WorldWideScience

Sample records for excited x-ray emission

  1. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  2. Ultrafast emission from colloidal nanocrystals under pulsed X-ray excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Turtos, R.M.; Polovitsyn, A.; Christodoulou, S.; Salomoni, M.; Auffray, E.; Moreels, I.; Lecoq, P.; Grim, J.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Fast timing has emerged as a critical requirement for radiation detection in medical and high energy physics, motivating the search for scintillator materials with high light yield and fast time response. However, light emission rates from conventional scintillation mechanisms fundamentally limit the achievable time resolution, which is presently at least one order of magnitude slower than required for next-generation detectors. One solution to this challenge is to generate an intense prompt signal in response to ionizing radiation. In this paper, we present colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as promising prompt photon sources. We investigate two classes of NCs: two-dimensional CdSe nanoplatelets (NPLs) and spherical CdSe/CdS core/giant shell quantum dots (GS QDs). We demonstrate that the emission rates of these NCs under pulsed X-ray excitation are much faster than traditional mechanisms in bulk scintillators, i.e. 5d-4f transitions. CdSe NPLs have a sub-100 ps effective decay time of 77 ps and CdSe/...

  3. Jovian X-ray emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H.; Lewis, W. S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Brandt, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    The Einstein and Rosat observations of X-ray emissions from Jupiter are summarized. Jupiter's soft X-ray emission is observed to originate from the planet's auroral zones, and specifically, from its equatorial region. The processes responsible for these emissions are not established. The brightness distribution of the Jovian X-rays is characterized by the dependence on central meridian longitude and by north-south and morning-afternoon asymmetries. The X-rays observed during the impact of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 are believed to be impact-induced brightenings of the X-ray aurora.

  4. Electronic Excitations in Vanadium Oxide Phthalocyanine Studied via Resonant Soft X-ray Emission and Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang,Y.; Wang, S.; Learmonth, T.; Plucinski, L.; Matsuura, A.; Bernardis, S.; ODonnell, C.; Downes, J.; Smith, K.

    2005-01-01

    The electronic structure of the organic semiconductor vanadium oxide phthalocyanine has been studied using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and X-ray emission spectroscopy. The vanadyl species in the films is shown to be highly localized, and good agreement between the measurements and a density functional calculation is obtained. Both dipole forbidden V 3d to V 3d*, and O 2p to V 3d* charge transfer transitions are observed, and explained in a local molecular orbital model.

  5. Depth-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy in nanostructures via standing-wave excited photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronast, F.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kaiser, A.; Wiemann, C.; Yang, S.-H.; Locatelli, A.; Burgler, D.E.; Schreiber, R.; Salmassi, F.; Fischer, P.; Durr, H.A.; Schneider, C.M.; Eberhardt, W.; Fadley, C.S.

    2008-11-24

    We present an extension of conventional laterally resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy. A depth resolution along the surface normal down to a few {angstrom} can be achieved by setting up standing x-ray wave fields in a multilayer substrate. The sample is an Ag/Co/Au trilayer, whose first layer has a wedge profile, grown on a Si/MoSi2 multilayer mirror. Tuning the incident x-ray to the mirror Bragg angle we set up standing x-ray wave fields. We demonstrate the resulting depth resolution by imaging the standing wave fields as they move through the trilayer wedge structure.

  6. [Development of X-ray excited fluorescence spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chen; Gu, Mu; Di, Wang; Cao, Dun-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Huang, Shi-Ming

    2009-08-01

    An X-ray excited fluorescence spectrometer was developed with an X-ray tube and a spectrometer. The X-ray tube, spectrometer, autocontrol method and data processing selected were roundly evaluated. The wavelength and detecting efficiency of the apparatus were calibrated with the mercury and tungsten bromine standard lamps, and the X-ray excited emission spectra of BaF2, Cs I (Tl) crystals were measured. The results indicate that the apparatus has advantages of good wavelength resolution, high stability, easy to operation and good radioprotection. It is a wery effective tool for exploration of new scintillation materials.

  7. X-Ray Emission Spectrometer Design with Single-Shot Pump-Probe and Resonant Excitation Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoth, Katherine; /SUNY, Buffalo /SLAC

    2012-08-28

    Core-level spectroscopy in the soft X-ray regime is a powerful tool for the study of chemical bonding processes. The ultrafast, ultrabright X-ray pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) allow these reactions to be studied in greater detail than ever before. In this study, we investigated a conceptual design of a spectrometer for the LCLS with imaging in the non-dispersive direction. This would allow single-shot collection of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements with varying laser pump X-ray probe delay or a variation of incoming X-ray energy over the illuminated area of the sample. Ray-tracing simulations were used to demonstrate how the components of the spectrometer affect its performance, allowing a determination of the optimal final design. These simulations showed that the spectrometer's non-dispersive focusing is extremely sensitive to the size of the sample footprint; the spectrometer is not able to image a footprint width larger than one millimeter with the required resolution. This is compatible with a single shot scheme that maps out the laser pump X-ray probe delay in the non-dispersive direction as well as resonant XES applications at normal incidence. However, the current capabilities of the Soft X-Ray (SXR) beamline at the LCLS do not produce the required energy range in a small enough sample footprint, hindering the single shot resonant XES application at SXR for chemical dynamics studies at surfaces. If an upgraded or future beamline at LCLS is developed with lower monochromator energy dispersion the width can be made small enough at the required energy range to be imaged by this spectrometer design.

  8. Reabsorption of soft x-ray emission at high x-ray free-electron laser fluences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; Sellberg, Jonas A; McQueen, Trevor; Laksmono, Hartawan; Kennedy, Brian; Eckert, Sebastian; Schlesinger, Daniel; Nordlund, Dennis; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Sierra, Raymond G; Segtnan, Vegard H; Kubicek, Katharina; Schlotter, William F; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan P; Bergmann, Uwe; Techert, Simone; Pettersson, Lars G M; Wernet, Philippe; Bogan, Michael J; Harada, Yoshihisa; Nilsson, Anders; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2014-10-10

    We report on oxygen K-edge soft x-ray emission spectroscopy from a liquid water jet at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We observe significant changes in the spectral content when tuning over a wide range of incident x-ray fluences. In addition the total emission yield decreases at high fluences. These modifications result from reabsorption of x-ray emission by valence-excited molecules generated by the Auger cascade. Our observations have major implications for future x-ray emission studies at intense x-ray sources. We highlight the importance of the x-ray pulse length with respect to the core-hole lifetime.

  9. On stellar X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Golub, L.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Stellar X-ray astronomy represents an entirely new astronomical discipline which has emerged during the past five years. It lies at the crossroads of solar physics, stellar physics, and general astrophysics. The present review is concerned with the main physical problems which arise in connection with a study of the stellar X-ray data. A central issue is the extent to which the extrapolation from solar physics is justified and the definition (if possible) of the limits to such extrapolation. The observational properties of X-ray emission from stars are considered along with the solar analogy and the modeling of X-ray emission from late-type stars, the modeling of X-ray emission from early-type stars, the physics of stellar X-ray emission, stellar X-ray emission in the more general astrophysical context, and future prospects.

  10. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  11. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors ...

  12. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of elementary excitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, Lucas Johannes Peter (Luuk)

    2010-01-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is an X-ray in, X-ray out technique that enables one to study the dispersion of excitations in solids. In this thesis, we investigated how various elementary excitations of transition metal oxides show up in RIXS spectra.

  13. X-ray Excitation Triggers Ytterbium Anomalous Emission in CaF 2 :Yb but Not in SrF 2 :Yb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes-Currie, Rosa B.; Ivanovskikh, Konstantin V.; Wells, Jon-Paul R.; Reid, Michael F.; Gordon, Robert A.; Seijo, Luis; Barandiarán, Zoila

    2017-02-27

    Materials that luminesce after excitation with ionizing radiation are extensively applied in physics, medicine, security, and industry. Lanthanide dopants are known to trigger crystal scintillation through their fast d–f emissions; the same is true for other important applications as lasers or phosphors for lighting. However, this ability can be seriously compromised by unwanted anomalous emissions often found with the most common lanthanide activators. We report high-resolution X-ray-excited optical (IR to UV) luminescence spectra of CaF2:Yb and SrF2:Yb samples excited at 8949 eV and 80 K. Ionizing radiation excites the known anomalous emission of ytterbium in the CaF2 host but not in the SrF2 host. Wave function-based ab initio calculations of host-to-dopant electron transfer and Yb2+/Yb3+ intervalence charge transfer explain the difference. The model also explains the lack of anomalous emission in Yb-doped SrF2 excited by VUV radiation.

  14. X-ray Excitation Triggers Ytterbium Anomalous Emission in CaF2:Yb but Not in SrF2:Yb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Currie, Rosa B; Ivanovskikh, Konstantin V; Wells, Jon-Paul R; Reid, Michael F; Gordon, Robert A; Seijo, Luis; Barandiarán, Zoila

    2017-03-16

    Materials that luminesce after excitation with ionizing radiation are extensively applied in physics, medicine, security, and industry. Lanthanide dopants are known to trigger crystal scintillation through their fast d-f emissions; the same is true for other important applications as lasers or phosphors for lighting. However, this ability can be seriously compromised by unwanted anomalous emissions often found with the most common lanthanide activators. We report high-resolution X-ray-excited optical (IR to UV) luminescence spectra of CaF2:Yb and SrF2:Yb samples excited at 8949 eV and 80 K. Ionizing radiation excites the known anomalous emission of ytterbium in the CaF2 host but not in the SrF2 host. Wave function-based ab initio calculations of host-to-dopant electron transfer and Yb(2+)/Yb(3+) intervalence charge transfer explain the difference. The model also explains the lack of anomalous emission in Yb-doped SrF2 excited by VUV radiation.

  15. X-ray Emission from Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavlin, Vyacheslav

    2006-01-01

    Isolated (solitary or non-accreting) millisecond pulsars with observed X-ray emission can be divided in two distinct groups: those emitting nonthermal (magnetospheric) radiation and pulsars with the bulk of X-rays of a thermal origin, presumably emitted from small hot spots around the magnetic poles on the neutron star surface (polar caps). I will discuss properties of X-ray emission detected with Chandra and XMM-Newton from a number of millisecond pulsars, with emphasis on those of the thermal component, and compare them with predictions of radio pulsar models.

  16. X-ray emission from normal stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Robert

    1990-01-01

    The paper addresses the potential for future X-ray missions to determine the fundamental cause of stellar X-ray emissions based on available results and existing analyses. The determinants of stellar X-ray emission are listed, and the relation of stellar X-ray emissions to the 'universal' activity-rotation connection is discussed. The specific rotation-activity connection for evolved stars is mentioned, and the 'decay' of stellar activity at the low-mass end of the main sequence is related to observational data. The data from Einstein and EXOSAT missions that correspond to these issues are found to be sparse, and more observational work is found to be necessary. Also, it is concluded that some issues need to be addressed, such as the X-ray dividing line in evolved stars and the absence of X-ray emission from dA stars. The related observational requirements and instrumental capabilities are given for each significant research focus.

  17. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  18. Tracking of azobenzene isomerization by X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, H

    2014-09-11

    Cis-trans isomerizations are among the fundamental processes in photochemistry. In azobenzene or its derivatives this dynamics is, due to its reversibility, one of the reactions widely used in photostimulation of molecular motors or in molecular electronics. Though intensively investigated in the optical regime, no detailed study exists in the X-ray regime so far. Because the X-ray emission spectroscopy echoes the electronic structure sensitive to the geometry, this theoretical report based on the density functional theory and its time-dependent version presents different nitrogen K-edge X-ray emission spectra for cis and trans isomers with close interrelation to their electron configuration. Considering the spectrum along the isomerization path, these structural signatures can be utilized to probe the isomerization dynamics in the excited molecule. The scheme can further be generalized to the element specific photoreactions.

  19. Magnetic effects in resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebennikov, V.I. E-mail: greben@imp.uran.ru

    2004-07-01

    A theoretical description for L{sub {alpha}} and L{sub {beta}} emission spectra recorded at different excitation photon energies gives the main spectral lines: a normal emission peak, with the constant energy, and a quasi-elastic peak that moves in energy scale when the incident photon energy changes. The intensity of the quasi-elastic peak is strongly controlled by valence electron excitations due to core-hole effects. Characteristic shake-up processes give rise to double lines in spectra. Applications of resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering for studying magnetic systems are discussed. Emission spectra (as well as absorption spectra) show the magnetic dichroism when they are excited by the polarized incident X-ray radiation. But, the emission experiments contain information on the local magnetic moment values on excited atoms even in the case of depolarized incident radiation and in disordered magnetic states. The integral intensities ratio for L{sub {beta}}/L{sub {alpha}} lines in transition metal oxides are analyzed from this point of view. The similarity of experimental X-ray fluorescent spectra with emission spectra received by electron impacts allow us to conclude that in 3d-element compounds the high-energy electron impact transfers the 2p-electron into valence states with considerable probability.

  20. X-Ray Point-source Populations Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Yoshida, Tessei; Ebisawa, Ken

    2013-03-01

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above ≈10-14 erg cm-2 s-1, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe Kα emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  1. X-ray Emission Mechanisms in Herbig - Haro objects .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Favata, F.; Rosner, R.

    X-ray emission in Herbig - Haro objects is a quite recent and uncommon finding still waiting full explanation. With the scope of explaining this X-ray emission, our project is devoted to model the interaction between a supersonic jet originating from a young stellar object and the ambient medium. We have performed a wide exploration of the parameter space to infer the configuration(s) which can give rise to X-ray emission very similar to what recently observed.

  2. X-ray excited optical luminescence, photoluminescence, photostimulated luminescence and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy studies on BaFBr:Eu

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, N; Govinda-Rajan, K; Mohammad-Yousuf; Santanu-Bera; Narasimhan, S V

    1997-01-01

    The results of x-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL), photoluminescence (PL), photostimulated luminescence (PSL) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) studies on the x-ray storage phosphor BaFBr:Eu are presented in this paper. Analyses of XEOL, PL and PSL spectra reveal features corresponding to the transitions from 4f sup 6 td sup 1 to 4f sup 7 configurations in different site symmetries of Eu sup 2 sup +. Increasing x-ray dose is seen to lead to a red shift in the maximum of the PL excitation spectrum for the 391 nm emission. The XEOL and XPS spectra do not show any signature of Eu sup 3 sup + in the samples studied by us, directly raising doubts about the model of Takahashi et al in which Eu sup 2 sup + is expected to ionize to Eu sup 3 sup + upon x-ray irradiation and remain stable until photostimulation. XEOL and PSL experiments with simultaneous x-ray irradiation and He - Ne laser excitation as well as those with sequential x-ray irradiation and laser stimulation bring out the competition betwe...

  3. X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cominsky, L

    2004-03-23

    This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

  4. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; hide

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These

  5. Understanding X-ray reflection emissivity profiles in AGN: locating the X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.

    2012-08-01

    The illumination pattern (or emissivity profile) of the accretion disc due to the reflection of X-rays in active galactic nucleus can be understood in terms of relativistic effects on the rays propagating from a source in a corona surrounding the central black hole, both on their trajectories and on the accretion disc itself. Theoretical emissivity profiles due to isotropic point sources as well as simple extended geometries are computed in general relativistic ray-tracing simulations performed on graphics processing units (GPUs). Such simulations assuming only general relativity naturally explain the accretion disc emissivity profiles determined from relativistically broadened emission lines which fall off steeply (with power-law indices of between 6 and 8) over the inner regions of the disc, then flattening off to almost a constant before tending to a constant power law of index 3 over the outer disc. Simulations for a variety of source locations, extents and geometries show how the emissivity profiles depend on these properties, and when combined with reverberation time lags allow the location and extent of the primary X-ray source to be constrained. Comparing the emissivity profile determined from the broadened iron K emission line in spectra of 1H 0707-495 obtained in 2008 January to theoretical emissivity profiles and applying constraints from reverberation lags suggest that there exists an extended region of primary X-ray emission located as low as 2rg above the accretion disc, extending outwards to a radius of around 30rg.

  6. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    X-rays from a 25-hJ plasma focus apparatus were observed with pinhole cameras. The cameras consist of 0.4 mm diameter pinholes in 2 cm thick lead housing enclosing an X-ray intensifying screen at the image plane. Pictures recorded through thin aluminum foils or plastic sheets for X-ray energies sub gamma smaller than 15 keV show distributed X-ray emissions from the focussed plasma and from the anode surface. However, when thick absorbers are used, radial filamentary structure in the X-ray emission from the anode surface is revealed. Occasionally larger structures are observed in addition to the filaments. Possible mechanisms for the filamentary structure are discussed.

  7. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  8. Observing Solvation Dynamics with Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Kristoffer; Gawelda, Wojciech; Abela, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In liquid phase chemistry dynamic solute solvent interactions often govern the path, ultimate outcome, and efficiency of chemical reactions. These steps involve many-body movements on subpicosecond time scales and thus ultrafast structural tools capable of capturing both intramolecular electronic......, confirming previous ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Structural changes in the aqueous solvent associated with density and temperature changes occur with similar to 1 ps time constants, characteristic for structural dynamics in water. This slower time scale of the solvent response allows us...... rearrangement of the solute with X-ray emission spectroscopy, thus establishing time zero for the ensuing X-ray diffuse scattering analysis. The simultaneously recorded X-ray diffuse scattering atterns reveal slower subpicosecond dynamics triggered by the intramolecular structural dynamics of the photoexcited...

  9. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Alexander; Kronast, Florian; Papp, Christian; Yang, See-Hun; Cramm, Stefan; Krug, Ingo P.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Hilken, Dawn L.; Anderson, Erik H.; Fischer, Peter; Durr, Hermann A.; Schneider, Claus M.; Fadley, Charles S.

    2010-10-29

    We demonstrate the addition of depth resolution to the usual two-dimensional images in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), with application to a square array of circular magnetic Co microdots. The method is based on excitation with soft x-ray standing-waves generated by Bragg reflection from a multilayer mirror substrate. Standing wave is moved vertically through sample simply by varying the photon energy around the Bragg condition. Depth-resolved PEEM images were obtained for all of the observed elements. Photoemission intensities as functions of photon energy were compared to x-ray optical calculations in order to quantitatively derive the depth-resolved film structure of the sample.

  10. X-Ray Emission in the Heliosphere: Ion-Neutral Collisions as a Plasma Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, Tom; Sibeck, David; Collier, MIchael

    2015-04-01

    The solar corona is the most powerful source of x-rays in the solar system but x-ray emission has also been observed from planets, including the Earth and Jupiter, from the Moon, from comets, and from interstellar gas entering the heliosphere. Astrophysical x-ray emission primarily comes from hot plasmas, such as in the million degree solar corona. The gas and plasma in planetary atmospheres are rather cold and the x-ray emission is driven by solar radiation and/or the solar wind. For example, x-rays from Venus come from the scattering and K-shell fluorescence of solar x-rays from the neutral atmosphere. Auroral x-ray emission at Earth and Jupiter is produced by energetic electron and ion precipitation from the magnetospheres into the atmospheres. Cometary and heliospheric x-ray emission is caused by charge transfer of high charge state solar wind ions (e.g., O7+, C6+,…) with neutral hydrogen and helium.An important source of solar system x-rays is the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) mechanism. The solar wind originates in the hot solar corona and species heavier than helium (comprising about 0.1% of the gas) are highly-charged (e.g., O7+, C6+, Fe12+,….). Such ions undergo charge transfer collisions when they encounter neutral gas (e.g., cometary or interstellar gas or the Earth’s geocoronal hydrogen). The product ions are in highly-excited states and, subsequently, emit soft x-ray photons. The SWCX mechanism can explain the observed cometary x-ray emission and can also explain part of the soft x-ray background (the other part of which originates in the hot interstellar medium).The Earth has an extensive hot hydrogen exosphere, or geocorona, that is visible in scattered solar Lyman alpha. X-ray emission is produced in the magnetosheath due to the SWCX mechanism as the solar wind interacts with the exospheric gas. The most intense x-ray emission comes from the subsolar sheath region and from the cusp regions. Imaging of this emission by a spacecraft located

  11. X-Ray Emissions from Accreting White Dwarfs: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, K.

    2017-01-01

    Interacting binaries in which a white dwarf accretes material from a companion-cataclysmic variables (CVs) in which the mass donor is a Roche-lobe filling star on or near the main sequence, and symbiotic stars in which the mass donor is a late type giant-are relatively commonplace. They display a wide range of behaviors in the optical, X-rays, and other wavelengths, which still often baffle observers and theorists alike. Here I review the existing body of research on X-ray emissions from these objects for the benefits of both experts and newcomers to the field. I provide introductions to the past and current X-ray observatories, the types of known X-ray emissions from these objects, and the data analysis techniques relevant to this field. I then summarize of our knowledge regarding the X-ray emissions from magnetic CVs, non-magnetic CVs and symbiotic stars, and novae in eruption. I also discuss space density and the X-ray luminosity functions of these binaries and their contribution to the integrated X-ray emission from the Galaxy. I then discuss open questions and future prospects.

  12. X-ray emission from Of stars and OB supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinelli, J. P.; Waldron, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    The result of a survey of X-ray emission from luminous early-type stars is reported in which observations were made using the imaging proportional counter on the Einstein Observatory. The survey suggests that all Of stars and OB supergiants earlier than B1 I are X-ray sources with luminosities not less than 10 to the 32nd ergs/s and that some later B supergiants have X-ray luminosities not less than 10 to the 31st ergs/s. The X-ray luminosities are roughly 10 to the -7.2nd of the bolometric luminosities for supergiants earlier than B1 and perhaps a factor of 3 less for later B supergiants. Spectral analysis of the X-rays in conjunction with information on anomalous ionization in the wind from four of the strongest sources implies that the data are not consistent with a model in which the X-rays originate in a thin slab coronal zone at the base of the wind. Constraints on the source of X-rays from B supergiants are derived by combining the X-ray flux information with that on ultraviolet line anomalies.

  13. The very soft X-ray emission of X-ray-faint early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, S.; Fabbiano, G.

    1994-01-01

    A recent reanaylsis of Einstein data, and new ROSAT observations, have revealed the presence of at least two components in the X-ray spectra of X-ray faint early-type galaxies: a relatively hard component (kT greater than 1.5 keV), and a very soft component (kT approximately 0.2-0.3 keV). In this paper we address the problem of the nature of the very soft component and whether it can be due to a hot interstellar medium (ISM), or is most likely originated by the collective emission of very soft stellar sources. To this purpose, hydrodynamical evolutionary sequences for the secular behavior of gas flows in ellipticals have been performed, varying the Type Ia supernovae rate of explosion, and the dark matter amount and distribution. The results are compared with the observational X-ray data: the average Einstein spectrum for six X-ray faint early-type galaxies (among which are NGC 4365 and NGC 4697), and the spectrum obtained by the ROSAT pointed observation of NGC 4365. The very soft component could be entirely explained with a hot ISM only in galaxies such as NGC 4697, i.e., when the depth of the potential well-on which the average ISM temperature strongly depends-is quite shallow; in NGC 4365 a diffuse hot ISM would have a temperature larger than that of the very soft component, because of the deeper potential well. So, in NGC 4365 the softest contribution to the X-ray emission comes certainly from stellar sources. As stellar soft X-ray emitters, we consider late-type stellar coronae, supersoft sources such as those discovered by ROSAT in the Magellanic Clouds and M31, and RS CVn systems. All these candidates can be substantial contributors to the very soft emission, though none of them, taken separately, plausibly accounts entirely for its properties. We finally present a model for the X-ray emission of NGC 4365, to reproduce in detail the results of the ROSAT pointed observation, including the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) spectrum and radial

  14. Enhanced X-ray Emission from Early Universe Analog Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorby, Matthew; Kaaret, Philip; Prestwich, Andrea H.; Mirabel, I. Felix; Feng, Hua

    2016-04-01

    X-rays from binaries containing compact objects may have played an important role in heating the early Universe. Here we discuss our findings from X-ray studies of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs), Lyman break analogs (LBAs), and Green Pea galaxies (GP), all of which are considered local analogs to high redshift galaxies. We find enhanced X-ray emission per unit star-formation rate which strongly correlates with decreasing metallicity. We find evidence for the existence of a L_X-SFR-Metallicity plane for star-forming galaxies. The exact properties of X-ray emission in the early Universe affects the timing and morphology of reionization, both being observable properties of current and future radio observations of the redshifted 21cm signal from neutral hydrogen.

  15. Characterization of X-ray emission from laser generated plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannavò Antonino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray emission from laser generated plasma was studied at low (1010 W/cm2 and high (1018 W/cm2 intensity using ns and fs laser, respectively. Plasma characteristics were controlled trough the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions and the target properties. The X-ray spectra were acquired using fast detection technique based on SiC diodes with different active regions. The X-ray yield increases with the atomic number of the target, both at low and high intensity, and a similar empirical law has been obtained. The X-ray emission mechanisms from plasma are correlated to the plasma temperature and density and to the Coulomb charge particle acceleration, due to the charge separation effects produced in the non-equilibrium plasma. Functional dependences, theoretical approaches and interpretation of possible mechanism will be presented and discussed.

  16. Characterization of X-ray emission from laser generated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, Antonino; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Ceccio, Giovanni; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Calcagno, Lucia; Sciuto, Antonella; Mazzillo, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    X-ray emission from laser generated plasma was studied at low (1010 W/cm2) and high (1018 W/cm2) intensity using ns and fs laser, respectively. Plasma characteristics were controlled trough the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions and the target properties. The X-ray spectra were acquired using fast detection technique based on SiC diodes with different active regions. The X-ray yield increases with the atomic number of the target, both at low and high intensity, and a similar empirical law has been obtained. The X-ray emission mechanisms from plasma are correlated to the plasma temperature and density and to the Coulomb charge particle acceleration, due to the charge separation effects produced in the non-equilibrium plasma. Functional dependences, theoretical approaches and interpretation of possible mechanism will be presented and discussed.

