WorldWideScience

Sample records for exciting radiation pulses

  1. Controlling the Radiation Parameters of a Resonant Medium Excited by a Sequence of Ultrashort Superluminal Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Belov, P. A.; Babushkin, I.; Tolmachev, Yu. A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of controlling the radiation parameters of a spatially periodic one-dimensional medium consisting of classical harmonic oscillators by means of a sequence of ultrashort pulses that propagate through the medium with a superluminal velocity. We show that, in the spectrum of the transient process, in addition to the radiation at a resonant frequency of oscillators, new frequencies arise that depend on the period of the spatial distribution of the oscillator density, the excitation velocity, and the angle of observation. We have examined in detail the case of excitation of the medium by a periodic sequence of ultrashort pulses that travel with a superluminal velocity. We show that it is possible to excite oscillations of complex shapes and to control the radiation parameters of the resonant medium by changing the relationship between the pulse repetition rate, the medium resonant frequency, and the new frequency.

  2. Transient radiation from a ring resonant medium excited by an ultrashort superluminal pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, R M [Humboldt University at Berlin (Germany); Arkhipov, M V; Tolmachev, Yu A [Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Babushkin, I V [Institute of Quantum Optics, Leibniz University Hannover, Welfengarten 1 30167, Hannover (Germany)

    2015-06-30

    We report some specific features of transient radiation from a periodic spatially modulated one-dimensional medium with a resonant response upon excitation by an ultrashort pulse. The case of ring geometry (with particle density distributed along the ring according to the harmonic law) is considered. It is shown that the spectrum of scattered radiation contains (under both linear and nonlinear interaction), along with the frequency of intrinsic resonance of the medium, a new frequency, which depends on the pulse velocity and the spatial modulation period. The case of superluminal motion of excitation, when the Cherenkov effect manifests itself, is also analysed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Transient radiation from a ring resonant medium excited by an ultrashort superluminal pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Babushkin, I. V.; Tolmachev, Yu A.

    2015-06-01

    We report some specific features of transient radiation from a periodic spatially modulated one-dimensional medium with a resonant response upon excitation by an ultrashort pulse. The case of ring geometry (with particle density distributed along the ring according to the harmonic law) is considered. It is shown that the spectrum of scattered radiation contains (under both linear and nonlinear interaction), along with the frequency of intrinsic resonance of the medium, a new frequency, which depends on the pulse velocity and the spatial modulation period. The case of superluminal motion of excitation, when the Cherenkov effect manifests itself, is also analysed.

  4. Radiation of a resonant medium excited by few-cycle optical pulses at superluminal velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Pakhomov, A. V.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Babushkin, I.; Tolmachev, Yu A.; Rosanov, N. N.

    2017-05-01

    Recent progress in generation of optical pulses of durations comparable to one optical cycle has presented great opportunities for studies of the fundamental processes in matter as well as time-resolved spectroscopy of ultrafast processes in nonlinear media. It opened up a new area of research in modern ultrafast nonlinear optics and led to appearance of the attosecond science. In parallel, a new research area related to emission from resonant media excited by superluminally propagating ultrashort bursts of electromagnetic radiation has been actively developed over the last few years. In this paper, we review our recent results on theoretical analysis of the Cherenkov-type radiation of a resonant medium excited by few-cycle optical pulses propagating at superluminal velocity. This situation can be realized when an electromagnetic pulse with a plane wavefront incidents on a straight string of resonant atoms or a spot of light rotates at very large angular frequency and excites a distant circular string of resonant dipoles. Theoretical analysis revealed some unusual and remarkable features of the Cherenkov radiation generated in this case. This radiation arises in a transient regime which leads to the occurrence of new frequencies in the radiation spectrum. Analysis of the characteristics of this radiation can be used for the study of the resonant structure properties. In addition, a nonlinear resonant medium excited at superluminal velocity can emit unipolar optical pulses, which can be important in ultrafast control of wave-packet dynamics of matter. Specifics of the few-cycle pulse-driven optical response of a resonant medium composed of linear and nonlinear oscillators is discussed.

  5. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of {beta}-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar ({approx}1 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for {beta}-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower ({approx}0.5 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for {beta}-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number

  6. ?erenkov-based radiation from superluminal excitation in microdroplets by ultrashort pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, M; Mess, L; Gouesbet, G; Gréhan, G

    2001-10-15

    We demonstrate from a generalized Lorenz-Mie theory that ultrashort pulses can induce superluminal excitation in microdroplets. A ?erenkov-like effect can thus be expected for sufficiently intense ultrashort pulses.

  7. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi; Rajguru, Suhrud M

    2014-09-15

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca(2+) imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25-1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm(2) resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca(2+)] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca(2+) involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca(2+)]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca(2+) release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Exciting dynamic anapoles with electromagnetic doughnut pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Tim; Fedotov, Vassili A.; Papasimakis, Nikitas; Youngs, Ian; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2017-08-01

    As was predicted in 1995 by Afanasiev and Stepanovsky, a superposition of electric and toroidal dipoles can lead to a non-trivial non-radiating charge current-configuration, the dynamic anapole. The dynamic anapoles were recently observed first in microwave metamaterials and then in dielectric nanodisks. However, spectroscopic studies of toroidal dipole and anapole excitations are challenging owing to their diminishing coupling to transverse electromagnetic waves. Here, we show that anapoles can be excited by electromagnetic Flying Doughnut (FD) pulses. First described by Helwarth and Nouchi in 1996, FD pulses (also known as "Flying Toroids") are space-time inseparable exact solutions to Maxwell's equations that have toroidal topology and propagate in free-space at the speed of light. We argue that FD pulses can be used as a diagnostic and spectroscopic tool for the dynamic anapole excitations in matter.

  9. Synthesis of Nanosecond Ultrawideband Radiation Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshelev, V. I.; Plisko, V. V.; Sevostyanov, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    The synthesis of electromagnetic pulses with an extended spectrum by summing pulses of different duration in free space has been studied. The radiation spectrum has been estimated analytically for a 4-element array of combined antennas excited by bipolar voltage pulses of duration 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 ns. It has been shown experimentally that radiation with a spectral width of more than three octaves can be produced using a 2×2 array of combined antennas excited by bipolar pulses of duration 2 and 3 ns.

  10. Stimulation of unidirectional pulses in excitable systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, M.; Ovsyshcher, I. E.; Fleidervish, I.; Crystal, E.; Rabinovitch, A.

    2004-10-01

    Using a judicious spatial shape of input current pulses (and electrodes), responses of an excitable system (FitzHugh-Nagumo) appear as unidirectional pulses (UDP’s) instead of bidirectional ones (in one dimension) or circular ones (in two dimensions). The importance of the UDP’s for a possible mechanism for pinpointing the reentry cycle position and for a possible use in tachycardia suppression is discussed.

  11. Modeling short-pulse laser excitation of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Sandkamm, Ditte Både; Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical description of ultrashort-pulse laser excitation of dielectric materials based on strong-field excitation in the Keldysh picture combined with a multiple-rateequation model for the electronic excitation including collisional processes is presented. The model includes light attenuation...

  12. Particular features of the emission of radiation by a superluminally excited Raman-active medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, R. M.

    2016-05-01

    Particular features of the emission of radiation by a Raman-active medium excited by a sequence of ultrashort superluminal pulses have been studied theoretically. It is shown that such an excitation gives rise to the possibility of obtaining unipolar rectangular videopulses the duration and amplitude of which depend on the velocity of propagation of the excitation over the medium.

  13. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  14. Radiative widths of neutral kaon excitations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    we limit the radiative widths Γr(K*(1410)) and Γr(K*. 2(1430)) to 52.9 and 5.4 keV, respectively, at 90% CL. While there is no prediction for Γr(K*(1410)), Babcock and Rosner [9] used SU(3) invariance to predict that excitations with JPC = 1++ or 2++ would have vanishing radiative widths. In the limit of SU(3), K*. 2(1430) has.

  15. Clinical Comparison of Pulse and Chirp Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Misaridis, T.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    Coded excitation (CE) using frequency modulated signals (chirps) combined with modified matched filtering has earlier been presented showing promising results in simulations and in-vitro. In this study an experimental ultrasound system is evaluated in a clinical setting, where image sequences are...

  16. Non-radiative excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riachy, Lina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-03-01

    Non-radiative Excitation Fluorescence Microscopy (NEFM) constitutes a new way to observe biological samples beyond the diffraction limit. Non-radiative excitation of the samples is achieved by coating the substrate with donor species, such as quantum dots (QDs). Thus the dyes are not excited directly by the laser source, as in common fluorescence microscopy, but through a non-radiative energy transfer. To prevent dewetting of the donor film, we have recently implemented a silanization process to covalently bond the QDs on the substrate. An homogeneous monolayer of QDs was then deposited on only one side of the coverslips. Atomic force microscopy was then used to characterize the QD layer. We highlight the potential of our method through the study of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) labeled with DiD as acceptor, in interaction with surface functionalized with poly-L-lysine. In the presence of GUVs, we observed a quenching of QDs emission, together with an emission of DiD located in the membrane, which clearly indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to DiD occurs.

  17. Excitation and Control of Plasma Wakefields by Multiple Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, J.; Thornton, C.; Arran, C.; Shalloo, R. J.; Corner, L.; Cheung, G.; Gregory, C. D.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matlis, N. H.; Symes, D. R.; Walczak, R.; Hooker, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the resonant excitation of plasma waves by trains of laser pulses. We also take an important first step to achieving an energy recovery plasma accelerator by showing that a plasma wave can be damped by an out-of-resonance trailing laser pulse. The measured laser wakefields are found to be in excellent agreement with analytical and numerical models of wakefield excitation in the linear regime. Our results indicate a promising direction for achieving highly controlled, GeV-scale laser-plasma accelerators operating at multikilohertz repetition rates.

  18. [Effect of the pulse shape on electrostimulation of excitable tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volobuev, A N; Razumov, A N; Romanchuk, P I; Romanchuk, N P

    2010-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the consideration of the mechanisms of electrostimulation of excitable tissues used in remedial medicine. Community of biophysical principles underlying the Weiss-Lapique and Dubois-Reymond laws is emphasized. The action of stimulating pulses on biological tissues and its consequences are analysed with reference to their shape (rectangular, triangular, and exponential). It is shown that the shape of the accommodation curve depends on the shape of stimulating pulses and physiological conditions of the tissue.

  19. Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation and damage of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Balling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation of dielectrics is an intricate problem due to the strong coupling between the rapidly changing material properties and the light. In the present paper, details of a model based on a multiple-rate-equation description of the conduction band are provided. The model...... is verified by comparison with recent experimental measurements of the transient optical properties in combination with ablation-depth determinations. The excitation process from the first creation of conduction-band electrons at low intensities to the formation of a highly-excited plasma and associated...

  20. Pulse-train solutions and excitability in an optoelectronic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, D. P.; Callan, K. E.; Gauthier, D. J.; Schöll, E.

    2011-11-01

    We study an optoelectronic time-delay oscillator with bandpass filtering for different values of the filter bandwidth. Our experiments show novel pulse-train solutions with pulse widths that can be controlled over a three-order-of-magnitude range, with a minimum pulse width of ~150 ps. The equations governing the dynamics of our optoelectronic oscillator are similar to the FitzHugh-Nagumo model from neurodynamics with delayed feedback in the excitable and oscillatory regimes. Using a nullclines analysis, we derive an analytical proportionality between pulse width and the low-frequency cutoff of the bandpass filter, which is in agreement with experiments and numerical simulations. Furthermore, the nullclines help to describe the shape of the waveforms.

  1. High voltage pulse generators for kicker magnet excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Fiander, D C; Metzmacher, K D; Pearce, P

    1973-01-01

    Describes three new pulse generator systems for the excitation of the kicker magnets of fast ejection facilities. Firstly a pulse generator for the fast ejection from the 28 GeV proton synchrotron (CPS) of any desired number of the twenty circulating proton bunches is treated. Secondly the paper describes the development of a pulse generator for the transfer at 50 mu sec intervals of single bunches of the proton beam from the CPS to the new 300 GeV machine (SPS) in construction at CERN. Finally the development of a programmable eleven step pulse generator for the CPS/SPS transfer is described. This generator allows the shaving of the CPS beam during eleven turns, and because of the CPS/SPS diameter ratio, allows the SPS to be uniformly filled. (7 refs).

  2. Radiative and Excited State Charmonium Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozef Dudek

    2007-07-30

    Renewed interest in the spectroscopy of charmonium has arisen from recent unexpected observations at $e^+e^-$ colliders. Here we report on a series of works from the previous two years examining the radiative physics of charmonium states as well as the mass spectrum of states of higher spin and internal excitation. Using new techniques applied to Domain-Wall and Clover quark actions on quenched isotropic and anisotropic lattices, radiative transitions and two-photon decays are considered for the first time. Comparisons are made with experimental results and with model approaches. Forthcoming application to the light-quark sector of relevance to experiments like Jefferson Lab's GlueX is discussed.

  3. Nonselective excitation of pulsed ELDOR using multi-frequency microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Yuki; Mutoh, Risa; Ishiura, Masahiro; Mino, Hiroyuki

    2011-12-01

    The use of a polychromatic microwave pulse to expand the pumping bandwidth in pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) was investigated. The pumping pulse was applied in resonance with the broad (˜100 mT) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal of the manganese cluster of photosystem II in the S 2 state. The observation pulses were in resonance with the narrow EPR signal of the tyrosine radical, YDrad . It was found that in the case of the polychromatic pumping pulse containing five harmonics with the microwave frequencies between 8.5 and 10.5 GHz the PELDOR effect corresponding to the dipole interaction between the Mn cluster and YDrad was about 2.9 times larger than that achieved with a monochromatic pulse. In addition to the dipolar modulation, the nuclear modulation effects were observed. The effects could be suppressed by averaging the PELDOR trace over the time interval between the observation microwave pulses. The polychromatic excitation technique described will be useful for improving the PELDOR sensitivity in the measurements of long distances in biological samples, where the pair consists of a radical with a narrow EPR spectrum and slow phase relaxation, and a metal center that has a broad EPR spectrum and a short phase relaxation time.

  4. Features of Biconical Antenna Pulse Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legenkiy, M. M.

    2015-06-01

    Fields in bicone line and in free space are presented in the form of expansion over frequency-independent modes. Each mode possesses the dispersion depending on radius. With the mode matching method, the bicone antenna pulse radiation is calculated. It is shown that introducing some dielectric layer improves the antenna characteristics and allows to obtain the radiated field with higher amplitude.

  5. Wideband frequency-swept excitation in pulsed EPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Andrin; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2017-07-01

    Excitation of electron spins with monochromatic rectangular pulses is limited to bandwidths that are smaller than the spectral widths of most organic radicals and much smaller than the spectral widths of transition and rare earth metal ions. With frequency-swept pulses, bandwidths of up to 800 MHz have previously been attained for excitation and detection of spin packets at frequencies of about 9.6 GHz and bandwidths of up to 2.5 GHz in a polarization transfer experiment at frequencies of about 34 GHz. The remaining limitations, mainly due to resonator bandwidth and due to pulse length restrictions are discussed. Flip angles for state-space rotations on passage of a transition can generally be computed from the critical adiabaticity by the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana expression. For hyperbolic secant pulses, the Demkov-Kunike model describes excitation for spin packets within and outside the sweep range. Well within the sweep range, the Bloch-Siegert phase shift is proportional to critical adiabaticity to a very good approximation. Because of the dependence of both flip angle and coherence phase on critical adiabaticity, it is advantageous to use pairs of amplitude and frequency modulation functions that provide such offset-independent adiabaticity. Compensation for the resonator response function should restore offset-independent adiabaticity. Whereas resonance offsets and Bloch-Siegert phase can be refocused at certain pulse length ratios, phase dispersion in coupled spin systems cannot generally be refocused. Based on the bandwidth limitations that arise from spin dynamics, requirements are derived for a spectrometer that achieves precise spin control over wide bands. The design of such a spectrometer and hardware characterization by EPR experiments are discussed.

  6. Conditions for effects of radiation pulsing

    CERN Document Server

    Trinkaus, H

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of pulsing effects on radiation damage is due to differences in the delay times of relevant defect reactions and/or to the non-linear dependence of such reactions on defect production rates. Thus, significant pulsing effects require (1) proper relationships of the internal time scales of defect production and reaction to the time scales of pulsing and (2) sufficiently large pulsing induced fluctuations in relevant microstructural variables. We show that the first condition, which we quantify by a 'relative dynamic bias', is indeed fulfilled in wide ranges of the main irradiation parameters. The second condition, quantified by an 'absolute dynamic bias', is, however, found to restrict the parameter ranges of possible pulsing effects substantially. For planned spallation neutron sources and similar accelerator driven systems facilities we find, for instance, that, in the temperature range of interest, the defect yield of one pulse (controlling the absolute dynamic bias) is much too small to allo...

  7. Response of variable impedance stripline to pulse excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWright, G.

    1984-12-15

    We describe a simple method to predict the transient response of variable impedance stripline to pulse excitation. The method uses a finite difference based, quasi-static impedance formulation to calculate the reflection coefficient at each point along the direction of pulse propagation and the subsequent short pulse behavior of a variable impedance structure. A Fortran computer program is written to determine the quasi-static impedance. Excellent agreement of better than 1% between the finite difference impedance predictions and experimental results is noted. A second computer program is written utilizing previous results but essentially incorporating reflection and transmission from several discontinuities to analyze the transient response of the structure. This transient analysis yields good agreement between predictions and results obtained by means of time domain reflectometry.

  8. Emission of radiation by a resonance medium excited with a variable superluminal velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Pakhomov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Specific properties of the radiation emitted by a spatially modulated resonance medium excited by an ultrashort light pulse propagating through the medium at a variable superluminal velocity are analyzed. In so doing, frequencies different from that of the resonance transition of the medium may appear in the emission spectrum. It is demonstrated that, in contrast to an earlier studied case of medium excitation at constant velocity, variation of the excitation velocity leads to generation of a spectral continuum, the boundaries of which are determined by the range of variation of the medium-excitation velocity.

  9. Xenon plasma sustained by pulse-periodic laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudoy, I. G.; Solovyov, N. G.; Soroka, A. M.; Shilov, A. O.; Yakimov, M. Yu., E-mail: yakimov@lantanlaser.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, A. Ishlinsky Institute for Problems in Mechanics (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The possibility of sustaining a quasi-stationary pulse-periodic optical discharge (POD) in xenon at a pressure of p = 10–20 bar in a focused 1.07-μm Yb{sup 3+} laser beam with a pulse repetition rate of f{sub rep} ⩾ 2 kHz, pulse duration of τ ⩾ 200 μs, and power of P = 200–300 W has been demonstrated. In the plasma development phase, the POD pulse brightness is generally several times higher than the stationary brightness of a continuous optical discharge at the same laser power, which indicates a higher plasma temperature in the POD regime. Upon termination of the laser pulse, plasma recombines and is then reinitiated in the next pulse. The initial absorption of laser radiation in successive POD pulses is provided by 5p{sup 5}6s excited states of xenon atoms. This kind of discharge can be applied in plasma-based high-brightness broadband light sources.

  10. Excitation of dielectric barrier discharges by unipolar submicrosecond square pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuhai; Neiger, Manfred

    2001-06-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are self-extinguishing discharges due to charge accumulation on dielectric surfaces. In order to take advantage of these surface charges also at a low repetition frequency, high-voltage unipolar square pulses (amplitude up to 15 kV, rise and fall time less than 20 ns) are applied to drive DBDs. For electrical diagnostics of this novel excitation method, a temporally dynamic model for diffuse DBDs is introduced, from which equations were derived which allow the calculation of internal electrical quantities in the discharge gap from measured external electrical quantities. It was found, following a primary discharge at the rising front or at the top of the voltage pulse, that a secondary discharge is induced at the end of the falling voltage flank without simultaneously consuming energy from the external circuit. The energy needed is provided by the accumulated surface and space charges left by the primary discharge, which are totally or partially lost under normal low-frequency sine or square wave excitation. Secondary discharges are observed in a wide range of electrode configurations, gases and gas pressures for both homogeneous and filamentary discharges. In the case of filamentary modes, secondary discharges are found to develop along the remaining channels of the preceding primary discharges. Experiments for ozone synthesis show an improved energy efficiency of 8-9 eV per ozone molecule, which is about 30% better than that achieved with sine wave excitation.

  11. Charges and Electromagnetic Radiation as Topological Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfried Faber

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a model with stable topological solitons in Minkowski space with only three degrees of freedom, the rotational angles of a spatial Dreibein. This model has four types of solitons differing in two topological quantum numbers which we identify with electric charge and spin. The vacuum has a two-dimensional degeneracy leading to two types of massless excitations, characterised by a topological quantum number which could have a physical equivalent in the photon number.

  12. Two-photon excitation of atoms by ultrashort electromagnetic pulses in a discrete spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Astapenko, Valery

    2015-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to the theoretical analysis of two-photon excitation of atoms in a discrete energy spectrum by ultrashort electromagnetic pulses of femto- and subfemtosecond ranges of durations. As examples, excitation of hydrogen and sodium atoms from the ground state to excited states with a zero orbital moment is considered.

  13. Radiofrequency pulse design for the selective excitation of dissolved 129Xe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, General; Norquay, Graham; Schulte, Rolf F; Wild, Jim M

    2015-01-01

    To optimize radiofrequency (RF) pulses for the selective excitation of dissolved phase (129)Xe that take into account the very short T2*, while simultaneously, minimally exciting the much larger gas signal. Numerical simulations of Shinnar le-Roux pulses and binomial coefficient composite-element pulses were performed and experimentally implemented on a 1.5 Tesla (T) clinical scanner. These were compared with pulses commonly used for short T2* imaging from the literature. The pulses were then experimentally tested in vivo with healthy volunteers inhaling hyperpolarized (129)Xe using nuclear MR spectroscopy on a 1.5T clinical scanner. Standard RF excitation pulses inadvertently excite the gas compartment, or are long enough that the T2* of the dissolved compartment deteriorates the received signal. Amplitude modulated binomial composite pulses perform well being short and having high selectivity, however, deteriorate at high amplifier gain setting. Composite pulses using pulse width modulation provide the desired frequency response even in these nonlinear, high gain regimes. Composite pulses provide a means of very narrow band frequency selectivity in a short duration pulse that is well suited to dissolved (129)Xe imaging. Pulse width modulation maintains the desired frequency response even in the presence of amplitude distortion. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The influence of the excitation pulse length on ultrafast magnetization dynamics in nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fognini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The laser-induced demagnetization of a ferromagnet is caused by the temperature of the electron gas as well as the lattice temperature. For long excitation pulses, the two reservoirs are in thermal equilibrium. In contrast to a picosecond laser pulse, a femtosecond pulse causes a non-equilibrium between the electron gas and the lattice. By pump pulse length dependent optical measurements, we find that the magnetodynamics in Ni caused by a picosecond laser pulse can be reconstructed from the response to a femtosecond pulse. The mechanism responsible for demagnetization on the picosecond time scale is therefore contained in the femtosecond demagnetization experiment.

  15. Sound Radiation of Aerodynamically Excited Flat Plates into Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Osterziel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow-induced vibrations and the sound radiation of flexible plate structures of different thickness mounted in a rigid plate are experimentally investigated. Therefore, flow properties and turbulent boundary layer parameters are determined through measurements with a hot-wire anemometer in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel. Furthermore, the excitation of the vibrating plate is examined by laser scanning vibrometry. To describe the sound radiation and the sound transmission of the flexible aluminium plates into cavities, a cuboid-shaped room with adjustable volume and 34 flush-mounted microphones is installed at the non flow-excited side of the aluminium plates. Results showed that the sound field inside the cavity is on the one hand dependent on the flow parameters and the plate thickness and on the other hand on the cavity volume which indirectly influences the level and the distribution of the sound pressure behind the flexible plate through different excited modes.

  16. Pulse excitation experiment of a superconducting generator; chodendo hatsudenki no parusu reiki shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyaike, K.; Iimura, T.; Nishimura, M.; Arata, M.; Takabatake, M. [Toshiba Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yamada, M.; Kanamori, Y.; Hasegawa, K. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    Efficiency improvement, improvement in the stability of electric power system it is miniaturization and weight reduction can be expected in comparison with the traditional-model generator superconducting generator. We produce the small superconducting generator for the experiment experimentally, and performance characteristics verification of the generator is carried out experimentally. This time, pulse excitation test of the superconducting generator was carried out, and the ac loss of the conductor by the pulse excitation investigated the effect on the quenching current. (NEDO)

  17. Excitation of coherent oscillations in underdoped cuprate superconductors by intense THz pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Turner, Joshua J.; Gerber, Simon M.; Bonn, Doug; Hardy, Walter; Liang, Ruixing; Salluzzo, Marco

    2016-05-01

    We use intense broadband THz pulses to excite the cuprate superconductors YBCO and NBCO in their underdoped phase, where superconducting and charge density wave ground states compete. We observe pronounced coherent oscillations at attributed to renormalized low-energy phonon modes. These oscillation features are much more prominent than those observed in all-optical pump-probe measurements, suggesting a different excitation mechanism.

  18. Luminescence and excitation spectra of YAG:Nd{sup 3+} excited by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning Lixin [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Tanner, Peter A. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: bhtan@cityu.edu.hk; Harutunyan, Vachagan V.; Aleksanyan, Eduard [Yerevan Physics Institute, 2 Alikhanian Brothers Str., 375036 Yerevan (Armenia); Makhov, Vladimir N. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninskii Prospect 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Kirm, Marco [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia)

    2007-12-15

    The low-temperature 4f{sup 2}5d{yields}4f{sup 3} fast emission of Nd{sup 3+} from YAG:Nd{sup 3+} has been studied under excitation by synchrotron radiation. Additionally, 4f{sup 3}{yields}4f{sup 3} luminescence of Nd{sup 3+} has been observed and assigned to transitions from the {sup 2}F(2){sub 5/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} multiplet terms. The observed experimental spectra of Nd{sup 3+} d-f emission and f-d excitation are well simulated by crystal-field calculations.

  19. Coherent effects in the relaxation dynamics of a multilevel quantum system excited by ultrashort light pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbukh, I.Sh; Kovarsky, V.A.; Perelman, N.F.

    1989-05-22

    Interference effects in luminescence produced by short light pulse excitation of a single quantum level interacting with a quasi-continuum of background states have been considered. Different regimes of subsequent luminescence quenching are revealed and analytically studied in a unified way: radiationless decay controlled emission, multiple repetitions of the initial pulse form, anharmonic dephasing and following revival, etc. (orig.).

  20. Anomalous photo-induced response by double-pulse excitation in the organic conductor (EDO-TTF)2PF6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Ken; Ogihara, Sho; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Okimoto, Yoichi; Shao, Xiangfeng; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-02-01

    We measured ultrafast reflectivity changes induced by double-pulse excitation in the organic conductor (EDO-TTF)2PF6. Using double-pulse excitation with a relatively high intensity, the sign of reflectivity change became reversed at around 0.8 ps and subsequently the reflectivity change reverted to that of the normal photo-induced state after about 1 ps. Using a optically phase-locked double-pulse with low intensity, we found that the temporal profile excited by an in-phase double-pulse differs from that by an out-of-phase double-pulse despite the time difference between the double-pulses being only 1.31 fs. This was true even when there is almost no overlap between each pulse in the double-pulse. These results indicate that the photo-response in this material to double-pulse excitation differs greatly from the linear sum of the responses to single pulses.

  1. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Oketa, Takatsugu; Masuda, Shinichi; Koga, James K.; Kondo, Shuji; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2002-10-01

    We investigate a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 1018 cm-3 is measured with a time-resolved frequency domain interferometer (FDI). The results show an accelerating wakefield excitation of 20 GeV/m with good coherency. This is the first time-resolved measurement of laser wakefield excitation in a gas-jet plasma. The experimental results agree with the simulation results and linear theory. The pump-probe interferometer system of FDI will be modified to the optical injection system as a relativistic electron beam injector. In 1D particle in cell simulation we obtain results of high quality intense electron beam generation.

  2. Planck's Radiation Law: Thermal Excitations of Vacuum Induced Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogiba F.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The second Planck’s radiation law is derived considering that “resonators” induced by the vacuum absorb thermal excitations as additional fluctuations. The maximum energy transfer, as required by the maximum entropy equilibrium, occurs when the frequencies of these two kind of vibrations are equal. The motion resembles that of the coherent states of the quantum oscillator, as originally pointed by Schrödinger [1]. The resulting variance, due to random phases, coincides with that used by Einstein to reproduce the first Planck’s radiation law from his thermal fluctuation equation [2].

  3. Electromagnetic Radiation Generated by Acoustic Excitation of Rock Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavorovich, Lyudmila V.; Bespalko, Anatolii A.; Fedotov, Pavel I.; Baksht, Rina B.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents an experiment on acoustic excitation of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) signals in skarn, sandstone, and magnetite ore samples. For the skarn and sandstone samples, the EMR signal amplitude was observed to decrease with increasing ultimate strength. Supposedly, this effect can be explained by assuming that EMR is generated when an acoustic wave propagates through an electrical double layer. The presence of piezoelectric inclusions ( e.g., quartz) in the magnetite ore enhances the analog EMR signal and its spectral components.

  4. Ultrafast emission from colloidal nanocrystals under pulsed X-ray excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Turtos, R.M.; Polovitsyn, A.; Christodoulou, S.; Salomoni, M.; Auffray, E.; Moreels, I.; Lecoq, P.; Grim, J.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Fast timing has emerged as a critical requirement for radiation detection in medical and high energy physics, motivating the search for scintillator materials with high light yield and fast time response. However, light emission rates from conventional scintillation mechanisms fundamentally limit the achievable time resolution, which is presently at least one order of magnitude slower than required for next-generation detectors. One solution to this challenge is to generate an intense prompt signal in response to ionizing radiation. In this paper, we present colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as promising prompt photon sources. We investigate two classes of NCs: two-dimensional CdSe nanoplatelets (NPLs) and spherical CdSe/CdS core/giant shell quantum dots (GS QDs). We demonstrate that the emission rates of these NCs under pulsed X-ray excitation are much faster than traditional mechanisms in bulk scintillators, i.e. 5d-4f transitions. CdSe NPLs have a sub-100 ps effective decay time of 77 ps and CdSe/...

  5. Broadband excitation in solid-state NMR using interleaved DANTE pulse trains with N pulses per rotor period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xingyu; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Carnevale, Diego; Ulzega, Simone; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Amoureux, Jean-Paul

    2013-11-01

    We analyze the direct excitation of wide one-dimensional spectra of nuclei with spin I=1/2 or 1 in rotating solids submitted to pulse trains in the manner of Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation (DANTE), either with one short rotor-synchronized pulse of duration τp in each of K rotor periods (D1(K)) or with N interleaved equally spaced pulses τp in each rotor period, globally also extending over K rotor periods (D(N)(K)). The excitation profile of D(N)(K) scheme is a comb of rf-spikelets with Nν(R)=N/T(R) spacing from the carrier frequency, and a width of each spikelet inversely proportional to the length, KT(R), of D(N)(K) scheme. Since the individual pulse lengths, τp, are typically of a few hundreds of ns, D(N)(K) scheme can readily excite spinning sidebands families covering several MHz, provided the rf carrier frequency is close enough to the resonance frequency of one the spinning sidebands. If the difference of isotropic chemical shifts between distinct chemical sites is less than about 1.35/(KT(R)), D(N)(K) scheme can excite the spinning sidebands families of several sites. For nuclei with I=1/2, if the homogeneous and inhomogeneous decays of coherences during the DANTE sequence are neglected, the K pulses of a D1(K) train have a linearly cumulative effect, so that the total nutation angle is θ(tot)=K2πν1τp, where ν1 is the rf-field amplitude. This allows obtaining nearly ideal 90° pulses for excitation or 180° rotations for inversion and refocusing across wide MAS spectra comprising many spinning sidebands. If one uses interleaved DANTE trains D(N)(K) with N>1, only spinning sidebands separated by intervals of Nν(R) with respect to the carrier frequency are observed as if the effective spinning speed was Nν(R). The other sidebands have vanishing intensities because of the cancellation of the N contributions with opposite signs. However, the intensities of the remaining sidebands obey the same rules as in spectra obtained

  6. Coherent excitation of vibrational levels using ultra short pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Clercq, LE

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a model of the coherent excitation of the first few vibrational modes in the electronic ground state of the molecule. The model will be used in combination with an optimization algorithm to optimize a...

  7. Radiation spectroscopy by digital pulse height analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Arcos, J.M. (Metrologia de Radiaciones, Instituto de Investigacion Basica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)); Garcia-Torano, E. (Metrologia de Radiaciones, Instituto de Investigacion Basica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)); Olmos, P. (Tecnologias Avanzadas de Sensores, Direccion de Tecnologia, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)); Marin, J. (Tecnologias Avanzadas de Sensores, Direccion de Tecnologia, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain))

    1994-12-30

    This paper presents a new version of the Digital Pulse-Height Analysis (DPHA) method described in a previous paper, which is based on data acquisition through a personal computer using a flash-ADC card followed by numerical processing of pulses in the same computer. Performance tests carried out with a pulse generator and gamma-ray spectra have been carried out and their results are discussed. ((orig.))

  8. Nonlinear response to picosecond pulse excitations in metal backed magnetic layers (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, H.; Vittoria, C.; Trott, K.

    1993-05-01

    For years there has been great interest in the radar survivability communities concerning the response of materials to narrow picosecond pulse excitation. In this report, we have calculated the nonlinear response of magnetodielectric thin layers to picosecond excitation utilizing direct time-domain integration. This is in contrast to our previous frequency-domain calculations,1 where the nonlinear properties of the material were dealt with only in an approximate manner. Using time domain calculations, relaxations, hysteresis, and magnetization phenomena associated with the response are, therefore, investigated in depth. The purpose of this calculation was to provide an analytical method by which physical properties of materials can be identified under picosecond pulse excitation as well as to explore special cases of excitations in which picosecond pulses are efficiently absorbed. The calculations indicate that by examining the reflected wave form of the incident rectangular picosecond pulse the amount of magnetic hysteresis and saturation of the material may be estimated. It is shown that magnetic hysteresis will affect the shape of the trailing edge of the reflected signal, whereas the magnetic saturation effect can be identified from the slope of the reflected pulse step. Examples of designing effective picosecond pulse screening structures have also been illustrated. The difference in between the time domain and frequency domain calculations are, therefore, discussed and compared.

  9. Photostability of a fluorescent marker under pulsed excited-state depletion through stimulated emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyba, Marcus; Hell, Stefan W

    2003-09-01

    Saturated stimulated-emission depletion (STED) of a fluorescent marker has been shown to break the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy and to facilitate spatial resolution down to a few tens of nanometers. Here we investigate the photostability of a fluorophore that, in this concept, is repeatedly excited and depleted by synchronized laser pulses. Our study of bacteria labeled with RH-414, a membrane marker, reveals that increasing the duration of the STED pulse from approximately 10 to 160 ps fundamentally improves the photostability of the dye. At the same time the STED efficiency is maintained. The observed photobleaching of RH-414 is due primarily to multiphoton absorption from its ground state. One can counteract photobleaching by employing STED pulses that range from 150 ps to approximately half of the lifetime of the excited state. The results also have implications for multiphoton excitation microscopy.

  10. Microcavity design for low threshold polariton condensation with ultrashort optical pulse excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellmann, C.; Leierseder, U.; Huber, R. [Department of Physics, University of Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Amo, A.; Bloch, J. [CNRS-Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Ménard, J.-M., E-mail: jean-michel.menard@mpl.mpg.de [Department of Physics, University of Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky-Straße 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-28

    We present a microcavity structure with a shifted photonic stop-band to enable efficient non-resonant injection of a polariton condensate with spectrally broad femtosecond pulses. The concept is demonstrated theoretically and confirmed experimentally for a planar GaAs/AlGaAs multilayer heterostructure pumped with ultrashort near-infrared pulses while photoluminescence is collected to monitor the optically injected polariton density. As the excitation wavelength is scanned, a regime of polariton condensation can be reached in our structure at a consistently lower fluence threshold than in a state-of-the-art conventional microcavity. Our microcavity design improves the polariton injection efficiency by a factor of 4, as compared to a conventional microcavity design, when broad excitation pulses are centered at a wavelength of λ = 740 nm. Most remarkably, this improvement factor reaches 270 when the excitation wavelength is centered at 750 nm.

  11. Microcavity design for low threshold polariton condensation with ultrashort optical pulse excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Poellmann, C; Galopin, E; Lemaître, A; Amo, A; Bloch, J; Huber, R; Ménard, J -M

    2016-01-01

    We present a microcavity structure with a shifted photonic stop-band to enable efficient non-resonant injection of a polariton condensate with spectrally broad femtosecond pulses. The concept is demonstrated theoretically and confirmed experimentally for a planar GaAs/AlGaAs multilayer heterostructure pumped with ultrashort near-infrared pulses while photoluminescence is collected to monitor the optically injected polariton density. As the excitation wavelength is scanned, a regime of polariton condensation can be reached in our structure at a consistently lower fluence threshold than in a state-of-the-art conventional microcavity. Our microcavity design improves the polariton injection efficiency by a factor of 4, as compared to a conventional microcavity design, when broad excitation pulses are centered at a wavelength of 740 nm. Most remarkably, this improvement factor reaches 270 when the excitation wavelength is centered at 750 nm.

  12. Efficient method to design RF pulses for parallel excitation MRI using gridding and conjugate gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuo; Ji, Jim

    2014-04-01

    Parallel excitation (pTx) techniques with multiple transmit channels have been widely used in high field MRI imaging to shorten the RF pulse duration and/or reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR). However, the efficiency of pulse design still needs substantial improvement for practical real-time applications. In this paper, we present a detailed description of a fast pulse design method with Fourier domain gridding and a conjugate gradient method. Simulation results of the proposed method show that the proposed method can design pTx pulses at an efficiency 10 times higher than that of the conventional conjugate-gradient based method, without reducing the accuracy of the desirable excitation patterns.

  13. Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, V. E.; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse is analyzed within the kinetic approach. It is shown that the most efficient source of plasma waves is the nonlinear current arising due to the gradient of the energy density of the high-frequency field. Generation of plasma waves by the drag current is usually less efficient but not negligibly small at relatively high frequencies of electron–ion collisions. The influence of electron collisions on the excitation of plasma waves by pulses of different duration is described quantitatively.

  14. Trapped electronic states in YAG crystal excited by femtosecond radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavedeev, E.V.; Kononenko, V.V.; Konov, V.I. [General Physics Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-15

    The excitation of an electronic subsystem of an yttrium aluminum garnet by 800 nm femtosecond radiation was studied theoretically and experimentally. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the refractive index (n) inside the beam waist was explored by means of the pump-probe interferometric technique with a submicron resolution. The observed increase in n indicated the formation of bound electronic states relaxed for ∝ 150 ps. We showed that the experimental data agreed with the computational simulation based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation only if these transient states were considered to arise from a direct light-induced process but not from the decay of radiatively generated free-electron-hole pairs. (orig.)

  15. Electroluminescence characteristics of organic thin film pumped by pulsed excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenqing; Gan, Zhengyu; Wei, Bin; Zhang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Zhilin; Jiang, Xueyin

    2010-06-01

    The current roll-off in organic light-emitting diodes has been studied by observing the current density versus voltage characteristics and spectra of single-layer and bilayer devices. Pumped by radiation sources of a variety of intensities, the current densities in a single-layer device decrease and spectra were shifted towards blue region. This is a result of the large amount of excess anion radicals that absorb the emitted photons. Using a bilayer device to balance the excess anion radicals is one of the methods to restrain the current roll-off.

  16. Discrete excitation of mode pulses using a diode-pumped solid-state digital laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, Sandile

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate novel method of generating discrete excitation of on-demand Lagaurre-Gaussian (LG) mode pulses, in a diode pumped solid-state digital laser. The digital laser comprises of an intra-cavity spatial light...

  17. Volumetric graphics in liquid using holographic femtosecond laser pulse excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Kota; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    Much attention has been paid to the development of three-dimensional volumetric displays in the fields of optics and computer graphics, and it is a dream of we display researchers. However, full-color volumetric displays are challenging because many voxels with different colors have to be formed to render volumetric graphics in real three-dimensional space. Here, we show a new volumetric display in which microbubble voxels are three-dimensionally generated in a liquid by focused femtosecond laser pulses. Use of a high-viscosity liquid, which is the key idea of this system, slows down the movement of the microbubbles, and as a result, volumetric graphics can be displayed. This "volumetric bubble display" has a wide viewing angle and simple refresh and requires no addressing wires because it involves optical access to transparent liquid and achieves full-color graphics composed on light-scattering voxels controlled by illumination light sources. In addition, a bursting of bubble graphics system using an ultrasonic vibrator also has been demonstrated. This technology will open up a wide range of applications in three-dimensional displays, augmented reality and computer graphics.

  18. Effect of plasma formation on the double pulse laser excitation of cubic silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otobe, T.; Hayashi, T.; Nishikino, M.

    2017-10-01

    We calculate the electron excitation in cubic silicon carbide caused by the intense femtosecond laser double pulses using the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). After the first pulse ends, excited electrons should be relaxed by collisional processes. Because TDDFT does not include scattering processes, thermalization is mimicked by following three assumptions. First, we assume no collisions and relaxation processes. Second, we assume the partially thermalized electronic state defined by two quasi-temperatures in the conduction and valence bands individually. Third, we assume the thermalized electron distribution, which is expressed by single electron temperature. Our results indicate that the plasma frequency (ωpl) formed by the first pulse is the key parameter in energy absorption in the second pulse. When the plasma frequency of the plasma formed by the first laser approaches the frequency of the laser, resonant excitation by the second pulse occurs. The lower electron temperature shows higher ωpl and higher efficient energy absorption because the effective mass of the electron becomes smaller.

  19. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kotaki, H

    2002-01-01

    We investigate a mechanism of nonlinear phenomena in laser-plasma interaction, a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. We need to understand and further employ some of these phenomena for our purposes. We measure self-focusing, filamentation, and the anomalous blueshift of the laser pulse. The ionization of gas with the self-focusing causes a broad continuous spectrum with blueshift. The normal blueshift depends on the laser intensity and the plasma density. We, however, have found different phenomenon. The laser spectrum shifts to fixed wavelength independent of the laser power and gas pressure above some critical power. We call the phenomenon 'anomalous blueshift'. The results are explained by the formation of filaments. An intense laser pulse can excite a laser wakefield in plasma. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 10 sup 1 sup 8 cm sup - sup 3 is mea...

  20. Ionisation Chamber for Measurement of Pulsed Photon Radiation Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, D

    2017-04-28

    The use of pulsed photon radiation in medical, industrial and security sectors has vastly increased during the recent years. The length of pulse from different X-ray flash generators that are commonly used as either portable, battery-operated or fixed systems can be as low as a few femtoseconds. However, the majority of radiation protection instruments, especially various active electronic dosemeters, have limitations when operated in pulsed fields. This study presents measurements that were performed using the dose-integration mode of the RI-02 and Ram Ion survey metres, which are based on ventilated ionisation chamber, when exposed to different pulsed X-ray sources. An intercomparison between the results that were obtained with the survey metres and those that were obtained with thermoluminescence dosemeter, reference passive dosemeter, show good agreement (deviation lies within 10%). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Development of advanced radiation monitors for pulsed neutron fields

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081895

    The need of radiation detectors capable of efficiently measuring in pulsed neutron fields is attracting widespread interest since the 60s. The efforts of the scientific community substantially increased in the last decade due to the increasing number of applications in which this radiation field is encountered. This is a major issue especially at particle accelerator facilities, where pulsed neutron fields are present because of beam losses at targets, collimators and beam dumps, and where the correct assessment of the intensity of the neutron fields is fundamental for radiation protection monitoring. LUPIN is a neutron detector that combines an innovative acquisition electronics based on logarithmic amplification of the collected current signal and a special technique used to derive the total number of detected neutron interactions, which has been specifically conceived to work in pulsed neutron fields. Due to its special working principle, it is capable of overcoming the typical saturation issues encountere...

  2. Taking the pulse of the cambrian radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Bruce S

    2003-02-01

    The Cambrian radiation is that key episode in the history of life when a large number of animal phyla appeared in the fossil record over a geologically short period of time. Over the last 20 years, scientific understanding of this radiation has increased significantly. Still, fundamental questions remain about the timing of the radiation and also the tempo of evolution. Trilobites are an excellent group to address these questions because of their rich abundance and diversity. Moreover, their complex morphology makes them readily amenable to phylogenetic analysis, and deducing the nature of macroevolutionary processes during the Cambrian radiation requires an understanding of evolutionary patterns. Phylogenetic biogeographic analysis of Early Cambrian olenellid trilobites, based on a modified version of Brooks Parsimony Analysis, revealed the signature of the breakup of Pannotia, a tectonic event that most evidence suggests is constrained to the interval 600 to 550 Ma. As trilobites are derived metazoans, this suggests the phylogenetic proliferation associated with the Cambrian radiation was underway tens of millions of years before the Early Cambrian, although not hundreds of millions of years as some have argued.Phylogenetic information from Early Cambrian olenellid trilobites was also used in a stochastic approach based on two continuous time models to test the hypothesis that rates of speciation were unusually high during the Cambrian radiation. No statistical evidence was found to support this hypothesis. Instead, rates of evolution during the Cambrian radiation, at least those pertaining to speciation, were comparable to those that have occurred during other times of adaptive or taxic radiation throughout the history of life.

  3. Pulse shaping of transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser using a simple plasma shutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Noah; Harilal, S. S.

    2009-03-01

    The pulse from a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser consists of a sharp spike followed by a long, drawn out tail region spanning about 2-5 μs caused by the nitrogen gas in the laser cavity. The nitrogen tail is undesirable in many applications because it decreases the average power of the laser pulse. We employ a pinhole plasma shutter for eliminating the nitrogen tail and shortening the pulse width. The pinhole shutter optically triggers plasma at a certain point in time with respect to the temporal profile of the laser pulse. This way, a good portion of the sharp spike is transmitted, while the energy stored in the nitrogen tail is consumed in heating the plasma. This simplistic plasma shutter is easy to build and inexpensive compared to other existing plasma shutter designs.

  4. Pulsed magnetic field excitation sensitivity of match-type electric blasting caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parson, Jonathan; Dickens, James; Walter, John; Neuber, Andreas A.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a study on energy deposition and electromagnetic compatibility of match-type electroexplosive devices (EEDs), which recently have found more usage in pulsed power environments with high electromagnetic interference (EMI) background. The sensitivity of these devices makes them dangerous to intended and unintended radiation produced by devices commonly used in pulsed power environments. Match-type EEDs have been found to be susceptible to such low levels of energy (7-8 mJ) that safe operation of these EEDs is vital when in use near devices that produce high levels of pulsed EMI. The scope of this paper is to provide an investigation that incorporates results of similar studies to provide detonation characteristics of these EEDs. The three topics included in this study are sensitivity testing, modeling of the thermodynamic heat propagation, and electromagnetic compatibility from pulsed electromagnetic radiation. The thermodynamic joule heating of the primary explosive has been modeled by a solution to the 1D heat equation. A simple pulsed generator, Marx generator with an inductive load, was used for the electromagnetic compatibility assessment of the coupled field between the pulse generator and shorted EED. The results of the electromagnetic compatibility assessment relate the resistive, inductive, and capacitive components of the pulse generator to the area of the shorted EED.

  5. Pulsed magnetic field excitation sensitivity of match-type electric blasting caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parson, Jonathan; Dickens, James; Walter, John; Neuber, Andreas A

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a study on energy deposition and electromagnetic compatibility of match-type electroexplosive devices (EEDs), which recently have found more usage in pulsed power environments with high electromagnetic interference (EMI) background. The sensitivity of these devices makes them dangerous to intended and unintended radiation produced by devices commonly used in pulsed power environments. Match-type EEDs have been found to be susceptible to such low levels of energy (7-8 mJ) that safe operation of these EEDs is vital when in use near devices that produce high levels of pulsed EMI. The scope of this paper is to provide an investigation that incorporates results of similar studies to provide detonation characteristics of these EEDs. The three topics included in this study are sensitivity testing, modeling of the thermodynamic heat propagation, and electromagnetic compatibility from pulsed electromagnetic radiation. The thermodynamic joule heating of the primary explosive has been modeled by a solution to the 1D heat equation. A simple pulsed generator, Marx generator with an inductive load, was used for the electromagnetic compatibility assessment of the coupled field between the pulse generator and shorted EED. The results of the electromagnetic compatibility assessment relate the resistive, inductive, and capacitive components of the pulse generator to the area of the shorted EED.

  6. SPIDYAN, a MATLAB library for simulating pulse EPR experiments with arbitrary waveform excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribitzer, Stephan; Doll, Andrin; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-02-01

    Frequency-swept chirp pulses, created with arbitrary waveform generators (AWGs), can achieve inversion over a range of several hundreds of MHz. Such passage pulses provide defined flip angles and increase sensitivity. The fact that spectra are not excited at once, but single transitions are passed one after another, can cause new effects in established pulse EPR sequences. We developed a MATLAB library for simulation of pulse EPR, which is especially suited for modeling spin dynamics in ultra-wideband (UWB) EPR experiments, but can also be used for other experiments and NMR. At present the command line controlled SPin DYnamics ANalysis (SPIDYAN) package supports one-spin and two-spin systems with arbitrary spin quantum numbers. By providing the program with appropriate spin operators and Hamiltonian matrices any spin system is accessible, with limits set only by available memory and computation time. Any pulse sequence using rectangular and linearly or variable-rate frequency-swept chirp pulses, including phase cycling can be quickly created. To keep track of spin evolution the user can choose from a vast variety of detection operators, including transition selective operators. If relaxation effects can be neglected, the program solves the Liouville-von Neumann equation and propagates spin density matrices. In the other cases SPIDYAN uses the quantum mechanical master equation and Liouvillians for propagation. In order to consider the resonator response function, which on the scale of UWB excitation limits bandwidth, the program includes a simple RLC circuit model. Another subroutine can compute waveforms that, for a given resonator, maintain a constant critical adiabaticity factor over the excitation band. Computational efficiency is enhanced by precomputing propagator lookup tables for the whole set of AWG output levels. The features of the software library are discussed and demonstrated with spin-echo and population transfer simulations.

  7. SPIDYAN, a MATLAB library for simulating pulse EPR experiments with arbitrary waveform excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribitzer, Stephan; Doll, Andrin; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-02-01

    Frequency-swept chirp pulses, created with arbitrary waveform generators (AWGs), can achieve inversion over a range of several hundreds of MHz. Such passage pulses provide defined flip angles and increase sensitivity. The fact that spectra are not excited at once, but single transitions are passed one after another, can cause new effects in established pulse EPR sequences. We developed a MATLAB library for simulation of pulse EPR, which is especially suited for modeling spin dynamics in ultra-wideband (UWB) EPR experiments, but can also be used for other experiments and NMR. At present the command line controlled SPin DYnamics ANalysis (SPIDYAN) package supports one-spin and two-spin systems with arbitrary spin quantum numbers. By providing the program with appropriate spin operators and Hamiltonian matrices any spin system is accessible, with limits set only by available memory and computation time. Any pulse sequence using rectangular and linearly or variable-rate frequency-swept chirp pulses, including phase cycling can be quickly created. To keep track of spin evolution the user can choose from a vast variety of detection operators, including transition selective operators. If relaxation effects can be neglected, the program solves the Liouville-von Neumann equation and propagates spin density matrices. In the other cases SPIDYAN uses the quantum mechanical master equation and Liouvillians for propagation. In order to consider the resonator response function, which on the scale of UWB excitation limits bandwidth, the program includes a simple RLC circuit model. Another subroutine can compute waveforms that, for a given resonator, maintain a constant critical adiabaticity factor over the excitation band. Computational efficiency is enhanced by precomputing propagator lookup tables for the whole set of AWG output levels. The features of the software library are discussed and demonstrated with spin-echo and population transfer simulations. Copyright © 2016

  8. Atomic xenon recombination laser excited by thermal ionizing radiation from a magnetoplasma compressor and discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrukov, A. S.; Kozlov, Nicolay P.; Opekan, A. G.; Protasov, Yuri S.; Rudoi, I. G.; Soroka, A. M.

    1991-09-01

    A description is given and the results are reported of the first photoionization-recombination laser using atomic xenon excited by thermal ionizing radiation from a plasma. The pump source was a multichannel plasmadynamic in magnetoplasma compressors, which was ignited in the active medium of the laser. When the composition of the working mixture was optimal (Xe:Ar equals 1:250) and the total pressure was 1 atm, the output energy was approximately 0.5 in the form of pulses of approximately 10 microsecond(s) duration, and maximum specific output energy represented by laser radiation was 1-2 J/l. The unsaturated gain was 27 m. A kinetic laser scheme was proposed and analyzed. It allowed for the processes of photoionization, ion conversion, dissociative recombination, interaction of excited states with electron and buffer gases, etc. An important role played by heating of the active medium during pumping was demonstrated; it explained the observed characteristics of the spatial and temporal structure of the lasing process, particularly bleaching of large volumes of the active medium. The potential output energy of the laser was considered, and specific constructions were proposed to attain a lasing efficiency amounting to a few percent.

  9. LASERS: Atomic xenon recombination laser excited by thermal ionizing radiation from a magnetoplasma compressor and discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrukov, A. S.; Kozlov, N. P.; Opekan, A. G.; Protasov, Yu S.; Rudoĭ, I. G.; Soroka, A. M.

    1989-07-01

    A description is given and the results are reported of the first photoionization-recombination laser using atomic xenon excited by thermal ionizing radiation from a plasma. The pump source was a multichannel plasmadynamic discharge in magnetoplasma compressors, which was ignited in the active medium of the laser. When the composition of the working mixture was optimal (Xe:Ar = 1:250) and the total pressure was 1 atm, the output energy was ~ 0.5 J in the form of pulses of ~ 10 μs duration and the maximum specific output energy represented by laser radiation was 1-2 J/liter. The unsaturated gain was 27 m - 1. A kinetic laser scheme was proposed and analyzed. It allowed for the processes of photoionization, ion conversion, dissociative recombination, interaction of excited states with electron and buffer gases, etc. An important role played by heating of the active medium during pumping was demonstrated and it explained the observed characteristics of the spatial and temporal structure of the lasing process, particularly bleaching of large volumes of the active medium. The potential output energy of the laser was considered and specific constructions were proposed to attain a lasing efficiency amounting to a few percent.

  10. Radiation Damage in Si Diodes from Short, Intense Ion Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, S. J.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2017-10-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Berkeley Lab is an induction accelerator studying the effects that concentrated ion beams have on various materials. Charged particle radiation damage was the focus of this research - we have characterized a series of Si diodes using an electrometer and calibrated the diodes response using an 241Am alpha source, both before and after exposing the diodes to 1 MeV He ions in the accelerator. The key part here is that the high intensity pulses from NDCX-II (>1010 ions/cm2 per pulse in accelerators, fusion energy experiments and space applications and results from short pulses can inform models of radiation damage evolution. This work was supported by the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC0205CH11231.

  11. A fast pulse design for parallel excitation with gridding conjugate gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuo; Ji, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Parallel excitation (pTx) is recognized as a crucial technique in high field MRI to address the transmit field inhomogeneity problem. However, it can be time consuming to design pTx pulses which is not desirable. In this work, we propose a pulse design with gridding conjugate gradient (CG) based on the small-tip-angle approximation. The two major time consuming matrix-vector multiplications are substituted by two operators which involves with FFT and gridding only. Simulation results have shown that the proposed method is 3 times faster than conventional method and the memory cost is reduced by 1000 times.

  12. Radiation protection effects by the presence of diphenyl alkanes studied by pulse radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Yoshinobu; Okawa, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Takao; Yamamoto, Tadashi [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Miki, Miyako; Kozawa, Takahiro; Yoshida, Yoichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    1998-10-01

    The primary processes of the radiation protection effects have been studied by means of nanosecond pulse radiolysis. Three kinds of diphenyl alkanes (diphenylmethane, diphenylethane and diphenylpropane) and diphenyl were used as additives, and benzene was also used for comparison. Benzene had significant reactivities with singlet excited state (S{sub 1}) and cation radical of n-dodecane, but no reactivity with thermal electron, while biphenyl efficiently reacted with S{sub 1} state, cation radical and electron. All of the diphenyl alkanes used in this study exhibited almost the same reactivity as benzene. From these results, it can be expected that the radiation protection effects by diphenyl alkanes are similar to those by benzene and that the radiation protection effects by diphenyl alkanes and benzene are lower than those by biphenyl. (author)

  13. Time-resolved microplasma excitation temperature in a pulsed microwave discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Jeffrey; Monfared, Shabnam; Hoskinson, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Microwave-driven microplasmas are usually operated in a steady-state mode such that the electron temperature is constant in time. Transient measurements of excitation temperature and helium emission lines, however, suggest that short microwave pulses can be used to raise the electron energy by 20-30% for approximately 100 ns. Time-resolved optical emission spectrometry reveals an initial burst of light emission from the igniting microplasma. This emission overshoot is also correlated with a measured increase in excitation temperature. Excimer emission lags atomic emission, however, and does not overshoot. A simple model demonstrates that an increase in electron temperature is responsible for the overshoot of atomic optical emission at the beginning of each microwave pulse. The formation of dimers and subsequent excimer emission requires slower three-body collisions with the excited rare gas atom; this is why excimer emission does not overshoot the steady state value. Similar experimental and modeling results are observed in argon gas. The overshoot in electron temperature may be used to manipulate the collisional production of species in microplasmas using short, low-duty cycle microwave pulses. This material is based upon work supported by the USAF and Physical Sciences Inc., under contract No. FA8650-C-12-C-2312. Additional support was provided by the DARPA MPD program under award FA9550-12-1-0006.

