three months old; were currently breastfeeding; no diagnosed mental illness; and used a mobile phone. Women in the intervention group received MumBubConnect, a text messaging service with automated responses delivered once a week for 8 weeks. Women in the comparison group received their usual care and were sampled two years after the intervention group. Data collection included online surveys at two time points, week zero and week nine, to measure breastfeeding exclusivity and duration, coping, emotions, accountability and self-efficacy. A range of statistical analyses were used to test for differences between groups. Hierarchical regression was used to investigate change in breastfeeding outcome, between groups, adjusting for co-variates. The intervention group had 120 participants at commencement and 114 at completion, the comparison group had 114 participants at commencement and 86 at completion. MumBubConnect had a positive impact on the primary outcome of breastfeeding behaviors with women receiving the intervention more likely to continue exclusive breastfeeding; with a 6% decrease in exclusive breastfeeding in the intervention group, compared to a 14% decrease in the comparison group (p issues. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12614001091695.

  4. Antenatal breastfeeding education for increasing breastfeeding duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbiganon, Pisake; Martis, Ruth; Laopaiboon, Malinee; Festin, Mario R; Ho, Jacqueline J; Hakimi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding (BF) is well recognised as the best food for infants. The impact of antenatal BF education on the duration of BF has not been evaluated. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of antenatal BF education for increasing BF initiation and duration. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (21 April 2010), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to April 2010) and SCOPUS (January 1985 to April 2010). We contacted experts and searched reference lists of retrieved articles. We updated the search of the Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register on 28 September 2011 and added the results to the awaiting classification section of the review. Selection criteria All identified published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of formal antenatal BF education or comparing two different methods of formal antenatal BF education, on duration of BF. We excluded RCTs that also included intrapartum or postpartum BF education. Data collection and analysis We assessed all potential studies identified as a result of the search strategy. Two review authors extracted data from each included study using the agreed form and assessed risk of bias. We resolved discrepancies through discussion. Main results We included 17 studies with 7131 women in the review and 14 studies involving 6932 women contributed data to the analyses. We did not do any meta-analysis because there was only one study for each comparison. Five studies compared a single method of BF education with routine care. Peer counselling significantly increased BF initiation. Three studies compared one form of BF education versus another. No intervention was significantly more effective than another intervention in increasing initiation or duration of BF. Seven studies compared multiple methods versus a single method of BF education. Combined BF educational interventions were not

  5. Breastfeeding Patterns in the Rural Community of Hilo, Hawai‘i: An Exploration of Existing Data Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Flood, Jeanie L

    2013-01-01

    Before any breastfeeding promotion effort, an understanding of the existing breastfeeding patterns is essential. Hawai‘i County is a rural, ethnically diverse, medically underserved community. The purpose of this study was to describe the breastfeeding patterns of women living in Hilo, Hawai‘i. Data from several existing national, state, and local data sets were accessed to identify and describe the breastfeeding patterns of women in this community. Available breastfeeding data about women in...

  6. Poisonous milk and sinful mothers: the changing meaning of breastfeeding in the wake of the HIV epidemic in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blystad Astrid

    2010-10-01

    action. Based on strong evidence of the risks when infants are not exclusively breastfed, there is a great need to protect breastfeeding from pressures of replacement feeding and to promote exclusive breastfeeding as the best infant feeding option for HIV positive and HIV negative mothers alike.

  7. Breastfeeding duration and associated factors between 1960 and 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Soares de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe a historical series on the median duration of breastfeeding in a population of mothers whose children were born from the 1960s onwards, identifying factors associated with the interruption of breastfeeding in each decade. Methods: Data were analyzed from the Pró-Saúde Study, a longitudinal epidemiological investigation started in 1999 among technical and administrative employees of a university in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Breastfeeding duration was collected in two study phases: Phase 1 (1999, and phase 4 (2011-2012. Of these, those who had at least one child and reported the duration of breastfeeding for the first child were selected (n = 1539. To analyze the duration of breastfeeding, survival curves were constructed using the Kaplan-Meier method and the effect of covariates on the duration of breastfeeding was estimated by Cox regression model. Results: It was found that the median duration of breastfeeding was higher in the 1990s and 2000s and lower in the 1970s, compared to the 1960s. In addition, there was an association between higher income and maternal age with breastfeeding interruption, which was focused in the 1970s. Conclusion: There was shorter duration of breastfeeding in the 1970s compared to the 1960s. Increased duration and prevalence of breastfeeding from the 1970s onwards coincided with the national trend and the promotion of this practice since 1980.