  17. X-ray emission from two nearby millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsett, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    This grant, titled 'X-Ray Emission from Two Nearby Millisecond Pulsars,' included ROSAT observations of the nearby pulsars PSR J2322+20 and PSR J2019+24. Neither was detected, although the observations were among the most sensitive ever made towards millisecond pulsars, reaching 1.5 x 10(exp 29) and 2.7 x 10(exp 29) erg s(exp -1) (0.1-2.4 keV), respectively. This is about, or slightly below, the predicted level of emission from the Seward and Wang empirical prediction, based on an extrapolation from slower pulsars. To understand the significance of this result, we have compared these limits with observations of four other millisecond pulsars, taken from the ROSAT archives. Except for the case of PSR B1821-21, where we identified a possible x-ray counterpart, only upper limits on x-ray flux were obtained. From these results, we conclude that x-ray emission beaming does not follow the same dependence on pulsar period as that of radio emission: while millisecond pulsars have beaming fractions near unity in the radio, x-ray emission is observed only for favorable viewing geometries.

  18. Exotic x-ray emission from dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Dachicourt, R.; Deschaud, B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.

    2015-11-01

    Exotic x-ray emission from dense matter is identified as the complex high intensity satellite emission from autoionizing states of highly charged ions. Among a vast amount of possible transitions, double K-hole hollow ion (HI) x-ray emission K0L X → K1L X-1 + hν hollow is of exceptional interest due to its advanced diagnostic potential for matter under extreme conditions where opacity and radiation fields play important roles. Transient ab initio simulations identify intense short pulse radiation fields (e.g., those emitted by x-ray free electron lasers) as possible driving mechanisms of HI x-ray emission via two distinct channels: first, successive photoionization of K-shell electrons, second, photoionization followed by resonant photoexciation among various ionic charge states that are simultaneously present in high density matter. We demonstrated that charge exchange of intermixing inhomogenous plasmas as well as collisions driven by suprathermal electrons are possible mechanisms to populate HIs to observable levels in dense plasmas, particularly in high current Z-pinch plasmas and high intensity field-ionized laser produced plasmas. Although the HI x-ray transitions were repeatedly identified in many other cases of dense optical laser produced plasmas on the basis of atomic structure calculations, their origin is far from being understood and remains one of the last holy grails of high intensity laser-matter interaction.

  19. X-rays from protostellar jets: emission from continuous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Favata, F.; Rosner, R.

    2007-02-01

    Context: Recently X-ray emission from protostellar jets has been detected with both XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, but the physical mechanism which can give rise to this emission is still unclear. Aims: We performed an extensive exploration of the parameter space for the main parameters influencing the jet/ambient medium interaction. Aims include: 1) to constrain the jet/ambient medium interaction regimes leading to the X-ray emission observed in Herbig-Haro objects in terms of the emission by a shock forming at the interaction front between a continuous supersonic jet and the surrounding medium; 2) to derive detailed predictions to be compared with optical and X-ray observations of protostellar jets; 3) to get insight into the protostellar jet's physical conditions. Methods: We performed a set of two-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations, in cylindrical coordinates, modeling supersonic jets ramming into a uniform ambient medium. The model takes into account the most relevant physical effects, namely thermal conduction and radiative losses. Results: Our model explains the observed X-ray emission from protostellar jets in a natural way. In particular, we find that a protostellar jet that is less dense than the ambient medium well reproduces the observations of the nearest Herbig-Haro object, HH 154, and allows us to make detailed predictions of a possible X-ray source proper motion (v_sh ≈500 km s-1) detectable with Chandra. Furthermore, our results suggest that the simulated protostellar jets which best reproduce the X-rays observations cannot drive molecular outflows.

  20. X-Ray and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Dim X-Ray Point Sources Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-Ray Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko Morihana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of X-ray and Near-Infrared observations of the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE. We extracted 2,002 X-ray point sources in the Chandra Bulge Field (l =0°.113, b = 1°.424 down to ~10-14.8 ergscm-2s-1 in 2-8 keV band with the longest observation (900 ks of the GRXE. Based on X-ray brightness and hardness, we classied the X-ray point sources into three groups: A (hard, B (soft and broad spectrum, and C (soft and peaked spectrum. In order to know populations of the X-ray point sources, we carried out NIR imaging and spectroscopy observation. We identied 11% of X-ray point sources with NIR and extracted NIR spectra for some of them. Based on X-ray and NIR properties, we concluded that non-thermal sources in the group A are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf binaries such as cataclysmic variables (CVs and Pre-CVs. We concluded that the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flare and quiescence, respectively.

  1. Heavy-ion-induced x-ray satellite emission as a chemical probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosseel, T.M.; Dale, J.M.; Hulett, L.D.; Krause, H.F.; Raman, S.; Vane, C.R.; Young, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Advances in energy technology often require correspondidng advances in materials fabrication and characterization. Among the new techniques being developed for the improved characterization of materials is an x-ray fluorescence method which uses heavy ions for excitation. High resolution measurements of heavy-ion excited x-ray spectra have revealed a series of prominent satellite lines in addition to the normal emission lines. It has been shown that these satellites display intensity variations indicative of the chemical state or environment of the emitting target atom and the projectile velocity. In order to evaluate heavy-ion induced x-ray satellite emission (HIXSE) as a chemical probe, we have examined a series of sulfur compounds and titanium, vanadium and molybdenum alloys and compounds. Results will be presented which demonstrate the chemical sensitivity of this technique, the range of elements which can be analyzed and the potential for applications to real chemical and materials problems.

  2. Investigating the X-ray Emission from Type IIn Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwarkadas, V.

    2017-10-01

    Type IIn supernovae (SNe) are characterized by narrow lines on a broad base in the optical spectrum. A wide diversity in their lightcurves, and in SNe that exhibit IIn features, has greatly complicated the task of identifying their progenitors. IIns have the highest X-ray luminosity of all SNe, generally exceeding 10^{40} ergs s^{-1} at early times, and 10^{38} ergs s^{-1} after several thousand days, and are observable in X-rays decades after explosion. Many of the lightcurves tend to fall off rather steeply at late times, although one interesting case displayed a rising light curve for several thousand days. These characteristics, along with their high luminosities at other wavelengths, imply initial expansion in a very dense medium. At later times the densities decrease faster than expected for expansion in a steady wind. Their X-ray spectra generally show distinct lines, suggesting thermal emission. In this presentation we will show the lightcurves of all IIns that have been observed in X-rays, and compare their lightcurves and spectra to those of other SNe. We summarize the known properties of the X-ray emission from Type IIn SNe, and explore the implications for the SN environment, progenitor mass-loss and the identity of the progenitors.

  3. X-ray excited luminescence of Ga- and In-doped ZnO microrods by annealing treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianli; Liu, Xiaolin; Gu, Mu; Huang, Shiming; Zhang, Juannan; Ni, Chen; Liu, Bo; Hu, Yahua; Wu, Qiang; Zhao, Shuning

    2016-10-01

    Ga- and In-doped ZnO microrods were prepared by low temperature hydrothermal process, and the effect of annealing temperature on morphology, crystallization, photoluminescence and X-ray excited luminescence were deeply researched. The results showed that both Ga- and In-doped ZnO microrods were possessed of a good crystalline quality and exhibited an intense visible emission band with a blue-shift under X-ray excitation. This blue-shift of the visible luminescence could be ascribed to the different contributions of the defect emissions, i.e. the increase in the oxygen vacancy (VO) emission and the decrease of the oxygen interstitial (Oi) emission. Moreover, a strong ultraviolet luminescence was also obtained by further hydrogen annealing. It is expected that Ga- and In-doped microrods are promising candidates for development of fast and high-spatial-resolution X-ray imaging detectors.

  4. Typing supernova remnants using X-ray line emission morphologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, L.A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Badenes, C.; Huppenkothen, D.; Jeltema, T.E.; Pooley, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new observational method to type the explosions of young supernova remnants (SNRs). By measuring the morphology of the Chandra X-ray line emission in 17 Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs with a multipole expansion analysis (using power ratios), we find that the core-collapse SNRs

  5. New X-ray emission spectrometer at the Rossendorf Beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Molecular Structures

    2016-07-01

    A preliminary Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer has recently been installed and tested at the Rossendorf Beamline (ROBL). The spectrometer consists of a single spherically bent crystal analyzer and an avalanche photodiode detector positioned on the vertical Rowland cycle with 1 m diameter. The instrument has been tested at the Zr-K edge.

  6. Screening in resonant X-ray emission of molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Hans; Luo, Yi; Gelmukhanov, Faris

    1996-01-01

    We explore the effects of screening in resonant X-ray emission from molecules by means of unconstrained multi-configurational self-consistent field optimizations of each state involved in the resonant and nonresonant X-ray processes. It is found that, although screening can produce shifts...... in transition energies of a few eV, its effect on the transition intensities is relatively minor. Using results from the investigated molecules, we find that the screening is quite dependent on the type of molecule - saturated versus unsaturated - and on the core site, but depends little on the particular core...

  7. Picosecond relaxation of X-ray excited GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Victor; Medvedev, Nikita; Lipp, Vladimir; Ziaja, Beata

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we present the current status of our theoretical studies on ultrafast relaxation of X-ray/XUV excited gallium arsenide. First, we discuss our previous approach, the unified model based on rate equations, two-temperature model and the extended Drude approach. By fitting the model to the available experimental data, we obtained realistic estimates on transient electronic temperature and electron-lattice thermalization timescale. Next, we make a step towards a rigorous description of the relaxation process with our hybrid code, XTANT. We extend the XTANT to include the band-specific effect of the suppression of collisional processes in GaAs, and perform dedicated simulations. We find that the extended model correctly describes the predicted transient non-isothermality of conduction and valence bands, however, currently, it cannot reproduce the experimentally observed reflectivity overshooting at 5 - 10 ps. The reason for this discrepancy is that the electron-phonon coupling rate implemented in XTANT, although successfully applied for diamond and silicon, clearly underestimates the strength of this coupling in GaAs. The outline for a respective model improvement is discussed.

  8. X-ray emission from hot subdwarfs with compact companions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We review the X-ray observations of hot subdwarf stars. While no X-ray emission has been detected yet from binaries containing B-type subdwarfs, interesting results have been obtained in the case of the two luminous O-type subdwarfs HD 49798 and BD + 37° 442. Both of them are members of binary systems in which the X-ray luminosity is powered by accretion onto a compact object: a rapidly spinning (13.2 s and massive (1.28  M⊙ white dwarf in the case of HD 49798 and most likely a neutron star, spinning at 19.2 s, in the case of BD + 37° 442. Their study can shed light on the poorly known processes taking place during common envelope evolutionary phases and on the properties of wind mass loss from hot subdwarfs.

  9. The X-ray emission of the γ Cassiopeiae stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Myron A.; Lopes de Oliveira, R.; Motch, C.

    2016-09-01

    Long considered as the ;odd man out; among X-ray emitting Be stars, γ Cas (B0.5e IV) is now recognized as the prototype of a class of stars that emit hard thermal X-rays. Our classification differs from the historical use of the term ; γ Cas stars; defined from optical properties alone. The luminosity output of this class contributes significantly to the hard X-ray production of massive stars in the Galaxy. The γ Cas stars have light curves showing variability on a few broadly-defined timescales and spectra indicative of an optically thin plasma consisting of one or more hot thermal components. By now 9-13 Galactic ≈ B0-1.5e main sequence stars are judged to be members or candidate members of the γ Cas class. Conservative criteria for this designation are for a ≈ B0-1.5e III-V star to have an X-ray luminosity of 1032-1033 ergs s-1, a hot thermal spectrum containing the short wavelength Lyα Fe XXV and Fe XXVI lines and the fluorescence FeK feature all in emission. If thermality cannot be demonstrated, for example from either the presence of these Lyα lines or curvature of the hard continuum of the spectrum of an X-ray active Be star, we call them γ Cas candidates. We discuss the history of the discovery of the complicated characteristics of the variability in the optical, UV, and X-ray domains, leading to suggestions for the physical cause of the production of hard X-rays. These include scenarios in which matter from the Be star accretes onto a degenerate secondary star and interactions between magnetic fields on the Be star and its decretion disk. The greatest aid to the choice of the causal mechanism is the temporal correlations of X-ray light curves and spectra with diagnostics in the optical and UV wavebands. We show why the magnetic star-disk interaction scenario is the most tenable explanation for the creation of hard X-rays on these stars.

  10. Spontaneous emission effects in optically pumped x-ray FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetanin, I.V.; Grigor`ev, S.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    An effect of spontaneous emission in both quantum and classical regimes of the optically pumped X-ray free electron laser (FEL) in investigated. The quantum properties of an FEL are determined by the ratio of the separation {h_bar} between the absorption and emission lines (i.e. the quanta emitted) and their effective width {Delta}{epsilon} {eta}={h_bar}/{Delta}{epsilon}. In the conventional classical regime {eta} {much_lt} 1 an electron emits and absorbes a great number of shortwavelength photons over the interaction region, the gain in FEL being the result of these competitive processes. In the quantum limit {eta} {much_gt} 1 the emission and absorption lines are completely separated and thus the FEL becomes a two-level quantum oscillator with a completely inverted active medium. Spontaneous emission causes the electron to leave the range of energies where resonant interaction with the laser field occurs, thus effectively reducing the number of particles that take part in generating the induced X-ray signal. This effect is found to be crucial for lasing in optically pumped X-ray FEL. The characteristic relaxation times are calculated for both classical and quantum FEL regimes. It is shown that spontaneous emission results in FEL electron beam threshold current, which is of rather high value. An optimal range of pumping laser intensities is determined.

  11. Spin-polarized x-ray emission of 3d transition-metal ions : A comparison via K alpha and K beta detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xin; deGroot, F.M.F.; Cramer, SP

    1997-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that spin-polarized x-ray-excitation spectra can be obtained using K alpha emission as well as K beta lines. A spin-polarized analysis of K alpha x-ray emission and the excitation spectra by K alpha detection on a Ni compound is reported. A systematic analysis of the

  12. Hard X-ray emission spectroscopy with pink beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Rossberg, Andre; Exner, Joerg; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    Valence-band X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) with a ''pink beam'', i.e. a beam with large energy bandwidth produced by a double-multilayer monochromator, is introduced here to overcome the weak count rate of monochromatic beams produced by conventional double-crystal monochromators. Our results demonstrate that - in spite of the large bandwidth in the order of 100 eV - the high spectral resolution of the Johann-type spectrometer is maintained, while the two orders of magnitude higher flux greatly reduces the required counting time. The short working distance Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer and multilayer monochromator is available at ROBL.

  13. Magnetic Circular Dichroism in X-Ray Emission from Ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Toshiya

    2017-09-01

    The existence of novel magnetic circular dichroism in core-level x-ray emission is reported. By means of circular polarization analysis, the dichroic effect of the Fe Kα 1 emission spectrum is measured on an Fe single crystal. The observed dichroic effect (12%) is remarkably large, if one takes into account the small dichroic effect (about 0.5%) in the conventional K -edge absorption spectroscopy of 3 d transition metal elements. The mechanism is ascribed to exchange splitting of the 2 p level possessing large spin-orbit coupling. This new magnetooptical effect enables us to explore a variety of new research subjects in the magnetism of 3 d transition metals and their compounds by fully utilizing its large dichroic effect, the true bulk sensitivity of hard x rays, and the element selectivity of core-level spectroscopy.

  14. X-ray line emission from the Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, S. M.; Charles, P. A.; Bowyer, S.; Blissett, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The HEAO 1 satellite has observed the X-ray spectrum of the Cygnus Loop in the 0.1-2.0 keV band. The observed count-rate spectrum is deconvolved by the Kahn and Blissett technique to demonstrate conclusively the presence of oxygen- and iron-line emission between 0.6 and 0.9 keV. The spectrum has been fitted with single- and two-component Raymond-Smith plasma emission models. The best-fit dominant X-ray temperature is approximately 3,200,000 K, and the best-fit interstellar column density is approximately a few times 10 to the 20th/sq cm.

  15. Probing buried layers by photoelectron spectromicroscopy with hard x-ray excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemann, C.; Patt, M.; Cramm, S. [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Escher, M.; Merkel, M. [FOCUS GmbH, D-65510 Huenstetten (Germany); Gloskovskii, A. [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Thiess, S.; Drube, W. [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Schneider, C. M. [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Fakultaet f. Physik and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2012-05-28

    We report about a proof-of-principle experiment which explores the perspectives of performing hard x-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy with high lateral resolution. Our results obtained with an energy-filtered photoemission microscope at the PETRA III storage ring facility using hard x-ray excitation up to 6.5 keV photon energy demonstrate that it is possible to obtain selected-area x-ray photoemission spectra from regions less than 500 nm in diameter.

  16. Einstein Observations of X-ray emission from A stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, L.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Maxson, C. W.; Vaiana, G. S.; Snow, T. P., Jr.; Rosner, R.; Cash, W. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Results are reported from the combined CfA Stellar Survey of selected bright A stars and an Einstein Guest Observer program for Ap and Am stars. In an initial report of results from the CfA Stellar Surveys by Vaiana et al. (1981) it was noted that the spread in observed X-ray luminosities among the few A stars observed was quite large. The reasons for this large spread was studied by Pallavicini et al. (1981). It was found that the X-ray emission from normal stars is related very strongly to bolometric luminosity for early-type stars and to rotation rate for late-type stars. However, an exception to this rule has been the apparently anomalous behavior of A star X-ray emission, for which the large spread in luminosity showed no apparent correlation with either bolometric luminosity or stellar rotation rate. In the present study, it is shown that the level of emission from normal A stars agrees with the correlation observed for O and B stars.

  17. Backscatter of hard X-rays in the solar atmosphere. [Calculating the reflectance of solar x ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The solar photosphere backscatters a substantial fraction of the hard X rays from solar flares incident upon it. This reflection was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation which takes into account Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption. Both isotropic and anisotropic X ray sources are considered. The bremsstrahlung from an anisotropic distribution of electrons are evaluated. By taking the reflection into account, the inconsistency is removed between recent observational data regarding the center-to-limb variation of solar X ray emission and the predictions of models in which accelerated electrons are moving down toward the photosphere.

  18. Measuring the X-ray Emission Impacting the Planets Orbiting Nearby Low-mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    M dwarf planetary systems present a truly exciting opportunity to discover and study the first habitable extrasolar planets in the next 5-10 years. As part of our larger HST MUSCLES project, we propose ACIS-S observations of 4 low-mass exoplanet hosts (3 M dwarfs -- GJ581, GJ1214, GJ849, and 1 K dwarf -- HD97658) that have no existing measurements of their coronal X-ray emission. We will measure their X-ray luminosities and coronal temperatures, and derive the high energy radiation field to facilitate exoplanet atmospheric modeling. These planetary systems allow study of exoplanet atmospheric chemistry and evolution under a wide diversity of physical situations. X-ray heating enhances evaporation and atmospheric escape, which can impact the long-term stability of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  19. X-ray emission of exotic ions in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Dachicourt, R.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.

    2017-03-01

    Hollow ion X-ray emission has been observed in experiments studying interaction of heavy ion beams with solids and their occurrence has been ascribed to charge exchange processes occurring when highly charged ions interact with a metal surface. In high temperature high-density plasmas, like, e.g., high intensity laser produced plasmas or high current Z-pinches, numerous researchers have reported about "exotic" X-ray transitions of hollow ions: K0LX →K1LX-1+hνhollow. Although atomic structure calculations seem to confirm that measured line positions correspond to transitions in hollow ions, line identification is difficult and the observed high intensity remains a mystery (by orders of magnitude) up to present days.

  20. Monitoring known X-ray magnetars for intermittent radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Fernando

    2013-10-01

    Radio emission has been detected from only four magnetars (all discovered at Parkes). This emission is transient and highly variable, and appears to share other characteristics (e.g., flat radio spectra) that distinguish it from the emission of ordinary rotation-powered pulsars. However, there is clearly some relation between the radio emission of ordinary pulsars and that sometimes displayed by these magnetically-powered neutron stars. Studying this radiation provides a new opportunity to learn more about both neutron star radio emission mechanisms and magnetars. We are limited, however, by the knowledge of only four objects in the class. Several more X-ray magnetars are known, however, a few discovered only in the past few years. We aim to search for radio emission from the 11 magnetars visible from Parkes that are not currently known to emit radio waves. For this purpose, we request 4.5 hr of telescope time once per semester.

  1. Charge Exchange: Velocity Dependent X-ray Emission Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, Renata

    2017-06-01

    Atomic collisions play a fundamental role in astrophysics, plasma physics, and fusion physics. Here, we focus on charge exchange (CX) between hot ions and neutral atoms and molecules. Even though charge exchange calculations can provide vital information, including neutral and ion density distributions, ion temperatures, elemental abundances, and ion charge state distributions in the environments considered, both theoretical calculations and laboratory studies of these processes lack the necessary reliability and/or coverage. In order to better understand the spectra we observe in astrophysical environments in which both hot plasma and neutral gas are present, including comets, the heliosphere, supernova remnants, galaxy clusters, star forming galaxies, the outflows of starburst galaxies, and cooling flows of hot gas in the intracluster medium, a thorough CX X-ray model is needed. Included in this model should be a complete set of X-ray line ratios for relevant ion and neutral interactions for a range of energies.In this work, theoretical charge exchange emission spectra are produced using cross sections calculated with widely applied approaches including the quantum mechanical molecular orbital close coupling (QMOCC), atomic orbital close coupling (AOCC), classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC), and the multichannel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) methods. When possible, theoretical data are benchmarked to experiments. Using a comprehensive, but still far from complete, CX database, new models are performed for a variety of X-ray emitting environments. In an attempt to describe the excess emission in X-rays of the starburst galaxy M82, Ne X CX line ratios are compared to line ratios observed in the region. A more complete XSPEC X-ray emission model is produced for H-like and He-like C-Al ions colliding with H and He for a range of energies; 200 to 5000 eV/u. This model is applied to the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant in an attempt to determine the

  2. Chandra ACIS Observations of Jovian X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmire, Gordon; Elsner, Ronald; Feigelson, Eric; Ford, Peter; Gladstone, G. Randall; Hurley, Kevin; Metzger, Albert; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    On November 25 and 26, 1999, the Chandra X-ray spacecraft conducted a set of four 19,000 sec observations of Jupiter. The ACIS-S instrument configuration was used for its good low energy efficiency and spatial resolution. An anomalous response was obtained which was subsequently attributed to strong jovian infrared radiation penetrating the detector and piling up spurious events across the entire X-ray range. However, the pre-observation establishment of an offsetting bias field has allowed the recovery of data from that portion of Jupiter's disc which remained within the elevated portion of the bias field during the observation. This ranges from fewer than 3000 sec to the entire observing time for about 10% of the planet. Auroral emission is seen near both poles in each observation. The northern aurora ia overall more intense than the southern, consistent with prior Einstein and ROSAT Observatory results. The southern aurora shows more modulation with Jupiter's rotation than the northern. Spatial resolution has been improved by at least a factor of two over prior measurements but convincing evidence of structure has not been seen. Lower latitude emission, first observed by ROSAT, is confirmed with flux levels averaging more than a factor of five below peak auroral values. Pronounced variation in the observed emission has occurred over the observing period. The spectral response extends from 0.24 keV, below which noise dominates, to about 1.2 keV. For all four observations the spectrum is clearly enhanced between 0.45 and 0.85 keV. This is apparently unequivocal evidence that Jupiter's X-ray emission is the result of oxygen and perhaps sulfur ions precipitating into the planet's atmosphere, where they undergo charge exchange interactions. The identification of specific transitions lines in the spectrum is among the ongoing efforts. A bremsstrahlung component has not yet been identified.

  3. Performance of soft X-ray emission spectrometer employing charge-coupled device detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, T A; Muramatsu, Y

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a soft X-ray emission spectrometer employing a charge-coupled device camera was examined in the energy range of 80-1250 eV. The spectra observed by low-energy electron irradiation for metal L, oxygen K and silicon L lines were in good agreement with the previous observations by conventional MCP detectors. The results suggest that the energy resolution is good enough for the resonant excitation spectroscopy by synchrotron radiation as well.

  4. Resonant x-ray emission from gas-phase TiCl{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, C.F.; Tronc, M. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); De Groot, F. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) has proved to be a powerful tool for studying the electronic structure of condensed matter. Over the past few years it has been used mainly for studying the valence bands of solids and condensed molecules. Very recently the advent of high brightness photon beams provided by third generation synchrotron radiation source undulators, associated with efficient x-ray emission spectrometers has made it possible to perform experiments on free diatomic molecular systems. RXE spectra of free molecules are of prime importance to gain insight into their electronic structure and bonding as they reflect the symmetry of orbitals engaged in the two-electron, two-step process with the l = 0, {+-}2 parity-conserving selection rule, and are free from solid state effects which can introduce difficulties in the interpretation. They provide information (more so than XAS) on the core excited states, and, when performed at fixed incident photon energy as a function of the emitted photon energy, on the electronic excitation (charge transfer, multiplet states). Moreover the anisotropy of the angular distribution of resonant x-ray emission affects the relative intensity of the emission peaks and provides information concerning the symmetries of final states. This is a preliminary report on what are the first RXE spectra of a 3d transition metal complex in the gas phase. The experiment concerns the Ti 3d {yields}2p emission spectrum of TiCl{sub 4} over the 450 to 470 eV region.

  5. Role of screening and angular distributions in resonant soft-x-ray emission of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In the present work the authors focus on two particular properties of resonant X-ray emission, namely core hole screening of the excited electron, and anisotropy caused by the polarization of the exciting synchrotron radiation. The screening of the core hole by the excited electron causes energy shifts and intensity variations in resonant spectra compared to the non-resonant case. The linear polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the dipole nature of the absorption process create a preferential alignment selection of the randomly oriented molecules in the case of resonant excitation, producing an anisotropy in the angular distribution of the emitted X-rays. The authors have chosen CO for this study because this molecule has previously served as a showcase for non-resonant X-ray emission, mapping the valence electronic structure differently according to the local selection rules. With the present work they take interest in how this characteristic feature of the spectroscopy is represented in the resonant case.