  14. Specific absorption rate benefits of including measured electric field interactions in parallel excitation pulse design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Cem Murat; Alon, Leeor; Brown, Ryan; Sodickson, Daniel K; Zhu, Yudong

    2012-01-01

    Specific absorption rate management and excitation fidelity are key aspects of radiofrequency pulse design for parallel transmission at ultra-high magnetic field strength. The design of radiofrequency pulses for multiple channels is often based on the solution of regularized least-squares optimization problems for which a regularization term is typically selected to control the integrated or peak pulse waveform amplitude. Unlike single-channel transmission, the specific absorption rate of parallel transmission is significantly influenced by interferences between the electric fields associated with the individual transmission elements, which a conventional regularization term does not take into account. This work explores the effects upon specific absorption rate of incorporating experimentally measurable electric field interactions into parallel transmission pulse design. Results of numerical simulations and phantom experiments show that the global specific absorption rate during parallel transmission decreases when electric field interactions are incorporated into pulse design optimization. The results also show that knowledge of electric field interactions enables robust prediction of the net power delivered to the sample or subject by parallel radiofrequency pulses before they are played out on a scanner. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Acceleration of a ground-state reaction by selective femtosecond-infrared-laser-pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensitzki, Till; Yang, Yang; Kozich, Valeri; Ahmed, Ashour A.; Kössl, Florian; Kühn, Oliver; Heyne, Karsten

    2018-02-01

    Infrared (IR) excitation of vibrations that participate in the reaction coordinate of an otherwise thermally driven chemical reaction are believed to lead to its acceleration. Attempts at the practical realization of this concept have been hampered so far by competing processes leading to sample heating. Here we demonstrate, using femtosecond IR-pump IR-probe experiments, the acceleration of urethane and polyurethane formation due to vibrational excitation of the reactants for 1:1 mixtures of phenylisocyanate and cyclohexanol, and toluene-2,4-diisocyanate and 2,2,2-trichloroethane-1,1-diol, respectively. We measured reaction rate changes upon selective vibrational excitation with negligible heating of the sample and observed an increase of the reaction rate up to 24%. The observation is rationalized using reactant and transition-state structures obtained from quantum chemical calculations. We subsequently used IR-driven reaction acceleration to write a polyurethane square on sample windows using a femtosecond IR pulse.

  16. Portable radiation detection system for pulsed high energy photon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harker, Y.D.; Lawrence, R.S.; Yoon, W.Y. [Idaho National Engineering Lab, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Portable, battery-operated, radiation detection systems for measuring the intensity and energy characteristics of intense, pulsed photon sources (either high energy X-ray or gamma) have been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These field-deployable, suitcase-sized detection units are designed to measure and record the characteristics of a single radiation burst or multiple bursts from a pulsed ionizing radiation source. The recorded information can then be analyzed on a simple laptop computer at a location remote from the detection system and completely independent of the ongoing data acquisition process. Two detection unit designs are described. The first, called the MARK-1, has eight bismuth germanate (BGO) radiation detectors. Four of which are unshielded and have different thicknesses (diameters). The remaining four are the same size as the largest unshielded detector but have different thicknesses of lead shielding surrounding each detector. The second unit design, called the MARK-1 A, utilizes the same detection methodology as the MARK-1 but has ten BGO detectors instead of eight and utilizes a different method of amplifying detector signals enabling reduced overall size and weight of the detection unit. Both the detection system designs have sensitivity ranges from 3 x 10{sup {minus}9} cGy to 9 x 10{sup {minus}5} cGy per radiation burst. Experimental detection results will be presented and discussed along the systems` potential for commercial applications.

  17. Absorption and generation of femtosecond laser-pulse excited spin currents in noncollinear magnetic bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalieu, M. L. M.; Helgers, P. L. J.; Koopmans, B.

    2017-07-01

    Spin currents can be generated on an ultrafast time scale by excitation of a ferromagnetic (FM) thin film with a femtosecond laser pulse. Recently, it has been demonstrated that these ultrafast spin currents can transport angular momentum to neighboring FM layers, being able to change both the magnitude and orientation of the magnetization in the adjacent layer. In this paper, both the generation and absorption of these optically excited spin currents are investigated. This is done using noncollinear magnetic bilayers, i.e., two FM layers separated by a conductive spacer. Spin currents are generated in a Co/Ni multilayer with out-of-plane (OOP) anisotropy, and absorbed by a Co layer with an in-plane (IP) anisotropy. This behavior is confirmed by careful analysis of the laser-pulse induced magnetization dynamics, whereafter it is demonstrated that the transverse spin current is absorbed very locally near the injection interface of the IP layer (90 % within the first ≈2 nm). Moreover, it will also be shown that this local absorption results in the excitation of THz standing spin waves within the IP layer. The dispersion measured for these high-frequency spin waves shows a discrepancy with respect to the theoretical predictions, for which an explanation involving intermixed interface regions is proposed. Lastly, the spin current generation is investigated by using magnetic bilayers with a different number of repeats for the Co/Ni multilayer, which proves to be of great relevance for identifying the optical spin current generation mechanism.

  18. Pulsed excitation of Rydberg-atom-pair states in an ultracold Cs gas

    CERN Document Server

    Saßmannshausen, Heiner; Deiglmayr, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed laser excitation of a dense ultracold Cs vapor has been used to study the pairwise interactions between Cs atoms excited to $n$p$_{3/2}$ Rydberg states of principal quantum numbers in the range $n=22-36$. Molecular resonances were observed that correspond to excitation of Rydberg-atom-pair states correlated not only to the $n$p$_{3/2}+n$p$_{3/2}$ dissociation asymptotes, but also to $n$s$_{1/2}+(n+1)$s$_{1/2}$, $n$s$_{1/2}+n'$f$_{j}$, and $(n-4)$f$_{j}+(n-3)$f$_{j}$ $(j=5/2,7/2)$ dissociation asymptotes. These pair resonances are interpreted as arising from dipole-dipole, and higher long-range-interaction terms between the Rydberg atoms on the basis of i) their spectral positions, ii) their response to static and pulsed electric fields, and iii) millimeter-wave spectra between pair states correlated to different pair-dissociation asymptotes. The Rydberg-atom--pair states were found to spontaneously decay by Penning ionization and the dynamics of the ionization process were investigated during the first...

  19. Asymmetric noise sensitivity of pulse trains in an excitable microlaser with delayed optical feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrien, Soizic; Krauskopf, Bernd; Broderick, Neil G. R.; Andréoli, Louis; Selmi, Foued; Braive, Rémy; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Sagnes, Isabelle; Barbay, Sylvain

    2017-10-01

    A semiconductor micropillar laser with delayed optical feedback is considered. In the excitable regime, we show that a single optical perturbation can trigger a train of pulses that is sustained for a finite duration. The distribution of the pulse train duration exhibits an exponential behavior characteristic of a noise-induced process driven by uncorrelated white noise present in the system. The comparison of experimental observations with theoretical and numerical analysis of a minimal model yields excellent agreement. Importantly, the random switch-off process takes place between two attractors of different nature: an equilibrium and a periodic orbit. Our analysis shows that there is a small time window during which the pulsations are very sensitive to noise, and this explains the observed strong bias toward switch-off. These results raise the possibility of all optical control of the pulse train duration that may have an impact for practical applications in photonics and may also apply to the dynamics of other noise-driven excitable systems with delayed feedback.

  20. Enhancement of Lamb Wave Imaging Resolution by Step Pulse Excitation and Prewarping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangchen Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of improving the damage localization accuracy, a prewarping technology is combined with step pulse excitation and this method is used in Lamb wave imaging of plate structures with adjacent damages. Based on the step pulse excitation, various narrowband or burst response can be derived by signal processing technology and this method provides flexibility for further prewarping approach. A narrowband signal warped with a preselected distance is then designed, and the dispersion in the response of this prewarping signal will be greatly reduced. However, in order to calculate the distance for prewarping, the first arrival needs to be estimated from the burst response. From the step-pulse response, narrowband responses at different central frequencies can be obtained, and by averaging peak-value time of their first arrivals, a more accurate estimation can be calculated. By using the prewarping method to the damage scattering signals before imaging, the imaging resolution of the delay-and-sum method can be highly enhanced. The experiment carried out in an aluminum plate with adjacent damages proves the efficiency of this method.

  1. Effect of frequency characteristic of excitation pulse on lateral spatial resolution in coded ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki

    2017-07-01

    Recently, portable ultrasonic diagnostic equipment has frequently been used in clinical situations. The use of portable ultrasonic diagnostic equipment expands various diagnosis areas, such as remote medical diagnosis, and emergent diagnosis at disaster. It is expected that portable ultrasonic diagnostic equipment will be used more frequently in the future. To make ultrasonic diagnostic equipment portable, the number of transducer elements in an ultrasonic probe should be reduced significantly. Therefore, the transmit-receive sensitivity of the ultrasonic probe is degraded. For the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the received ultrasonic echo, coded excitation was introduced in ultrasonic imaging. Owing to pulse compression applied to the received echo signal, its SNR significantly improved without the degradation of the range spatial resolution. However, the lateral spatial resolution in coded ultrasound imaging has not been investigated in previous studies. The present study showed that the lateral resolution in coded ultrasound imaging using a typical code, 5-bit Barker code, was worse than that using a conventional short pulse. Such degradation was discussed in terms of the frequency characteristics of the impulse response of the ultrasonic transducer and the excitation pulse. Also, the Gaussian phase coherence factor was introduced as one of the methods to overcome such degradation in lateral spatial resolution.

  2. Modeling of collisional excited x-ray lasers using short pulse laser pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Akira; Moribayashi, Kengo; Utsumi, Takayuki; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    A simple atomic kinetics model of electron collisional excited x-ray lasers has been developed. The model consists of a collisional radiative model using the average ion model (AIM) and a detailed term accounting (DTA) model of Ni-like Ta. An estimate of plasma condition to produce gain in Ni-like Ta ({lambda}=44A) is given. Use of the plasma confined in a cylinder is proposed to preform a uniform high density plasma from 1-D hydrodynamics calculations. (author)

  3. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse operating at high repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhui; Uno, Kazuyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-11-01

    A short-pulse longitudinally excited CO2 laser operating at a high repetition rate was developed. The discharge tube was made of a 45 cm-long or 60 cm-long dielectric tube with an inner diameter of 16 mm and two metallic electrodes at the ends of the tube. The optical cavity was formed by a ZnSe output coupler with a reflectivity of 85% and a high-reflection mirror. Mixed gas (CO2:N2:He = 1:1:2) was flowed into the discharge tube. A high voltage of about 33 kV with a rise time of about 200 ns was applied to the discharge tube. At a repetition rate of 300 Hz and a gas pressure of 3.4 kPa, the 45 cm-long discharge tube produced a short laser pulse with a laser pulse energy of 17.5 mJ, a spike pulse energy of 0.2 mJ, a spike width of 153 ns, and a pulse tail length of 90 μs. The output power was 5.3 W. The laser pulse waveform did not depend on the repetition rate, but the laser beam profile did. At a low repetition rate of less than 50 Hz, the laser beam had a doughnut-like shape. However, at a high repetition rate of more than 150 Hz, the discharge concentrated at the center of the discharge tube, and the intensity at the center of the laser beam was higher. The laser beam profile depended on the distribution of the discharge. An output power of 7.0 W was achieved by using the 60 cm-long tube.

  4. Explosive pulsed power system for new radiation sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oona, H. (Henn); Goforth, J. H. (James H.); Idzorek, G. C. (George C.); Herrera, D. H. (Dennis H.); King, J. C. (James Carrel); Lopez, E. A. (Emmanuel A.); Tasker, D. G. (Douglas G.); Torres, D. T. (David T)

    2004-01-01

    High explosive pulsed power (HEPP) systems are capable of accessing very high energy densities and can reach conditions that are not possible with capacitor bank systems. The Procyon system was developed and used for experiments over a period of six years, and is exemplary of the capabilities of HEPP systems for state-of-the-art research. In this paper we will summarize some of the more interesting aspects of the work done in the past but will suggest ideas toward applications for future research. One of the main, unique features of HEPP systems is that they integrate easily to a particular physics experiment and the power flow can be optimized for a specific test. Magnetic flux compression generators have been an ideal power source for both high current plasma physics and hydrodynamic experimental loads. These experiments have contributed greatly to the understanding of high temperature and density plasmas and more recently to the understanding of instability growth in thick ({approx}1 mm) imploding metal cylinders. Common to all these experiments is the application of a large current pulse to a cylindrically symmetric load. The resulting Lorenz force compresses the load to produce hydrodynamic motion and/or high temperature, high density plasma. In the plasma physics experiments, plasma thermalizes on axis and a black body distribution of x-rays is produced. To get better access to the radiation pulse, the load electrode geometry was modified. For example, by shaping the plasma implosion glide planes, a mass depletion region was formed along one electrode at pinch time which generated a very large voltage drop across a 1-2 mm segment of the pinch, and also produced a high energy ion beam on axis. These results were predicted by magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) codes and verified with framing camera and x-ray, pinhole, camera pictures. We have not previously published these features but will take another look and propose possible scenarios for studying and generating

  5. Interaction of Repetitively Pulsed High Energy Laser Radiation With Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred

    1986-10-01

    The paper is concerned with laser target interaction processes involving new methods of improving the overall energy balance. As expected theoretically, this can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed by using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 kW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminium for example were thereby increased by lore than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements were found for the overall absorptivities that were increased by this method by more than an order of magnitude.

  6. Negative Binomial States of the Radiation Field and their Excitations are Nonlinear Coherent States

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao-Guang; Fu, Hong-Chen

    1999-01-01

    We show that the well-known negative binomial states of the radiation field and their excitations are nonlinear coherent states. Excited nonlinear coherent state are still nonlinear coherent states with different nonlinear functions. We finally give exponential form of the nonlinear coherent states and remark that the binomial states are not nonlinear coherent states.

  7. A total internal reflection-fluorescence correlation spectroscopy setup with pulsed diode laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Lukas; Hoffmann-Jacobsen, Kerstin

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measures fluctuations in a (sub-)femtoliter volume to analyze the diffusive behavior of fluorescent particles. This highly sensitive method has proven to be useful for the analysis of dynamic biological systems as well as in chemistry, physics, and material sciences. It is routinely performed with commercial fluorescence microscopes, which provide a confined observation volume by the confocal technique. The evanescent wave of total internal reflectance (TIR) is used in home-built systems to permit a surface sensitive FCS analysis. We present a combined confocal and TIR-FCS setup which uses economic low-power pulsed diode lasers for excitation. Excitation and detection are coupled to time-correlated photon counting hardware. This allows simultaneous fluorescence lifetime and FCS measurements in a surface-sensitive mode. Moreover, the setup supports fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy at surfaces. The excitation can be easily switched between TIR and epi-illumination to compare the surface properties with those in liquid bulk. The capabilities of the presented setup are demonstrated by measuring the diffusion coefficients of a free dye molecule, a labeled polyethylene glycol, and a fluorescent nanoparticle in confocal as well as in TIR-FCS.

  8. Interaction of excitable waves emitted from two defects by pulsed electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Zhang, Han; Qiao, Li-Yan; Liang, Hong; Sun, Wei-Gang

    2018-01-01

    In response to a pulsed electric field, spatial distributed heterogeneities in excitable media can serve as nucleation sites for the generation of intramural electrical waves, a phenomenon called as ;wave emission from heterogeneities; (WEH effect). Heterogeneities in cardiac tissue strongly influence each other in the WEH effect. We study the WEH effect in a medium possessing two defects. The role of two defects and their interaction by pulsed DC electric fields (DEF) and rotating electric fields (REF) are investigated. The direction of the applied electric field plays a major role not only in the minimum electrical field necessary to originate wave propagation, but also in the degree of influences of nearby defects. The distance between two defects, i.e. the density of defects, also play an important role in the WEH effect. Generally, the REF is better than the DEF when pulsed electric fields are applied. These results may contribute to the improved application of WEH, especially in older patients with fibrosis and scarring, which are accompanied by a higher incidence of conductivity discontinuities.

  9. Circuit-field coupled finite element analysis method for an electromagnetic acoustic transducer under pulsed voltage excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Kuan-Sheng; Huang, Song-Ling; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Shen

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) under voltage excitation and considers the non-uniform distribution of the biased magnetic field. A complete model of EMATs including the non-uniform biased magnetic field, a pulsed eddy current field and the acoustic field is built up. The pulsed voltage excitation is transformed to the frequency domain by fast Fourier transformation (FFT). In terms of the time harmonic field equations of the EMAT system, the impedances of the coils under different frequencies are calculated according to the circuit-field coupling method and Poynting's theorem. Then the currents under different frequencies are calculated according to Ohm's law and the pulsed current excitation is obtained by inverse fast Fourier transformation (IFFT). Lastly, the sequentially coupled finite element method (FEM) is used to calculate the Lorentz force in the EMATs under the current excitation. An actual EMAT with a two-layer two-bundle printed circuit board (PCB) coil, a rectangular permanent magnet and an aluminium specimen is analysed. The coil impedances and the pulsed current are calculated and compared with the experimental results. Their agreement verified the validity of the proposed method. Furthermore, the influences of lift-off distances and the non-uniform static magnetic field on the Lorentz force under pulsed voltage excitation are studied.

  10. The effect of positively chirped laser pulse on energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosoughian, H.; Sarri, G.; Borghesi, M.; Hajiesmaeilbaigi, F.; Afarideh, H.

    2017-10-01

    Proton energy enhancement in a combinational radiation pressure and bubble regime by applying a positively chirped laser pulse has been studied using a series of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In this regime, the proton injection in the half-first period of an excited plasma wave in an under-dense plasma plays the main role in the acceleration process. Moreover, exciting as high as large-amplitude plasma waves can significantly increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy into kinetic energy of the trapped protons. Here, the utilization of the positively chirped laser pulse is proposed as an effective approach to excite the higher amplitude wake in the combinational regime. Our studies indicate that in the positively chirped combinational regime, the plasma wake with approximately two-fold enhancement is produced that results in the generation of the proton bunch with the narrower energy spread and also the peak enhancement by a factor of two, compared with the un-chirped one. This improvement in proton energy reveals that the chirped laser pulse can be introduced as a tool to tune the energy of generated protons in the combinational radiation pressure and bubble regime.

  11. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-04

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ.

  12. ARTICLES: Thermohydrodynamic models of the interaction of pulse-periodic radiation with matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Pis'mennyĭ, V. D.

    1987-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were made of the processes of drilling and deep melting of metals by pulsed and pulse-periodic laser radiation. Direct photography of the surface revealed molten metal splashing due to interaction with single CO2 laser pulses. A proposed thermohydrodynamic model was used to account for the experimental results and to calculate the optimal parameters of pulse-periodic radiation needed for deep melting. The melt splashing processes were simulated numerically.

  13. Radiation-induced insulator discharge pulses in the CRRES Internal Discharge Monitor satellite experiment. [Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Mullen, E. G.; Brautigam, D. H.; Kerns, K. J.; Robinson, P. A., Jr.; Holman, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    The Internal Discharge Monitor (IDM) is designed to observe electrical pulses from common electrical insulators in space service. The IDM is flying on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). The sixteen insulator samples include G10 circuit boards, FR4 and PTFE fiberglass circuit boards, FEP Teflon, alumina, and wires with common insulations. The samples are fully enclosed, mutually isolated, and space radiation penetrates 0.02 cm of aluminum before striking the samples. The IDM results indicate the rate at which insulator pulses occur. Pulsing began on the seventh orbit. The maximum pulse rate occurred near orbit 600 when over 50 pulses occurred. The average pulse rate is approximately two per orbit, but nearly half of the first 600 orbits experienced no pulses. The pulse rate per unit flux of high energy electrons has not changed dramatically over the first ten months in space. These pulse rates are in agreement with laboratory experience on shorter time scales. Several of the samples have never pulsed. IDM pulses are the seeds of larger satellite electrical anomalies. The pulse rates are compared with space radiation intensities, L shell location, and spectral distributions from the radiation spectrometers on CRRES.

  14. Radiative processes in air excited by an ArF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Huo, Winifred M.

    1988-01-01

    The emission spectrum of air that is excited by an ArF laser has been investigated experimentally and theoretically to determine the conditions under which fluorescence from O2 can be used for the measurement of temperature in aerodynamic flows. In addition to the expected fluorescence from O2, the spectrum from excitation with an intense laser beam is shown to contain significant contributions from the near-resonant Raman fundamental and overtone bands, the four-photon fluorescence excitation of C produced from ambient CO2, and possibly the three-photon excitation of O(2+). The nature of the radiative interactions contributing to these additional features is described.

  15. Practical Method for engineering Erbium-doped fiber lasers from step-like pulse excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causado-Buelvas, J D; Gomez-Cardona, N D; Torres, P, E-mail: jdcausad@unal.edu.co [Escuela de fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia-sede Medellin A.A.3840, Medellin (Colombia)

    2011-01-01

    A simple method, known as 'easy points', has been applied to the characterization of Erbium-doped fibers, aiming for the engineering of fiber lasers. Using low- optical-power flattop pulse excitations it has been possible to determine both the attenuation coefficients and the intrinsic saturation powers of doped single-mode fibers at 980 and 1550 nm. Laser systems have been projected for which the optimal fiber length and output power have been determined as a function of the input power. Ring and linear laser cavities have been set up, and the characteristics of the output laser have been obtained and compared with the theoretical predictions based on the 'easy points' parameters.

  16. Elastic and magnetic dynamics of nanomagnet-ordered arrays impulsively excited by subpicosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin, A; Giannetti, C; Samoggia, G; Vavassori, P; Grando, D; Colombi, P; Bontempi, E; Depero, L E; Metlushko, V; Ilic, B; Parmigiani, F

    2006-11-24

    This Letter reports on the first observation of elastic and magnetic dynamics of ordered arrays of permalloy nanodots excited by low-intensity 120 fs light pulses. The first order of the diffraction pattern, generated by the probe beam in a pump-probe configuration, is used for time-resolved reflectivity and time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements. The nonadiabatical absorption of the pump triggers an acoustic standing wave, detected by the reflected probe signal, with a frequency related to the array wave vector. Instead, the magneto-optical signal exhibits, on the nanosecond time scale, the signature of the heat-exchange diffusion processes. In addition, a clear oscillation of the magnetic signal, at a frequency close to the frequency of the acoustic wave, is unambiguously detected. Finally, the interplay between the elastic and magnetic dynamics is analyzed and interpreted.

  17. Simultaneous time-space resolved reflectivity and interferometric measurements of dielectrics excited with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Haahr-Lillevang, L.; Siegel, J.; Balling, P.; Guizard, S.; Solis, J.

    2017-06-01

    Simultaneous time-and-space resolved reflectivity and interferometric measurements over a temporal span of 300 ps have been performed in fused silica and sapphire samples excited with 800 nm, 120 fs laser pulses at energies slightly and well above the ablation threshold. The experimental results have been simulated in the frame of a multiple-rate equation model including light propagation. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the reflectivity and the interferometric measurements at 400 nm clearly shows that the two techniques interrogate different material volumes during the course of the process. While the former is sensitive to the evolution of the plasma density in a very thin ablating layer at the surface, the second yields an averaged plasma density over a larger volume. It is shown that self-trapped excitons do not appreciably contribute to carrier relaxation in fused silica at fluences above the ablation threshold, most likely due to Coulomb screening effects at large excited carrier densities. For both materials, at fluences well above the ablation threshold, the maximum measured plasma reflectivity shows a saturation behavior consistent with a scattering rate proportional to the plasma density in this fluence regime. Moreover, for both materials and for pulse energies above the ablation threshold and delays in the few tens of picoseconds range, a simultaneous "low reflectivity" and "low transmission" behavior is observed. Although this behavior has been identified in the past as a signature of femtosecond laser-induced ablation, its origin is alternatively discussed in terms of the optical properties of a material undergoing strong isochoric heating, before having time to substantially expand or exchange energy with the surrounding media.

  18. Detection of coincident radiations in a single transducer by pulse shape analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, William K [Menlo Park, CA

    2008-03-11

    Pulse shape analysis determines if two radiations are in coincidence. A transducer is provided that, when it absorbs the first radiation produces an output pulse that is characterized by a shorter time constant and whose area is nominally proportional to the energy of the absorbed first radiation and, when it absorbs the second radiation produces an output pulse that is characterized by a longer time constant and whose area is nominally proportional to the energy of the absorbed second radiation. When radiation is absorbed, the output pulse is detected and two integrals are formed, the first over a time period representative of the first time constant and the second over a time period representative of the second time constant. The values of the two integrals are examined to determine whether the first radiation, the second radiation, or both were absorbed in the transducer, the latter condition defining a coincident event.

  19. Radiation-induced insulator discharge pulses in the CRRES internal discharge monitor satellite experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Mullen, E. G.; Brautigam, D. H.; Kerns, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Internal Discharge Monitor (IDM) was designed to observe electrical pulses from common electrical insulators in space service. The sixteen insulator samples included twelve planar printed circuit boards and four cables. The samples were fully enclosed, mutually isolated, and space radiation penetrated 0.02 cm of aluminum before striking the samples. Pulsing began on the seventh orbit, the maximum pulse rate occurred on the seventeenth orbit when 13 pulses occurred, and the pulses slowly diminished to about one per 3 orbits six months later. After 8 months, the radiation belts abruptly increased and the pulse rates attained a new high. These pulse rates were in agreement with laboratory experience on shorter time scales. Several of the samples never pulsed. If the pulses were not confined within IDM, the physical processes could spread to become a full spacecraft anomaly. The IDM results indicate the rate at which small insulator pulses occur. Small pulses are the seeds of larger satellite electrical anomalies. The pulse rates are compared with space radiation intensities, L shell location, and spectral distributions from the radiation spectrometers on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite.

  20. Pulsed magnetization transfer contrast MRI by a sequence with water selective excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schick, F. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    1996-01-01

    A water selective SE imaging sequence was developed providing suitable properties for the assessment of magnetization transfer (MT) effects in tissues with considerable amounts of fat. The sequence with water selective excitation and slice selective refocusing combines the following features: The RIF exposure on the macromolecular protons is relatively low for single slice imaging without MT prepulses, since no additional pulses for fat saturation are necessary. Water selection by frequency selective excitation diminishes faults in the subtraction of images recorded with and without MT prepulses (which might arise from movements). High differences in the signal amplitudes from hyaline cartilage and muscle tissue were obtained comparing images recorded with irradiation of the series of prepulses for MT and those lacking MT prepulses. Utilizations of the described water selective approach for the assessment of MT effects in lesions of cartilage and bone are demonstrated. MT saturation was also examined in muscles with fatty degeneration of patients suffering from progressive muscular dystrophy. The described technique allows determination of MT effects with good precision in a single slice, especially in regions with dominating fat signals. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Pulsed Excitation Dynamics of an Optomechanical Crystal Resonator near Its Quantum Ground State of Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seán M. Meenehan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Using pulsed optical excitation and read-out along with single-phonon-counting techniques, we measure the transient backaction, heating, and damping dynamics of a nanoscale silicon optomechanical crystal cavity mounted in a dilution refrigerator at a base temperature of T_{f}≈11  mK. In addition to observing a slow (approximately 740-ns turn-on time for the optical-absorption-induced hot-phonon bath, we measure for the 5.6-GHz “breathing” acoustic mode of the cavity an initial phonon occupancy as low as ⟨n⟩=0.021±0.007 (mode temperature T_{min}≈70  mK and an intrinsic mechanical decay rate of γ_{0}=328±14  Hz (Q_{m}≈1.7×10^{7}. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of using short pulsed measurements for a variety of quantum optomechanical applications despite the presence of steady-state optical heating.

  2. Cherenkov excited phosphorescence-based pO2 estimation during multi-beam radiation therapy: phantom and simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Robert W; Zhang, Rongxiao; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Glaser, Adam K; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W

    2014-09-21

    Megavoltage radiation beams used in External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) generate Cherenkov light emission in tissues and equivalent phantoms. This optical emission was utilized to excite an oxygen-sensitive phosphorescent probe, PtG4, which has been developed specifically for NIR lifetime-based sensing of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). Phosphorescence emission, at different time points with respect to the excitation pulse, was acquired by an intensifier-gated CCD camera synchronized with radiation pulses delivered by a medical linear accelerator. The pO2 distribution was tomographically recovered in a tissue-equivalent phantom during EBRT with multiple beams targeted from different angles at a tumor-like anomaly. The reconstructions were tested in two different phantoms that have fully oxygenated background, to compare a fully oxygenated and a fully deoxygenated inclusion. To simulate a realistic situation of EBRT, where the size and location of the tumor is well known, spatial information of a prescribed region was utilized in the recovery estimation. The phantom results show that region-averaged pO2 values were recovered successfully, differentiating aerated and deoxygenated inclusions. Finally, a simulation study was performed showing that pO2 in human brain tumors can be measured to within 15 mmHg for edge depths less than 10-20 mm using the Cherenkov Excited Phosphorescence Oxygen imaging (CEPhOx) method and PtG4 as a probe. This technique could allow non-invasive monitoring of pO2 in tumors during the normal process of EBRT, where beams are generally delivered from multiple angles or arcs during each treatment fraction.

  3. On the influence of dispersion on the spatial distribution of the intensity of luminescence excited by opposing laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynovich, E. F.; Rudenko, G. V.; Polityko, S. I.

    2009-01-01

    The spatial dynamics of variations in the intensity of the luminescence of quantum systems in crystals of the medium and highest categories of symmetry upon excitation with opposing optical pulses of an arbitrary shape is investigated by numerical simulation methods. It is established that the material dispersion, which is responsible for the dispersion spreading of pulses, has no effect on the shape and width of the envelope of the spatial distribution of the luminescence intensity, as well as on the depth of the luminescence intensity modulation associated with the interference of opposing pulses.

  4. A new digital pulse height analysis method for radiation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Arcos, J.M. (Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Inst. de Investigacion Basica, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)); Garcia-Torano, E. (Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Inst. de Investigacion Basica, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain))

    1994-01-22

    A new PHA method has been developed which analyzes the preamplifier pulses directly. This technique is based on digital sampling of the preamplifier output, followed by hard-disk storage and digital processing. Data are acquired by a dual-channel oscilloscope with 32 x 2 kbytes of storage memory and up to 100 Msample/s to give a time resolution of 10 ns. A personal computer is used to control the acquisition system through a standard GPIB interface; data processing is also carried out off-line on the same computer. The procedure has been applied to radiation spectra obtained with semiconductor detectors, and the results have been compared with equivalent spectra acquired by conventional PHA methods under the same experimental conditions. (orig.)

  5. Control of HOD photodissociation dynamics via bond-selective infrared multiphoton excitation and a femtosecond ultraviolet laser pulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup, Bjarne; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1992-01-01

    A scheme for controlling the outcome of a photodissociation process is studied. It involves two lasers—one intense laser in the infrared region which is supposed to excite a particular bond in the electronic ground state, and a second short laser pulse in the ultraviolet region which, at the righ...

  6. Collective State of Interwell Excitons in GaAs/AlGaAs Double Quantum Wells under Pulse Resonance Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larionov, A. V.; Timofeev, V. B.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2002-01-01

    phase arises with a time delay relative to the exciting pulse (several nanoseconds), which is due to density and temperature relaxation to the equilibrium values. The origination of the collective phase of interwell excitons is accompanied by a strong narrowing of the corresponding photoluminescence...

  7. Pulse-periodic iodine photodissociation laser pumped with radiation from magnetoplasma compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashnikov, G. N.; Orlov, V. K.; Panin, A. N.; Piskunov, A. K.; Reznikov, V. A.

    1980-09-01

    The design and operation of an iodine photodissociation laser, pumped by radiation from magnetoplasma compressors, are described. The laser uses a closed-circulation system with C3F7I as the working gas. Repetitive-pulse operation has been achieved with an interval between pulses of 1 minute, a lasing energy of 110 J, and a pulse duration of 30 microseconds.

  8. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caresana, M.; Denker, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Golnik, N.; Hohmann, E.; Leuschner, A.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Manessi, G.; Mayer, S.; Ott, K.; Röhrich, J.; Silari, M.; Trompier, F.; Volnhals, M.; Wielunski, M.

    2014-02-01

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instruments were placed in a reference position and irradiated with neutrons delivered in bursts of different intensity. The analysis of the instrument response as a function of the burst charge (the total electric charge of the protons in the burst shot onto the tungsten target) permitted to assess for each device the dose underestimation due to the time structure of the radiation field. The personal neutron dosemeters were exposed on a standard PMMA slab phantom and the response linearity was evaluated.

  9. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caresana, M., E-mail: marco.caresana@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, CESNEF, Dipartimento di Energia, via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Denker, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Esposito, A. [IFNF-LNF, FISMEL, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Ferrarini, M. [CNAO, Via Privata Campeggi, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Golnik, N. [Institute of Metrology and Biomedical Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Sw. A. Boboli 8, 02-525 Warsaw (Poland); Hohmann, E. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Radiation Metrology Section, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Leuschner, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Luszik-Bhadra, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Manessi, G. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, L69 7ZE Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mayer, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Radiation Metrology Section, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ott, K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, BESSYII, Albert-Einstein-Str.15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Röhrich, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Silari, M. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Trompier, F. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, F-92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France); Volnhals, M.; Wielunski, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2014-02-11

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instruments were placed in a reference position and irradiated with neutrons delivered in bursts of different intensity. The analysis of the instrument response as a function of the burst charge (the total electric charge of the protons in the burst shot onto the tungsten target) permitted to assess for each device the dose underestimation due to the time structure of the radiation field. The personal neutron dosemeters were exposed on a standard PMMA slab phantom and the response linearity was evaluated.

  10. Parametric excitation of multiple resonant radiations from localized wavepackets

    CERN Document Server

    Conforti, Matteo; Mussot, Arnaud; Kudlinski, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental physical phenomena such as laser-induced ionization, driven quantum tunneling, Faraday waves, Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations, and the control of new states of matter rely on time-periodic driving of the system. A remarkable property of such driving is that it can induce the localized (bound) states to resonantly couple to the continuum. Therefore experiments that allow for enlightening and controlling the mechanisms underlying such coupling are of paramount importance. We implement such an experiment in a special fiber optics system characterized by a dispersion oscillating along the propagation coordinate, which mimics "time". The quasi-momentum associated with such periodic perturbation is responsible for the efficient coupling of energy from the localized wave-packets sustained by the fiber nonlinearity into free-running linear dispersive waves (continuum), at multiple resonant frequencies. Remarkably, the observed resonances can be explained by means of a unified approach, regardless of ...

  11. Observation of non-radiative de-excitation processes in silicon nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, J.N.; Wojcik, J.; Mascher, P. [Department of Engineering Physics, Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Crowe, I.; Sherliker, B.; Halsall, M.P. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Gwilliam, R.M. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Knights, A.P.

    2009-05-15

    We describe the impact of non-radiative de-excitation mechanisms on the optical emission from silicon nanocrystals formed in SiO{sub 2}. Auger excitation via free carriers deliberately introduced through phosphorus ion implantation, shows a monotonic increase with increasing phosphorus concentration which can be modelled adequately using a simple statistical approach. We also report a reduction in nanocrystal luminescence intensity with increasing exposure to UV radiation and suggest this phenomenon results from the introduction of non-radiative defects in the Si/SiO{sub 2} network. The effect of UV radiation varies significantly depending on the sample preparation. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. [Research on radiation intensity of nanosecond pulse laser-induced soil plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-zhong; Song, Guang-ju; Sun, Jiang; Li, Xu; Wei, Yan-hong

    2012-01-01

    To improve the quality of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, nanosecond pulse laser generated by Nd : YAG laser was used to excite soil sample. The laser-induced plasma spectrum was observed using a grating spectrometer and a photoelectric detection system. The influence of laser output energy ranging from 100 to 500 mJ on the radiation intensity of plasma was studied. The results show that both the line intensity and signal-to-background ratio can be enhanced under the optimized condition that the laser energy is 200 mJ. The quality of spectrum was further improved after the laser beam used to excite the sample was defocused properly. When the defocusing position is + 6 mm, the spectral lines intensity of element Mg, Al, K and Fe increased about 46%, 63%, 59% and 45% compared to that without defocusing respectively. The spectral signal-to-background ratio increased about 11%, 31%, 35% and 38% respectively. This lays a foundation for detection of trace impurity element in soil.

  13. Power dependent effects in photoluminescence vs voltage scans of GaAs/electrolyte junctions using picosecond pulse excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, J.F.; Balko, B.A.; Richmond, G.L. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    1992-07-23

    Photoluminescence from n-GaAs has been measured as a function of applied voltage under excitation with a picosecond laser at three excitation power levels. A large increase in the photoluminescence intensity at the flat band potential is observed as the excitation power is increased. Analysis of the data with the modified dead layer model shows that the surface minority trapping velocity decreases as the laser power is increased. The authors attribute this to a saturation of surface minority carrier traps resulting from picosecond pulse excitation and compare the results with a companion study in which surface minority trapping velocities at the flat band potential are determined from luminescence decay profiles. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  14. RADIATION ACOUSTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Lyamshev, L.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a new branch of acoustics. Its' fundamentals are lying in the research of acoustical effects due to the interaction of a radiation with matter. The sound excitation in liquids and solids by modulated or pulsed particle beams (electron, proton, ion beams, γ-radiation and single high-energy elementary particles) and some practical applications are discussed.

  15. Temporal structure of X-ray radiation pulses of picosecond laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, V S; Kovkov, D V; Matafonov, A P; Karabadzhak, G F; Raikunov, G G [Central Research Institute of Machine Building, Korolev, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, S A; Skobelev, I Yu; Pikuz, T A; Fokin, D A; Fortov, V E [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ignat' ev, G N; Kapitanov, S V; Krapiva, P S; Korotkov, K E [All-Russian Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-30

    The shape of the X-ray pulse generated by picosecond laser plasma is experimentally studied. The unusual phenomenon was experimentally observed for the first time for targets made of moderate-heavy chemical elements, namely, the pulse of hard X-ray radiation generated by laser plasma at the laser radiation flux of ∼10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2} had a longer duration than the pulse of softer X-ray radiation. A simple kinetic model is suggested for explaining this fact. We have suggested a method for controlling the temporal shape of X-ray pulse emitted by laser plasma by varying the contrast of laser pulse. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  16. Coherent phase control of excitation of atoms by bichromatic laser radiation in an electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astapenko, VA

    A new method for coherent phase control of excitation of atoms in a discrete spectrum under the action of bichromatic laser radiation with the frequency ratio 1 : 2 is analysed. An important feature of this control method is the presence of a electrostatic field, which removes the parity selection

  17. Repetitively pulsed UV radiation source based on a run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baksht, E Kh; Burachenko, A G; Lomaev, M I; Panchenko, A N; Tarasenko, V F [Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-30

    An extended repetitively pulsed source of spontaneous UV radiation is fabricated, which may also be used for producing laser radiation. Voltage pulses with an incident wave amplitude of up to 30 kV, a half-amplitude duration of ∼4 ns and a rise time of ∼2.5 ns are applied to a gap with a nonuniform electric field. For an excitation region length of 35 cm and a nitrogen pressure of 30 – 760 Torr, a diffusive discharge up to a pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz is produced without using an additional system for gap preionisation. An investigation is made of the plasma of the run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge. Using a CCD camera it is found that the dense diffused plasma fills the gap in a time shorter than 1 ns. X-ray radiation is recorded from behind the foil anode throughout the pressure range under study; a supershort avalanche electron beam is recorded by the collector electrode at pressures below 100 Torr. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. Repetitively pulsed UV radiation source based on a run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge in nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. Kh; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Panchenko, A. N.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-04-01

    An extended repetitively pulsed source of spontaneous UV radiation is fabricated, which may also be used for producing laser radiation. Voltage pulses with an incident wave amplitude of up to 30 kV, a half-amplitude duration of ~4 ns and a rise time of ~2.5 ns are applied to a gap with a nonuniform electric field. For an excitation region length of 35 cm and a nitrogen pressure of 30 - 760 Torr, a diffusive discharge up to a pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz is produced without using an additional system for gap preionisation. An investigation is made of the plasma of the run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge. Using a CCD camera it is found that the dense diffused plasma fills the gap in a time shorter than 1 ns. X-ray radiation is recorded from behind the foil anode throughout the pressure range under study; a supershort avalanche electron beam is recorded by the collector electrode at pressures below 100 Torr.

  19. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    CERN Document Server

    Caresana, M; Esposito, A; Ferrarini, M; Golnik, N; Hohmann, E; Leuschner, A; Luszik-Bhadra, M; Manessi, G; Mayer, S; Ott, K; Röhrich, J; Silari, M; Trompier, F; Volnhals, M; Wielunski, M

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instru...

  20. Dose equivalent measurements in a strongly pulsed high-energy radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S; Kyllonen, J E; Menzel, Hans Gregor; Otto, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The stray radiation field outside the shielding of high-energy accelerators comprises neutrons, photons and charged particles with a wide range of energies. Often, accelerators operate by accelerating and ejecting short pulses of particles, creating an analogue, pulsed radiation field. The pulses can be as short as 10 mu s with high instantaneous fluence rates and dose rates. Measurements of average dose equivalent (rate) for radiation protection purposes in these fields present a challenge for instrumentation. The performance of three instruments (i.e. a recombination chamber, the Sievert Instrument and a HANDITEPC) measuring total dose equivalent is compared in a high-energy reference radiation field (CERF) and a strongly pulsed, high-energy radiation field at the CERN proton synchrotron (PS).

  1. Research on quasi-cw and pulse interaction of strong laser radiation with the military technical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycyk, Antoni; CzyŻ, Krzysztof; Sarzyński, Antoni; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Ostrowski, Roman; Strzelec, Marek; Jach, Karol; Świerczyński, Robert

    2016-12-01

    The paper describes work connected to the investigation of the interaction of strong laser radiation with selected metals, constituting typical materials applied in military technology, like aluminum, copper, brass and titanium. A special laser experimental stand was designed and constructed to achieve this objective. The system consisted of two Nd:YAG lasers working in the regime of free generation (quasi-cw) and another Nd:YAG laser, generating short pre-pulses in the Qswitching regime. During the concurrent operation of both quasi-cw systems it was possible to obtain pulse energies amounting to 10 J in a time period (pulses) of 1 ms. The synchronized, serial operation resulted in energy amounting to 5 J over a time period (pulse) of 2 ms. Variations of the target's surface reflection coefficient, caused by the interaction of short pre-pulses with high power density were determined. The experiments were performed using a standard Nd:YAG laser with amplifiers, generating output pulses whose duration amounted to 10 ns and energy to 1 J, with near Gaussian profile. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze the emission spectra of targets under the conditions of the interaction of destructive strong and weak as well as long and short excitation laser pulses. A decay of the spectra in the UV range from 200 to around 350 nm was observed when irradiating the target with a long, quasi-cw destructive pulse. Moreover, in the case of an Al target, some AlO molecular spectra appeared, suggesting a chemical reaction of the aluminum atoms with oxygen.

  2. Time-resolved two-pulse excitation of quantum dots coupled to a photonic crystal cavity in the Purcell regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Saucer, Timothy W; Martin, Andrew J; Millunchick, Joanna M; Sih, Vanessa

    2013-01-04

    We investigate the nonlinear emission dynamics of quantum dots coupled to photonic crystal cavities in the Purcell regime using luminescence intensity autocorrelation. Two laser pulses with a controlled time delay sequentially excite the coupled system inducing emission that depends on the delay and laser power. We find distinct contrasts between exciton and biexciton emission as a function of time delay which originate from different nonlinearities. A quantum optical simulation is also performed that accounts for the interaction between the laser pulses, exciton, and cavity mode.

  3. Nonlinear delayed symmetry breaking in a solid excited by hard x-ray free electron laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, A., E-mail: aferrer@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Johnson, J. A., E-mail: jjohnson@chem.byu.edu; Mariager, S. O.; Grübel, S.; Staub, U. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Huber, T.; Trant, M.; Johnson, S. L., E-mail: johnson@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Zhu, D.; Chollet, M.; Robinson, J.; Lemke, H. T. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Ingold, G.; Beaud, P. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); SwissFEL, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Milne, C. [SwissFEL, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-04-13

    We have studied the ultrafast changes of electronic states in bulk ZnO upon intense hard x-ray excitation from a free electron laser. By monitoring the transient anisotropy induced in an optical probe beam, we observe a delayed breaking of the initial c-plane symmetry of the crystal that lasts for several picoseconds. Interaction with the intense x-ray pulses modifies the electronic state filling in a manner inconsistent with a simple increase in electronic temperature. These results may indicate a way to use intense ultrashort x-ray pulses to investigate high-energy carrier dynamics and to control certain properties of solid-state materials.

  4. Slice-selective RF pulses for in vivo B1+ inhomogeneity mitigation at 7 tesla using parallel RF excitation with a 16-element coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setsompop, Kawin; Alagappan, Vijayanand; Gagoski, Borjan; Witzel, Thomas; Polimeni, Jonathan; Potthast, Andreas; Hebrank, Franz; Fontius, Ulrich; Schmitt, Franz; Wald, Lawrence L; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2008-12-01

    Slice-selective RF waveforms that mitigate severe B1+ inhomogeneity at 7 Tesla using parallel excitation were designed and validated in a water phantom and human studies on six subjects using a 16-element degenerate stripline array coil driven with a butler matrix to utilize the eight most favorable birdcage modes. The parallel RF waveform design applied magnitude least-squares (MLS) criteria with an optimized k-space excitation trajectory to significantly improve profile uniformity compared to conventional least-squares (LS) designs. Parallel excitation RF pulses designed to excite a uniform in-plane flip angle (FA) with slice selection in the z-direction were demonstrated and compared with conventional sinc-pulse excitation and RF shimming. In all cases, the parallel RF excitation significantly mitigated the effects of inhomogeneous B1+ on the excitation FA. The optimized parallel RF pulses for human B1+ mitigation were only 67% longer than a conventional sinc-based excitation, but significantly outperformed RF shimming. For example the standard deviations (SDs) of the in-plane FA (averaged over six human studies) were 16.7% for conventional sinc excitation, 13.3% for RF shimming, and 7.6% for parallel excitation. This work demonstrates that excitations with parallel RF systems can provide slice selection with spatially uniform FAs at high field strengths with only a small pulse-duration penalty. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Regular radiation field pulses produced by intracloud lightning discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krider, E. P.; Radda, G. J.; Noggle, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Sequences or bursts of uniform pulses have been recorded during a large fraction of intracloud lightning discharges in Florida and Arizona. The wave form of a typical pulse begins with a fast large-amplitude portion followed by a small and slowly varying overshoot. The full width and half maximum of the large amplitude peak is typically 0.75 microsec, and the time intervals between pulses are typically 5 microsec in both maritime and continental storms. The pulse shapes and interval times suggest that the source of these pulses in an intracloud dart-stepped leader process similar to that which has been photographed in discharges to ground.

  6. Spectromicroscopy of Polymers: Comparison of Radiation Damage with Electron and Photon Core Excitation Spectroscopy Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, H.; Smith, A. P.; Rightor, E. G.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Urquhart, S.; Leapman, R.

    1997-03-01

    Core excitation microspectroscopy has become a powerful tool for the characterization of polymeric materials due to its sensitivity to chemical functionality. However, the excitations utilized in electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (TEM-EELS) and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy can introduce radiation damage and chemically modify the sample. In order to understand the radiation damage associated with TEM-EELS and NEXAFS spectroscopy we have studied the radiation damage of the common polymer poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as exhibited by changes in the acquired C K-edge excitation spectra. By fitting gaussian functions to the spectral intensity changes as a function of dose, we have determined the critical radiation dose of PET for both NEXAFS spectroscopy and TEM-EELS under typical operating conditions. This critical radiation dose for TEM-EELS is found to be 1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^8 grey (1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^4 Mrad) compared to a critical radiation dose for NEXAFS spectroscopy of 1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^9 grey (1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^5 Mrad). By considering the G factors of the two techniques and the critical radiation dose, a rule of thumb was derived that indicates that with typical present operating conditions, NEXAFS spectroscopy can analyze areas 500 times smaller than TEM-EELS given the same amount of radiation damage. Work supported by: NSF Young Investigator Award (DMR-9458060) and Dow Chemical

  7. Renal zoomed EPI-DWI with spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yong-Lan, E-mail: ylhe_526@163.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Hausmann, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.hausmann@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim – Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Morelli, John N., E-mail: dr.john.morelli@gmail.com [St. John' s Medical Center, Tulsa, OK (United States); Attenberger, Ulrike I., E-mail: ulrike.attenberger@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim – Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O., E-mail: stefan.schoenberg@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim – Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Riffel, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.riffel@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim – Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Renal zoomed diffusion-weighted imaging with spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses is feasible. • z-EPI offers considerable potential for mitigating the limitations of conventional EPI techniques. • z-EPI of kidney may lead to substantial image quality improvements with reduced artifacts. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and clinical robustness of zoomed diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging (z-EPI) relative to conventional single-shot EPI (c-EPI) for DWI of the kidneys. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by the institutional research ethics board. 66 patients (median age 58.5 years ± 13.4, range 23–83 years, 45 men, 21 women) undergoing 3T (Magnetom Skyra{sup ®}, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) using a dynamic parallel transmit array (TimTX TrueShape, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) for renal MRI were included in this study. Both c-EPI and z-EPI images were obtained. For z-EPI, a two-dimensional spatially-selective radiofrequency (RF) pulse was applied for echo planar imaging with the FOV reduced by a factor of 3. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical data and scan parameters evaluated the images with respect to their diagnostic confidence, overall preference, overall image quality, delineation of the kidney, spatial distortion, and image blur. Sequences were compared using a paired Wilcoxon test. ADC values for the upper pole, mid-zone, lower pole of the normal kidneys were compared between sequences as well as ADC values for renal lesions, using a paired t-test. Results: With z-EPI, the kidney was significantly better delineated with sharper boundaries, less image blur and distortion, and overall better image quality relative to c-EPI (all p < 0.001). The z-EPI technique led to greater diagnostic confidence than c-EPI (p = 0.020). z-EPI was preferred to c-EPI in 60 cases (90.9%, 60/66). No statistically significant differences in the ADC values of renal parenchyma or

  8. Macrophage and tumor cell responses to repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldakov, M. A.; Tretyakova, M. S.; Ryabov, V. B.; Klimov, I. A.; Kutenkov, O. P.; Kzhyshkowska, J.; Bol'shakov, M. A.; Rostov, V. V.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.

    2017-05-01

    To study a response of tumor cells and macrophages to the repetitive pulsed low-dose X-ray radiation. Methods. Tumor growth and lung metastasis of mice with an injected Lewis lung carcinoma were analysed, using C57Bl6. Monocytes were isolated from a human blood, using CD14+ magnetic beads. IL6, IL1-betta, and TNF-alpha were determined by ELISA. For macrophage phenotyping, a confocal microscopy was applied. “Sinus-150” was used for the generation of pulsed X-ray radiation (the absorbed dose was below 0.1 Gy, the pulse repetition frequency was 10 pulse/sec). The irradiation of mice by 0.1 Gy pulsed X-rays significantly inhibited the growth of primary tumor and reduced the number of metastatic colonies in the lung. Furthermore, the changes in macrophage phenotype and cytokine secretion were observed after repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation. Conclusion. Macrophages and tumor cells had a different response to a low-dose pulsed X-ray radiation. An activation of the immune system through changes of a macrophage phenotype can result in a significant antitumor effect of the low-dose repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation.

  9. Collective state of interwall excitons on GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum wells under pulse resonant excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, A V; Hvam, J; Soerensen, K

    2002-01-01

    The time evolution and kinetics of the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the interwall excitons under the pulse resonant excitation of the interwall excitons are studied in the GaAs/AlGaAs binary quantum well. It is established, that the collective exciton phase originates with the time delay relative to the exciting pulse (several nanoseconds), which is conditioned by the density and temperature relaxation to the equilibrium values.The origination of the collective phase of the interwall excitons is accompanied by the strong narrowing of the corresponding photoluminescence line, the superlinear growth of its intensity and large time of change in the degree of the circular polarization.The collective exciton phase originates at the temperatures < 6 K and the interwall excitons densities 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 0 cm sup - sup 2

  10. PERCEPTION LEVEL EVALUATION OF RADIO ELECTRONIC MEANS TO A PULSE OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The method for evaluating the perception level of electronic means to pulsed electromagnetic radiation is consid- ered in this article. The electromagnetic wave penetration mechanism towards the elements of electronic systems and the impact on them are determined by the intensity of the radiation field on the elements of electronic systems. The impact of electromagnetic radiation pulses to the electronic systems refers to physical and analytical parameters of the relationship between exposure to pulses of electromagnetic radiation and the sample parameters of electronic systems. A physical and mathematical model of evaluating the perception level of electronic means to pulsed electromagnetic radiation is given. The developed model was based on the physics of electronics means failure which represents the description of electro- magnetic, electric and thermal processes that lead to the degradation of the original structure of the apparatus elements. The conditions that lead to the total equation electronic systems functional destruction when exposed to electromagnetic radia- tion pulses are described. The internal characteristics of the component elements that respond to the damaging effects are considered. The ratio for the power failure is determined. A thermal breakdown temperature versus pulse duration of expo- sure at various power levels is obtained. The way of evaluation the reliability of electronic systems when exposed to pulses of electromagnetic radiation as a destructive factor is obtained.

  11. The effect of excitation and preparation pulses on nonslice selective 2D UTE bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shihong [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Yancheng Medical College, Jiangsu (China); The First People' s Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China); Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92161 and Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Bae, Won C.; Du, Jiang, E-mail: jiangdu@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Hua, Yanqing [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Zhou, Yi [The First People' s Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of excitation, fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion pulses on ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging with bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone for potential applications in osteoporosis. Methods: Six bovine cortical bones and six human tibial midshaft samples were harvested for this study. Each bone sample was imaged with eight sequences using 2D UTE imaging at 3T with half and hard excitation pulses, without and with fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion recovery (IR) preparation pulses. Single- and bicomponent signal models were utilized to calculate the T2{sup *}s and/or relative fractions of short and long T2{sup *}s. Results: For all bone samples UTE T2{sup *} signal decay showed bicomponent behavior. A higher short T2{sup *} fraction was observed on UTE images with hard pulse excitation compared with half pulse excitation (75.6% vs 68.8% in bovine bone, 79.9% vs 73.2% in human bone). Fat saturation pulses slightly reduced the short T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequences (5.0% and 2.0% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 6.3% and 8.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Long T2 saturation pulses significantly reduced the long T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequence (18.9% and 17.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 26.4% and 27.7% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). With IR-UTE preparation the long T2{sup *} components were significantly reduced relative to regular UTE sequence (75.3% and 66.4% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 87.7% and 90.3% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Conclusions: Bound and free water T2{sup *}s and relative fractions can

  12. An atmospheric air gas-liquid diffuse discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container used for water sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tang, Kai; Song, Ying

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we report that the air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container with different bottom structures at atmospheric pressure. Optical diagnostic measurements show that bountiful chemically and biologically active species, which are beneficial for effective sterilization in some areas, are produced. Such diffuse plasmas are then used to treat drinking water containing the common microorganisms (Candida albicans and Escherichia coli). It is found that these plasmas can sterilize the microorganisms efficiently.

  13. In-situ microscopy of front and rear side ablation processes in alkali aluminosilicate glass using ultra short pulsed laser radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Großmann, D.; Reininghaus, M.; Kalupka, C.; Jenne, M.; Kumkar, M.

    2017-01-01

    The visualization of the nonlinear absorption, the subsequent relaxation of excited states and the formation of defects enables the investigation of fundamental laser-material-interaction as well as the identification of process windows for micromachining of transparent materials with ultra short pulsed laser radiation. In this work, time resolved pump probe microscopy is applied to analyze the laser-material-interaction and to reduce damage inside the material during front- and rear side abl...

  14. Directed high-power THz radiation from transverse laser wakefield excited in an electron density filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, Serge; Englesbe, Alexander; Elle, Jennifer; Domonkos, Matthew; Schmitt-Sody, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    A tightly focused femtosecond, weakly relativistic laser pulse partially ionizes the ambient gas, creating a string (a ``filament'') of electron density, locally reducing the nonlinear index and compensating for the self-focusing effect caused by bound electrons. While maintaining the filament over many Rayleigh lengths, the pulse drives inside it a three-dimensional (3D) wave of charge separation - the plasma wake. If the pulse waist size is much smaller than the Langmuir wavelength, electron current in the wake is mostly transverse. Electrons, driven by the wake across the sharp radial boundary of the filament, lose coherence within 2-3 periods of wakefield oscillations, and the wake decays. The laser pulse is thus accompanied by a short-lived, almost aperiodic electron current coupled to the sharp index gradient. The comprehensive 3D hydrodynamic model shows that this structure emits a broad-band THz radiation, with the highest power emitted in the near-forward direction. The THz radiation pattern contains information on wake currents surrounding the laser pulse, thus serving as an all-optical diagnostic tool. The results are tested in cylindrical and full 3D PIC simulations using codes WAKE and EPOCH.