  8. Markets, breastfeeding and trade in mothers' milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julie P

    2015-01-01

    This introduction to a special issue on the economics of breastfeeding draws attention to the lack of economic justice for women. Human milk is being bought and sold. Commodifying and marketing human milk and breastfeeding risk reinforcing social and gender economic inequities. Yet there are potential benefits for breastfeeding, and some of the world's poorest women might profit. How can we improve on the present situation where everyone except the woman who donates her milk benefits? Breastfeeding is a global food production system with unsurpassed capacity to promote children's food security and maternal and child health, but it is side-lined by trade negotiators who seek instead to expand world markets for cow's milk-based formula. Regulators focus on potential risks of feeding donated human milk, rather than on health risks of exposing infants and young children to highly processed bovine milk. Similarly, policymakers aspire to provide universal health care access that may be unaffordable when two thirds of the world's children are not optimally nourished in infancy, resulting in a global double burden of infectious and chronic disease. Universal breastfeeding requires greater commitment of resources, but such investment remains lacking despite the cost effectiveness of breastfeeding protection, support and promotion in and beyond health services. Women invest substantially in breastfeeding but current policy - epitomised by the G20 approach to the 'gender gap' - fails to acknowledge the economic value of this unpaid care work. Economic incentives for mothers to optimally breastfeed are dwarfed by health system and commercial incentives promoting formula feeding and by government fiscal policies which ignore the resulting economic costs. 'The market' fails to protect breastfeeding, because market prices give the wrong signals. An economic approach to the problem of premature weaning from optimal breastfeeding may help prioritise global maternity protection as

  9. Breastfeeding policies and breastfeeding support programs in the mother's workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinelli, Maria Enrica

    2012-10-01

    Women should never be forced to make a choice between mother-work and other work. Many women mistakenly think they cannot breastfeed if they plan to return to work, and thus they may not talk with their employers about their intention to breastfeed or how breastfeeding might be supported at their workplace. All breastfeeding policies and strategies underline the importance of providing support for lactating mothers and highlight the need to promote specific interventions in the workplace. Possible strategies for working mothers include having the mother keep the baby with her while she works, allowing the mother to go to the baby to breastfeed during the workday, telecommuting, offering flexible work schedules, maintaining part-time work schedules, and using on-site or nearby child care centres.

  10. Challenges to Breastfeeding Initiation and Duration for Teen Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota-Robles, Sonia; Pedersen, Laura; LeCroy, Craig Winston

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate breastfeeding practices of teen mothers in a pre- and postnatal education and support program. We studied breastfeeding practices of primarily Hispanic and non-Hispanic White teen mothers who participated in the Teen Outreach Pregnancy Services (TOPS) program, which promoted breastfeeding through prenatal programming and postpartum support. Analyses identified the most common reasons participants had not breastfed and, for those who initiated breastfeeding, the most common reasons they stopped. Participants (g = 314) reported on whether and for how long they breastfed. Nearly all participants reported initiating breastfeeding but few breastfed to 6 months. For the most part, reasons they reported stopping breastfeeding paralleled those previously reported for adult mothers across the first several months of motherhood. We found that teen mothers can initiate breastfeeding at high rates. Results highlight areas in which teen mothers' knowledge and skills can be supported to promote breastfeeding duration, including pain management and better recognizing infant cues. Our findings expand limited previous research investigating reasons that teen mothers who initiate breastfeeding stop before 6 months.