  6. X-Ray Emission from Comet McNaught-Hartley (C/1999 T1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Christian, D. J.; Kharchenko, V.; Dalgarno, A.; Wolk, S. J.; Lisse, C. M.; Stern, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    Comet McNaught-Hartley was observed in five 1-h exposures on January 8-14 2001 using the advanced CCD imaging spectrometer on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The X-ray image of the comet does not show a crescent-like shape. The brightest region is offset from the nucleus between the sunward and comet velocity directions. The comet mean X-ray luminosity is equal to 7.8×10 15 erg s -1 for photon energy E>150 eV and aperture ρ=1.5×10 5 km where the comet X-ray brightness exceeds 20% of the peak value. Gas production rate was 10 29 s -1 during the observations, and the efficiency of X-ray excitation was equal to 4×10 -14 erg AU 3/2. Day-to-day variations in X-rays reached a factor of 5. The strongest short-term variation was by a factor of 1.75 for 1600 s. This variation may be explained by a decline in the solar-wind flux by the same factor in ≈800 s. The comet and Earth were seeing different faces of the Sun, and time delay in the solar-wind events on the Earth and the comet was long, equal to 6 days. The best correlation between the comet X-ray luminosity and the solar-wind proton density is for the time delay of 5.5 days and may be explained by the higher velocity of heavy ions. Careful background subtraction made it possible to extract the comet spectrum from 150 to 1000 eV. No signal was detected at E>1000 eV, and a 3σ upper limit to any emission with E>1000 eV is 0.3% of the photon emission at 150-1000 eV. The best χ 2-fit model to the spectrum consists of nine narrow emission features. The emission energies and intensities are in good agreement with a charge exchange spectrum calculated by us for the slow solar wind. Using this spectrum, we identify the observed emissions as (Ne 7++Mg 7++Mg 8+) at 195 eV, (Mg 8++Mg 9++Si 8+) at 250 eV, C 5+ at 370 and 460 eV, O 6+ at 560 eV, O 7+ at 650, 780, and 840 eV, and Ne 8+ at 940 eV. X-ray spectroscopy of comets may be used to diagnose the solar-wind composition and its interaction with comets.

  7. The velocity dependence of X-ray emission due to Charge Exchange in the Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, Renata; Lyons, David; Mullen, Patrick Dean; Shelton, Robin L.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Schultz, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere [1], planetary exospheres [2], and supernova remnants [3,4]. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly-excited, high charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays.To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate these environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross-sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities relevant to astrophysics for collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant will be shown as an example with ion velocity dependence.[1] Henley, D. B. & Shelton, R. L. 2010, ApJSS, 187, 388[2] Dennerl, K. et al. 2002, A&A 386, 319[3] Katsuda, S. et al. 2011, ApJ 730 24[4] Cumbee, R. S. et al. 2014, ApJ 787 L31This work was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  8. Exploring X-ray lasing in nitrogen pinch plasma at very high and fast discharge current excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwal, S.; Nigam, S.; Aneesh, K.; Prasad, Y. B. S. R.; Sharma, M. L.; Tripathi, P. K.; Joshi, A. S.; Naik, P. A.; Vora, H. S.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-06-01

    The possibility to demonstrate X-ray lasing in nitrogen at 13.4 nm through recombination scheme driven by capillary discharge excitation has been explored at a high discharge current of 95 kA, with 46 ns quarter period. The emission from nitrogen pinch plasma showed a fast pulse at the instant of pinch formation, overriding the long duration Bremsstrahlung emission. The spectroscopic study revealed dominant X-ray line emissions at 2.8 and 2.1 nm, apart from various X-ray line emissions at higher wavelengths. Line emission at 2.8 nm confirms the formation of NVI charge state of nitrogen. At lower pressures, faint emission of Ly-α line at 2.4 nm indicated formation of NVII ions by further heating. The favourable role of pre-pulse in the formation of higher charge states of nitrogen was also established beyond doubt. This study provides important inputs for future experiments towards demonstration of X-ray lasing at 13.4 nm.

  9. In vivo X-Ray excited optical luminescence from phosphor-doped aerogel and Sylgard 184 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stephen W.; Baker, Ethan S.; Lynch, Kyle J.; Sabri, Firouzeh

    2017-06-01

    X-Ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) is a new and noninvasive diagnostic technique suitable for in situ biochemical imaging and disease detection. The X-Ray excited optical luminescence of phosphor doping in crosslinked silica aerogel and Sylgard 184 hosts was investigated in this study. Composite silica aerogels and Sylgard 184 samples of 5%, 15%, and 50% concentrations by weight of La2O2S:Eu phosphor were prepared and inserted subcutaneously in a Sprague-Dawley rat and excited by X-Ray emission at 70 and 100 kV. A fiber optic bundle positioned within 5 mm of the sample collected the luminescence signal and conveyed it to a photomultiplier detector. The signal intensity scaled with dopant concentration. The time dependence of the predominantly red luminescence consisted of 60 cycle bursts of approximately 8 ms duration. The amplitude was modulated at about 10 Hz with a 60% depth. This indicates the time dependence of the X-Ray source. A simulation showed how to observe phosphor decay between individual burst pulses. The emission from the two types of composite samples was easily detected from the outside of the skin layer. Both Sylgard 184 and crosslinked silica aerogels are biocompatible and bio stable materials that could serve a variety of potential XEOL applications. These very strong signals imply potential for creating new In-vivo sensing applications and diagnostic tools.

  10. Nonquasineutral relativistic current filaments and their X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, A. V.; Losseva, T. V.

    2009-02-01

    Nonquasineutral electron current filaments with the azimuthal magnetic field are considered that arise due to the generation of electron vorticity in the initial (dissipative) stage of evolution of a current-carrying plasma, when the Hall number is small (σ B/ en e c ≪ 1) because of the low values of the plasma conductivity and magnetic field strength. Equilibrium filamentary structures with both zero and nonzero net currents are considered. Structures with a zero net current type form on time scales of t magnetic ( B θ) fields, ultrarelativistic electron beams on the typical charge-separation scale r B = B/(4π en e ) (the so-called magnetic Debye radius) can be generated. It is found that, for comparable electron currents, the characteristic electron energy in filaments with a nonzero net current is significantly lower than that in zero-net-current filaments that form on typical time scales of t repel one another; as a result, both the density and velocity of electrons increase near the filament axis, where the velocities of relativistic electrons are maximum. Filaments with a zero net current can emit X rays with photon energies ℏ ω up to 10 MeV. The electron velocity distributions in filaments, the X-ray emission spectra, and the total X-ray yield per unit filament length are calculated as functions of the current and the electron number density in the filament. Analytical estimates of the characteristic lifetime of a radiating filament and the typical size of the radiating region as functions of the plasma density are obtained. The results of calculations are compared with the available experimental data.

  11. Application of X-ray emission techniques for monitoring environmental pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernasconi, G.; Danesi, P.R.; Dargie, M.; Haselberger, N.; Markowicz, A.; Tajani, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency Laboratories, Seibersdorf (Austria)

    1997-10-01

    X-ray emission techniques are versatile and powerful methods used for multielement non-destructive analysis. They include X-ray fluorescence (XRF), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray spectrometry and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Since many years the IAEA has utilised and promoted these techniques for the analysis of environmental, biological and geological samples. In this paper recent progress at our laboratory in selected aspects related to the application of X-ray emission techniques is briefly overviewed. (authors) 12 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan); Suto, Keiko [Nara Women' s Univ., Graduate School of Human Culture, Nara (Japan); Kagawa, Takashi [Nara Women' s Univ., Department of Physics, Nara (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x10{sup 11} is estimated. (author)

  13. Non-thermal x-ray emission from wire array z-pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ampleford, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, Stephanie B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jennings, Christopher Ashley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Webb, Timothy Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper-Slaboszewicz, V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Loisel, Guillaume Pascal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flanagan, Timothy McGuire [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bell, Kate Suzanne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Brent M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McPherson, Leroy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rochau, Gregory A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chittenden, Jeremy P. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Sherlock, Mark [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Appelbe, Brian [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Giuliani, John [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Ouart, Nicholas [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Seely, John [Artep Inc., Ellicott City, MD (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We report on experiments demonstrating the transition from thermally-dominated K-shell line emission to non-thermal, hot-electron-driven inner-shell emission for z pinch plasmas on the Z machine. While x-ray yields from thermal K-shell emission decrease rapidly with increasing atomic number Z, we find that non-thermal emission persists with favorable Z scaling, dominating over thermal emission for Z=42 and higher (hn ≥ 17keV). Initial experiments with Mo (Z=42) and Ag (Z=47) have produced kJ-level emission in the 17-keV and 22-keV Kα lines respectively. We will discuss the electron beam properties that could excite these non - thermal lines. We also report on experiments that have attempted to control non - thermal K - shell line emission by modifying the wire array or load hardware setup.

  14. Discovery of Hard Nonthermal Pulsed X-Ray Emission from the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, L.; Hermsen, W.; Méndez, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    We report the discovery of nonthermal pulsed X-ray/soft gamma-ray emission up to ~150 keV from the anomalous 11.8 s X-ray pulsar AXP 1E 1841-045 located near the center of supernova remnant Kes 73 using Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array and High Energy X-Ray Timing

  15. Soft X-ray emission studies of biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurmaev, E.Z. E-mail: kurmaev@ifmlrs.uran.ru; Werner, J.P.; Moewes, A.; Chiuzbaian, S.; Bach, M.; Ching, W.-Y.; Motozaki, W.; Otsuka, T.; Matsuya, S.; Endo, K.; Neumann, M

    2004-07-01

    Soft X-ray fluorescence measurements are used to characterize three groups of biomaterials: Vitamin B{sub 12} and derivatives, antioxidants (aspirin and paracetamol), and human teeth. We show that the chemical bonding in Vitamin B{sub 12} is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and the relatively weak Co-N bond. The Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is found to be stronger than that of methylcobalamin leading to their different biological activity. The chemical bonding of paracetamol and aspirin is characterized by the formation of oxygen lone-pair {pi}-orbitals, which can neutralize free radicals and therefore be related to antioxidant activity of these compounds. Carbon K{alpha} emission spectra of a caries lesion suggest that the CaCO{sub 3} like phase exists in sound enamel and that a selective loss of carbonate occurs during the early stages of a caries attack.

  16. Extended hard-X-ray emission in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J.; Bauer, Franz E.

    2015-01-01

    of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems. Observations of diffuse hard-X-ray (more than 10...... range. This emission is more sharply peaked towards the Galactic Centre than is the surface brightness of the soft-X-ray population. This could indicate a significantly more massive population of accreting white dwarfs, large populations of low-mass X-ray binaries or millisecond pulsars, or particle...

  17. Extended X-Ray Monitoring of Gravitational Lenses with Chandra and Joint Constraints on X-Ray Emission Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerras, Eduardo; Dai, Xinyu; Steele, Shaun; Liu, Ang; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Chartas, George; Morgan, Christopher W.; Chen, Bin

    2017-02-01

    We present an X-ray photometric analysis of six gravitationally lensed quasars, with observation campaigns spanning from 5 to 14 years, measuring the total (0.83-21.8 keV restframe), soft- (0.83-3.6 keV), and hard- (3.6-21.8 keV) band image flux ratios for each epoch. Using the ratios of the model-predicted macro-magnifications as baselines, we build differential microlensing light curves and obtain joint likelihood functions for the average X-ray emission region sizes. Our analysis yields a probability distribution function for the average half-light radius of the X-ray emission region in the sample that peaks slightly above 1 gravitational radius and with nearly indistinguishable 68 % confidence (one-sided) upper limits of 17.8 and 18.9 gravitational radii for the soft and hard X-ray emitting regions, assuming a mean stellar mass of 0.3 M ⊙. We see hints of energy dependent microlensing between the soft and hard bands in two of the objects. In a separate analysis on the root-mean-square (rms) of the microlensing variability, we find significant differences between the soft and hard bands, but the sign of the difference is not consistent across the sample. This suggests the existence of some kind of spatial structure to the X-ray emission in an otherwise extremely compact source. We also discover a correlation between the rms microlensing variability and the average microlensing amplitude.

  18. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelby, Megan L.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Jackson, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Photoexcited Nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), like many open-shell metalloporphyrins, relaxes rapidly through multiple electronic states following an initial porphyrin-based excitation, some involving metal centered electronic configuration changes that could be harnessed catalytically......), structural dynamics before thermalization were not resolved due to the similar to 100 ps duration of the available X-ray probe pulse. Using the femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the Ni center electronic configuration from the initial excited state to the relaxed (d...

  19. Linking Jet Emission, X-Ray States, and Hard X-Ray Tails in the Neutron Star X-Ray Binary GX 17+2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Migliari, S.; Miller-Jones, J.C.A.; Fender, R.P.; Homan, J.; di Salvo, T.; Rothschild, R.E.; Rupen, M.P.; Tomsick, J.A.; Wijnands, R.; van der Klis, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of simultaneous radio (VLA) and X-ray (RXTE) observations of the Z-type neutron star X-ray binary GX 17+2. The aim is to assess the coupling between X-ray and radio properties throughout its three rapidly variable X-ray states and during the time-resolved transitions. These

  20. X-ray emission from relativistically moving electron density cusps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kando, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Nakamura, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Kawase, K.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Fukuda, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Daito, I.; Kameshima, T.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Daido, H.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Ma, J.; Chen, L.-M.; Ragozin, E. N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Osaka University (Japan); Joint Institute for High Temperature of the Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Japan Atomic Energy Agency and Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries (Japan); Ludwig-Maximilians-University (Germany); and others

    2012-07-11

    We report on novel methods to generate ultra-short, coherent, X-rays using a laserplasma interaction. Nonlinear interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma creates stable, specific structures such as electron cusps. For example, wake waves excited in an underdense plasma by an intense, short-pulse laser become dense and propagate along with the laser pulse. This is called a relativistic flying mirror. The flying mirror can reflect a counter-propagating laser pulse and directly convert it into high-frequency radiation, with a frequency multiplication factor of {approx} 4{gamma}{sup 2} and pulse shortening with the same factor. After the proof-of-principle experiments, we observed that the photon number generated in the flying mirror is close to the theoretical estimate. We present the details of the experiment in which a 9 TW laser pulse focused into a He gas jet generated the Flying Mirror, which partly reflected a 1 TW pulse, giving up to {approx} 10{sup 10} photons, 60 nJ (1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} photons/sr) in the XUV spectral region (12.8-22 nm).

  1. Scaling of x-ray emission and ion velocity in laser produced Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Email: yprasad@cat.ernet.in. Abstract. The x-ray emission from slab targets of copper irradiated by Nd:glass laser (1.054 μm,. 5 and 15 ns) at intensities between 10. Ѕѕ and 10. ½. W/cm. ¾ has been studied. The x-ray emissions were monitored with the help of high quantum efficiency x-ray silicon photo diodes and vacuum.

  2. X-ray excited optical luminescence studies on the system BaXY (X ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present paper reports the experimental observations on the x-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) along with the afterglow and colour center features found for the barium salts, represented by the formula, Ba, where and are the halides. The system thus consists of four dihalides (BaF2, . . . ,BaI2) and six ...

  3. EVIDENCE OF BULK ACCELERATION OF THE GRB X-RAY FLARE EMISSION REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing, E-mail: uhm@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Applying our recently developed generalized version of the high-latitude emission theory to the observations of X-ray flares in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), here we present clear observational evidence that the X-ray flare emission region is undergoing rapid bulk acceleration as the photons are emitted. We show that both the observed X-ray flare light curves and the photon index evolution curves can be simultaneously reproduced within a simple physical model invoking synchrotron radiation in an accelerating emission region far from the GRB central engine. Such an acceleration process demands an additional energy dissipation source other than kinetic energy, which points toward a significant Poynting flux in the emission region of X-ray flares. As the X-ray flares are believed to share a similar physical mechanism as the GRB prompt emission, our finding here hints that the GRB prompt emission jets may also carry a significant Poynting flux in their emitting region.

  4. Discovery of extended X-ray emission around the highly magnetic RRAT J1819-1458

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, N.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Gaensler, B.M.; Slane, P.O.; Stella, L.; Reynolds, S.P.; Burgay, M.; Israel, G.L.; Possenti, A.; Chatterjee, S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the discovery of extended X-ray emission around the high magnetic field rotating radio transient J1819-1458. Using a 30 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation, we found significant evidence for extended X-ray emission with a peculiar shape: a compact region out to similar to 5.'' 5, and more

  5. Is optical Fe II emission related to the soft X-ray properties of quasars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Elvis, Martin; McHardy, Ian

    1987-10-01

    Radio-quiet quasars generally show broad, blended multiplets of Fe II emission in their optical and UV spectra. Radio-loud quasars also show UV Fe II emission, but their optical Fe II emission is generally weaker. No satisfactory theory connecting the generation of Fe II and radio emission has been found to explain this effect. A second, well-established distinction between the two clases of quasar is in their X-ray properties: radio-loud quasars are more X-ray luminous, and recent results have shown that they also have systematically flatter soft X-ray slopes. Here it is proposed that the second effect causes the first; i.e., that the primary factor controlling the optical Fe II emission is the soft X-ray spectrum. This proposition is supported by X-ray and optical data for nine quasars, which shows a correlation between the soft X-ray slope and the strength of the optical Fe II emission. One of these quasars (1803+676) is radio-quiet, and yet its optical spectrum shows no evidence for Fe II emission. This quasar is also unusual in that it has a flat X-ray spectrum. This further supports the proposal that the X-ray spectrum is important in determining the relative strengths of UV and optical Fe II emission.

  6. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  7. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma, produced by laser pulses of 45 fs duration, focussed up to an intensity of ∼1018 W cm-2, is carried out. The plasma conditions prevalent during the emission of X-ray spectrum were identified by comparing the experimental spectra with the ...

  8. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelby, Megan L. [Chemical; Department; Lestrange, Patrick J. [Department; Jackson, Nicholas E. [Department; Haldrup, Kristoffer [Physics; Mara, Michael W. [Chemical; Department; Stickrath, Andrew B. [Chemical; Zhu, Diling [LCLS, SLAC National Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, United States; Lemke, Henrik T. [LCLS, SLAC National Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, United States; Chollet, Matthieu [LCLS, SLAC National Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, United States; Hoffman, Brian M. [Department; Li, Xiaosong [Department; Chen, Lin X. [Chemical; Department

    2016-07-06

    Photoexcited Nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), like many open-shell metalloporphyrins, relaxes rapidly through multiple electronic states following an initial porphyrin-based excitation, some involving metal centered electronic configuration changes that could be harnessed catalytically before excited state relaxation. While a NiTMP excited state present at 100 ps was previously identified by X-ray transient absorption (XTA) spectroscopy at a synchrotron source as a relaxed (d,d) state, the lowest energy excited state (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 9616 and Chem. Sci., 2010, 1, 642), structural dynamics before thermalization were not resolved due to the similar to 100 ps duration of the available X-ray probe pulse. Using the femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the Ni center electronic configuration from the initial excited state to the relaxed (d,d) state has been obtained via ultrafast Ni K-edge XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) on a time scale from hundreds of femtoseconds to 100 ps. This enabled the identification of a short-lived Ni(I) species aided by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods. Computed electronic and nuclear structure for critical excited electronic states in the relaxation pathway characterize the dependence of the complex's geometry on the electron occupation of the 3d orbitals. Calculated XANES transitions for these excited states assign a short-lived transient signal to the spectroscopic signature of the Ni(I) species, resulting from intramolecular charge transfer on a time scale that has eluded previous synchrotron studies. These combined results enable us to examine the excited state structural dynamics of NiTMP prior to thermal relaxation and to capture intermediates of potential photocatalytic significance.

  9. Determination of rare-earth elements in rocks by isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1970-01-01

    Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated......-ray spectrometric scan of a longitudinally sliced drill core showed a close correlation between rare-earth abundances and appropriate minerals....

  10. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars: Evidence for Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z 330 times weaker than...... expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL...... quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three...

  11. X-ray emission from SN 2012ca: A Type Ia-CSM supernova explosion in a dense surrounding medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenek, Christopher D.; Dwarkadas, Vikram V.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Fox, Ori D.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Smith, Nathan; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2018-01-01

    X-ray emission is one of the signposts of circumstellar interaction in supernovae (SNe), but until now, it has been observed only in core-collapse SNe. The level of thermal X-ray emission is a direct measure of the density of the circumstellar medium (CSM), and the absence of X-ray emission from Type Ia SNe has been interpreted as a sign of a very low density CSM. In this paper, we report late-time (500-800 d after discovery) X-ray detections of SN 2012ca in Chandra data. The presence of hydrogen in the initial spectrum led to a classification of Type Ia-CSM, ostensibly making it the first SN Ia detected with X-rays. Our analysis of the X-ray data favours an asymmetric medium, with a high-density component which supplies the X-ray emission. The data suggest a number density >108 cm-3 in the higher density medium, which is consistent with the large observed Balmer decrement if it arises from collisional excitation. This is high compared to most core-collapse SNe, but it may be consistent with densities suggested for some Type IIn or superluminous SNe. If SN 2012ca is a thermonuclear SN, the large CSM density could imply clumps in the wind, or a dense torus or disc, consistent with the single-degenerate channel. A remote possibility for a core-degenerate channel involves a white dwarf merging with the degenerate core of an asymptotic giant branch star shortly before the explosion, leading to a common envelope around the SN.

  12. X-RAY EMISSION FROM MAGNETIC MASSIVE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazé, Yaël [GAPHE, Département AGO, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Petit, Véronique [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Rinbrand, Melanie; Owocki, Stan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Bartol Research Institute, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Cohen, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA 19081 (United States); Ud-Doula, Asif [Penn State Worthington Scranton, Dunmore, PA 18512 (United States); Wade, Gregg A., E-mail: naze@astro.ulg.ac.be [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, PO Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, ON K7K 4B4 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Magnetically confined winds of early-type stars are expected to be sources of bright and hard X-rays. To clarify the systematics of the observed X-ray properties, we have analyzed a large series of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, corresponding to all available exposures of known massive magnetic stars (over 100 exposures covering ∼60% of stars compiled in the catalog of Petit et al.). We show that the X-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with the stellar wind mass-loss rate, with a power-law form that is slightly steeper than linear for the majority of the less luminous, lower- M-dot B stars and flattens for the more luminous, higher- M-dot O stars. As the winds are radiatively driven, these scalings can be equivalently written as relations with the bolometric luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities, and their trend with mass-loss rates, are well reproduced by new MHD models, although a few overluminous stars (mostly rapidly rotating objects) exist. No relation is found between other X-ray properties (plasma temperature, absorption) and stellar or magnetic parameters, contrary to expectations (e.g., higher temperature for stronger mass-loss rate). This suggests that the main driver for the plasma properties is different from the main determinant of the X-ray luminosity. Finally, variations of the X-ray hardnesses and luminosities, in phase with the stellar rotation period, are detected for some objects and they suggest that some temperature stratification exists in massive stars' magnetospheres.

  13. Soft X-ray excited optical luminescence from functional organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sham, T.K., E-mail: tsham@uwo.ca

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Many functional organic materials convert X-ray energy into visible light. • The X-ray induced luminescence (XEOL) across an absorption edge can be site and excitation channel specific. • XEOL is composition, morphology, size and crystallinity dependent. • XEOL using the time structure of a synchrotron can reveal the decay and energy transfer dynamics of the sample. • The combined use of XEOL and XAS in the analysis of functional organic materials is illustrated. - Abstract: This brief report reviews some of the recent findings in the study of synchrotron based X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) from representative organic light emitting device (OLED) and related functional organic materials. The systems of interest include Alq{sub 3}, aluminium tris(8-hydroxylquinoline); Ru(bipy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, tris-(2,2-bipyridine) ruthenium(II); Ir(bpy){sub 3}, tris(2-phenyl-bipyridine)iridium; PVK (poly(N-vinylcarbazole)) and [Au{sub 2}(dppe)(bipy)]{sup 2+}, a Au(I) polymer containing 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane and the 4,40-bipyridyl ligands, as well as TBPe (2,5,8,11-tetra-tert-butylperylene) polyhedral crystals and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and FITC-labelled proteins. It is shown that tunable and pulsed X-rays from synchrotron light sources enable the detailed tracking of the optical properties of organic functional materials by monitoring the luminescence in both the energy and time domain as the excitation energy is scanned across an element-specific absorption edge. The use of XEOL and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in materials analysis is illustrated.

  14. EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Santiago, J. [Instituto de Matemática Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseñor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Río Negro (Argentina); De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-20

    Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup –1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.

  15. Evaluation of an X-ray-excited optical microscope for chemical imaging of metal and other surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbe, Pieter-Jan; Dowsett, Mark; Hand, Matthew; Grayburn, Rosie; Thompson, Paul; Bras, Wim; Adriaens, Annemie

    2014-12-02

    The application of a modular system for the nondestructive chemical imaging of metal and other surfaces is described using heritage metals as an example. The custom-built X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL) microscope, XEOM 1, images the chemical state and short-range atomic order of the top 200 nm of both amorphous and crystalline surfaces. A broad X-ray beam is used to illuminate large areas (up to 4 mm(2)) of the sample, and the resulting XEOL emission is collected simultaneously for each pixel by a charge-coupled device sensor to form an image. The input X-ray energy is incremented across a range typical for the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and an image collected for each increment. The use of large-footprint beams combined with parallel detection allows the power density to be kept low and facilitates complete nondestructive XANES mapping on a reasonable time scale. In this study the microscope was evaluated by imaging copper surfaces with well-defined patterns of different corrosion products (cuprite Cu2O and nantokite CuCl). The images obtained show chemical contrast, and filtering the XEOL light allowed different corrosion products to be imaged separately. Absorption spectra extracted from software-selected regions of interest exhibit characteristic XANES fingerprints for the compounds present. Moreover, when the X-ray absorption edge positions were extracted from each spectrum, an oxidation state map of the sample could be compiled. The results show that this method allows one to obtain nondestructive and noninvasive information at the micrometer scale while using full-field imaging.