  15. Atmospheric air dielectric barrier discharge excited by nanosecond pulse and AC used for improving the hydrophilicity of aramid fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, YUAN; Wenchun, WANG; Dezheng, YANG; Zilu, ZHAO; Li, ZHANG; Sen, WANG

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a long line-shape dielectric barrier discharge excited by a nanosecond pulse and AC is generated in atmospheric air for the purpose of discussing the uniformity, stability and ability of aramid fiber treatment. The discharge images, waveforms of current and voltage, optical emission spectra, and gas temperatures of both discharges are compared. It is found that nanosecond pulsed discharge has a more uniform discharge morphology, higher energy efficiency and lower gas temperature, which indicates that nanosecond pulsed discharge is more suitable for surface modification. To reduce the water contact angle from 96° to about 60°, the energy cost is only about 1/7 compared with AC discharge. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are employed to understand the mechanisms of hydrophilicity improvement.

  16. Area dependence of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures for varying band gap materials after double pulse excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höhm, S., E-mail: Hoehm@mbi-berlin.de [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Straße 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Straße 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krüger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures upon irradiation of titanium, silicon, and fused silica with multiple irradiation sequences consisting of parallel polarized Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser pulse pairs (pulse duration 50–150 fs, central wavelength ∼800 nm) is studied experimentally. The temporal delay between the individual near-equal energy fs-laser pulses was varied between 0 and 5 ps with a temporal resolution of better than 0.2 ps. The surface morphology of the irradiated surface areas is characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In all materials a decrease of the rippled surface area is observed for increasing delays. The characteristic delay decay scale is quantified and related to material dependent excitation and energy relaxation processes.

  17. Pulsed electromagnetic field radiation from a narrow slot antenna with a dielectric layer

    OpenAIRE

    Stumpf, M.; de Hoop, A. T.; Lager, I. E.

    2010-01-01

    Analytic time domain expressions are derived for the pulsed electromagnetic field radiated by a narrow slot antenna with a dielectric layer in a two?dimensional model configuration. In any finite time window of observation, exact pulse shapes for the propagated, reflected, and refracted wave constituents are constructed with the aid of the modified Cagniard method (Cagniard?DeHoop method). Numerical results are presented for vanishing slot width and field pulse shapes at the dielectric/free s...

  18. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Pulse-periodic iodine photodissociation laser pumped with radiation from magnetoplasma compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashnikov, G. N.; Orlov, V. K.; Panin, A. N.; Piskunov, A. K.; Reznikov, Vladimir A.

    1980-09-01

    A study was made of the characteristics of an iodine photodissociation laser pumped by radiation emitted from magnetoplasma compressors. A closed system for circulating the working gas C3F7I was employed in this laser. Pulse-periodic operation with an interval of 1 min between the pulses was achieved; the output energy was 110 J and the pulse duration was 30 μ sec.

  19. Efficient Femtosecond Mid-infrared Pulse Generation by Dispersive Wave Radiation in Bulk Lithium Niobate Crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Binbin; Guo, Hairun; Bache, Morten

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate efficient mid-infrared pulse generation by dispersive wave radiation in bulk lithium niobate crystal. Femtosecond mid-IR pulses centering from 2.8-2.92 μm are generated using the single pump wavelengths from 1.25-1.45 μm. © 2014 Optical Society of America...

  20. Imaging feedback for histotripsy by characterizing dynamics of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI)-induced shear waves excited in a treated volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2014-07-01

    Our previous study indicated that shear waves decay and propagate at a lower speed as they propagate into a tissue volume mechanically fractionated by histotripsy. In this paper, we hypothesize that the change in the shear dynamics is related to the degree of tissue fractionation, and can be used to predict histotripsy treatment outcomes. To test this hypothesis, lesions with different degrees of tissue fractionation were created in agar-graphite tissue phantoms and ex vivo kidneys with increasing numbers of therapy pulses, from 0 to 2000 pulses per treatment location. The therapy pulses were 3-cycle 750-kHz focused ultrasound delivered at a peak negative/positive pressure of 17/108 MPa and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. The shear waves were excited by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) focused at the center of the lesion. The spatial and temporal behavior of the propagating shear waves was measured with ultrasound plane wave imaging. The temporal displacement profile at a lateral location 10 mm offset to the shear excitation region was detected with M-mode imaging. The decay and delay of the shear waves were quantitatively characterized on the temporal displacement profile. Results showed significant changes in two characteristics on the temporal displacement profile: the peak-to-peak displacement decayed exponentially with increasing numbers of therapy pulses; the relative time-to-peak displacement increased with increasing numbers of therapy pulses, and appeared to saturate at higher numbers of pulses. Correspondingly, the degree of tissues fractionation, as indicated by the percentage of structurally intact cell nuclei, decreased exponentially with increasing numbers of therapy pulses. Strong linear correlations were found between the two characteristics and the degree of tissue fractionation. These results suggest that the characteristics of the shear temporal displacement profile may provide useful feedback information regarding the treatment outcomes.

  1. Broadband and high power terahertz pulse generation beyond excitation bandwidth limitation via chi2 cascaded processes in LiNbO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Masaya; Jewariya, Mukesh; Ichikawa, Yuki; Ohtake, Hideyuki; Sugiura, Toshiharu; Uehara, Yuzuru; Tanaka, Koichiro

    2009-07-06

    We proposed a novel THz generation technique beyond the limitation of the input optical pulse width, based on phase modulation via cascaded chi((2)) process. When intense THz electric field generated by optical rectification lies in electro-optic (EO) crystal, emitted THz field gives phase modulation to the optical excitation pulse. The phase modulation causes excitation pulse narrowing and consequently gives rise to the enhancement of conversion efficiency and THz wave bandwidth broadening. We experimentally realize this generation technique with high chi((2)) EO crystal LiNbO(3) and with subpicosecond pulse from Yb-doped fiber laser. It opens new concept of THz technologies.

  2. Electromagnetic induction and radiation-induced abnormality of wave propagation in excitable media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wu, Fuqiang; Hayat, Tasawar; Zhou, Ping; Tang, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Continuous wave emitting from sinus node of the heart plays an important role in wave propagating among cardiac tissue, while the heart beating can be terminated when the target wave is broken into turbulent states by electromagnetic radiation. In this investigation, local periodical forcing is applied on the media to induce continuous target wave in the improved cardiac model, which the effect of electromagnetic induction is considered by using magnetic flux, then external electromagnetic radiation is imposed on the media. It is found that target wave propagation can be blocked to stand in a local area and the excitability of media is suppressed to approach quiescent but homogeneous state when electromagnetic radiation is imposed on the media. The sampled time series for membrane potentials decrease to quiescent state due to the electromagnetic radiation. It could accounts for the mechanism of abnormality in heart failure exposed to continuous electromagnetic field.

  3. Photophysical aspects of single-molecule detection by two-photon excitation with consideration of sequential pulsed illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesner, R; Roth, W; Gericke, Karl-Heinz

    2004-05-17

    An important goal in single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is the theoretical simulation of the fluorescence signal stemming from individual molecules and its autocorrelation function. The simulation approaches developed up to now are based exclusively on continuous-wave (cw) illumination and consequently on cw-excitation. However, this approximation is no longer valid in the case of two-photon excitation, for which pulsed illumination is usually employed. We present a novel theoretical model for the simulation of the fluorescence signal of single molecules and its autocorrelation function with consideration of the time dependence of the excitation flux and thus of all illumination-dependent photoprocesses: two-photon excitation, induced emission and photobleaching. Further important characteristics of our approach are the consideration of the dependence of the photobleaching rate on illumination and the low intersystem-crossing rates of the studied coumarins. Moreover, using our approach, we can predict quantitatively the effect of the laser pulse width on the fluorescence signal of a molecule, that is, the contributions of the photobleaching and saturation effects, and thus we can calculate the optimal laser pulse width. The theoretical autocorrelation functions were fitted to the experimental data, and we could ascertain a good agreement between the resulting and the expected parameters. The most important parameter is the photobleaching constant sigma, the cross section of the transition Sn<--S1, which characterises the photostability of the molecules independent of the experimental conditions. Its value is 1.7 x 10(-23) cm2 for coumarin 153 and 5 x 10(-23) cm2 for coumarin 314.

  4. Excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorner, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1996-12-31

    A short introduction to instrumental resolution is followed by a discussion of visibilities of phonon modes due to their eigenvectors. High precision phonon dispersion curves in GaAs are presented together with `ab initio` calculations. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is taken as an example of selected visibility due to group theory. By careful determination of phonon intensities eigenvectors can be determined, such as in Silicon and Diamond. The investigation of magnon modes is shown for the garnet Fe{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3}, where also a quantum gap due to zero point spin fluctuations was observed. The study of the splitting of excitons in CsFeCl{sub 3} in an applied magnetic field demonstrates the possibilities of neutron polarisation analysis, which made it possible to observe a mode crossing. An outlook to inelastic X-ray scattering with very high energy resolution of synchrotron radiation is given with the examples of phonons in Beryllium and in water. (author) 19 figs., 36 refs.

  5. NMR investigation of domain wall dynamics and hyperfine field anisotropy in magnets by the magnetic video-pulse excitation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavasheli, Ts A.; Mamniashvili, GI; Gegechkori, T. O.

    2017-04-01

    Two-pulse nuclear spin echoes were studied experimentally depending on the time of application and pulse amplitudes of the DC magnetic field-magnetic video-pulses (MVP) as well as on the value of the external magnetic field. The measurements were performed with nanopowders and polycrystals of metallic cobalt, in lithium ferrite and half metal Co2MnSi. Two types of dependences of these signals on time of application of MVP with respect to moments of application of exciting radio-frequency pulses were established, which were determined by the degree of anisotropy of local hyperfine fields. The mechanisms of influence of the pinning and mobility of domain walls on the revealed specific features of the signals under study are also discussed. It is shown that temporal spectra of the MVP effect on two-pulse echoes in multidomain magnets are determined by the parameters of domain walls and can be used for qualitative and quantitative characterization of the domain wall dynamics of magnets.

  6. Designing hyperbolic secant excitation pulses to reduce signal dropout in gradient-echo echo-planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastling, Stephen J; Barker, Gareth J

    2015-09-01

    To design hyperbolic secant (HS) excitation pulses to reduce signal dropout in the orbitofrontal and inferior temporal regions in gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) for functional MRI (fMRI) applications. An algorithm based on Bloch simulations optimizes the HS pulse parameters needed to give the desired signal response across the range of susceptibility gradients observed in the human head (approximately ±250 μT·m(-1) ). The impact of the HS pulse on the signal, temporal signal-to-noise ratio, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) sensitivity, and ability to detect resting state BOLD signal changes was assessed in six healthy male volunteers at 3T. The optimized HS pulse (μ = 4.25, β = 3040 Hz, A0 = 12.3 μT, Δf = 4598 Hz) had a near uniform signal response for through-plane susceptibility gradients in the range ±250 μT·m(-1) . Signal, temporal signal-to-noise ratio, BOLD sensitivity, and the detectability of resting state networks were all partially recovered in the orbitofrontal and inferior temporal regions; however, there were signal losses of up to 50% in regions of homogeneous field (and signal loss from in-plane susceptibility gradients remained). The HS pulse reduced signal dropout and could be used to acquire task and resting state fMRI data without loss of spatial coverage or temporal resolution. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Spatial resolution and maximum compensation factor of two-dimensional selective excitation pulses for MRI of objects containing conductive implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeseong Woo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be disturbed by radiofrequency (RF field inhomogeneity induced by the conductive implants. This inhomogeneity causes a local decrease of the signal intensity around the conductor, resulting in a deterioration of the accurate quantification. In a previous study, we developed an MRI imaging method using a two-dimensional selective excitation pulse (2D pulse to mitigate signal inhomogeneity induced by metallic implants. In this paper, the effect of 2D pulse was evaluated quantitatively by numerical simulation and MRI experiments. We introduced two factors for evaluation, spatial resolution and maximum compensation factor. Numerical simulations were performed with two groups. One group was composed of four models with different signal loss width, to evaluate the spatial resolution of the 2D pulse. The other group is also composed of four models with different amounts of signal loss for evaluating maximum compensation factor. In MRI experiments, we prepared phantoms containing conductors, which have different electrical conductivities related with the amounts of signal intensity decrease. The recovery of signal intensity was observed by 2D pulses, in both numerical simulations and experiments.

  8. Class 1 neural excitability, conventional synapses, weakly connected networks, and mathematical foundations of pulse-coupled models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, E M

    1999-01-01

    Many scientists believe that all pulse-coupled neural networks are toy models that are far away from the biological reality. We show here, however, that a huge class of biophysically detailed and biologically plausible neural-network models can be transformed into a canonical pulse-coupled form by a piece-wise continuous, possibly noninvertible, change of variables. Such transformations exist when a network satisfies a number of conditions; e.g., it is weakly connected; the neurons are Class 1 excitable (i.e., they can generate action potentials with an arbitrary small frequency); and the synapses between neurons are conventional (i.e., axo-dendritic and axo-somatic). Thus, the difference between studying the pulse-coupled model and Hodgkin-Huxley-type neural networks is just a matter of a coordinate change. Therefore, any piece of information about the pulse-coupled model is valuable since it tells something about all weakly connected networks of Class 1 neurons. For example, we show that the pulse-coupled network of identical neurons does not synchronize in-phase. This confirms Ermentrout's result that weakly connected Class 1 neurons are difficult to synchronize, regardless of the equations that describe dynamics of each cell.

  9. Relaxation and excitation electronic processes in dielectrics irradiated by ultrafast IR and VUV pulses; Processus electroniques d'excitation et de relaxation dans les solides dielectriques excites par des impulsions IR et XUV ultracourtes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudin, J

    2005-11-15

    We studied excitation and relaxation of electrons involved during interaction of visible and VUV femtosecond pulses with dielectrics. The generated population of hot electrons, having energy of few eV to few tens of eV above the bottom of the conduction band, is responsible of phenomena ranging to defect creation to optical breakdown. Owing to two techniques: photoemission and transient photoconductivity we improve the understanding of the The first photoemission experiments deal with dielectrics irradiated by 30 fs IR pulses. The photoemission spectra measured show a large population of electrons which energy rise up to 40 eV. We interpret this result in terms of a new absorption process: direct multi-photons inter-branch transitions. The 2. type of photoemission experiments are time resolved 'pump/probe' investigation. We study the relaxation of electrons excited by a VUV pulses. We used the high order harmonics (HOH) as light sources. We found surprisingly long decay time in the range of ps timescale. Last type of experiments is photoconductivity studies of diamond samples. Using HOH as light source we measure the displacement current induced by excited electrons in the conduction band. Those electrons relax mainly by impact ionisation creating secondary electrons. Hence by probing the number of electrons we were able to measure the efficiency of these relaxation processes. We observe a diminution of this efficiency when the energy of exciting photons is above 20 eV. Owing to Monte-Carlo simulation we interpret this result in terms of band structure effect. (author)

  10. THE EXCITED LOADS OF ATTRACTION IN A SYMMETRICAL INDUCTOR SYSTEM FOR THE MAGNETIC PULSE REMOVING OF THE BODY CAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Gnatov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, repair and recovery of vehicle body operations become more and more popular. A special place here is taken by equipment that provides performance of given repair operations. The most interesting are methods for recovery of car body panels that allow the straightening without disassembling of car body panels and damaging of existing protective coating. Now, there are several technologies for repair and recovery of car body panels without their disassembly and dismantling. The most perspective is magnetic-pulse technology of external noncontact straightening. Results. The calculation of excited loads attractions in a symmetrical inductor system in the universal tool of magnetic-pulse straightening is provided. According to the obtained analytical dependence of the numerical evaluation of volumetric construction diagrams, phase and amplitude of the radial dependence of the spatial distribution of the excited efforts of attraction is obtained. The influence of the magnetic properties of the blank screen and manifested in the appearance of powerful magnetic attraction forces is determined. Originality. A new trend of research of magnetic-pulse working of thin-walled metals has been formulated and received further development, which allows to create not only new equipment, but principally new technological processes of external non-contact repair and recovery of vehicle body panels. Scientific basis of electrodynamic and magnetic attraction of thin-walled sheet metals with using the energy of high-power pulsed fields was created for the first time and proved theoretically and experimentally. Scientific and technical solutions in design of effective tools based on single-turn inductor systems of cylindrical geometry for straightening and recovery of car body panels were formulated and proved theoretically, as well as experimentally. Practical value. Using the results of the calculations we can create effective tools for an external magnetic

  11. Electromagnetic diffraction radiation of a subwavelength-hole array excited by an electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shenggang; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yaxin; Li, Yuebao; Zhong, Renbin

    2009-09-01

    This paper explores the physics of the electromagnetic diffraction radiation of a subwavelength holes array excited by a set of evanescent waves generated by a line charge of electron beam moving parallel to the array. Activated by a uniformly moving line charge, numerous physical phenomena occur such as the diffraction radiation on both sides of the array as well as the electromagnetic penetration or transmission below or above the cut-off through the holes. As a result the subwavelength holes array becomes a radiation array. Making use of the integral equation with relevant Green's functions, an analytical theory for such a radiation system is built up. The results of the numerical calculations based on the theory agree well with that obtained by the computer simulation. The relation among the effective surface plasmon wave, the electromagnetic penetration or transmission of the holes and the diffraction radiation is revealed. The energy dependence of and the influence of the hole thickness on the diffraction radiation and the electromagnetic penetration or transmission are investigated in detail. Therefore, a distinct diffraction radiation phenomenon is discovered.

  12. Electronically driven adsorbate excitation mechanism in femtosecond-pulse laser desorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegård, Per; Heinz, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    Femtosecond-pulse laser desorption is a process in which desorption is driven by a subpicosecond temperature pulse of order 5000 K in the substrate-adsorbate electron system, whose energy is transferred into the adsorbate center-of-mass degrees of freedom by a direct coupling mechanism. We presen...

  13. SENSORS OFMAGNETIC HEADINGOF THE AIRCRAFT AND THE LOCAL MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE BASIS OF FERROPROBES WITH PULSE EXCITATION SCHEME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flux gate for measurement of size and direction of magnetic field of the Earth and for measurement of local magnetic fields, applying the unidirectional pulse scheme in an excitement chain are examined. The article treats the bene- fits of ferroprobes with pulse excitement in comparison with the similar sensors with sinusoidal excitement. According to the original circuit proposed by the authors of the article flux gate sensor for measurement of a local magnetic field with two ferroprobes for the purpose of compensation of the Earth’s magnetic field is designed. The experiment with flux gate sensors which contain various quantities of rounds in an output winding and a permanent magnet is carried out. The factors that influence the output voltage of the sensor are examined during the experiment. The regression equation for the ferro- probe by the experimental data is obtained. The regression is important for development of similar measuring systems. First of all, the results of the research are important for the analysis of technical characteristics of magneto-modulation sensors, and for ferroprobes design in aircraft industry.

  14. Computer modelling of a short-pulse excited dielectric barrier discharge xenon excimer lamp (lambda approx 172 nm)

    CERN Document Server

    Carman, R J

    2003-01-01

    A detailed rate-equation analysis has been used to simulate the plasma kinetics in a pulsed-excited dielectric barrier discharge in xenon, under operating conditions where the discharge structure is spatially homogeneous. The one-dimensional model, incorporating 14 species and 70 reaction processes, predicts results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the electrical characteristics, and optical (vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and visible) pulse shapes. The model reveals that electrical breakdown of the discharge gap occurs via a fast-moving ionization/excitation wavefront that starts close to the anode dielectric and propagates towards the cathode at approx 3x10 sup 5 m s sup - sup 1. The wavefront appears as a result of successive avalanches of electrons that propagate across the discharge gap after release from the cathode dielectric. During breakdown, the mean electron energy in the bulk plasma is close to optimum for preferential excitation of the Xe* 1s sub 4 sub , sub 5 states that fe...

  15. Forward-backward asymmetry of photoemission in C60 excited by few-cycle laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, C.-Z.; Dinh, P. M.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Suraud, E.; Meier, C.

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically analyze angle-resolved photoelectron spectra (ARPES) generated by the interaction of C60 with intense, short laser pulses. In particular, we focus on the impact of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) onto the angular distribution. The electronic dynamics is described by time-dependent density functional theory, and the ionic background of C60 is approximated by a particularly designed jellium model. Our results show a clear dependence of the angular distributions onto the CEP for very short pulses covering only very few laser cycles, which disappears for longer pulses. For the specific laser parameters used in recent experiments, a very good agreement is obtained. Furthermore, the asymmetry is found to depend on the energy of the emitted photoelectrons. The strong influence of the angular asymmetry of electron emission onto the CEP and pulse duration suggests using this sensitivity as a means to analyze the structure of few-cycle laser pulses.

  16. Monitored steady-state excitation and recovery (MSSER) radiation force imaging using viscoelastic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, F W; Haider, M A; Loboa, E G; Behler, R H; Euliss, L E; Pfeiler, T W; Gallippi, C M

    2008-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force imaging methods distinguish tissue structure and composition by monitoring tissue responses to applied radiation force excitations. Although these responses are a complex, multidimensional function of the geometric and viscoelastic nature of tissue, simplified discrete biomechanical models offer meaningful insight to the physical phenomena that govern induced tissue motion. Applying Voigt and standard linear viscoelastic tissue models, we present a new radiation force technique - monitored steady-state excitation and recovery (MSSER) imaging - that tracks both steady-state displacement during prolonged force application and transient response following force cessation to estimate tissue mechanical properties such as elasticity and viscosity. In concert with shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) estimates for Young's modulus, MSSER methods are useful for estimating tissue mechanical properties independent of the applied force magnitude. We test our methods in gelatin phantoms and excised pig muscle, with confirmation through mechanical property measurement. Our results measured 10.6 kPa, 14.7 kPa, and 17.1 kPa (gelatin) and 122.4 kPa (pig muscle) with less than 10% error. This work demonstrates the feasibility of MSSER imaging and merits further efforts to incorporate relevant mechanical tissue models into the development of novel radiation force imaging techniques.

  17. Simultaneous excitation of selective multiple Raman Stokes wavelengths (green-yellow-red) using shaped multi-step pulses from an all-fiber MOPA system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dejiao; Alam, Shaif-ul; Teh, Peh Siong; Chen, Kang Kang; Richardson, David J.

    2011-02-01

    We report the simultaneous excitation of multiple Raman Stokes lines in a 250 m long fiber using multi-step pump pulses. The frequency doubled output of a single polarization all-fiber Yb-doped MOPA operating at 1060 nm was used as the pump source. By adjusting the pump power and the pulse profiles we achieved the simultaneous excitation of green (1st Stokes), yellow (4th Stokes) and red light (6th Stokes) using 3-step pulses or the combination of any two using 2-step pulses. Through the use of pulse shaping we generate sequences of colored pulses with the flexibility of providing dynamic, agile frequency tuning between well-defined wavelengths.

  18. Deep tissue optical imaging of upconverting nanoparticles enabled by exploiting higher intrinsic quantum yield through use of millisecond single pulse excitation with high peak power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T.; Dumlupinar, Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    quantum yield that is utilized by upconverting nanoparticles for generating this near infrared upconversion emission. The pulsed excitation approach thus promises previously unreachable imaging depths and shorter data acquisition times compared with continuous wave excitation, while simultaneously keeping...... the possible thermal side-effects of the excitation light moderate. These key results facilitate means to break through the general shallow depth limit of upconverting-nanoparticle-based fluorescence techniques, necessary for a range of biomedical applications, including diffuse optical imaging, photodynamic...

  19. Tunable terahertz radiation from arbitrary profile dielectric grating coated with graphene excited by an electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tao; Zhong, Ren-Bin; Hu, Min; Chen, Xiao-Xing; Zhang, Ping; Gong, Sen; Liu, Sheng-Gang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the enhanced terahertz radiation transformed from surface plasmon polaritons, excited by a uniformly moving electron bunch, in a structure consisting of a monolayer graphene supported on a dielectric grating with arbitrary profile is investigated. The results show that the grating profile has significant influence on the dispersion curves and radiation characteristics including radiation frequency and intensity. The dependence of dispersion and radiation characteristics on the grating shape for both the symmetric and asymmetric gratings is studied in detail. Moreover, we find that, for an asymmetric grating with certain profile, there exist two different diffraction types, and one of the two types can provide higher radiation intensity comparing to the other one. These results will definitely facilitate the practical application in developing a room-temperature, tunable, coherent and miniature terahertz radiation source. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB339801), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61231005, 11305030, and 612111076), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. ZYGX2013J058), and the National High-tech Research and Development Project of China (Grant No. 2011AA010204).

  20. Using a heterodyne vibrometer in combination with pulse excitation for primary calibration of ultrasonic hydrophones in amplitude and phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Martin; Wilkens, Volker

    2017-08-01

    A high-frequency vibrometer was used with ultrasonic pulse excitation in order to perform a primary hydrophone calibration. This approach enables the simultaneous characterization of the amplitude and phase transfer characteristic of ultrasonic hydrophones. The method allows a high frequency resolution in a considerably short time for the measurement. Furthermore, the uncertainty contributions of this approach were investigated and quantified. A membrane hydrophone was calibrated and the uncertainty budget for this measurement was determined. The calibration results are presented up to 70~\\text{MHz} . The measurement results show good agreement with the results obtained by sinusoidal burst excitation through the use of the vibrometer and by a homodyne laser interferometer, with RMS deviation of approximately 3% -4% in the frequency range from 1 to 60~\\text{MHz} . Further hydrophones were characterized up to 100~\\text{MHz} with this procedure to demonstrate the suitability for very high frequency calibration.

  1. Thermomechanical effect of pulse-periodic laser radiation on cartilaginous and eye tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, O. I.; Zheltov, G. I.; Omelchenko, A. I.; Romanov, G. S.; Romanov, O. G.; Sobol, E. N.

    2013-08-01

    This paper is devoted to theoretical and experimental studies into the thermomechanical action of laser radiation on biological tissues. The thermal stresses and strains developing in biological tissues under the effect of pulse-periodic laser radiation are theoretically modeled for a wide range of laser pulse durations. The models constructed allow one to calculate the magnitude of pressures developing in cartilaginous and eye tissues exposed to laser radiation and predict the evolution of cavitation phenomena occurring therein. The calculation results agree well with experimental data on the growth of pressure and deformations, as well as the dynamics of formation of gas bubbles, in the laser-affected tissues. Experiments on the effect of laser radiation on the trabecular region of the eye in minipigs demonstrated that there existed optimal laser irradiation regimens causing a substantial increase in the hydraulic permeability of the radiation-exposed tissue, which can be used to develop a novel glaucoma treatment method.

  2. Excitation of different chromium centres by synchrotron radiation in MgO:Cr single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shablonin, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila Str. 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Popov, A.I., E-mail: popov@latnet.lv [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga 8, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia); Lushchik, A., E-mail: aleksandr.lushchik@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila Str. 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Kotlov, A. [Photon Science at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Dolgov, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila Str. 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2015-11-15

    The excitation spectra for the emissions of chromium-containing centres have been measured at 10 K using synchrotron radiation of 4–32 eV in MgO single crystals with different content of Cr{sup 3+} (5–850 ppm) and Ca{sup 2+} impurity ions. Both virgin crystals and the samples preliminarily irradiated with x-rays at 295 K have been studied. The role of complex chromium centres containing two Cr{sup 3+} and a cation vacancy (sometimes nearby a Ca{sup 2+} ion) on the luminescence processes and the transformation/creation of structural defects has been analysed. Such anharmonic complex centres could serve as the seeds for the creation of 3D defects that facilitate the cracking and brittle destruction of MgO crystals under their irradiation with ∼GeV heavy ions providing extremely high excitation density within cylindrical ion tracks.

  3. Calculation and analysis of the number of return photons from sodium laser beacon excited by the long pulse laser with circular polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-Yuan; Qian, Xian-Mei; Li, Yu-Jie; Rao, Rui-Zhong

    2014-12-01

    The number of return photons from sodium laser beacon (SLB) greatly suffers down-pumping, recoil, and geomagnetic field when the long pulse laser with circular polarization interacts with sodium atoms in the mesosphere. Considering recoil and down-pumping effects on the number of return photons from SLB, the spontaneous radiation rates are obtained by numerical computations and fittings. Furthermore, combining with the geomagnetic field effects, a new expression is achieved for calculating the number of return photons. By using this expression and considering the stochastic distribution of laser intensity in the mesosphere under different turbulence models for atmosphere, the number of return photons excited by the narrow-band single mode laser and that by the narrow-band three-mode laser are respectively calculated. The results show that the narrow-band three-mode laser with a specific spectrum structure has a higher spontaneous radiation rate and more return photons than a narrow-band single mode laser. Of note, the effect of the atmospheric turbulence on the number of return photons is remarkable. Calculation results indicate that the number of return photons under the HV5/7 model for atmospheric turbulence is much higher than that under the Greenwood and ModHV models.

  4. Radiated Emission of Breath Monitoring System Based on UWB Pulses in Spacecraft Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, P.; Mariani Primiani, V.; De Leo, A.; Cerri, G.

    2012-05-01

    The paper describes some EMC aspects related to a UWB radar for monitoring astronauts breathing activity. Compliance to EMC space standards forces some design aspects, in particular the peak voltage and the pulse waveform. Moreover some simulations were carried out to consider realistic operating condition. In the first case the interference towards a victim wifi circuit was analyzed, in the second case the effect of the environment on the radiated pulse was studied.

  5. Speckle Reduction for Ultrasonic Imaging Using Frequency Compounding and Despeckling Filters along with Coded Excitation and Pulse Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua S. Ullom

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR while maintaining the −6 dB axial resolution of ultrasonic B-mode images is proposed. The technique proposed is known as eREC-FC, which enhances a recently developed REC-FC technique. REC-FC is a combination of the coded excitation technique known as resolution enhancement compression (REC and the speckle-reduction technique frequency compounding (FC. In REC-FC, image CNR is improved but at the expense of a reduction in axial resolution. However, by compounding various REC-FC images made from various subband widths, the tradeoff between axial resolution and CNR enhancement can be extended. Further improvements in CNR can be obtained by applying postprocessing despeckling filters to the eREC-FC B-mode images. The despeckling filters evaluated were the following: median, Lee, homogeneous mask area, geometric, and speckle-reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD. Simulations and experimental measurements were conducted with a single-element transducer (f/2.66 having a center frequency of 2.25 MHz and a −3 dB bandwidth of 50%. In simulations and experiments, the eREC-FC technique resulted in the same axial resolution that would be typically observed with conventional excitation with a pulse. Moreover, increases in CNR of 348% were obtained in experiments when comparing eREC-FC with a Lee filter to conventional pulsing methods.

  6. Anisotropic lattice response induced by a linearly-polarized femtosecond optical pulse excitation in interfacial phase change memory material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Kotaro; Saito, Yuta; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alexander V; Nakano, Takashi; Tominaga, Junji; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-25

    Optical excitation of matter with linearly-polarized femtosecond pulses creates a transient non-equilibrium lattice displacement along a certain direction. Here, the pump and probe pulse polarization dependence of the photo-induced ultrafast lattice dynamics in (GeTe)2/(Sb2Te3)4 interfacial phase change memory material is investigated under obliquely incident conditions. Drastic pump polarization dependence of the coherent phonon amplitude is observed when the probe polarization angle is parallel to the c-axis of the sample, while the pump polarization dependence is negligible when the probe polarization angle is perpendicular to the c-axis. The enhancement of phonon oscillation amplitude due to pump polarization rotation for a specific probe polarization angle is only found in the early time stage (≤2 ps). These results indicate that the origin of the pump and probe polarization dependence is dominantly attributable to the anisotropically-formed photo-excited carriers which cause the directional lattice dynamics.

  7. In vivo study of human skin using pulsed terahertz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickwell, E [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Cole, B E [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Fitzgerald, A J [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Pepper, M [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Wallace, V P [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-07

    Studies in terahertz (THz) imaging have revealed a significant difference between skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma) and healthy tissue. Since water has strong absorptions at THz frequencies and tumours tend to have different water content from normal tissue, a likely contrast mechanism is variation in water content. Thus, we have previously devised a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) model which is able to closely simulate the interaction of THz radiation with water. In this work we investigate the interaction of THz radiation with normal human skin on the forearm and palm of the hand in vivo. We conduct the first ever systematic in vivo study of the response of THz radiation to normal skin. We take in vivo reflection measurements of normal skin on the forearm and palm of the hand of 20 volunteers. We compare individual examples of THz responses with the mean response for the areas of skin under investigation. Using the in vivo data, we demonstrate that the FDTD model can be applied to biological tissue. In particular, we successfully simulate the interaction of THz radiation with the volar forearm. Understanding the interaction of THz radiation with normal skin will form a step towards developing improved imaging algorithms for diagnostic detection of skin cancer and other tissue disorders using THz radiation.

  8. Real-time evolvable pulse shaper for radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanchares, Juan, E-mail: julandan@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garnica, Oscar, E-mail: ogarnica@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Risco-Martín, José L., E-mail: jlrisco@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ignacio Hidalgo, J., E-mail: hidalgo@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Regadío, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.regadio@insa.es [Área de Tecnologías Electrónicas, Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), 28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-01

    In the last two decades, recursive algorithms for real-time digital pulse shaping in pulse height measurements have been developed and published in number of articles and textbooks. All these algorithms try to synthesize in real time optimum or near optimum shapes in the presence of noise. Even though some of these shapers can be considered effective designs, some side effects like aging cannot be ignored. We may observe that after sensors degradation, the signal obtained is not valid. In this regard, we present in this paper a novel technique that, based on evolvable hardware concepts, is able to evolve the degenerated shaper into a new design with better performance than the original one under the new sensor features.

  9. Pulse picker for synchrotron radiation driven by a surface acoustic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadilonga, Simone; Zizak, Ivo; Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Petsiuk, Andrei; Dolbnya, Igor; Sawhney, Kawal; Erko, Alexei

    2017-05-15

    A functional test for a pulse picker for synchrotron radiation was performed at Diamond Light Source. The purpose of a pulse picker is to select which pulse from the synchrotron hybrid-mode bunch pattern reaches the experiment. In the present work, the Bragg reflection on a Si/B4C multilayer was modified using surface acoustic wave (SAW) trains. Diffraction on the SAW alters the direction of the x rays and it can be used to modulate the intensity of the x rays that reach the experimental chamber. Using electronic modulation of the SAW amplitude, it is possible to obtain different scattering conditions for different x-ray pulses. To isolate the single bunch, the state of the SAW must be changed in the short time gap between the pulses. To achieve the necessary time resolution, the measurements have been performed in conical diffraction geometry. The achieved time resolution was 120 ns.

  10. The radiation-wavefront instability in pulsed CO2 amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, S. V.; Iur'ev, M. S.

    1987-07-01

    The space-time evolution of a small-scale perturbation against a background of a smooth input beam which is incident on a pulsed CO2 amplifier is studied theoretically. Ranges of transverse frequency, longitudinal coordinate, and time values are found in which the perturbation growth is exponential in nature. It is shown that the wavefront instability is stabilized by the amplification of the main beam and sound damping.

  11. Nuclear reactor pulse calibration using a CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kyle A; Geuther, Jeffrey A; Neihart, James L; Riedel, Todd A; Rojeski, Ronald A; Saddler, Jeffrey L; Schmidt, Aaron J; McGregor, Douglas S

    2012-07-01

    A CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector was used to calibrate nuclear reactor pulses. The standard configuration of the Pockels cell has collimated light passing through an optically transparent CdZnTe crystal located between crossed polarizers. The transmitted light was focused onto an IR sensitive photodiode. Calibrations of reactor pulses were performed using the CdZnTe Pockels cell by measuring the change in the photodiode current, repeated 10 times for each set of reactor pulses, set between 1.00 and 2.50 dollars in 0.50 increments of reactivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of the optical radiation hazard from a home-use intense pulsed light (IPL) source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, Ewan; Miller, Paul; Goodman, Teresa; Moseley, Harry

    2009-09-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) systems have evolved and crossed over from the clinic to the home. Studies have shown home-use IPLs to be clinically effective but there has been no published data on ocular safety. It was our aim to measure the spectral and temporal optical radiation output from a home-use IPL and assess the ocular hazard. The iPulse Personal is a new home-use IPL hair reduction system. We measured its optical radiation spectral output using a calibrated diode array spectrometer that was traceable to national standards. Pulse duration was determined by measurement with a fast photodiode. The results from these measurements were used to assess the optical radiation hazard to the human eye. Retinal thermal hazard (RTH), blue light hazard (BLH), and infrared radiation hazard to the cornea and lens were assessed in accordance with IEC TR 60825-9 and the International Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Guidelines on Limits of Exposure to Broad-band Incoherent Optical Radiation, as there are no specific international IPL standards. Neither the BLH radiance dose nor the infrared radiation hazard to the cornea and lens irradiance exceeded the exposure limit values (ELVs) set by the ICNIRP. The RTH radiance, however, was exceeded at a fluence of 11 J cm(-2) and pulse duration of 16 milliseconds. Following these results the settings on the IPL were adjusted and the RTH was no longer exceeded at a new fluence of 10 J cm(-2) and pulse duration of 26 milliseconds. The home-use device that we assessed does not present an optical hazard according to currently available international standards.

  13. Inertial cavitation in theranostic nanoemulsions with simultaneous pulsed laser and low frequency ultrasound excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Bastien; Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Lombardo, Michael; Perez, Camilo; Matula, Thomas J.; Pozzo, Danilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation is a mechanical process used for site-localized therapies such as non-invasive surgery. Initiating cavitation in tissue requires very high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and low-frequencies. Hence, some applications like thrombolysis require targeted contrast agents to reduce peak intensities and the potential for secondary effects. A new type of theranostic nanoemulsion has been developed as a combined ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic(PA) agent for molecular imaging and therapy. It includes a nanoscale emulsion core encapsulated with a layer of gold nanospheres at the water/ oil interface. Its optical absorption exhibits a spectrum broadened up to 1100 nm, opening the possibility that 1064 nm light can excite cavitation nuclei. If optically-excited nuclei are produced at the same time that a low-frequency US wave is at peak negative pressure, then highly localized therapies based on acoustic cavitation may be enabled at very low US pressures. We have demonstrated this concept using a low-cost, low energy, portable 1064 nm fiber laser in conjunction with a 1.24 MHz US transducer for simultaneous laser/US excitation of nanoemulsions. Active cavitation detection from backscattered signals indicated that cavitation can be initiated at very low acoustic pressures (less than 1 MPa) when laser excitation coincides with the rarefaction phase of the acoustic wave, and that no cavitation is produced when light is delivered during the compressive phase. US can sustain cavitation activity during long acoustic bursts and stimulate diffusion of the emulsion, thus increasing treatment speed. An in vitro clot model has been used to demonstrate combined US and laser excitation of the nanoemulsion for efficient thrombolysis.

  14. Transient optical transmission changes induced by pulsed electron radiation in commercial crown silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchek, A. O.; Lisitsyn, V. M.; Gusarov, A. I.; Yakovlev, V. Yu.; Arbuzov, V. I.

    2003-09-01

    We report on results of time-resolved induced optical absorption measurements in commercial crown silicate glass K8 (similar to Schott BK7 glass) and its radiation-resistant counterpart K108 under 0.25-MeV pulsed electron radiation. The spectra have been obtained in a wavelength range 280-1100 nm on a time interval 10 ns-1 s after the end of a 20-ns pulse. In contrast to behavior of stable defects, the efficiency of non-stationary color centers' generation in the long-wavelength spectrum range is similar for both standard and radiation-resistant glasses. The characteristic time for transmission recovery in the visible range at room temperature was found to be about 100 μs. Based on the Kramers-Krönig relations we have estimated transient refractive index changes. For the same radiation dose such changes can be two orders of magnitude higher than those observed in stationary conditions.

  15. Strong and radiative decays of excited vector mesons and predictions for a new ϕ (1930 ) resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Milena; Reisinger, Christian; Giacosa, Francesco

    2017-09-01

    We study the phenomenology of two nonets of excited vector mesons, {ρ (1450 ),K*(1410 ),ω (1420 ),ϕ (1680 )} and {ρ (1700 ),K*(1680 ),ω (1650 ),ϕ (???)} , which (roughly) correspond to radially excited 2 3S1 and to orbitally excited 1 3D1 vector mesons. We evaluate the strong and radiative decays of these mesons into pseudoscalar and ground-state vector mesons by using an effective relativistic QFT model based on flavor symmetry. We compare decay widths and branching ratios with various experimental results listed in the PDG. An overall agreement of theory with experiment reinforces the standard quark-antiquark assignment of the resonances mentioned above. Predictions for not-yet-measured quantities are also made. In particular, we shall also make predictions for the not-yet-discovered s s ¯ state of the 1 3D1 nonet, denoted as ϕ (???) . Its mass can be estimated to be about 1930 MeV; hence we shall call this putative state ϕ (1930 ). Its main decays are into K K*(892 ) (about 200 MeV) and K K (about 100 MeV). Since this state couples also to γ η , it can be searched for in the near future in the photoproduction-based experiments GlueX and CLAS12 at Jefferson Lab.

  16. Excited meson radiative transitions from lattice QCD using variationally optimized operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shultz, Christian J. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Dudek, Jozef J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Edwards, Robert G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-06-02

    We explore the use of 'optimized' operators, designed to interpolate only a single meson eigenstate, in three-point correlation functions with a vector-current insertion. These operators are constructed as linear combinations in a large basis of meson interpolating fields using a variational analysis of matrices of two-point correlation functions. After performing such a determination at both zero and non-zero momentum, we compute three-point functions and are able to study radiative transition matrix elements featuring excited state mesons. The required two- and three-point correlation functions are efficiently computed using the distillation framework in which there is a factorization between quark propagation and operator construction, allowing for a large number of meson operators of definite momentum to be considered. We illustrate the method with a calculation using anisotopic lattices having three flavors of dynamical quark all tuned to the physical strange quark mass, considering form-factors and transitions of pseudoscalar and vector meson excitations. In conclusion, the dependence on photon virtuality for a number of form-factors and transitions is extracted and some discussion of excited-state phenomenology is presented.

  17. Radiative Decay Widths of Ground and Excited States of Vector Charmonium and Bottomonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hluf Negash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the radiative decay widths of vector quarkonia for the process of J/ψ(nS→ηc(nSγ and Υ(nS→ηb(nSγ (for principal quantum numbers n=1,2,3 in the framework of Bethe-Salpeter equation under the covariant instantaneous ansatz using a 4×4 form of BSE. The parameters of the framework were determined by a fit to the mass spectrum of ground states of pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia, such as ηc, ηb, J/ψ, and Υ. These input parameters so fixed were found to give good agreements with data on mass spectra of ground and excited states of pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia, leptonic decay constants of pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia, two-photon decays, and two-gluon decays of pseudoscalar quarkonia in our recent paper. With these input parameters so fixed, the radiative decay widths of ground (1S and excited (2S,3S states of heavy vector quarkonia (J/Ψ and Υ are calculated and found to be in reasonable agreement with data.

  18. Plasma Dipole Oscillation Excited by Trapped Electrons Leading to Bursts of Coherent Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kwon, Kyu Been; Song, Hyung Seon; Kim, Young-Kuk; Ersfeld, Bernhard; Jaroszynski, Dino A; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plasma dipole oscillation (PDO) depicted as harmonic motion of a spatially localized block of electrons has, until now, been hypothetical. In practice, the plasma oscillation occurs always as a part of a plasma wave. Studies on radiation burst from plasmas have focused only on coupling of the plasma wave and electromagnetic wave. Here we show that a very-high-field PDO can be generated by the electrons trapped in a moving train of potential wells. The electrons riding on the potential train coherently construct a local dipole moment by charge separation. The subsequent PDO is found to persist stably until its energy is emitted entirely via coherent radiation. In our novel method, the moving potentials are provided by two slightly-detuned laser pulses colliding in a non-magnetized plasma. The radiated energy reaches several millijoules in the terahertz spectral region. The proposed method provides a way of realizing the PDO as a new radiation source in the laboratory. PDO as a mechanism of astrophysical radio-...

  19. Transient self-amplified Cerenkov radiation with a short pulse electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Poole

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available An analytic and numerical examination of the slow wave Cerenkov free electron maser is presented. We consider the steady-state amplifier configuration as well as operation in the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE regime. The linear theory is extended to include electron beams that have a parabolic radial density inhomogeneity. Closed form solutions for the dispersion relation and modal structure of the electromagnetic field are determined in this inhomogeneous case. To determine the steady-state response, a macroparticle approach is used to develop a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic wave, which are solved in conjunction with the particle dynamical equations to determine the response when the system is driven as an amplifier with a time harmonic source. We then consider the case in which a fast rise time electron beam is injected into a dielectric loaded waveguide. In this case, radiation is generated by SASE, with the instability seeded by the leading edge of the electron beam. A pulse of radiation is produced, slipping behind the leading edge of the beam due to the disparity between the group velocity of the radiation and the beam velocity. Short pulses of microwave radiation are generated in the SASE regime and are investigated using particle-in-cell (PIC simulations. The nonlinear dynamics are significantly more complicated in the transient SASE regime when compared with the steady-state amplifier model due to the slippage of the radiation with respect to the beam. As strong self-bunching of the electron beam develops due to SASE, short pulses of superradiant emission develop with peak powers significantly larger than the predicted saturated power based on the steady-state amplifier model. As these superradiant pulses grow, their pulse length decreases and forms a series of solitonlike pulses. Comparisons between the linear theory, macroparticle model, and PIC

  20. Discrete fractional Fourier transform as a fast algorithm for evaluating the diffraction pattern of pulsed radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Magdy Tawfik; Shaarawi, Amr Mohamed; Seif, Nabila Philip Attalla; Ahmed, Waleed Abd El Maguid

    2011-08-01

    A technique is proposed for computing the field radiated from a rectangular aperture. This technique, based on the discrete fractional Fourier transform, avoids the complexities of computing the diffraction pattern by the direct evaluation of the Fresnel integral. The advocated approach provides a fast and accurate computational tool, especially in the case of evaluating pulsed fields radiated through two-dimensional screens of complex amplitude. A detailed numerical study that demonstrates the efficacy of this approach is carried out.

  1. Enhancement of ultrafast electron photoemission from metallic nano antennas excited by a femtosecond laser pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Gubko, M A; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V; Nathala, C S R; Rudenko, A A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Treshin, I V

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated for the first time that an array of nanoantennas (central nanotips inside sub-micron pits) on an aluminum surface, fabricated using a specific double-pulse femtosecond laser irradiation scheme, results in a 28-fold enhancement of the non-linear (three-photon) electron photoemission yield, driven by a third intense IR femtosecond laser pulse. The supporting numerical electrodynamic modeling indicates that the electron emission is increased not owing to a larger effective aluminum surface, but due to instant local electromagnetic field enhancement near the nanoantenna, contributed by both the tip's lightning rod effect and the focusing effect of the pit as a microreflector and annular edge as a plasmonic lens.

  2. Experimental investigation on noise radiation characteristics of pulse detonation engine–driven ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-qiao Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The noise radiation characteristics of multi-cycle pulse detonation engine with and without ejector were investigated under different operating frequencies utilizing gasoline as fuel and air as oxidizer. The straight cylindrical ejector with convergent inlet geometry was coaxially installed at different axial locations relative to the exit of the detonation tube. In all the experiments, the equivalence ratios of gasoline–air mixture and the fill fraction were 1.2 and 1.0, respectively. The experimental results implied that the addition of ejector could drastically change the far-field acoustic performance of pulse detonation engine exit and the peak sound pressure level of noise radiation was a strong function of the ejector axial position. But the peak sound pressure level was not sensitive to the operating frequencies which varied from 10 to 25 Hz. The pulse sound pressure level, however, increased with the increase in operating frequencies. The far-field jet-noise measurements of the pulse detonation engine-ejector system also showed that ejector could decrease the peak sound pressure level of pulse detonation engine. The maximum reduction was approximately 8.5 dB. For the current pulse detonation engine test conditions, an optimum ejector position was found to be a downstream axial placement of x/DPDE  = 0.5.

  3. Electromagnetic Fields, Pulsed Radiofrequency Radiation, and Epigenetics: How Wireless Technologies May Affect Childhood Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Cindy; Burgio, Ernesto

    2018-01-01

    Mobile phones and other wireless devices that produce electromagnetic fields (EMF) and pulsed radiofrequency radiation (RFR) are widely documented to cause potentially harmful health impacts that can be detrimental to young people. New epigenetic studies are profiled in this review to account for some neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral changes…

  4. Selective excitation of multiple Raman Stokes wavelengths (green-yellow-red) using shaped multi-step pulses from an all-fiber PM MOPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dejiao; Alam, Shaif-ul; Teh, Peh Siong; Chen, Kang Kang; Richardson, David J

    2011-01-31

    We report a rapidly tunable, wavelength agile fiber laser system capable of the synchronous generation of sequences of pulses with different wavelengths in the visible region of the spectrum using stimulated Raman scattering of multi-step pump pulses in a 250 m length of fiber. The frequency doubled output of a single polarization all-fiber Yb-doped MOPA operating at 1060 nm was used as the pump source. By adjusting the pump power and the pulse profiles we achieved the sequential excitation of green (1st Stokes), yellow (4th Stokes) and red light (6th Stokes) using 3-step pulses, or the combination of any two using 2-step pulses. The wavelength switching time was <5 ns and was limited only by the pulse shaping drive electronics.

  5. Resonance radiation and high excitation of neutrals in plasma-gas interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litnovsky, A.M. E-mail: litnovsky@mtu-net.ru; Khripunov, B.I.; Sholin, G.V.; Petrov, V.B.; Shapkin, V.V.; Antonov, N.V

    2001-03-01

    Experimental investigation of plasma-gas interaction has been performed in LENTA linear facility in order to model processes expected to occur in the divertor of a fusion tokamak reactor. Steady-state helium plasma with density {approx}(0.2-3)x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} generated by beam-plasma discharge flowed into the region with high neutral pressure, interacted with neutral helium there and then reached the target plate. An intensive volume recombination and significant decrease in plasma pressure have been observed while the plasma stream interacted with gas target. Electron temperature fell below 1 eV. These processes were accompanied by an intensive emission from highly excited helium atoms and this radiation became even higher with increase in neutral pressure. Microwave emission absorption at high (P{sub gas}=20 mTorr) neutral pressures in the gas target was detected. A model of plasma-gas transition layer was developed to provide physics understanding of these phenomena. Resonance radiation and stimulated radiative recombination play an important role in this model.

  6. Quasi-real-time photon pulse duration measurement by analysis of FEL radiation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Robin, E-mail: robin.engel@uni-oldenburg.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany); Düsterer, Stefan; Brenner, Günter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Teubner, Ulrich [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Considering the second-order spectral correlation function of SASE-FEL radiation allows a real-time observation of the photon pulse duration during spectra acquisition. For photon diagnostics at free-electron lasers (FELs), the determination of the photon pulse duration is an important challenge and a complex task. This is especially true for SASE FELs with strongly fluctuating pulse parameters. However, most techniques require an extensive experimental setup, data acquisition and evaluation time, limiting the usability in all-day operation. In contrast, the presented work uses an existing approach based on the analysis of statistical properties of measured SASE FEL spectra and implements it as a software tool, integrated in FLASH’s data acquisition system. This allows the calculation of the average pulse durations from a set of measured spectral distributions with only seconds of delay, whenever high-resolution spectra are recorded.

  7. Zoomed EPI-DWI of the pancreas using two-dimensional spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Philipp; Michaely, Henrik J; Morelli, John N; Pfeuffer, Josef; Attenberger, Ulrike I; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Haneder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of DWI in the abdomen is challenging due to artifacts, particularly those arising from differences in tissue susceptibility. Two-dimensional, spatially-selective radiofrequency (RF) excitation pulses for single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) combined with a reduction in the FOV in the phase-encoding direction (i.e. zooming) leads to a decreased number of k-space acquisition lines, significantly shortening the EPI echo train and potentially susceptibility artifacts. To assess the feasibility and image quality of a zoomed diffusion-weighted EPI (z-EPI) sequence in MR imaging of the pancreas. The approach is compared to conventional single-shot EPI (c-EPI). 23 patients who had undergone an MRI study of the abdomen were included in this retrospective study. Examinations were performed on a 3T whole-body MR system (Magnetom Skyra, Siemens) equipped with a two-channel fully dynamic parallel transmit array (TimTX TrueShape, Siemens). The acquired sequences consisted of a conventional EPI DWI of the abdomen and a zoomed EPI DWI of the pancreas. For z-EPI, the standard sinc excitation was replaced with a two-dimensional spatially-selective RF pulse using an echo-planar transmit trajectory. Images were evaluated with regard to image blur, respiratory motion artifacts, diagnostic confidence, delineation of the pancreas, and overall scan preference. Additionally ADC values of the pancreatic head, body, and tail were calculated and compared between sequences. The pancreas was better delineated in every case (23/23) with z-EPI versus c-EPI. In every case (23/23), both readers preferred z-EPI overall to c-EPI. With z-EPI there was statistically significantly less image blur (pEPI (pEPI (pEPI leads to substantial image quality improvements with reduction of susceptibility artifacts in pancreatic DWI.

  8. Uniform dielectric barrier discharge with nanosecond pulse excitation for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayan, Halim

    For some period of time the use of plasma in medicine has been limited to thermal discharges for cauterization and dissection. The effects of thermal plasma on tissue are entirely related to local heating. Non-thermal plasma, on the other hand, can have many different modes of interaction with tissue. It has been recently demonstrated that direct treatment of smooth surfaces by non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air is highly effective in killing pathogens. Moreover, DBD can create different sub-lethal and selective effects. These results hold significant promise for medical applications such as sterilization of wound surfaces. However, a typical DBD in air can be highly non-uniform, particularly on topographically non-uniform surfaces such as in most living tissues. This creates significant limitations for use of DBDs in wound care and other biomedical applications. In this thesis, a novel non-thermal plasma system, namely nanosecond-pulsed DBD, has been developed and investigated to address this important limitation. Nanosecond-pulsed DBD is shown to be uniform in air at atmospheric pressure and much more effective in killing bacteria than conventional DBDs, particularly on topographically non-uniform surfaces. Thus, this new plasma system is potentially convenient for in vivo and hospital sterilization cases.

  9. Attosecond gamma-ray pulses via nonlinear Compton scattering in the radiation dominated regime

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Xing; Galow, Benjamin J; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of a relativistic electron bunch with a counter-propagating tightly-focused laser beam is investigated for intensities when the dynamics is strongly affected by its own radiation. The Compton scattering spectra of gamma-radiation are evaluated employing a semiclassical description for the laser-driven electron dynamics and a quantum electrodynamical description for the photon emissions. We show for laser facilities under construction that gamma-ray bursts of few hundred attoseconds and dozens of megaelectronvolt photon energies may be detected in the near-backwards direction of the initial electron motion. Tight focussing of the laser beam and radiation reaction are demonstrated to be jointly responsible for such short gamma-ray bursts which are independent of both duration of electron bunch and laser pulse. Furthermore, the stochastic nature of the gamma-photon emission features signatures in the resulting gamma-ray comb in the case of the application of a multi-cycle laser pulse.

  10. Surface cracking of soda lime glass under pulsed high-current electron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Paul W. [Department of Physics, Bradley University, Peoria, IL 61625 (United States)]. E-mail: pwang@bradley.edu; Kimberlin, K.R. [Department of Physics, Bradley University, Peoria, IL 61625 (United States); Wang Chengyu [Institute of Glass and Inorganic New Materials, Dalian Institute of Light Industry (China); Tao Ying [Institute of Glass and Inorganic New Materials, Dalian Institute of Light Industry (China); Guo Quianglin [Laboratory of Material Modification by Ion, Electron, and Laser Beam, Dalian University of Technology (China); Wu Aimin [Laboratory of Material Modification by Ion, Electron, and Laser Beam, Dalian University of Technology (China); Xu Jiujun [Institute of Materials and Technology, Dalian Maritime University (China)

    2005-12-15

    Electron beam radiation has been widely used to modify the surface properties of materials such as metals, ceramics, and glasses. However, a few investigations of surface topology of glasses after electron irradiation can be found. In contrast to the surface cracking by bending, indentation, and thermally induced stress in soda lime glasses a 2 {mu}s pulsed high-current electron beam was used to modify the surfaces of soda lime glass. Surface topology of irradiated samples was studied by using traditional optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Parallel to and perpendicular to surface cracks were observed. The depth of crack can be obtained by electron penetration, Newton's ring and AFM. The stress to produce the crack by electron radiation was calculated using three obtained depths. The observed surface crack is explained in terms of radiation-induced thermal stress and high local electric field-induced by deposited charges from pulsed electrons.

  11. Standard Test Method for Measuring Dose for Use in Linear Accelerator Pulsed Radiation Effects Tests

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a calorimetric measurement of the total dose delivered in a single pulse of electrons from an electron linear accelerator or a flash X-ray machine (FXR, e-beam mode) used as an ionizing source in radiation-effects testing. The test method is designed for use with pulses of electrons in the energy range from 10 to 50 MeV and is only valid for cases in which both the calorimeter and the test specimen to be irradiated are“thin” compared to the range of these electrons in the materials of which they are constructed. 1.2 The procedure described can be used in those cases in which (1) the dose delivered in a single pulse is 5 Gy (matl) (500 rd (matl)) or greater, or (2) multiple pulses of a lower dose can be delivered in a short time compared to the thermal time constant of the calorimeter. Matl refers to the material of the calorimeter. The minimum dose per pulse that can be acceptably monitored depends on the variables of the particular test, including pulse rate, pulse uniformity...