  11. [Educational practices in accordance with the "Ten steps to successful breastfeeding" in a Human Milk Bank].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristianny Miranda E; Pellegrinelli, Ana Luiza Rodrigues; Pereira, Simone Cardoso Lisboa; Passos, Ieda Ribeiro; Santos, Luana Caroline Dos

    2017-05-01

    This article sought to evaluate educational practices in line with the "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding" in a Human Milk Bank. It involved a retrospective study using sociodemographic data about the pregnancy and the baby, obtained from a nursing mothers care protocol (2009-2012). These data were associated to steps related to educational practices from the "Ten Steps." Descriptive analysis, chi-square test and Poisson regression were performed. 12,283 mothers, with a median of 29 (12-54) years old, were evaluated. The guidelines about breastfeeding received during prenatal care (step 3) prevailed among mothers aged 30-39 years and the skin to skin contact (step 4) prevailed among oriented mothers. Breastfeeding training (step 5) predominated among those who breastfed exclusively. Higher prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (step 6), breastfeeding on demand (step 8) and use of artificial nipples (step 9) were noted among infants whose mothers were oriented. These findings indicate the important role of health professionals on mother/child training about breastfeeding, on encouragement of the skin/skin contact, exclusive breastfeeding and breastfeeding on demand. The guidelines indicated the need to improve in order to reduce the use of artificial nipples and enhance exclusive breastfeeding.

  12. Early breastfeeding problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feenstra, Maria Monberg; Kirkeby, Mette Jørgine; Thygesen, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Breastfeeding problems are common and associated with early cessation. Stilllength of postpartum hospital stay has been reduced. This leaves new mothers to establish breastfeeding at home with less support from health care professionals. The objective was to explore mothers’ perspectives...... on when breastfeeding problems were the most challenging and prominent early postnatal. The aim was also toidentify possible factors associated with the breastfeeding problems. Methods In a cross-sectional study, a mixed method approach was used to analyse postal survey data from 1437 mothers with full...... term singleton infants. Content analysis was used to analyse mothers’ open text descriptions of their most challenging breastfeeding problem. Multiple logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for early breastfeeding problems according to sociodemographic- and psychosocial factors. Results...

  13. BEYOND THE BIO-MEDICAL ORTHODOXIES: SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND ATTITUDINAL IMPEDIMENTS TO EXCLUSIVE BREAST FEEDING IN RURAL ZIMBABWE AND POSSIBLE ROLES OF SOCIAL WORKERS AND INTERVENTIONS TO PROMOTE ITS UPTAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchacha, Munyaradzi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF which is one of the major remedies to infant and child mortality, is largely underutilised especially in rural Zimbabwe. EBF is a physiological process which transpires in a specific socio- economic milieu, to that end this paper labours to investigate the socio- economic factors militating against its uptake. Using the mixed methodology the paper reveals that issues such as povertygender inequalities, social and cultural beliefs are critical obstacles against EBF infant feeding practice. It is within the context of these socio-economic barriers this paper argues that social workers have a key role in facilitating EBF

  14. Pattern of urine specific gravity in exclusively breastfed and water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Exclusive breastfeeding, an essential intervention for the reduction of infant mortality, is not widely practised. A major reason is the issue of thirst, especially in the hot regions of the world. Objective: To describe the pattern of specific gravity of breastfeeding infants aged 0-6 months as a measure of their ...

  15. Does breastfeeding influence the risk of developing diabetes mellitus in children? A review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia Feliciano; Alfenas, Rita de Cássia G; Araújo, Raquel Maria A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a review to investigate the influence of breastfeeding as a protective agent against the onset of diabetes in children. non-systematic review of SciELO, LILACS, MEDLINE, Scopus, and VHL databases, and selection of the 52 most relevant studies. A total of 21 articles, specifically on the topic, were analyzed (nine related to type 1 diabetes and 12 to type 2 diabetes). The duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding, as well as the early use of cow's milk, have been shown to be important risk factors for developing diabetes. It is believed that human milk contains substances that promote the maturation of the immune system, which protect against the onset of type 1 diabetes. Moreover, human milk has bioactive substances that promote satiety and energy balance, preventing excess weight gain during childhood, thus protecting against the development of type 2 diabetes. Although the above mentioned benefits have not been observed by some researchers, inaccuracies on dietary habit reports during childhood and the presence of interfering factors have been considered responsible for the lack of identification of beneficial effects. Given the scientific evidence indicated in most published studies, it is believed that the lack of breastfeeding can be a modifiable risk factor for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Strategies aiming at the promotion and support of breastfeeding should be used by trained healthcare professionals in order to prevent the onset of diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental Health Pain Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually ...