  16. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM YOUNG SUNS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hainich, R. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Sun, W.; Chen, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 Jiangsu (China); Evans, C. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Henault-Brunet, V. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Gallagher, J. S. III [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 5534 Sterling, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Guedel, M. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Silich, S. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica, AP 51, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Naze, Y. [GAPHE, Departement AGO, Universite de Liege, Allee du 6 Aout 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Reyes-Iturbide, J. [LATO-DCET/Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Rodovia Jorge Amado, km 16, 45662-000 Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of extended X-ray emission within the young star cluster NGC 602a in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on observations obtained with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. X-ray emission is detected from the cluster core area with the highest stellar density and from a dusty ridge surrounding the H II region. We use a census of massive stars in the cluster to demonstrate that a cluster wind or wind-blown bubble is unlikely to provide a significant contribution to the X-ray emission detected from the central area of the cluster. We therefore suggest that X-ray emission at the cluster core originates from an ensemble of low- and solar-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, each of which would be too weak in X-rays to be detected individually. We attribute the X-ray emission from the dusty ridge to the embedded tight cluster of the newborn stars known in this area from infrared studies. Assuming that the levels of X-ray activity in young stars in the low-metallicity environment of NGC 602a are comparable to their Galactic counterparts, then the detected spatial distribution, spectral properties, and level of X-ray emission are largely consistent with those expected from low- and solar-mass PMS stars and young stellar objects (YSOs). This is the first discovery of X-ray emission attributable to PMS stars and YSOs in the SMC, which suggests that the accretion and dynamo processes in young, low-mass objects in the SMC resemble those in the Galaxy.

  17. A PILOT DEEP SURVEY FOR X-RAY EMISSION FROM fuvAGB STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahai, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sánchez Contreras, C. [Astrobiology Center (CSIC-INTA), ESAC campus, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Stute, M. [Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, D-72076, Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in three of six fuvAGB stars observed—the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long timescales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ∼(0.002–0.2) L{sub ⊙} and the X-ray-emitting plasma temperatures are ∼(35–160) × 10{sup 6} K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively cool (<20,000 K). In addition, the high X-ray luminosities specifically argue against emission originating in the coronae of main-sequence companions. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  18. Comparative study of X-ray emission from plasma focus relative to different preionization schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Qayyum, A.; Hassan, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2017-07-01

    A 2.7-kJ Mather-type plasma focus has been investigated for X-ray emission with preionization produced by an α-source, a β-source, and a shunt resistor. Time-resolved and time integrated measurements are carried out using a PIN-diode-based X-ray spectrometer and pinhole camera. The β-source (28Ni63) assisted preionization enhances the X-ray emission up to 25%, while preionization induced by depleted uranium (92U238) increases both Cu-Kα and total X-ray yield of about 100%. The preionization caused by the optimum shunt resistor enhances the Cu-Kα and total X-ray yield of about 53%. It is found that preionization also broadens the working pressure range for the high X-ray yield and improves the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the system. Pinhole images reveal that the X-ray emission from the anode tip is dominant owing to impact of electron bombardment, while the X-ray emission from hot spots is also visible.

  19. X-ray emission spectroscopy study of the Verwey transition in Fe sub 3 O sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Moewes, A; Finkelstein, L D; Galakhov, A V; Gota, S; Gautier-Soyer, M; Rueff, J P; Hague, C F

    2003-01-01

    The temperature-dependent Verwey transition in a 500 A (111) thin film of Fe sub 3 O sub 4 (magnetite) has been studied using soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy at room temperature and below the transition temperature T sub V. The Fe L sub 2 sub , sub 3 x-ray emission spectra show an increase in the intensity of the L sub 2 emission relative to the L sub 3 emission below T sub V. This is independent of the excitation energy and is attributed to a metal-insulator transition across T sub V. Comparison of the Fe L sub 3 emission and O K alpha spectra with LDA band structure calculations supports the suggestion of charge ordering in Fe sub 3 O sub 4 at low temperature.

  20. X-ray spectra from magnetar candidates - III. Fitting SGR/AXP soft X-ray emission with non-relativistic Monte Carlo models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zane, S.; Rea, N.; Turolla, R.; Nobili, L.

    2009-01-01

    Within the magnetar scenario, the ‘twisted magnetosphere’ model appears very promising in explaining the persistent X-ray emission from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). In the first two papers of the series, we have presented a 3D Monte Carlo code for solving radiation

  1. X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades, remarkable and often spectacular progress has been made in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x–ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. This progress includes considerable technological improvements in the design and production of detectors especially with the development and expansion of large-scale synchrotron reactors All this has resulted in improved analytical performance and new applications, as well as in the perspective of a dramatic enhancement in the potential of x–ray based analysis techniques for the near future. This comprehensive two-volume treatise features articles that explain the phenomena and describe examples of X–ray absorption and emission applications in several fields, including chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, amorphous and liquid systems, synchrotron radiation, and surface phenomena. Contributors explain the underlying theory, how to set up X–ray absorption experiments, and how to analyze the details of the resulting spectra. X-R...

  2. Modeling of collisional excited x-ray lasers using short pulse laser pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Akira; Moribayashi, Kengo; Utsumi, Takayuki; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    A simple atomic kinetics model of electron collisional excited x-ray lasers has been developed. The model consists of a collisional radiative model using the average ion model (AIM) and a detailed term accounting (DTA) model of Ni-like Ta. An estimate of plasma condition to produce gain in Ni-like Ta ({lambda}=44A) is given. Use of the plasma confined in a cylinder is proposed to preform a uniform high density plasma from 1-D hydrodynamics calculations. (author)

  3. STELLAR WIND INDUCED SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Lammer, H. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria); Fossati, L. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie der Universität Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Johnstone, C. P. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Holmström, M. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Zaitsev, V. V., E-mail: kristina.kislyakova@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-30

    In this Letter, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX), which produces soft X-ray emission, is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the solar system, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus, and the Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈10{sup 22} erg s{sup –1}, which is 10{sup 6} times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss also the possibility of observing the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  4. Influence of the voltage-time derivative in X-ray emission from laboratory sparks

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Víctor; Montanyà, Joan

    2010-10-01

    X-rays produced by laboratory sparks in air at atmospheric pressure for rod-rod and rod-plane configurations were observed. A total of 510 sparks were applied for both polarities. The paper shows the effects of the voltage rise time and the peak voltage in the generation of X-rays. It is found here that shorter rise times and high peak voltages tend to produce more X-rays emissions with higher energies than longer front waveforms or lower peak voltages. In a similar way, higher voltage variations produce more energetic emissions. This finding suggests that the variation of the electric field before the breakdown can play a fundamental role in the X-ray production. The results are similar with the observations of X-rays produced in natural lightning where detections have been associated to leader steps before the return stroke.

  5. X-Ray Emission from Ultraviolet Luminous Galaxies and Lyman Break Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornschemeier, Ann; Ptak, A. F.; Salim, S.; Heckman, T. P.; Overzier, R.; Mallery, R.; Rich, M.; Strickland, D.; Grimes, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present results from an XMM mini-survey of GALEX-selected Ultraviolet-Luminous Galaxies (UVLGs) that appear to include an interesting subset that are analogs to the distant (3Break Galaxies (LBGs). The 2-10 kev X-ray emission of LBGs appear to be broadly similar to that of galaxies in the local Universe, possibly indicating similarity in the production of accreting binaries over large evolutionary timescales in the Universe. We have detected luminous X-ray emission from one UVLG that permits basic X-ray spectroscopic analysis, and have direct X-ray constraints on a total of 6 UVLGs. We find evidence for likely large scatter in the assumed X-ray/star-formation rate relation for LBGs.

  6. News on the X-ray emission from hot subdwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombara, Nicola La; Mereghetti, Sandro

    2017-12-01

    In latest years, the high sensitivity of the instruments on-board the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites allowed us to explore the properties of the X-ray emission from hot subdwarf stars. The small but growing sample of X-ray detected hot subdwarfs includes binary systems, in which the X-ray emission is due to wind accretion onto a compact companion (white dwarf or neutron star), as well as isolated sdO stars, in which X-rays are probably due to shock instabilities in the wind. X-ray observations of these low-mass stars provide information which can be useful for our understanding of the weak winds of this type of stars and can lead to the discovery of particularly interesting binary systems. Here we report the most recent results we have recently obtained in this research area.

  7. Characterizing X-Ray and Radio Emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni During Quiescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Vikram; Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broadband (0...

  8. Detailed Characterization of a Nanosecond-Lived Excited State: X-ray and Theoretical Investigation of the Quintet State in Photoexcited [Fe(terpy)(2)](2+)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanko, Gyoergy; Bordage, Amelie; Pápai, Mátyás Imre

    2015-01-01

    to investigate the quintet state of [Fe(terpy)(2)](2+) 80 ps after light excitation. High-quality X-ray absorption, nonresonant emission, and resonant emission spectra as well as X-ray diffuse scattering data clearly reflect the formation of the high-spin state of the [Fe(terpy)(2)](2+) molecule; moreover...... for the description of the low-spin (LS)-high-spin (HS) transition. We identify the electronic structure origin of the differences between the two possible quintet modes, and finally, we unambiguously identify the formed quintet state as 5E, in agreement with our theoretical expectations....

  9. Metal-line emission from the warm-hot intergalactic medium - I. Soft X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, Serena; Schaye, Joop; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Booth, C. M.; Theuns, Tom; Wiersma, Robert P. C.

    2010-09-01

    Emission lines from metals offer one of the most promising ways to detect the elusive warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM; 105 rsim 106 K). We find that the OVIII 18.97 Å is the strongest emission line, with a predicted maximum surface brightness of ~102photon s-1 cm-2 sr-1, but a number of other lines are only slightly weaker. All lines show a strong correlation between the intensity of the observed flux and the density and metallicity of the gas responsible for the emission. On the other hand, the potentially detectable emission consistently corresponds to the temperature at which the emissivity of the electronic transition peaks. The emission traces neither the baryonic nor the metal mass. In particular, the emission that is potentially detectable with proposed missions traces overdense (ρ > rsim 102ρmean) and metal-rich (Z > rsim 10-1 Zsolar) gas in and around galaxies and groups. While soft X-ray line emission is therefore not a promising route to close the baryon budget, it does offer the exciting possibility to image the gas accreting on to and flowing out of galaxies.

  10. AGN X-Ray emission and black holes (Kelly+, 2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, B. C.; Bechtold, J.; Trump, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    In this analysis we combine 169 RQQs from Kelly et al. (2007ApJ...665.1489K) with 149 RQQs from the main SDSS sample of Strateva et al. (2005, Cat. J/AJ/130/387) to create a sample of 318 RQQs. Out of these 318 sources, 276 (86.8%) are detected in the X-ray. (1 data file).......In this analysis we combine 169 RQQs from Kelly et al. (2007ApJ...665.1489K) with 149 RQQs from the main SDSS sample of Strateva et al. (2005, Cat. J/AJ/130/387) to create a sample of 318 RQQs. Out of these 318 sources, 276 (86.8%) are detected in the X-ray. (1 data file)....

  11. [X-ray excited luminescence property of ZnS : Au, Cu fine particles synthesized by hydrothermal method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Mei; Cao, Wang-He

    2009-08-01

    Highly luminescent ZnS : Au, Cu X-ray phosphor fine particles synthesized by hydrothermal method is reported for the first time and its photoluminescence (PL) and X-ray excited luminescence (XEL) properties were studied in detail. With direct hydrothermal treatment at 200 degrees C for 12 h, the average gain size of samples is about 15 nm; the synthesized sphere-like nanocrystals with well dispersity and narrow gain size distribution show cubic structure. After baking in argon at 1 000 degrees C for 1h the sample agglomerate size is about 1-2 microm and the roughly spherical fine particles show pure hexagonal structure. The PL and XEL spectra of all the samples show a broad emission band and an intense emission band in the range of 400-600 nm. The maximum XEL intensity of sample directly synthesized by hydrothermal treatment was observed when Cu/Zn and Cu/Al were 3 x 10(-5) and 2, respectively. In this condition, the strongest PL emission was observed for the direct synthesized sample being further baked in argon at 900 degrees C for 1 h and the PL peak was centered at about 529 nm. The strongest XEL emission was observed for the direct synthesized sample being further baked in argon at 1 000 degrees C for 1h and the XEL peak was centered at about 445 and 513 nm, respectively. In the meantime, the XEL intensity increased about ten times compared with that directly synthesized without baking. The difference between PL and XEL spectra is due to its different excitation mechanism. The luminescence mechanism and different excitation mechanism of PL and XEL were discussed. The red shift of XEL spectrum with directly synthesized sample was observed with increasing the Cu/Zn. The reason can also be explained by the luminescence mechanism and excitation mechanism of XEL.

  12. First Hard X-Ray Detection of the Non-Thermal Emission Around the Arches Cluster: Morphology and Spectral Studies With NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Bauer, Franz E.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe K(alpha) line emission at 6.4 keV from material that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper, we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 10 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity of the possible illuminating hard X-ray source. The properties of the observed emission are also in broad agreement with the low-energy cosmic-ray proton excitation scenario. Key words: cosmic rays - Galaxy: center - ISM: general - X-rays: individual (Arches cluster)

  13. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-06

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  14. On the Absence of Non-thermal X-Ray Emission around Runaway O Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toalá, J. A. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Oskinova, L. M. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Theoretical models predict that the compressed interstellar medium around runaway O stars can produce high-energy non-thermal diffuse emission, in particular, non-thermal X-ray and γ -ray emission. So far, detection of non-thermal X-ray emission was claimed for only one runaway star, AE Aur. We present a search for non-thermal diffuse X-ray emission from bow shocks using archived XMM-Newton observations for a clean sample of six well-determined runaway O stars. We find that none of these objects present diffuse X-ray emission associated with their bow shocks, similarly to previous X-ray studies toward ζ Oph and BD+43°3654. We carefully investigated multi-wavelength observations of AE Aur and could not confirm previous findings of non-thermal X-rays. We conclude that so far there is no clear evidence of non-thermal extended emission in bow shocks around runaway O stars.

  15. The velocity dependence of X-ray emission due to Charge Exchange: Applications in the Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, Renata; Lyons, David; Mullen, Patrick; Shelton, Robin L.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Schultz, David R.

    2016-04-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere [1], planetary exospheres [2], and supernova remnants [3,4]. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly-excited, high charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays.To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate high-energy astrophysical environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross-sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities. Collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2 are considered. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant will be shown as an example with ion velocity dependence.[1] Henley, D. B. & Shelton, R. L. 2010, ApJSS, 187, 388[2] Dennerl, K. et al. 2002, A&A 386, 319[3] Katsuda, S. et al. 2011, ApJ 730 24[4] Cumbee, R. S. et al. 2014, ApJ 787 L31

  16. The X-ray emission mechanism in the protostellar jet HH 154

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Favata, F.; Rosner, R.

    2004-09-01

    We study the mechanism causing the X-ray emission recently detected in protostellar jets, by performing a detailed modeling of the interaction between a supersonic jet originating from a young stellar object and the ambient medium, for various values of density contrast, ν, between the ambient density and the jet, and of Mach number, M; radiative losses and thermal conduction have been taken into account. Here we report a representative case which reproduces, without any ad hoc assumption, the characteristics of the X-ray emission recently observed in the protostellar jet HH 154. We find that the X-ray emission originates from a localized blob, consistent with observations, which moves with velocity v ˜ 500 km s-1; we therefore predict the X-ray source to have a detectable proper motion.

  17. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, S. B., E-mail: sbhanse@sandia.gov, E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Colgan, J.; Abdallah, J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Faenov, A. Ya., E-mail: sbhanse@sandia.gov, E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Wagenaars, E.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Booth, N.; Lancaster, K. L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Evans, R. G. [Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 ONG (United Kingdom); Kaempfer, T.; Schulze, K. S. [Helmholtzinstitut Jena, Jena D-07743 (Germany); Uschmann, I. [Helmholtzinstitut Jena, Jena D-07743 (Germany); Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronic, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien Platz 1, Jena, D-07743 (Germany); and others

    2014-03-15

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  18. Superluminal radio sources - What does X-ray emission tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Diana M.

    1987-01-01

    In a study on superluminal radio sources, statistical relationships between X-ray, optical, and radio luminosities among different categories of active galactic nuclei are compared to search for common energy mechanisms. The X-ray versus optical and X-ray versus radio correlations of radio-loud QSOs and superluminal radio sources are found to be similar, arguing against a model in which the emission in only one or two of the three wave bands is relativistically boosted. A regression analysis shows that highly polarized QSOs and optically violently variable QSOs are more similar to other flat-spectrum, radio-loud QSOs than to BL Lac objects, and it is reasonable to assume that self-Compton emission dominates the X-ray emission from at least half of the sources in this class. The X-ray versus radio correlation for BL Lac objects is poor, and there is support for the hypothesis that their X-ray emission is dominated by an isotropic component which is not directly related to relativistically boosted radio emission.

  19. SphinX Measurements of the 2009 Solar Minimum X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Kuzin, S.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Bakała, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B.

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 × 1047 cm-3 and 1.1 × 1048 cm-3. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  20. SphinX MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2009 SOLAR MINIMUM X-RAY EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Bakala, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 51-622, Kopernika 11, Wroclaw (Poland); Kuzin, S. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute (FIAN), Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Farnik, F. [Astronomical Institute, Ondrejov Observatory (Czech Republic); Reale, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Palermo, Italy, and INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Phillips, K. J. H., E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} cm{sup -3} and 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 48} cm{sup -3}. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  1. Experimental studies of X-pinch dynamics and X-ray emission point parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Hammer, D. A.; Greenly, J. B.; Dimant, Y. S.

    1999-11-01

    New x-ray and spectroscopic diagnostics on the XP Pulser at Cornell (450 kA, 100 ns) have allowed quantitative measurements important for understanding the behavior of X-pinches. X-pinches produce intense x-ray radiation bursts from spots close to 1 μm in diameter lasting about 0.5 ns. Using two parallel X-pinches, the radiation burst from each X-pinch was used to generate a magnified X-ray backlighter image of the other [1]. These images allow previously unobserved structure close to the time of x-ray burst emission to be seen. An intial stage is revealed in which a 300 μm length z-pinch forms between the virtual electrodes of a "mini-diode" located at the crossing-point of the X-pinch. This z-pinch collapses rapidly into a series of narrow necks until an x-ray burst occurs from a spot inside the narrowest neck. After the x-ray burst, the z-pinch disappears quickly leaving only the mini-diode visible. Using a simple technique involving a reference mesh superimposed on the x-ray images, the x-ray emission point is located to within 10 μm. Calibrated density measurements of Al x-pinches have been made using an Al step wedge in the film pack. K-spectra of H- and He-like Al, Ti, and Ni, as well as Ne-like Mo ions have been registered using FSSR spectrography with spherically bent mica crystals. These spectra yield estimates of Ne > 10^21 cm-3 and Te > 1 keV for the x-ray emission point. 1. T.A.Shelkovenko, S.A.Pikuz, A.R.Mingaleev and D.A.Hammer, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 70, 667 (1999).

  2. Resonantly excited betatron hard X-Rays from Ionization Injected Electron Beam in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, K; Li, Y F; Li, D Z; Tao, M Z; Mirzaie, M; Ma, Y; Zhao, J R; Li, M H; Chen, M; Hafz, N; Sokollik, T; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    A new scheme for bright hard x-ray emission from laser wakefield electron accelerator is reported, where pure nitrogen gas is adopted. Intense Betatron x-ray beams are generated from ionization injected K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating wave bucket. The x-ray radiation shows synchrotron-like spectrum with total photon yield 8$\\times$10$^8$/shot and $10^8$ over 110keV. In particular, the betatron hard x-ray photon yield is 10 times higher compared to the case of helium gas under the same laser parameters. Particle-in-cell simulation suggests that the enhancement of the x-ray yield results from ionization injection, which enables the electrons to be quickly accelerated to the driving laser region for subsequent betatron resonance. Employing the present scheme,the single stage nitrogen gas target could be used to generate stable high brightness betatron hard x-ray beams.

  3. Ultra fast atomic process in X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Tajima, T.

    1998-03-01

    An ultra-fast atomic process together with X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization using high intensity (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (20fs) X-ray is studied. A new class of experiment is proposed and a useful pumping source is suggested. In this method, it is found that the gain value of X-ray laser amounts to larger than 1000(1/cm) with use of the density of 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} of carbon atom. Electron impact ionization effect and initial density effect as well as intensity of pumping source effect are also discussed. (author)

  4. Mapping X-ray emission in a laser-plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Corde, S; Phuoc, K Ta; Lifschitz, A; Lambert, G; Faure, J; Lundh, O; Benveniste, E; Ben-Ismail, A; Arantchuk, L; Marciniak, A; Stordeur, A; Brijesh, P; Rousse, A; Specka, A; Malka, V

    2011-01-01

    The X-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators can be a powerful tool to understand the physics of relativistic laser-plasma interaction. It is shown here that the mapping of betatron X-ray radiation can be obtained from the X-ray beam profile when an object is placed off-axis and close to the source. The influence of the plasma density on the position and the longitudinal profile of the X-ray emission is investigated and compared to Particle-In-Cell simulations. The results provide insight on the dynamics of the interaction, including the laser pulse self-focusing, electron self-injection and the role of the electron beam wakefield.

  5. XMM Observations of X-Ray Emission from Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immler, Stefan; Lewin, Walter

    2003-01-01

    Of the six proposed targets, only one observation was performed. The observation resulted in a 28ks observation of SN 1998S. At the time of writing the proposal, our target list only contained previously unknown X-ray supernovae. Between submission of the proposal and the actual observation, a Chandra DDT observation resulted in the detection of SN 1998S. Since SN 1998S was observed with Chandra five times before the XMM-Newton observation was made, the data did not yield enough new information to warrant a separate SN 1998S publication. The key science results of that observation were presented in a review article (by Immler and Lewin); the results were also presented at two conferences.

  6. Electron and photon emissions from gold nanoparticles irradiated by X-ray photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casta, R., E-mail: castaromain@gmail.com, E-mail: romain.casta@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Champeaux, J.-P.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Sence, M.; Cafarelli, P. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, CNRS, UMR 5589 (France)

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we develop a totally new probabilistic model for the electron and photon emission of gold nanoparticles irradiated by X-ray photons. This model allows direct applications to recent researches about the radiotherapy enhancement by gold nanoparticles in the context of cancer treatment. Our model uses, in a complete original way, simulated Auger cascade and stopping power to compute electron emission spectra, photon emission spectra and released energy inside the material of gold nanoparticles. It allows us to present new results about the electron and photon emission of gold nanoparticle irradiated by hard X-rays.

  7. Crushing of interstellar gas clouds in supernova remnants. II. X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, S.; Bocchino, F.; Peres, G.; Reale, F.; Plewa, T.; Rosner, R.

    2006-10-01

    Context: .X-ray observations of evolved supernova remnants (e.g. the Cygnus loop and the Vela SNRs) reveal emission originating from the interaction of shock waves with small interstellar gas clouds. Aims: .We study and discuss the time-dependent X-ray emission predicted by hydrodynamic modeling of the interaction of a SNR shock wave with an interstellar gas cloud. The scope includes: 1) to study the correspondence between modeled and X-ray emitting structures, 2) to explore two different physical regimes in which either thermal conduction or radiative cooling plays a dominant role, and 3) to investigate the effects of the physical processes at work on the emission of the shocked cloud in the two different regimes. Methods: .We use a detailed hydrodynamic model, including thermal conduction and radiation, and explore two cases characterized by different Mach numbers of the primary shock: M= 30 (post-shock temperature T_psh ≈ 1.7 MK) in which the cloud dynamics is dominated by radiative cooling and M= 50 (T_psh ≈ 4.7 MK) dominated by thermal conduction. From the simulations, we synthesize the expected X-ray emission, using available spectral codes. Results: .The morphology of the X-ray emitting structures is significantly different from that of the flow structures originating from the shock-cloud interaction. The hydrodynamic instabilities are never clearly visible in the X-ray band. Shocked clouds are preferentially visible during the early phases of their evolution. Thermal conduction and radiative cooling lead to two different phases of the shocked cloud: a cold cooling dominated core emitting at low energies and a hot thermally conducting corona emitting in the X-ray band. The thermal conduction makes the X-ray image of the cloud smaller, more diffuse, and shorter-lived than that observed when thermal conduction is neglected.

  8. Ultrasoft X-ray emission and the electronic structure of the acetaldehyde molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydova, N. V.; Yumatov, V. D.

    2012-07-01

    The electronic structure of the acetaldehyde molecule was studied by the ultrasoft X-ray emission method with the use of quantum-chemical calculations. The O K α and C K α spectra of the compound in the gas phase were obtained. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed at the RHF/6-311++G** level. The calculation results were used to construct theoretical X-ray spectra. The experimental spectra are interpreted.

  9. X-Ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei with Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, G. C.; Mathur, S.; Griffiths, R. E.; Rao, A. R.