  12. Neuronal excitation and permeabilization by 200-ns pulsed electric field: An optical membrane potential study with FluoVolt dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Semenov, Iurii; Casciola, Maura; Xiao, Shu

    2017-07-01

    Electric field pulses of nano- and picosecond duration are a novel modality for neurostimulation, activation of Ca 2+ signaling, and tissue ablation. However it is not known how such brief pulses activate voltage-gated ion channels. We studied excitation and electroporation of hippocampal neurons by 200-ns pulsed electric field (nsPEF), by means of time-lapse imaging of the optical membrane potential (OMP) with FluoVolt dye. Electroporation abruptly shifted OMP to a more depolarized level, which was reached within 10s), so cells remained above the resting OMP level for at least 20-30s. Activation of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) enhanced the depolarizing effect of electroporation, resulting in an additional tetrodotoxin-sensitive OMP peak in 4-5ms after nsPEF. Omitting Ca 2+ in the extracellular solution did not reduce the depolarization, suggesting no contribution of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). In 40% of neurons, nsPEF triggered a single action potential (AP), with the median threshold of 3kV/cm (range: 1.9-4kV/cm); no APs could be evoked by stimuli below the electroporation threshold (1.5-1.9kV/cm). VGSC opening could already be detected in 0.5ms after nsPEF, which is too fast to be mediated by the depolarizing effect of electroporation. The overlap of electroporation and AP thresholds does not necessarily reflect the causal relation, but suggests a low potency of nsPEF, as compared to conventional electrostimulation, for VGSC activation and AP induction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of Absolute Hydroxyl Radical Concentration in Lean Fuel-Air Mixtures Excited by Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Z.; Lempert, W. R.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2013-06-01

    The focus in plasma assisted combustion research has been on the evaluation of conventional plasma/combustion mechanisms in predicting oxidation and ignition processes initiated and/or sustained by non-equilibrium, nanosecond discharges. Accurate quantitative data such as temperature and species concentration are needed for assessing and improving numerical modeling. As an important intermediate species, the concentration of hydroxyl radical (OH) is very sensitive to the combustion environment (e.g., temperature, equivalence ratio), and therefore is of great interest to kinetic study. In this work, Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was used for time-resolved temperature and OH number density measurements in lean H_2-, CH_4-, C_2H_4-, and C_3H_8- air mixtures in a plasma flow reactor inside a tube furnace. The premixed fuel-air flow in the reactor, initially at T_0=500 K and P=100 torr, was excited by a burst of repetitive nanosecond electric pulses in a dielectric-barrier plane-to-plane geometry (˜28 kV peak voltage and ˜5 nsec pulse width, estimated 1.25 mJ/pulse coupled energy). Laser was timed to probe after the discharge burst was over to avoid strong plasma emission interference. Relative fluorescence signal was put on an absolute scale by calibrating against Rayleigh scattering signal in the same flow reactor. Experimental results were compared to predictions from a 0-D plasma/combustion chemistry model employing several well-established combustion mechanisms. 2-D temperature and OH concentration distributions in the discharge volume were obtained by planar LIF and was used to quantitatively evaluate plasma uniformity in the reactor. These results were used to determine the validity of the 0-D model. thanks

  14. Two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with sub-nanosecond pulses and a high analog bandwidth signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Hakert, Hubertus; Weng, Daniel; Huber, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) are powerful imaging techniques in bio-molecular science. The need for elaborate light sources for TPEF and speed limitations for FLIM, however, hinder an even wider application. We present a way to overcome this limitations by combining a robust and inexpensive fiber laser for nonlinear excitation with a fast analog digitization method for rapid FLIM imaging. The applied sub nanosecond pulsed laser source is synchronized to a high analog bandwidth signal detection for single shot TPEF- and single shot FLIM imaging. The actively modulated pulses at 1064nm from the fiber laser are adjustable from 50ps to 5ns with kW of peak power. At a typically applied pulse lengths and repetition rates, the duty cycle is comparable to typically used femtosecond pulses and thus the peak power is also comparable at same cw-power. Hence, both types of excitation should yield the same number of fluorescence photons per time on average when used for TPEF imaging. However, in the 100ps configuration, a thousand times more fluorescence photons are generated per pulse. In this paper, we now show that the higher number of fluorescence photons per pulse combined with a high analog bandwidth detection makes it possible to not only use a single pulse per pixel for TPEF imaging but also to resolve the exponential time decay for FLIM. To evaluate the performance of our system, we acquired FLIM images of a Convallaria sample with pixel rates of 1 MHz where the lifetime information is directly measured with a fast real time digitizer. With the presented results, we show that longer pulses in the many-10ps to nanosecond regime can be readily applied for TPEF imaging and enable new imaging modalities like single pulse FLIM.

  15. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Bleaching-wave laser excited by radiation from magnetoplasma compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrukov, A. S.; Logunov, O. A.; Ovchinnikov, P. A.; Protasov, Yu S.; Startsev, Aleksandr V.; Stoĭlov, Yu Yu

    1989-04-01

    A bleaching-wave laser (utilizing an ether solution of coumarin 6 and 1,4-diphenylbutadiene) was pumped by a flashlamp-type source utilizing magnetoplasma compressors. When the bleaching wave propagated in the solution at a velocity of ~ 1 km/s, cw lasing was obtained for 30-40 μs with an output energy of 1.2 J in the 517 ± 5 nm range. Estimates were made of the threshold pump intensity and of the internal losses in the bleaching-wave laser. It was found that, compared with a laser without a bleaching wave (utilizing an ethyl solution of coumarin 6), a bleaching wave improved greatly (under the same excitation conditions) the output energy and the directionality of the radiation.

  16. Transient optical gratings for pulsed ionizing radiation studies

    CERN Document Server

    Fullagar, Wilfred K; Hall, Chris J

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the invention of holography or lasers, Bragg's X-ray microscope opened the door to optical computation in short-wavelength studies using spatially coherent visible light, including phase retrieval methods. This optical approach lost ground to semiconductor detection and digital computing in the 1960s. Since then, visible optics including spatial light modulators (SLMs), array detectors and femtosecond lasers have become widely available, routinely allowing versatile and computer-interfaced imposition of optical phase, molecular coherent control, and detection. Today, high brilliance X-ray sources begin to offer opportunities for atomic resolution and ultrafast pump-probe studies. Correspondingly, this work considers an overlooked aspect of Bragg's X-ray microscope - the incoherent ionizing radiation to coherent visible (IICV) conversion that is a necessary prerequisite for coherent optical computations. Technologies are suggested that can accomplish this conversion. Approaches to holographic data sto...

  17. The interaction of excited atoms and few-cycle laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Calvert, J E; Palmer, A J; Glover, R D; Tong, X M; Dolmatov, V K; Kheifets, A S; Bartschat, K; Litvinyuk, I V; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the first observations of the ionisation of neon in a metastable atomic state utilising a strong-field, few-cycle light pulse. We compare the observations to theoretical predictions based on the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) theory and a solution to the time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE). The TDSE provides better agreement with the experimental data than the ADK theory. We optically pump the target atomic species and demonstrate that the ionisation rate depends on the spin state of the target atoms and provide physically transparent interpretation of such a spin dependence in the frameworks of the spin-polarised Hartree-Fock and random-phase approximations.

  18. Optimising the separation of quartz and feldspar optically stimulated luminescence using pulsed excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2010-01-01

    In luminescence dating, the two most commonly used natural minerals, quartz and feldspar, are exposed to different dose rates in the natural environment, and so record different doses. The luminescence signals also have different stabilities. For accurate dosimetry, the signals from these two...... minerals must be separated, either by physical separation of the mineral grains, or by instrumental separation of the luminescence signals. The luminescence signals from quartz and feldspar have different luminescence lifetimes under pulsed optical stimulation. This difference in lifetime can be used...... OSL intensity ratio is at a maximum. By using these parameters with an additional infrared (IR) stimulation at 175 °C before measurement (to further reduce the feldspar signal intensity), we obtain a factor of 25 enhancement in signal separation compared to that from a conventional prior-IR CW...

  19. Excitation of flare-induced waves in coronal loops and the effects of radiative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provornikova, Elena; Ofman, Leon; Wang, Tongjiang

    2018-01-01

    EUV imaging observations from several space missions (SOHO/EIT, TRACE, and SDO/AIA) have revealed a presence of propagating intensity disturbances in solar coronal loops. These disturbances are typically interpreted as slow magnetoacoustic waves. However, recent spectroscopic observations with Hinode/EIS of active region loops revealed that the propagating intensity disturbances are associated with intermittent plasma upflows (or jets) at the footpoints which are presumably generated by magnetic reconnection. For this reason, whether these disturbances are waves or periodic flows is still being studied. This study is aimed at understanding the physical properties of observed disturbances by investigating the excitation of waves by hot plasma injections from below and the evolution of flows and wave propagation along the loop. We expand our previous studies based on isothermal 3D MHD models of an active region to a more realistic model that includes full energy equation accounting for the effects of radiative losses. Computations are initialized with an equilibrium state of a model active region using potential (dipole) magnetic field, gravitationally stratified density and temperature obtained from the polytropic equation of state. We model an impulsive injection of hot plasma into the steady plasma outflow along the loops of different temperatures, warm (∼1 MK) and hot (∼6 MK). The simulations show that hot jets launched at the coronal base excite slow magnetoacoustic waves that propagate to high altitudes along the loops, while the injected hot flows decelerate rapidly with heights. Our results support that propagating disturbances observed in EUV are mainly the wave features. We also find that the effect of radiative cooling on the damping of slow-mode waves in 1-6 MK coronal loops is small, in agreement with the previous conclusion based on 1D MHD models.

  20. Combination of fiber-guided pulsed erbium and holmium laser radiation for tissue ablation under water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratisto, H; Frenz, M; Ith, M; Altermatt, H J; Jansen, E D; Weber, H P

    1996-07-01

    Because of the high absorption of near-infrared laser radiation in biological tissue, erbium lasers and holmium lasers emitting at 3 and 2 µm, respectively, have been proven to have optimal qualities for cutting or welding and coagulating tissue. To combine the advantages of both wavelengths, we realized a multiwavelength laser system by simultaneously guiding erbium and holmium laser radiation by means of a single zirconium fluoride (ZrF(4)) fiber. Laser-induced channel formation in water and poly(acrylamide) gel was investigated by the use of a time-resolved flash-photography setup, while pressure transients were recorded simultaneously with a needle hydrophone. The shapes and depths of vapor channels produced in water and in a submerged gel after single erbium and after combination erbium-holmium radiation delivered by means of a 400-µm ZrF(4) fiber were measured. Transmission measurements were performed to determine the amount of pulse energy available for tissue ablation. The effects of laser wavelength and the delay time between pulses of different wavelengths on the photomechanical and photothermal responses of meniscal tissue were evaluated in vitro by the use of histology. It was observed that the use of a short (200-µs, 100-mJ) holmium laser pulse as a prepulse to generate a vapor bubble through which the ablating erbium laser pulse can be transmitted (delay time, 100 µs) increases the cutting depth in meniscus from 450 to 1120 µm as compared with the depth following a single erbium pulse. The results indicate that a combination of erbium and holmium laser radiation precisely and efficiently cuts tissue under water with 20-50-µm collateral tissue damage.

  1. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation: 2016 project annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, Sergei O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-04

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 3, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) the demonstration of the measurement of thermally activated defect-interaction processes by pulsed ion beam techniques and (ii) the demonstration of alternative characterization techniques to study defect dynamics. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  2. Radiation excited by a charged-particle bunch on a planar periodic wire structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Tyukhtin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic field of a bunch moving in the presence of a plane grid composed of thin parallel wires is considered by using the averaged boundary conditions method. Two different cases of motion are examined. In the first one, the bunch moves at a constant distance from the grid orthogonally to the wires. The excited surface wave is presented in the form of a spectral integral for a thin bunch with an arbitrary longitudinal profile. The wave propagates along the wires and does not decay with distance (if dissipation is negligible. Energy losses of the bunch over a unit path are obtained. In the second case, the bunch orthogonally crosses the wire grid. The volume and surface waves are separately analyzed. Properties of the spectral angular density of energy of volume radiation in the far-field zone are described. The energy losses due to the volume and surface radiation are determined. It is demonstrated that the structure of the surface waves in both cases allows determination of the length of the bunch.

  3. Electron beam excitation of coherent sub-terahertz radiation in periodic structures manufactured by 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, A. R.; MacLachlan, A. J.; Robertson, C. W.; Zhang, L.; Konoplev, I. V.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.

    2017-07-01

    For the creation of novel coherent sub-THz sources excited by electron beams there is a requirement to manufacture intricate periodic structures to produce and radiate electromagnetic fields. The specification and the measured performance is reported of a periodic structure constructed by additive manufacturing and used successfully in an electron beam driven sub-THz radiation source. Additive manufacturing, or ;3D printing;, is promising to be quick and cost-effective for prototyping these periodic structures.

  4. Relationship between sound radiation from sound-induced and force-excited vibration: Analysis using an infinite elastic plate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yairi, Motoki; Sakagami, Kimihiro; Nishibara, Kosuke; Okuzono, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Although sound radiation from sound-induced vibration and from force-excited vibration of solid structures are similar phenomena in terms of radiating from vibrating structures, the general relationship between them has not been explicitly studied to date. In particular, airborne sound transmission through walls and sound radiation from structurally vibrating surfaces in buildings are treated as different issues in architectural acoustics. In this paper, a fundamental relationship is elucidated through the use of a simple model. The transmission coefficient for random-incidence sound and the radiated sound power under point force excitation of an infinite elastic plate are both analyzed. Exact and approximate solutions are derived for the two problems, and the relationship between them is theoretically discussed. A conversion function that relates the transmission coefficient and radiated sound power is obtained in a simple closed form through the approximate solutions. The exact solutions are also related by the same conversion function. It is composed of the specific impedance and the wavenumber, and is independent of any elastic plate parameters. The sound radiation due to random-incidence sound and point force excitation are similar phenomena, and the only difference is the gradient of those characteristics with respect to the frequency.

  5. On the biphoton excitation of the fluorescence of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules of purple photosynthetic bacteria by powerful near IR femto-picosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, A. Yu., E-mail: borissov@belozersky.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Belozersky Institute of Physicochemical Biology (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    The authors of a number of experimental works detected nonresonance biphoton excitation of bacteriochlorophyll molecules, which represent the main pigment in the light-absorbing natural 'antenna' complexes of photosynthesizing purple bacteria, by femtosecond IR pulses (1250-1500 nm). They believe that IR quanta excite hypothetic forbidden levels of the pigments of these bacteria in the double frequency range 625-750 nm. We propose and ground an alternative triplet mechanism to describe this phenomenon. According to our hypothesis, the mechanism of biphoton excitation of molecules by IR quanta can manifest itself specifically, through high triplet levels of molecules in the high fields induced by femtosecond-picosecond laser pulses.

  6. Pulse shape and spectrum of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation from electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Tilborg, J.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-12-20

    The electric field in the temporal and spectral domain of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation is studied. An electron bunch, with arbitrary longitudinal momentum distribution, propagating at normal incidence to a sharp metal-vacuum boundary with finite transverse dimension is considered. A general expression for the spatiotemporal electric field of the transition radiation is derived, and closed-form solutions for several special cases are given. The influence of parameters such as radial boundary size, electron momentum distribution, and angle of observation on the waveform (e.g., radiation pulse length and amplitude) are discussed. For a Gaussian electron bunch, the coherent radiation waveform is shown to have a single-cycle profile. Application to a novel THz source based on a laser-driven accelerator is discussed.

  7. Beam characteristics of short-pulse radiation with electromagnetic missile effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Wen Bing; Liang, Chang Hong

    1998-05-01

    Beam characteristics such as beamwidth and beam intensity of short-pulse radiation with electromagnetic missile effect, not restricted to the electromagnetic missile, are generally range dependent in pulse propagation. An effective measure to study such beam characteristics is to investigate the local drop rate of the energy pattern in the beam profile and the local decay rate of energy in the pulse beam. It is shown that both the energy decay rate and the energy drop rate are definitely determined by the time-space source parameters so that the beam characteristics can be readily evaluated and properly controlled. Moreover, the underlying relation between the slow decay rate and the energy drop rate are constructed, which shows perfect harmony in achieving slower-energy decay and higher-energy concentration in the beam.

  8. Investigation of damage to metals by pulsed CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedenov, A. A.; Gladush, G. G.; Drobyazko, S. V.; Senatorov, Yu M.

    1981-10-01

    A study was made of the physical mechanism involved in piercing holes in metallic plates, using CO2 laser radiation. It was established experimentally that the energy consumed in removing a unit volume of a metal has a minimum, depending on the duration and energy of the laser pulse. An explanation is proposed for the laws governing this behavior, based on ideas of the ejection of liquid from a crater by the vapor pressure of the material. The effect on the interaction efficiency of the absorption of laser radiation in the plasma jet is taken into account.

  9. ARTICLES: Physical laws governing the interaction of pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedenov, A. A.; Gladush, G. G.; Drobyazko, S. V.; Pavlovich, Yu V.; Senatorov, Yu M.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown theoretically and experimentally that the efficiency of welding metals with a pulse-periodic CO2 laser beam of low duty ratio, at low velocities, can exceed that of welding with cw lasers and with electron beams. For the first time an investigation was made of the influence of the laser radiation parameters (energy and frequency) and of the welding velocity on the characteristics of the weld and on the shape of the weldpool. The influence of the laser radiation polarization on the efficiency of deep penetration was analyzed.

  10. EXCITATION TEMPERATURE OF THE WARM NEUTRAL MEDIUM AS A NEW PROBE OF THE Lyα RADIATION FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Claire E.; Lindner, Robert R.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Pingel, Nickolas M.; Lawrence, Allen; Babler, Brian L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Goss, W. M.; Jencson, Jacob [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dickey, John [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Hennebelle, Patrick, E-mail: cmurray@astro.wisc.edu [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp—CNRS—Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-02-01

    We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to conduct a high-sensitivity survey of neutral hydrogen (H I) absorption in the Milky Way. In combination with corresponding H I emission spectra obtained mostly with the Arecibo Observatory, we detect a widespread warm neutral medium component with excitation temperature 〈T{sub s}〉=7200{sub −1200}{sup +1800} K (68% confidence). This temperature lies above theoretical predictions based on collisional excitation alone, implying that Lyα scattering, the most probable additional source of excitation, is more important in the interstellar medium (ISM) than previously assumed. Our results demonstrate that H I absorption can be used to constrain the Lyα radiation field, a critical quantity for studying the energy balance in the ISM and intergalactic medium yet notoriously difficult to model because of its complicated radiative transfer, in and around galaxies nearby and at high redshift.

  11. Renal zoomed EPI-DWI with spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong-Lan; Hausmann, Daniel; Morelli, John N; Attenberger, Ulrike I; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Riffel, Philipp

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and clinical robustness of zoomed diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging (z-EPI) relative to conventional single-shot EPI (c-EPI) for DWI of the kidneys. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional research ethics board. 66 patients (median age 58.5 years±13.4, range 23-83 years, 45 men, 21 women) undergoing 3T (Magnetom Skyra(®), Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) using a dynamic parallel transmit array (TimTX TrueShape, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) for renal MRI were included in this study. Both c-EPI and z-EPI images were obtained. For z-EPI, a two-dimensional spatially-selective radiofrequency (RF) pulse was applied for echo planar imaging with the FOV reduced by a factor of 3. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical data and scan parameters evaluated the images with respect to their diagnostic confidence, overall preference, overall image quality, delineation of the kidney, spatial distortion, and image blur. Sequences were compared using a paired Wilcoxon test. ADC values for the upper pole, mid-zone, lower pole of the normal kidneys were compared between sequences as well as ADC values for renal lesions, using a paired t-test. With z-EPI, the kidney was significantly better delineated with sharper boundaries, less image blur and distortion, and overall better image quality relative to c-EPI (all pEPI technique led to greater diagnostic confidence than c-EPI (p=0.020). z-EPI was preferred to c-EPI in 60 cases (90.9%, 60/66). No statistically significant differences in the ADC values of renal parenchyma or of renal lesions were observed between the two sequences (all p>0.05). Image quality, distortion, and susceptibility artifacts might be improved by using z-EPI rather than c-EPI for DWI of the kidney. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Zoomed EPI-DWI of the pancreas using two-dimensional spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Riffel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Implementation of DWI in the abdomen is challenging due to artifacts, particularly those arising from differences in tissue susceptibility. Two-dimensional, spatially-selective radiofrequency (RF excitation pulses for single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI combined with a reduction in the FOV in the phase-encoding direction (i.e. zooming leads to a decreased number of k-space acquisition lines, significantly shortening the EPI echo train and potentially susceptibility artifacts. PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility and image quality of a zoomed diffusion-weighted EPI (z-EPI sequence in MR imaging of the pancreas. The approach is compared to conventional single-shot EPI (c-EPI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 23 patients who had undergone an MRI study of the abdomen were included in this retrospective study. Examinations were performed on a 3T whole-body MR system (Magnetom Skyra, Siemens equipped with a two-channel fully dynamic parallel transmit array (TimTX TrueShape, Siemens. The acquired sequences consisted of a conventional EPI DWI of the abdomen and a zoomed EPI DWI of the pancreas. For z-EPI, the standard sinc excitation was replaced with a two-dimensional spatially-selective RF pulse using an echo-planar transmit trajectory. Images were evaluated with regard to image blur, respiratory motion artifacts, diagnostic confidence, delineation of the pancreas, and overall scan preference. Additionally ADC values of the pancreatic head, body, and tail were calculated and compared between sequences. RESULTS: The pancreas was better delineated in every case (23/23 with z-EPI versus c-EPI. In every case (23/23, both readers preferred z-EPI overall to c-EPI. With z-EPI there was statistically significantly less image blur (p<0.0001 and respiratory motion artifact compared to c-EPI (p<0.0001. Diagnostic confidence was statistically significantly better with z-EPI (p<0.0001. No statistically significant differences in calculated ADC values were observed

  13. Antibacterial effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation at different energy settings in root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folwaczny, Matthias; Mehl, Albert; Jordan, Christian; Hickel, Reinhard

    2002-01-01

    The in vitro study aimed at the determination of the bacterial reduction in root canals used pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation without a photosensitizing dye. In addition the temperature change in the root canals was determined during laser irradiation. The study sample was 114 root canals of extracted single-rooted human teeth that have been enlarged mechanically, sterilized, and randomly assigned to two experimental units. The source of radiation was a Nd:YAG laser device emitting pulsed infrared radiation at a wavelength of 1.064 microm, a pulse duration of 100 micros, and a pulse repetition rate of 20 pps. Samples of each experimental unit were inoculated with Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) or Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), respectively, and divided into subgroups of 13 teeth each for irradiation for 20 s at 100 mJ or 200 mJ. One subgroup was left untreated as positive control and one subgroup was rinsed with 0.5 ml of sodium hypochloride. After laser treatment or rinsing with sodium hypochloride the number of bacteria in each root canal was determined using the surface spread plate technique. Statistical analysis of the results was performed with ANOVA and Scheffé test at a level of significance of 5% (p temperature increase at 100 mJ was 24.3 degrees C (+/-3.9) and that at 200 mJ was 61.8 degrees C (+/-4.2). The Nd:YAG laser radiation has antimicrobial effects in root canals even in the absence of photosensitizing dyes but also causes considerable temperature increase.

  14. Compression and radiation of high-power short rf pulses. II. A novel antenna array design with combined compressor/radiator elements

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation of compressed high power short RF pulses using two different types of antennas: (i) A simple monopole antenna and (ii) a novel array design, where each of the elements is constructed by combining a compressor and a radiator. The studies on the monopole antenna demonstrate the possibility of a high power short RF pulse\\'s efficient radiation even using simple antennas. The studies on the novel array design demonstrate that a reduced size array with lower pulse distortion and power decay can be constructed by assembling the array from elements each of which integrates a compressor and a radiator. This design idea can be used with any type of antenna array; in this work it is applied to a phased array.

  15. Needle-array to Plate DBD Plasma Using Sine AC and Nanosecond Pulse Excitations for Purpose of Improving Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Dezheng; Wang, Wenchun; Wang, Sen; Yuan, Hao; Zhao, Zilu; Sang, Chaofeng; Jia, Li

    2016-04-01

    In this study, needle-array to plate electrode configuration was employed to generate an atmospheric air diffuse discharge using both nanosecond pulse and sine AC voltage as excitation voltage for the purpose of improving indoor air quality. Different types of voltage sources and electrode configurations are employed to optimize electrical field distribution and improve discharge stability. Discharge images, electrical characteristics, optical emission spectra, and plasma gas temperatures in both sine AC discharge and nanosecond pulse discharge were compared and the discharge stability during long operating time were discussed. Compared with the discharge excited by sine AC voltage, the nanosecond pulsed discharge is more homogenous and stable, besides, the plasma gas temperature of nanosecond pulse discharge is much lower. Using packed-bed structure, where γ- Al2O3 pellets are filled in the electrode gap, has obvious efficacy in the production of homogenous discharge. Furthermore, both sine AC discharge and nanosecond pulse discharge were used for removing formaldehyde from flowing air. It shows that nanosecond pulse discharge has a significant advantage in energy cost. And the main physiochemical processes for the generation of active species and the degradation of formaldehyde were discussed.

  16. Beam-excited whistler waves at oblique propagation with relation to STEREO radiation belt observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sauer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Isotropic electron beams are considered to explain the excitation of whistler waves which have been observed by the STEREO satellite in the Earth's radiation belt. Aside from their large amplitudes (~240 mV/m, another main signature is the strongly inclined propagation direction relative to the ambient magnetic field. Electron temperature anisotropy with Te⊥>Te||, which preferentially generates parallel propagating whistler waves, can be excluded as a free energy source. The instability arises due to the interaction of the Doppler-shifted cyclotron mode ω=−Ωe+kVbcosθ with the whistler mode in the wave number range of kc/ωe≤1 (θ is the propagation angle with respect to the background magnetic field direction, ωe is the electron plasma frequency and Ωe the electron cyclotron frequency. Fluid and kinetic dispersion analysis have been used to calculate the growth rate of the beam-excited whistlers including the most important parameter dependencies. One is the beam velocity (Vb which, for instability, has to be larger than about 2VAe, where VAe is the electron Alfvén speed. With increasing VAe the propagation angle (θ of the fastest growing whistler waves shifts from θ~20° for Vb=2VAe to θ~80° for Vb=5VAe. The growth rate is reduced by finite electron temperatures and disappears if the electron plasma beta (βe exceeds βe~0.2. In addition, Gendrin modes (kc/ωe≈1 are analyzed to determine the conditions under which stationary nonlinear waves (whistler oscillitons can exist. The corresponding spatial wave profiles are calculated using the full nonlinear fluid approach. The results are compared with the STEREO satellite observations.

  17. New method to measure the angular antispring effect in a Fabry–Perot cavity with remote excitation using radiation pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Koji, E-mail: knagano@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Enomoto, Yutaro; Nakano, Masayuki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Furusawa, Akira [Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kawamura, Seiji [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2016-03-06

    In experiments with Fabry–Perot cavities consisting of suspended mirrors, an angular antispring effect on the mirror of the cavity is caused by radiation pressure from resonant light in the cavity. A new method was invented to measure the effect precisely with remote excitation on the mirror using the radiation pressure. This method was found to be available for the suspended 23 mg mirror and improved the measurement accuracy by a factor of two, compared with the previous method. This result leads to stable control systems to eliminate the angular instability of the mirror caused by the effect. - Highlights: • A method to measure an angular antispring effect on a suspended mirror was proposed. • Remote excitation on the mirror with radiation pressure of resonant light is used. • This method provides better measurement accuracy compared with the previous method.

  18. Measurement and analysis of electromagnetic pulses radiated from a charged copper pipe. Taidendo pipe kara hoshasareru denji pulse no sokutei to kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masugi, M.; Murakawa, K.; Kuwabara, N.; Amemiya, F. (Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-12-20

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of electromagnetic wave accompanied with the electrostatic discharge. Experimental and analytical results on electromagnetic pulses radiated from a charged copper pipe are described. The electromagnetic pulses radiated from the copper pipe were measured by using electromagnetic field measuring antennas, such as loop antenna, biconical antenna, and double ridged guide antenna. Electromagnetic energy of the electromagnetic pulses was analyzed by integrating energy spectrums of three frequency domains of 1 to 30MHz, 30 to 300MHz, and 300 to 750MHz. Consequently, it was found that the radiated electromagnetic energy by discharge does not always increase in proportion to charging voltage. In addition, it was shown that high speed touch discharges by charging voltage of 7 or 10kV increase electromagnetic energy especially in the frequency region of 300 to 750MHz. 13 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Nonlinear currents generated in plasma by a radiation pulse with a frequency exceeding the electron plasma frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, V. E.; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    It is shown that the nonlinear currents generated in plasma by a radiation pulse with a frequency exceeding the electron plasma frequency change substantially due to a reduction in the effective electron–ion collision frequency.

  20. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE PROCESS OF RADIATION-CONVECTIVE DRYING FRUIT AND VEGETA- BLE CHIPS WITH PULSED ENERGY SUPPLY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. N. Ostrikov; E. U. Zheltouhova

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model of combined radiation and convection drying of fruit and vegetable chips with pulsed energy supply is developed, the model describes the change in temperature and moisture content...

  1. Response of a semiconducting infinite medium under two temperature theory with photothermal excitation due to laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfy, Kh.; Gabr, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    A novel model of two-dimensional deformations for two-temperature theory at the free surface under the excitation of thermoelastic wave by pulsed laser for a semi-infinite semiconducting medium is studied. The effect of mechanical force during a photothermal process is investigated. The mathematical methods of the Lord-Shulman (LS includes one relaxation time) and Green-Lindsay (GL with two relaxation times) theories as well as the classical dynamical coupled theory (CD) are used. An exact expression for displacement components, force stresses, carrier density and distribution of temperature are obtained using the harmonic wave analysis. Combinations of two-temperature and photothermal theories are obtained analytically. Comparisons of the results are made between the three theories also. The effects of thermoelectric coupling parameter, two-temperature parameter on the displacement component, force stress, carrier density, and distribution of temperature for silicon (Si) medium have been illustrated graphically. The variations of the considered variables with the horizontal distance have been discussed.

  2. Dependence of diode sensitivity on the pulse rate of delivered radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jursinic, Paul A

    2013-02-01

    It has been reported that diode sensitivity decreases by as much as 2% when the average dose rate set at the accelerator console was decreased from 600 to 40 MU∕min. No explanation was given for this effect in earlier publications. This work is a detailed investigation of this phenomenon: the change of diode sensitivity versus the rate of delivery of dose pulses in the milliseconds and seconds range. X-ray beams used in this work had nominal energies of 6 and 15 MV and were generated by linear accelerators. The average dose rate was varied from 25 to 600 MU∕min, which corresponded to time between microsecond-long dose pulses of 60-2.7 ms, respectively. The dose-per-pulse, dpp, was changed by positioning the detector at different source-to-detector distance. A variety of diodes fabricated by a number of manufacturers were tested in this work. Also, diodes in three different MapCHECKs (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) were tested. For all diodes tested, the diode sensitivity decreases as the average dose rate is decreased, which corresponds to an increase in the pulse period, the time between radiation pulses. A sensitivity decrease as large as 5% is observed for a 60-ms pulse period. The diode sensitivity versus the pulse period is modeled by an empirical exponential function. This function has a fitting parameter, t(eff), defined as the effective lifetime. The values of t(eff) were found to be 1.0-14 s, among the various diodes. For all diodes tested, t(eff) decreases as the dpp decreases and is greater for 15 MV than for 6 MV x rays. The decrease in diode sensitivity after 20 s without radiation can be reversed by as few as 60 radiation pulses. A decrease in diode sensitivity occurs with a decrease in the average dose rate, which corresponds to an increase in the pulse period of radiation. The sensitivity decrease is modeled by an empirical exponential function that decreases with an effective lifetime, t(eff), of 1.0-14 s. t(eff) varies widely for different diodes

  3. ALL-OPTICAL CONTROL OF THZ RADIATION IN PARALLEL PLATE WAVEGUIDES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to control of THz radiation in parallel plate waveguides (PPWG) by forming components in the waveguide by use of optical radiation pulses. Patterns of excited regions induced in the PPWG by an optical excitation pulses changes the electromagnetic properties of the waveguide...... medium in the THz regime, thereby forming transient passive and active components for controlling THz radiation signals. The excitation can be generation of free charge carriers in a semiconductor material in the PPWG, to create metallic regions that form mirrors, lenses or photonic crystal structures......-on-a-chip applications. The optical and THz radiation can be ultrashort pulses with picosecond or femtosecond pulse durations. L...

  4. Development of short pulse laser driven micro-hohlraums as a source of EUV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krushelnick, Karl; Batson, Thomas; McKelvey, Andrew; Raymond, Anthony; Thomas, Alec; Yanovsky, Victor; Nees, John; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2015-11-01

    Experiments at large scale laser facilities such as NIF allow the radiativ properties of dens, high-temperature matter to be studied at previously unreachable regime, but are limited by cost and system availability. A scaled system using a short laser pulses and delivering energy to much smaller hohlraum could be capable of reaching comparable energy densities by depositing the energy in a much smaller volume before ablation of the wall material closes the cavit. The laser is tightl focused through the cavity and then expands to illuminate the wall. Experiments were performe using the Hercules Ti:Sapphire laser system at Michiga. Targets include cavities machined in bulk material using low laser power, and then shot in situ with a single full power pulse as well as micron scale pre-fabricate target. Spectral characteristics were measured using a soft X-ray spectromete, K-alpha x-ray imaging system and a filtered photo cathode array. Scalings of the radiation temperature were made for variations in the hohlraum cavit, the pulse duration as well as the focusing conditions. Proof of principle time resolved absorption spectroscopy experiments were also performe. These sources may allow opacity and atomic physics measurements with plasma an radiation temperatures comparable to much larger hohlraums, but with much higher repetition rate and in a university scale laboratory. We acknowledge funding from DTRA grant HDTRA1-11-1-0066.

  5. Interaction of high-speed plasma jet with a pulse of powerful microwave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashchina, A. S.; Brovkin, V. G.; Ryazanskiy, N. M.

    2017-11-01

    The interaction of high-speed plasma jet created by a discharge in an ablative capillary with powerful pulse of microwave radiation (W≈600 kW, λ=2.3 cm, τ=8 μs) is studied. A significant influence of microwave radiation pulse on the plasma jet flow pattern, connected with the development of instability similar to the instability of the free shear flows, is found. Evolution of instability depends on the initial level of perturbation and the plasma flow velocity. The typical for gas jet flows “classical” evolution scenario of instability, including the steps of perturbation amplification, the formation of large-scale vortex structures, their nonlinear interaction and the development of turbulence is realized only at high intensities of the initial perturbation and plasma velocity close to the threshold of the laminar-turbulent transition. In the case of low-speed plasma jets the perturbation amplification leads, eventually, to the interruption of the flow without obvious signs of turbulence. The scenario of instability attenuation is realized at low levels of initial perturbation and generally is common both for low-speed and for high-speed jets, and includes the perturbation zone extension with its simultaneous drift downstream. The drift velocity of the perturbation is comparable to the plasma velocity in the peripheral zone of the jet, which indicates the shear nature of the instability. A significant influence of the plasma jet’s condition on the spatial position of the microwave pulse energy release domain is found.

  6. Small-angle Thomson scattering of ultrafast laser pulses for bright, sub-100-fs x-ray radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelin Li

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a scheme for bright sub-100-fs x-ray radiation generation using small-angle Thomson scattering. Coupling high-brightness electron bunches with high-power ultrafast laser pulses, radiation with photon energies between 8 and 40 keV can be generated with pulse duration comparable to that of the incoming laser pulse and with peak spectral brightness close to that of the third-generation synchrotron light sources of ∼10^{20} photons s^{-1} mm^{-2} mrad^{-2} per 10^{-3} bandwidth. A preliminary dynamic calculation is performed to understand the property of this novel scattering scheme with relativistic laser intensities.

  7. Primary radiation damage in tryptophan and tryptamine. A pulse-radiolysis and low-temperature ESR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theisen, Haakon; Sagstuen, Einar; Nilsson, Goesta; Lund, Anders

    1987-01-01

    The transient optical absorption spectra of tryptamine and tryptophan single crystals have been obtained by pulse radiolysis. Two components were identified. One, denoted as A, exhibiting a lambdasub(max) value at 450 nm, was attributed to an excited triplet. The other component, B, absorbing in the u.v., was assigned to the radical anion. Both components decayed by first-order kinetics and the decay proceeded without activation energy. For component B the decay is ascribed to protonation of the anion at the indole ring. Crystals irradiated at 15 K were studied using ESR spectroscopy. The ESR spectrum consisted of two components. One single line was attributed to the radical anion with the unpaired spin density localized on the indole moiety. The other multiline resonance was assigned to a dienyl type radical which became more prominent at higher temperatures and radiation doses. This species is thought to be formed by protonation of the anion at the indole ring. It is stable up to room temperature. The differences in structure and reactions between radical anions of amino acids with aliphatic and aromatic side chains are pointed out. Radical pairs were found in tryptophan but not in tryptamine after irradiation at 15 K.

  8. Measurements and kinetic modeling of atomic species in fuel-oxidizer mixtures excited by a repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, C.; Eckert, Z.; Yin, Z.; Frederickson, K.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2018-01-01

    This work presents the results of number density measurements of metastable Ar atoms and ground state H atoms in diluted mixtures of H2 and O2 with Ar, as well as ground state O atoms in diluted H2–O2–Ar, CH4–O2–Ar, C3H8–O2–Ar, and C2H4–O2–Ar mixtures excited by a repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge. The measurements have been made in a nanosecond pulse, double dielectric barrier discharge plasma sustained in a flow reactor between two plane electrodes encapsulated within dielectric material, at an initial temperature of 500 K and pressures ranging from 300 Torr to 700 Torr. Metastable Ar atom number density distribution in the afterglow is measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, and used to characterize plasma uniformity. Temperature rise in the reacting flow is measured by Rayleigh scattering. H atom and O atom number densities are measured by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence. The results are compared with kinetic model predictions, showing good agreement, with the exception of extremely lean mixtures. O atoms and H atoms in the plasma are produced mainly during quenching of electronically excited Ar atoms generated by electron impact. In H2–Ar and O2–Ar mixtures, the atoms decay by three-body recombination. In H2–O2–Ar, CH4–O2–Ar, and C3H8–O2–Ar mixtures, O atoms decay in a reaction with OH, generated during H atom reaction with HO2, with the latter produced by three-body H atom recombination with O2. The net process of O atom decay is O  +  H  →  OH, such that the decay rate is controlled by the amount of H atoms produced in the discharge. In extra lean mixtures of propane and ethylene with O2–Ar the model underpredicts the O atom decay rate. At these conditions, when fuel is completely oxidized by the end of the discharge burst, the net process of O atom decay, O  +  O  →  O2, becomes nearly independent of H atom number density. Lack of agreement with the

  9. Revisiting Bragg's X-ray microscope: scatter based optical transient grating detection of pulsed ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Wilfred K; Paganin, David M; Hall, Chris J

    2011-06-01

    Transient optical gratings for detecting ultrafast signals are routine for temporally resolved photochemical investigations. Many processes can contribute to the formation of such gratings; we indicate use of optically scattering centres that can be formed with highly variable latencies in different materials and devices using ionising radiation. Coherent light scattered by these centres can form the short-wavelength-to-optical-wavelength, incoherent-to-coherent basis of a Bragg X-ray microscope, with inherent scope for optical phasing. Depending on the dynamics of the medium chosen, the way is open to both ultrafast pulsed and integrating measurements. For experiments employing brief pulses, we discuss high-dynamic-range short-wavelength diffraction measurements with real-time optical reconstructions. Applications to optical real-time X-ray phase-retrieval are considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of ATLOG and Xyce for Bell Labs Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Long Dissipative Conductors over a Ground Plane.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Basilio, Lorena I. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report details the modeling results for the response of a finite-length dissipative conductor interacting with a conducting ground to the Bell Labs electromagnetic pulse excitation. We use both a frequency-domain and a time-domain method based on transmission line theory through a code we call ATLOG - Analytic Transmission Line Over Ground. Results are compared to the circuit simulator Xyce for selected cases. Intentionally Left Blank

  11. Diagnostics of the efficiency of surface plasmon-polariton excitation by quantum dots via polarization measurements of the output radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukushkin, V. A., E-mail: vakuk@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation); Baidus, N. V. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation); Zdoroveishchev, A. V. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod, Physicotechnical Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    It is demonstrated that the efficiency of surface plasmon-polariton excitation at a metal-semiconductor interface by active quantum dots can be determined from measurements of the polarization characteristics of the output radiation. Experimentally, the proposed diagnostic method is based on finding the ratio of the intensities of the output radiation with polarizations orthogonal and parallel to the nanoheterostructure plane for two different distances between the quantum-dot layer and the metal-semiconductor interface. These data are then used to obtain the unknown parameters in the proposed mathematical model which makes it possible to calculate the rate of surface plasmon-polariton excitation by active quantum dots. As a result, this rate can be determined without complicated expensive equipment for fast time-resolved measurements.

  12. Optical Communication among Oscillatory Reactions and Photo-Excitable Systems: UV and Visible Radiation Can Synchronize Artificial Neuron Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Pier Luigi; Giubila, Maria Sole; Germani, Raimondo; Romani, Aldo; Nicoziani, Andrea; Spalletti, Anna; Heron, B Mark

    2017-06-19

    Neuromorphic engineering promises to have a revolutionary impact in our societies. A strategy to develop artificial neurons (ANs) is to use oscillatory and excitable chemical systems. Herein, we use UV and visible radiation as both excitatory and inhibitory signals for the communication among oscillatory reactions, such as the Belousov-Zhabotinsky and the chemiluminescent Orban transformations, and photo-excitable photochromic and fluorescent species. We present the experimental results and the simulations regarding pairs of ANs communicating by either one or two optical signals, and triads of ANs arranged in both feed-forward and recurrent networks. We find that the ANs, powered chemically and/or by the energy of electromagnetic radiation, can give rise to the emergent properties of in-phase, out-of-phase, anti-phase synchronizations and phase-locking, dynamically mimicking the communication among real neurons. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Doubly-excited state effects on two-photon double ionization of helium by time-delayed, oppositely circularly-polarized attosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoko Djiokap, J. M.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2017-12-01

    We study two-photon double ionization (TPDI) of helium by a pair of time-delayed (non-overlapping), oppositely circularly-polarized attosecond pulses whose carrier frequencies are resonant with 1P o doubly-excited states. All of our TPDI results are obtained by numerical solution of the two-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the six-dimensional case of circularly-polarized attosecond pulses, and they are analyzed using perturbation theory (PT). As compared with the corresponding nonresonant TPDI process, we find that the doubly-excited states change the character of vortex patterns in the two-electron momentum distributions for the case of back-to-back detection of the two ionized electrons in the polarization plane. The doubly-excited states also completely change the structure of fixed-energy, two-electron angular distributions. Moreover, both the fixed-energy and energy-integrated angular distributions, as well as the two-electron energy distributions, exhibit a periodicity with time delay τ between the two attosecond pulses of about 69 as, i.e. the beat period between the (2s2p){}1{{{P}}}o doubly-excited state and the He ground state. Using PT we derive an expression for an angle-integrated energy distribution that is sensitive to the slower beat period ∼1.2 fs between different doubly-excited states as well as to the long timescale ∼17 fs of autoionization lifetimes. However, with our current computer codes we are only able to study numerically the time-dependent phenomena occurring on an attosecond time scale.

  14. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of a target on operation of a pulsed CO2 laser emitting microsecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V. Yu; Dolgov, V. A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Semak, V. V.

    1987-12-01

    The profile of pulses emitted by a TEA CO2 laser with an unstable resonator changed as a result of interaction of laser radiation with the surface of a metal in the presence of a breakdown plasma. This influence of a target on laser operation and its possible applications in laser processing of materials are analyzed.

  15. Excitation and ionic fragmentation of gas-phase biomolecules using electrons and synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, G G B de [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 21949-900 (Brazil); Coutinho, L H [Centro Universitario Estadual da Zona Oeste, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 23070-200 (Brazil); Nunez, C [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia, INPA, Manaus, AM, 69083-000 (Brazil); Bernini, R [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 21949-900 (Brazil); Castilho, R B [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 21949-900 (Brazil); Lago, A F [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz SIncrotron (LNLS), Box 6192, Campinas, SP, 13084-971 (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    An experimental study of the electronic excitation and ionic dissociation of two important classes of biomolecules-natural products (biogenic volatile organic compounds, VOCs, and volatile components of essential oils) and DNA and RNA constituents (aminoacids and bases) is here exemplified with recent results on the fragmentation of thymine and isoprene as induced by synchrotron radiation and fast electrons. Fragmentation of the thymine molecule was seen to dramatically increase as the photon energy increased from 21 to 300 eV and 450 eV. At the highest photon energy, simply and doubly charged N and O atoms were observed. The parent ion (m/z = 126) could be observed at all photon energies. The fragmentation pattern observed in the 1.0 keV electron impact mass spectrum of thymine resembled more closely the fragmentation observed with 21 eV photons. In isoprene, the dominant fragments observed at 21 eV and 310 eV photon energy as well as in the 1.0 keV electron impact mass spectrum were C{sub 5}H{sub 7}{sup +}(m/z = 67), C{sub 4}H{sub 5}{sup +}(m/z = 53), C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}(m/z = 39) and C{sub 2}H{sub 3}{sup +}(m/z = 27). Previously unreported fragments, namely H{sup +}, C{sup +}, CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 3}{sup +} were observed at the high photon energies and at the electron impact mass spectrum.

  16. A radiative transfer model to treat infrared molecular excitation in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debout, V.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Zakharov, V.

    2016-02-01

    The exospheres of small Solar System bodies are now observed with high spatial resolution from space missions. Interpreting infrared spectra of cometary gases obtained with the VIRTIS experiment onboard the Rosetta cometary mission requires detailed modeling of infrared fluorescence emission in optically thick conditions. Efficient computing methods are required since numerous ro-vibrational lines excited by the Sun need to be considered. We propose a new model working in a 3-D environment to compute numerically the local incoming radiation. It uses a new algorithm using pre-defined directions of ray propagation and ray grids to reduce the CPU cost in time with respect to Monte Carlo methods and to treat correctly the sunlight direction. The model is applied to the ν3 bands of CO2 and H2O at 4.3 μ m and 2.7 μ m respectively, and to the CO ∨ (1 → 0) band at 4.7 μ m. The results are compared to the ones obtained by a 1-D algorithm which uses the Escape Probability (EP) method, and by a 3-D ;Coupled Escape Probability; (CEP) model, for different levels of optical thickness. Our results suggest that the total band flux may vary strongly with azimuth for optically thick cases whereas the azimuth average total band flux computed is close to the one obtained with EP. Our model globally predicts less intensity reduction from opacity than the CEP model of Gersch and A'Hearn (Gersch, A.M., A'Hearn, M.F. [2014]. Astrophys. J. 787, 36-56). An application of the model to the observation of CO2, CO and H2O bands in 67/P atmosphere with VIRTIS is presented to predict the evolution of band optical thickness along the mission.

  17. Circular polarization of X-ray radiation emitted by longitudinally polarized electron impact excitation: Under a screened Coulomb interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhan-Bin

    2017-12-01

    Longitudinally polarized electron impact excitation from the ground state 1s2 to the excited state 1s2l (l =s,p) levels of highly charged He-like Fe24+ ions in weakly coupled hot-dense plasmas is investigated using a fully relativistic distorted-wave method. The Debye-Hückel potential is used to describe the plasma screening. Benchmark results such as the total cross sections, the magnetic sublevels cross sections, and the circular polarizations of corresponding X-ray radiations are presented. For the excitation process, results show that the plasma screening has an effect in reducing both the total and magnetic sublevels cross sections. For the de-excitation process, it is found that while the plasma screening as a slightly effect on the circular polarizations of radiations for the 1 s 2 s 3S1 → 1 s21S0,1 s 2 p 3P2 → 1 s21S0 , and 1 s 2 p 1P1 → 1 s21S0 transition lines, it gives a substantial contribution for the same properties of the 1 s 2 p 3P1 → 1 s21S0 line.

  18. Atmospheric air diffuse array-needles dielectric barrier discharge excited by positive, negative, and bipolar nanosecond pulses in large electrode gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, De-zheng; Wang, Wen-chun; Liu, Zhi-jie; Wang, Sen; Jiang, Peng-chao; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, positive, negative, and bipolar nanosecond pulses are employed to generate stable and diffuse discharge plasma using array needles-plate electrode configuration at atmospheric pressure. A comparison study of discharge images, electrical characteristics, optical emission spectra, and plasma vibrational temperature and rotational temperatures in three pulsed polarity discharges is carried on under different discharge conditions. It is found that bipolar pulse is beneficial to the excitation of diffuse dielectric barrier discharge, which can generate a room temperature plasma with more homogeneous and higher discharge intensity compared with unipolar discharges. Under the condition of 6 mm electrode gap distance, 26 kV pulse peak voltage, and 150 Hz pulse repetition rate, the emission intensity of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg) of the bipolar pulsed discharge is 4 times higher than the unipolar discharge (both positive and negative), while the plasma gas temperature is kept at 300 K, which is about 10-20 K lower than the unipolar discharge plasma.

  19. Studies on the optogalvanic effect and isotope-selective excitation of ytterbium in a hollow cathode discharge lamp using a pulsed dye laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Kumar, Jitendra; Prakash, Om; Saini, Vinod K; Dixit, Sudhir K; Nakhe, Shankar V

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents studies on the pulsed optogalvanic effect and isotope-selective excitation of Yb 555.648 nm (0 cm(-1) → 17 992.007 cm(-1)) and 581.067 nm (17 992.007 cm(-1) → 35 196.98 cm(-1)) transitions, in a Yb/Ne hollow cathode lamp. The Yb atoms were excited by narrow linewidth (500-1000 MHz) Rh110 and Rh6G dye based pulsed lasers. Optogalvanic signal inversion for ground state transition at 555.648 nm was observed beyond a hollow cathode discharge current of 8.5 mA, in contrast to normal optogalvanic signal at 581.067 nm up to maximum current of 14 mA. The isotope-selective excitation studies of Yb were carried out by recording Doppler limited optogalvanic signals as a function of dye laser wavelength. For the 581.067 nm transition, three even isotopes, (172)Yb, (174)Yb, and (176)Yb, and one odd isotope, (171)Yb, were clearly resolved. These data were compared with selective isotope excitation by 10 MHz linewidth continuous-wave dye laser. For 555.648 nm transition, isotopes were not clearly resolved, although isotope peaks of low modulation were observed.

  20. Theory of propagation of spectrum and correlations of radiation in optically dense gas in the case of the closed excitation contour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barantsev K.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to generalization of the semi-classical theory of interaction of broadband laser radiation with the atomic gas at the room temperature in the cell in the case of the closed excitation contour. The atomic density matrix equations and spectrum and correlations transport equations have been derived for excitation by fluctuating field with Gaussian statistics. It is shown that the spatial oscillations of radiation intensity and atomic density matrix can be excited. It was found that such medium can serve as a filter of incoherent part of the radiation.

  1. A high-brightness repetitively pulsed UV radiation source using a linearly stabilized surface discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugrimov, S. N.; Kamrukov, A. S.; Kashnikov, G. N.; Kozlov, N. P.; Ovchinnikov, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    A method is proposed for initiating spark plasma discharges on a dielectric surface in the form of strictly rectilinear plasma channels. The method can be implemented using relatively modest (less than 25 kV) working and ignition voltages and does not require any 'hard' electrotechnical loops. Experiments were carried out in order to study the formation dynamics, energy, and spectral brightness characteristics of linearly stabilized surface discharges having linearly stabilized spark channel and the results are discussed. High-speed photographs of the discharges are presented and the spectrum of radiation from the discharges is illustrated in graphic form. It is shown that linearly stabilized discharges can be used to obtain high-power repetitively pulsed sources of CW ultraviolet radiation in the UV region having a brightness temperature of at least 40 K.

  2. Localized dispersing of ceramic particles in tool steel surfaces by pulsed laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgenberg, K., E-mail: hilgenberg@uni-kassel.de [Metal Forming Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Behler, K. [Laser Technology, THM University of Applied Sciences (Germany); Steinhoff, K. [Metal Forming Technology, University of Kassel (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    In this paper the capability of a localized laser dispersing technique for changing the material microstructure and the surface topology of steels is discussed. The laser implantation named technique bases on a discontinuous dispersing of ceramic particles into the surface of steels by using pulsed laser radiation. As ceramic particles TiC, WC and TiB{sub 2} are used, substrate material is high-alloyed cold working steel (X153CrMoV12). The influence of the laser parameters pulse length and pulse intensity was investigated in a comprehensive parameter study. The gained surface topology and microstructure were evaluated by optical microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and white light interferometry; mechanical properties were analyzed by micro hardness measurement. The experiments reveal that the alignment of separated, elevated, dome-shaped spots on the steel surface is feasible. The geometrical properties as well as the mechanical properties are highly controllable by the laser parameters. The laser implanted spots show a mostly crack-free and pore-free bonding to the substrate material as well as a significant increase of micro hardness.

  3. Localized dispersing of ceramic particles in tool steel surfaces by pulsed laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgenberg, K.; Behler, K.; Steinhoff, K.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper the capability of a localized laser dispersing technique for changing the material microstructure and the surface topology of steels is discussed. The laser implantation named technique bases on a discontinuous dispersing of ceramic particles into the surface of steels by using pulsed laser radiation. As ceramic particles TiC, WC and TiB2 are used, substrate material is high-alloyed cold working steel (X153CrMoV12). The influence of the laser parameters pulse length and pulse intensity was investigated in a comprehensive parameter study. The gained surface topology and microstructure were evaluated by optical microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and white light interferometry; mechanical properties were analyzed by micro hardness measurement. The experiments reveal that the alignment of separated, elevated, dome-shaped spots on the steel surface is feasible. The geometrical properties as well as the mechanical properties are highly controllable by the laser parameters. The laser implanted spots show a mostly crack-free and pore-free bonding to the substrate material as well as a significant increase of micro hardness.

  4. Pulse radiolysis of nucleic acids and their base constituents: Bibliographies on radiation chemistry. XI

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Sonntag, Clemens; Ross, Alberta B.

    In the elucidation of the primary processes involved in the free-radical-induced damage to DNA and its subunits, pulse radiolysis proves to be one of the most powerful tools. The first studies data back to 1964. The updating review (C. v. Sonntag, Radiat. Phys. Chem. 1987, 30, 313) which precedes this compilation has placed the emphasis on the more recent developments. It has been felt that a bibliography including the earlier literature on this subject might be helpful for further reading. For this compilation the data stored by the Radiation Chemistry Data Center bibliographic database (1) through 1986 were processed using the SELECT keywords: purines, pyrimidines, nucleotides, nucleosides, nucleic acids and pulse radiolysis. The number of citations found was reduced by about one-third by eliminating privately published symposia papers, theses and papers not strictly relevant to this topic, e.g. on flavins, NADH, one-electron reduction of nitrouracil or the redox potential of isobarbituric acid. On the other hand, a few more papers known to us but not revealed by the keywords were added. The bibliography is arranged in approximately chronological order, references grouped by year of publication. Reviews are collected at the end of the bibliography in a separate section.

  5. Two-photon excited spectroscopies of ex vivo human skin endogenous species irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianxin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Luo, Tianshu; Zhao, Jingjun

    2006-10-01

    Two-photon excited spectroscopies from ex vivo human skin are investigated by using a femtosecond laser and a confocal microscope (Zeiss LSM 510 META). In the dermis, collagen is responsible for second harmonic generation (SHG); elastin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), melanin and porphyrin are the primary endogenous sources of two-photon excited autofluorescence. In the epidermis, keratin, NADH, melanin and porphyrins contribute to autofluorescence signals. The results also show that the SHG spectra have the ability to shift with the excitation wavelength and the autofluorescence spectra display a red shift of the spectral peaks when increasing the excitation wavelength. These results may have practical implications for diagnosis of skin diseases.

  6. Homogeneous non-selective and slice-selective parallel-transmit excitations at 7 Tesla with universal pulses: A validation study on two commercial RF coils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Gras

    Full Text Available Parallel transmission (pTx technology, despite its great potential to mitigate the transmit field inhomogeneity problem in magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field (UHF, suffers from a cumbersome calibration procedure, thereby making the approach problematic for routine use. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate on two different 7T systems respectively equipped with 8-transmit-channel RF coils from two different suppliers (Rapid-Biomed and Nova Medical, the benefit of so-called universal pulses (UP, optimized to produce uniform excitations in the brain in a population of adults and making unnecessary the calibration procedures mentioned above. Non-selective and slice-selective UPs were designed to return homogeneous excitation profiles throughout the brain simultaneously on a group of ten subjects, which then were subsequently tested on ten additional volunteers in magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE and multi-slice gradient echo (2D GRE protocols. The results were additionally compared experimentally with the standard non-pTx circularly-polarized (CP mode, and in simulation with subject-specific tailored excitations. For both pulse types and both coils, the UP mode returned a better signal and contrast homogeneity than the CP mode. Retrospective analysis of the flip angle (FA suggests that the FA deviation from the nominal FA on average over a healthy adult population does not exceed 11% with the calibration-free parallel-transmit pulses whereas it goes beyond 25% with the CP mode. As a result the universal pulses designed in this work confirm their relevance in 3D and 2D protocols with commercially available equipment. Plug-and-play pTx implementations henceforth become accessible to exploit with more flexibility the potential of UHF for brain imaging.