  17. Antenatal breastfeeding education for increasing breastfeeding duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbiganon, Pisake; Martis, Ruth; Laopaiboon, Malinee; Festin, Mario R; Ho, Jacqueline J; Hakimi, Mohammad

    2016-12-06

    Breast milk is well recognised as the best food source for infants. The impact of antenatal breastfeeding (BF) education on the duration of BF has not been evaluated. To assess the effectiveness of antenatal breastfeeding (BF) education for increasing BF initiation and duration. We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register on 1 March 2016, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, 2016, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1966 to 1 March 2016) and Scopus (January 1985 to 1 March 2016). We contacted experts and searched reference lists of retrieved articles. All identified published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of formal antenatal BF education or comparing two different methods of formal antenatal BF education, on the duration of BF. We included RCTs that only included antenatal interventions and excluded those that combined antenatal and intrapartum or postpartum BF education components. Cluster-randomised trials were included in this review. Quasi-randomised trials were not eligible for inclusion. We assessed all potential studies identified as a result of the search strategy. Two review authors extracted data from each included study using the agreed form and assessed risk of bias. We resolved discrepancies through discussion. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. This review update includes 24 studies (10,056 women). Twenty studies (9789 women) contribute data to analyses. Most studies took place in high-income countries such as the USA, UK, Canada and Australia. In the first five comparisons, we display the included trials according to type of intervention without pooling data. For the 'Summary of findings' we pooled data for a summary effect.Five included studies were cluster-randomised trials: all of these adjusted data and reported adjustments as odds ratios (OR). We have analysed the data using the generic inverse variance method and presented results as odds ratios, because we were

  18. Lactation counseling increases breast-feeding duration but not breast milk intake as measured by isotopic methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albernaz, Elaine; Victora, Cesar G; Haisma, Hinke; Wright, Antony; Coward, William A

    The importance of exclusive breast-feeding in the first 6 mo of life is widely recognized, but most mothers still do not reach this goal. Several studies have shown that face-to-face lactation counseling is effective in increasing not only exclusive breast-feeding rates but also the total duration

  19. Epidural analgesia, neonatal care and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppa, Antonio Alberto; Alighieri, Giovanni; Riccardi, Riccardo; Cavani, Maria; Iafisco, Alma; Cota, Francesco; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2014-11-29

    The objective of our study is to evaluate the correlation between epidural analgesia during labor, start of breastfeeding and type of maternal-neonatal care.Two different assistance models were considered: Partial and Full Rooming-in.In this cohort study, 2480 healthy infants were enrolled, 1519 in the Partial Rooming-in group and 1321 in the Full Rooming-in group; 1223 were born to women subjected to epidural analgesia in labor.In case of Partial Rooming-in the rate of exclusive or prevailing breastfeeding is significant more frequent in newborns born to mothers who didn't receive analgesia. Instead, in case of Full Rooming-in the rate of exclusive or prevailing breastfeeding is almost the same and there's no correlation between the use or not of epidural analgesia.The good start of lactation and the success of breastfeeding seems to be guaranteed by the type of care offered to the couple mother-infant, that reverses any possible adverse effects of the use of epidural analgesia in labor.

  20. The Effect of Message-Framing on Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Among Nulliparous Women in Shushtar, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdasi, Fatemeh; Araban, Marzieh; Saki, Malehi Amal

    2017-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months and continuing it for 2 years, along with complementary feeding, are the primary objectives of public health plans and nutrition around the world. Self-efficacy is a theoretical framework that could be a strong predictive for breastfeeding. This study aimed to determine the effect of message-framing on self-efficacy of breastfeeding in nulliparous women in Shushtar. This quasi-experimental study was conducted in 2015 on 210 nulliparous women in Shushtar (Iran). The participants were randomly allocated into intervention and control groups. The study tool was the short form of breastfeeding self-efficacy scale that was completed on arrival of the study (days 3-5), at the end of week four and at the end of week eight. Data were analyzed by SPSS 19, using Chi-square, ANOVA, and repeated measurements. Mean age of participants was 24.52 years old with standard deviation of 95.4. Mean score of breastfeeding self-efficacy in gain-framed group at days 3-5, week four and week eight was 47.94, 57.43 and 52.8 respectively; in loss-framed group it was 47.76, 56.11 and 52.64 respectively; and in control group it was 45.16, 48.68 and 45.31 respectively. No significant difference was observed between the score of average self-efficacy of days 3-5 and week eight in control group (p=0.93). However, in gain-framed group (p=0.001) and loss-framed group (p=0.004), a significant difference was observed. Results of this study showed that message-framing promotes breastfeeding self-efficacy in nulliparous women and in this regard, there is no difference between gain-framed and loss-framed messages.