    2008-12-01

    We present a systematic X-ray study of eight active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with intermediate-mass black holes (MBH ~ 8-95 × 104 M⊙) based on 12 XMM-Newton observations. The sample includes the two prototype AGNs in this class—NGC 4395 and POX 52 and six other AGNs discovered with the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey. These AGNs show some of the strongest X-ray variability, with the normalized excess variances being the largest and the power density break timescales being the shortest observed among radio-quiet AGNs. The excess-variance-luminosity correlation appears to depend on both the BH mass and the Eddington luminosity ratio. The break timescale-black hole mass relations for AGN with IMBHs are consistent with that observed for massive AGNs. We find that the FWHM of the Hβ/Hα line is uncorrelated with the BH mass, but shows strong anticorrelation with the Eddington luminosity ratio. Four AGNs show clear evidence for soft X-ray excess emission (kTin ~ 150-200 eV). X-ray spectra of three other AGNs are consistent with the presence of the soft excess emission. NGC 4395 with lowest L/LEdd lacks the soft excess emission. Evidently small black mass is not the primary driver of strong soft X-ray excess emission from AGNs. The X-ray spectral properties and optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions of these AGNs are similar to those of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The observed X-ray/UV properties of AGNs with IMBHs are consistent with these AGNs being low-mass extensions of more massive AGNs, those with high Eddington luminosity ratio looking more like narrow-line Seyfert 1 s and those with low L/LEdd looking more like broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  10. NuSTAR HARD X-RAY SURVEY OF THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION. I. HARD X-RAY MORPHOLOGY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE DIFFUSE EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Canipe, Alicia M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Krivonos, Roman; Tomsick, John A.; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hong, Jaesub [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ponti, Gabriele [Max-Planck-Institut f. extraterrestrische Physik, HEG, Garching (Germany); Bauer, Franz [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Alexander, David M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Baganoff, Frederick K. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusets Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Barret, Didier [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space—National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Forster, Karl [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Giommi, Paolo, E-mail: kaya@astro.columbia.edu [ASI Science Data Center, Via del Politecnico snc I-00133, Roma (Italy); and others

    2015-12-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456–2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Γ ∼ 1.3–2.3 up to ∼50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe Kα fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (∼10{sup 23} cm{sup −2}), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Γ ∼ 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to L{sub X} ≳ 10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}. Above ∼20 keV, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95–0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses M{sub WD} ∼ 0.9 M{sub ⊙}. Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95–0.04 is likely the hard X-ray counterpart of the ultra-high gamma-ray source HESS J1745–290, strongly favoring a leptonic origin of the GC TeV emission.

  11. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Lin X; Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(ii) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were measured...... on the low-energy shoulder of the edge, which is aided by the computation of X-ray transitions for postulated excited electronic states. The observed and computed inner shell to valence orbital transition energies demonstrate and quantify the influence of the electronic configuration on specific metal...... orbital energies. A strong influence of the valence orbital occupation on the inner shell orbital energies indicates that one should not use the transition energy from 1s to other orbitals to draw conclusions about the d-orbital energies. For photocatalysis, a transient electronic configuration could...

  12. X-ray emission and photoelectron spectra of Pr0.5Sr0.5MnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Korotin, M. A.; Galakhov, V. R.; Finkelstein, L. D.; Zabolotzky, E. I.; Efremova, N. N.; Lobachevskaya, N. I.; Stadler, S.; Ederer, D. L.; Callcott, T. A.; Zhou, L.; Moewes, A.; Bartkowski, S.; Neumann, M.; Matsuno, J.; Mizokawa, T.; Fujimori, A.; Mitchell, J.

    1999-05-01

    The results of measurements of x-ray photoelectron (XPS), x-ray emission (XES), and x-ray absorption spectra and local spin-density approximation band structure (LSDA) calculations of Pr0.5Sr0.5MnO3 are presented. The excitation energy dependence of Mn L2,3 and O Kα x-ray emission spectra of Pr0.5Sr0.5MnO3 is measured using tunable synchrotron radiation. The XES measurements yielded no photon energy dependence for the O Kα spectra, but the Mn L2,3 spectra yielded inelastic scattering losses of 2 and 6 eV, corresponding to features in the structure of the occupied part of the valence band. Comparing XPS and XES measurements with LSDA band-structure calculations, one concludes that the electronic structure of the compound consists mainly of Mn 3d and O 2p states. States of 3d character localized at the Mn site predominate near the top of the valence band (VB). Some differences in the Mn 3d distribution in this part of the XPS valence band and Mn L3 XES with d symmetry due to spin-selection rules that govern the Mn L3 XES. In addition, the Mn 3d states distribution is hybridized with the O 2p part of the VB. Mn L3 XES spectra were determined relative to the Fermi energy by assuming normal x-ray emission begins from the lowest level of the p5dn+1L intermediate state (which is the Mn 2p ionizatation threshold). From the local spin-density approximation, the orbital character of the Mn 3d electrons can be assigned eg symmetry at the top of the valence band T2g in the central part of the VB, and equal contributions of eg and t2g states at the bottom of the valence band.

  13. X-ray Emission Properties of Intermediate-Mass, Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Binder, Breanna; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.

    2017-08-01

    Intermediate-mass (2-8 M⊙) main-sequence stars with A to mid-B spectral types occupy an X-ray "desert" of weak intrinsic emission between low- and high-mass stars. Lacking the wind-shock driven emission of massive, O and early B stars or the convectively-driven magnetic reconnection flaring activity of later-type stars, X-ray detections of (non-peculiar) main-sequence AB stars are typically ascribed to the presence of unresolved, lower-mass binary companions. There is mounting evidence, however, that intermediate-mass, pre-main sequence stars (IMPS) with GK spectral types produce intrinsic X-ray emission that rapidly decays with time following the development of a radiative zone as IMPS approach the ZAMS as AB stars. This suggests that X-ray emission from IMPS may be a more luminous analog of the well-studied coronal X-ray emission from lower-mass, T Tauri stars. Statistical studies of young IMPS have been hampered by their scarcety in nearby, unobscured star-forming regions. We present the first results from a spectral-fitting study to measure absorption-corrected X-ray luminosities and plasma temperatures for hundreds of candidate X-ray emitting IMPS found in the MYStIX and MAGiX surveys of massive Galactic star forming regions. Candidate IMPS are placed on the HR diagram via a novel infrared spectral energy distribution modeling technique designed for highly-obscured, young massive star-forming regions. The rapid decay of X-ray emission from these objects has the potential to provide an independent chronometer to constrain star formation rates, and may produce an age-dependent bias in the relationship between the stellar X-ray luminosity function and mass function in distant (>2 kpc) regions observed with relatively shallow X-ray observations.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant CAREER-1454334 and by NASA through Chandra Award 18200040.

  14. Evidence of non-thermal X-ray emission from HH 80

    OpenAIRE

    López-Santiago, J.; Peri, C.; Bonito, R.; Miceli, M.; Albacete-Colombo, J.; Benaglia, P.; De Castro, E.

    2013-01-01

    Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s^-1, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambie...

  15. X-ray emission from open star clusters with Spectrum-Rontgen-Gamma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K.P.; Ojha, D.K.; Schnopper, H.W.

    1998-01-01

    The study of X-ray emission from co-evolving populations of stars in open dusters is extremely important for understanding the dynamo activity among the stars. With this objective, we propose to observe a number of open clusters in the X-ray and UV bands using SPECTRUM-Rontgen-Gamma. The high...... throughput of SPECTRUM-Rontgen-Gamma will help detect main sequence stars like Sun in middle-aged and old clusters. We will study the relationships between various parameters - age, rotation, abundance, UBV colors, X-ray luminosity, coronal temperature etc. X-ray spectra of younger and brighter populations...... of stars which include synchronous binaries, rapid rotators and peculiar stars, would also be carried out....

  16. Study of X-ray emission from plasma focus device using vacuum photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, N.; Borthakur, T. K.; Neog, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    A newly fabricated vacuum photodiode (VPD) is used to measure time resolved X-ray emission and electron temperature from plasma focus device operated in hydrogen medium. The VPD signals are compared with the PIN diode signal and observed to be of similar in nature. The acquired signals from VPD are deduced to measure electron temperature and X-ray radiated power for four different anode tips (cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging). The electron temperatures are found to be 0.64, 1.5, 0.60 and 0.55 keV for cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging anode tips respectively in hydrogen plasma. The X-ray radiated powers are observed to be varying with respect to the shape of the anode tips and it is found highest in case of converging tip and lowest for the diverging one. Results indicate that VPD could efficiently be employed as an X-ray diagnostics in plasma focus device.

  17. Study of X-ray emission from plasma focus device using vacuum photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, N.; Borthakur, T.K., E-mail: tkborthakur@yahoo.co.uk; Neog, N.K.

    2013-10-21

    A newly fabricated vacuum photodiode (VPD) is used to measure time resolved X-ray emission and electron temperature from plasma focus device operated in hydrogen medium. The VPD signals are compared with the PIN diode signal and observed to be of similar in nature. The acquired signals from VPD are deduced to measure electron temperature and X-ray radiated power for four different anode tips (cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging). The electron temperatures are found to be 0.64, 1.5, 0.60 and 0.55 keV for cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging anode tips respectively in hydrogen plasma. The X-ray radiated powers are observed to be varying with respect to the shape of the anode tips and it is found highest in case of converging tip and lowest for the diverging one. Results indicate that VPD could efficiently be employed as an X-ray diagnostics in plasma focus device.

  18. Magnetar-like X-Ray Bursts Suppress Pulsar Radio Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, R. F.; Lyutikov, M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Tendulkar, S. P. [Department of Physics and McGill Space Institute, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Burgay, M.; Possenti, A. [INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Esposito, P.; Rea, N. [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Israel, G. [INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy); Kerr, M. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Sarkissian, J. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Parkes Observatory, P.O. Box 276, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia); Scholz, P., E-mail: archibald@astro.utoronto.ca [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, BC V2A 6J9 (Canada)

    2017-11-10

    Rotation-powered pulsars and magnetars are two different observational manifestations of neutron stars: rotation-powered pulsars are rapidly spinning objects that are mostly observed as pulsating radio sources, while magnetars, neutron stars with the highest known magnetic fields, often emit short-duration X-ray bursts. Here, we report simultaneous observations of the high-magnetic-field radio pulsar PSR J1119−6127 at X-ray, with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR , and at radio energies with the Parkes radio telescope, during a period of magnetar-like bursts. The rotationally powered radio emission shuts off coincident with the occurrence of multiple X-ray bursts and recovers on a timescale of ∼70 s. These observations of related radio and X-ray phenomena further solidify the connection between radio pulsars and magnetars and suggest that the pair plasma produced in bursts can disrupt the acceleration mechanism of radio-emitting particles.

  19. The Hard X-Ray Emission of the Blazar PKS 2155-304

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Haritma; Chen, Liang; Misra, R.; Sahayanathan, S.; Gu, M. F.; Kushwaha, P.; Dewangan, G. C.

    2017-12-01

    The synchrotron peak of the X-ray bright High Energy Peaked Blazar PKS 2155-304 occurs in the UV-EUV region and hence its X-ray emission (0.6-10 keV) lies mostly in the falling part of the synchrotron hump. We aim to study the X-ray emission of PKS 2155-304 during different intensity states in 2009-2014 using the XMM-Newton satellite. We studied the spectral curvature of all of the observations to provide crucial information on the energy distribution of the nonthermal particles. Most of the observations show curvature or deviation from a single power law and can be well modeled by a log parabola model. In some of the observations, we find spectral flattening after 6 keV. In order to find the possible origin of the X-ray excess, we built the Multiband Spectral Energy distribution. We find that the X-ray excess in PKS 2155-304 is difficult to fit in the one zone model but, could be easily reconciled in the spine/layer jet structure. The hard X-ray excess can be explained by the inverse Comptonization of the synchrotron photons (from the layer) by the spine electrons.

  20. Modeling the Magnetospheric X-ray Emission from Solar Wind Charge Exchange with Verification from XMM-Newton Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    Earth (i.e., hydrogen) to a heavy , high charge state, ion in the solarwind. The electron can be captured in an excited state and transition to lower... heavy ions , Geophys Res. Lett., 24, 105–109, doi:10.1029/96GL03780. Cravens, T. E. (2000), Heliospheric X-ray emission associated with charge transfer...quantifying charge exchange from other ions with emission lines around the 1 4 keV band have also been performed, though the lack of cross-sectional

  1. Application of 'direct' beta particle excitation for the determination of noble metals in catalysts by radioisotope excited X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Rosales, P.A.; Quiero, A. (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas)

    1982-01-01

    A new technique was applied for exciting X-rays for X-ray fluorescence analysis by 'direct' beta excitation for the determination of noble metals in catalytic materials. A series of five synthetic standards were prepared each for platinum and palladium in the range of 0.5-10% for both carbon and alumina supports. The X-ray spectrometer system employed was a modified TN-11 and /sup 147/Pm inserted directly in the sample itself acts as the excitation source. The detector was a high resolution Si(Li) semiconductor with better than 160 eV resolution.

  2. Relation between X-Ray and γ-Ray Emissions for Fermi Blazars ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    consensus on the dominant emission process. These emission models may imply ... Finally, our results support the view that γ-rays are produced co-spatially with X-ray radiation, mainly through SSC process. ... China (U1231202, 11063004), the innovation team of gravitation theory research in. Yunnan Normal University ...

  3. Nonlinear delayed symmetry breaking in a solid excited by hard x-ray free electron laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, A., E-mail: aferrer@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Johnson, J. A., E-mail: jjohnson@chem.byu.edu; Mariager, S. O.; Grübel, S.; Staub, U. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Huber, T.; Trant, M.; Johnson, S. L., E-mail: johnson@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Zhu, D.; Chollet, M.; Robinson, J.; Lemke, H. T. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Ingold, G.; Beaud, P. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); SwissFEL, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Milne, C. [SwissFEL, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-04-13

    We have studied the ultrafast changes of electronic states in bulk ZnO upon intense hard x-ray excitation from a free electron laser. By monitoring the transient anisotropy induced in an optical probe beam, we observe a delayed breaking of the initial c-plane symmetry of the crystal that lasts for several picoseconds. Interaction with the intense x-ray pulses modifies the electronic state filling in a manner inconsistent with a simple increase in electronic temperature. These results may indicate a way to use intense ultrashort x-ray pulses to investigate high-energy carrier dynamics and to control certain properties of solid-state materials.

  4. X-RAY EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES DURING AN ENERGETIC THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURST FROM IGR J17062-6143

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D. [Astronomical Institute ' ' Anton Pannekoek' ' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fabian, A. C., E-mail: degenaar@umich.edu [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-20

    Type-I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions occurring in the surface layers of accreting neutron stars. These events are powerful probes of the physics of neutron stars and their surrounding accretion flow. We analyze a very energetic type-I X-ray burst from the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary IGR J17062-6143 that was detected with Swift on 2012 June 25. The light curve of the {approx_equal}18 minute long X-ray burst tail shows an episode of {approx_equal}10 minutes during which the intensity is strongly fluctuating by a factor of {approx_equal}3 above and below the underlying decay trend on a timescale of seconds. The X-ray spectrum reveals a highly significant emission line around {approx_equal}1 keV, which can be interpreted as an Fe-L shell line caused by the irradiation of cold gas. We also detect significant absorption lines and edges in the Fe-K band, which are strongly suggestive of the presence of hot, highly ionized gas along the line of sight. None of these features are present in the persistent X-ray spectrum of the source. The timescale of the strong intensity variations, the velocity width of the Fe-L emission line (assuming Keplerian motion), and photoionization modeling of the Fe-K absorption features each independently point to gas at a radius of {approx_equal} 10{sup 3} km as the source of these features. The unusual X-ray light curve and spectral properties could have plausibly been caused by a disruption of the accretion disk due to the super-Eddington fluxes reached during the X-ray burst.

  5. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Montez, R. Jr. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Macquarie Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Jones, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Atacama, Copayapu 485, Copiapó (Chile); Miszalski, B. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Sahai, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Blackman, E.; Frank, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Chu, Y.-H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, Granada, E-18008 (Spain); Lopez, J. A. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Ensenada, Apdo. Postal 22860, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Zijlstra, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bujarrabal, V. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Corradi, R. L. M. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nordhaus, J. [NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellow, Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  6. GIANT CORONAL LOOPS DOMINATE THE QUIESCENT X-RAY EMISSION IN RAPIDLY ROTATING M STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, O.; Yadav, R.; Garraffo, C.; Saar, S. H.; Wolk, S. J.; Kashyap, V. L.; Drake, J. J.; Pillitteri, I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Observations indicate that magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars are very strong, on both small and large scales. What is the nature of the resulting corona? Here we seek to shed some light on this question. We use the results of an anelastic dynamo simulation of a rapidly rotating fully convective M star to drive a physics-based model for the stellar corona. We find that due to the several kilo Gauss large-scale magnetic fields at high latitudes, the corona, and its X-ray emission are dominated by star-size large hot loops, while the smaller, underlying colder loops are not visible much in the X-ray. Based on this result, we propose that, in rapidly rotating stars, emission from such coronal structures dominates the quiescent, cooler but saturated X-ray emission.

  7. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. 1. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; /Fermilab; Harris, D.E.; /Smithsonian Astrophys. Observ.; Marshall, H.L.; /MIT, MKI; Meisenheimer, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-05-01

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyze the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright ''knot A'', ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows.

  8. Inverse Compton X-ray emission from the superluminal quasar 3C 345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, S. C.; Wehrle, A. E.; Urry, C. M.; Gilmore, D. M.; Barton, E. J.; Kjerulf, B. C.; Zensus, J. A.; Rabaca, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    In quasars with strong radio cores, the inverse-Compton process is believed to be the dominant source X-ray emission. For objects with parsec-scale radio jets, simple models have predicted that components in the jet emerging from the quasar nucleus generate the observed X-ray emission. We have tested this hypothesis in detail for the quasar 3C 345 using a ROSAT X-ray observation in 1990 July, together with quasi-simultaneous very long base interferometry (VLBI) imaging of the parsec-scale jet at five frequencies. The ROSAT spectrum is well fitted by a power law with index alpha = -0.96 +/- -0.13, consistent with models in which the X-ray emission results from inverse-Compton scattering of radio radiation from high-energy electrons in compact components. We show that the radio properties of brightest `knot' in the jet (`C5') can be fitted with a homogeneous sphere model whose parameters require bulk relativistic motion of the emitting material; otherwise the predicted model whose parameters require bulk relativistic motion of the emitting material; otherwise the predicted inverse-Compton X-ray emission exceeds the observed flux. If C5 is the origin of the X-ray emission, then it has a Doppler factor delta = 7.5((sup +3 sub -2)). If the nucleus or other components contribute to the X-ray emission, then this becomes a firm lower limit to delta. The inhomogeneous jet model of Koenigl is a good fit both to the barely resolved (less than 1 pc) flat-spectrum nucleus in the radio, and also to the ROSAT X-ray spectrum. The synchrotron and inverse-Compton emitting fluid moves down a narrow cone (opening angle 2 phi approximately 5 deg) nucleus relativistically, with delta approximately 4.6. Doppler factors for the nucleus and C5, derived from our ROSAT observation, provide evidence for bulk relativistic motion in the jet. By combining these constraints with well-known superluminal motion of jet components, we can deduce geometry. For epoch 1990.5 we infer the Lorentz factor

  9. X-Ray Emission from the Wolf-Rayet Bubble S 308

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toala, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Arthur, S. J.; Smith, R. C.; Snowden, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its Northwest quadrant (Chu et al. 2003), map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a 22' in size central cavity and a shell thickness of approx. 8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at approx.0.43 keV and O VII at approx.0.5 keV, and declines towards high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T1 approx.1.1 x 10(exp 6) K, T2 approx.13 x 10(exp 6) K), with a total X-ray luminosity approx.3 x 10(exp 33) erg/s at the assumed distance of 1.8 kpc. Qualitative comparison of the X-ray morphology of S 308 with the results of numerical simulations of wind-blown WR bubbles suggests a progenitor mass of 40 Stellar mass and an age in the WR phase approx.20,000 yrs. The X-ray luminosity predicted by simulatioms including the effects of heat conduction is in agreement with the observations, however, the simulated X-ray spectrum indicates generally hotter gas than is derived from the observations. We suggest that non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) may provide an explanation for this discrepancy.

  10. Effect of anode shape on pinch structure and X-ray emission of plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, N.; Neog, N. K.; Borthkur, T. K.

    The effect of anode shapes on pinch structure and X-ray emission of plasma focus device operated with cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging anode tips is reported. The pinch structure in the radial compression phase has been investigated by employing a triple pinhole camera. It has been observed that pinch structure as well as the X-ray emission of PF device strongly depends upon anode tip designs. For the first time the studies were carried out in two new shapes of anode tips that is the oval and the divergent one. It has been observed that the oval and diverging anode tips are more conducive for the formation of instabilities and hotspot generation. The studies of X-ray emission were also carried out by employing three channels of a p-i-n diode X-ray spectrometer in entire anode designs to corroborate the results of a triple pinhole camera. Additionally, the effective hard X-ray photon energy was also estimated by the radiography method for all the anode tip designs, which indirectly provide a qualitative idea of the generation of induced accelerating field in the pinched column during compression.

  11. X-ray emission from T Tauri stars in the Lupus 3 star-forming region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondoin, P.

    2006-08-01

    Aims.In this paper, I present analysis results of an {XMM-Newton} observation of the Lupus 3 region that contains a high proportion of young low mass (M Methods: .The detection of X-ray sources in 0.5 to 4.5 keV images of the Lupus 3 core was performed using the standard source detection method of the {XMM-Newton} Science Analysis Software. The detected sources were correlated with a list of Herbig-Haro objects and Hα emission stars that contains mainly classical T Tauri stars, with a catalogue of weak-line T Tauri Stars and with a recent list of new low-mass members of the Lupus 3 dark cloud found in a visible-light spectroscopic survey at the center of the Lupus 3 star-forming core. The light curves and spectra of the brightest X-ray sources with known T Tauri star counterparts were analysed. Results: .One hundred and two X-ray sources were detected in the 30´ diameter field-of-view of the EPIC cameras, of which 25 have visible or near-IR counterparts that are known as pre-main sequence stars. Their X-ray luminosity ranges from 3 × 1028 to 3 × 1030 erg s-1. Two of these objects with mass estimates lower than 0.075 M⊙ have an X-ray luminosity of about 4-7 × 1028 erg s-1, comparable with that of flaring young brown dwarfs. A linear correlation is found between the X-ray luminosity and the mass or volume of the stars that is qualitatively expected from some models of distributed turbulent dynamos. The EPIC spectra of the X-ray brightest sources can be fitted using optically thin plasma emission models with two components at temperatures in the ranges 3-9 × 106 K and 1-50 × 107 K, respectively. The large emission measure of hot plasma may be caused by disruptions of magnetic fields associated with an intense flaring activity, while the X-ray emission from the "cool" plasma components may result from solar-type active regions. The emission measures of the plasma components are of the order of 1052 cm-3, typical of the values expected from coronal plasmas in T

  12. An X-Ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert. galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, and Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubifiski, and Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can, in principle, be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the heretofore poorly measured hard X-ray continuum above approximately 50 keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Conversely, forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray telescopes, such as those aboard the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  13. X-ray Emission from the Radio Jet in 3C 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, D. E.; Hjorth, J.; Sadun, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-ray emission from a radio knot at a projected distance of 25" from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy, 3C 120. The data were obtained with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI). Optical upper limits for the knot preclude a simple power law extension of the radio...... spectrum and we calculate some of the physical parameters for thermal bremsstrahlung and synchrotron self-Compton models. We conclude that no simple model is consistent with the data but if the knot contains small regions with flat spectra, these could produce the observed X-rays (via synchrotron emission...

  14. Compton scattering artifacts in electron excited X-ray spectra measured with a silicon drift detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Nicholas W M; Newbury, Dale E; Lindstrom, Abigail P

    2011-12-01

    Artifacts are the nemesis of trace element analysis in electron-excited energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Peaks that result from nonideal behavior in the detector or sample can fool even an experienced microanalyst into believing that they have trace amounts of an element that is not present. Many artifacts, such as the Si escape peak, absorption edges, and coincidence peaks, can be traced to the detector. Others, such as secondary fluorescence peaks and scatter peaks, can be traced to the sample. We have identified a new sample-dependent artifact that we attribute to Compton scattering of energetic X-rays generated in a small feature and subsequently scattered from a low atomic number matrix. It seems likely that this artifact has not previously been reported because it only occurs under specific conditions and represents a relatively small signal. However, with the advent of silicon drift detectors and their utility for trace element analysis, we anticipate that more people will observe it and possibly misidentify it. Though small, the artifact is not inconsequential. Under some conditions, it is possible to mistakenly identify the Compton scatter artifact as approximately 1% of an element that is not present.

  15. Study on vinasse dynamics in soil using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence with radioisotopic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simabuco, S.M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia; Nascimento Filho, V.F. [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz]|[Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    1994-05-01

    The distribution of S, Cl, K and Ca along the profiles of two soils of different texture (Red Yellow Podzolic and Dark Red Latosol) treated with amounts of vinasse equivalent to 4000 m{sup 3}/ha were studied using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, observing a significant increase in the contents of these elements. The same effect was observed for Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr contents in soils treated with vinasse as compared to the control. The concentrations of Al, Si, Ti, Mn, Fe and Zr could also be evaluated but no significant variation was observed due to the high soil initial concentrations of these elements as compared to the low concentrations in the vinasse. Annular radioactive sources of Fe-55 and Cd-109 were employed for the excitation of these elements in the soil samples, treated or not with vinasse. For the detection of the characteristic X-rays, a Si(Li) semiconductor detector was used, coupled to a multichannel emulation card inserted in a microcomputer. (author). 8 refs, 6 figs, 4 tabs.

  16. Obtaining attosecond x-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Zholents

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a technique for the generation of a solitary attosecond x-ray pulse in a free-electron laser (FEL, via a process of self-amplified spontaneous emission. In this method, electrons experience an energy modulation upon interacting with laser pulses having a duration of a few cycles within single-period wiggler magnets. Two consecutive modulation sections, followed by compression in a dispersive section, are used to obtain a single, subfemtosecond spike in the electron peak current. This region of the electron beam experiences an enhanced growth rate for FEL amplification. After propagation through a long undulator, this current spike emits a ∼250   attosecond x-ray pulse whose intensity dominates the x-ray emission from the rest of the electron bunch.

  17. The two solar flares diagnostics based on the soft X-ray emission recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail I. Savchenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The time history of the temperature and the emission measure of the solar flare plasma have been studied relying upon the experimental data on the soft X-rays recorded by the IRIS spectrometer on June 29, 2002 (F1 and March 27, 2003 (F2. F1 was a thermal flare and was not accompanied by hard X-rays. This data analysis revealed that at least two sequential energy-release processes occurred during the F1 event. The F2 event took place behind the limb, so only the top part of the flare loop being the soft X-ray source was recorded by the satellite-based spectrometer. From this data analysis it appeared that fast plasma heating occurred in the initial stage of F2 and then the flare region expanded and the emission measure of flare plasma increased.