  7. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of protein crystals: a new tool for studying radiation damage during diffraction data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robin L; Yorke, Briony A; Pearson, Arwen R

    2012-05-01

    During X-ray irradiation protein crystals radiate energy in the form of small amounts of visible light. This is known as X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL). The XEOL of several proteins and their constituent amino acids has been characterized using the microspectrophotometers at the Swiss Light Source and Diamond Light Source. XEOL arises primarily from aromatic amino acids, but the effects of local environment and quenching within a crystal mean that the XEOL spectrum of a crystal is not the simple sum of the spectra of its constituent parts. Upon repeated exposure to X-rays XEOL spectra decay non-uniformly, suggesting that XEOL is sensitive to site-specific radiation damage. However, rates of XEOL decay were found not to correlate to decays in diffracting power, making XEOL of limited use as a metric for radiation damage to protein crystals. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of surface breakdown on the process of drilling metals with pulsed CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Dolgov, V. A.; Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.

    1988-03-01

    A report is given of the influence of low-threshold surface optical breakdown, occurring under the action of short (~ 5-μs) radiation pulses from a CO2 laser, on the process of the laser drilling of metals. Data are given on the difference between the interaction of radiation pulses having the same duration but differing in shape. A study was made of the influence of the pressure of the atmosphere surrounding a target on the results of laser drilling of metals. A theoretical explanation is given of the experimental results.

  9. Angular distribution of hypersatellite and satellite radiation emitted after resonant and excitation into $U^{91+}$ ions

    CERN Document Server

    Zakowicz, S; Harman, Z; Scheid, W

    2003-01-01

    In collisions of heavy few-electron projectile ions with light targets, an electron can be transferred from the target with the simultaneous excitation of a projectile electron. We study the angular distribution of de-excitation X rays following the resonant capture process. Our results are compared to experimental values of Ma et al. [Phys. Rev. A (joint to this issue)] for collisions of U91+ ions with a hydrogen gas target.

  10. White light emission from Er2O3 nano-powder excited by infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanli, Sevcan; Eryurek, Gonul; Di Bartolo, Baldassare

    2017-07-01

    Phosphors of Er2O3 nano-crystalline powders were synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. The structural properties of the nano-powders were investigated with XRD and HRTEM measurements. The cubic phase with a = 10.540 Å was the only phase observed. The average crystalline sizes and the widths of the grain size distribution curves were determined to be 27.2, 18.7 and 9.7 nm, respectively. The spectroscopic properties of the Er2O3 nano-powder were studied by measuring the luminescence, decay and rise patterns under 808 and 975 nm diode laser excitations. A peculiar effect of the pressure was observed since an optically active ion (Er) is part of the complex and not a dopant. A broad band of the white light emission combined with blue, green and red up-conversion emission bands of Er3+ ions were observed at 0.03 mbar pressure under both excitation wavelengths. Only, an intense broad band white light emission was observed from these nanocrystals at atmospheric pressure. Rising patterns show that the white light intensity reaches its maximum value more rapidly under 975 nm excitation although it decays slower than that of 808 nm excitation. The color quality parameters such as the color coordinate (CRI), correlated color temperature and the color rendering index were found to vary with both the excitation wavelength and the ambient pressure indicating that these nanocrystals could be considered good white light emitting source under the infrared excitations.

  11. Radiation oxygen biology with pulse electron paramagnetic resonance imaging in animal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, Gage; Elas, Martyna; Epel, Boris; Barth, Eugene D; Halpern, Howard J

    2013-01-01

    The reduced oxygen in tumors (hypoxia) generates radiation resistance and limits tumor control probability (TCP) at radiation doses without significant normal tissue complication. Modern radiation therapy delivery with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) enables complex, high-dose gradient patterns, which avoid sensitive human tissues and organs. EPR oxygen images may allow selection of more resistant parts of a tumor to which to deliver more radiation dose to enhance TCP. EPR O2 images are obtained using injected narrow-line, low relaxation rate trityl spin probes that enable pulse radiofrequency EPR O2 images of tumors in the legs of mice, rats, and rabbits, the latter exceeding 4 cm in size. Low relaxation rates of trityls have enabled novel T1-, rather than T2-, based oximetry, which provides near absolute pO2 imaging. Tomographic image formation and filtered back projection reconstruction are used to generate these images with fixed, linear stepped gradients. Images obtained both with T2 and T1 oximetric images have demonstrated the complex in vivo mechanism explaining the unexpected efficacy of TNFerade, a radiation-inducible adenoviral construct to locally produce TNF-induced vascular as well as radiation damage [1, 2]. The unexpected efficacy of large-dose radiation fractions is seen to be due to an interaction between host microvasculature and tumor cells producing a prompt (15 min) postradiation hypoxia, paralyzing tumor cell repair, and sensitizing tumors. Finally, cure of tumors treated to a single 50 % control dose shows a significant dependence on EPR O2 image hypoxic fractions, best shown with the fraction of voxels less than 10 Torr (HF10). We show that these O2 images provide a quantitative basis for measuring tumor and normal tissue response to abnormally low O2 levels. Measurements of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in a specific syngeneic mouse fibrosarcoma, FSa versus fraction of tissue voxels with pO2 less than 10

  12. FPGA-based photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer and a brief comparison with that operated in a pulsed-excitation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Taga, Takanori; Mizuno, Takahiko

    2017-12-01

    We have constructed a high-efficiency, photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) using a field-programmable gate array, which is a modified version of the photon-counting fluorometer (PCF) that works in a pulsed-excitation mode (Iwata and Mizuno in Meas Sci Technol 28:075501, 2017). The common working principle for both is the simultaneous detection of the photoelectron pulse train, which covers 64 ns with a 1.0-ns resolution time (1.0 ns/channel). The signal-gathering efficiency was improved more than 100 times over that of conventional time-correlated single-photon-counting at the expense of resolution time depending on the number of channels. The system dead time for building a histogram was eliminated, markedly shortening the measurement time for fluorescent samples with moderately high quantum yields. We describe the PC-PMF and make a brief comparison with the pulsed-excitation PCF in precision, demonstrating the potential advantage of PC-PMF.

  13. Radiation defect dynamics in Si at room temperature studied by pulsed ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J. B.; Charnvanichborikarn, S.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Myers, M. T.; Shao, L.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2015-10-07

    The evolution of radiation defects after the thermalization of collision cascades often plays the dominant role in the formation of stable radiation disorder in crystalline solids of interest to electronics and nuclear materials applications. Here, we explore a pulsed-ion-beam method to study defect interaction dynamics in Si crystals bombarded at room temperature with 500 keV Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe ions. The effective time constant of defect interaction is measured directly by studying the dependence of lattice disorder, monitored by ion channeling, on the passive part of the beam duty cycle. The effective defect diffusion length is revealed by the dependence of damage on the active part of the beam duty cycle. Results show that the defect relaxation behavior obeys a second order kinetic process for all the cases studied, with a time constant in the range of ~4–13 ms and a diffusion length of ~15–50 nm. Both radiation dynamics parameters (the time constant and diffusion length) are essentially independent of the maximum instantaneous dose rate, total ion dose, and dopant concentration within the ranges studied. However, both the time constant and diffusion length increase with increasing ion mass. This demonstrates that the density of collision cascades influences not only defect production and annealing efficiencies but also the defect interaction dynamics.

  14. Coherent and tunable terahertz radiation from graphene surface plasmon polaritons excited by an electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shenggang, E-mail: liusg@uestc.edu.cn; Hu, Min; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Gong, Sen; Zhao, Tao; Zhong, Renbin [Terahertz Research Centre, School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Cooperative Innovation Centre of Terahertz Science, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Zhang, Chao [Terahertz Research Centre, School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Cooperative Innovation Centre of Terahertz Science, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); School of Physics and Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia)

    2014-05-19

    Although surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) resonance in graphene can be tuned in the terahertz regime, transforming such SPPs into coherent terahertz radiation has not been achieved. Here, we propose a graphene-based coherent terahertz radiation source with greatly enhanced intensity. The radiation works at room temperature, it is tunable and can cover the whole terahertz regime. The radiation intensity generated with this method is 400 times stronger than that from SPPs at a conventional dielectric or semiconducting surface and is comparable to that from the most advanced photonics source such as a quantum cascade laser. The physical mechanism for this strong radiation is presented. The phase diagrams defining the parameters range for the occurrence of radiation is also shown.

  15. Electron correlation effect on radiative decay processes of the core-excited states of Be-like ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Cuicui, E-mail: sangcc@126.com [Department of Physics, Qinghai Normal University, Xining 810001 (China); Li, Kaikai [College of Forensic Science, People' s Public Security University of China, Beijing 100038 (China); Sun, Yan; Hu, Feng [School of Mathematic and Physical Science, Xuzhou Institute of Technology, Xuzhou 221400, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiative rates of the states 1s2s{sup 2}2p and 1s2p{sup 3} with Z = 8–54 are studied. • Electron correlation effect on the radiative transition rates is studied. • Forbidden transitions are explored. - Abstract: Energy levels and the radiative decay processes of the core-excited configurations 1s2s{sup 2}2p and 1s2p{sup 3} of Be-like ions with Z = 8–54 are studied. Electron correlation effect on the energy levels and the radiative transition rates are studied in detail. Except for E1 radiative transition rates, the E2, M1 and M2 forbidden transitions are also explored. Further relativistic corrections from the Breit interaction, quantum electrodynamics and the finite nuclear size are included in the calculations to make the results more precise. Good agreement is found between our results and other theoretical data.

  16. Quadri-Pulse Theta Burst Stimulation using Ultra-High Frequency Bursts - A New Protocol to Induce Changes in Cortico-Spinal Excitability in Human Motor Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Patterned transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) such as theta burst stimulation (TBS) or quadri-pulse stimulation (QPS) can induce changes in cortico-spinal excitability, commonly referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term depression (LTD)-like effects in human motor cortex ...... in cortico-spinal excitability. Induced current direction in the brain appears to be relevant when qTBS targets I-wave periodicity, corroborating that high-fidelity spike timing mechanisms are critical for inducing bi-directional plasticity in human M1....... was set to 666 Hz to mimic the rhythmicity of the descending cortico-spinal volleys that are elicited by TMS (i.e., I-wave periodicity). In a second experiment, burst frequency was set to 200 Hz to maximize postsynaptic Ca2+ influx using a temporal pattern unrelated to I-wave periodicity. The second phase...

  17. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    de Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible...

  18. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra short pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible....

  19. Higher order mode excitation in eccentric active nano-particles for tailoring of the near-field radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, R. O.; Arslanagic, Samel

    2015-01-01

    We examine the excitation of resonant modes inside eccentrically layered cylindrical active nano-particles. The nano-particle is a three-layer structure comprised of a silica core, a free-space middle layer, and an outer shell of silver. It is shown that a concentric configuration, initially desi...... of the gain constant, is shown to be controlled by the direction of the core displacement. The present eccentric active nano-particles may provide alternative strategies for directive near-field radiation relative to the existing designs....

  20. LASER EMISSIONS FROM CO2 VIBRATIONAL TRANSITIONS IN A LOW TEMPERATURE SUPERSONIC FLOW EXCITED BY A PULSED ELECTRON BEAM STABILIZED DISCHARGE

    OpenAIRE

    Fontaine, B.; Forestier, B.; Gross, P.; Koudriavtsev, E.

    1980-01-01

    High power long pulse infrared laser emission has been achieved on CO2 molecule with the high density and very low temperature supersonic flow-electron beam-stabilized discharge excitation device developped at I.M.F.M. ([MATH] [MATH] 2 amagats, T [MATH] 70 - 150 K). Laser emission at [MATH] = 10.6 µ has been achieved for a resonant cavity set at the discharge location and also 3 cm downstream of the discharge location. With Ar/CO2, Ar/CO2/H2, He/CO2, and He/CO2/N2 mixtures, lasing energy and ...

  1. Interaction of power pulses of laser radiation with glasses containing implanted metal nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, A L; Hole, D E; Bukharaev, A A

    2001-01-01

    The sodium-calcium silicate glasses, implanted by the Ag sup + ions with the energy of 60 keV and the dose of 7 x 10 sup 1 sup 6 cm sup - sup 2 by the ion current flux density of 10 mu A/cm sup 2 , are studied. The ion implantation makes it possible to synthesize in the near-the-surface glass area the composite layer, including the silver nanoparticles. The effect of the powerful pulse excimer laser on the obtained composite layer is investigated. It is established that the laser radiation leads to decrease in the silver nanoparticles size in the implanted layer. However nonuniform distribution of particles by size remains though not so wide as before the irradiation. The experimental results are explained by the effect of glass and metallic particles melting in the nanosecond period of time

  2. Visualization of transient phenomena during the interaction of pulsed CO2 laser radiation with matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R.; Hugenschmidt, Manfred

    1996-05-01

    Carbon-dioxide-lasers operating in the pulsed mode with energy densities up to several tens of J/cm2 and peak power densities in the multi-MW/cm2-range may cause fast heating and melting. Eventually quasi-explosive ejection, decomposition or vaporization of material can be observed. Surface plasmas are strongly influencing the energy transfer from the laser radiation field to any target. For optically transparent plastics, such as PMMA for example, only slowly expanding plasmas (LSC-waves) are ignited at fluences around 20 J/cm2, with a low level of self-luminosity. High brightness, supersonically expanding plasma jets (LSD-waves) are generated at the same fluences on glasses. Similar conditions were found for metals as well. From recordings with a high speed CCD-camera, interesting features concerning the initial plasma phases and temporal evolution were deduced. Additionally, information was obtained concerning the quasi explosive ejection of material for PMMA.

  3. Electromagnetic Fields, Pulsed Radiofrequency Radiation, and Epigenetics: How Wireless Technologies May Affect Childhood Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Cindy; Burgio, Ernesto

    2018-01-01

    Mobile phones and other wireless devices that produce electromagnetic fields (EMF) and pulsed radiofrequency radiation (RFR) are widely documented to cause potentially harmful health impacts that can be detrimental to young people. New epigenetic studies are profiled in this review to account for some neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral changes due to exposure to wireless technologies. Symptoms of retarded memory, learning, cognition, attention, and behavioral problems have been reported in numerous studies and are similarly manifested in autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, as a result of EMF and RFR exposures where both epigenetic drivers and genetic (DNA) damage are likely contributors. Technology benefits can be realized by adopting wired devices for education to avoid health risk and promote academic achievement. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  4. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, B. W.

    1987-06-01

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity.

  5. Generation of thermo-acoustic waves from pulsed solar/IR radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Aowabin

    Acoustic waves could potentially be used in a wide range of engineering applications; however, the high energy consumption in generating acoustic waves from electrical energy and the cost associated with the process limit the use of acoustic waves in industrial processes. Acoustic waves converted from solar radiation provide a feasible way of obtaining acoustic energy, without relying on conventional nonrenewable energy sources. One of the goals of this thesis project was to experimentally study the conversion of thermal to acoustic energy using pulsed radiation. The experiments were categorized into "indoor" and "outdoor" experiments, each with a separate experimental setup. The indoor experiments used an IR heater to power the thermo-acoustic lasers and were primarily aimed at studying the effect of various experimental parameters on the amplitude of sound waves in the low frequency range (below 130 Hz). The IR radiation was modulated externally using a chopper wheel and then impinged on a porous solid, which was housed inside a thermo-acoustic (TA) converter. A microphone located at a certain distance from the porous solid inside the TA converter detected the acoustic signals. The "outdoor" experiments, which were targeted at TA conversion at comparatively higher frequencies (in 200 Hz-3 kHz range) used solar energy to power the thermo-acoustic laser. The amplitudes (in RMS) of thermo-acoustic signals obtained in experiments using IR heater as radiation source were in the 80-100 dB range. The frequency of acoustic waves corresponded to the frequency of interceptions of the radiation beam by the chopper. The amplitudes of acoustic waves were influenced by several factors, including the chopping frequency, magnitude of radiation flux, type of porous material, length of porous material, external heating of the TA converter housing, location of microphone within the air column, and design of the TA converter. The time-dependent profile of the thermo-acoustic signals

  6. SU-C-201-03: Ionization Chamber Collection Efficiency in Pulsed Radiation Fields of High Pulse Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotz, M; Karsch, L [Oncoray - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Pawelke, J [Oncoray - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the reduction of collection efficiency of ionization chambers (IC) by volume recombination and its correction in pulsed fields of very high pulse dose. Methods: Measurements of the collection efficiency of a plane-parallel advanced Markus IC (PTW 34045, 1mm electrode spacing, 300V nominal voltage) were obtained for collection voltages of 100V and 300V by irradiation with a pulsed electron beam (20MeV) of varied pulse dose up to approximately 600mGy (0.8nC liberated charge). A reference measurement was performed with a Faraday cup behind the chamber. It was calibrated for the liberated charge in the IC by a linear fit of IC measurement to reference measurement at low pulse doses. The results were compared to the commonly used two voltage approximation (TVA) and to established theories for volume recombination, with and without considering a fraction of free electrons. In addition, an equation system describing the charge transport and reactions in the chamber was solved numerically. Results: At 100V collection voltage and moderate pulse doses the established theories accurately predict the observed collection efficiency, but at extreme pulse doses a fraction of free electrons needs to be considered. At 300V the observed collection efficiency deviates distinctly from that predicted by any of the established theories, even at low pulse doses. However, the numeric solution of the equation system is able to reproduce the measured collection efficiency across the entire dose range of both voltages with a single set of parameters. Conclusion: At high electric fields (3000V/cm here) the existing theoretical descriptions of collection efficiency, including the TVA, are inadequate to predict pulse dose dependency. Even at low pulse doses they might underestimate collection efficiency. The presented, more accurate numeric solution, which considers additional effects like electric shielding by the charges, might provide a valuable tool for future

  7. Method for detecting and distinguishing between specific types of environmental radiation using a high pressure ionization chamber with pulse-mode readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2017-12-19

    An environmental radiation detector for detecting and distinguishing between all types of environmental radiation, including photons, charged particles, and neutrons. A large volume high pressure ionization chamber (HPIC) includes BF.sub.3 gas at a specific concentration to render the radiation detector sensitive to the reactions of neutron capture in Boron-10 isotope. A pulse-mode readout is connected to the ionization chamber capable of measuring both the height and the width of the pulse. The heavy charged products of the neutron capture reaction deposit significant characteristic energy of the reaction in the immediate vicinity of the reaction in the gas, producing a signal with a pulse height proportional to the reaction energy, and a narrow pulse width corresponding to the essentially pointlike energy deposition in the gas. Readout of the pulse height and the pulse width parameters of the signals enables distinguishing between the different types of environmental radiation, such as gamma (x-rays), cosmic muons, and neutrons.

  8. Ultrafast detection and autocorrelation of picosecond THz radiation pulses with a GaAs/AlAs superlattice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winnerl, S.; Seiwerth, W.; Schomburg, E.; Grenzer, J.; Renk, K. F.; Langerak, Cjgm; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Pavel' ev, D. G.; Koschurinov, Y.; Ignatov, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    We used a wide miniband GaAs/AlAs superlattice (at room temperature) for detection and autocorrelation of picosecond THz radiation pulses (frequency 4.3 THz) from a free- electron laser. The detection was based on a THz-field induced change in conductivity of the superlattice, and the correlation on

  9. EVALUATION OF THE THERAPEUTIC EFFICACY OF HIGH-INTENSITY PULSED-PERIODIC LASER RADIATION (CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sokolov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the experience of clinical observations, we have shown a high therapeutic effectiveness of the medical laser KULON-MED in: cosmetics, non-cancer inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and cancer (cancer of the stomach and colon as at different wavelengths, and with different types of photosensitizers. In the area of anti-tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT, based on experimental studies, we have showed the high antitumor (sarcoma S‑37 effectiveness of the laser (with the inhibition of tumor growth of up to 100% for repetitively pulsed irradiation mode, and for mode fractionation doses laser radiation. In addition, significant differences are shown in the effectiveness of anticancer PDT methods in the application of high-intensity lasers, continuous and pulsed caused fundamental properties of laser radiation characteristics – time structure of the radiation pulses. Thus, for the first time we have shown that the time of high-intensity laser pulses structure significantly affects therapeutic efficacy laser system, and hence on the mechanisms of interaction of laser radiation with biological tissue.

  10. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE PROCESS OF RADIATION-CONVECTIVE DRYING FRUIT AND VEGETA- BLE CHIPS WITH PULSED ENERGY SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Ostrikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of combined radiation and convection drying of fruit and vegetable chips with pulsed energy supply is developed, the model describes the change in temperature and moisture content during the period of constant and periods of decreasing drying rate.

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation modulation of corticospinal excitability by targeting cortical I-waves with biphasic paired-pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallioniemi, Elisa; Savolainen, Petri; Järnefelt, Gustaf; Koskenkorva, Päivi; Karhu, Jari; Julkunen, Petro

    2017-10-20

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) induced I-wave behavior can be demonstrated at neuronal population level using paired-pulses and by observing short-interval cortical facilitation (SICF). Advancements in stimulator technology have made it possible to apply biphasic paired-pulses to induce SICF. Our aim was to characterize the SICF I-wave interaction by biphasic paired-pulses with the ultimate objective to enhance TMS effects via SICF in various TMS-applications. We used biphasic paired-pulses in 15 volunteers to characterize corticospinal SICF using various 1.2-8.0ms inter-stimulus intervals, and measuring SICF input-output response. SICF interaction with the first I-wave (I1) was observed in the output responses (motor evoked potentials; MEPs) in all subjects. Most subjects (≥80%) also exhibited later SICF I-wave interaction. SICF at I1 was present at all applied intensities below 140% of resting motor threshold. At I2, we observed SICF only with intensities just above motor threshold. Biphasic paired-pulses can reliably induce SICF shown by the facilitatory I-wave interaction, and could therefore be applied with repetitive bursts to enhance responsiveness to TMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurement of the energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, Gordon Andrew; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Warne, Larry Kevin; Dropinski, Steven Clark; Hanson, Donald L.; Johnson, William Arthur; York, Mathew William; Lewis, D.F. (International Specialty Products, Wayne , NJ); Korde, R. (International Radiation Detectors, Torrance, CA); Haslett, C.L. (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Wall, D.L. (Resonetics, Nashua, New hampshire); Ruggles, Laurence E.; Ramirez, L.E. (ATK Mission Research Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Stygar, William A.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; McKenney, John Lee; Bryce, Edwin Anthony; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Torres, Jose A.; Mills, Jerry Alan; Leeper, Ramon Joe; McGurn, John Stephen; Fehl, David Lee; Spielman, R. B. (International Specialty Products, Wayne , NJ); Pyle, John H. (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Ives, Harry Crockett, III (EG& G, Albuquerque, NM); Seamen, Johann F.; Simpson, Walter W.

    2006-02-01

    We have developed a diagnostic system that measures the spectrally integrated (i.e. the total) energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source. The total-energy-and-power (TEP) diagnostic system is optimized for blackbody temperatures between 50 and 350 eV. The system can view apertured sources that radiate energies and powers as high as 2 MJ and 200 TW, respectively, and has been successfully tested at 0.84 MJ and 73 TW on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The TEP system consists of two pinhole arrays, two silicon-diode detectors, and two thin-film nickel bolometers. Each of the two pinhole arrays is paired with a single silicon diode. Each array consists of a 38 x 38 square array of 10-{micro}m-diameter pinholes in a 50-{micro}m-thick tantalum plate. The arrays achromatically attenuate the x-ray flux by a factor of {approx}1800. The use of such arrays for the attenuation of soft x rays was first proposed by Turner and co-workers [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 656 (1999)RSINAK0034-674810.1063/1.1149385]. The attenuated flux from each array illuminates its associated diode; the diode's output current is recorded by a data-acquisition system with 0.6-ns time resolution. The arrays and diodes are located 19 and 24 m from the source, respectively. Because the diodes are designed to have an approximately flat spectral sensitivity, the output current from each diode is proportional to the x-ray power. The nickel bolometers are fielded at a slightly different angle from the array-diode combinations, and view (without pinhole attenuation) the same x-ray source. The bolometers measure the total x-ray energy radiated by the source and--on every shot--provide an in situ calibration of the array-diode combinations. Two array-diode pairs and two bolometers are fielded to reduce random uncertainties. An analytic model (which accounts for pinhole-diffraction effects) of the sensitivity of an array-diode combination is presented.

  13. Measurement of the energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Ives

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a diagnostic system that measures the spectrally integrated (i.e. the total energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source. The total-energy-and-power (TEP diagnostic system is optimized for blackbody temperatures between 50 and 350 eV. The system can view apertured sources that radiate energies and powers as high as 2 MJ and 200 TW, respectively, and has been successfully tested at 0.84 MJ and 73 TW on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The TEP system consists of two pinhole arrays, two silicon-diode detectors, and two thin-film nickel bolometers. Each of the two pinhole arrays is paired with a single silicon diode. Each array consists of a 38×38 square array of 10-μm-diameter pinholes in a 50-μm-thick tantalum plate. The arrays achromatically attenuate the x-ray flux by a factor of ∼1800. The use of such arrays for the attenuation of soft x rays was first proposed by Turner and co-workers [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 656 (1999RSINAK0034-674810.1063/1.1149385]. The attenuated flux from each array illuminates its associated diode; the diode’s output current is recorded by a data-acquisition system with 0.6-ns time resolution. The arrays and diodes are located 19 and 24 m from the source, respectively. Because the diodes are designed to have an approximately flat spectral sensitivity, the output current from each diode is proportional to the x-ray power. The nickel bolometers are fielded at a slightly different angle from the array-diode combinations, and view (without pinhole attenuation the same x-ray source. The bolometers measure the total x-ray energy radiated by the source and—on every shot—provide an in situ calibration of the array-diode combinations. Two array-diode pairs and two bolometers are fielded to reduce random uncertainties. An analytic model (which accounts for pinhole-diffraction effects of the sensitivity of an array-diode combination is presented.

  14. Second harmonic generation in NLO polymers excited by Surface Plasmon enhanced electric field induced by femtosecond optical pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawata Y.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We will report second harmonic generation (SHG in nonlinear optical (NLO polymers excited by surface plasmon enhanced optical fields. The surface plasmon (SP polariton was excited in an attenuated total reflection geometry having the Kretchmann configuration. The NLO polymers, consisting of Disperse Red1 as guest chromophores and poly (methyl methacrylate as host materials, were coated upon the Ag layers. Our experimental results indicated that the SHG signal intensity from the polymer coated Ag films was more than 10 times higher than that from the non-coated Ag films. The SHG autocorrelation traces excited by SP-enhanced fields were also studied and the correlation time was shorter than 150 fs, the temporal resolutions of the present spectrometer.

  15. Optical and application study of gas-liquid discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Liu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-10-15

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulse with 20ns rising time is employed to generate air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma with room gas temperature in quartz tube at atmospheric pressure. The image of the discharge and optical emission spectra of active species in the plasma are recorded. The plasma gas temperature is determined to be approximately 390K by compared the experimental spectra with the simulated spectra, which is slightly higher than the room temperature. The result indicated that the gas temperature rises gradually with pulse peak voltage increasing, while decreases slightly with the electrode gap distance increasing. As an important application, bipolar nanosecond pulse discharge is used to sterilize the common microorganisms (Actinomycetes, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli) existing in drinking water, which performs high sterilization efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Optical and application study of gas-liquid discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Liu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulse with 20 ns rising time is employed to generate air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma with room gas temperature in quartz tube at atmospheric pressure. The image of the discharge and optical emission spectra of active species in the plasma are recorded. The plasma gas temperature is determined to be approximately 390 K by compared the experimental spectra with the simulated spectra, which is slightly higher than the room temperature. The result indicated that the gas temperature rises gradually with pulse peak voltage increasing, while decreases slightly with the electrode gap distance increasing. As an important application, bipolar nanosecond pulse discharge is used to sterilize the common microorganisms (Actinomycetes, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli) existing in drinking water, which performs high sterilization efficiency.

  17. Numerical method for calculating sound radiation characteristics of plate structure excited by turbulent boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zuhui

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As the turbulent boundary layer (TBL is one of the most important sources of vibration and noise in underwater vehicles, there is an important significance in studying the numerical method for the calculation of flow-induced noise. In this paper, the methods of Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Vibro-Acoustic Transfer Vectors (VATV based on LMS Virtual Lab software are used to calculate the sound characteristics of a plate structure excited by TBL. The Corcos model of the wave number-frequency spectrum of the wall pressure field beneath the TBL is used to describe random excitation. By comparing the calculating time and sound pressure auto power spectra curves of the two methods, the following conclusions are obtained: both the VATV method and PCA method can be used effectively for the calculation of the flow-induced noise of structures excited by the TBL, and the results of the two methods match; the VATV method can quickly forecast the structure of flow-induced noise and takes up fewer computing resources than the PCA method; the PCA method can also obtain the structure vibration response in comparison with the VATV method. The current work can serve as a reference for the rapid prediction of the flow-induced noise of underwater structures.

  18. Accelerated Time-Domain Modeling of Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Length Dissipative Conductors over a Ground Plane via Function Fitting and Recursive Convolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sainath, Kamalesh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Basilio, Lorena I. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    In this report we overview the fundamental concepts for a pair of techniques which together greatly hasten computational predictions of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) excitation of finite-length dissipative conductors over a ground plane. In a time- domain, transmission line (TL) model implementation, predictions are computationally bottlenecked time-wise, either for late-time predictions (about 100ns-10000ns range) or predictions concerning EMP excitation of long TLs (order of kilometers or more ). This is because the method requires a temporal convolution to account for the losses in the ground. Addressing this to facilitate practical simulation of EMP excitation of TLs, we first apply a technique to extract an (approximate) complex exponential function basis-fit to the ground/Earth's impedance function, followed by incorporating this into a recursion-based convolution acceleration technique. Because the recursion-based method only requires the evaluation of the most recent voltage history data (versus the entire history in a "brute-force" convolution evaluation), we achieve necessary time speed- ups across a variety of TL/Earth geometry/material scenarios. Intentionally Left Blank

  19. Nonlinear excitations of blood flow in large vessels under thermal radiations and uniform magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabi, C. B.; Motsumi, T. G.; Bansi Kamdem, C. D.; Mohamadou, A.

    2017-08-01

    A nonlinear model of blood flow in large vessels is addressed. The influence of radiations, viscosity and uniform magnetic fields on velocity and temperature distribution waveforms is studied. Exact solutions for the studied model are investigated through the F - expansion method. Based on the choice of parameter values, single-, multi-soliton and Jacobi elliptic function solutions are obtained. Viscosity and permanent magnetic field bring about wave spreading and reduce the velocity of blood, while radiations have reversed effects with strong impact on the waveform frequency of both the velocity and temperature distribution.

  20. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  1. Interband electronic excitation-assisted atomic-scale restructuring of metal surfaces by nanosecond pulsed laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst; Charra; Douillard

    1998-01-30

    Interaction of high-power laser light with materials often causes irreversible damage of the near-surface region. It is shown that copper single-crystal surfaces can be patterned by laser light. Irradiation with green light produced adatoms and vacancies, which self-organized into nanoscale pyramids. This restructuring can be removed by annealing. In contrast to green light, infrared laser irradiation at equivalent absorbed energy density did not produce any structural change. This, for metallic systems, unforeseen spectral difference in laser light action points to a concerted process as the source for structural modification, which involves long-lived primary excitation of localized d-electrons through interband transition together with phonon excitation.

  2. Numerical and experimental studies of mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on nerve cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duka, M. V.; Dvoretskaya, L. N.; Babelkin, N. S.; Khodzitskii, M. K.; Chivilikhin, S. A.; Smolyanskaya, O. A.

    2014-08-01

    We have studied the mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on the growth of neurites of sensory ganglia using a comparative analysis of measured reflection spectra of ganglion neurites (in the frequency range 0.1 - 2.0 THz) and spectra obtained by numerical simulation with CST Microwave Studio. The observed changes are shown to be mainly due to pulse energy absorption in the ganglion neurites. Of particular interest are the observed single resonance frequencies related to resonance size effects, which can be used to irradiate ganglia in order to activate their growth.

  3. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation. 2015 Annual Progress Report for DOE/NE/NEET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, S. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-07

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation processes in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 2, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) measurement of the temperature dependence of defect dynamics in SiC and (ii) the evaluation of the robustness of the pulsed beam method from studies of the defect generation rate. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  4. Picosecond pulses of coherent MM-wave radiation in a photoinjector-driven waveguide free-selected laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fochs, S.N.; Le Sage, G.P.; Feng, L. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A 5 MeV, high repetition rate (2.142 GHz in burst mode), high brightness, tabletop photoinjector is currently under construction at the UC Davis Department of Applied Science, on the LLNL site. Ultrashort pulses of coherent synchrotron radiation can be generated by transversally accelerating the electron beam with a wiggler in either metallic or dielectric-loaded waveguide FEL structures. This interaction is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Subpicosecond photoelectron bunches will be produced in the photoinjector by irradiating a high quantum efficiency Cs{sub 2}Te (Cesium Telluride) photocathode with a train of 100 UV (210 nm), ultra-short (250 fs) laser pulses. These bunches will be accelerated in a 1-1/2 cell {pi}-mode X-band RF gun e energized by a 20 MW, 8,568 GHz SLAC klystron. The peak current is 0.25 kA (0.25 nC, 1 ps), with a normalized beam emittance {epsilon}{sub n}<2.5 {pi} mm-mrad. This prebunched electron beam is then transversally accelerated in a cylindrical waveguide by a 30-mm period, 10 period long helical wiggler. The peak wiggler field is adjusted to 8.5 kG, so that the group velocity of the radiated electromagnetic waves matches the axial velocity of the electron bunch (grazing condition, zero slippage). Chirped output pulses in excess of 2 MW power are predicted, with an instantaneous bandwidth extending from 125 GHz to 225 GHz and a pulse duration of 15 ps (HWHM). To produce even shorter pulses, a dielectric-loaded waveguide can be used. The dispersion relation of this waveguide structure has an inflection point (zero group velocity dispersion). If the grazing condition is satisfied at this point, the final output pulse duration is no longer determined by slippage, or by group velocity dispersion and bandwidth, but by higher-order dispersive effects yielding transform-limited pulses.

  5. Temperature dependence of pulse-induced mechanoluminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Mechanoluminescence; dislocations; pulse-induced excitation; alkali halides; radiative recombination. ... B P Chandra2. Department of Post Graduate Studies and Research in Physics and Electronics, Rani Durgawati University, Jabalpur 482 001, India; Pt. Ravi Shanker Shukla University, Raipur 492 010, India ...

  6. Optical Quantification of Harmonic Acoustic Radiation Force Excitation in a Tissue-Mimicking Phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomi, Visa; Edwards, David; Cleveland, Robin

    2015-12-01

    Optical tracking was used to characterize acoustic radiation force-induced displacements in a tissue-mimicking phantom. Amplitude-modulated 3.3-MHz ultrasound was used to induce acoustic radiation force in the phantom, which was embedded with 10-μm microspheres that were tracked using a microscope objective and high-speed camera. For sine and square amplitude modulation, the harmonic components of the fundamental and second and third harmonic frequencies were measured. The displacement amplitudes were found to increase linearly with acoustic radiation force up to 10 μm, with sine modulation having 19.5% lower peak-to-peak amplitude values than square modulation. Square modulation produced almost no second harmonic, but energy was present in the third harmonic. For the sine modulation, energy was present in the second harmonic and low energy in the third harmonic. A finite-element model was used to simulate the deformation and was both qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with the measurements. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The radiative decays of excited states of transition elements located inside and near core-shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukhov, Konstantin K.

    2017-12-01

    Here we discuss the radiative decays of excited states of transition elements located inside and outside of the subwavelength core-shell nanoparticles embedded in dielectric medium. Based on the quantum mechanics and quantum electrodynamics, the general analytical expressions are derived for the probability of the spontaneous transitions in the luminescent centers (emitter) inside and outside the subwavelength core-shell nanoparticle. Obtained expressions holds for arbitrary orientation of the dipole moment and the principal axes of the quadrupole moment of the emitter with respect to the radius-vector r connecting the center of the emitter with the center of the nanoparticle. They have simple form and show how the spontaneous emission in core-shell NPs can be controlled and engineered due to the dependence of the emission rates on core-shell sizes, radius-vector r and permittivities of the surrounding medium, shell, and core.

  8. The contribution of electronically excited states to the radiation chemistry of organic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipsky, S.

    1990-01-01

    The photocurrent from anthracene in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, 2.2- dimethylbutane, cyclohexane, cyclopentane, and tetramethylsilane has been studied as a function of excitation energy from the ionization threshold to the onset of strong solvent absorption. The fluroescence from solutions of hexafluorobenzene in cyclopentane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, 2,2-dimethylbutane and tetramethylsilane irradiated with {beta}-particles has been studied as a function of the hexafluorobenzene concentration from c = 10{sup {minus}3}-10{sup {minus}1} M. The data are analyzed to permit extraction of the geminate ion-pair scavenging probability. The absorption of 160 nm light by cyclohexane in mixtures of cyclohexane, benzene and tetraphenylmethylenediamine results in an emission spectrum consisting of the simultaneous fluorescence from all three components. A mechanism for the development of this spectrum and its dependence on benzene concentration is constructed and shown to be quantitatively consistent with the results of independent measurements on the separate components. 55 refs.

  9. Using radiation intensity dependence on excitation level for the analysis of surface plasmon resonance effect on ZnO luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, S. I.; Tarasov, A. P.; Briskina, C. M.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Markushev, V. M.; Lotin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    For the analysis of ZnO luminescence the system of rate equations (SRE) was proposed. It contains a set of parameters that characterizes processes participating in luminescence: zone-zone excitation, excitons formation and recombination, formation and disappearance of photons and surface plasmons (SP). It is shown that experimental ZnO microstructure radiation intensity dependence on photoexcitation level can be approximated by using SRE. Thus, the values of these parameters can be estimated and used for luminescence analysis. This approach was applied for the analysis of ZnO microfilms radiation with different thickness of Ag island film covering. It was revealed that the increase of cover thickness leads to the increase of losses and decrease of probability of photons to SP conversion. In order to take into account visible emission, rate equations for levels populations in band-gap and for corresponding photons and SP were added to SRE. By using such SRE it is demonstrated that the form of visible luminescence intensity dependence on excitation level (P) like P1/3, as obtained elsewhere [1], is possible only in case of donor-acceptor pairs existence. The proposed approach was applied for consideration of experimental results obtained in [5-8] taking into account their interpretation of these results based on assumption about transfer of electrons from defect level in ZnO band-gap to metal and then to conduction band in ZnO. Results of performed calculations using modified SRE revealed that effects observed in these papers can exist under only low pumping level. This result will be experimentally checked later.

  10. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: Excitation and Suppression of the Brain Waves by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS-team Team

    2017-10-01

    The novel study of the laser excitation-suppression of the brain waves is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated multi-photon fiber-laser interaction with the brain parvalbumin (PV) neurons. The repetition frequency matches the low frequency brain waves (5-100 Hz); enabling the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the PV neurons (the generators of the brain wave activity). The tunable fiber laser frequencies are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling the monitoring of the PV neuron-DNA, within the 10s of milliseconds. In medicine, the method can be used as an ``instantaneous-on-off anesthetic.'' Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  11. Interaction of soft x-ray laser pulse radiation with aluminum surface: Nano-meter size surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Masahiko; Faenov, Anatoly; Tanaka, Momoko; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Pikuz, Tatiana; Inogamov, Nail; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Skobelev, Igor; Fortov, Vladimir; Khohlov, Viktor; Shepelev, Vadim; Ohba, Toshiyuki; Kaihori, Takeshi; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Imazono, Takashi; Kawachi, Tetsuya [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Graduate School of Humanities and Science, Nara Women' s University, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Science, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Institute for Computer Aided Design, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow 123056 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-11

    Interaction of soft x-ray laser radiation with material and caused modification of the exposed surface has both physical and practical interests. We irradiated the focusing soft x-ray laser (SXRL) pulses having a wavelength of 13.9 nm and the duration of 7 ps to aluminum (Al) surface. After the SXRL irradiation process, the irradiated Al surface was observed with a scanning electron microscope. The surface modifications caused by SXRL single pulse exposure were clearly seen. In addition, it was found that the conical structures having around 100 nm in diameters were formed in the shallow features. The nano-meter size modified structures at Al surface induced by SXRL pulse is interesting as the newly surface structure. Hence, the SXRL beam would be a candidate for a tool of micromachining. We also provide a thermomechanical modeling of SXRL interaction with Al briefly to explain the surface modification.

  12. Performance studies of an optical fiber OSL/RL dosimetry system in pulsed high-intensity radiation beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ravotti, F; Dusseau, Laurent; Mukherjee, Bhaskar; Glaser, Maurice; Ravotti, Federico

    2010-01-01

    The SrS:Ce,Sm phosphor is suitable for operation in harsh radiation environments where real-time dosimetry measurements are needed to survey the Total Ionizing Dose (TID) damage in electronic components. For these applications, the OSL and RL emissions from this phosphor can be exploited by mounting the SrS crystal at the edge of a single, radiation-hard, optical fiber. In this work we present an exhaustive characterization of this real-time OSL/RL probe including stability, repeatability of the measured signals, dosimetry performance and measurements of the temporal behavior of the RI signal in pulsed particle beams. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of single event transient pulse-width in 65 nm commercial radiation-hardened logic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haisong; Wu, Longsheng; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yihu

    2017-08-01

    With the critical charge reduced to generate a single event effect (SEE) and high working frequency for a nanometer integrated circuit, the single event effect (SET) becomes increasingly serious for high performance SOC and DSP chips. To analyze the radiation-hardened method of SET for the nanometer integrated circuit, the n+ guard ring and p+ guard ring have been adopted in the layout for a 65 nm commercial radiation-hardened standard cell library. The weakest driving capacity inverter cell was used to evaluate the single event transient (SET) pulse-width distribution. We employed a dual-lane measurement circuit to get more accurate SET’s pulse-width. Six kinds of ions, which provide LETs of 12.5, 22.5, 32.5, 42, 63, and 79.5 {MeV}\\cdot {{cm}}2/{mg}, respectively, have been utilized to irradiate the SET test circuit in the Beijing Tandem Accelerator Nuclear Physics National Laboratory. The testing results reveal that the pulse-width of most SETs is shorter than 400 ps in the range of LETeff from 12.5 {MeV}\\cdot {{cm}}2/{mg} to 79.5 {MeV}\\cdot {{cm}}2/{mg} and the pulse-width presents saturation tendency when the effective linear energy transfer (LETeff) value is larger than 40 {MeV}\\cdot {{cm}}2/{mg}. The test results also show that the hardened commercial standard cell’s pulse-width concentrates on 33 to 264 ps, which decreases by 40% compared to the pulse-width of the 65 nm commercial unhardened standard cell.

  14. A Power-Efficient Multichannel Neural Stimulator Using High-Frequency Pulsed Excitation From an Unfiltered Dynamic Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Marijn N; Serdijn, Wouter A

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a neural stimulator system that employs a fundamentally different way of stimulating neural tissue compared to classical constant current stimulation. A stimulation pulse is composed of a sequence of current pulses injected at a frequency of 1 MHz for which the duty cycle is used to control the stimulation intensity. The system features 8 independent channels that connect to any of the 16 electrodes at the output. A sophisticated control system allows for individual control of each channel's stimulation and timing parameters. This flexibility makes the system suitable for complex electrode configurations and current steering applications. Simultaneous multichannel stimulation is implemented using a high frequency alternating technique, which reduces the amount of electrode switches by a factor 8. The system has the advantage of requiring a single inductor as its only external component. Furthermore it offers a high power efficiency, which is nearly independent on both the voltage over the load as well as on the number of simultaneously operated channels. Measurements confirm this: in multichannel mode the power efficiency can be increased for specific cases to 40% compared to 20% that is achieved by state-of-the-art classical constant current stimulators with adaptive power supply.

  15. Reactions of electronically excited boron atoms. Quenching rate constants and the radiative lifetime of the 4p 2P state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuefeng; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    1992-12-01

    Collisional quenching and radiative decay of the 4p 2P level of the boron atom has been studied in a cell experiment, in which B atoms are prepared by 266 nm multiphoton dissociation of BBr 3 and the 4p 2P level is prepared by sequential 2-photon absorption through the 3s 2S level. A radiative lifetime of 360 ± 50 ns is derived for B (4p 2P) by extrapolation of the measured decay rates versus BBr 3 partial pressure in several Torr helium buffer gas. Bimolecular quenching rate constants were also determined for a number of atomic and molecular species from the dependence of the B (4p 2P) decay rate on the quencher gas partial pressure. The quenching rate constants for the molecular species were quite large (≈(1-2)×10 -9 molecule -1 cm 3 s -1), presumably reflecting the small B (4p 2P) ionization potential and the rapid removal of the excited state by chemical reaction.

  16. A tunable general purpose Q-band resonator for CW and pulse EPR/ENDOR experiments with large sample access and optical excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijerse, Edward; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Isaacson, Roger; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We describe a frequency tunable Q-band cavity (34 GHz) designed for CW and pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as well as Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR) experiments. The TE 011 cylindrical resonator is machined either from brass or from graphite (which is subsequently gold plated), to improve the penetration of the 100 kHz field modulation signal. The (self-supporting) ENDOR coil consists of four 0.8 mm silver posts at 2.67 mm distance from the cavity center axis, penetrating through the plunger heads. It is very robust and immune to mechanical vibrations. The coil is electrically shielded to enable CW ENDOR experiments with high RF power (500 W). The top plunger of the cavity is movable and allows a frequency tuning of ±2 GHz. In our setup the standard operation frequency is 34.0 GHz. The microwaves are coupled into the resonator through an iris in the cylinder wall and matching is accomplished by a sliding short in the coupling waveguide. Optical excitation of the sample is enabled through slits in the cavity wall (transmission ˜60%). The resonator accepts 3 mm o.d. sample tubes. This leads to a favorable sensitivity especially for pulse EPR experiments of low concentration biological samples. The probehead dimensions are compatible with that of Bruker flexline Q-band resonators and it fits perfectly into an Oxford CF935 Helium flow cryostat (4-300 K). It is demonstrated that, due to the relatively large active sample volume (20-30 μl), the described resonator has superior concentration sensitivity as compared to commercial pulse Q-band resonators. The quality factor ( Q L) of the resonator can be varied between 2600 (critical coupling) and 1300 (over-coupling). The shortest achieved π/2-pulse durations are 20 ns using a 3 W microwave amplifier. ENDOR (RF) π-pulses of 20 μs ( 1H @ 51 MHz) were obtained for a 300 W amplifier and 7 μs using a 2500 W amplifier. Selected applications of the

  17. [High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma with a Fassel-torch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Yu; Gong, Zhen-Bin; Huang, Ben-Li

    2006-02-01

    High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP-HCL) excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a Fassel-torch has been investigated. In wide condition ranges only IFS was observed, whilst atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) was not detectable. More intense ionic fluorescence signal was observed at lower observation heights and at lower incident RF powers. Without introduction of any reduction organic gases into the ICP, the limit of detection (LOD, 3sigma) of Ba was improved by 50-fold over that of a conventional pulsed (CP) HCL with the Baird sleeve-extended torch. For Ca and Sr, the LODs by HCMP-HCL-ICP-IFS and CP-HCL-ICP-AFS show no significant difference. Relative standard deviations were 0.6%-1.4% (0.1-0.2 microg x mL(-1), n = 10) for 5 ionic fluorescence lines. Preliminary studies showed that the intensity of ionic fluorescence could be depressed in the presence of K, Al and P.

  18. Optical quantification of harmonic acoustic radiation force excitation in a tissue-mimicking phantom

    CERN Document Server

    Suomi, Visa; Cleveland, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Optical tracking was used to characterize acoustic radiation force (ARF) induced displacements in a tissue-mimicking phantom. Amplitude modulated (AM) 3.3 MHz ultrasound was used to induce ARF in the phantom which was embedded with 10 {\\mu}m microspheres that were tracked using a microscope objective and high speed camera. For sine and square AM the harmonic components of the fundamental and second and third harmonic frequencies were measured. The displacement amplitudes were found to increase linearly with ARF up to 10 {\\mu}m with sine modulation having 19.5% lower peak-to-peak amplitude values than square modulation. Square modulation produced almost no second harmonic but energy was present in the third harmonic. For the sine modulation energy was present in the second harmonic and low energy in the third harmonic. A finite element model was used to simulate the deformation and was both qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with the measurements.

  19. Decay of coherent acoustic phonons generated by femtosecond pulsed optical excitation and injected in a Wannier-Stark superlattice (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Anthony J.; Poyser, Caroline L.; Akimov, Andrey V.; York, William; Henini, Mohamed; Campion, Richard P.

    2017-02-01

    In the past decade, sound amplification by the stimulated emission of (acoustic phonon) radiation (saser) devices for generating coherent terahertz (THz) acoustic waves have been demonstrated [1 - 3]. The devices exploit the electron-phonon interactions in periodic semiconductor nanostructures known as superlattices (SLs) to amplify acoustic phonons. In addition, the particular acoustic properties of SLs can be exploited to make mirrors and cavities for THz phonons. Thus SLs can provide the two essential elements of a saser: the acoustic gain medium and the acoustic cavity. In this presentation I will describe experimental studies of the THz phonon dynamics in a weakly-coupled GaAs/AlAs saser SL, which is DC electrically biased into the Wannier-Stark regime. Picoseconds-duration pulses of coherent THz acoustic phonons were generated using pump light pulses from a femtosecond laser and injected into the SL device. These phonon pulses seeded the saser cavity modes at about 220 and 440 GHz, which were amplified within the device. The phonons were detected using two methods: reflection of femtosecond probe light pulses, in a conventional pump-probe arrangement, and through the transient electrical response of the device itself. When the DC bias conditions for saser were achieved in the device, the amplitude and lifetime of the seeded modes were both increased, analogous to the threshold and spectral line narrowing effects seen in laser devices. [1] R P Beardsley et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 085501 (2010). [2] W Maryam et al., Nature Communications 4:2184 (2013). [3] K Shinokita et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 075504 (2016).

  20. Research of the elastic waves generated by a pulse laser. Excitation mechanism of elastic waves and application to nondestructive testing; Pulse laser de reikishita danseiha ni kansuru kenkyu. Danseiha reiki no mechanism to hihakai kensa eno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, H.; Takemoto, M. [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). College of Science and Engineering

    1994-07-20

    A bulk wave is generated when a pulse laser is irradiated to the material, and the characteristics of a Young`s modulus and Poisson`s ratio can be nondestructively estimated from the bulk wave. The generation mechanism of laser ultrasonic waves must be first clarified for such application. In this paper, fundamental research was conducted to study the generation mechanism of the elastic waves excited by a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, and the generation method and characteristics of Rayleigh waves. The following result was obtained. A bulk wave is generated by the disk-like adiabatic expansion near the surface if the laser power is small when a spot-shape pulse laser was irradiated. A bulk wave is generated by the thin disk-like adiabatic expansion beneath the surface due to the thermal diffusion in the depth direction of a base material when the laser power becomes large. Moreover, a bulk wave is generated by the impact force due to abrasion and plasma when the power becomes still larger. The information on the bulk wave characteristics and Rayleigh wave was also obtained. 25 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-06-24

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation.

  2. [Pulse-modulated Electromagnetic Radiation of Extremely High Frequencies Protects Cellular DNA against Damaging Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapeyev, A B; Lukyanova, N A

    2015-01-01

    Using a comet assay technique, we investigated protective effects of. extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation in combination with the damaging effect of X-ray irradiation, the effect of damaging agents hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate on DNA in mouse whole blood leukocytes. It was shown that the preliminary exposure of the cells to low intensity pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation (42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2, 20-min exposure, modulation frequencies of 1 and 16 Hz) caused protective effects decreasing the DNA damage by 20-45%. The efficacy of pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation depended on the type of genotoxic agent and increased in a row methyl methanesulfonate--X-rays--hydrogen peroxide. Continuous electromagnetic radiation was ineffective. The mechanisms of protective effects may be connected with an induction of the adaptive response by nanomolar concentrations of reactive oxygen species formed by pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation.

  3. Effect of surface-breakdown plasma on metal drilling by pulsed CO2-laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutiunian, P. V.; Baranov, V. Iu.; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'Shakov, L. A.; Dolgov, V. A.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of low-threshold surface breakdown produced by short (5-microsec) CO2-laser pulses on the metal drilling process is investigated. Data on the interaction of metals with laser pulses having the same duration but different shape are shown to be different. The effect of the ambient atmospheric pressure on the laser drilling process is investigated.

  4. Small Field-of-view single-shot EPI-DWI of the prostate: Evaluation of spatially-tailored two-dimensional radiofrequency excitation pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenberger, Ulrike I; Rathmann, Nils; Sertdemir, Metin; Riffel, Philipp; Weidner, Anja; Kannengiesser, Stefan; Morelli, John N; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Hausmann, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Spatially-tailored (RF) excitation pulses in echo-planar imaging (EPI), combined with a decreased FOV in the phase-encoding direction, enable a reduction of k-space acquisition lines, which shortens the echo train length (ETL) and reduces susceptibility artifacts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the image quality of a zoomed EPI (z-EPI) sequence in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the prostate in comparison to a conventional single-shot EPI using single-channel (c-EPI1) and multi-channel (c-EPI2) RF excitation, with and without use of an endorectal coil. 33 consecutive patients (mean age: 61 +/- 9 years; mean PSA: 8.67±6.23 ng/ml) with examinations between 10/2012 and 02/2014 were analyzed in this retrospective study. In 26 of 33 patients the initial multiparametric (mp)-MRI was performed on a whole-body 3T scanner (Magnetom Trio, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using an endorectal coil (c (conventional)-EPI1). Zoomed-EPI (Z-EPI) examinations of these patients and a complete mp-MRI protocol including c-EPI2 of 7 additional patients were carried out on another 3T wb MR scanner with two-channel dynamic parallel transmit capability (Magnetom Skyra with TimTX TrueShape, Siemens). For z-EPI, the one-dimensional spatially selective RF excitation pulse was replaced by a two-dimensional RF pulse. Degree of image blur and susceptibility artifacts (0=not present to 3= non-diagnostic), maximum image distortion (mm), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, as well as overall scan preference were evaluated. SNR maps were generated to compare c-EPI2 and z-EPI. Overall image quality of z-EPI was preferred by both readers in all examinations with a single exception. Susceptibility artifacts were rated significantly lower on z-EPI compared to both other methods (z-EPI vs c-EPI1: pEPI vs c-EPI2: pEPI vs c-EPI1: pEPI vs c-EPI2: pEPI (z-EPI vs c-EPI1: p=0.12; z-EPI vs c-EPI2: p=0.42). Interobserver agreement for ratings of susceptibility artifacts, image blur and

  5. Insights in the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signal generation underwater using dual pulse excitation — Part I: Vapor bubble, shockwaves and plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, V.; Laserna, J. J.; Jovicevic, S.

    2013-04-01

    Plasma and vapor bubble formation and evolution after a nanosecond laser pulse delivered to aluminum targets inside water were studied by fast photography. This technique was also applied to monitor the plasma produced by a second laser pulse and for different interpulse delays. The bubble growth was evident only after 3 μs from the first laser pulse and the bubble shape changed during expansion and collapse cycles. The evolution and propagation of the initial shockwave and its reflections both from the back sample surface and cell walls were detected by Schlieren photography. The primary plasma develops in two phases: violent particle expulsion and ionization during the first μs, followed by slow plasma growth from the ablation crater into the evolving vapor bubble. The shape of the secondary plasma strongly depends on the inner bubble pressure whereas the particle expulsion into the expanded bubble is much less evident. Both the primary and secondary plasma have similar duration of about 30 μs. Detection efficiency of the secondary plasma is much reduced by light refraction at the curved bubble-water interface, which behaves as a negative lens; this leads to an apparent reduction of the plasma dimensions. Defocusing power of the bubble lens increases with its expansion due to the lowering of the vapor's refraction index with respect to that of the surrounding liquid (Lazic et al., 2012 [1]). Smell's reflections of secondary plasma radiation at the expanded bubble wall redistribute the detected intensity on a wavelength-dependent way and allow gathering of the emission also from the external plasma layer that otherwise, would not enter into the optical system.

  6. Generation of high-photon flux-coherent soft x-ray radiation with few-cycle pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmler, Stefan; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Krebs, Manuel; Hage, Arvid; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    We present a tabletop source of coherent soft x-ray radiation with high-photon flux. Two-cycle pulses delivered by a fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier operating at 180 kHz repetition rate are upconverted via high harmonic generation in neon to photon energies beyond 200 eV. A maximum photon flux of 1.3·10(8) photons/s is achieved within a 1% bandwidth at 125 eV photon energy. This corresponds to a conversion efficiency of ~10(-9), which can be reached due to a gas jet simultaneously providing a high target density and phase matching. Further scaling potential toward higher photon flux as well as higher photon energies are discussed.

  7. Investigating the performances of a 1 MV high pulsed power linear transformer driver: from beam dynamics to x radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonny, R.; Ribière, M.; Toury, M.; Plewa, J. M.; Caron, M.; Auriel, G.; d'Almeida, T.

    2016-12-01

    The performance of a 1 MV pulsed high-power linear transformer driver accelerator were extensively investigated based on a numerical approach which utilizes both electromagnetic and Monte Carlo simulations. Particle-in-cell calculations were employed to examine the beam dynamics throughout the magnetically insulated transmission line which governs the coupling between the generator and the electron diode. Based on the information provided by the study of the beam dynamics, and using Monte Carlo methods, the main properties of the resulting x radiation were predicted. Good agreement was found between these simulations and experimental results. This work provides a detailed understanding of mechanisms affecting the performances of this type of high current, high-voltage pulsed accelerator, which are very promising for a growing number of applications.