  1. Association between Breastfeeding Duration and Type of Birth Attendant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordyn T. Wallenborn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Healthcare providers play an integral role in breastfeeding education and subsequent practices; however, the education and support provided to patients may differ by type of provider. The current study aims to evaluate the association between type of birth attendant and breastfeeding duration. Methods. Data from the prospective longitudinal study, Infant Feeding Practices Survey II, was analyzed. Breastfeeding duration and exclusive breastfeeding duration were defined using the American Academy of Pediatrics’ national recommendations. Type of birth attendant was categorized into obstetricians, other physicians, and midwife or nurse midwife. If mothers received prenatal care from a different type of provider than the birth attendant, they were excluded from the analysis. Multinomial logistic regression was conducted to obtain crude and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results. Compared to mothers whose births were attended by an obstetrician, mothers with a family doctor or midwife were twice as likely to breastfeed at least six months. Similarly, mothers with a midwife birth attendant were three times as likely to exclusively breastfeed less than six months and six times more likely to exclusively breastfeed at least six months compared to those who had an obstetrician birth attendant. Conclusions. Findings from the current study highlight the importance of birth attendants in breastfeeding decisions. Interventions are needed to overcome barriers physicians encounter while providing breastfeeding support and education. However, this study is limited by several confounding factors that have not been controlled for as well as by the self-selection of the population.

  2. Breastfeeding practices of ethnic Indian immigrant women in Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Natasha; Bandyopadhyay, Mridula

    2013-12-18

    The health benefits of breastfeeding are well documented in public health and medical literature worldwide. Despite this, global rates of breastfeeding steadily decline during the first couple of months postpartum. Although immigrant women have higher initiation rates and a longer duration of breastfeeding overall, breastfeeding practices are compromised because of a myriad of socioeconomic and cultural factors, including the acculturation process. The objective of this study was to show how acculturation and cultural identity influenced breastfeeding practices among Indian immigrants in Melbourne, Australia. Twelve case studies were employed to gather narratives of women's lived experiences. Ethnographic field research methods were used to collect data, including participant observation, semi-structured interviews, case studies, and life histories. This provided in-depth information from women on various aspects of the immigrant experience of motherhood, including infant care and feeding. Participants were opportunistically recruited from Indian obstetricians and gynaecologists. Women identifying as ethnic Indian and in their third trimester of pregnancy were recruited. Interviews were conducted in women's homes in metropolitan Melbourne over a 12 month period between 2004 and 2005. Data were coded and analysed thematically. All women identified as ethnic Indian and initiated breastfeeding in accordance with their cultural identity. Social support and cultural connectivity impacted positively on duration of breastfeeding. However, acculturation (adopting Australian cultural values and gender norms, including returning to paid employment) negatively influenced breastfeeding duration. In addition, the high reliance of recent immigrants on the advice of healthcare professionals who gave inconsistent advice negatively affected exclusive breastfeeding. For ethnic Indian immigrant women breastfeeding practice is closely linked to acculturation and identity construction

  3. Legislation should support optimal breastfeeding practices and access to low-cost, high-quality complementary foods: Indonesia provides a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekarjo, Damayanti; Zehner, Elizabeth

    2011-10-01

    It is important to support women to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months and continue breastfeeding for 24 months and beyond. It is also necessary to provide the poor with access to affordable ways to improve the quality of complementary foods. Currently, many countries do not have the legal and policy environment necessary to support exclusive and continued breastfeeding. Legislative and policy changes are also necessary for introducing complementary food supplements, allowing them to be marketed to those who need them, and ensuring that marketing remains appropriate and in full compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes. This paper aims to illustrate the above with examples from Indonesia and to identify legislative requirements for supporting breastfeeding and enabling appropriate access to high-quality complementary food supplements for children 6-24 months of age. Requirements include improved information, training, monitoring and enforcement systems for the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes; implementation and monitoring of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative; establishment of a registration category for complementary food supplements to enhance availability of high-quality, low-cost fortified products to help improve young child feeding; clear identification and marketing of these products as complementary food supplements for 6-24-month-olds so as to promote proper use and not interfere with breastfeeding. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. [Breastfeeding: the importance of intervening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Hélder; Silva, Ana Isabel