  18. Multireference X-Ray Emission and Absorption Spectroscopy calculations from Monte Carlo Configuration Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, J P

    2015-01-01

    We adapt the method of Monte Carlo configuration interaction to calculate core-hole states and use this for the computation of X-ray emission and absorption values. We consider CO, CH$_{4}$, NH$_{3}$, H$_{2}$O, HF, HCN, CH$_{3}$OH, CH$_{3}$F, HCl and NO using a 6-311G** basis. We also look at carbon monoxide with a stretched geometry and discuss the dependence of its results on the cutoff used. The Monte Carlo configuration interaction results are compared with EOM-CCSD values for X-ray emission and with experiment for X-ray absorption. Oscillator strengths are also computed and we quantify the multireference nature of the wavefunctions to suggest when approaches based on a single reference would be expected to be successful.

  19. Relations Between FUV Excess and Coronal Soft X-Ray Emission Among Dwarf Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graeme H.; Hargrave, Mason; Eckholm, Elliot

    2017-11-01

    The far-ultraviolet magnitudes of late-F, G and early-K dwarfs with (B - V) ⩾ 0.50 as measured by the GALEX satellite are shown to correlate with soft X-ray luminosity. This result indicates that line and continuum emission from stellar active regions make significant contributions to the flux in the GALEX FUV band for late-F, G and K dwarfs. By contrast, detection of a correlation between FUV brightness and soft X-ray luminosity among early-F dwarfs requires subtraction of the photospheric component from the FUV flux. The range in (B - V) among F and G dwarfs over which a correlation between uncorrected FUV magnitude and X-ray luminosity is detected coincides with the range in colour over which coronal and chromospheric emission correlates with stellar rotation.

  20. Einstein X-ray survey of the Pleiades - The dependence of X-ray emission on stellar age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Serio, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Bookbinder, J.; Golub, L.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1985-01-01

    The data obtained with two pointed observations of 1 deg by 1 deg fields of the Pleiades region have been analyzed, and the results are presented. The maximum-likelihood X-ray luminosity functions for the Pleiades G and K stars in the cluster are derived, and it is shown that, for the G stars, the Pleiades X-ray luminosity function is significantly brighter than the corresponding function for Hyades G dwarf stars. This finding indicates a dependence of X-ray luminosity on stellar age, which is confirmed by comparison of the same data with median X-ray luminosities of pre-main sequence and local disk population dwarf G stars. It is suggested that the significantly larger number of bright X-ray sources associated with G stars than with K stars, the lack of detection of M stars, and the relatively rapid rotation of the Pleiades K stars can be explained in terms of the onset of internal differential rotation near the convective envelope-radidative core interface after the spin-up phase during evolution to the main sequence.

  1. The Sun's X-ray Emission During the Recent Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Mirek; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Kuzin, Sergey; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2010-02-01

    The Sun recently underwent a period of a remarkable lack of major activity such as large flares and sunspots, without equal since the advent of the space age a half century ago. A widely used measure of solar activity is the amount of solar soft X-ray emission, but until recently this has been below the threshold of the X-ray-monitoring Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). There is thus an urgent need for more sensitive instrumentation to record solar X-ray emission in this range. Anticipating this need, a highly sensitive spectrophotometer called Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was included in the solar telescope/spectrometer TESIS instrument package on the third spacecraft in Russia's Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun (CORONAS-PHOTON) program, launched 30 January 2009 into a near-polar orbit. SphinX measures X-rays in a band similar to the GOES longer-wavelength channel.

  2. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miaja-Avila

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3  keV spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe(2,2^{′}-bipyridine_{3}]^{2+} and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  3. Hit detection in serial femtosecond crystallography using X-ray spectroscopy of plasma emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Olof Jönsson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond crystallography is an emerging and promising method for determining protein structures, making use of the ultrafast and bright X-ray pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers. The upcoming X-ray laser sources will produce well above 1000 pulses per second and will pose a new challenge: how to quickly determine successful crystal hits and avoid a high-rate data deluge. Proposed here is a hit-finding scheme based on detecting photons from plasma emission after the sample has been intercepted by the X-ray laser. Plasma emission spectra are simulated for systems exposed to high-intensity femtosecond pulses, for both protein crystals and the liquid carrier systems that are used for sample delivery. The thermal radiation from the glowing plasma gives a strong background in the XUV region that depends on the intensity of the pulse, around the emission lines from light elements (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen. Sample hits can be reliably distinguished from the carrier liquid based on the characteristic emission lines from heavier elements present only in the sample, such as sulfur. For buffer systems with sulfur present, selenomethionine substitution is suggested, where the selenium emission lines could be used both as an indication of a hit and as an aid in phasing and structural reconstruction of the protein.

  4. Time-Resolved XAFS of a Molecular Excited State and Glass-Capillary Concentration of X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Daniel Joseph

    Two x-ray techniques are presented. One is a new spectroscopic method to study changes in molecular structure upon laser excitation. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) has been combined with rapid-flow laser spectroscopy to achieve new insight into the structure of the lowest triplet state of tetrakis(pyrophosphito) diplatinate(II), rm Pt_2(P_2O _5H_2)_sp{4}{4-}. The phosphorous planes are found to contract along the Pt-Pt axis by 0.52 +/- 0.16 A in response to the laser excitation. This experiment, which is the first musec-resolved XAFS measurement, has given unprecedented structural detail of a molecule excited to a short-lived electronic state. The other technique is a new method to concentrate, or "focus", a collimated x-ray beam. Unlike standard x -ray focusing methods, this method consists of using the inner wall of a tapered glass capillary to guide the x rays down the bore of the capillary by multiple total external reflections at the air/glass interface. The x-ray beam emerging from the capillary is compressed to a size given by the size of the bore at the tip of the capillary. A variety of tapered capillaries have been fabricated with exit bore sizes ranging from 0.1 μm to 100 mum. The methods used in fabricating and characterizing the concentrators are presented along with the measured x-ray intensity enhancements due to the devices. In addition, the results of various applications of these x-ray concentrators are reported including an XAFS measurement, an imaging experiment, and a beam-steering technique. The most significant part of this research has been the generation of submicron diameter x-ray beams with intensity enhancements greater than 100. This method is the only method presently available to produce such x-ray beams. Finally, a ray-tracing program has been developed which calculates the paths of the meridional rays passing through the two-dimensional profile of any channel including the irregular figures of the tapered glass capillaries

  5. Bulk and surface electronic structure of GaN measured using angle resolved photoemission, soft x-ray emission and soft x-ray absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.E.; Dhesi, S.S.; Duda, L.C.; Stagarescu, C.B.; Singh, R.; Moustakas, T.D. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Guo, J.H.; Nordgren, J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics

    1997-12-31

    The electronic structure of thin film wurtzite GaN has been studied using a combination of angle resolved photoemission, soft x-ray absorption and soft x-ray emission spectroscopies. The authors have measured the bulk valence and conduction band partial density of states by recording Ga L and N K- x-ray emission and absorption spectra. They compare the x-ray spectra to a recent ab initio calculation and find good overall agreement. The x-ray emission spectra reveal that the top of the valence band is dominated by N 2p states, while the x-ray absorption spectra show the bottom of the conduction band as a mixture of Ga 4s and N 2p states, again in good agreement with theory. However, due to strong dipole selection rules the authors can also identify weak hybridization between Ga 4s- and N 2p-states in the valence band. Furthermore, a component to the N K-emission appears at approximately 19.5 eV below the valence band maximum and can be identified as due to hybridization between N 2p and Ga 3d states. They report preliminary results of a study of the full dispersion of the bulk valence band states along high symmetry directions of the bulk Brillouin zone as measured using angle resolved photoemission. Finally, they tentatively identify a non-dispersive state at the top of the valence band in parts of the Brillouin zone as a surface state.

  6. The chemical sensitivity of X-ray spectroscopy: high energy resolution XANES versus X-ray emission spectroscopy of substituted ferrocenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2013-06-07

    X-ray spectroscopy at the metal K-edge is an important tool for understanding catalytic processes and provides insight into the geometric and electronic structures of transition metal complexes. In particular, X-ray emission-based methods such as high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C-XES) hold the promise of providing increased chemical sensitivity compared to conventional X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, we explore the ability of HERFD-XANES and V2C-XES spectroscopy to distinguish substitutions beyond the directly coordinated atoms for the example of ferrocene and selected ferrocene derivatives. The experimental spectra are assigned and interpreted through the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that while the pre-edge peaks in the HERFD-XANES spectra are affected by substituents at the cyclopentadienyl ring containing π-bonds [A. J. Atkins, Ch. R. Jacob and M. Bauer, Chem.-Eur. J., 2012, 18, 7021], the V2C-XES spectra are virtually unchanged. The pre-edge in HERFD-XANES probes the weak transition to unoccupied metal d-orbitals, while the V2C-XES spectra are determined by dipole-allowed transitions from occupied ligand orbitals to the 1s core hole. The latter turn out to be less sensitive to changes beyond the first coordination shell.

  7. Interplay between relativistic energy corrections and resonant excitations in x-ray multiphoton ionization dynamics of Xe atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Koudai; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we theoretically study x-ray multiphoton ionization dynamics of heavy atoms taking into account relativistic and resonance effects. When an atom is exposed to an intense x-ray pulse generated by an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), it is ionized to a highly charged ion via a sequence of single-photon ionization and accompanying relaxation processes, and its final charge state is limited by the last ionic state that can be ionized by a single-photon ionization. If x-ray multiphoton ionization involves deep inner-shell electrons in heavy atoms, energy shifts by relativistic effects play an important role in ionization dynamics, as pointed out in Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 173005 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.173005. On the other hand, if the x-ray beam has a broad energy bandwidth, the high-intensity x-ray pulse can drive resonant photoexcitations for a broad range of ionic states and ionize even beyond the direct one-photon ionization limit, as first proposed in Nat. Photon. 6, 858 (2012), 10.1038/nphoton.2012.261. To investigate both relativistic and resonance effects, we extend the xatom toolkit to incorporate relativistic energy corrections and resonant excitations in x-ray multiphoton ionization dynamics calculations. Charge-state distributions are calculated for Xe atoms interacting with intense XFEL pulses at a photon energy of 1.5 keV and 5.5 keV, respectively. For both photon energies, we demonstrate that the role of resonant excitations in ionization dynamics is altered due to significant shifts of orbital energy levels by relativistic effects. Therefore, it is necessary to take into account both effects to accurately simulate multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity.

  8. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares Rajmal Jain, Malini Aggarwal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ray line and thermal ... and during the flare provide a wonderful opportunity to study the soft X-ray characteristics of active region. 125 .... observed spectrum. The multi-thermal power-law function enables us to measure the emission measure,.

  9. 2p3d Resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy of cobalt compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, M.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315032863

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript demonstrates that 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) yields unique information on the chemically relevant valence electrons of transition metal atoms or ions. Experimental data on cobalt compounds and several theories were used hand-in-hand. In chapter 1 2p3d RXES was

  10. Detections of hard X-ray emissions from bright early-type galaxies with ASCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, K.; Makishima, K.; Awaki, H.; Canizares, C. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Loewenstein, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Mihara, T.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    Five bright elliptical galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, NGC 4365, NGC 4374 (M84), NGC 4406 (M86), NGC 4472 (M49), and NGC 4636, were observed with ASCA. In addition to the extended thermal X-ray emission of temperature kT approximately 1 keV, harder X-rays with color temperature kT greater than or equal to 2 keV were detected from all of them. The 2-10 keV luminosities of this hard component for the five galaxies, integrated within 5 min, are distributed within a relatively narrow range of (1-4) x 10(exp 40) ergs/s. The hard X-ray component is primarily attributed to the integrated emission from discrete X-ray sources. In NGC 4406 and NGC 4374 the data indicate that the hard component is contributed additionally by foreground/background emission from the hot intracluster medium (ICM) of the Virgo Cluster. The hard component of NGC 4472 seems also contributed by the Virgo ICM emission, but in this case there is evidence that the ICM brightness is locally enhanced within approximately 10 min of NGC 4472.

  11. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. Nov. & Dec. 2000 physics pp. 789–795. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions. V K SENECHA, Y B S R PRASAD, M P KAMATH, A S JOSHI, G S SOLANKI,. A P KULKARNI, S GUPTA, R PAREEK and H C PANT. Laser Plasma Division, Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 103, India.

  12. Lattice dynamics in two-photon-excited CdS studied by picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimura, Hiroaki; Hironaka, Yoichiro [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, R3-10, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Nakamura, Kazutaka G. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, R3-10, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)], E-mail: nakamura.k.ai@m.titech.ac.jp

    2008-08-01

    Lattice dynamics and radiative processes in single-crystal cadmium sulfide induced by two-photon excitation with a femtosecond laser are investigated. The development of lattice expansion is directly observed by picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction. The obtained lattice dynamics are explained on the basis of a thermally induced impulsive-strain model. The model calculation indicates that two- and more-photon absorption processes occur and that reflectivity rapidly increases under laser irradiation. In photoluminescence spectroscopy, the spectra for TW cm{sup -2} excitation are shifted to lower energy and show an additional shoulder at 2.35 eV. Furthermore, emission due to Fabry-Perot laser modes with self-formed cavities was observed under 11 TW cm{sup -2} excitation. The discrepancy between carrier densities deduced from the lattice expansion and the PL spectra indicates that the predominant process at a higher carrier density is not radiative recombination, but Auger recombination followed by lattice heating.

  13. Detection of hard X-ray emission from the Galactic nuclear region with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belanger, G.; Goldwurm, A.; Goldoni, P.

    2004-01-01

    , in the energy ranges 20 - 40 and 40 - 100 keV. These give a yet unseen view of the high-energy sources of this region in hard X-rays and gamma rays with an angular resolution of 12' (FWHM). We report on the discovery of a source, IGR J1745.6 - 2901, coincident with the Galactic nucleus Sgr A* to within 0......, this is the first report of significant hard X-ray emission from within the inner 10' of the Galaxy and a contribution from the Galactic supermassive black hole itself cannot be excluded....

  14. Extended Hard-X-Ray Emission in the Inner Few Parsecs of the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J.; Bauer, Franz E.; Krivonos, Roman A.; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barriere, Nicholas M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic Centre hosts a puzzling stellar population in its inner few parsecs, with a high abundance of surprisingly young, relatively massive stars bound within the deep potential well of the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (ref. 1). Previous studies suggest that the population of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems2, 3, 4, 5.

  15. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and mo...

  16. The Spectacular Radio-Near-IR-X-Ray Jet of 3C 111: the X-Ray Emission Mechanism and Jet Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, Devon; Perlman, Eric S.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.; Tombesi, Francesco; Cara, Mihai; Marshall, Herman L.; Hogan, Brandon M.; Kazanas, Demos

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic jets are the most energetic manifestation of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) phenomenon. AGN jets are observed from the radio through gamma-rays and carry copious amounts of matter and energy from the subparsec central regions out to the kiloparsec and often megaparsec scale galaxy and cluster environs. While most spatially resolved jets are seen in the radio, an increasing number have been discovered to emit in the optical/near- IR and/or X-ray bands. Here we discuss a spectacular example of this class, the 3C 111 jet, housed in one of the nearest, double-lobed FR II radio galaxies known. We discuss new, deep Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations that reveal both near-IR and X-ray emission from several components of the 3C 111 jet, as well as both the northern and southern hotspots. Important differences are seen between the morphologies in the radio, X-ray, and near-IR bands. The long (over 100 kpc on each side), straight nature of this jet makes it an excellent prototype for future, deep observations, as it is one of the longest such features seen in the radio, near-IR/optical, and X-ray bands. Several independent lines of evidence, including the X-ray and broadband spectral shape as well as the implied velocity of the approaching hotspot, lead us to strongly disfavor the EC/CMB model and instead favor a two-component synchrotron model to explain the observed X-ray emission for several jet components. Future observations with NuSTAR, HST, and Chandra will allow us to further constrain the emission mechanisms.

  17. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schafer, Donald W.; Sellberg, Jonas; Kenney, Christopher; Herbst, Ryan; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Glatzel, Pieter; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as well as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. The technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II. PMID:23129631

  18. Laboratory Measurements of X-Ray Emissions From Centimeter-Long Streamer Corona Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, C. L.; Millan, R. M.; McGaw, D. G.; Yu, C. T.; Putter, A. S.; LaBelle, J.; Dwyer, J.

    2017-11-01

    We provide extensive evidence that runaway electron acceleration and subsequent bremsstrahlung X-ray emission are a common feature in negative electrical discharges with voltages as low as 100 kV, indicating that all negative lightning could potentially produce runaway electrons. Centimeter long streamer corona discharges produce bursts of X-ray radiation, emitted by a source highly compact in space and time, leading to photon pileup. Median photon burst energies vary between 33 and 96 keV in 100 kV discharges. Statistical analysis of 5,000+ discharges shows that X-rays are observed in as many as 60% of the triggers, depending on the configuration. X-ray detection is more frequent when streamers are not followed by a spark, the detector is oriented perpendicular to the gap, and a thicker anode is used. In an 8-cm-long gap, X-rays are produced when runaway electrons hit the anode, and the electron acceleration is not necessarily correlated with streamer collisions.

  19. Modelling Supernova Remnant kinematics and X-ray emission. Some Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, M.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.; Sanchez-Cruces, M.; Velazquez, P.; Ambrocio-Cruz, P.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.

    2017-10-01

    Confrontation of MHD numerical simulations of Supernova Remnants (SNRs) with observations of X-ray emission complemented with the kinematics derived also from observations of the optical filaments is very useful. In this work we present some examples of this confrontation and the results we derived for the studied SNRs. The examples are: 1) The SNR CTB 109 (G109-1.0) where the kinematics of the optical filaments allow us to determine that the SNR is in the Perseus Arm of our Galaxy, and 2) The confrontation of the observed X-ray fluxes of the superbubbles N 70 and N 185 in the Large Magellanic Cloud with numerical hidrodynamic simulations that implies that a supernova explosion is also required (besides the action of stellar winds of the interior, massive stars) in order to explain the X-ray fluxes and large velocities derived from the kinematics of their optical filaments.

  20. Characterization of metallic nanoparticles by high-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Timna-Josua

    2012-03-15

    In almost all areas of technology, metallic nanoparticles are of interest due to their special thermal, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Their special properties are mainly due to their small size which implies the relevance of quantum effects as well as the significance of the surface: For 2 nm nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio is already 1:1. However, the identification of surface-to-volume interactions - that are responsible for the new properties - is a difficult task due to the small size that inhibits a lot of 'standard' techniques to be applicable. Here X-ray absorption/emission spectroscopy (XAS/XES) is a favorable tool for the characterization of nanoparticles, independent on size, degree of crystallinity and shape/condition of the surface. Using XAS, a tempered nanosized Co{sub 3}Pt/C catalyst have been investigated. Its outstanding oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) properties in a fuel cell could be related to a lowered Pt 5d-band center connected to a tightened Pt-Pt bonding distance, leading to a weakening of the oxygen adsorption strength so that the ORR may proceed faster. One drawback remains, however, as the properties found by (standard) XAS are summed up for different chemical environments of the chosen element. Thus, no distinction can be made between, e.g., the pure metal in a nanoparticles' interior and the ligated metal in the outer shells or surface. Here, high-resolution fluorescence-detected XAS (HRFD-XAS) provides additional opportunities as, due to its chemical sensitivity, it leads to site-selective XAS. For a system of 6 nm sized Co nanoparticles, build up of a metallic core surrounded by a protecting shell, that resulted from the 'smooth oxidation' process, this technique of site-selective XAS was proven to be applicable. For the first time, the interior and outer shell of a metallic nanoparticle could be characterized separately. In particular, the Co-hcp phase could be determined for the

  1. Detailed Characterization of a Nanosecond-Lived Excited State: X-ray and Theoretical Investigation of the Quintet State in Photoexcited [Fe(terpy)2](2.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankó, György; Bordage, Amélie; Pápai, Mátyás; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Glatzel, Pieter; March, Anne Marie; Doumy, Gilles; Britz, Alexander; Galler, Andreas; Assefa, Tadesse; Cabaret, Delphine; Juhin, Amélie; van Driel, Tim B; Kjær, Kasper S; Dohn, Asmus; Møller, Klaus B; Lemke, Henrik T; Gallo, Erik; Rovezzi, Mauro; Németh, Zoltán; Rozsályi, Emese; Rozgonyi, Tamás; Uhlig, Jens; Sundström, Villy; Nielsen, Martin M; Young, Linda; Southworth, Stephen H; Bressler, Christian; Gawelda, Wojciech

    2015-03-19

    Theoretical predictions show that depending on the populations of the Fe 3d xy , 3d xz , and 3d yz orbitals two possible quintet states can exist for the high-spin state of the photoswitchable model system [Fe(terpy)2](2+). The differences in the structure and molecular properties of these (5)B2 and (5)E quintets are very small and pose a substantial challenge for experiments to resolve them. Yet for a better understanding of the physics of this system, which can lead to the design of novel molecules with enhanced photoswitching performance, it is vital to determine which high-spin state is reached in the transitions that follow the light excitation. The quintet state can be prepared with a short laser pulse and can be studied with cutting-edge time-resolved X-ray techniques. Here we report on the application of an extended set of X-ray spectroscopy and scattering techniques applied to investigate the quintet state of [Fe(terpy)2](2+) 80 ps after light excitation. High-quality X-ray absorption, nonresonant emission, and resonant emission spectra as well as X-ray diffuse scattering data clearly reflect the formation of the high-spin state of the [Fe(terpy)2](2+) molecule; moreover, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy resolves the Fe-ligand bond-length variations with unprecedented bond-length accuracy in time-resolved experiments. With ab initio calculations we determine why, in contrast to most related systems, one configurational mode is insufficient for the description of the low-spin (LS)-high-spin (HS) transition. We identify the electronic structure origin of the differences between the two possible quintet modes, and finally, we unambiguously identify the formed quintet state as (5)E, in agreement with our theoretical expectations.

  2. X-ray emission from the local hot bubble and solar wind charge exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprety, Youaraj

    DXL (Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission to quantify the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX) X-ray emission in the interplanetary medium, and separate its contribution from the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) emission. The first launch of DXL took place in December 2012. This thesis will describe the DXL instrumentation and calibrations, and discuss the results obtained. The mission uses two large area proportional counters to scan through the Helium Focusing Cone (HFC), a high helium density region in the solar system emitting excess X-rays due to SWCX. Using well determined models of the interplanetary neutral distribution and comparing the DXL results with data from the same region obtained by the ROSAT satellite away from the cone, we calculated that SWCX contributes at most 36% to the ¼ keV ROSAT band and 13% to the ¾ keV ROSAT band, in the galactic plane. This provides a firm proof for existence of a LHB which dominates the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXB) at ¼ keV, while raising new questions on the origin of the ¾ keV emission.

  3. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WOLF-RAYET BUBBLE S 308

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toala, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Arthur, S. J. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Smith, R. C. [NOAO/CTIO, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Snowden, S. L., E-mail: toala@iaa.es [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its northwest quadrant, map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a central cavity {approx}22' in size and a shell thickness of {approx}8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at 0.43 keV and O VII at 0.57 keV, and declines toward high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T{sub 1} {approx} 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K, T{sub 2} {approx} 13 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K), with a total X-ray luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} at the assumed distance of 1.5 kpc.

  4. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lin X.; Shelby, Megan L.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Jackson, Nicholas E.; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Mara, Michael W.; Stickrath, Andrew B.; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik; Chollet, Matthieu; Hoffman, Brian M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were successfully measured for optically excited state at a timescale from 100 fs to 50 ps, providing insight into its sub-ps electronic and structural relaxation processes. Importantly, a transient reduced state Ni(I) (π, 3dx2-y2) electronic state is captured through the interpretation of a short-lived excited state absorption on the low-energy shoulder of the edge, which is aided by the computation of X-ray transitions for postulated excited electronic states. The observed and computed inner shell to valence orbital transition energies demonstrate and quantify the influence of electronic configuration on specific metal orbital energies. A strong influence of the valence orbital occupation on the inner shell orbital energies indicates that one should not use the transition energy from 1s to other orbitals to draw conclusions about the d-orbital energies. For photocatalysis, a transient electronic configuration could influence d-orbital energies up to a few eV and any attempt to steer the reaction pathway should account for this to ensure that external energies can be used optimally in driving desirable processes. NiTMP structural evolution and the influence of the porphyrin macrocycle conformation on relaxation kinetics can be likewise inferred from this study.