  8. A novel-type tunable and narrowband extreme ultraviolet radiation source based on high-harmonic conversion of picosecond laser pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barkauskas, M.; Brandi, F.; Giammanco, F.; Neshev, D.; Pirri, A.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    At the Laser Centre Vrije Universiteit a table-top size, tunable and narrowband laser-based source of extreme ultraviolet radiation was developed using high-harmonic generation of powerful laser pulses of 300 ps duration and Fourier-transform limited bandwidth. The generated radiation has

  9. High-power radio frequency pulse generation and extration based on wakefield excited by an intense charged particle beam in dielectric-loaded waveguides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, F.; High Energy Physics; Illinois Inst. of Tech

    2009-07-24

    Power extraction using a dielectric-loaded (DL) waveguide is a way to generate high-power radio frequency (RF) waves for future particle accelerators, especially for two-beam-acceleration. In a two-beam-acceleration scheme, a low-energy, high-current particle beam is passed through a deceleration section of waveguide (decelerator), where the power from the beam is partially transferred to trailing electromagnetic waves (wakefields); then with a properly designed RF output coupler, the power generated in the decelerator is extracted to an output waveguide, where finally the power can be transmitted and used to accelerate another usually high-energy low-current beam. The decelerator, together with the RF output coupler, is called a power extractor. At Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA), we designed a 7.8GHz power extractor with a circular DL waveguide and tested it with single electron bunches and bunch trains. The output RF frequency (7.8GHz) is the sixth harmonic of the operational frequency (1.3GHz) of the electron gun and the linac at AWA. In single bunch excitation, a 1.7ns RF pulse with 30MW of power was generated by a single 66nC electron bunch passing through the decelerator. In subsequent experiments, by employing different splitting-recombining optics for the photoinjector laser, electron bunch trains were generated and thus longer RF pulses could be successfully generated and extracted. In 16-bunch experiments, 10ns and 22ns RF pulses have been generated and extracted; and in 4-bunch experiments, the maximum power generated was 44MW with 40MW extracted. A 26GHz DL power extractor has also been designed to test this technique in the millimeter-wave range. A power level of 148MW is expected to be generated by a bunch train with a bunch spacing of 769ps and bunch charges of 20nC each. The arrangement for the experiment is illustrated in a diagram. Higher-order-mode (HOM) power extraction has also been explored in a dual-frequency design. By using a bunch

  10. Pulsed radio frequency radiation affects cognitive performance and the waking electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regel, Sabine J; Gottselig, Julie M; Schuderer, Jürgen; Tinguely, Gilberte; Rétey, Julia V; Kuster, Niels; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Achermann, Peter

    2007-05-28

    We investigated the effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields on brain physiology. Twenty-four healthy young men were exposed for 30 min to pulse-modulated or continuous-wave radio frequency electromagnetic fields (900 MHz; peak specific absorption rate 1 W/kg), or sham exposed. During exposure, participants performed cognitive tasks. Waking electroencephalogram was recorded during baseline, immediately after, and 30 and 60 min after exposure. Pulse-modulated radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure reduced reaction speed and increased accuracy in a working-memory task. It also increased spectral power in the waking electroencephalogram in the 10.5-11 Hz range 30 min after exposure. No effects were observed for continuous-wave radio frequency electromagnetic fields. These findings provide further evidence for a nonthermal biological effect of pulsed radio frequency electromagnetic fields.

  11. The electromagnetic radiation fields of a relativistic electron avalanche with special attention to the origin of narrow bipolar pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, G. V.; Cooray, G. K.

    2011-12-01

    Gurevich et al. [1] postulated that the source of narrow bipolar pulses, a class of high energy pulses that occur during thunderstorms, could be a runaway electron avalanche driven by the intense electric fields of a thunderstorm. Recently, Watson and Marshall [2] used the modified transmission line model to test the mechanism of the source of narrow bipolar pulses. In a recent paper, Cooray and Cooray [3] demonstrated that the electromagnetic fields of accelerating charges could be used to evaluate the electromagnetic fields from electrical discharges if the temporal and spatial variation of the charges in the discharge is known. In the present study, those equations were utilized to evaluate the electromagnetic fields generated by a relativistic electron avalanche. In the analysis it is assumed that all the electrons in the avalanche are moving with the same speed. In other words, the growth or the decay of the number of electrons takes place only at the head of the avalanche. It is shown that the radiation is emanating only from the head of the avalanche where electrons are being accelerated. It is also shown that an analytical expression for the radiation field of the avalanche at any distance can be written directly in terms of the e-folding length of the avalanche. This makes it possible to extract directly the spatial variation of the e-folding length of the avalanche from the measured radiation fields. In the study this model avalanche was used to investigate whether it can be used to describe the measured electromagnetic fields of narrow bipolar pulses. The results obtained are in reasonable agreement with the two station data of Eack [4] for speeds of propagation around (2 - 2.5) x 10^8 m/s and when the propagation effects on the electric fields measured at the distant station is taken into account. [1] Gurevich et al. (2004), Phys. Lett. A., 329, pp. 348 -361. [2] Watson, S. S. and T. C. Marshall (2007), Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 34, L04816, doi: 10

  12. Insights in the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signal generation underwater using dual pulse excitation — Part I: Vapor bubble, shockwaves and plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazic, V., E-mail: violeta.lazic@enea.it [ENEA (UTAPRAD-DIM), Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Laserna, J.J. [Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Málaga, Málaga (Spain); Jovicevic, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2013-04-01

    Plasma and vapor bubble formation and evolution after a nanosecond laser pulse delivered to aluminum targets inside water were studied by fast photography. This technique was also applied to monitor the plasma produced by a second laser pulse and for different interpulse delays. The bubble growth was evident only after 3 μs from the first laser pulse and the bubble shape changed during expansion and collapse cycles. The evolution and propagation of the initial shockwave and its reflections both from the back sample surface and cell walls were detected by Schlieren photography. The primary plasma develops in two phases: violent particle expulsion and ionization during the first μs, followed by slow plasma growth from the ablation crater into the evolving vapor bubble. The shape of the secondary plasma strongly depends on the inner bubble pressure whereas the particle expulsion into the expanded bubble is much less evident. Both the primary and secondary plasma have similar duration of about 30 μs. Detection efficiency of the secondary plasma is much reduced by light refraction at the curved bubble–water interface, which behaves as a negative lens; this leads to an apparent reduction of the plasma dimensions. Defocusing power of the bubble lens increases with its expansion due to the lowering of the vapor's refraction index with respect to that of the surrounding liquid (Lazic et al., 2012 [1]). Smell's reflections of secondary plasma radiation at the expanded bubble wall redistribute the detected intensity on a wavelength-dependent way and allow gathering of the emission also from the external plasma layer that otherwise, would not enter into the optical system. - Highlights: ► Primary plasma during the first μs is irregular due to particle expulsion. ► Later the plasma grows into the evolving bubble, its emission lasts more than 30 μs. ► The initial shockwave and its echoes alter locally the refraction index. ► Defocusing by the bubble

  13. Towards diffractive imaging with single pulses of FEL radiation. Dynamics within irradiatied samples and their influence on the analysis of imaging data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fenglin

    2010-08-15

    3D single particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) of bioparticles (such as proteins, macromolecules and viruses) is one of the main possible applications of the new generation of light sources: free-electron lasers (FELs), which are now available at FLASH (Hamburg, Germany) and LCLS (Stanford, U.S.A.). The extremely bright and ultrashort FEL pulses potentially enable CDI to achieve high resolution down to subnanometer length scale. However, intense FEL pulses cause serious radiation damage in bioparticles, even during single shots, which may set the resolution limits for CDI with FELs. Currently, since the signal-to-noise ratio is very low for small biological particles, direct experimental study of radiation damage in the single particle imaging is fairly difficult. Single atomic (noble gas) clusters become good objects to reveal effects of radiation damage processes on CDI with FEL radiation. This thesis studies three aspects of the radiation damage problem, which are treated in three independent chapters: (1) Molecular Dynamics simulations to quantitively describe radiation damage processes within irradiated atomic clusters during single pulses; (2) reconstruction analysis of single-shot CDI diffraction patterns of atomic clusters, which may potentially help to understand the radiation damage occurring in biological samples; and (3) testing the effects of coating water layers in CDI, which is supposed to minimize the radiation damage in irradiated bioparticles. (orig.)

  14. Laser-induced incandescence of suspended particles as a source of excitation of dye luminescence

    CERN Document Server

    Zelensky, S

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of pulsed YAG-Nd sup 3 sup + laser radiation with submicron light-absorbing particles suspended in an aqueous solution of Rhodamine 6G is investigated experimentally. The experiments demonstrate that the laser-induced incandescence of suspended particles excites the luminescence of the dissolved dye molecules. The mechanism of the luminescence excitation consists in the reabsorption of the thermal radiation within the volume of the sample cell. On the ground of this mechanism of excitation, a method of measurement of the luminescence quantum yield is proposed and realized. The method requires the knowledge of the geometrical parameters of the cell and does not require the use of reference samples.

  15. Observations of Infrared Radiation During Disruptions in Textor - Heat Pulses and Runaway Electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Jaspers,; Grewe, T.; Finken, K.H.; KramerFlecken, A.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Mank, G.; Waidmann, G.

    1995-01-01

    Disruptions are studied in TEXTOR using two infrared cameras. In the thermal quench phase, fast changing heat fluxes are observed, each delivering energies larger than 1 kJ/m(2) to the limiter. These bursts are correlated with an electron temperature pulse near the limiter and an increased release

  16. Modification of the SiO2/Si interface by pulsed fibre laser radiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, A. M.; Veiko, V. P.; Huynh, C. T.; Polyakov, D. S.; Tamper, A. M.

    2017-07-01

    We report a detailed study of structural modification of the silicon–silica interface under the effect of laser pulses at a wavelength of 1.07 μm. A thermal oxide layer on the silicon surface has been shown to have a significant effect on the defect formation process and surface microstructuring because of the complex stress state of such a structure.

  17. The Investigation of Properties of Copper Vapor Pulsed Power Active Medium in Time and Development of Operational Control Methods of Output Radiation Parameters on Their Basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Lyabin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The given paper focuses on the investigation in time of the properties of a pulsed CVL AM using CVLS of the type DO – SFC –PA and mistiming method in wide limits (± 1000 ns of a DO light radiation pulse relatively to PA light pulse from the moment of maximal amplification.It was stated that CVL AM in relation to its own radiation has got four characteristic time zones following each other and repeating from pulse to pulse: weak absorption 30-50 ns in length (appears at the initial stage of pulse pump current development, amplification 20-40 ns in length (appears at the sharp leading edge of the current pulse, complete absorption over 1000 ns in length (appears at the pulse current cut and follows the pulse and maximal transparency over 1000 ns in length (before the new current pulse.These AM properties have become the basis for developing methods and electron devices of operational control of power and radiation pulse repetition frequency (PRF, including packet and pulse-to-pulse modulation according to preset algorithm in industrial CVLs and CVLSs of new generation. Based on such class of CVLs and CVLSs a set of up-to-date automated laser technological installations (ALTI “Karavella” with computerized control: “Karavella-1”, “Karavella-1M”, “Karavella-2”, “Karavella-2M” were created for precision microprocessing of materials for electron engineering products (EEP 0.02 – 2 mm thick.The capability of ALTI “Karavella” to operate in the modes of high speed control over the laser radiation parameters allows to increase significantly the operational control over technological processes of manufacturing precision parts, to increase the productivity of material microprocessing, to make cuts and holes with minimal roughness and zone of thermal influence.The main conclusions made in the given paper on the results of experimental investigations of CVL AM time properties are also true for lasers on self-contained transitions

  18. MDCT of the coronary arteries: feasibility of low-dose CT with ECG-pulsed tube current modulation to reduce radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abada, Hicham T; Larchez, Christophe; Daoud, Béatrice; Sigal-Cinqualbre, Anne; Paul, Jean-François

    2006-06-01

    The objective of our study was to show the feasibility of coronary CT using low kilovoltage (80 kV) combined with ECG-pulsed tube current modulation in selected patients. This study showed the combined effect of lowering the kilovoltage setting (80 kV) and using an automatic modulation technique (ECG-pulsed tube current modulation) for coronary CT. Radiation dose exposure can be reduced by up to 88% for slim patients without impairing image quality.

  19. Interaction of pulse laser radiation of 532 nm with model coloration layers for medieval stone artefacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, J. [University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nimmrichter, J. [Austrian Federal Office for the Care of Monuments, Department for Conservation and Restoration, Arsenal, Objekt 15, Tor 4, A-1030 Vienna (Austria); Kautek, W., E-mail: wolfgang.kautek@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-01

    Multilayer polychrome coatings on medieval and Renaissance stone artefacts represent substantial challenges in laser cleaning. Therefore, polychromic models with classical pigments, minium (Pb{sub 2}{sup 2+}Pb{sup 4+}O{sub 4}), zinc white (ZnO), and lead white ((PbCO{sub 3}){sub 2}·Pb(OH){sub 2}) in an acrylic binder, were irradiated with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser emitting at 532 nm. The studied medieval pigments exhibit strongly varying incubation behaviours directly correlated to their band gap energies. Higher band gaps beyond the laser photon energy of 2.3 eV require more incubative generation of defects for resonant transitions. A matching of the modification thresholds after more than four laser pulses was observed. Laser cleaning with multiple pulsing should not exceed ca. 0.05 J/cm{sup 2} when these pigments coexist in close spatial proximity.

  20. De-polarization of a CdZnTe radiation detector by pulsed infrared light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dědič, V., E-mail: vaclav.dedic@mff.cuni.cz; Franc, J.; Rejhon, M.; Grill, R.; Zázvorka, J. [Institute of Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, Prague 121 16 (Czech Republic); Sellin, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-20

    This work is focused on a detailed study of pulsed mode infrared light induced depolarization of CdZnTe detectors operating at high photon fluxes. This depolarizing effect is a result of the decrease of positive space charge that is caused by the trapping of photogenerated holes at a deep level. The reduction in positive space charge is due to the optical transition of electrons from a valence band to the deep level due to additional infrared illumination. In this paper, we present the results of pulse mode infrared depolarization, by which it is possible to keep the detector in the depolarized state during its operation. The demonstrated mechanism represents a promising way to increase the charge collection efficiency of CdZnTe X-ray detectors operating at high photon fluxes.

  1. STUDENT AWARD FINALIST: Study of Self-Absorbed Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation during Pulsed Atmospheric Breakdown in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laity, George; Fierro, Andrew; Hatfield, Lynn; Neuber, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes recent experiments to investigate the role of self-produced vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in the physics of pulsed atmospheric breakdown. A unique apparatus was constructed which enables the detailed exploration of VUV light in the range 115-135 nm, which is emitted from breakdown between two point-point electrodes in an air environment at atmospheric pressure. Time-resolved diagnostics include VUV sensitive photomultipliers, intensified CCD imaging, optically isolated high voltage probes, and fast rise-time Rogowski current monitors. Temporally resolved spectroscopy from air breakdowns revealed VUV emission is released during the initial streamer phase before voltage collapse, with the majority of the emission lines identified from various atmospheric gases or surface impurities. Imaging of VUV radiation was performed which conserved the spatial emission profile, and distinct differences between nitrogen and oxygen VUV emission during onset of breakdown have been observed. Specifically, the self-absorption of HI, OI, and NI lines is addressed which elucidates the role of radiation transport during the photon-dominated streamer breakdown process. Supported by AFOSR, NASA / TSGC, DEPS, and IEEE DEIS.

  2. Quantifying immediate radiative forcing by black carbon and organic matter with the Specific Forcing Pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Bond

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Climatic effects of short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs differ from those of long-lived greenhouse gases, because they occur rapidly after emission and because they depend upon the region of emission. The distinctive temporal and spatial nature of these impacts is not captured by measures that rely on global averages or long time integrations. Here, we propose a simple measure, the Specific Forcing Pulse (SFP, to quantify climate warming or cooling by these pollutants, where we define "immediate" as occurring primarily within the first year after emission. SFP is the amount of energy added to or removed from a receptor region in the Earth-atmosphere system by a chemical species, per mass of emission in a source region. We limit the application of SFP to species that remain in the atmosphere for less than one year. Metrics used in policy discussions, such as total forcing or global warming potential, are easily derived from SFP. However, SFP conveys purely physical information without incurring the policy implications of choosing a time horizon for the global warming potential.

    Using one model (Community Atmosphere Model, or CAM, we calculate values of SFP for black carbon (BC and organic matter (OM emitted from 23 source-region combinations. Global SFP for both atmosphere and cryosphere impacts is divided among receptor latitudes. SFP is usually greater for open-burning emissions than for energy-related (fossil-fuel and biofuel emissions because of the timing of emission. Global SFP for BC varies by about 45% for energy-related emissions from different regions. This variation would be larger except for compensating effects. When emitted aerosol has larger cryosphere forcing, it often has lower atmosphere forcing because of less deep convection and a shorter atmospheric lifetime.

    A single model result is insufficient to capture uncertainty. We develop a best estimate and uncertainties for SFP by combining forcing results from

  3. LASER PHYSICS: Instability of the radiation wavefront in pulsed CO2 amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, S. V.; Yur'ev, M. S.

    1987-07-01

    A theoretical investigation is reported of the evolution in space and time of a small-scale perturbation against the background of a smooth beam entering a pulsed CO2 amplifier. The ranges of the transverse frequency, longitudinal coordinate, and time in which the perturbation growth is exponential are determined. It is shown that the wavefront instability can be suppressed by amplification of the main beam and by the attenuation of sound.

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Generation of magnetic fields as a result of interaction of pairs of radiation pulses with solid barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, N. S.; Shaĭnoga, I. S.; Shentsev, N. I.

    1989-02-01

    An analysis is made of the problem of generation of magnetic fields in a laser plasma jet formed as a result of the interaction of two consecutive radiation pulses of moderate intensity with a dielectric barrier. It is assumed that the source of an emf is the thermo-emf of the inhomogeneous plasma. The structure of gasdynamic streams and the parameters of magnetic fields in the plasma jet are found by numerical solution of a known system of equations considered in a two-dimensional cylindrical configuration. The profiles of the plasma parameters and the temporal and spatial distributions of the magnetic fields are presented. It is shown that the results of numerical calculations can be useful, for example, in the diagnostics of laser jets.

  5. Nested radiations and the pulse of angiosperm diversification: increased diversification rates often follow whole genome duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, David C; Eastman, Jonathan M; Pennell, Matthew W; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Hinchliff, Cody E; Brown, Joseph W; Sessa, Emily B; Harmon, Luke J

    2015-07-01

    Our growing understanding of the plant tree of life provides a novel opportunity to uncover the major drivers of angiosperm diversity. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny, we characterized hot and cold spots of lineage diversification across the angiosperm tree of life by modeling evolutionary diversification using stepwise AIC (MEDUSA). We also tested the whole-genome duplication (WGD) radiation lag-time model, which postulates that increases in diversification tend to lag behind established WGD events. Diversification rates have been incredibly heterogeneous throughout the evolutionary history of angiosperms and reveal a pattern of 'nested radiations' - increases in net diversification nested within other radiations. This pattern in turn generates a negative relationship between clade age and diversity across both families and orders. We suggest that stochastically changing diversification rates across the phylogeny explain these patterns. Finally, we demonstrate significant statistical support for the WGD radiation lag-time model. Across angiosperms, nested shifts in diversification led to an overall increasing rate of net diversification and declining relative extinction rates through time. These diversification shifts are only rarely perfectly associated with WGD events, but commonly follow them after a lag period. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Physical Model of Laser-Assisted Blocking of Blood Flow: II. Pulse Modulation of Radiation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zheltov, GI

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is a continuation of our preceding inves- tigation [1], where we considered the mechanism of blocking blood flow under laser irradiation and assumed that the experimentally observed contraction of blood vessels [2] is a consequence... of the blood vessel due to the vaporization phase transition and formation of gas–vapor bubbles. As an alternative, we will consider below a possible way to reduce this risk by using irra- diation with a regular series (train) of short pulses. The total...

  7. Pulsed Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy in Combination With Temozolomide in a Murine Orthotopic Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, David Y.; Chunta, John L.; Park, Sean S.; Huang, Jiayi; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Grills, Inga S.; Krueger, Sarah A.; Wilson, George D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian, E-mail: brian.marples@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of pulsed low-dose radiation therapy (PLRT) combined with temozolomide (TMZ) as a novel treatment approach for radioresistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a murine model. Methods and Materials: Orthotopic U87MG hGBM tumors were established in Nu-Foxn1{sup nu} mice and imaged weekly using a small-animal micropositron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) system. Tumor volume was determined from contrast-enhanced microCT images and tumor metabolic activity (SUVmax) from the F18-FDG microPET scan. Tumors were irradiated 7 to 10 days after implantation with a total dose of 14 Gy in 7 consecutive days. The daily treatment was given as a single continuous 2-Gy dose (RT) or 10 pulses of 0.2 Gy using an interpulse interval of 3 minutes (PLRT). TMZ (10 mg/kg) was given daily by oral gavage 1 hour before RT. Tumor vascularity and normal brain damage were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Radiation therapy with TMZ resulted in a significant 3- to 4-week tumor growth delay compared with controls, with PLRT+TMZ the most effective. PLRT+TMZ resulted in a larger decline in SUVmax than RT+TMZ. Significant differences in survival were evident. Treatment after PLRT+TMZ was associated with increased vascularization compared with RT+TMZ. Significantly fewer degenerating neurons were seen in normal brain after PLRT+TMZ compared with RT+TMZ. Conclusions: PLRT+TMZ produced superior tumor growth delay and less normal brain damage when compared with RT+TMZ. The differential effect of PLRT on vascularization may confirm new treatment avenues for GBM.

  8. High power terahertz radiation generation by optical rectification of a shaped pulse laser in axially magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Kishor; Singh, Monika; Rajouria, Satish Kumar; Sharma, R. P.

    2017-10-01

    An analytical expression has been derived for terahertz (THz) emission by optical rectification of a laser pulse having a Gaussian as well as hyperbolic-secant shape in axially magnetised ripple density plasma. The interaction between short laser pulses of sub picoseconds duration and plasma leads to the radiation of a wave having frequency in THz regime. The non-uniform intensity profile, say supper-Gaussian, of laser beam exerts a quasi-static ponderomotive force to the electron. The electron acquired a nonlinear transverse drift velocity component. Hence, a strong transient current density having a frequency component in the THz regime produces due to coupling of this velocity component with ripple density plasma and derives a strong THz wave. The generated THz field amplitude is directly proportional to the amplitude of the density ripple and field amplitude of the laser beam. In this generation mechanism, the ripple wave number plays a critical role. The THz field amplitude is maximized when cyclotron frequency approaches to the THz frequency and higher value of profile index. For typical laser plasma parameter, the emitted normalised amplitude of THz field is on the order of 10-2.

  9. Vibrational kinetics of electronically excited states in H2 discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, Gianpiero; Pietanza, Lucia D.; D'Ammando, Giuliano; Celiberto, Roberto; Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2017-11-01

    The evolution of atmospheric pressure hydrogen plasma under the action of repetitively ns electrical pulse has been investigated using a 0D state-to-state kinetic model that self-consistently couples the master equation of heavy particles and the Boltzmann equation for free electrons. The kinetic model includes, together with atomic hydrogen states and the vibrational kinetics of H2 ground state, vibrational levels of singlet states, accounting for the collisional quenching, having a relevant role because of the high pressure. The mechanisms of excitations, radiative decay and collisional quenching involving the excited H2 states and the corresponding cross sections, integrated over the non-equilibrium electron energy distribution function (EEDF) to obtain kinetic rates, are discussed in the light of the kinetic simulation results, i.e. the time evolution during the pulse of the plasma composition, of the EEDF and of the vibrational distributions of ground and singlet excited states.

  10. Experimental and numerical investigations of radiation characteristics of Russian portable/compact pulsed neutron generators: ING-031, ING-07, ING-06 and ING-10-20-120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernikova, D.; Romodanov, V. L.; Belevitin, A. G.; Afanas`ev, V. V.; Sakharov, V. K.; Bogolubov, E. P.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Khasaev, T. O.; Sladkov, A. A.; Bitulev, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    The present paper discusses results of full-scale experimental and numerical investigations of influence of construction materials of portable pulsed neutron generators ING-031, ING-07, ING-06 and ING-10-20-120 (VNIIA, Russia) to their radiation characteristics formed during and after an operation (shutdown period). In particular, it is shown that an original monoenergetic isotropic angular distribution of neutrons emitted by TiT target changes into the significantly anisotropic angular distribution with a broad energy spectrum stretching to the thermal region. Along with the low-energetic neutron part, a significant amount of photons appears during the operation of generators. In the pulse mode of operation of neutron generator, a presence of the construction materials leads to the "tailing" of the original neutron pulse and the appearance of an accompanying photon pulse at ~ 3 ns after the instant neutron pulse. In addition to that, reactions of neutron capture and inelastic scattering lead to the creation of radioactive nuclides, such as 58Co, 62Cu, 64Cu and 18F, which form the so-called activation radiation. Thus, the selection of a portable neutron generator for a particular type of application has to be done considering radiation characteristics of the generator itself. This paper will be of interest to users of neutron generators, providing them with valuable information about limitations of a specific generator and with recommendations for improving the design and performance of the generator as a whole.

  11. Differential Sensitivity of Cells to Radiation Mediated by p53 Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Mi Young; Kawala, Remigius A.; Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin-Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Exposure of cells to ionizing radiation activates protein genes related cell cycle arrest and cell death (apoptosis or autophagy). The tumor suppressor p53 participates not only in regulation of apoptosis, but also in autophagy mechanism. Apoptosis (type I cell death) is characterized by the activation of caspases and the formation of apoptotic bodies, and plays essential roles in all multicellular organisms. On the other hand, autophagy (type II cell death) is characterized by the presence of cytoplasmic engulfing vesicles, alias autophagosomes, and is a major intracellular pathway for degradation and recycling of proteins, ribosomes and entire organelles. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ionizing radiation treatment induces autophagy depending on the p53 expression levels. RKO (wild-type p53) and RKO E6 (null-type p53) cells were used to evaluate the effects of p53 on the sensitivity of cells to ionizing radiation. In the RKO E6 cells, the function of p53 was disabled with human papillomavirus E6 oncoprotein. These results indicated that p53 and p21 were required to block apoptosis and induce autophagy in RKO cells. The expression of p21 by a p53-dependent mechanism is required to develop autophagic properties after DNA damage. Results in this study suggest that the radioresistance of the RKO cells was associated with the increased p21 expression, resulting in autophagy induction. The tumor suppressor p53 could regulate radiosensitivity by inhibiting autophagy and activating apoptosis; the ionizing radiation-induced expression of p53 in the RKO cells regulated autophagy, suggesting the significance of the level of p53 in determining the radiosensitivity by regulating autophagy and apoptosis.

  12. Characteristics of the evolution of a plasma generated by radiation from CW and repetitively pulsed CO2 lasers in different gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevskii, M. F.; Stepanova, M. A.

    1990-06-01

    The interaction between high-power CW and repetitively pulsed CO2 laser radiation and a low-threshold optical-breakdown plasma near a metal surface is investigated. The characteristics of the breakdown plasma are examined as functions of the experimental conditions. A qualitative analysis of the results obtained was performed using a simple one-dimensional model for laser combustion waves.

  13. Improving Outcome in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM) Using Pulsed-Protracted External Beam Radiation (PERT) and Intrapleural Delivery of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM) survival remains poor despite multidisciplinary treatment involving aggressive surgery, chemotherapy and... Mesothelioma (MPM) survival remains poor despite multidisciplinary treatment involving aggressive surgery, chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT... Mesothelioma (MPM) Using Pulsed-Protracted External Beam Radiation (PERT) and Intrapleural Delivery of

  14. Optical Cherenkov radiation by cascaded nonlinear interaction: an efficient source of few-cycle energetic near- to mid-IR pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Zhou, Binbin

    2011-01-01

    When ultrafast noncritical cascaded second-harmonic generation of energetic femtosecond pulses occur in a bulk lithium niobate crystal optical Cherenkov waves are formed in the near- to mid-IR. Numerical simulations show that the few-cycle solitons radiate Cherenkov (dispersive) waves in the λ = ...... efficiency is up to 25%. Thus, optical Cherenkov waves formed with cascaded nonlinearities could become an efficient source of energetic near- to mid-IR few-cycle pulses.......When ultrafast noncritical cascaded second-harmonic generation of energetic femtosecond pulses occur in a bulk lithium niobate crystal optical Cherenkov waves are formed in the near- to mid-IR. Numerical simulations show that the few-cycle solitons radiate Cherenkov (dispersive) waves in the λ = 2...

  15. A comparative study of the plasmon effect in nanoelectrode THz emitters: Pulse vs. continuous-wave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Kiwon; Lee, Eui Su; Lee, Il-Min; Han, Sang-Pil; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Park, Kyung Hyun, E-mail: khp@etri.re.kr [Terahertz Basic Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeongyong [Metal-Insulator Transition Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Donghun [Optical Internet Components Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Plasmonic field enhancement in terahertz (THz) generation is one of the recently arisen techniques in the THz field that has attracted considerable interest. However, the reported levels of enhancement of THz output power in the literature are significantly different from each other, from less than two times to about two orders of magnitude of enhancement in power, which implies the existence of other major limiting factors yet to be revealed. In this work, the contribution of the plasmonic effect to the power enhancement of THz emitters is revisited. We show that the carrier collection efficiency in a THz emitter with plasmonic nanostructures is more critical to the device performance than the plasmonic field enhancement itself. The strong reverse fields induced by the highly localized plasmonic carriers in the vicinity of the nanoelectrodes screen the carrier collections and seriously limit the power enhancement. This is supported by our experimental observations of the significantly enhanced power in a plasmonic nanoelectrode THz emitter in continuous-wave radiation mode, while the same device has limited enhancement with pulsed radiation. We hope that our study may provide an intuitive but practical guideline in adopting plasmonic nanostructures with an aim of enhancing the efficiency of optoelectronic devices.

  16. Remote detection of radioactive material using high-power pulsed electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsung; Yu, Dongho; Sawant, Ashwini; Choe, Mun Seok; Lee, Ingeun; Kim, Sung Gug; Choi, EunMi

    2017-05-09

    Remote detection of radioactive materials is impossible when the measurement location is far from the radioactive source such that the leakage of high-energy photons or electrons from the source cannot be measured. Current technologies are less effective in this respect because they only allow the detection at distances to which the high-energy photons or electrons can reach the detector. Here we demonstrate an experimental method for remote detection of radioactive materials by inducing plasma breakdown with the high-power pulsed electromagnetic waves. Measurements of the plasma formation time and its dispersion lead to enhanced detection sensitivity compared to the theoretically predicted one based only on the plasma on and off phenomena. We show that lower power of the incident electromagnetic wave is sufficient for plasma breakdown in atmospheric-pressure air and the elimination of the statistical distribution is possible in the presence of radioactive material.

  17. Remote detection of radioactive material using high-power pulsed electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsung; Yu, Dongho; Sawant, Ashwini; Choe, Mun Seok; Lee, Ingeun; Kim, Sung Gug; Choi, EunMi

    2017-01-01

    Remote detection of radioactive materials is impossible when the measurement location is far from the radioactive source such that the leakage of high-energy photons or electrons from the source cannot be measured. Current technologies are less effective in this respect because they only allow the detection at distances to which the high-energy photons or electrons can reach the detector. Here we demonstrate an experimental method for remote detection of radioactive materials by inducing plasma breakdown with the high-power pulsed electromagnetic waves. Measurements of the plasma formation time and its dispersion lead to enhanced detection sensitivity compared to the theoretically predicted one based only on the plasma on and off phenomena. We show that lower power of the incident electromagnetic wave is sufficient for plasma breakdown in atmospheric-pressure air and the elimination of the statistical distribution is possible in the presence of radioactive material. PMID:28486438

  18. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) radiation by laser interaction with a solid H.sub.2./sub. ribbon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Marco, Massimo; Krása, Josef; Cikhardt, J.; Velyhan, Andriy; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Dudžák, Roman; Dostál, Jan; Krouský, Eduard; Limpouch, J.; Pisarczyk, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Chodukowski, T.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Chatain, D.; Perin, J.P.; Margarone, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 8 (2017), s. 1-6, č. článku 083103. ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA ČR GA16-07036S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089; GA MŠk LQ1606 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 654148 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * electromagnetic pulse * solid hydrogen ribbon Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.115, year: 2016

  19. Remote detection of radioactive material using high-power pulsed electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsung; Yu, Dongho; Sawant, Ashwini; Choe, Mun Seok; Lee, Ingeun; Kim, Sung Gug; Choi, Eunmi

    2017-05-01

    Remote detection of radioactive materials is impossible when the measurement location is far from the radioactive source such that the leakage of high-energy photons or electrons from the source cannot be measured. Current technologies are less effective in this respect because they only allow the detection at distances to which the high-energy photons or electrons can reach the detector. Here we demonstrate an experimental method for remote detection of radioactive materials by inducing plasma breakdown with the high-power pulsed electromagnetic waves. Measurements of the plasma formation time and its dispersion lead to enhanced detection sensitivity compared to the theoretically predicted one based only on the plasma on and off phenomena. We show that lower power of the incident electromagnetic wave is sufficient for plasma breakdown in atmospheric-pressure air and the elimination of the statistical distribution is possible in the presence of radioactive material.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Plasma heating near a metal target by nanosecond pulses of the first, second, and fourth Nd-laser harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufetov, Igor'A.; Bufetova, G. A.; Kravtsov, S. B.; Fyodorov, V. B.; Fomin, V. K.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements were made of the electron temperature Te of a laser plasma formed on the surface of a metal target by the action of nanosecond pulses of wavelengths λ = 1060, 530, and 265 nm. The laser radiation intensity was I approx 109—1013 W cm-2. The electron temperature was determined from the emf of a double charge layer at the plasma boundary. Within the limits of the scatter of the experimental results, the plasma temperature was independent of the laser radiation wavelength (in the range 1060-265 nm). The dependence of this temperature on the radiation intensity obeyed approximately Te propto I1/3 throughout the investigated range.

  1. The applicability of the Sedov - Taylor scaling during material removal of metals and oxide layers with pulsed ? and excimer laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aden, M.; Kreutz, E. W.; Schlüter, H.; Wissenbach, K.

    1997-03-01

    For the removal of material with pulsed laser radiation the distance travelled by the shock or blast wave and the amount of energy released in the plasma state due to the absorption of laser radiation are determined experimentally and theoretically. The distance travelled by the blast wave is detected by schlieren photography, the released energy by monitoring the transmitted laser radiation during the removal process. The theoretical evaluation is performed by numerical simulation using a model incorporating the laser-induced vaporization process and the dynamics of the plasma state. The results obtained from the experiments and the model are compared with that of the Sedov - Taylor scaling. The removal of the oxide layer from austenitic steel is investigated with 0022-3727/30/6/011/img8 laser radiation produced by a TEA and a high-power 0022-3727/30/6/011/img8 laser device. For the TEA laser with fluences of 5 and 10 J 0022-3727/30/6/011/img10 50 - 80% of the pulse energy is released into the plasma state and the Sedov - Taylor scaling describes the distance travelled by the blast wave in agreement with data from the experiments and the simulation. For the high-power 0022-3727/30/6/011/img8 laser with a fluence of 50 J 0022-3727/30/6/011/img10, 6% of the pulse energy is released into the plasma state and the Sedov - Taylor scaling does not describe the data of the simulation. The process of removal of copper and aluminium material is simulated for excimer laser radiation with fluences of 15 and 30 J 0022-3727/30/6/011/img10. For copper 15 - 30% of the pulse energy is released into the plasma state and the Sedov - Taylor scaling is applicable. For aluminium, less than 2% of the pulse energy is released into the plasma state and the Sedov - Taylor scaling is only applicable for the higher fluence.

  2. Contribution of electronically excited states to the radiation chemistry of organic systems. Progress report, September 1, 1978-August 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipsky, S.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of n-perfluorohexane to quench both the emission and photoionization current of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in isooctane and in tetramethylsilane has been shown to be consistent with an interaction of perfluorohexane with some relatively long-lived, coherently excited state of TMPD that is generated at the photoionization threshold and which decays either to the emitting state of TMPD or to a geminate ion-pair. The 0/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/ electron impact spectra of the stable isomers of C/sub 3/, C/sub 4/, and C/sub 5/ saturated hydrocarbons are being determined. Preliminary results show large structural effects on the lowest Rydberg singlet-triplet splittings. Two photon excited emission spectra of decalin, bicyclohexyl, and cyclohexane have been observed in good agreement with previously reported one-photon spectra. A weak emission from propylene has also been detected. From measurement of the photosensitized singlet emission of p-xylene by bicyclohexyl excited at 1740 A, it appears that the bicyclohexyl triplet contributes importantly to the sensitization. Also previously reported deviations from Stern-Volmer behavior in the fast-electron-excited process are found too in the photo-excited process (at 1740 A) and therefore cannot be attributed exclusively to ionic processes. The much larger ratio of excimer to monomer intensity in polystyrene as compared to neat liquid benzene appears to be due mainly to a reduced entropy of dissociation of the excimer when the phenyls are tied to the polymer backbone. Excimers formed therefore from distant phenyl groups may manifest themselves at high quencher concentrations and thus provide a new technique for probing polymer conformation.

  3. Experiment and analysis of shock waves radiated from pulse laser focusing in a gelatin gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Ando, Keita

    2017-11-01

    A fundamental understanding of shock and bubble dynamics in human tissues is essential to laser application for medical purposes. Here, we experimentally study the dynamics of shock waves in viscoelastic media. A nanosecond laser pulse of wavelength at 532 nm and of energy up to 2.66 +/- 0.09 mJ was focused through a microscope objective lens (10 x, NA = 0.30) into a gel of gelatin concentration at 3 and 10 wt%; a shock wave and a bubble can be generated, respectively, by rapid expansion of the laser-induced plasma and local heat deposition after the plasma recombines. The shock propagation and the bubble growth were recorded by a ultra-high-speed camera at 100 Mfps. The shock evolution was determined by image analysis of the recording and the shock pressure in the near field was computed according to the Rankine-Hugoniot relation. The far-field pressure was measured by a hydrophone. In the poster, we will present the decay rate of the shock pressure in the near and far fields and examine viscous effects on the shock dynamics. The Research Grant of Keio Leading-edge Laboratory of Science & Technology.

  4. Short-pulse, high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Will

    2013-10-01

    Recent experimental results of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of ~GeV electrons driven by the 200TW HERCULES and the 400TW ASTRA-GEMINI laser systems and their subsequent generation of photons, positrons, and neutrons are presented. In LWFA, high-intensity (I >1019 W /cm2), ultra-short (τL counter-propagating, ultra-high intensity (I >1021 W /cm2) laser pulse to undergo inverse Compton scattering and emit a high-peak brightness beam of high-energy photons. Preliminary results and experimental sensitivities of the electron-laser beam overlap are presented. The high-energy photon beams can be spectrally resolved using a forward Compton scattering spectrometer. Moreover, the photon flux can be characterized by a pixelated scintillator array and by nuclear activation and (γ,n) neutron measurements from the photons interacting with a secondary solid target. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA to support the yield estimates. This research was supported by DOE/NSF-PHY 0810979, NSF CAREER 1054164, DARPA AXiS N66001-11-1-4208, SF/DNDO F021166, and the Leverhulme Trust ECF-2011-383.

  5. Radiation effects on poly(methyl methacrylate) induced by pulsed laser irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Italiano, A.; Amato, E.; Caridi, F.; Cutroneo, M.; Squeri, C. A.; Squeri, G.; Roszkowska, A. M.

    2012-09-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was irradiated using a medical UV-ArF excimer laser operating at the fundamental wavelength of 193 nm. Characterized by a beam diameter of 1.8 mm and energy of 180 mJ with a Gaussian energy profile, it operates in a single mode or at 30 Hz repetition rate. Mechanical profilometry was carried out on ablation craters in order to study the rugosity and the ablation yield in the various operative conditions. Optical transmission and reflection measurements at six wavelengths were conducted in order to characterize the optical properties of the irradiated surfaces. Measured crater depths in PMMA were lower with respect to the forecasted ones in corneal tissue, while the lateral crater aperture was maintained. The rugosity produced at the crater bottom after irradiation was about 0.3 μm, and the ablation yield was about 1015 molecules/laser pulse, while etching depth and diameter show a roughly linear dependence on the number of laser shots. These experiments constitute a base for deeper clinical investigations.

  6. Excitation of Artificial Ionospheric Turbulence in the High-Latitude Ionospheric F Region as a Function of the Eiscat/Heating Effective Radiated Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T. D.; Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Yeoman, T. K.; Häggström, I.

    2017-10-01

    We present the results of experimental studies of the parameters of HF-enhanced ion-acoustic and Langmuir plasma waves, as well as small-scale artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAIs) when the EISCAT/Heating effective radiated power is varied from 10 to 560 MW. In the course of the experiments, a high-power HF radio wave with the alternating ordinary (O-mode) and extraordinary (X-mode) polarizations was radiated towards the magnetic zenith at a frequency of 7.953 MHz lying below the cutoff frequency of the F2 layer. A fundamental difference in the development of artificial ion-acoustic and Langmuir turbulence, which is seen as HF-enhanced ion and plasma lines in the EISCAT spectra, under the O- and X-mode HF pumping was found. The minimum values of the HF pump-wave electric fields in the ionosphere when the HF-enhanced ion and plasma lines, as well as small-scale artificial field-aligned irregularities, start to be excited, were determined from experimental data both for the O- and X-mode HF pumping. Comparison between the experimental and theoretical threshold values of the electric field required for the excitation of artificial ionospheric turbulence in thermal, Langmuir, and ion-acoustic modes in the high-latitude ionospheric F2 layer for the O-mode HF pump wave was made.

  7. Excitation of Artificial Ionospheric Turbulence in the High-Latitude Ionospheric F Region as a Function of the Eiscat/Heating Effective Radiated Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T. D.; Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Yeoman, T. K.; Häggström, I.

    2017-09-01

    We present the results of experimental studies of the parameters of HF-enhanced ion-acoustic and Langmuir plasma waves, as well as small-scale artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAIs) when the EISCAT/Heating effective radiated power is varied from 10 to 560 MW. In the course of the experiments, a high-power HF radio wave with the alternating ordinary (O-mode) and extraordinary (X-mode) polarizations was radiated towards the magnetic zenith at a frequency of 7.953 MHz lying below the cutoff frequency of the F2 layer. A fundamental difference in the development of artificial ion-acoustic and Langmuir turbulence, which is seen as HF-enhanced ion and plasma lines in the EISCAT spectra, under the O- and X-mode HF pumping was found. The minimum values of the HF pump-wave electric fields in the ionosphere when the HF-enhanced ion and plasma lines, as well as small-scale artificial field-aligned irregularities, start to be excited, were determined from experimental data both for the O- and X-mode HF pumping. Comparison between the experimental and theoretical threshold values of the electric field required for the excitation of artificial ionospheric turbulence in thermal, Langmuir, and ion-acoustic modes in the high-latitude ionospheric F2 layer for the O-mode HF pump wave was made.

  8. Use of radiation intensity dependence on excitation level for the analysis of surface plasmon resonance effect on ZnO luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Stepan; Tarasov, Andrey; Briskina, Charus; Ryzhkov, Mikhail; Markushev, Valery; Lotin, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    For the analysis of ZnO luminescence, a set of rate equations (SRE) is proposed. It contains a set of parameters that characterize processes participating in luminescence: zone-zone excitation, excitons formation and recombination, formation and disappearance of photons, surface plasmons (SP), and phonons. It is shown that experimental ZnO microstructure radiation intensity dependence on photoexcitation levels can be approximated by using SRE. This approach was applied for the analysis of ZnO microfilm radiation with different thicknesses of Ag island film covering. It was revealed that the increase of cover thickness leads to an increase of losses and a decrease of the probability of photon-to-SP conversion. In order to take into account visible emission, rate equations for level populations in the bandgap and for corresponding photons and SPs were added to the SRE. By using such an SRE, it is demonstrated that the form of visible luminescence intensity dependence on excitation level (P) like P, as obtained elsewhere, is possible only if donor-acceptor pairs exist. The proposed approach was also applied for consideration of experimental results obtained in several papers taking into account the interpretation of these results based on assumptions about the transfer of electrons from the defect level in the ZnO bandgap to metal and then to the conduction band.

  9. Non-adiabatic rotational excitation of dipolar molecule under the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    adiabatically by half cycle pulse. (HCP) is controlled using the second ultrashort HCP. ... excited to create a rotational quantum wave packet, a .... Non-adiabatic rotational excitation of dipolar molecule under the influence of delayed pulses. 1215.

  10. High power UV and VUV pulsed excilamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V.; Erofeev, M.; Lomaev, M.; Rybka, D.

    2008-07-01

    Emission characteristics of a nanosecond discharge in inert gases and its halogenides without preionization of the gap from an auxiliary source have been investigated. A volume discharge, initiated by an avalanche electron beam (VDIAEB) was realized at pressures up to 12 atm. In xenon at pressure of 1.2 atm, the energy of spontaneous radiation in the full solid angle was sim 45 mJ/cm^3, and the FWHM of a radiation pulse was sim 110 ns. The spontaneous radiation power rise in xenon was observed at pressures up to 12 atm. Pulsed radiant exitance of inert gases halogenides excited by VDIAEB was sim 4.5 kW/cm^2 at efficiency up to 5.5 %.

  11. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasimakis, N.; Fedotov, V. A.; Savinov, V.; Raybould, T. A.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information.

  12. Observation of coherent optical phonons excited by femtosecond laser radiation in Sb films by ultrafast electron diffraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironov, B. N.; Kompanets, V. O.; Aseev, S. A., E-mail: isanfemto@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation); Ischenko, A. A. [Moscow Technological University, Institute of High Chemical Technologies (Russian Federation); Kochikov, I. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Misochko, O. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation); Chekalin, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The generation of coherent optical phonons in a polycrystalline antimony film sample has been investigated using femtosecond electron diffraction method. Phonon vibrations have been induced in the Sb sample by the main harmonic of a femtosecond Ti:Sa laser (λ = 800 nm) and probed by a pulsed ultrashort photoelectron beam synchronized with the pump laser. The diffraction patterns recorded at different times relative to the pump laser pulse display oscillations of electron diffraction intensity corresponding to the frequencies of vibrations of optical phonons: totally symmetric (A{sub 1g}) and twofold degenerate (E{sub g}) phonon modes. The frequencies that correspond to combinations of these phonon modes in the Sb sample have also been experimentally observed.

  13. Wave-packet dynamics in alkaline dimers. Investigation and control through coherent excitation with fs-pulses; Wellenpaketdynamik in Alkali-Dimeren. Untersuchung und Steuerung durch kohaerente Anregung mit fs-Pulsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, F.N.B.

    2007-07-01

    During my PhD thesis I investigated alkaline dimers with coherent control in a molecular beam as well as with pump-probe spectroscopy in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The aim of the coherent control experiments were the isotope selective ionization with phase- and amplitude-shaped fs-pulses. Chapter 4 described the gained results of isotope selective ionization of NaK and KRb in a molecular beam by using different pulse formers. For the NaK dimer was the reached optimization factor R{sub Ph} and {sub Ampl}{sup 770}=R{sub max}/R{sub min}=25 between maximization and minimization of the isotopomer ratio ({sup 23}Na{sup 39}K){sup +}/({sup 23}Na{sup 41}K){sup +} with phase and amplitude modulation of the fs-pulse with a central wavelength of {lambda}=770 nm. From the electronic ground-state X(1){sup 1}{sigma}{sup +};{nu}''=0 transfers a one-photon-excitation population in the first excited A(2) {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} state. The coherent control experiment on KRb was used to maximize and minimize the isotopomer ratio ({sup 124}KRb){sup +}/({sup 126}KRb){sup +}. It was the first coherent control experiment with a spectral resolution of 1.84 cm{sup -1}/Pixel. For the phase and amplitude optimization was the received optimization factor between minimization and maximization of the isotopomer ratio R{sub Ph} and {sub Ampl}=R{sub max}/R{sub min}=7 at a central wavelength of 840 nm. The results showed a stepwise excitation process from the electronic ground-state in the first excited (2){sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} state with a further excitation, that is possible over three resonant energy potential curves into the ionic ground-state. In the second part of my thesis I realized pump-probe spectroscopy of Rb{sub 2} dimers in a dark SPOT. (orig.)

  14. Theoretical studies on the reaction pathways of electronically excited DAAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quenneville, Jason M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The use of temporally and spectrally shaped ultrafast laser pulses to initiate, as well as detect, high explosives is being explored at Los Alamos. High level ab initio calculations, presented here, are employed to help guide and interpret the experiments. The ground and first excited electronic states of 3,3{prime}-diamino-4,4{prime}-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) are investigated using complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The geometrical and energetic character of the excited state minima, conical intersections and reaction pathways of DAAF are described. Two radiative and two non-radiative excited state population quenching mechanisms are outlined, and possible pathways for photochemical and spectroscopic control are discussed. The use of laser light to control chemical reactions has many applications. The initiation and the detection of explosives are two such applications currently under development at Los Alamos. Though inherently experimental, the project can be aided by theory through both prediction and interpretation. When the laser light is in the UV/visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum, the absorbing molecule is excited electronically and excitation decay may occur either radiatively (fluorescence or phosphorescence) or non-radiatively (through internal conversion). In many cases decay of the excitation occurs through a mixture of processes, and maximizing the desired result requires sophisticated laser pulses whose amplitude has been optimally modulated in time and/or frequency space. Control of cis-stilbene photochemistry was recently demonstrated in our group, and we aim to extend this work to high explosive compounds. Maximizing radiative decay leads to increased fluorescence quantum yields and enhances the possibility of spectral detection of the absorbing molecule. Maximizing non-radiative decay can lead to chemistry, heating of the sample and possibly detonation initiation in

  15. Vibrational excitation of hydrogen molecules by two-photon absorption and third-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Hara, Hideaki; Hiraki, Takahiro; Masuda, Takahiko; Sasao, Noboru; Uetake, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2018-01-01

    We report the coherent excitation of the vibrational state of hydrogen molecules by two-photon absorption and the resultant third-harmonic generation (THG). Parahydrogen molecules cooled by liquid nitrogen are irradiated by mid-infrared nanosecond pulses at 4.8 μm with a nearly Fourier-transform-limited linewidth. The first excited vibrational state of parahydrogen is populated by two-photon absorption of the mid-infrared photons. Because of the narrow linewidth of the mid-infrared pulses, coherence between the ground and excited states is sufficient to induce higher-order processes. Near-infrared photons from the THG are observed at 1.6 μm. The dependence of the intensity of the near-infrared radiation on mid-infrared pulse energy, target pressure, and cell length is determined. We used a simple formula for THG with consideration of realistic experimental conditions to explain the observed results.

  16. Radiation dose reduction in CT-guided sacroiliac joint injections to levels of pulsed fluoroscopy: a comparative study with technical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Juraj Artner, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike LattigDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, RKU, GermanyBackground: The sacroiliac (SI joint is frequently the primary source of low back pain. Over the past decades, a number of different SI injection techniques have been used in its diagnosis and therapy. Despite the concerns regarding exposure to radiation, image-guided injection techniques are the preferred method to achieve safe and precise intra-articular needle placement. The following study presents a comparison of radiation doses, calculated for fluoroscopy and CT-guided SI joint injections in standard and low-dose protocol and presents the technical possibility of CT-guidance with maximum radiation dose reduction to levels of fluoroscopic-guidance for a precise intra-articular injection technique.Objective: To evaluate the possibility of dose reduction in CT-guided sacroiliac joint injections to pulsed-fluoroscopy-guidance levels and to compare the doses of pulsed-fluoroscopy-, CT-guidance, and low-dose CT-guidance for intra-articular SI joint injections.Study design: Comparative study with technical considerations.Methods: A total of 30 CT-guided intra-articular SI joint injections were performed in January 2012 in a developed low-dose mode and the radiation doses were calculated. They were compared to 30 pulsed-fluoroscopy-guided SI joint injections, which were performed in the month before, and to five injections, performed in standard CT-guided biopsy mode for spinal interventions. The statistical significance was calculated with the SPSS software using the Mann–Whitney U-Test. Technical details and anatomical considerations were provided.Results: A significant dose reduction of average 94.01% was achieved using the low-dose protocol for CT-guided SI joint injections. The radiation dose could be approximated to pulsed-fluoroscopy-guidance levels.Conclusion: Radiation dose of CT-guided SI joint injections can be

  17. Computational studies on the excited states of luminescent platinum(II) alkynyl systems of tridentate pincer ligands in radiative and nonradiative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wai Han; Lam, Elizabeth Suk-Hang; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2013-10-09

    Platinum(II) alkynyl complexes of various tridentate pincer ligands, [Pt(trpy)(C≡CR)](+) (trpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+) (R'-bzimpy = 2,6-bis(N-alkylbenzimidazol-2'-yl)pyridine and R' = alkyl), [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] (R'-bzimb = 1,3-bis(N-alkylbenzimidazol-2'-yl)benzene and R' = C4H9), have been found to possess rich photophysical properties. The emission in dilute solutions of [Pt(trpy)(C≡CR)](+) originated from a triplet alkynyl-to-tridentate pincer ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT) excited state, with mixing of a platinum-to-tridentate pincer ligand metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state, while that of [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] originated from a triplet excited state of intraligand (IL) character of the tridentate ligand mixed with a platinum-to-tridentate ligand MLCT character. Interestingly, both emissions were observed in [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+) in some cases. In addition, [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] displayed a photoluminescence quantum yield higher than that of [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+). Computational studies have been performed on the representative complexes [Pt(trpy)(C≡CPh)](+) (1), [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CPh)](+) (2), and [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CPh)] (3), where R' = CH3 and Ph = C6H5, to provide an in-depth understanding of the nature of their emissive origin as well as the radiative and nonradiative processes. In particular, the factors governing the ordering of the triplet excited states and radiative decay rate constants of the emissive state ((3)ES) have been examined. The potential energy profiles for the deactivation process from the (3)ES via triplet metal-centered ((3)MC) states have also been explored. This work reveals for the first time the potential energy profiles for the thermal deactivation pathway of square planar platinum(II) complexes.

  18. Inductive Pulse Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Lindblom, Adam

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed power generators are a key component in compact systems for generation of high-power microwaves (HPM). HPM generation by virtual cathode devices such as Vircators put high demands on the source. The rise time and the pulse length of the source voltage are two key issues in the generation of HPM radiation. This thesis describes the construction and tests of several inductive high power pulse generators. The pulse generators were designed with the intent to deliver a pulse with fast rise...

  19. Radiation of the Rat Brain Suppresses Seizure-Induced Neurogenesis and Transiently Enhances Excitability during Kindling Acquisition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, R.; Boon, P.; Perssson, A.; Alborn, A.M.; Boterberg, T.; Van Dycke, A.; Linder, B.; De Smedt, T.; Wadman, W.J.; Ben-Menachem, E.; Eriksson, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is enhanced in several models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In this study, we used low-dose whole brain radiation to suppress hippocampal neurogenesis and then studied the effect of this treatment on epileptogenesis in a kindling model for TLE. Methods:

  20. Photodissociation C/sub 3/F/sub 7/I laser excited by radiation from a magnetoplasma compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, N.P.; Kamrukov, A.S.; Kashnikov, G.N.; Malashchenko, V.A.; Orlov, V.K.; Protasov, Yu.S.

    1975-05-01

    The necessary conditions are realized in the plasma focus of a magnetoplasma compressor of the erosion type. The investigations of the radiation properties of the plasma focus in the visible and UV regions have shown that the emission spectrum differs strongly from a Planck spectrum. Experiments on optical pumping of active media were performed. (MHR)

  1. Development Of Beam Position And Profile Monitor Based On Light Radiation Of Atoms Excited By The Beam Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Balalykin, N I; Brovko, O I; Bykovsky, V F; Dietrich, J; Kamerdzhiev, V; Meshkov, I N; Mohos, I; Parfenov, A N

    2004-01-01

    Particle beam position and profile monitor based on registration of the light radiated by residual gas atoms is being developed by collaboration JINR-Forschungszentrum Jülich. Proposed device and first experiments have been performed at Nuclotron (JINR) and COSY (FZJ) accelerators are presented in this report.

  2. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vodungbo, B; Tudu, B; Perron, J; Delaunay, R; Müller, L; Berntsen, M.H; Grübel, G; Malinowski, G; Weier, C; Gautier, J; Lambert, G; Zeitoun, P; Gutt, C; Jal, E; Reid, A.H; Granitzka, P.W; Jaouen, N; Dakovski, G.L; Moeller, S; Minitti, M.P; Mitra, A; Carron, S; Pfau, B; von Korff Schmising, C; Schneider, M; Eisebitt, S; Lüning, J

    2016-01-01

    .... Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer...

  3. Evidence for excitation of fluorescence in RPE melanin by multiphoton absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Denton, Michael L.

    2002-06-01

    Previously, we reported that ultrashort, near infrared (NIR) laser pulses caused more DNA breakage in cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells than did CW, NIR laser radiation delivering a similar radiant exposure. We hypothesized that this difference was due to multiphoton absorption in an intracellular chromophore such as the RPE melanin. We investigated two-photon excitation of fluorescence in a suspension of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes exposed to a 1-KHz train of approximately 50- fsec laser pulses at 810 nm from a Ti:Sapphire laser, and compared this to the fluorescence excited by CW exposures at 406 nm from a Krypton ion laser. Fluorescence was measured with a PC-based spectrometer. The CW sources excited fluorescence with a peak at 525 nm. The fluorescence intensity depended on the irradiance of the sample, as well as the melanosome concentration. Peak fluorescence was obtained with a suspension of ~2 x 107 melanin granules/ml. The 810-nm, ultrashort pulses also excited fluorescence, but with a broader, lower-amplitude peak. The weaker fluorescence signal excited by the 810-nm ultrashort pulse laser for a given melanosome concentration, compared to 406-nm CW excitation, is possibly due to the smaller two- photon absorption cross-section. These results indicate the involvement of multiphoton absorption in DNA damage.