    2011-12-01

    Breast milk is considered by the WHO the ideal food for the first months of life. Although health professionals are aware of recommendations, high rates of drop-outs have been identified in Portugal. A false notion of hypogalactia is the major factor for early termination, which is allied to the technical difficulties of the feeding. Health professionals, often lacking training in the area, may have difficulty in reassuring mothers in these situations. In Portugal, at the 3rd month, most mothers stop breastfeeding by indication of their medical assistant. Gather evidence about the advantages of breast-feeding compared to artificial milk, and establish useful strategies in clinical practice to avoid early withdrawal. A survey was conducted for articles from the last six years in the major sites of evidence-based medicine and reference sites (Pubmed, Cochrane, National Guideline Clearinghouse, Tripdatabase, WHO). Breast-feeding is clearly associated with benefits to the infant, including significant protective effects for gastrointestinal infections (64%), middle ear (23- 50%), severe respiratory infections (73%) and for acute lymphocytic leukemia (19%) and sudden death syndrome in infants (36%). We also found long-term benefits, such as for obesity (7-24%) and other cardiovascular risk factors in adulthood. The mother also benefits from its protective effect for cancers of the breast and ovary, and diabetes mellitus type 2 as also, proportionate to the duration of breastfeeding. Health professionals have an important role in the initiation and continuation of breastfeeding. The notion of its advantages, the communication prior to delivery, accessibility support and training in technical aspects of correct picks are the proven strategies for evidence explored in the article. Breast milk contains several unique and exclusive elements, orchestrators of its health benefits. Postnatal period is critical to the development of neuro--hypothalamic circuits involved in

  5. Breast-feeding does not protect against allergic sensitization in early childhood and allergy-associated disease at age 7 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelding-Dannemand, Ea; Malby Schoos, Ann-Marie; Bisgaard, Hans

    2015-01-01

    clinic at 7 years of age, strictly adhering to predefined algorithms. Associations between duration of exclusive breast-feeding and outcomes were analyzed by logistic regression. RESULTS: We found no significant association between duration of exclusive breast-feeding and development of sensitization......% CI, 0.82-1.14]; and OR, 1.02 [95% CI, 0.84-1.23], respectively). Adjusting for reverse causation by excluding children with eczema, wheeze, or a positive skin prick test response before ending exclusive breast-feeding did not alter the results. CONCLUSION: Exclusive breast-feeding does not affect...

  6. Health Education to Strengthen Breastfeeding Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Rodrigues Cipriano Sousa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast milk is, without a doubt, the food that provides all the nutrients essential for the healthy growth and development of children. Through effective breastfeeding practices, it is possible to prevent several chronic noncommunicable diseases in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Objective: To investigate the relevance of using an educational strategy in breastfeeding promotion. Methods: It was a descriptive study with uncontrolled analytical approach conducted with 36 mothers of children under 2 years of age about breastfeeding, through an educational intervention using the booklet “Breastfeeding: an act of love”. Data collection took place in two moments (pre-test and post-test. Ethics Committee approved the project under protocol No. 058657. Results: Data analysis revealed that 41.6% of the interviewees stated that they did not receive guidance about breast problems from any professional during prenatal care, and 22% reported having presented nipple fissures. Regarding the initiation of breastfeeding, 11.1% of the women interviewed did not knowthe importance of colostrum, and 30.6% did not know its benefits. Assessment of the mothers’ knowledge before and after the intervention obtained a percentage of correctness of 50.7% and 70%, respectively. Conclusion: The educational activity to encourage breastfeeding was able to increase the mothers’ knowledge about breastfeeding and its health benefits for women and children. It is imperative to carry out activities such as the one proposed in this study, which enables the prevention of several problems that directly affect the health of families, acting effectively to promote a solid knowledge for the population. Keywords: Breast Feeding. Child Health. Health Education. Infant Nutrition. Food and Nutrition Education.