  5. Projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Shadi Mohammad Ibrahim

    2010-03-16

    This work reports on the study of the projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions. Excitation of K-shell in He-like uranium ions, electron capture into H-like uranium ions and Simultaneous ionization and excitation of initially He-like uranium ions have been studied using the experimental storage ring at GSI. For the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} and K{sub {alpha}}{sub 2} transitions originating from the excitation of the He-like uranium ions, no alignment was observed. In contrast, the Ly{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} radiation from the simultaneous ionization-excitation process of the He-like uranium ions shows a clear alignment. The experimental value leads to the inclusion of a magnetic term in the interaction potential. The capture process of target electrons into the highly-charged heavy ions was studied using H-like uranium ions at an incident energy of 220 MeV/u, impinging on N{sub 2} gas-target. It was shown that, the strongly aligned electrons captured in 2p{sub 3/2} level couple with the available 1s{sub 1/2} electron which shows no initial directional preference. The magnetic sub-state population of the 2p{sub 3/2} electron is redistributed according to the coupling rules to the magnetic sub-states of the relevant two-electron states. This leads to the large anisotropy in the corresponding individual ground state transitions contributing to the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} emission. From the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1}/K{sub {alpha}}{sub 2} ratio, the current results show that the incoherent addition of the E1 and M2 transition components yield to an almost isotropic emission of the total K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1}. In contrast to the radiative electron capture, the experimental results for the K-shell single excitation of He-like uranium ions indicate that only the {sup 1}P{sub 1} level contributes to the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} transition. For this case, the anisotropy parameter {beta}{sub 20} was found to be -0.20{+-}0.03. This work also reports on the study of a two

  6. Laboratory Measurements of Solar-Wind/Comet X-Ray Emission and Charge-Exchange Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Ĉade, I.; Greenwood, J. B.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Smith, S. J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-11-01

    The detection of X-rays from comets such as Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, d'Arrest, and Linear as they approach the Sun has been both unexpected and exciting. This phenomenon, moreover, should be quite general, occurring wherever a fast solar or stellar wind interacts with neutrals in a comet, a planetary atmosphere, or a circumstellar cloud. Comet-modeling calculations to date have (a) used an approximate, over-barrier expression for the charge-exchange (CE) cross section, (b) assumed a flat energy dependence of cross section, and (c) neglected multiple charge exchanges. In support of the understanding of the X-ray emissions (their intensity and spatial extent) laboratory measurements have been carred out at the JPL Highly-Charged Ion Facility [1]. The projectiles have been partially- and fully-stripped H, He, C, N, O, and Ne ions interacting with the comet molecules He, H2, CO, CO2, and H2O. Absolute CE cross sections have been measured, and normalized X-ray emission cross sections reported for these major HCI components of the solar wind [2-5]. The minor, heavier HCI components will produce high-energy X-rays. A large body of data has been acquired on Fe(5-13)+[6]. The experimental approach will be discussed and results given. Future work will be extended to Mgq+ charge states, and include as well NH3 as the target. R. Mawhorter thanks the National Research Council for a fellowship though the NASA-NRC program. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and was supported under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  7. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Joshua J., E-mail: joshuat@slac.stanford.edu; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Hwang, Harold Y. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Staub, Urs [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Johnson, Steven [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 16, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mitra, Ankush; Swiggers, Michele; Noonan, Peter; Curiel, G. Ivan; Holmes, Michael [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-11

    This paper describes new instrumentation developments at the LCLS for materials studies using THz laser excitation and resonant soft X-ray scattering. This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm{sup −1} electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  8. X-ray excited luminescence of polystyrene composites loaded with SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkiv, T.M.; Halyatkin, O.O.; Vistovskyy, V.V. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 8a Kyryla i Mefodiya St., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Hevyk, V.B. [Ivano-Frankivsk National Technical University of Oil and Gas, 15 Karpatska St., 76019 Ivano-Frankivsk (Ukraine); Yakibchuk, P.M. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 8a Kyryla i Mefodiya St., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Gektin, A.V. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, NAS of Ukraine, 60 Lenina Ave, 61001 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Voloshinovskii, A.S. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 8a Kyryla i Mefodiya St., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2017-03-01

    The polystyrene film nanocomposites of 0.3 mm thickness with embedded SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles up to 40 wt% have been synthesized. The luminescent and kinetic properties of the polystyrene composites with embedded SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles upon the pulse X-ray excitation have been investigated. The luminescence intensity of the pure polystyrene scintillator film significantly increases when it is loaded with the inorganic SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles. The film nanocomposites show fast (∼2.8 ns) and slow (∼700 ns) luminescence decay components typical for a luminescence of polystyrene activators (p-Terphenyl and POPOP) and SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles, respectively. It is revealed that the fast decay luminescence component of the polystyrene composites is caused by the excitation of polystyrene by the photoelectrons escaped from the nanoparticles due to photoeffect, and the slow component is caused by reabsorption of the self-trapped exciton luminescence of SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles by polystyrene.

  9. Intragroup and Galaxy-linked Diffuse X-ray Emission In Hickson Compact Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Mulchaey, John S.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Cardiff, Ann; Johnson, Kelsey E.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L(sub X-Tau) relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L(sub X-sigma) relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L(sub X) increases with decreasing group Hi to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on Hi morphology whereby systems with intragroup Hi indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L(sub X) of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  10. INTRAGROUP AND GALAXY-LINKED DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Hornschemeier, Ann E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Johnson, Kelsey E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3813, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Zabludoff, Ann I., E-mail: tdesjar@uwo.ca [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 95721 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L{sub X} -T relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L{sub X} -{sigma} relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L{sub X} increases with decreasing group H I to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on H I morphology whereby systems with intragroup H I indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L{sub X} of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  11. Exploring the Diffuse X-ray Emission of Supernova Remnant Kesteven 69 with XMM-Newton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Ae Seo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the X-ray emission from the shock-heated plasma of the Galactic supernova remnant Kesteven 69 with XMM-Newton. Assuming the plasma is at collisional ionization equilibrium, a plasma temperature and a column absorption are found to be kT ~ 0.62 keV and NH ~ 2.85 ×1022 cm-2 respectively by imaging spectroscopy. Together with the deduced emission measure, we place constraints on its Sedov parameters.

  12. EVIDENCE FOR ELEVATED X-RAY EMISSION IN LOCAL LYMAN BREAK GALAXY ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu-Zych, Antara R.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Ptak, Andrew F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Goncalves, Thiago S. [Observatorio do Valongo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ladeira Pedro Antonio 43, Saude, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, CEP 22240-060 (Brazil); Fragos, Tassos [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Overzier, Roderik A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Schiminovich, David, E-mail: antara.r.basu-zych@nasa.gov [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Our knowledge of how X-ray emission scales with star formation at the earliest times in the universe relies on studies of very distant Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). In this paper, we study the relationship between the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity (L{sub X}), assumed to originate from X-ray binaries (XRBs), and star formation rate (SFR) in ultraviolet (UV) selected z < 0.1 Lyman break analogs (LBAs). We present Chandra observations for four new Galaxy Evolution Explorer selected LBAs. Including previously studied LBAs, Haro 11 and VV 114, we find that LBAs demonstrate L{sub X}/SFR ratios that are elevated by {approx}1.5{sigma} compared to local galaxies, similar to the ratios found for stacked LBGs in the early universe (z > 2). Unlike some of the composite LBAs studied previously, we show that these LBAs are unlikely to harbor active galactic nuclei, based on their optical and X-ray spectra and the spatial distribution of the X-rays in three spatially extended cases. Instead, we expect that high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) dominate the X-ray emission in these galaxies, based on their high specific SFRs (sSFRs {identical_to} SFR/M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1}), which suggest the prevalence of young stellar populations. Since both UV-selected populations (LBGs and LBAs) have lower dust attenuations and metallicities compared to similar samples of more typical local galaxies, we investigate the effects of dust extinction and metallicity on the L{sub X}/SFR for the broader population of galaxies with high sSFRs (>10{sup -10} yr{sup -1}). The estimated dust extinctions (corresponding to column densities of N{sub H} < 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) are expected to have insignificant effects on observed L{sub X}/SFR ratio for the majority of galaxy samples. We find that the observed relationship between L{sub X}/SFR and metallicity appears consistent with theoretical expectations from XRB population synthesis models. Therefore, we conclude that lower metallicities, related to

  13. Characterizing the X-ray Emission in Small Magellanic Cloud Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Nicole; Auchettl, Katie; Lopez, Laura

    2018-01-01

    The Small Magellanic Cloud is a close, metal-poor galaxy with active star formation, and it has a diverse population of 24 supernova remnants (SNRs) that have been identified at several wavelengths. Past work has characterized the X-ray emission in these sources separately and aimed to constrain their explosive origins from observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton. Three SNRs have possible evidence for Type Ia explosions based on strong Fe-L emission in their X-ray spectra, although the environments and intermediate-mass element abundances are more consistent with those of core-collapse SNe. In this poster, we analyze the archival Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the SMC SNR sample, and we model the sources' X-ray spectra in a systematic way to derive the plasma properties and to constrain the nature of the explosions. In one SNR, we note the presence of an X-ray binary near the source's geometric center, suggesting the compact object was produced in the SN explosion. As one of only three SNRs known in the Local Group to host a binary system, this source is worthy of follow-up investigations to probe explosions of massive stars in binary systems.

  14. Soft X-ray synchrotron radiation investigations of actinidematerials systems utilizing X-ray emission spectroscopy and resonantinelastic X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuh, D.K.; Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.-H.; Nordgren, J.

    2004-01-03

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) methods have been utilized with increasing frequency over the past several years to study topics in actinide science, ranging from those of a fundamental nature to those that address a specifically-targeted technical need. In particular, the emergence of microspectroscopic and fluorescence-based techniques have permitted investigations of actinide materials at sources of soft x-ray SR. Spectroscopic techniques with fluorescence-based detection are useful for actinide investigations since they are sensitive to small amounts of material and the information sampling depth may be varied. These characteristics also serve to simplify both sample preparation and safety considerations. Examples of investigations using these fluorescence techniques will be described along with their results, as well as the prospects for future investigations utilizing these methodologies.

  15. The Origin of X-ray Emission from the Enigmatic Be Star γ Cassiopeiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Oskinova, L.; Russell, C. M. P.; Petre, R.; Enoto, T.; Morihana, K.; Ishida, M.

    2017-11-01

    Gamma Cassiopeiae is an enigmatic Be star with unusually hard, strong X-ray emission compared with normal main-sequence B stars. The origin has been debated for decades between two theories: mass accretion onto a hidden compact companion and a magnetic dynamo driven by the star-Be disk differential rotation. There has been no decisive signature found that supports either theory, such as a pulse in X-ray emission or the presence of large-scale magnetic field. In a ~100 ksec duration observation of the star with the Suzaku X-ray observatory in 2011, we detected six rapid X-ray spectral hardening events called ``softness dips''. All the softness dip events show symmetric softness ratio variations, and some of them have flat bottoms apparently due to saturation. The softness dip spectra are best described by either ~40% or ~70% partial covering absorption to kT ~12 keV plasma emission by matter with a neutral hydrogen column density of ~2 - 8 × 1021cm-2, while the spectrum outside of these dips is almost free of absorption. This result suggests that two distinct X-ray emitting spots in the γ Cas system, perhaps on a white dwarf companion with dipole mass accretion, are occulted by blobs in the Be stellar wind, the Be disk, or rotating around the white dwarf companion. The formation of a Be star and white dwarf binary system requires mass transfer between two stars; γ Cas may have experienced such activity in the past.

  16. Probing Transient Valence Orbital Changes with Picosecond Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    March, Anne Marie; Assefa, Tadesse A.; Boemer, Christina

    2017-01-01

    valence orbitals to the nascent core-hole. Vtc-XES offers particular insight into the molecular orbitals directly involved in the light-driven dynamics; a change in the metal ligand orbital overlap results in an intensity reduction and a blue energy shift in agreement with our theoretical calculations......We probe the dynamics of valence electrons in photoexcited [Fe(terpy)2]2+ in solution to gain deeper insight into the Fe ligand bond changes. We use hard X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), which combines element specificity and high penetration with sensitivity to orbital structure, making...... it a powerful technique for molecular studies in a wide variety of environments. A picosecond-time-resolved measurement of the complete Is X-ray emission spectrum captures the transient photoinduced changes and includes the weak valence-to-core (vtc) emission lines that correspond to transitions from occupied...

  17. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joshua J; Dakovski, Georgi L; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Hwang, Harold Y; Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Staub, Urs; Johnson, Steven; Mitra, Ankush; Swiggers, Michele; Noonan, Peter; Curiel, G Ivan; Holmes, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm(-1) electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  18. Electronic structure and optical properties of CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures from X-ray absorption near edge structure, X-ray excited optical luminescence, and density functional theory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M. W. [DESY (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron), FS-PEX, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Yiu, Y. M., E-mail: yyiu@uwo.ca; Sham, T. K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A5B7 (Canada); Ward, M. J. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Liu, L. [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Soochow University-Western University Center for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu, 215123 (China); Hu, Y. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N2V3 (Canada); Zapien, J. A. [Center Of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Liu, Yingkai [Institute of Physics and Electronic Information, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, Yunnan, 650500 (China)

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure and optical properties of a series of iso-electronic and iso-structural CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures have been investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray excited optical luminescence at various absorption edges of Cd, S, and Se. It is found that the system exhibits compositions, with variable local structure in-between that of CdS and CdSe accompanied by tunable optical band gap between that of CdS and CdSe. Theoretical calculation using density functional theory has been carried out to elucidate the observations. It is also found that luminescence induced by X-ray excitation shows new optical channels not observed previously with laser excitation. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  19. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  20. Charge Exchange X-Ray Emission due to Highly Charged Ion Collisions with H, He, and H2: Line Ratios for Heliospheric and Interstellar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, R. S.; Mullen, P. D.; Lyons, D.; Shelton, R. L.; Fogle, M.; Schultz, D. R.; Stancil, P. C.

    2018-01-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere, planetary exospheres, and supernova remnants. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly excited, high-charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays. To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate these environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, molecular-orbital close-coupling, and classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities relevant to astrophysics. X-ray spectra were computed for collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2 with results compared to available experimental data. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant and the heliosphere are shown as examples with ion velocity dependence.

  1. Origin of magnetic circular dichroism in soft x-ray fluorescence of Heusler alloys at threshold excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yablonskikh, M. V.; Yarmoshenko, Yu. M.; Grebennikov, V. I.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Butorin, S. M.; Duda, L.-C.; Nordgren, J.; Plogmann, S.; Neumann, M.

    2001-06-15

    The results of investigations of the Heusler alloys NiMnSb and Co{sub 2}MnSb by magnetic circular dichroism in soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (SXEMCD) are presented. The data obtained are in a good agreement with theoretical calculations of x-ray emission. A very intense resonant inelastic peak in the Mn L{sub 3} spectra in the region of states above the nominal Fermi level was observed and attributed to x-ray reemission. The interplay between the theoretically predicted half-metallic character of the Mn 3d valence band and the Mn L{sub 2},L{sub 3} SXEMCD spectra is discussed.

  2. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  3. Diffuse X-ray emission from the superbubbles N70 and N185 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Iturbide, J.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Velázquez, P. F. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70–543, D.F. México (Mexico); Rosado, M.; Sánchez-Cruces, M. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70–264, C.P. 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Ambrocio-Cruz, P. [Instituto de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Ciudad Universitaria, Km 4.5 Carretera Pachuca-Tulancingo, Col. Carboneras, C.P. 42184, Mineral de la Reforma, Hgo. (Mexico)

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of the diffuse X-ray emission from superbubbles (SBs) N70 (DEM L301) and N185 (DEM L25) located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on data from the XMM-Newton Satellite. We obtained spectra and images of these objects in the soft X-ray energy band. These X-ray spectra were fitted by a thermal plasma model, with temperatures of 2.6×10{sup 6} K and 2.3×10{sup 6} K, for N70 and N185, respectively. For N70, images show that X-ray emission comes from the inner regions of the SB when we compare the distribution of the X-ray and the optical emission, while for N185, the X-ray emission is partially confined by the optical shell. We suggest that the observed X-ray emission is caused by shock-heated gas, inside of the optical shells. We also obtained X-ray luminosities which exceed the values predicted by the standard analytical model. This fact shows that, in addition to the winds of the interior stars, it is necessary to consider another ingredient in the description, such as a supernova explosion, as has been proposed in previous numerical models.

  4. X-ray narrow emission lines from the nuclear region of NGC 1365

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whewell, M.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Page, M. J.

    2016-11-01

    Context. NGC 1365 is a Seyfert 2 galaxy with a starburst ring in its nuclear region. In this work we look at the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) data from four 2012-13, three 2007 and two 2004 observations of NGC 1365, in order to analyse and characterise in a uniform way the soft X-ray narrow-line emitting gas in the nucleus. Aims: We characterise the narrow-line emitting gas visible by XMM-Newton RGS and make comparisons between the 2012-13 spectra and those from 2004-07, already published. Methods: This source is usually absorbed within the soft X-ray band, with a typical neutral column density of >1.5 × 1023 cm-2, and only one observation of the nine we investigate shows low enough absorption for the continuum to emerge in the soft X-rays. We stack all observations from 2004-07, and separately three of the four observations from 2012-13, analysing the less absorbed observation separately. We first model the spectra using Gaussian profiles representing the narrow line emission. We fit physically motivated models to the 2012-13 stacked spectra, with collisionally ionised components representing the starburst emission and photoionised line emission models representing the AGN line emission. The collisional and photoionised emission line models are fitted together (rather than holding either one constant), on top of a physical continuum and absorption model. Results: The X-ray narrow emission line spectrum of NGC 1365 is well represented by a combination of two collisionally ionised (kT of 220 ± 10 and 570 ± 15 eV) and three photoionised (log ξ of 1.5 ± 0.2, 2.5 ± 0.2, 1.1 ± 0.2) phases of emitting gas, all with higher than solar nitrogen abundances. This physical model was fitted to the 2012-13 stacked spectrum, and yet also fits well to the 2004-07 stacked spectrum, without changing any characteristics of the emitting gas phases. Our 2004-07 results are consistent with previous emission line work using these data, with five additional

  5. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of protein crystals: a new tool for studying radiation damage during diffraction data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robin L; Yorke, Briony A; Pearson, Arwen R

    2012-05-01

    During X-ray irradiation protein crystals radiate energy in the form of small amounts of visible light. This is known as X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL). The XEOL of several proteins and their constituent amino acids has been characterized using the microspectrophotometers at the Swiss Light Source and Diamond Light Source. XEOL arises primarily from aromatic amino acids, but the effects of local environment and quenching within a crystal mean that the XEOL spectrum of a crystal is not the simple sum of the spectra of its constituent parts. Upon repeated exposure to X-rays XEOL spectra decay non-uniformly, suggesting that XEOL is sensitive to site-specific radiation damage. However, rates of XEOL decay were found not to correlate to decays in diffracting power, making XEOL of limited use as a metric for radiation damage to protein crystals. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  6. Modeling X-ray and gamma-ray emission in the intrabinary shock of pulsar binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, H.

    2017-10-01

    We present broadband SED and light curve, and a wind interaction model for the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856 (J1018) which exhibits double peaks in the X-ray light curve. Assuming that the X-ray to low-energy gamma-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation and high-energy gamma rays by inverse Compton scattering in the intrabinary shock (IBS), we model the broadband SED and light curve of J1018 using a two-component model having slow electrons in the shock and fast bulk-accelerated electrons at the skin of the shock. The model explains the broadband SED and light curve of J1018 qualitatively well. In particular, modeling the synchrotron emission constrains the orbital geometry. We discuss potential use of the model for other pulsar binaries.

  7. Second launch of the Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Sapkota, Dhaka

    2016-04-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) is a sounding rocket mission to study the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX) and Local Hot Bubble (LHB) X-ray emission. After a successful launch of December 2012, DXL’s capabilities were expanded by using two additional proportional counters and three unique filters for the launch of December 2015. Employing Be-, B- and C-based plastic filters, DXL mission re-scanned the Helium Focusing Cone for better spectral and positional information (to address the IBEX controversy). In this paper, we will review the upgraded mission hardware and performance, while sharing some preliminary results from the latest observation.Submitted for the DXL Collaboration

  8. Measurements of laser generated soft X-ray emission from irradiated gold foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J. S.; Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Shvarts, D. [University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Frank, Y.; Raicher, E.; Fraenkel, M. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    2016-11-15

    Soft x-ray emission from laser irradiated gold foils was measured at the Omega-60 laser system using the Dante photodiode array. The foils were heated with 2 kJ, 6 ns laser pulses and foil thicknesses were varied between 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μm. Initial Dante analysis indicates peak emission temperatures of roughly 100 eV and 80 eV for the 0.5 μm and 1.0 μm thick foils, respectively, with little measurable emission from the 2.0 μm foils.

  9. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  10. Resolving the hard X-ray emission of GX 5-1 with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paizis, A.; Ebisawa, K.; Tikkanen, T.

    2005-01-01

    contamination from the nearby black hole candidate GRS 1758-258 above 20 keV. During our observations, GX 5-1 was mostly found in the horizontal and normal branch of its hardness intensity diagram. A clear hard X-ray emission is observed above similar to 30 keV which exceeds the exponential cut-off spectrum......We present the study of one year of INTEGRAL data on the neutron star low mass X-ray binary GX 5-1. Thanks to the excellent angular resolution and sensitivity of INTEGRAL, we are able to obtain a high quality spectrum of GX 5-1 from similar to 5keV to similar to 100 keV, for the first time without...

  11. Evidence for Intermediate Polars as the Origin of the Galactic Center Hard X-ray Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Perez, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, unresolved hard (20-40 keV) X-ray emission has been discovered within the central 10 pc of the Galaxy, possibly indicating a large population of intermediate polars (IPs). Chandra and XMM-Newton measurements in the surrounding ∼50 pc imply a much lighter population of IPs with 〈MWD〉≈0.5H...... estimated white dwarf mass. Observations of the inner 10 pc can be accounted for by IPs with 〈MWD〉≈0.9M⊙, consistent with that of the CV population in general and the X-ray observed field IPs in particular. The lower mass derived by Chandra and XMM-Newton appears to be an artifact of narrow energy...

  12. A Benchmark Experiment for Photoionized Plasma Emission from Accretion-Powered X-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, G.; Bailey, J.; Nagayama, T.; Hansen, S.; Rochau, G.; Liedahl, D.; Fontes, C.; Kallman, T.; Mancini, R.

    2017-10-01

    Accretion-powered emission from X-ray binaries or black-hole accretion in Active Galactic Nuclei is a powerful diagnostic for their behavior and structure. Interpretation of x-ray emission from these objects requires a spectral synthesis model for photoionized plasma. Models must predict the photoionized charge state distribution, the photon emission processes, and the radiation transport influence on the observed emission. At the Z facility, we have measured simultaneously emission and absorption from a photoionized silicon plasma suitable to benchmark photoionization and spectrum formation models with +/-5% reproducibility and E/dE >2500 spectral resolution. Plasma density, temperature, and charge state distribution are determined with absorption spectroscopy. Self-emission measured at adjustable column densities tests radiation transport effects. Observation of 14 transitions in He-like silicon will help understand population mechanisms in a photoionized plasma. First observation of radiative recombination continuum in a photoionized plasma will be presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA-0003525.

  13. Investigating Quasar Diversity using UV, X-ray, and Emission-line Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briana Rivera, Angelica; Richards, Gordon; Shemmer, Ohad; Gallagher, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the diversity of quasars through the analysis of their UV (Sheldon et al, these proceedings), X-ray, and emission-line properties. We concentrate on a sample of 25 radio-quiet SDSS quasars with HST observations that all have similar optical luminosities and redshifts (z~0.5). These objects fill gaps in the sample of “reverberation mapped (RM)” quasars in terms of their CIV parameter space (CIV EQW vs. CIV blueshift). In addition to exploring their UV properties, we use Chandra observations to analyze their X-ray properties (Γ, αox, Δαox), in order to determine how accretion disk winds (which are regulated by αox) contribute to the diversity of UV emission-line properties in quasars. We compare optical and X-ray derived values of L/LEdd , as Γ has been shown to be an indicator of the accretion rate. We are able to determine Γ for 7 quasars from the Chandra sample with over 100 counts. Preliminary data reduction demonstrates that all of the quasars observed with over 100 counts have similar values of αox and Δαox (averaging ~ -1.56 and ~0.42, respectively), while those below 100 counts lie within a wider, weaker range (average αox ~ -1.78, and average Δαox ~0.2). With the combined UV and X-ray data, we explore the differences between quasars and attempt to understand how/when quasars can have high L/LEdd, but show little evidence for strong winds.

  14. X-RAY ABSORPTION, NUCLEAR INFRARED EMISSION, AND DUST COVERING FACTORS OF AGNs: TESTING UNIFICATION SCHEMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Barcons, X. [Instituto de Física de Cantabria (CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria), E-39005, Santander (Spain); Ramos, A. Asensio; Almeida, C. Ramos [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Watson, M. G.; Blain, A. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Caccianiga, A.; Ballo, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Brera 28, I-20121 Milano (Italy); Braito, V., E-mail: mateos@ifca.unican.es [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2016-03-10

    We present the distributions of the geometrical covering factors of the dusty tori (f{sub 2}) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGNs drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGNs have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2–10 keV luminosities between 10{sup 42} and 10{sup 46} erg s{sup −1}, and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work, we determined the rest-frame 1–20 μm continuum emission from the torus, which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGNs are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGNs having, on average, tori with higher f{sub 2} than type 1 AGNs. Nevertheless, ∼20% of type 1 AGNs have tori with large covering factors, while ∼23%–28% of type 2 AGNs have tori with small covering factors. Low f{sub 2} are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGNs the effect is certainly small. f{sub 2} increases with the X-ray column density, which implies that dust extinction and X-ray absorption take place in material that share an overall geometry and most likely belong to the same structure, the putative torus. Based on our results, the viewing angle, AGN luminosity, and also f{sub 2} determine the optical appearance of an AGN and control the shape of the rest-frame ∼1–20 μm nuclear continuum emission. Thus, the torus geometrical covering factor is a key ingredient of unification schemes.

  15. Implications of heavy-ion-induced satellite x-ray emission. III. Chemical effects in high resolution sulfur K/sub. cap alpha. / x-ray spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vane, C.R.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Kahane, S.; McDaniel, F.D.; Milner, W.T.; Raman, S.; Rosseel, T.M.; Slaughter, G.G.; Varghese, S.L.; Young, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    High resolution (approx. 7 eV at 2.3 keV) sulfur K/sub ..cap alpha../ x-ray spectra have been obtained for a series of sulfur compound targets under heavy ion impact at the Holified Heavy Ion Facility. The spectra observed are dominated by a series of satellite peaks arising from varying degrees of L-shell ionization at the time of x-ray emission. Each spectral profile has been parameterized by a single variable p/sub L/, the apparent average L-shell ionization probability. Correlations are evident between p/sub L/ and the corresponding sulfur atom chemical environment. Much stronger correlations are however found for variations of some individual peak intensities with specific chemical parameters. Comparison of results for Ar/sup q+/ and Kr/sup q+/ projectiles shows that while L-shell ionization probability has increased, chemical sensitivity has apparently saturated.