  4. Analysis of Single-Event Effects in a Radiation-Hardened Low-Jitter PLL Under Heavy Ion and Pulsed Laser Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuojun; Lin, Min; Ding, Ding; Zheng, Yunlong; Sang, Zehua; Zou, Shichang

    2017-01-01

    A radiation-hardened low-jitter phase-locked loop (PLL) with a low-mismatch charge pump and a robust voltage-controlled oscillator is designed in a 130 nm PD-SOI process. In order to evaluate the overall response to single-event effects, the accumulated phase jitter has been put forward, which can exclude the inherent noise floor and accumulate all the radiation-induced noise. Then the single-event sensitivity of the proposed PLL is comprehensively analyzed by heavy ion and pulsed laser tests.

  5. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    OpenAIRE

    Boris Vodungbo; Bahrati Tudu; Jonathan Perron; Renaud Delaunay; Leonard Müller; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Gerhard Grübel; Grégory Malinowski; Christian Weier; Julien Gautier; Guillaume Lambert; Philippe Zeitoun; Christian Gutt; Emmanuelle Jal; Reid, Alexander H.

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a ne...

  6. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on new trabecular bone during bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model: a synchrotron radiation micro-CT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Lu

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on bone regeneration during the bone-tendon junction healing process and to explore the application of synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography in three dimensional visualization of the bone-tendon junction to evaluate the microarchitecture of new trabecular bone. Twenty four mature New Zealand rabbits underwent partial patellectomy to establish a bone-tendon junction injury model at the patella-patellar tendon complex. Animals were then divided into low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment (20 min/day, 7 times/week and placebo control groups, and were euthanized at week 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 6 for each group and time point. The patella-patellar tendon specimens were harvested for radiographic, histological and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography detection. The area of the newly formed bone in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that of control group at postoperative week 8 and 16. The high resolution three dimensional visualization images of the bone-tendon junction were acquired by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment promoted dense and irregular woven bone formation at week 8 with greater bone volume fraction, number and thickness of new trabecular bone but with lower separation. At week 16, ultrasound group specimens contained mature lamellar bone with higher bone volume fraction and thicker trabeculae than that of control group; however, there was no significant difference in separation and number of the new trabecular bone. This study confirms that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment is able to promote bone formation and remodeling of new trabecular bone during the bone-tendon junction healing process in a rabbit model, and the synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography could be applied for three dimensional visualization to quantitatively evaluate

  7. Measurements of Channelling Radiation and its Polarization, X-Ray Excitation, together with Deviations from Landau Distributions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a continuation of the channelling experiments PS164 and WA64. The following points are investigated : \\item a)~Radiation from channelled 1 to 10 GeV/c positrons and electrons. The results clearly show that the region of 1-10 GeV/c is a very important and interesting momentum range where the onset of relativistic effects in connection with the unharmonicity of the channelling potential can give rise to very sharp pea photon spectra which could be used as a radiation source. With a detector opening angle which is large compared to 1/@g, these peaks appear sharp only on the high energy side. If, on the other hand, only forward emitted channelling radiation is detected, nearly symmetric peaks are expected to emerge. This is measured by means of a position sentitive @g-detector, consisting of an CdTe-array. Here each detector is 0.8~x~0.8~x~3~mm|3 and act as an active converter with the final shower absorbed in a large scintillator. Hereby an angular resolution of 1/3~@g around 40~@mrad is obtai...

  8. Core exciton migration in Rb{sub 0.82}Cs{sub 0.18}Cl under excitation with synchrotron radiation and laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujibayashi, Toru [Department of Physics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan)]. E-mail: toru-t@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp; Azuma, Junpei [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Inabe, Yoshiyuki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Shinshu University, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Toyoda, Koichi [Department of Physics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Kamada, Masao [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Itoh, Minoru [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Shinshu University, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan)

    2007-01-15

    The migration of the core exciton in a mixed crystal of Rb{sub 0.82}Cs{sub 0.18}Cl is investigated through time-resolved measurement under excitation with synchrotron radiation (SR) and laser. The photon energy of SR is tuned to the absorption band due to the exciton composed of a conduction electron and the hole originated from the outermost core state of the Rb ion (Rb-core exciton). The time-integrated intensity of Auger-free luminescence (AFL) due to the outermost core state of the Cs ion is increased by the laser irradiation. The lifetime of the laser-induced AFL depends on the photon energy of SR. The experimental result suggests the difference between the migration length of the Rb-core exciton and that of the Cs-core hole.

  9. Nature of quantum states created by one photon absorption: pulsed coherent vs pulsed incoherent light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Alex C; Shapiro, Moshe; Brumer, Paul

    2013-08-29

    We analyze electronically excited nuclear wave functions and their coherence when subjecting a molecule to the action of natural, pulsed incoherent solar-like light and to that of ultrashort coherent light assumed to have the same center frequencies and spectral bandwidths. Specifically, we compute the spatiotemporal dependence of the excited wave packets and their electronic coherence for these two types of light sources, on different electronic potential energy surfaces. The resultant excited state wave functions are shown to be dramatically different, reflecting the light source from which they originated. In addition, electronic coherence is found to decay significantly faster for incoherent light than for coherent ultrafast excitation, for both continuum and bound wave packets. These results confirm that the dynamics observed from ultrashort coherent excitation does not reflect what happens in processes induced by solar-like radiation, and conclusions drawn from one do not, in general, apply to the other. These results provide further support to the view that the dynamics observed in studies using ultrashort coherent pulses can be significantly different than those that would result from excitation with natural incoherent light.

  10. Chirped-pulse Fourier transform millimeter-wave spectroscopy of ten vibrationally excited states of i-propyl cyanide: exploring the far-infrared region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Benjamin E; Gruet, Sébastien; Steber, Amanda L; Giuliano, Barbara M; Schnell, Melanie

    2017-01-18

    We report here further spectroscopic investigation of the astrochemically relevant molecule i-propyl cyanide. We observed and analysed the rotational spectra of the ground state of the molecule and ten vibrationally excited states with energies between 180-500 cm(-1). For this, we used a segmented W-band spectrometer (75-110 GHz) and performed the experiments under room temperature conditions. This approach thus provides access to high-resolution, pure rotational data of vibrational modes that occur in the far-infrared fingerprint region, and that can be difficult to access with other techniques. The obtained, extensive data set will support further astronomical searches and identifications, such as in warmer regions of the interstellar space where contributions from vibrationally excited states become increasingly relevant.

  11. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states; Excitation et ionisation des atomes d'hydrogene et d'helium par des impulsions laser femtosecondes: approche theorique par des etats de Coulomb-Volkov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichard, R

    2007-12-15

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when {Dirac_h}{omega} > I{sub p}: it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with {Dirac_h}{omega} < I{sub p}: new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  12. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Characteristics of the evolution of a plasma formed by cw and pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation in various gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Stepanova, M. A.

    1990-06-01

    An investigation was made of the interaction between high-power cw and pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation and a low-threshold optical breakdown plasma near a metal surface. Characteristics of the breakdown plasma were studied as a function of the experimental conditions. A qualitative analysis was made of the results using a simple one-dimensional model for laser combustion waves.

  13. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Calculation of mass transfer in the remote cutting of metals by radiation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladush, G. G.; Rodionov, N. B.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of remote cutting of steel plates by radiation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO2 laser is theoretically studied. The models of melt removal by the gravity force and the recoil pressure of material vapour are proposed and the sufficient conditions for the initiation of cutting are determined. A numerical model of a thermally thin plate was employed to describe the cutting for large focal spots.

  14. Modeling saturable absorption for ultra short X-ray pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatada, Keisuke, E-mail: keisuke.hatada@unicam.it [CNISM, Sezione di Fisica, Scuola di Scienze e Tecnologie, Universit‘a di Camerino, via Madonna delle Carceri 9, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Di Cicco, Andrea [CNISM, Sezione di Fisica, Scuola di Scienze e Tecnologie, Universit‘a di Camerino, via Madonna delle Carceri 9, I-62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Saturable absorption was recently observed in transmission measurements above the L{sub II,III} edge of pure Al thin films using ultra short X-ray pulses at a free-electron-laser (FEL) facility. The high fluence reachable by FEL pulses, the shortness of the pulse duration, and the typical lifetime of the excited state are all important factors enabling observation of the phenomenon. We devised a simplified theoretical approach describing the saturation phenomenon using a three-channel model containing ground, excited and relaxed states. This phenomenological model explicitly includes the interaction between the solid and photon field in a semi-classical way, and the resulting non-linear coupled equation is solved numerically. We successfully applied this model to recent experimental results obtained using FEL radiation.

  15. Formation of periodic mesoscale structures arranged in a circular symmetry at the silicon surface exposed to radiation of a single femtosecond laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romashevskiy, S.A., E-mail: sa.romashevskiy@gmail.com [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya st. 13, Bd. 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Ashitkov, S.I.; Ovchinnikov, A.V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya st. 13, Bd. 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Kondratenko, P.S. [Nuclear Safety Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Bol' shaya Tul' skaya st. 53, Moscow 115191 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutskiy per., Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Agranat, M.B. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya st. 13, Bd. 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Single pulse irradiation of silicon gave rise to the periodic mesoscale structures. • The number of the periodic structures depends on the incident laser fluence. • The theory of periodically modulated absorption of laser energy is proposed. - Abstract: The periodic mesoscale structures arranged in a circular symmetry were found at the silicon surface exposed to radiation of the single femtosecond laser pulse with a Gaussian intensity profile in the ambient air conditions. These peculiar structures have the appearance of the protrusions of ∼10 nm height and of ∼600 nm width (at a FWHM) separately located inside the ablated region with a period of the incident laser wavelength. It was found that their position at the surface corresponds to the specified laser intensity slightly above the ablation threshold. The number of the formed periodic structures varies with the fluence of the incident laser pulse and in our experiments it was found to have changed from one to eleven. We suppose that formation of these mesoscale structures is caused by heating of a microscale volume to the strongly defined temperature. The theoretical model was proposed to explain the obtained data. It assumes that the interference of incident laser radiation with laser-induced surface electromagnetic waves results in generation of periodic distribution of electron temperature. Thus formation of the periodic structures at the specified laser intensity is attributed to periodically modulated absorption of laser energy at a focal laser spot.

  16. Ballistic phonon and thermal radiation transport across a minute vacuum gap in between aluminum and silicon thin films: Effect of laser repetitive pulses on transport characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa; Ali, H.

    2016-08-15

    Short-pulse laser heating of aluminum and silicon thin films pair with presence of a minute vacuum gap in between them is considered and energy transfer across the thin films pair is predicted. The frequency dependent Boltzmann equation is used to predict the phonon intensity distribution along the films pair for three cycles of the repetitive short-pulse laser irradiation on the aluminum film surface. Since the gap size considered is within the Casimir limit, thermal radiation and ballistic phonon contributions to energy transfer across the vacuum gap is incorporated. The laser irradiated field is formulated in line with the Lambert's Beer law and it is considered as the volumetric source in the governing equations of energy transport. In order to assess the phonon intensity distribution in the films pair, equivalent equilibrium temperature is introduced. It is demonstrated that thermal separation of electron and lattice sub-systems in the aluminum film, due to the short-pulse laser irradiation, takes place and electron temperature remains high in the aluminum film while equivalent equilibrium temperature for phonons decays sharply in the close region of the aluminum film interface. This behavior is attributed to the phonon boundary scattering at the interface and the ballistic phonon transfer to the silicon film across the vacuum gap. Energy transfer due to the ballistic phonon contribution is significantly higher than that of the thermal radiation across the vacuum gap.

  17. Control of coherent excitation of neon in the extreme ultraviolet regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenge, Jürgen; Wirsing, Andreas; Raschpichler, Christopher; Wassermann, Bernhard; Rühl, Eckart

    2011-01-01

    Coherent excitation of a superposition of Rydberg states in neon by the 13th harmonic of an intense 804 nm pulse and the formation of a wave packet is reported. Pump-probe experiments are performed, where the 3d-manifold of the 2p6-->2p5 (2P3/2) 3d [1/2]1- and 2p6-->2p5 (2P3/2) 3d [3/2]1-transitions are excited by an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation pulse, which is centered at 20.05 eV photon energy. The temporal evolution of the excited state population is probed by ionization with a time-delayed 804 nm pulse. Control of coherent transient excitation and wave packet dynamics in the XUV-regime is demonstrated, where the spectral phase of the 13th harmonic is used as a control parameter. Modulation of the phase is achieved by propagation of the XUV-pulse through neon of variable gas density. The experimental results indicate that phase-shaped high-order harmonics can be used to control fundamental coherent excitation processes in the XUV-regime.

  18. Side effects from intense pulsed light: Importance of skin pigmentation, fluence level and ultraviolet radiation-A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaysen-Petersen, Daniel; Erlendsson, Andres M; Nash, J F; Beerwerth, Frank; Philipsen, Peter A; Wulf, Hans C; Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2017-01-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) is a mainstream treatment for hair removal. Side effects after IPL are known, but risk factors remain to be investigated. The objective of this study was to assess the contribution of skin pigmentation, fluence level, and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on IPL-induced side effects. The study was a blinded, randomized intra-individual controlled trial including 16 healthy subjects with Fitzpatrick Skin Types (FST) II-V. Three test areas were each divided into four sites, randomized to a single IPL exposure of 22, 34, 46 J/cm(2) or triple stacking of 46 J/cm(2) . Areas were subsequently randomized to no UVR or single solar-simulated UVR exposure of 3 Standard Erythema Dose at 30 minutes or 24 hours after IPL. Each area had a corresponding control, resulting in 15 treatment sites. Follow-up visits were scheduled up to 4 weeks after IPL. Outcome measures were: (i) blinded clinical skin reactions; (ii) objectively measured erythema and pigmentation; (iii) pain measured by visual analog scale (VAS); (iv) histology (H&E, Fontana-Masson); and (v) mRNA-expression of p53. Fifteen subjects with FST II-IV completed the protocol. IPL induced a wide range of skin reactions, including erythema (87% of subjects), purpura (27%), blisters (20%), edema (13%), crusting (13%), hyper- (60%), and hypopigmentation (20%). Darker skin pigmentation and increasing IPL fluence were determinants for IPL-induced side effects (P ≤ 0.002), while a single exposure of UVR did not exacerbate side effects (P ≥ 0.180). Clinical findings were confirmed objectively by reflectance spectrometry and qualitatively by histological changes in skin architecture, inflammatory infiltration, and pigmentation. Marker of cellular DNA damage, that is, p53, did not increase after IPL (P ≥ 0.24). Skin pigmentation and IPL fluence are major determinants of side effects after IPL exposure, while a single exposure to three SED of UVR at 30 minutes or 24 hours after IPL

  19. Optical sensor based on fluorescent quenching and pulsed blue LED excitation for long-term monitoring of dissolved oxygen in NASA space bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Frank G; Fay, James M; Mathew, Grace; Jeevarajan, Antony S; Anderson, Melody M

    2005-01-01

    There is a need to monitor the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) present in the culture medium for NASA's space cell biology experiments, as well as in earth-based cell cultures. Continuous measurement of DO concentration in the cell culture medium in perfused bioreactors requires that the oxygen sensor provide adequate sensitivity and low toxicity to the cells, as well as maintain calibration over several weeks. Although there are a number of sensors for dissolved oxygen on the market and under development elsewhere, very few meet these stringent conditions. An in-house optical oxygen sensor (HOXY) based on dynamic fluorescent quenching of Tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) chloride and a pulsed blue LED light source was developed in our laboratory to address these requirements. The sensing element consisted of the fluorescent dye embedded in a silicone matrix and coated onto a glass capillary. Photobleaching was minimized by a pulsed LED light source. The total noise in the sensor output is 2% and the sensor dynamic range is 0 to 200 mm Hg. The resolution of the sensor is 0.1 mm Hg at 50 mm Hg, and 0.25 mm Hg at 130 mm Hg, while the accuracy is 5%. The LED-based oxygen sensor exhibited stable performance and low drift, making it compatible for space-flight bioreactor systems.

  20. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for pancreatic and prostate cancer using pulsed low–dose rate delivery techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Kang, Shengwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital, Chengdu (China); Lin, Mu-han; Chen, Xiaoming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chen, Fu; Guo, Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eye Ear Nose and Throat Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Lili [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie, E-mail: charlie.ma@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Reirradiation of patients who were previously treated with radiotherapy is vastly challenging. Pulsed low–dose rate (PLDR) external beam radiotherapy has the potential to reduce normal tissue toxicities while providing significant tumor control for recurrent cancers. This work investigates treatment planning techniques for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-based PLDR treatment of various sites, including cases with pancreatic and prostate cancer. A total of 20 patients with clinical recurrence were selected for this study, including 10 cases with pancreatic cancer and 10 with prostate cancer. Large variations in the target volume were included to test the ability of IMRT using the existing treatment planning system and optimization algorithm to deliver uniform doses in individual gantry angles/fields for PLDR treatments. Treatment plans were generated with 10 gantry angles using the step-and-shoot IMRT delivery technique, which can be delivered in 3-minute intervals to achieve an effective low dose rate of 6.7 cGy/min. Instead of dose constraints on critical structures, ring structures were mainly used in PLDR-IMRT optimization. In this study, the PLDR-IMRT plans were compared with the PLDR-3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans and the PLDR-RapidArc plans. For the 10 cases with pancreatic cancer that were investigated, the mean planning target volume (PTV) dose for each gantry angle in the PLDR-IMRT plans ranged from 17.6 to 22.4 cGy. The maximum doses ranged between 22.9 and 34.8 cGy. The minimum doses ranged from 8.2 to 17.5 cGy. For the 10 cases with prostate cancer that were investigated, the mean PTV doses for individual gantry angles ranged from 18.8 to 22.6 cGy. The maximum doses per gantry angle were between 24.0 and 34.7 cGy. The minimum doses per gantry angle ranged from 4.4 to 17.4 cGy. A significant reduction in the organ at risk (OAR) dose was observed with the PLDR-IMRT plan when compared with that using the PLDR-3DCRT

  1. Investigating the performances of a 1 MV high pulsed power linear transformer driver: from beam dynamics to x radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maisonny

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a 1 MV pulsed high-power linear transformer driver accelerator were extensively investigated based on a numerical approach which utilizes both electromagnetic and Monte Carlo simulations. Particle-in-cell calculations were employed to examine the beam dynamics throughout the magnetically insulated transmission line which governs the coupling between the generator and the electron diode. Based on the information provided by the study of the beam dynamics, and using Monte Carlo methods, the main properties of the resulting x radiation were predicted. Good agreement was found between these simulations and experimental results. This work provides a detailed understanding of mechanisms affecting the performances of this type of high current, high-voltage pulsed accelerator, which are very promising for a growing number of applications.

  2. The early stages of silicon surface damage induced by pulsed CO{sub 2} laser radiation: an AFM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, D.-Q.; Sacher, E.; Meunier, M

    2004-01-30

    The early stages of the surface microstructural modification of silicon, induced by single pulses of CO{sub 2} laser irradiation ({lambda}=10.6 {mu}m), have been studied, in both vacuum and air, by contact mode AFM. The laser pulse was found to be absorbed at the front surface of the sample, facing the laser; this was shown to be due to the presence of native oxide, which absorbs at this wavelength. We found that this absorption of energy caused the stress-induced formation of vertically oriented, square-shaped fragments, 400-700 nm in length, often with short branches, that form a wall around the impact site; they oriented toward the plane of the sample with distance from the impact site, aligning more in the electric field direction of the pulse. In addition, electrically charged, branched fragments were redeposited at the outer extremities of the pulse site.

  3. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Balling, Peter; Frislev, Martin Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We report an approach to modeling the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and dielectric materials. The model includes the excitation of carriers by the laser through strongfield excitation, collisional excitation, and absorption in the plasma consisting of conduction-band electrons formed...

  4. Comparison of luminescence spectra of natural spodumene under KrCl laser and e-beam excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatov, E.I. [High Current Electronics Institute SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Avenue, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: lipatov@loi.hcei.tsc.ru; Orlovskii, V.M. [High Current Electronics Institute SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Avenue, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Tarasenko, V.F. [High Current Electronics Institute SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Avenue, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Solomonov, V.I. [Institute of Electrophysics UB RAS, 106, Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-15

    Spectral characteristics of pulsed photoluminescence (PL) and pulsed cathodoluminescence (PCL) of a natural spodumene were investigated. PL was excited by laser radiation at 222 nm with pulse duration of 10 ns at FWHM. PCL was excited by electron beams with pulse duration from 0.1 up to 4 ns and with current densities of 40-200 A/cm{sup 2}. There was a dominant broad band at 600 nm due to the manganese impurity in PCL spectra. But in PL spectra, the orange band had the intensity comparable with intensities of intrinsic defect bands. At sample cooling by liquid nitrogen, the intensity of orange band in the PCL spectrum increased by two times and the short-wave shoulder of the band reduced.

  5. Effect of the excitation source on the quantum-yield measurements of rhodamine B laser dye studied using thermal-lens technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindhu, C V; Harilal, S S

    2001-01-01

    A dual-beam transient thermal-lens technique was employed for the determination of absolute fluorescence quantum-yield measurements of Rhodamine B laser dye in different solvents. We investigated the effect of excitation on the absolute fluorescence quantum yield of Rhodamine B. 514 nm radiation from an argon ion laser was used as a cw excitation source and 532 nm pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser were used as a pulsed excitation source. The fluorescence quantum-yield values were found to be strongly influenced by environmental effects as well as the transient nature of the excitation beam. Our results also indicate that parameters, like the concentration of the dye solution, aggregate formation and excited state absorption, affect the absolute values of the fluorescence yield significantly.

  6. High frequency excitation waveform for efficient operation of a xenon excimer dielectric barrier discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleznai, Sz; Mihajlik, G.; Maros, I.; Balázs, L.; Richter, P.

    2010-01-01

    The application of a high frequency (~2.5 MHz) burst (amplitude-modulated sinusoidal) excitation voltage waveform is investigated for driving a fluorescent dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) light source. The excitation waveform presents a novel method for generating spatially stable homogeneous Xe DBD possessing a high conversion efficiency from electrical energy to VUV Xe_{2}^{\\ast} excimer radiation (~172 nm), even at a significantly higher electrical energy deposition than realized by pulsed excitation. Simulation and experimental results predict discharge efficiencies around 60%. Lamp efficacy above 74 lm W-1 has been achieved. VUV emission and loss mechanisms are investigated extensively and the performance of burst and pulsed waveforms is compared both theoretically and experimentally.

  7. High frequency excitation waveform for efficient operation of a xenon excimer dielectric barrier discharge lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beleznai, Sz; Mihajlik, G; Richter, P [Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 3-9.Muegyetem rkp., Budapest H-1111 (Hungary); Maros, I; Balazs, L, E-mail: beleznai@dept.phy.bme.h [GE Consumer and Industrial-Lighting, 77 Vaci ut, Budapest H-1344 (Hungary)

    2010-01-13

    The application of a high frequency ({approx}2.5 MHz) burst (amplitude-modulated sinusoidal) excitation voltage waveform is investigated for driving a fluorescent dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) light source. The excitation waveform presents a novel method for generating spatially stable homogeneous Xe DBD possessing a high conversion efficiency from electrical energy to VUV Xe{sub 2}{sup *} excimer radiation ({approx}172 nm), even at a significantly higher electrical energy deposition than realized by pulsed excitation. Simulation and experimental results predict discharge efficiencies around 60%. Lamp efficacy above 74 lm W{sup -1} has been achieved. VUV emission and loss mechanisms are investigated extensively and the performance of burst and pulsed waveforms is compared both theoretically and experimentally.

  8. Ultra-short strong excitation of two-level systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pankaj K.; Eleuch, Hichem; Grazioso, Fabio

    2014-11-01

    We present a model describing the use of ultra-short strong pulses to control the population of the excited level of a two-level quantum system. In particular, we study an off-resonance excitation with a few cycles pulse which presents a smooth phase jump i.e. a change of the pulse's phase which is not step-like, but happens over a finite time interval. A numerical solution is given for the time-dependent probability amplitude of the excited level. The control of the excited level's population is obtained acting on the shape of the phase transient, and other parameters of the excitation pulse.

  9. Continuous and Pulsed THz generation with molecular gas lasers and photoconductive antennas gated by femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Flavio C.; Nogueira, T.; Costa, Leverson F. L.; Jarschel, Paulo F.; Frateschi, Newton C.; Viscovini, Ronaldo C.; Vieira, Bruno R. B.; Guevara, Victor M. B.; Pereira, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    We report THz generation based on two systems: 1) continuous-wave (cw) laser generation in molecular gas lasers, and 2) short pulse generation in photoconductive antennas, gated by femtosecond near-infrared Ti:sapphire lasers. With the first system, we have generated tens of monochromatic cw laser lines over the last years, extending roughly from 40 microns to several hundred microns. This is done by optical pumping of gas lasers based on polar molecules such as methanol and its isotopes. In the second system, under development, pulsed THz radiation is generated by a photoconductive antenna built in a semi-insulating GaAs substrate excited by femtosecond pulses from a near-infrared (800 nm) Ti:sapphire laser.

  10. Collisional-radiative calculations for the J = 0‑1 lasing line of neon-like germanium under anisotropic excitation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentotoche, M. S.; Inal, M. K.; Benmouna, M.

    2018-02-01

    A new asymmetry parameter characterizing the differences between the polarized π and σ gain components of the soft-x-ray J = 0–1 lasing line of neon-like ions is calculated in the case of Ge22+ assuming an electron distribution which is a weighted sum of an isotropic Maxwellian and a monoenergetic beam. Using a quasi steady-state collisional-radiative model, we determine in the weak amplification regime the relative populations of the upper M = 0 and lower M=0,+/- 1 magnetic sublevels of the lasing line as a function of electron density from 1020 to 2× {10}21 cm‑3. This model includes inelastic and elastic collisional transitions, as well as spontaneous radiative decay between all the 337 M-sublevels arising from the 75 lowest-lying Ge22+ J-levels. The computations were performed for a temperature {T}{{e}} of the Maxwellian component between 1.2× {10}6 and 8× {10}6 K, a kinetic energy E 0 and a fraction f of the beam component in the ranges 1.5{--}20 {keV} and 0.1 % {--}10 % , respectively. The basic atomic data, such as level energies, radiative decay probabilities and inelastic collision strengths, were calculated with the flexible atomic code. However, some modifications of this code were made to get the collision strengths for transitions between M-sublevels due to impact with isotropic electrons as well as due to impact with an electron beam in the case of de-excitation. We find that the newly introduced asymmetry parameter may become significant under certain conditions of electron distribution corresponding to relatively low {T}{{e}} (1.2× {10}6{--}2.5× {10}6 K) and E 0 (3–6 keV). The results reported here may be useful in the evaluation of the polarization degree of the J = 0–1 x-ray laser output from a germanium plasma in the presence of fast directional electrons.

  11. Calibrated Pulse-Thermography Procedure for Inspecting HDPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Omar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript discusses the application of a pulse-thermography modality to evaluate the integrity of a high-density polyethylene HDPE joint for delamination, in nonintrusive manner. The inspected HDPE structure is a twin-cup shape, molded through extrusion, and the inspection system comprises a high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulse to excite thermal emission; the text calibrates the experiment settings (pulse duration, and detector sampling rate to accommodate HDPE bulks thermal response. The acquired thermal scans are processed through new contrast computation named “self-referencing”, to investigate the joint tensile strength and further map its adhesion interface in real-time. The proposed system (hardware, software combination performance is assessed through an ultrasound C-scan validation and further benchmarked using a standard pulse phase thermography (PPT routine.

  12. Improving the precision of linear optics measurements based on turn-by-turn beam position monitor data after a pulsed excitation in lepton storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, L.; Coello de Portugal, J.; Persson, T.; Skowroński, P. K.; Tomás, R.; Franchi, A.; Liuzzo, S.

    2017-08-01

    Beam optics control is of critical importance for machine performance and protection. Nowadays, turn-by-turn (TbT) beam position monitor (BPM) data are increasingly exploited as they allow for fast and simultaneous measurement of various optics quantities. Nevertheless, so far the best documented uncertainty of measured β -functions is of about 10‰ rms. In this paper we compare the β -functions of the ESRF storage ring measured from two different TbT techniques—the N-BPM and the Amplitude methods—with the ones inferred from a measurement of the orbit response matrix (ORM). We show how to improve the precision of TbT techniques by refining the Fourier transform of TbT data with properly chosen excitation amplitude. The precision of the N-BPM method is further improved by refining the phase advance measurement. This represents a step forward compared to standard TbT measurements. First experimental results showing the precision of β -functions pushed down to 4‰ both in TbT and ORM techniques are reported and commented.

  13. Total Ionizing Dose Response of Hafnium-Oxide Based MOS Devices to Low-Dose-Rate Gamma Ray Radiation Observed by Pulse CV and On-Site Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yifei; Zhao, Ce Zhou; Lu, Qifeng; Zhao, Chun; Qi, Yanfei; Lam, Sang; Mitrovic, Ivona Z.; Taylor, Stephen; Chalker, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the low-dose-rate radiation response of Al-HfO2/SiO2-Si MOS devices, where the gate dielectric was formed by atomic layer deposition with 4.7 nm equivalent oxide thickness. The degradation of the devices was characterized by a pulse capacitance-voltage (CV) and on-site radiation response techniques under continuous gamma (γ) ray exposure at a relatively low-dose-rate of 0.116 rad(HfO2)/s. A significant variation of the flat-band voltage shift of up to ± 1.1 V under positive and negative biased irradiation, with the total dose of up to 40 krad (HfO2) and the electric field of 0.5 MV/cm, has been measured on the HfO2-based MOS devices using the proposed techniques, not apparent by conventional CV measurements. The large flat-band voltage shift is mainly attributed to the radiation-induced oxide trapped charges, which are not readily compensated by bias-induced charges produced over the measurement timescales of less than 5 ms. Analysis of the experimental results suggest that both hole and electron trapping can dominate the radiation response performance of the HfO2-based MOS devices depending on the applied bias. No distinct loop width variation has been found with irradiation in all cases.

  14. Plasma response to transient high voltage pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solitary electron and ion holes) is reviewed for a metallic electrode covered by a dielectric material. The wave excitation during and after the pulse withdrawal, excitation and propagation characteristics of various electrostatic plasma waves are ...

  15. Photobleaching response of different sources of chromophoric dissolved organic matter exposed to natural solar radiation using absorption and excitation-emission matrix spectra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlin Zhang

    Full Text Available CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN:TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN:TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254, was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 0-9, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%-5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein

  16. Photobleaching response of different sources of chromophoric dissolved organic matter exposed to natural solar radiation using absorption and excitation-emission matrix spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN:TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN:TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254), was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 0-9, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%-5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein

  17. Features of the scattering of focused terahertz radiation from the probe of a terahertz near-field microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trukhin, V. N.; Samoylov, L. L.; Khor'kov, D. P.

    2013-02-01

    The scattering of pulsed terahertz radiation from metallic probes in the form of thin cylinders and cones with a small opening angle, which are used in apertureless terahertz near-field microscopes, has been investigated. The extrema of the waveform of pulsed terahertz radiation scattered from a free probe are linearly shifted with a change in the vertical position of the probe, and the spectral distribution is characterized by an inversely proportional frequency dependence. In the presence of a reflecting surface under the probe, when new excitation and detection directions appear, the spectrum of scattered terahertz radiation does not differ from the spectrum of the incident radiation. The experimental data are in mutual agreement with the theoretical results obtained within the model of the generation of diffraction edge waves at the interface of inhomogeneous excitation between the excitation region and shadow region.

  18. Compression and radiation of high-power short rf pulses. I. Energy accumulation in direct-flow waveguide compressors

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    Proper design of efficient requires precise understanding of the physics pertinent to energy accumulation and exhaust processes in resonant waveguide cavities. In this paper, practically for the first time these highly non-monotonic transient processes are studied in detail using a rigorous time-domain approach. Additionally, influence of the geometrical design and excitation parameters on the compressor\\'s performance is quantified in detail.

  19. The effect of pulsed laser radiation on a thermoviscoelastic semi-infinite solid under two-temperature theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Mohamed I.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the thermoviscoelastic interactions in a homogeneous, isotropic semi-infinite solid under two-temperature theory with heat source. The Kelvin-Voigt model of linear viscoelasticity which describes the viscoelastic nature of the material is used. The bounding plane surface of the medium is subjected to a non-Gaussian laser pulse. The generalized thermoelasticity theory with dual phase lags model is used to solve this problem. Laplace transform technique is used to obtain the general solution for a suitable set of boundary conditions. Some comparisons have been shown in figures to estimate the effects of the phase lags, viscosity, temperature discrepancy, laser-pulse and the laser intensity parameters on all the studied fields. A comparison was also made with the results obtained in the case of one temperature thermoelasticity theory.

  20. CO{sub 2} laser pulse shortening by laser ablation of a metal target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, T.; Mazoyer, M.; Lynch, A.; O' Sullivan, G.; O' Reilly, F.; Dunne, P.; Cummins, T. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2012-03-15

    A repeatable and flexible technique for pulse shortening of laser pulses has been applied to transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} laser pulses. The technique involves focusing the laser output onto a highly reflective metal target so that plasma is formed, which then operates as a shutter due to strong laser absorption and scattering. Precise control of the focused laser intensity allows for timing of the shutter so that different temporal portions of the pulse can be reflected from the target surface before plasma formation occurs. This type of shutter enables one to reduce the pulse duration down to {approx}2 ns and to remove the low power, long duration tails that are present in TEA CO{sub 2} pulses. The transmitted energy is reduced as the pulse duration is decreased but the reflected power is {approx}10 MW for all pulse durations. A simple laser heating model verifies that the pulse shortening depends directly on the plasma formation time, which in turn is dependent on the applied laser intensity. It is envisaged that this plasma shutter will be used as a tool for pulse shaping in the search for laser pulse conditions to optimize conversion efficiency from laser energy to useable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation for EUV source development.

  1. Luminescent rise times of inorganic phosphors excited by high intensity ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R J; Ricchio, S G

    1973-11-01

    The relative delay between excitation and luminescence was measured for a number of common inorganic phosphors using short, high intensity excitation pulses. The delays were found to be much shorter than anticipated; on the basis of low intensity pulsed luminescence measurements and were found to be extremely intensity-dependent. Both the luminescence rise and decay times were found to be intensitydependent as well, with the luminescence pulse waveform tending to approach the exciting pulse at the higher excitation intensities.

  2. Ultrashort laser pulse-induced anti-Stokes photoluminescence of hot electrons in gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikov, D. S.; Yurkevich, A. A.; Kotelev, M. S.; Ziangirova, M.; Chefonov, O. V.; Ilina, I. V.; Vinokurov, V. A.; Muradov, A. V.; Itzkan, I.; Agranat, M. B.; Perelman, L. T.

    2014-07-01

    We report observing anti-Stokes broadband radiation induced in gold nanorods by ultrashort laser pulses. The radiation is in the visible spectral range along with the second harmonic peak. Unlike conventional photoluminescence of metal nanoparticles, the energy of the excitation photons is smaller than the gap between the top of the d band and the Fermi level. Because the gold nanorods are irradiated with a pulse whose time is shorter than the electron-phonon equilibration time in gold, the energy is absorbed by s/p band electrons, creating a temperature difference between the electrons and the lattice, as described by the two-temperature model. Therefore, we identify the origin of the observed radiation as the recombination of hot conduction electrons with the d band holes created by the same ultrashort laser pulse.

  3. Excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1974-01-01

    Excited States, Volume I reviews radiationless transitions, phosphorescence microwave double resonance through optical spectra in molecular solids, dipole moments in excited states, luminescence of polar molecules, and the problem of interstate interaction in aromatic carbonyl compounds. The book discusses the molecular electronic radiationless transitions; the double resonance techniques and the relaxation mechanisms involving the lowest triplet state of aromatic compounds; as well as the optical spectra and relaxation in molecular solids. The text also describes dipole moments and polarizab

  4. Backward stimulated radiation from filaments in Nitrogen gas and air pumped by circularly polarized 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Mitryukovskiy, Sergey; Ding, Pengji; Houard, Aurélien; Mysyrowicz, André

    2014-01-01

    We report on strong backward stimulated emission at 337 nm in Nitrogen gas pumped by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm. A distinct dependence of the backward UV spectrum on pump laser polarization and intensity is observed, pointing to the occurrence of backward amplified spontaneous emission inside filaments. We attribute the population inversion to inelastic collision between the free electrons produced by the pump laser and neutral N2 molecules. The addition of Oxygen molecules is detrimental for the gain, reducing it to near threshold at atmospheric concentration.

  5. Propulsion of a flat tin target with pulsed CO2 laser radiation: measurements using a ballistic pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatosh, B. V.; Abramenko, D. B.; Ivanov, V. V.; Medvedev, V. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Yakunin, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    The recoil momentum transfer produced by irradiation of a flat tin (Sn) target with pulses of high-power CO2 laser with intensity ranging from 107 to 1010 W cm-2 has been studied. Momentum measurements were performed using a ballistic pendulum, capable of measuring momenta as small as 0.001 g · cm s-1 . It has been established that the recoil momentum monotonically increases with the laser energy and asymptotically reaches the power scaling law p ∼ Iα with α = 0.96 +/- 0.07 . Results are compared with previously published theoretical studies.

  6. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vodungbo, B.; Tudu, B.; Perron, J.; Delaunay, R.; Müller, L.; Berntsen, M.H.; Grübel, G.; Malinowski, G.; Weier, C.; Gautier, J.; Lambert, G.; Zeitoun, P.; Gutt, C.; Jal, E.; Reid, A.H.; Granitzka, P.W.; Jaouen, N,; Dakovski, G.L.; Moeller, S.; Minitti, M.P.; Mitra, A.; Carron, S.; Pfau, B.; von Korff Schmising, C.; Schneider, M.; Eisebitt, S.; Lüning, J.

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium

  7. Influence of laser pulse duration on extreme ultraviolet and ion emission features from tin plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Harilal, S. S.; Polek, M. P.; Hassan, S. M.; Endo, A.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the role of laser pulse duration and intensity on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) generation and ion emission from a laser produced Sn plasma. For producing plasmas, planar slabs of pure Sn were irradiated with 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses with varying pulse duration (5-20 ns) and intensity. Experimental results performed at CMUXE indicate that the conversion efficiency (CE) of the EUV radiation strongly depend on laser pulse width and intensity, with a maximum CE of ˜2.0% measured for the shortest laser pulse width used (5 ns). Faraday Cup ion analysis of Sn plasma showed that the ion flux kinetic profiles are shifted to higher energy side with the reduction in laser pulse duration and narrower ion kinetic profiles are obtained for the longest pulse width used. However, our initial results showed that at a constant laser energy, the ion flux is more or less constant regardless of the excitation laser pulse width. The enhanced EUV emission obtained at shortest laser pulse duration studied is related to efficient laser-plasma reheating supported by presence of higher energy ions at these pulse durations.

  8. Influence of laser pulse duration on extreme ultraviolet and ion emission features from tin plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, A., E-mail: roy@fzu.cz, E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in [HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-Pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Harilal, S. S.; Polek, M. P.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Endo, A. [HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-Pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-03-15

    We investigated the role of laser pulse duration and intensity on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) generation and ion emission from a laser produced Sn plasma. For producing plasmas, planar slabs of pure Sn were irradiated with 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses with varying pulse duration (5–20 ns) and intensity. Experimental results performed at CMUXE indicate that the conversion efficiency (CE) of the EUV radiation strongly depend on laser pulse width and intensity, with a maximum CE of ∼2.0% measured for the shortest laser pulse width used (5 ns). Faraday Cup ion analysis of Sn plasma showed that the ion flux kinetic profiles are shifted to higher energy side with the reduction in laser pulse duration and narrower ion kinetic profiles are obtained for the longest pulse width used. However, our initial results showed that at a constant laser energy, the ion flux is more or less constant regardless of the excitation laser pulse width. The enhanced EUV emission obtained at shortest laser pulse duration studied is related to efficient laser-plasma reheating supported by presence of higher energy ions at these pulse durations.

  9. Reduction of the pulse duration of the ultrafast laser pulses of the Two-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (2PLSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshak Ali

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We provide an update of our two-photon laser scanning microscope by compressing or reducing the broadening of the pulse width of ultrafast laser pulses for dispersion precompensation, to enable the pulses to penetrate deeply inside the sample. Findings The broadening comes as the pulses pass through the optical elements. We enhanced and modified the quality and the sharpness of images by enhancing the resolution using special polarizer namely Glan Laser polarizer GL10. This polarizer consists of two prisms separated by air space. This air separation between the two prisms uses to delay the red wavelength when the light leaves the first prism to the air then to second prism. We note a considerable enhancing with using the GL polarizer, and we can see the details of the leaf structure in early stages when we trying to get focus through z-stacks of images in comparison to exactly the same measurements without using GL polarizer. Hence, with this modification we able to reduce the time of exposure the sample to the laser radiation thereby we will reduce the probability of photobleaching and phototoxicity. When the pulse width reduced, the average power of the laser pulses maintained at a constant level. Significant enhancement is found between the two kinds of images of the Two-Photon Excitation Fluorescence (TPEF. Conclusion In summary reduction the laser pulse width allowed to collect more diffraction orders which will used to form the images. The more diffraction orders the higher resolution images.

  10. Taking X-ray Diffraction to the Limit: Macromolecular Structures from Femtosecond X-ray Pulses and Diffraction Microscopy of Cells with Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Miao, J; Kirz, J; Sayre, D; Hodgson, K O

    2003-10-01

    The methodology of X-ray crystallography has recently been successfully extended to the structure determination of non-crystalline specimens. The phase problem was solved by using the oversampling method, which takes advantage of ''continuous'' diffraction pattern from non-crystalline specimens. Here we review the principle of this newly developed technique and discuss the ongoing experiments of imaging non-periodic objects, like cells and cellular structures using coherent and bright X-rays from the 3rd generation synchrotron radiation. In the longer run, the technique may be applied to image single biomolecules by using the anticipated X-ray free electron lasers. Computer simulations have so far demonstrated two important steps: (1) by using an extremely intense femtosecond X-ray pulse, a diffraction pattern can be recorded from a macromolecule before radiation damage manifests itself, and (2) the phase information can be ab initio retrieved from a set of calculated noisy diffraction patterns of single protein molecules.

  11. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.

  12. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bharati; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H; Granitzka, Patrick W; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.

  13. Research of burning of methane in a supersonic stream of the caused cross-section pulse-periodic laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zudov, Vladimir N.; Tretyakov, Pavel K.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of a focused pulsed-periodic beam of a CO2 laser on initiation and evolution of combustion in subsonic and supersonic flows of homogeneous fuel-air mixtures (CH4 + air) is experimentally studied. The beam generated by the CO2 laser propagates across the flow and is focused by a lens at the jet axis. The flow structure is determined by a schlieren system with a slot and a plane knife aligned in the streamwise direction. The image is recorded by a high speed camera with an exposure time of 1.5 μs and a frame frequency of 1000 s-1. The structure of the combustion region is studied by an example of inherent luminescence of the flame at the wavelengths of OH and CH radicals. The distribution of the emission intensity of the mixture components in the optical discharge region is investigated in the present experiments by methods of emission spectroscopy.

  14. Transmission of 1064 nm laser radiation during ablation with an ultra-short pulse laser (USPL) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelle, Florian; Meister, Jörg; Oehme, Bernd; Frentzen, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    During ablation of oral hard tissue with an USPL system a small amount of the incident laser power does not contribute to the ablation process and is being transmitted. Partial transmission of ultra-short laser pulses could potentially affect the dental pulp. The aim of this study was to assess the transmission during ablation and to deduce possible risks for the patient. The study was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser, emitting pulses with a duration of 8 ps at a wavelength of 1064 nm. A repetition rate of 500 kHz and an average power of 9 W were chosen to achieve high ablation efficiency. A scanner system created square cavities with an edge length of 1 mm. Transmission during ablation of mammoth ivory and dentin slices with a thickness of 2 mm and 5 mm was measured with a power meter, placed directly beyond the samples. Effects on subjacent blood were observed by ablating specimens placed in contact to pork blood. In a separate measurement the temperature increase during ablation was monitored using an infrared camera. The influence of transmission was assessed by tuning down the laser to the corresponding power and then directly irradiating the blood. Transmission during ablation of 2 mm specimens was about 7.7% (ivory) and 9.6% (dentin) of the incident laser power. Ablation of specimens directly in contact to blood caused coagulation at longer irradiation times (t~18s). Direct irradiation of blood with the transmitted power provoked bubbling and smoke formation. Temperature measurements identified heat generation as the main reason for the observed coagulation.

  15. RESEARCH OF THE ENTRANCE ANGLE EFFECT ON THE REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF THE STAINLESS STEEL SURFACE OXIDIZED BY PULSED LASER RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Veiko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.Oxide films on the metal surfaces can be obtained both by surface-uniform infrared heating and local laser treatment e.g. by sequence of nanosecond laser pulses. Due to interference in created films the coloration of treated area is observed. The present work shows the results of spectrophotometric measurements for various light entrance angles in the range of 10-60°. Method. AISI 304 stainless steel plates were oxidized by two methods: in muffle furnace FM - 10 (Т= 500-600° С, t = 5-7 min. and at line-by-line scanning by sequence of nanosecond laser pulses (λ = 1.06 μm, τ =100 ns, r = 25 μm,q=2.91∙107 W/cm2, Nx = 30, Ny = 1. Surface research in optical resolution was realized by Carl Zeiss Axio Imager A1M. Reflectance spectra were obtained with spectrophotometer Lambda Perkin 1050 with integrating sphere at different fixed light incidence angles. Topographic features were detected by scanning probe microscopy investigation with NanoEducator equipment. Main Results. The quantitative surface geometry characteristics of AISI 304 stainless steel patterns treated by different methods are obtained. It was found that the increase of light entrance angle has no influence on the form of reflection coefficient dependence from a wavelength, but a blue-shift occurs especially for the case of laser treatment. This difference can be caused by surface topology formed by laser heating and variety of oxide film thickness. This effect results in more significant change in observed sample color for laser treatment then for infrared heating. Practical Relevance. The results obtained in the present work can be used to implement a new element of product protection against forgery with the product marking.

  16. Translation and Rotation of Transformation Media under Electromagnetic Pulse

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Xu, Hongyi; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    ...'. Here we investigate responses of three transformation media under electromagnetic pulses, and find that pulse radiation can induce unbalanced net force on transformation media, which will cause...

  17. Spectral photoluminescence for the characterization of excitation states in semiconductors and fluorescence solar collectors with manipulation of the in and out coupling of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knabe, Sebastian

    2011-05-20

    In this thesis results of different experiments are presented (e.g. angular dependent photoluminescence) to characterize the propagation of electro-magnetic radiation inside and out of absorbers using the examples of crystalline silicon and fluorescence collectors with and without manipulation of the in- and out-coupling of the radiation by photonic structures (opal and edge filters). Experimental results were compared with results from simulations of the propagation of radiation, which are based on the fundamental equations for the properties of electro-magnetic radiation like reflection, transmission, absorption or phase accumulation.

  18. Study of hydrogen ECR plasma in a simple mirror magnetic trap heated by 75 GHz pulsed gyrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalyga, V. A.; Izotov, I. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Golubev, S. V.; Razin, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge sustained by millimeter wave radiation is widely used for production of ion beams of different kind. The main trend in ECR ion sources development nowadays is an increase of frequency and power of microwave heating. The most advanced systems use gyrotrons in 24-60 GHz frequency range. In previous studies at IAP RAS it was demonstrated that ECR source SMIS 37 (Simple Mirror Ion Source) with 37.5 GHz heating operating in quasigasdynamic regime of plasma confinement is able to produce proton and deuteron beams with ion current density about 700 mA/cm2. As the next step of these investigations plasma properties of the discharge sustained by 75 GHz radiation have been studied. Plasma density and electron temperature were determined using spectroscopic and Langmuir probe techniques. It was demonstrated that plasma density could reach values close to 1014 cm-3 and that is of great interest for further development of high current ion sources for various applications.

  19. CINE: Comet INfrared Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-08-01

    CINE calculates infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. One of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets is the fluorescence by the solar radiation followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state. This command-line tool calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Fluorescence coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  20. Root-flipped multiband refocusing pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj; Lustig, Michael; Grissom, William A

    2016-01-01

    To design low peak power multiband refocusing radiofrequency pulses, with application to simultaneous multislice spin echo MRI. Multiband Shinnar-Le Roux β polynomials were designed using convex optimization. A Monte Carlo algorithm was used to determine patterns of β polynomial root flips that minimized the peak power of the resulting refocusing pulses. Phase-matched multiband excitation pulses were also designed to obtain linear-phase spin echoes. Simulations compared the performance of the root-flipped pulses with time-shifted and phase-optimized pulses. Phantom and in vivo experiments at 7T validated the function of the root-flipped pulses and compared them to time-shifted spin echo signal profiles. Averaged across number of slices, time-bandwidth product, and slice separation, the root-flipped pulses have 46% shorter durations than time-shifted pulses with the same peak radiofrequency amplitude. Unlike time-shifted and phase-optimized pulses, the root-flipped pulses' excitation errors do not increase with decreasing band separation. Experiments showed that the root-flipped pulses excited the desired slices at the target locations, and that for equivalent slice characteristics, the shorter root-flipped pulses allowed shorter echo times, resulting in higher signal than time-shifted pulses. The proposed root-flipped multiband radiofrequency pulse design method produces low peak power pulses for simultaneous multislice spin echo MRI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The evolutionary diversification of parrots supports a taxon pulse model with multiple trans-oceanic dispersal events and local radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Manuel; Seehausen, Ole; Güntert, Marcel; Hertwig, Stefan T

    2010-03-01

    Vicariance is thought to have played a major role in the evolution of modern parrots. However, as the relationships especially of the African taxa remained mostly unresolved, it has been difficult to draw firm conclusions about the roles of dispersal and vicariance. Our analyses using the broadest taxon sampling of old world parrots ever based on 3219bp of three nuclear genes revealed well-resolved and congruent phylogenetic hypotheses. Agapornis of Africa and Madagascar was found to be the sister group to Loriculus of Australasia and Indo-Malayasia and together they clustered with the Australasian Loriinae, Cyclopsittacini and Melopsittacus. Poicephalus and Psittacus from mainland Africa formed the sister group of the Neotropical Arini and Coracopsis from Madagascar and adjacent islands may be the closest relative of Psittrichas from New Guinea. These biogeographic relationships are best explained by independent colonization of the African continent via trans-oceanic dispersal from Australasia and Antarctica in the Paleogene following what may have been vicariance events in the late Cretaceous and/or early Paleogene. Our data support a taxon pulse model for the diversification of parrots whereby trans-oceanic dispersal played a more important role than previously thought and was the prerequisite for range expansion into new continents. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Superluminal pulse propagation and amplification without inversion of microwave radiation via four-wave mixing in superconducting phase quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini Sabegh, Z.; Vafafard, A.; Maleki, M. A.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-08-01

    We study the interaction of the microwave fields with an array of superconducting phase quantum circuits. It is shown that the different four-level configurations i.e. cascade, N-type, diamond, Y-type and inverted Y-type systems can be obtained in the superconducting phase quantum circuits by keeping the third order of the Josephson junction potential expansion whereas by dropping the third order term, just the cascade configuration can be established. We study the propagation and amplification of a microwave field in a four-level cascade quantum system, which is realized in an array of superconducting phase quantum circuits. We find that by increasing the microwave pump tones feeding the system, the normal dispersion switches to the anomalous and the gain-assisted superluminal microwave propagation is obtained in an array of many superconducting phase quantum circuits. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the stimulated microwave field is generated via four-wave mixing without any inversion population in the energy levels of the system (amplification without inversion) and the group velocity of the generated pulse can be controlled by the external oscillating magnetic fluxes. We also show that in some special set of parameters, the absorption-free superluminal generated microwave propagation is obtained in superconducting phase quantum circuit system.

  3. Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, W.P.; Esarey, E.; van Tilborg, J.; Michel, P.A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2004-10-01

    Electron beam based radiation sources provide electromagnetic radiation for countless applications. The properties of the radiation are primarily determined by the properties of the electron beam. Compact laser driven accelerators are being developed that can provide ultra-short electron bunches (femtosecond duration) with relativistic energies reaching towards a GeV. The electron bunches are produced when an intense laser interacts with a dense plasma and excites a large amplitude plasma density modulation (wakefield) that can trap background electrons and accelerate them to high energies. The short pulse nature of the accelerated bunches and high particle energy offer the possibility of generating radiation from one compact source that ranges from coherent terahertz to gamma rays. The intrinsic synchronization to a laser pulse and unique character of the radiation offers a wide range of possibilities for scientific applications. Two particular radiation source regimes are discussed: Coherent terahertz emission and x-ray emission based on betatron oscillations and Thomson scattering.

  4. Excited Delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeuchi, Asia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Excited (or agitated delirium is characterized by agitation, aggression, acute distress and sudden death, often in the pre-hospital care setting. It is typically associated with the use of drugs that alter dopamine processing, hyperthermia, and, most notably, sometimes with death of the affected person in the custody of law enforcement. Subjects typically die from cardiopulmonary arrest, although the cause is debated. Unfortunately an adequate treatment plan has yet to be established, in part due to the fact that most patients die before hospital arrival. While there is still much to be discovered about the pathophysiology and treatment, it is hoped that this extensive review will provide both police and medical personnel with the information necessary to recognize and respond appropriately to excited delirium. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:77-83.

  5. Femtosecond-pulse inscription of fiber Bragg gratings in multimode graded index fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostovalov, Alexandr V.; Wolf, Alexey A.; Zlobina, Ekaterina A.; Kablukov, Sergey I.; Babin, Sergey A.

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond-pulse modification of the refractive index in transparent materials enables the inscription of fiber Bragg gratings with new features and extended capabilities. In this study we present the results of fiber Bragg gratings inscription in Corning 62.5/125 multimode graded index fiber with IR femtosecond laser pulses. The specifics of point-by-point inscription including single and multiple Bragg grating inscription in limited fiber segment as well as different transverse modes excitation/suppression is discussed. Multimode fiber Bragg gratings inscribed with femtosecond radiation are investigated for the first time directly in the Raman fiber laser cavity.

  6. Pulse Splitting for Harmonic Beamforming in Time-Modulated Linear Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Poli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel strategy for harmonic beamforming in time-modulated linear arrays is proposed. The pulse splitting technique is exploited to simultaneously generate two harmonic patterns, one at the central frequency and another at a preselected harmonic of arbitrary order, while controlling the maximum level of the remaining sideband radiations. An optimization strategy based on the particle swarm optimizer is developed in order to determine the optimal parameters describing the pulse sequence used to modulate the excitation weights of the array elements. Representative numerical results are reported and discussed to point out potentialities and limitations of the proposed approach.

  7. The action of pulse-modulated GSM radiation increases regional changes in brain activity and c-Fos expression in cortical and subcortical areas in a rat model of picrotoxin-induced seizure proneness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martín, E; Bregains, J; Relova-Quinteiro, J L; Cadarso-Suárez, C; Jorge-Barreiro, F J; Ares-Pena, F J

    2009-05-01

    The action of the pulse-modulated GSM radiofrequency of mobile phones has been suggested as a physical phenomenon that might have biological effects on the mammalian central nervous system. In the present study, GSM-exposed picrotoxin-pretreated rats showed differences in clinical and EEG signs, and in c-Fos expression in the brain, with respect to picrotoxin-treated rats exposed to an equivalent dose of unmodulated radiation. Neither radiation treatment caused tissue heating, so thermal effects can be ruled out. The most marked effects of GSM radiation on c-Fos expression in picrotoxin-treated rats were observed in limbic structures, olfactory cortex areas and subcortical areas, the dentate gyrus, and the central lateral nucleus of the thalamic intralaminar nucleus group. Nonpicrotoxin-treated animals exposed to unmodulated radiation showed the highest levels of neuronal c-Fos expression in cortical areas. These results suggest a specific effect of the pulse modulation of GSM radiation on brain activity of a picrotoxin-induced seizure-proneness rat model and indicate that this mobile-phone-type radiation might induce regional changes in previous preexcitability conditions of neuronal activation.

  8. Generation of Short X-Ray Pulses Using Crab Cavities at the Advanced Photon Source

    CERN Document Server

    Harkay, Katherine C; Chae, Yong-Chul; Decker, Glenn; Dejus, Roger J; Emery, Louis; Guo, Weiming; Horan, Douglas; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kustom, Robert; Mills, Dennis M; Milton, Stephen; Pile, Geoffery; Sajaev, Vadim; Shastri, Sarvjit D; Waldschmidt, Geoff J; White, Marion; Yang Bing Xin; Zholents, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    There is growing interest within the user community to utilize the pulsed nature of synchrotron radiation from storage ring sources. Conventional third-generation light sources can provide pulses on the order of 100 ps but typically cannot provide pulses of about 1 ps that some users now require to advance their research programs. However, it was recently proposed by A. Zholents et al. to use rf orbit deflection to generate subpicosecond X-ray pulses.* In this scheme, two crab cavities are used to deliver a longitudinally dependent vertical kick to the beam, thus exciting longitudinally correlated vertical motion of the electrons. This makes it possible to spatially separate the radiation coming from different longitudinal parts of the beam. An optical slit can then be used to slice out a short part of the radiation pulse, or an asymetrically cut crystal can be used to compress the radiation in time. In this paper, we present a feasibility study of this method applied to the Advanced Photon Source. We find th...