  7. Maternal and Hospital Factors Associated with First-Time Mothers' Breastfeeding Practice: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tzu-I; Huang, Shu-Her; Lee, Shoou-Yih D

    2015-01-01

    Continuity of breastfeeding is infrequent and indeterminate. Evidence is lacking regarding factors associated with breastfeeding at different postpartum time points. This prospective study investigated the change in, and correlates of, breastfeeding practices after delivery at a hospital and at 1, 3, and 6 months postpartum among first-time mothers. We followed a cohort of 300 primiparous mothers of Taiwan who gave birth at two hospitals during 2010-2011. Logistic and Cox regression analyses were performed to determine factors that were correlated with breastfeeding practices. In the study sample, the rate of exclusive breastfeeding during the hospital stay was 66%; it declined to 37.5% at 1 month and 30.2% at 3 months postpartum. Only 17.1% of women reported continuing breastfeeding at 6 months. Early initiation of breastfeeding, rooming-in practice, and self-efficacy were significantly related to exclusive breastfeeding during the hospital stay. After discharge, health literacy, knowledge, intention, and self-efficacy were positively and significantly associated with breastfeeding exclusivity. Later initiation (hazard ratio=1.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.05, 1.97), shorter intention (hazard ratio=1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.13, 1.68), and self-efficacy (hazard ratio=0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.96, 0.99) were important predictors of breastfeeding cessation within 6 months of delivery. Continuous breastfeeding practice for 6 months is challenging and difficult for new mothers. Results showed that factors related to breastfeeding varied over time after delivery. Interventions seeking to sustain breastfeeding should consider new mothers' needs and barriers at different times.

  8. Effect of maternal country of birth on breastfeeding practices: results from Portuguese GXXI birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, Musa Abubakar; Rodrigues, Carina; Fonseca, Maria João; Santos, Ana Cristina; Barros, Henrique

    2018-01-01

    Maternal country of birth has been associated with perinatal health outcomes but less is known regarding breastfeeding practices in contemporary European settings. This study investigated effect of maternal country of birth on breastfeeding initiation and duration by comparing native Portuguese and migrant mothers. We analyzed data of 7065 children of the Generation XXI (GXXI) birth cohort recruited at birth (2005-06) and followed-up 4 years later. Logistic regression was used to assess the effect of maternal country of birth on breastfeeding initiation. Kaplan-Meier estimate was used to compare breastfeeding duration by maternal country of birth and length of residence by migrant mothers in Portugal. Breastfeeding initiation and the type of breastfeeding practice were similar for native Portuguese and migrant mothers. The migrants had significantly higher median duration in months of any breastfeeding (Odds Ratio [OR] 6.0, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 5.4,6.6) and exclusive breastfeeding (OR 4.0, 95% CI 3.8,4.2) than native Portuguese mothers (OR 4.0, 95% CI 3.8,4.2 and OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.9,3.0). Migrant mothers who resided in Portugal for either ≤5 years (OR 5.0, 95% CI 3.9,6.1 and OR 4.0, 95% CI 3.8,4.2) or >  5 years (OR 6.0, 95% CI 5.5,6.5 and OR 4.0, 95% CI 3.7,4.3) years had similar duration of any breastfeeding or exclusive breastfeeding, in both cases higher than the native Portuguese mothers. No significant differences were found when world regions were compared. Maternal country of birth does not influence breastfeeding initiation and type of feeding practice. However, migrant mothers have longer breastfeeding duration of either exclusive or any breastfeeding, which was not changed by length of residence in Portugal.

  9. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of-a-kind bond that breastfeeding brings. Staying healthy and eating well YouTube embed video: https://www.youtube-nocookie. ... https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/kYQhoQ4umgg Healthy eating can keep you strong while breastfeeding. Learn more ...

  10. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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  11. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... health topics Printables and Shareables Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental ... Shareables Browse by health topic Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental ...

  12. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

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    Full Text Available ... is the best time to learn about the benefits of breastfeeding and make plans to give your baby a healthy start in life. Expand the sections below to watch videos ab