  9. Excited-State Dynamics of Melamine and Its Lysine Derivative Investigated by Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyuan Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Melamine may have been an important prebiotic information carrier, but its excited-state dynamics, which determine its stability under UV radiation, have never been characterized. The ability of melamine to withstand the strong UV radiation present on the surface of the early Earth is likely to have affected its abundance in the primordial soup. Here, we studied the excited-state dynamics of melamine (a proto-nucleobase and its lysine derivative (a proto-nucleoside using the transient absorption technique with a UV pump, and UV and infrared probe pulses. For melamine, the excited-state population decays by internal conversion with a lifetime of 13 ps without coupling significantly to any photochemical channels. The excited-state lifetime of the lysine derivative is slightly longer (18 ps, but the dominant deactivation pathway is otherwise the same as for melamine. In both cases, the vast majority of excited molecules return to the electronic ground state on the aforementioned time scales, but a minor population is trapped in a long-lived triplet state.

  10. Is there any dose-rate effect in breaking DNA strands by short pulses of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation? (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyšín, Ludek; Burian, Tomáš; Ukraintsev, Egor; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor; Grisham, Michael E.; Heinbuch, Scott C.; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2017-05-01

    Possible dose-rate effects in a plasmid DNA exposed to pulsed extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) water window radiation from two different table-top plasma-based sources was studied. Dose delivered to the target molecule was controlled by attenuating the incident photon flux with aluminum thin foils as well as varying the DNA/buffer-salt ratio in the irradiated sample. Irradiated samples were analyzed using the agarose gel electrophoresis. Some additional bands were identified in gel electrophoretograms as results of a DNA cross-linking. They were inspected by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Yields of single- and double-strand breaks (Gy-1 Da-1) were determined as a function of incident dose rate. Both yields decreased with a dose rate increasing. The ratio of single- and double-strand breaks exhibited only a slight increase at elevated dose rates. In conclusion, complex and/or clustered damages do not seem to be initiated under these irradiation conditions.

  11. Pulsed Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Cisplatin Results in Superior Tumor Growth Delay in a Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Murine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Kurt; Krueger, Sarah A.; Kane, Jonathan L.; Wilson, Thomas G.; Hanna, Alaa; Dabjan, Mohamad; Hege, Katie M.; Wilson, George D.; Grills, Inga; Marples, Brian, E-mail: brian.marples@beaumont.edu

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 3-week schedules of low-dose pulsed radiation treatment (PRT) and standard radiation therapy (SRT), with concurrent cisplatin (CDDP) in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft model. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous UT-SCC-14 tumors were established in athymic NIH III HO female mice. A total of 30 Gy was administered as 2 Gy/d, 5 d/wk for 3 weeks, either by PRT (10 × 0.2 Gy/d, with a 3-minute break between each 0.2-Gy dose) or SRT (2 Gy/d, uninterrupted delivery) in combination with concurrent 2 mg/kg CDDP 3 times per week in the final 2 weeks of radiation therapy. Treatment-induced growth delays were defined from twice-weekly tumor volume measurements. Tumor hypoxia was assessed by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography imaging, and calculated maximum standardized uptake values compared with tumor histology. Tumor vessel density and hypoxia were measured by quantitative immunohistochemistry. Normal tissues effects were evaluated in gut and skin. Results: Untreated tumors grew to 1000 mm{sup 3} in 25.4 days (±1.2), compared with delays of 62.3 days (±3.5) for SRT + CDDP and 80.2 days (±5.0) for PRT + CDDP. Time to reach 2× pretreatment volume ranged from 8.2 days (±1.8) for untreated tumors to 67.1 days (±4.7) after PRT + CDDP. Significant differences in tumor growth delay were observed for SRT versus SRT + CDDP (P=.04), PRT versus PRT + CDDP (P=.035), and SRT + CDDP versus PRT + CDDP (P=.033), and for survival between PRT versus PRT + CDDP (P=.017) and SRT + CDDP versus PRT + CDDP (P=.008). Differences in tumor hypoxia were evident by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography imaging between SRT and PRT (P=.025), although not with concurrent CDDP. Tumor vessel density differed between SRT + CDDP and PRT + CDDP (P=.011). No differences in normal tissue parameters were seen. Conclusions: Concurrent CDDP was more effective in combination PRT than SRT at

  12. Radiation from an electron beam in magnetized plasma: excitation of a whistler mode wave packet by interacting, higher-frequency, electrostatic-wave eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenning, N.; Axnäs, I.; Koepke, M.; Raadu, M. A.; Tennfors, E.

    2017-12-01

    Infrequent, bursty, electromagnetic, whistler-mode wave packets, excited spontaneously in the laboratory by an electron beam from a hot cathode, appear transiently, each with a time duration τ around ∼1 μs. The wave packets have a center frequency f W that is broadly distributed in the range 7 MHz electrostatic (es) plasma oscillations at values of f hf, 200 MHz < f hf < 500 MHz, that are hypothesized to match eigenmode frequencies of an axially localized hf es field in a well-defined region attached to the cathode. Features of these es-eigenmodes that are studied include: the mode competition at times of transitions from one dominating es-eigenmode to another, the amplitude and spectral distribution of simultaneously occurring es-eigenmodes that do not lead to a transition, and the correlation of these features with the excitation of whistler mode waves. It is concluded that transient coupling of es-eigenmode pairs at f hf such that | {{{f}}}1,{{h}{{f}}}-{{{f}}}2,{{h}{{f}}}| = {f}{{W}}< {f}{{g}{{e}}} can explain both the transient lifetime and the frequency spectra of the whistler-mode wave packets (f W) as observed in lab. The generalization of the results to bursty whistler-mode excitation in space from electron beams, created on the high potential side of double layers, is discussed.

  13. Development of optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifiers and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Nobuhisa

    2006-11-21

    -cycle infrared pulses in an argon target. Because of the longer carrier period, the IR pulses transfer more quiver energy to ionized free electrons compared to conventional NIR pulses. Therefore, higher energy radiation is emitted upon recombination of the accelerated electrons. This result shows the highest photon energy generated by a laser excitation in neutral argon. (orig.)

  14. differential pulse voltammetric determination of theophylline at poly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    DIFFERENTIAL PULSE VOLTAMMETRIC DETERMINATION OF. THEOPHYLLINE AT ... KEY WORDS: Cyclic voltammetry, Differential pulse voltammetry, Theophylline, 4-Amino-3- hydroxynaphthalene sulfonic acid ... serious toxicity, including vomiting, tachycardia, seizures and central nervous system excitation [1, 4, 5].

  15. Luminescence decay of S Zn::Ag and O Zn:Ga scintillation detectors excited by a pulsed laser; Evolucion temporal de la luminiscencia producida por un laser pulsado de los detectores de centello SZn:Ag y OZn:Ga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, L.; Campos, J.

    1981-07-01

    In the present work a high sensitivity experimental set up for luminescence decay measurements in the 1 0 {sup -}1 sec range has been developed. As an application, luminescence light decay In S Zn:Ag and 0Zn:Ga after excitation by a pulsed N{sub 2} laser has been measured. In SZnrAg, measurements of total light decay was compared with donor acceptor pairs theory. In both substances, spectral evolution in the first 15 sec was investigated. (Author) 4 refs.

  16. Pulse on Pulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik; Carlson, Merete

    2012-01-01

    of the visitor’s beating heart to the blink of a fragile light bulb, thereby transforming each light bulb into a register of individual life. But at the same time the blinking light bulbs together produce a chaotically flickering light environment composed by various layers of repetitive rhythms, a vibrant...... and pulsating ‘room’. Hence, the visitors in Pulse Room are invited into a complex scenario that continuously oscillates between various aspects of signification (the light bulbs representing individual lives; the pulse itself as the symbolic ‘rhythm of life’) and instants of pure material processuality...... (flickering light bulbs; polyrhythmic layers). Taking our point of departure in a discussion of Gilles Deleuze’s concepts of modulation and signaletic material in relation to electronic media, we examine how the complex orchestration of pulsation between signification and material modulation produces...

  17. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdobintsev, P Yu; Rakcheeva, L P; Murashov, S V; Melnikov, A S; Lyubchik, S; Timofeev, N A; Pastor, A A; Khodorkovskii, M A

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  18. Survey of nuclei for low-energy nuclear excitation in laser-produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granja, C. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz; Kuba, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Haiduk, A. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Renner, O. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2007-03-01

    We present a survey of stable and long-lived nuclei as well as nuclear isomers looking for candidates of studies of low-energy (1-30 keV) nuclear excitation by laser-produced plasma radiation. We concentrate on medium-size high-power lasers with pulse duration of hundreds of ps providing energy up to 1000 J and subrelativistic intensity of 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} Wcm{sup -2}. Screening criteria are primarily the transition energy and the half-life, spin and parity of nuclear levels. Ta181 is suggested as first candidate for which an estimation of reaction efficiency is included.

  19. Radiation power control of the industrial CO2 lasers excited by a nonself-sustained glow discharge with regard to dissociation in a working gas mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemyakin, Andrey N.; Rachkov, Michael Yu.; Solovyov, Nikolay G.; Yakimov, Mikhail Yu.

    2018-01-01

    The action of a working gas mixture degradation related to the plasma chemical reactions in a glow discharge on the laser output power of the molecular laser excited by a nonself-sustained glow discharge has been studied by the example of an industrial laser of ;Lantan; CO2 laser series. It was found that the laser power overshoot when operating on a fresh gas mixture may exceed 3 times power level set in a steady-state regime. The working algorithm for the control system was proposed and developed setting standard fresh CO2/N2/He laser gas mixture to plasma chemical equilibrium composition during the laser turn-on procedure after full refill of a working gas mixture.

  20. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  1. Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, A F; Crowhurst, J C

    2005-03-24

    We describe the design and operation of a spatially-filtered Raman/fluorescence spectrometer that incorporates a pulsed 532 nm laser excitation source and a synchronized and electronically gated CCD detector. This system permits the suppression of undesired continuous radiation from various sources by a factor of up to 50,000 providing the possibility of acquiring Raman signals at temperatures exceeding 5,000 K. We present performance comparisons of this system with that of a state-of-the-art conventional CW system using a 458 nm excitation source. We also demonstrate that the pulsed system is capable of suppressing an impurity-induced (single nitrogen defects) fluorescence in diamond, and further suggest that this capability can be used to suppress the stress-induced fluorescence in diamond that may appear at pressures near or above 150 GPa.

  2. Discharge pulse phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, A. R.

    1985-01-01

    A model was developed which places radiation induced discharge pulse results into a unified conceptual framework. Only two phenomena are required to interpret all space and laboratory results: (1) radiation produces large electrostatic fields inside insulators via the trapping of a net space charge density; and (2) the electrostatic fields initiate discharge streamer plasmas similar to those investigated in high voltage electrical insulation materials; these streamer plasmas generate the pulsing phenomena. The apparent variability and diversity of results seen is an inherent feature of the plasma streamer mechanism acting in the electric fields which is created by irradiation of the dielectrics. The implications of the model are extensive and lead to constraints over what can be done about spacecraft pulsing.

  3. Open system perspective on incoherent excitation of light-harvesting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Botero, Juan D.; Brumer, Paul

    2017-09-01

    The nature of excited states of open quantum systems produced by incoherent natural thermal light is analyzed based on a description of the quantum dynamical map. Natural thermal light is shown to generate long-lasting coherent dynamics because of (i) the super-Ohmic character of the radiation, and (ii) the absence of pure dephasing dynamics. In the presence of an environment, the long-lasting coherences induced by suddenly turned-on incoherent light dissipate and stationary coherences are established. As a particular application, dynamics in a subunit of the PC645 light-harvesting complex is considered where it is further shown that aspects of the energy pathways landscape depend on the nature of the exciting light and number of chromophores excited. Specifically, pulsed laser and natural broadband incoherent excitation induce significantly different energy transfer pathways. In addition, we discuss differences in perspective associated with the eigenstate versus site basis, and note an important difference in the phase of system coherences when coupled to blackbody radiation or when coupled to a phonon background. Finally, an appendix contains an open systems example of the loss of coherence as the turn-on time of the light assumes natural time scales.

  4. Changes of the electronic structure of the atoms of nitrogen in nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes under the influence of pulsed ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korusenko, P.M., E-mail: korusenko@obisp.oscsbras.ru [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Bolotov, V.V.; Nesov, S.N.; Povoroznyuk, S.N. [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Khailov, I.P. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Ave. 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    With the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) there have been investigated the changes of the chemical state of nitrogen atoms in the structure of nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CN{sub x}-MWCNTs) resulting from the impact of pulsed ion beam at various parameters of the beam (energy density, number of pulses). It has been established that irradiation with the pulsed ion beam leads to a reduction of the total amount of nitrogen in CN{sub x} nanotubes. It has been shown that a single pulse irradiation of ion beam at the energy densities of 0.5, 1, 1.5 J/cm{sup 2} leads to restructuring of the nitrogen from pyridinic and pyrrolic configuration to graphitic state. Complete removal of nitrogen (pyridinic, pyrrolic, graphitic) embedded in the structure of the walls of CN{sub x} nanotubes occurs at ten pulses and 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}.

  5. Asymmetric Ultrasonic Pulse Radiation Using Electromagnetic-Induction Transducer and PZT(Pb(Zr-Ti)O3) Transducer with Wave Synthesis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Koji

    1993-05-01

    In medical applications, especially in urology, we use a fragmentation calculus technique with shock waves. This technique is very profitable because of no abdominal surgery for a human being. Large negative sound amplitude pulses, however, can cause problems such as internal hemorrhage or pain in the human body. The final goal of this study is to develop a means to project an intense positive unipolar pulse without negative sound pressure. We improved a composite transducer consisting of an electromagnetic-induction-type (EMI) transducer and PZT (Pb(Zr-Ti)O3) transducers. An EMI transducer consisting of a metal coil and vibration membrane can project intense sound pulses into water. In order to suppress its negative sound pressure, we project a compensation pulse with PZT transducers using an inverse filtering method. An asymmetric pulse whose P+ to P- amplitude ratio was very high was projected in water.

  6. Generation and characterization of superradiant undulator radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocek, David [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    High-power, pulsed, coherent, far-infrared (FIR) radiation has many scientific applications, such as pump-probe studies of surfaces, liquids, and solids, studies of high-Tc superconductors, biophysics, plasma diagnostics, and excitation of Rydberg atoms. Few sources of such FIR radiation currently exist. Superradiant undulator radiation produced at the SUNSHINE (Stanford UNiversity SHort INtense Electron-source) is such a FIR source. First proposed in the mm-wave spectral range by Motz, superradiant undulator radiation has been realized in the 45 μm to 300 μm spectral range by using sub-picosecond electron bunches produced by the SUNSHINE facility. The experimental setup and measurements of this FIR radiation are reported in this thesis. In addition, to being a useful FIR source, the superradiant undulator radiation produced at SUNSHINE is an object of research in itself. Measured superlinear growth of the radiated energy along the undulator demonstrates the self-amplification of radiation by the electron bunch. This superlinear growth is seen at 47 μm to 70 {micro}m wavelengths. These wavelengths are an order of magnitude shorter than in previous self-amplification demonstrations.

  7. Nonresonant Multiple-Pulse Control of Molecular Motions in Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikiforov V.G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose the implementation of the multiple-pulse excitation for manipulation of the molecular contributions to the optically-heterodyne-detected optical-Kerr-effect. The key parameters controlling the specificity of the multiple-pulse excitation scenarios are the pulses durations, the delays between pulses, the relation between the pump pulses amplitudes and the pulses polarizations. We model the high-order optical responses and consider some principles of the scenarios construction. We show that it is possible to adjust the excitation scenario in such a way that the some responses can be removed from detected signal along with the enhancement of the interested response amplitude. The theoretical analysis and first experimental data reveal that the multiple-pulse excitation technique can be useful for the selective spectroscopy of the molecular vibrations and rotations in liquid.

  8. Spontaneously Fluctuating Motor Cortex Excitability in Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stern, William M; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Hoad, Damon; Jaffer, Fatima; Strigaro, Gionata; Sander, Josemir W; Rothwell, John C; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2016-01-01

    .... Nine people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood were recruited; eight were successfully tested using transcranial magnetic stimulation to study motor cortex excitability, using single and paired pulse paradigms...

  9. Evaluation of granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, CaF sub 2 :Eu and ZnS:Ag for alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination in a flow-cell radiation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Devol, T A; Fjeld, R A

    1999-01-01

    Granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, and CaF sub 2 :Eu; CaF sub 2 :Eu coated with a fluorescent polymer, and combinations of coated and uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu with ZnS:Ag were evaluated for their ability to discriminate between alpha and beta particles in a flow-cell radiation detector. The evaluations were based on the analysis of pulse shape spectra. Various granulated scintillators were packed into flow cell detectors that were coils of 3.0 mm ODx1.5 mm ID fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon[reg] tubing positioned between dual photomultiplier tubes for analysis. The best pulse shape discrimination was obtained for a combination of equal masses of uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu (63-90 mu m) and ZnS:Ag (10 mu m), which had a 9% spillover. Additional research is needed to reduce the spillover.

  10. Development of a fiber-optic laser delivery system capable of delivering 213 and 266 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation for tissue ablation in a fluid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joe; Yu, Xiao-Bo; Yu, Paula K; Cringle, Stephen J; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2011-02-20

    Ultraviolet (UV) lasers have the capability to precisely remove tissue via ablation; however, due to strong absorption of the applicable portion the UV spectrum, their surgical use is currently limited to extraocular applications at the air/tissue boundary. Here we report the development and characterization of a fiber-optic laser delivery system capable of outputting high-fluence UV laser pulses to internal tissue surfaces. The system has been developed with a view to intraocular surgical applications and has been demonstrated to ablate ocular tissue at the fluid/tissue boundary. The fifth (213 nm) and fourth(266 nm) harmonics of a Nd:YAG laser were launched into optical fibers using a hollow glass taper to concentrate the beam. Standard and modified silica/silica optical fibers were used, all commercially available. The available energy and fluence as a function of optical fiber length was evaluated and maximized. The maximum fluence available to ablate tissue was affected by the wavelength dependence of the fiber transmission; this maximum fluence was greater for 266 nm pulses (8.4 J/cm2) than for 213 nm pulses (1.4 J/cm2). The type of silica/silica optical fiber used did not affect the transmission efficiency of 266 nm pulses, but transmission of 213 nm pulses was significantly greater through modified silica/silica optical fiber. The optical fiber transmission efficiency of 213 nm pulses decreased as a function of number of pulses transmitted, whereas the transmission efficiency of 266 nm radiation was unchanged. Single pulses have been used to ablate fresh porcine ocular tissue. In summary, we report a method for delivering the fifth (213 nm) and fourth (266 nm) harmonics of a Nd:YAG laser to the surface of immersed tissue, the reliability and stability of the system has been characterized, and proof of concept via tissue ablation of porcine ocular tissue demonstrates the potential for the intraocular surgical application of this

  11. Rapidly tuning miniature transversely excited atmospheric-pressure CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yanchen; Ren, Deming; Hu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Fengmei; Zhao, Jingshan

    2002-08-20

    An experimental study of a rapidly tuning miniature transversely excited atmospheric-pressure CO2 laser is reported. To rapidly shift laser wavelengths over selected transitions in the 9-11 microm wavelength region, we have utilized a high-frequency stepping motor and a diffraction grating. The laser is highly automated with a monolithic microprocessor controlled laser line selection. For the achievement of stable laser output, a system of laser excitation with a voltage of 10 kV, providing effective surface corona preionization and allowing one to work at various gas pressures, is utilized. Laser operation at 59 emission lines of the CO2 molecule rotational transition is obtained and at 51 lines, the pulse energy of laser radiation exceeds 30 mJ. The system can be tuned between two different rotational lines spanning the wavelength range from 9.2 to 10.8 microm within 10 ms.

  12. Interaction of femtosecond X-ray pulses with periodical multilayer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenzov, Dmitry

    2010-07-01

    The VUV Free Electron Laser FLASH operates in soft X-ray range and produces high-intensive pulse trains with few tens femtoseconds duration. The transversely fully coherent beam will open new experiments in solid state physics which can not be studied with present radiation sources. The study of the time dependent response of the multilayer to the X-ray pulse can provide insights into the process of interaction of highly intense FEL radiation with matter. To test the influence of electron excitation on the optical properties of boron carbide, the refractive index of B{sub 4}C was measured near B K-edge by energy-resolved photon-in-photon-out method probing a Bragg reflection from periodical multilayers. The measured data clearly show that the variation of the fine structure of the Kabsorption edges due to the chemical nature of the absorber element. The knowledge obtained from experiments with continuous radiation was used to design the respective experiments with pulse from the FEL. In my thesis, it is proposed that the geometrical setup, where the incident pulse arrives from the FEL under the angle close to the 1st order ML Bragg peak, provides the most valuable information. Preliminary simulation considering form factors of neutral and ionized boron showed that due to ionization, pronounced changes in the reflectivity curve are expected. The proposed scheme can be the powerful tool to study the various processes within the electronic subsystem of the FEL pulse interaction with matter. This type of investigations gives a deep understanding of the nature of the electronic excitation and the recombination at the femtosecond scale. (orig.)

  13. Transformative Pulsed Power Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-16

    myocyte excitation by ultrashort high-field pulses”, Biophys. J. 96:1640-1648, 2009. 8. D. Singleton, J. Sinibaldi, C. Brophy, A. Kuthi and M. A. Gundersen...Valderrabano, “Cardiac Myocyte Excitation by Ultrashort High- Field Pulses,” Biophysical Journal, 96(4), 1640-1648, 2009 12. J. M. Sanders, A. Kuthi

  14. Pulses and waves of contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min

    2017-12-04

    The nature of signal transduction networks in the regulation of cell contractility is not entirely clear. In this study, Graessl et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201706052) visualized and characterized pulses and waves of Rho activation in adherent cells and proposed excitable Rho signaling networks underlying cell contractility. © 2017 Wu.

  15. Timeresolved investigation of atomic order in tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) monocrystals after excitation with ultrashort light pulses; Zeitaufgeloeste Untersuchung atomarer Ordnung in Tetrathiafulvalen-Tetracyanochinodimethan (TTF-TCNQ)-Einkristallen nach Anregung mit ultrakurzen Lichtpulsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sager, Christian

    2011-02-15

    This thesis describes time-resolved investigations of the atomic structure of one-dimensional organic molecular crystals after laser excitation of the photo-induced phase transition. There is a neutral to ionic phase transition in tetrathiafulvalene-chloranil-crystals (TTF-CA-crystals). At this phase transition a Peierls distortion occurs. A new model is introduced, that can explain the photo-induced phase transition in TTF-CY-crystals. This model is called charge density wave model of photo induced structural phase transition. There is a structural phase transition in tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanochinodimethane-crystals (TTF-TCNQ-crystals). At this phase transition the one-dimensional metal TTF-TCNQ is transformed to an insulator. The phase transition is driven by the Peierls distortion. The charge density wave model is appropriate for description of the processes in TTF-TCNQ-crystals after laser excitation. The results of time-resolved measurements of the structure of TTF-TCNQ-crystals after excitation of the photo-induced phase transition can be anticipated with the charge density wave model. In the basis of these anticipated results, a time-resolved measurement for investigation of the atomic structure of TTF-TCNQ after excitation of the photo-induced phase transition is proposed. The time-resolved measurement should be performed at a beamline of a third generation synchrotron by the optical pump X-ray probe technique. The time-resolved measurement is prepared by an optical characterization and by static X-ray diffraction measurements. The results of the optical characterization and the static X-ray diffraction measurements are presented and analyzed. (orig.)

  16. Photoionization pathways and thresholds in generation of Lyman-α radiation by resonant four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg A. Louchev; Norihito Saito; Yu Oishi; Koji Miyazaki; Kotaro Okamura; Jumpei Nakamura; Masahiko Iwasaki; Satoshi Wada

    2016-01-01

    We develop a set of analytical approximations for the estimation of the combined effect of various photoionization processes involved in the resonant four-wave mixing generation of ns pulsed Lyman-α (L-α) radiation by using 212.556 nm and 820-845 nm laser radiation pulses in Kr-Ar mixture: (i) multi-photon ionization, (ii) step-wise (2+1)-photon ionization via the resonant 2-photon excitation of Kr followed by 1-photon ionization and (iii) laser-induced avalanche ionization produced by genera...

  17. Unravelling the effects of radiation forces in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrath, Nelson G C; Malacarne, Luis C; Baesso, Mauro L; Lukasievicz, Gustavo V B; Bialkowski, Stephen E

    2014-07-07

    The effect of radiation forces at the interface between dielectric materials has been a long-standing debate for over a century. Yet there has been so far only limited experimental verification in complete accordance with the theory. Here we measure the surface deformation at the air-water interface induced by continuous and pulsed laser excitation and match this to rigorous theory of radiation forces. We demonstrate that the experimental results are quantitatively described by the numerical calculations of radiation forces. The Helmholtz force is used for the surface radiation pressure. The resulting surface pressure obtained is consistent with the momentum conservation using the Minkowski momentum density expression assuming that the averaged momentum per photon is given by the Minkowski momentum. Considering the total momentum as a sum of that propagating with the electromagnetic wave and that deposited locally in the material, the Abraham momentum interpretation also appears to be appropriate.

  18. Photo- excitation of Cd atom by optogalvanic technique monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Mahdieh

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available   Optogalavanic technique has been used widely in laser spectroscopy. In this paper we have presented the results of an experimental three- step photo- excitation of Gd atom, using optogalvanic technique. Three tunable dye laser pulses were applied to excite the Gd atom in a three-step photo – excitation process. The optogalvanic signal was used to monitor the laser wavelength and efficiency of the excitation process. The results show that the optogalvanic signal is very sensitive to the first photo- excitation step in comparison with those of the second and the third step.

  19. Radiative and rovibrational collisional relaxation of sodium dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Burcin; Horton, Tim; McFarland, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Radiative and rovibrational collisional relaxation of sodium dimer of the A1Σu+ (8,30) state have been measured by direct observation of the decay fluorescence. Sodium molecular vapor is created in a heatpipe oven at 600 K and excited using a 6-ns pulsed dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG, operating at 532 nm. The preliminary lifetime measurement was done by directly acquiring lifetime data through boxcar averager from the stored oscilloscope trace of the fluorescence. Analysis of the exponential decay of the fluorescence allows us to obtain the radiative lifetime. By introducing the argon buffer gas and varying the pressure of the heatpipe, a collisional cross section between excited sodium dimer and ground state argon atom collision can be extracted using Stern-Volmer relation.

  20. Excitable solitons in a semiconductor laser with a saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turconi, Margherita; Prati, Franco; Barland, Stéphane; Tissoni, Giovanna

    2015-11-01

    Self-pulsing cavity solitons may exist in a semiconductor laser with an intracavity saturable absorber. They show locally the passive Q -switching behavior that is typical of lasers with saturable absorbers in the plane-wave approximation. Here we show that excitable cavity solitons are also possible in a suitable parameter range and characterize their excitable dynamics and properties.

  1. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Thresholds of surface plasma formation by the interaction of laser pulses with a metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1995-04-01

    An analysis is made of a model of the formation of a surface laser plasma which takes account of the heating and vaporisation of thermally insulated surface microdefects. This model is used in an interpretation of experiments in which such a plasma has been formed by irradiation of a titanium target with microsecond CO2 laser pulses. A comparison with the experimental breakdown intensities is used to calculate the average sizes of microdefects and their concentration: the results are in agreement with the published data. The dependence of the delay time of plasma formation on the total energy in a laser pulse is calculated.

  2. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER AND OTHER LASER APPLICATIONS: Changes in the emission properties of metal targets during pulse-periodic laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konov, Vitalii I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1988-02-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used with a pulse-periodic CO2 laser to discover the laws governing the correlation of the modified microrelief of metal surfaces, subjected to the action of multiple laser pulses, with the emission of charged particles and the luminescence of the irradiated zone. It was established that the influence of sorption and laser-induced desorption on the emission signals may be manifested differently depending on the regime of current generation in the "target-vacuum chamber" circuit.

  3. Nanofabrication of tailored surface structures in dielectrics using temporally shaped femtosecond-laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Götte, Nadine; Siegel, Jan; Soccio, Michelina; Zielinski, Bastian; Sarpe, Cristian; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Ezquerra, Tiberio A; Baumert, Thomas; Solis, Javier

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the use of tightly focused, temporally shaped femtosecond (fs)-laser pulses for producing nanostructures in two dielectric materials (sapphire and phosphate glass) with different characteristics in their response to pulsed laser radiation. For this purpose, laser pulses shaped by third-order dispersion (TOD) were used to generate temporally asymmetric excitation pulses, leading to the single-step production of subwavelength ablative and subablative surface structures. When compared to previous works on the interaction of tightly focused TOD-shaped pulses with fused silica, we show here that this approach leads to very different nanostructure morphologies, namely, clean nanopits without debris surrounding the crater in sapphire and well-outlined nanobumps and nanovolcanoes in phosphate glass. Although in sapphire the debris-free processing is associated with the much lower viscosity of the melt compared to fused silica, nanobump formation in phosphate glass is caused by material network expansion (swelling) upon resolidification below the ablation threshold. The formation of nanovolcanoes is a consequence of the combined effect of material network expansion and ablation occurring in the periphery and central part of the irradiated region, respectively. It is shown that the induced morphologies can be efficiently controlled by modulating the TOD coefficient of the temporally shaped pulses.

  4. Feasibility of measuring radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks and their repair by pulsed field gel electrophoresis in freshly isolated cells from the mouse RIF-1 tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanWaarde, MAWH; vanAssen, AJ; Konings, AWT; Kampinga, HH

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the technical feasibility of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) as a predictive assay for the radioresponsiveness of tumors. Induction and repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in a freshly prepared cell suspension from a RIF-1 tumor (irradiated ex vivo) was compared

  5. Coherent two-photon excitation of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, L.; Huber, T.; Prilmüller, M.; Solomon, G. S.; Ritsch, H.; Weihs, G.; Predojević, A.

    2016-04-01

    Single semiconductor quantum dots, due to their discrete energy structure, form single photon and twin photon sources that are characterized by a well-defined frequency of the emitted photons and inherently sub-Poissonian statistics. The single photons are generated through a recombination of an electron-hole pair formed by an electron from the conduction band and a hole from the valence band. When excited to the biexciton state quantum dots can provide pairs of photons emitted in a cascade. It has been shown that this biexciton-exciton cascade can deliver entangled pairs of photons. To achieve a deterministic generation of photon pairs from a quantum dot system one requires exciting it using a two-photon resonant excitation of the biexciton. Particularly, an efficient and coherent excitation of the biexciton requires the elimination of the single exciton probability amplitude in the excitation pulse and reaching the lowest possible degree of dephasing caused by the laser excitation. These two conditions impose contradictory demands on the excitation pulse-length and its intensity. We addressed this problem from a point of view that does not include interaction of the quantum dot with the semiconductor environment. We found an optimized operation regime for the system under consideration and provide guidelines on how to extend this study to other similar systems. In particular, our study shows that an optimal excitation process requires a trade-off between the biexciton binding energy and the excitation laser pulse length.

  6. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Modern high-energy particle accelerators and synchrotron light sources demand smaller and smaller beam emittances in order to achieve higher luminosity or better brightness. For light particles such as electrons and positrons, radiation damping is a natural and effective way to obtain low emittance beams. However, the quantum aspect of radiation introduces random noise into the damped beams, yielding equilibrium emittances which depend upon the design of a specific machine. In this dissertation, the author attempts to make a complete analysis of the process of radiation damping and quantum excitation in various accelerator systems, such as bending magnets, focusing channels and laser fields. Because radiation is formed over a finite time and emitted in quanta of discrete energies, he invokes the quantum mechanical approach whenever the quasiclassical picture of radiation is insufficient. He shows that radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In addition, he investigates methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. He proposes a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to rapid cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space charge effects encountered in a medium energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of low emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored.

  7. Measurements of terahertz radiation generated using a metallic, corrugated pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl, E-mail: kbane@slac.stanford.edu [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stupakov, Gennady [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Antipov, Sergey [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (United States); Fedurin, Mikhail; Kusche, Karl; Swinson, Christina [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Xiang, Dao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-02-01

    A method for producing narrow-band THz radiation proposes passing an ultra-relativistic beam through a metallic pipe with small periodic corrugations. We present results of a measurement of such an arrangement at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). Our pipe was copper and was 5 cm long; the aperture was cylindrically symmetric, with a 1 mm (radius) bore and a corrugation depth (peak-to-peak) of 60 µm. In the experiment we measured both the effect on the beam of the structure wakefield and the spectral properties of the radiation excited by the beam. We began by injecting a relatively long beam compared to the wavelength of the radiation, but with short rise time, to excite the structure, and then used a downstream spectrometer to infer the radiation wavelength. This was followed by injecting a shorter bunch, and then using an interferometer (also downstream of the corrugated pipe) to measure the spectrum of the induced THz radiation. For the THz pulse we obtain and compare with calculations: the central frequency, the bandwidth, and the spectral power—compared to a diffraction radiation background signal.

  8. AN UPDATE ON NIF PULSED POWER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, P A; James, G F; Petersen, D E; Pendleton, D L; McHale, G B; Barbosa, F; Runtal, A S; Stratton, P L

    2009-06-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam laser fusion driver operating at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF relies on three large-scale pulsed power systems to achieve its goals: the Power Conditioning Unit (PCU), which provides flashlamp excitation for the laser's injection system; the Power Conditioning System (PCS), which provides the multi-megajoule pulsed excitation required to drive flashlamps in the laser's optical amplifiers; and the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC), which enables NIF to take advantage of a fourpass main amplifier. Years of production, installation, and commissioning of the three NIF pulsed power systems are now complete. Seven-day-per-week operation of the laser has commenced, with the three pulsed power systems providing routine support of laser operations. We present the details of the status and operational experience associated with the three systems along with a projection of the future for NIF pulsed power.

  9. Laser plasma acceleration with a negatively chirped pulse: all-optical control over dark current in the blowout regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, S. Y.; Beck, A.; Davoine, X.; Lefebvre, E.; Shadwick, B. A.

    2012-03-01

    Recent experiments with 100 terawatt-class, sub-50 femtosecond laser pulses show that electrons self-injected into a laser-driven electron density bubble can be accelerated above 0.5 gigaelectronvolt energy in a sub-centimetre-length rarefied plasma. To reach this energy range, electrons must ultimately outrun the bubble and exit the accelerating phase; this, however, does not ensure high beam quality. Wake excitation increases the laser pulse bandwidth by red-shifting its head, keeping the tail unshifted. Anomalous group velocity dispersion of radiation in plasma slows down the red-shifted head, compressing the pulse into a few-cycle-long piston of relativistic intensity. Pulse transformation into a piston causes continuous expansion of the bubble, trapping copious numbers of unwanted electrons (dark current) and producing a poorly collimated, polychromatic energy tail, completely dominating the electron spectrum at the dephasing limit. The process of piston formation can be mitigated by using a broad-bandwidth (corresponding to a few-cycle transform-limited duration), negatively chirped pulse. Initial blue-shift of the pulse leading edge compensates for the nonlinear frequency red-shift and delays the piston formation, thus significantly suppressing the dark current, making the leading quasi-monoenergetic bunch the dominant feature of the electron spectrum near dephasing. This method of dark current control may be feasible for future experiments with ultrahigh-bandwidth, multi-joule laser pulses.

  10. Investigations into photo-excited state dynamics in colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gaurav

    separated by poly-electrolyte spacers of varying thickness, and conclusively show that plasmon coupling can strongly enhance fluorescence yields and dynamics of multi-excited states in QDs. I will also discuss some recent experiments using our multi-pulse technique to successfully probe delayed fluorescence (due to triplet-triplet annihilation) in porphyrin dyes. The results presented here are helping us to advance the field of QD photo-physics by enabling us to learn more about multi-excited states in QDs and many of the factors that control their radiative and non-radiative recombination. They are also guiding us in the design of better ways to utilize multi-excited states in new hybrid metal-QD devices.

  11. Laser assisted removal of synthetic painting-conservation materials using UV radiation of ns and fs pulse duration: Morphological studies on model samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouli, P., E-mail: ppouli@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, Heraklion, 71110 Crete (Greece); Nevin, A. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, Heraklion, 71110 Crete (Greece); Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, Somerset House, Strand, WC2R 0RN, London (United Kingdom); Andreotti, A.; Colombini, P. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita di Pisa, via Risorgimento 35, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Georgiou, S. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, Heraklion, 71110 Crete (Greece); Fotakis, C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, Heraklion, 71110 Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion, 71003 (Greece)

    2009-02-15

    In an effort to establish the optimal parameters for the cleaning of complex layers of polymers (mainly based on acrylics, vinyls, epoxys known as Elvacite, Laropal, Paraloid B72, among others) applied during past conservation treatments on the surface of wall paintings, laser cleaning tests were performed with particular emphasis on the plausible morphological modifications induced in the remaining polymeric material. Pulse duration effects were studied using laser systems of different pulse durations (ns and fs) at 248 nm. Prior to tests on real fragments from the Monumental Cemetery in Pisa (Italy) which were coated with different polymers, attention was focused on the study of model samples consisting of analogous polymer films cast on quartz disks. Ultraviolet irradiation is strongly absorbed by the studied materials both in ns and fs irradiation regimes. However, it is demonstrated that ultrashort laser pulses result in reduced morphological alterations in comparison to ns irradiation. In addition, the dependence of the observed alterations on the chemical composition of the consolidation materials in both regimes was examined. Most importantly, it was shown that in this specific conservation problem, an optimum cleaning process may rely not only on the minimization of laser-induced morphological changes but also on the exploitation of the conditions that favour the disruption of the adhesion between the synthetic material and the painting.

  12. Ionization and Excitation in Non-Polar Organic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Sanford

    1981-01-01

    Reviews recent advances in radiation chemistry concerning the effect of high-energy radiation on organic liquids. Discusses the general nature of excited and ionized states, pathways for decay, the effect of environmental perturbation, the behavior of an electron in a nonpolar liquid, and comparison of photochemical and radiation chemical effects.…

  13. Laser breakdown with millijoule trains of picosecond pulses transmitted through a hollow-core photonic-crystal fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Konorov, S O; Kolevatova, O A; Beloglasov, V I; Skibina, N B; Shcherbakov, A V; Wintner, E; Zheltikov, A M

    2003-01-01

    Sequences of picosecond pulses with a total energy in the pulse train of about 1 mJ are transmitted through a hollow-core photonic-crystal fibre with a core diameter of approximately 14 mu m. The fluence of laser radiation coupled into the core of the fibre under these conditions exceeds the breakdown threshold of fused silica by nearly an order of magnitude. The laser beam coming out of the fibre is then focused to produce a breakdown on a solid surface. Parameters of laser radiation were chosen in such a way as to avoid effects related to the excitation of higher order waveguide modes and ionization of the gas filling the fibre in order to provide the possibility to focus the output beam into a spot with a minimum diameter, thus ensuring the maximum spatial resolution and the maximum power density in the focal spot.

  14. Radiofrequency Radiation Effects on Excitable Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    1979). 9. Bhattacharyya, M. L., R. D. Nathan, and V. L. Shelton. Release of sialic acid alters the stability of the membrane potential in cardiac...and K. Seraydarian. Sialic acid : Effect of removal of calcium exchange on cultured heart cells. Science 193:1013-1015 (1976). 33. Liu, L. M., F. J...illustrated data indicate that the effect can occur without changes in * -conduction velocity. Invertebrate neurons have also been studied to obtain

  15. Molecular spinning by a chiral train of short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floß, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2012-12-01

    We provide a detailed theoretical analysis of molecular rotational excitation by a chiral pulse train, a sequence of linearly polarized pulses with the polarization direction rotating from pulse to pulse by a controllable angle. Molecular rotation with a preferential rotational sense (clockwise or counterclockwise) can be excited by this scheme. We show that the directionality of the rotation is caused by quantum interference of different excitation pathways. The chiral pulse train is capable of selective excitation of molecular isotopologs and nuclear spin isomers in a mixture. We demonstrate this using 14N2 and 15N2 as examples for isotopologs and para- and ortho-nitrogen as examples for nuclear-spin isomers.

  16. A novel programmable pulse generator with nanosecond resolution for pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasahayam, N; Subramanian, S; Krishna, M C

    2008-02-01

    A pulse programmer with nanosecond time resolution needed for time-domain electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic applications is described. This unit uses commercially available timing and input-output port modules and control software developed in our laboratory. The pulse programmer is operated through a personal computer front panel graphic user interface (GUI) inputs to control pulse widths, delays, and the associated acquisition trigger timings. Based on these parameters, all other associated gate and trigger timings are internally generated automatically without the need to enter them explicitly. The excitation pulse widths were of nanosecond resolution while all other gate pulses can be incremented in steps of 20 ns without compromising spectrometer performance. In the current configuration, the pulse programmer permits generation of a single pulse or multiple pulse sequences for EPR imaging with minimal data entry via the front panel GUI.

  17. Pulsed Laser Spectroscopy: An Inexpensive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J. G.; Hastings, R.; Schmidt, J. A.

    1982-10-01

    The assembly of a pulsed laser spectroscopy laboratory is presented. The authors describe how they constructed pulsed lasers, fast photodetectors, a boxcar signal averager, and associated equipment. A molecular nitrogen laser operating up to 50 Hz with an ultraviolet (337.1 nm) 700 kW pulse was used to optically pump an organic dye laser. The resulting output could be tuned from 360.0 to 680.0 nm. This pulse was typically 30 kW and 8 nsec, which makes it ideally suited to selective excitation and fluorescence studies. By constructing this equipment, it is estimated that the investment was one-tenth the cost of commercial components.

  18. Isovector monopole excitation energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, J.D.; Lipparini, E.; Stringary, S.

    1987-11-05

    Using a hydrodynamical model whose parameters have been adjusted to fit the polarizability and excitation energy of the giant dipole nuclear resonance we predict excitation energies of the isovector monopole resonance. The predicted values are in good agreement with experimental data. The mass dependence of the excitation energy is strongly influenced by nuclear geometry.

  19. Spontaneously Fluctuating Motor Cortex Excitability in Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study: e0151667

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    William M Stern; Mahalekshmi Desikan; Damon Hoad; Fatima Jaffer; Gionata Strigaro; Josemir W Sander; John C Rothwell; Sanjay M Sisodiya

    2016-01-01

    .... Nine people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood were recruited; eight were successfully tested using transcranial magnetic stimulation to study motor cortex excitability, using single and paired pulse paradigms...

  20. Pulse Oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people need more oxygen when asleep than when awake. Some need more oxygen with activity than when ... oxygen saturation levels (below 80%) or with very dark skin. When should I use a pulse oximeter? ...

  1. Inspection of bonded composites using selectively excited ultrasonic modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Gordon Gustav

    Improved methods of nondestructive testing (NDT) of multi-layered composites are vital for fundamental research in composites fabrication and performance. Fast, accurate NDT methods can also be used to predict catastrophic in-use failure and to reduce costly rejects during the manufacture of composite parts. Commercial normal incidence inspection techniques have generally yielded reliable detection of large areas of delamination and damage. They fail, however, to detect defects within thin bonded regions, such as disbonds, debonds, kissing bonds, and porosity. We have developed and studied a nondestructive testing technique designed to be sensitive to flaws in the bond area of adhesively bonded anisotropic materials. The technique utilizes specific ultrasonic modes which are selected through a priori modeling of the composite as a single anisotropic elastic layer. The displacement and stress profiles of the modes within the fluid loaded layer are evaluated. A propagating mode that is predicted to be highly sensitive to the bond area is then utilized in the inspection. The inspection is carried out with an apparatus designed and constructed to excite and detect the selected ultrasonic mode. The apparatus uses transducers oriented at the theoretically optimal incident angle to excite the desired mode, using a tone burst between 0.5 and 10.0 MHz. We monitor with a second transducer changes in the amplitude of the leaky component of the mode propagating in the plate. By using this apparatus we have experimentally distinguished changes in the bond areas of adhesively bonded aluminum plates and carbon-epoxy composite plates of unidirectional and quasi-isotropic lay-up, The radiated leaky wave amplitudes from poorly bonded plates were less than 50% of those from corresponding well bonded plates. We observed no significant changes in the amplitudes of normal incidence pulse-echo signals for these specimens. These results demonstrate that selective mode excitation can

  2. UV Excited Photoacoustic Raman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J. Chance [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chambers, David H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Steele, Paul T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haugen, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heller, Don [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-11-15

    To summarize, our efforts and findings are as follows: we analyzed the theoretical system performance using known PARS theory coupled with an acoustic detector model to estimate the expected signal-­to-noise ratio (SNR). The system model comprised a mathematical model of the Raman process leading to a prediction of the temperature change in the active region; a thermoacoustic gas prediction of the radiated pressure field (amplitude and pulse shape); and the receiver response for an acoustic microphone, including a simple model of the receiver circuitry (filters, integrators, etc.). Based on the PARS experimental parameters in Appendix B, the model predicted a PARS signal with pressure peak of 7 Pa and duration slightly longer than 2 ms at a distance of 7 mm from the focal spot when acoustic dissipation is not included. An analytical model of a PARS signal with acoustic dissipation was constructed but the numerical calculation is limited to gains of <1% of the experimental value. For these lower gains, the model predicts spreading of the signal.

  3. Two-photon excitation STED microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneron, Gael; Hell, Stefan W

    2009-08-17

    We report sub-diffraction resolution in two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscopy achieved by merging this technique with stimulated-emission depletion (STED). We demonstrate an easy-to-implement and promising laser combination based on a short-pulse laser source for two-photon excitation and a continuous-wave (CW) laser source for resolution enhancement. Images of fluorescent nanoparticles and the immunostained transcription regulator NF kappaB in mammalian cell nuclei exhibit resolutions of barrier. (c) 2009 Optical Society of America

  4. Absorption spectra measurements of the x-ray radiation heated sio{sub 2} aerogel plasma in 'dog-bone' targets irradiated by high power laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Dong, Q-L; Wang, S-J; Li, Y-T; Zhang, J [Laboratory of Optical Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Wei, H-G; Shi, J-R; Zhao, G [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang, J-Y; Wen, T-S; Zhang, W-H; Hu, X; Liu, S-Y; Ding, Y-K; Zhang, L; Tang, Y-J; Zhang, B-H; Zheng, Z-J [Research Center for Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Nishimura, H; Fujioka, S [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: yizhang@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: ytli@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jzhang@aphy.iphy.ac.cn (and others)

    2008-05-01

    We studied the opacity effect of the SiO{sub 2} aerogel plasma heated by x-ray radiation produced by high power laser pulses irradiating the inner surface of golden 'dog-bone' targets. The PET crystal spectrometer was used to measure the absorption spectra of the plasmas in the range from 6.4 A to 7.4 A, among which the line emissions involving the K shell of Si ions from He-like to neutral atom were located. The experimental results were analyzed with Detailed-Level-Accounting method. As the plasma temperature increased, the characteristic lines of highly ionized ions gradually dominated the absorption spectrum.

  5. An Acoustic Demonstration Model for CW and Pulsed Spectrosocopy Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, Torben; Mäder, Heinrich; Trueman, Trevor; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    High school and undergraduate students have often difficulties if new concepts are introduced in their physics or chemistry lectures. Lecture demonstrations and references to more familiar analogues can be of great help to the students in such situations. We have developed an experimental setup to demonstrate the principles of cw absorption and pulsed excitation - emission spectroscopies, using acoustical analogues. Our radiation source is a speaker and the detector is a microphone, both controlled by a computer sound card. The acoustical setup is housed in a plexiglas box, which serves as a resonator. It turns out that beer glasses are suitable samples; this also helps to keep the students interested! The instrument is controlled by a LabView program. In a cw experiment, the sound frequency is swept through a certain frequency range and the microphone response is recorded simultaneously as function of frequency. A background signal without sample is recorded, and background subtraction yields the beer glass spectrum. In a pulsed experiment, a short sound pulse is generated and the microphone is used to record the resulting emission signal of the beer glass. A Fourier transformation of the time domain signal gives then the spectrum. We will discuss the experimental setup and show videos of the experiments.

  6. INTERACTION OF RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Increase in the amplitude of hf currents during exposure of a neutral target to microsecond CO2 laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, A. A.; Losev, Leonid L.; Meshalkin, E. A.

    1988-09-01

    High-frequency electric currents were generated by irradiation of a metal target with CO2 laser pulses. It was found that the region where the ambient gas was photoionized had a decisive influence on the hf current amplitude. A method for increasing the amplitude of the current by creating an auxiliary laser jet on the target was proposed and used. An hf current of up to 1 A amplitude was observed at a frequency of 75 MHz and this current lasted for 1.5 μs.

  7. Multi-frequency excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-03-10

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected for the device based on the natural frequency. Additionally, a second voltage amplitude of a second source of excitation can be selected for the device, and the first and second sources of excitation can be applied to the device. After applying the first and second sources of excitation, a frequency of the second source of excitation can be swept. Using the methods of multi- frequency excitation described herein, new operating frequencies, operating frequency ranges, resonance frequencies, resonance frequency ranges, and/or resonance responses can be achieved for devices and systems.

  8. Radiation Chemistry of Xenon Trioxide, Xenate and Perxenate and Photochemistry of Perxenate - A Pulse Radiolysis and Laser Flash-Photolysis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kläning, U. K.; Sehested, Knud; Wolff, T.

    1982-01-01

    Unstable species containing xenon in the formal oxidation states five, XeV, and seven, XeVII, were observed by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of xenon trioxide, XeO3, at pH 8–9 and of xenate, HXeO–4, at pH 11–13. XeVII and species containing xenon in the formal oxidation state nine, Xe......IX, were observed in pulse radiolysis and flash photolysis of aqueous solutions of perxenate, HXeO3–6, at pH 11–13. The formulae HXeO3 and H3XeO2–7 are assumed for XeV and XeIX, whereas the observations suggest that XeVII corresponds to three different species for which the formulae HXeO4, HXeO2–5 and H3Xe...... spectra and kinetics of disappearance. Estimated values of standard Gibbs energy of formation of the xenon species are used for selecting thermodynamically feasible mechanisms for one-electron reduction of perxenate and for the decomposition of perxenate in acid solution....

  9. THE GENERATION OF THERMOELASTIC STRESS WAVES BY IMPULSIVE ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ABSORPTION), (*STRESSES, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), SURFACE PROPERTIES, INTERACTIONS, HEAT TRANSFER, ELASTIC PROPERTIES, ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSES, LASERS, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS, SOLIDS

  10. Controlling nonlinear waves in excitable media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puebla, Hector [Departamento de Energia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Av. San Pablo No. 180, Reynosa-Tamaulipas, Azcapotzalco 02200, DF, Mexico (Mexico)], E-mail: hpuebla@correo.azc.uam.mx; Martin, Roland [Laboratoire de Modelisation et d' Imagerie en Geosciences, CNRS UMR and INRIA Futurs Magique-3D, Universite de Pau (France); Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa (Mexico); Aguilar-Lopez, Ricardo [Departamento de Biotecnologia y Bioingenieria, CINVESTAV-IPN (Mexico)

    2009-01-30

    A new feedback control method is proposed to control the spatio-temporal dynamics in excitable media. Applying suitable external forcing to the system's slow variable, successful suppression and control of propagating pulses as well as spiral waves can be obtained. The proposed controller is composed by an observer to infer uncertain terms such as diffusive transport and kinetic rates, and an inverse-dynamics feedback function. Numerical simulations shown the effectiveness of the proposed feedback control approach.

  11. Pulse-train control of photofragmentation at constant field energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiwari, Ashwani Kumar; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2014-01-01

    We consider a phaselocked two-pulse sequence applied to photofragmentation in the weak-field limit. The two pulses are not overlapping in time, i.e., the energy of the pulse-train is constant for all time delays. It is shown that the relative yield of excited Br* in the nonadiabatic process: I + Br......*←IBr → I + Br, changes as a function of time delay when the two excited wave packets interfere. The underlying mechanisms are analyzed and the change in the branching ratio as a function of time delay is only a reflection of a changing frequency distribution of the pulse train; the branching ratio does...

  12. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as chlorine, bromine, iodine, and sulfur. Preliminary investigations into this area are reported, including documentation

  13. Pulse plating

    CERN Document Server

    Hansal, Wolfgang E G; Green, Todd; Leisner, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The electrodeposition of metals using pulsed current has achieved practical importance in recent years. Although it has long been known that changes in potential, with or without polarity reversal, can significantly affect the deposition process, the practical application of this has been slow to be adopted. This can largely be explained in terms of the complex relationship between the current regime and its effect on the electrodeposition process. In order to harness these effects, an understanding of the anodic and cathodic electrochemical processes is necessary, together with the effects of polarity reversal and the rate of such reversals. In this new monograph, the basics of metal electrodeposition from solution are laid out in great detail in seven distinct chapters. With this knowledge, the reader is able to predict how a given pulse train profile can be adopted to achieve a desired outcome. Equally important is the choice of a suitable rectifier and the ancillary control circuits to enable pulse platin...

  14. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given ...

  15. Excited states 2

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that deals with molecules in the excited states. The book describes the geometries of molecules in the excited electronic states. One paper describes the geometries of a diatomic molecule and of polyatomic molecules; it also discusses the determination of the many excited state geometries of molecules with two, three, or four atoms by techniques similar to diatomic spectroscopy. Another paper introduces an ordered theory related to excitons in pure and mixed molecular crystals. This paper also presents some experimental data such as those invo

  16. A pulsed plasma jet with the various Ar/N2 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhordari, A.; Ganjovi, A.; Mirzaei, I.; Falahat, A.; Rostami Ravari, M. N.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, using the Optical Emission Spectroscopy technique, the physical properties of a fabricated pulsed DBD plasma jet are studied. Ar/N2 gaseous mixture is taken as operational gas, and Ar contribution in Ar/N2 mixture is varied from 75 to 95%. Through the optical emission spectra analysis of the pulsed DBD plasma jet, the rotational, vibrational and excitation temperatures and density of electrons in plasma medium of the pulsed plasma jet are obtained. It is seen that, at the wavelength of 750.38 nm, the radiation intensity from the Ar 4p → 4 s transition increases at the higher Ar contributions in Ar/N2 mixture. It is found that, for 95% of Ar presence in the mixture, the emission intensities from argon and molecular nitrogen are higher, and the emission line intensities will increase nonlinearly. In addition, it is observed that the quenching of Ar* by N2 results in the higher intensities of N2 excited molecules. Moreover, at the higher percentages of Ar in Ar/N2 mixture, while all the plasma temperatures are increased, the plasma electron density is reduced.

  17. Suppression of transverse ablative Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by using elliptically polarized laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Dong; Qiao, B; Zhou, C T; Yan, X Q; Yu, M Y; He, X T

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the transverse Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability in the hole boring radiation pressure acceleration can be suppressed by using elliptically polarized (EP) laser. A moderate ${J}\\times{B}$ heating of the EP laser will thermalize the local electrons, which leads to the transverse diffusion of ions, suppressing the short wavelength perturbations of RT instability. A proper condition of polarization ratio is obtained analytically for the given laser intensity and plasma density. The idea is confirmed by two dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, showing that the ion beam driven by the EP laser is more concentrated and intense compared with that of the circularly polarized laser.

  18. Femtosecond laser pulses principles and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    1998-01-01

    This smooth introduction for advanced undergraduate students starts with the fundamentals of lasers and pulsed optics Thus prepared, the student learns how to generate short and ultrashort laser pulses, how to manipulate them, and how to measure them Finally, spectroscopic implications are discussed This rounded text gives the student an up-to-date introduction to one of the most exciting fields in laser physics

  19. Livermore experience: contributions of J. H. Eberly to laser excitation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B W; Kulander, K; Davis, J I

    2000-10-12

    This article summarizes the developing understanding of coherent atomic excitation, as gained through a collaboration of J. H. Eberly with the Laser Isotope Separation Program of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, particularly aspects of coherence, population trapping, multilevel multiphoton excitation sequences, analytic solutions to multistate excitation chains, the quasicontinuum, pulse propagation, and noise. In addition to the discovery of several curious and unexpected properties of coherent excitation, mentioned here, the collaboration provided an excellent example of unexpected benefits from investment into basic research.

  20. Role of laser pre-pulse wavelength and inter-pulse delay on signal enhancement in collinear double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diwakar, P.K., E-mail: pdiwakar@purdue.edu; Harilal, S.S.; Freeman, J.R.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-09-01

    Dual-pulse (DP) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides significant improvement in signal intensity as compared to conventional single-pulse LIBS. We investigated collinear DPLIBS experimental performance using various laser wavelength combinations employing 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 266 nm Nd:YAG lasers. In particular, the role of the pre-pulse laser wavelength, inter-pulse delay times, and energies of the reheating pulses on LIBS sensitivity improvements is studied. Wavelengths of 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 266 nm pulses were used for generating pre-pulse plasma while 1064 nm pulse was used for reheating the pre-formed plasma generated by the pre-pulse. Significant emission intensity enhancement is noticed for all reheated plasma regardless of the pre-pulse excitation beam wavelength compared to single pulse LIBS. A dual peak in signal enhancement was observed for different inter-pulse delays, especially for 1064:1064 nm combinations, which is explained based on temperature measurement and shockwave expansion phenomenon. Our results also show that 266 nm:1064 nm combination provided maximum absolute signal intensity as compared to 1064 nm:1064 nm or 532 nm:1064 nm. - Highlights: • Role of pre-pulse wavelength and inter-pulse delay on LIBS sensitivity was studied. • For NIR:NIR combination, dual peaks in signal enhancement were observed. • UV:NIR combination resulted in maximum absolute signal intensity. • Persistence of neutral species was increased for double pulse.