  16. Modelling the thermal X-ray emission around the Galactic centre from colliding Wolf-Rayet winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher M. P.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2017-11-01

    We compute the thermal X-ray emission from hydrodynamic simulations of the 30 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting within a parsec of Sgr A*, with the aim of interpreting the Chandra X-ray observations of this region. The model well reproduces the spectral shape of the observations, indicating that the shocked WR winds are the dominant source of this thermal emission. The model X-ray flux is tied to the strength of the Sgr A* outflow, which clears out hot gas from the vicinity of Sgr A*. A moderate outflow best fits the present-day observations, even though this supermassive black hole (SMBH) outflow ended ~100 yr ago.

  17. The Relation Between Magnetic Fields and X-ray Emission for Solar Microflares and Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.

    2017-09-01

    We present the result of a comparison between magnetic field parameters and the intensity of X-ray emission for solar microflares with Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) classes from A0.02 to B5.1. For our study, we used the monochromatic MgXII Imaging Spectroheliometer (MISH), the Full-disk EUV Telescope (FET), and the Solar PHotometer in X-rays (SphinX) instruments onboard the Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun-Photon CORONAS- Photon spacecraft because of their high sensitivity in soft X-rays. The peak flare flux (PFF) for solar microflares was found to depend on the strength of the magnetic field and on the total unsigned magnetic flux as a power-law function. In the spectral range 2.8 - 36.6 Å, which shows very little increase related to microflares, the power-law index of the relation between the X-ray flux and magnetic flux for active regions is 1.48 ±0.86, which is close to the value obtained previously by Pevtsov et al. ( Astrophys. J. 598, 1387, 2003) for different types of solar and stellar objects. In the spectral range 1 - 8 Å, the power-law indices for PFF(B) and PFF(Φ) for microflares are 3.87 ±2.16 and 3 ±1.6, respectively. We also make suggestions on the heating mechanisms in active regions and microflares under the assumption of loops with constant pressure and heating using the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana scaling laws.

  18. The Comptonization of accretion disc X-ray emission: consequences for X-ray reflection and the geometry of AGN coronae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, D. R.; Gallo, L. C.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the Comptonization of the photons that make up the relativistically blurred reflection that is commonly detected from the accretion discs of active galactic nuclei by the coronae of energetic particles believed to give rise to the powerful X-ray continua by the inverse-Compton scattering of thermal seed photons from the disc. Recent measurements of the emissivity profiles of accretion discs as well as reverberation time lags between the primary X-ray continuum and the reflection suggest that this corona is situated at a low height above the disc and extends radially, tens of gravitational radii over the disc surface, hence should also Compton scatter the reflected X-rays. We find that the detection of blurred reflection from as close in as the innermost stable circular orbits (ISCOs) of maximally rotating black holes is consistent with such coronae, but requires that the corona be patchy, consisting perhaps of a number of isolated flares throughout the region. Considering only the requirement that it be possible to detect reflection from the ISCO, we find that at any given moment, the covering fraction of the inner part of the accretion disc by the corona needs to be less than 85 per cent, although the detection of `reflection-dominated' spectra in which the total reflected flux exceeds that seen in the continuum requires covering fractions as low as 50 or 25 per cent.

  19. Discovery of radio emission from the symbiotic X-ray binary system GX 1+4

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eijnden, J.; Degenaar, N.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Wijnands, R.; Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Rupen, M. P.

    2018-02-01

    We report the discovery of radio emission from the accreting X-ray pulsar and symbiotic X-ray binary GX 1+4 with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. This is the first radio detection of such a system, wherein a strongly magnetized neutron star accretes from the stellar wind of an M-type giant companion. We measure a 9 GHz radio flux density of 105.3 ± 7.3 μJy, but cannot place meaningful constraints on the spectral index due to a limited frequency range. We consider several emission mechanisms that could be responsible for the observed radio source. We conclude that the observed properties are consistent with shocks in the interaction of the accretion flow with the magnetosphere, a synchrotron-emitting jet, or a propeller-driven outflow. The stellar wind from the companion is unlikely to be the origin of the radio emission. If the detected radio emission originates from a jet, it would show that strong magnetic fields (≥1012 G) do not necessarily suppress jet formation.

  20. Conduction-Zone Measurements Using X-Ray Self-Emission Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. K.; Michel, D. T.; Sefkow, A.; Ding, Y. H.; Epstein, R.; Hu, S. X.; Knauer, J. P.; Froula, D. H.

    2017-10-01

    Time-gated soft x-ray self-emission images of directly driven implosions were measured to probe the hydrodynamic conditions between the critical-density surface and the ablation front of a CH target (conduction zone) at the beginning of a laser pulse. The self-emission at each point in the coronal plasma depends on the local electron temperature and the ion density, and the intensity measured at the diagnostic plane is the line-integrated emissivity through the target. Measured 2-D images of spherically symmetric implosions were angularly averaged and compared with synthetic self-emission profiles generated from 1-D hydrodynamic simulations to benchmark the hydrodynamic parameters in the corona. This comparison was performed for a range of times early in the implosion to study the formation and evolution of the conduction zone. This measurement is significant for inertial confinement fusion since it governs the length of time that the plasma is too small to provide substantial beam smoothing through thermal conduction, determining the laser imprint efficiency. The conduction zone has previously proven challenging to probe because the density is too high for optical diagnostics and because the temperature is too high for x-ray radiography. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  1. Intrinsic disc emission and the soft X-ray excess in active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, Chris; Davis, S. W.; Jin, C.; Blaes, O.; Ward, M.

    2012-03-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies have low-mass black holes and mass accretion rates close to (or exceeding) Eddington, so a standard blackbody accretion disc should peak in the extreme ultraviolet. However, the lack of true absorption opacity in the disc means that the emission is better approximated by a colour temperature corrected blackbody, and this colour temperature correction is large enough (˜2.4) that the bare disc emission from a zero spin black hole can extend into the soft X-ray bandpass. Part of the soft X-ray excess seen in these objects must be intrinsic emission from the disc unless the vertical structure is very different to that predicted. None the less, this is not the whole story even for the extreme NLS1 as the shape of the soft excess is much broader than predicted by a bare disc spectrum, indicating some Compton upscattering by warm, optically thick material. We associate this with the disc itself, so it must ultimately be powered by mass accretion. We build an energetically self-consistent model assuming that the emission thermalizes to a (colour temperature corrected) blackbody only at large radii. At smaller radii the gravitational energy is split between powering optically thick Comptonized disc emission (forming the soft X-ray excess) and an optically thin corona above the disc (forming the tail to higher energies). We show examples of this model fit to the extreme NLS1 RE J1034+396, and to the much lower Eddington fraction broad-line Seyfert 1 PG 1048+231. We use these to guide our fits and interpretations of three template spectra made from co-adding multiple sources to track out a sequence of active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra as a function of L/LEdd. Both the individual objects and template spectra show the surprising result that the Compton upscattered soft X-ray excess decreases in importance with increasing L/LEdd. The strongest soft excesses are associated with low mass accretion rate AGN rather than being tied to some

  2. ORIGIN OF THE GALACTIC DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION: IRON K-SHELL LINE DIAGNOSTICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobukawa, Masayoshi [Department of Teacher Training and School Education, Nara University of Education, Takabatake-cho, Nara, 630-8528 (Japan); Uchiyama, Hideki [Faculty of Education, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka, 422-8529 (Japan); Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Koyama, Katsuji [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Yamauchi, Shigeo, E-mail: nobukawa@nara-edu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nara Women’s University, Kitauoyanishimachi, Nara, 630-8506 (Japan)

    2016-12-20

    This paper reports detailed K-shell line profiles of iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) of the Galactic Center X-ray Emission (GCXE), Galactic Bulge X-ray Emission (GBXE), Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE), magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (mCVs), non-magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (non-mCVs), and coronally Active Binaries (ABs). For the study of the origin of the GCXE, GBXE, and GRXE, the spectral analysis is focused on equivalent widths of the Fe i-K α , Fe xxv-He α , and Fe xxvi-Ly α  lines. The global spectrum of the GBXE is reproduced by a combination of the mCVs, non-mCVs, and ABs spectra. On the other hand, the GRXE spectrum shows significant data excesses at the Fe i-K α and Fe xxv-He α  line energies. This means that additional components other than mCVs, non-mCVs, and ABs are required, which have symbiotic phenomena of cold gas and very high-temperature plasma. The GCXE spectrum shows larger excesses than those found in the GRXE spectrum at all the K-shell lines of iron and nickel. Among them the largest ones are the Fe i-K α , Fe xxv-He α , Fe xxvi-Ly α , and Fe xxvi-Ly β  lines. Together with the fact that the scale heights of the Fe i-K α , Fe xxv-He α , and Fe xxvi-Ly α lines are similar to that of the central molecular zone (CMZ), the excess components would be related to high-energy activity in the extreme envelopment of the CMZ.

  3. Comparison Between X-rays Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Measurements on a Ceramic Envelop Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafitte, Bruno; Aubes, Michel; Zissis, Georges

    2007-12-01

    Burners of metal halide lamps used for illumination are generally made of polycrystalline alumina ceramic (PCA) which is translucent to visible light. We show that the difficulty of selecting a line of sight through the lamp prevents the use of optical emission diagnostic. X-rays photons are mainly absorbed and not scattered by PCA. Absorption by mercury atoms contributing to the discharge allowed us to determine the density of mercury in the lamp. By comparing diagnostic methods, we put in evidence the difficulty of taking into account the scattering of light mathematically.

  4. Deka-keV X-ray emission associated with the onset of radio noise storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crosby, N.; Vilmer, N.; Lund, Niels

    1996-01-01

    Radio noise storms show that suprathermal electrons (a few tens of keV) are present in the vicinity of active regions during several hours or even a few days. Where and how these electrons are energized is not yet well known. A flare-like sudden energy release in the active region is in general...... observed at the onset of noise storms, either as a fully developed flare or, more often, as a soft X-ray brightening without conspicuous Her signature. In order to investigate to what extent electrons energized in the active region contribute to the noise-storm emission in the overlying coronal structures...

  5. Quantum coherence in the dynamical excitation, ionization, and decaying of neon gas induced by X-ray laser

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yongqiang; Dong, Wenpu; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    We develop a large scale quantum master equation approach to describe dynamical processes of practical open quantum systems driven by both coherent and stochastic interactions by including more than one thousand true states of the systems, motivated by the development of highly bright and fully coherent lasers in the X-ray wavelength regime. The method combines the processes of coherent dynamics induced by the X-ray laser and incoherent relaxations due to spontaneous emissions, Auger decays, and electronic collisions. As examples, theoretical investigation of {\\it real} coherent dynamics of inner-shell electrons of a neon gas, irradiated by a high-intensity X-ray laser with a full temporal coherence, is carried out with the approach. In contrast to the rate equation treatment, we find that coherence can suppress the multiphoton absorptions of a neon gas in the ultra-intense X-ray pulse, due to coherence-induced Rabi oscillations and power broadening effects. We study the influence of coherence on ionization p...

  6. First light - II. Emission line extinction, population III stars, and X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Kirk S. S.; Wise, John H.; Aykutalp, Aycin; O'Shea, Brian W.; Norman, Michael L.; Xu, Hao

    2018-02-01

    We produce synthetic spectra and observations for metal-free stellar populations and high-mass X-ray binaries in the Renaissance Simulations at a redshift of 15. We extend our methodology from the first paper in the series by modelling the production and extinction of emission lines throughout a dusty and metal-enriched interstellar and circum-galactic media extracted from the simulation, using a Monte Carlo calculation. To capture the impact of high-energy photons, we include all frequencies from hard X-ray to far-infrared with enough frequency resolution to discern line emission and absorption profiles. The most common lines in our sample in order of their rate of occurrence are Ly α, the C IV λλ1548, 1551 doublet, H α, and the Ca II λλλ8498, 8542, 8662 triplet. The best scenario for a direct observation of a metal-free stellar population is a merger between two Population III Galaxies. In mergers between metal-enriched and metal-free stellar populations, some characteristics may be inferred indirectly. Single Population III galaxies are too dim to be observed photometrically at z = 15. Ly α emission is discernible by JWST as an increase in J200w - J277w colour off the intrinsic stellar tracks. Observations of metal-free stars will be difficult, though not impossible, with the next generation of space telescopes.

  7. X-RAY EMISSION FROM STELLAR JETS BY COLLISION AGAINST HIGH-DENSITY MOLECULAR CLOUDS: AN APPLICATION TO HH 248

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Santiago, J.; Ustamujic, S.; Castro, A. I. Gómez de [S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Bonito, R.; Orlando, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Orellana, M. [Sede Andina de la Universidad Nacional de Río Negro (Argentina); Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Sede Atlántica de la Universidad Nacional de Río Negro, Don Bosco y Leloir s/n, 8500 Viedma RN (Argentina); Castro, E. de [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Facultad de Física, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the plausibility of detecting X-ray emission from a stellar jet that impacts a dense molecular cloud, a scenario that may be typical for classical T Tauri stars with jets in dense star-forming complexes. We first model the impact of a jet against a dense cloud using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, exploring different configurations of the ambient environment. Then, we compare our results with XMM-Newton observations of the Herbig–Haro object HH 248, where extended X-ray emission aligned with the optical knots is detected at the edge of the nearby IC 434 cloud. Our simulations show that a jet can produce plasma with temperatures up to 10{sup 7} K, consistent with production of X-ray emission, after impacting a dense cloud. We find that jets denser than the ambient medium but less dense than the cloud produce detectable X-ray emission only at impact with the cloud. From an exploration of the model parameter space, we constrain the physical conditions (jet density and velocity and cloud density) that reproduce the intrinsic luminosity and emission measure of the X-ray source possibly associated with HH 248 well. Thus, we suggest that the extended X-ray source close to HH 248 corresponds to a jet impacting a dense cloud.

  8. Large enhancement of X-ray excited luminescence in Ga-doped ZnO nanorod arrays by hydrogen annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianli; Liu, Xiaoliln; Gu, Mu; Li, Fengrui; Zhang, Juannan; Wu, Qiang; Huang, Shiming; Liu, Si

    2018-03-01

    Highly c-axis oriented and densely packed ZnO:Ga nanorod arrays were fabricated on ZnO-seeded substrates by hydrothermal method, and the effect of hydrogen annealing on their morphology, structure and luminescence properties was investigated in detail. Under ultraviolet or X-ray excitation, an intense ultraviolet luminescence appeared in the hydrogen-annealed samples owing to the formation of a shallow hydrogen donor state, which can sharply activate the reconbination radiation. The luminescence intensity increased with the annealing temperature, and then decreased at a higher temperature due to the dissociation of the hydrogen ion. The optimum concentration and time of hydrogen annealing were acquired simultaneously. It is expected that the ZnO:Ga nanorod array is a promising candidate for application in ultrafast and high-spatial-resolution X-ray imaging detector.

  9. An Exploration of the Emission Properties of X-Ray Bright Points Seen with SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, S. H.; Elsden, T.; Muglach, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a study of X-ray Bright Point (XBP) EUV emission and its dependence on other properties. The XBPs were located using a new, automated XBP finder for AlA developed as part of the Feature Finding Team for SDO Computer Vision. We analyze XBPs near disk center, comparing AlA EUV fluxes, HMI LOS magnetic fields, and photospheric flow fields (derived from HMI data) to look for relationships between XBP emission, magnetic flux, velocity fields, and XBP local environment. We find some evidence for differences in the mean XBP temperature with environment. Unsigned magnetic flux is correlated with XBP emission, though other parameters play a role. The majority of XBP footpoints are approaching each other, though at a slight angle from head-on on average. We discuss the results in the context of XBP heating.

  10. Physiologically gated microbeam radiation using a field emission x-ray source array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel, E-mail: PavelC@unc.edu, E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, 152 MacNider Hall, Campus Box 7575, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Burk, Laurel; Inscoe, Christina; Ger, Rachel; Hadsell, Michael; Lu, Jianping [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Phillips Hall, CB #3255, 120 East Cameron Avenue, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yuan, Hong [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, 2006 Old Clinic, CB #7510, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhang, Lei [Department of Applied Physical Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapman Hall, CB#3216, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, 101 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, 101 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 (United States); Zhou, Otto, E-mail: PavelC@unc.edu, E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Phillips Hall, CB #3255, 120 East Cameron Avenue, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, 101 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses narrow planes of high dose radiation beams to treat cancerous tumors. This experimental therapy method based on synchrotron radiation has been shown to spare normal tissue at up to 1000 Gy of peak entrance dose while still being effective in tumor eradication and extending the lifetime of tumor-bearing small animal models. Motion during treatment can lead to significant movement of microbeam positions resulting in broader beam width and lower peak to valley dose ratio (PVDR), which reduces the effectiveness of MRT. Recently, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of generating microbeam radiation for small animal treatment using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array. The purpose of this study is to incorporate physiological gating to the CNT microbeam irradiator to minimize motion-induced microbeam blurring. Methods: The CNT field emission x-ray source array with a narrow line focal track was operated at 160 kVp. The x-ray radiation was collimated to a single 280 μm wide microbeam at entrance. The microbeam beam pattern was recorded using EBT2 Gafchromic{sup ©} films. For the feasibility study, a strip of EBT2 film was attached to an oscillating mechanical phantom mimicking mouse chest respiratory motion. The servo arm was put against a pressure sensor to monitor the motion. The film was irradiated with three microbeams under gated and nongated conditions and the full width at half maximums and PVDRs were compared. An in vivo study was also performed with adult male athymic mice. The liver was chosen as the target organ for proof of concept due to its large motion during respiration compared to other organs. The mouse was immobilized in a specialized mouse bed and anesthetized using isoflurane. A pressure sensor was attached to a mouse's chest to monitor its respiration. The output signal triggered the electron extraction voltage of the field emission source such that x-ray was generated only

  11. Energetic electrons, hard x-ray emission and MHD activity studies in the IR-T1 tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, K Mikaili; Ghoranneviss, M; Elahi, A Salar

    2015-01-01

    Determinations of plasma parameters as well as the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) activity, energetic electrons energy and energy confinement time are essential for future fusion reactors experiments and optimized operation. Also some of the plasma information can be deduced from these parameters, such as plasma equilibrium, stability, and MHD instabilities. In this contribution we investigated the relation between energetic electrons, hard x-ray emission and MHD activity in the IR-T1 Tokamak. For this purpose we used the magnetic diagnostics and a hard x-ray spectroscopy in IR-T1 tokamak. A hard x-ray emission is produced by collision of the runaway electrons with the plasma particles or limiters. The mean energy was calculated from the slope of the energy spectrum of hard x-ray photons.

  12. X-ray emission on hybird stars: ROSAT observations of alpha Trianguli Australis and iota Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, V.; Rosner, R.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.

    1994-01-01

    We report on deep ROSAT observations of two Hybrid atmosphere stars, alpha TrA and iota Aur, and our analysis of these observations. We detect high-energy transient phenomena on alpha TrA and consider the implications of this discovery to the atmospheres of Hybrid stars. We detect iota Aur in the high-energy passband of ROSAT, implying the existence of multimillion degree plasma on the star. Our major results include the following: discovery of two large flare events, detected during pointed observations of alpha TrA; the demonstration that the flare emission most likely comes from the giant itself, rather than from a previously unseen low-mass companion star; the demonstration that the plasma characteristics associated with the flares and with the 'quiescent' component are essentially indistinguishable; and that the geometric dimensions of the emitting plasma are considerably smaller than the critical dimension characterizing stable 'hot' coronal loop structures. Our results suggest that alpha TrA does not have any steady X-ray emission consistent with theoretical expectations, and support the argument that Hybrid stars constitute a transitional type of object in which large-scale magnetic dynamo activity ceases, and the dominant spatial scales characterizing coronal structure rapidly decline as such stars evolve across the X-ray 'Dividing Line' in the H-R diagram.

  13. Wind-embedded shocks in FASTWIND: X-ray emission and K-shell absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, L. P.; Puls, J.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Hoffmann, T. L.

    2017-11-01

    EUV and X-ray radiation emitted from wind-embedded shocks can affect the ionization balance in the outer atmospheres of massive stars, and can also be the mechanism responsible for producing highly ionized atoms detected in the wind UV spectra. To investigate these processes, we implemented the emission from wind-embedded shocks and related physics into our atmosphere/spectrum synthesis code FASTWIND. We also account for the high energy absorption of the cool wind, by adding important K-shell opacities. Various tests justfying our approach have been described by Carneiro+(2016, A&A 590, A88). In particular, we studied the impact of X-ray emission on the ionization balance of important elements. In almost all the cases, the lower ionization stages (O iv, N iv, P v) are depleted and the higher stages (N v, O v, O vi) become enhanced. Moreover, also He lines (in particular He ii 1640 and He ii 4686) can be affected as well. Finally, we carried out an extensive discussion of the high-energy mass absorption coefficient, κν, regarding its spatial variation and dependence on T eff. We found that (i) the approximation of a radially constant κν can be justified for r >= 1.2R * and λ <= 18 Å, and also for many models at longer wavelengths. (ii) In order to estimate the actual value of this quantity, however, the He ii background needs to be considered from detailed modeling.

  14. H- and He-like Charge-Exchange Induced X-ray Emission due to Ion Collisions with H, He, and H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, Renata; Mullen, Patrick; Miller, Ansley; Lyons, David; Shelton, Robin L.; Schultz, David R.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.

    2017-08-01

    When a hot plasma collides with a cold neutral gas interactions occur between the microscopic constituents including charge exchange (CX). CX is a process in which an electron can be transferred from a neutral atom or molecule into an excited energy level of an ion. Following this transfer, the excited electron relaxes to lower energy levels, emitting X-rays. This process has been established as a primary source of X-ray emission within our solar system, such as when the solar wind interacts with cometary and planetary atmospheres, and outside of our solar system, such as in the hot outflows of starburst galaxies.Since the CX X-ray emission spectrum varies greatly with collision velocity, it is critical that realistic CX data are included in X-ray spectral models of astrophysical environments in which CX might be significant in order to correctly estimate the ion abundance and plasma velocities. Here, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo methods for a variety of collision energies relevant to various astrophysical environments. Collisions of bare and H-like C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, and Cl ions are shown with H, He, and H2 as the neutral collision targets. An X-ray model using line ratios for C-Si ions is then performed within XSPEC for a region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant for 8 collision energies in order to highlight the variation in CX spectral models with collision energy.R. Cumbee’s research was partially supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at NASA GSFC, administered by Universities Space Research Association under contract with NASA. Work at UGA was partially supported by NASA grants NNX09AC46G and NNG09WF24I.

  15. Nuclear absorption and emission in the AGN merger NGC 6240 : the hard X-ray view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Emanuele

    2017-11-01

    We present the analysis of four NuSTAR observations of the luminous infrared galaxy merger NGC 6240 , hosting a close pair of highly obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Over a period of about 2 yr, the source exhibits hard X-ray variability of the order of 20 per cent, peaking around 20 keV. When the two AGNs are resolved with Chandra , column densities in the range of NH ˜ 1-2 × 1024 cm-2 are estimated for both of them. The exact values are hard to determine, as they appear to depend on aspects that are sometimes overlooked in Compton-thick objects, such as the covering factor of the absorber, iron abundance and the contamination in the Fe K band from foreground hot-gas emission. Nearly spherical covering and slightly subsolar iron abundance are preferred in this case. While the southern nucleus is suggested to be intrinsically more powerful, as also implied by the mid-IR and 2-10 keV brightness ratios, solutions involving a similar X-ray luminosity of the two AGNs cannot be ruled out. The observed variability is rather limited compared to the one revealed by the Swift /BAT light curve, and it can be fully explained by changes in the continuum flux from the two AGNs, without requiring significant column density variations. NGC 6240 is hereby confirmed to represent a unique opportunity to investigate the X-ray (and broad-band) properties of massive galaxy mergers, which were much more frequent in the early Universe.

  16. Kossel interferences of proton-induced X-ray emission lines in periodic multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meiyi; Le Guen, Karine; André, Jean-Michel [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); CNRS UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Ilakovac, Vita [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); CNRS UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Université de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Vickridge, Ian [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, boîte courrier 840, F-75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); CNRS UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, boîte courrier 840, F-75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Schmaus, Didier [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, boîte courrier 840, F-75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); CNRS UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, boîte courrier 840, F-75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Université Paris Diderot-P7, F-75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); and others

    2016-11-01

    The Kossel interferences generated by characteristic X-ray lines produced inside a periodic multilayer have been observed upon proton irradiation, by submitting a Cr/B{sub 4}C/Sc multilayer stack to 2 MeV protons and observing the intensity of the Sc and Cr Kα characteristic emissions as a function of the detection angle. When this angle is close to the Bragg angle corresponding to the emission wavelength and period of the multilayer, an oscillation of the measured intensity is detected. The results are in good agreement with a model based on the reciprocity theorem. The combination of the Kossel measurements and their simulation, will be a useful tool to obtain a good description of the multilayer stack and thus to study nanometer-thick layers and their interfaces.

  17. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5–7.5 × 1013 cm−3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d–4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20–40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  18. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hayato; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sasaki, Akira; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; LHD Experiment Group

    2017-08-01

    The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA) emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5-7.5) × 1013 cm-3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d-4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20-40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  19. Spectral analysis of x-ray emission created by intense laser irradiation of copper materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntington, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P. [Atmospheric, Oceanic, Space Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States); Malamud, G. [Atmospheric, Oceanic, Space Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States); Department of Physics, Nuclear Research Center - Negev, 84190 Beer-Sheva (Israel); Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We have measured the x-ray emission, primarily from K{sub {alpha}},K{sub {beta}}, and He{sub {alpha}} lines, of elemental copper foil and 'foam' targets irradiated with a mid-10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse. The copper foam at 0.1 times solid density is observed to produce 50% greater He{sub {alpha}} line emission than copper foil, and the measured signal is well-fit by a sum of three synthetic spectra generated by the atomic physics code FLYCHK. Additionally, spectra from both targets reveal characteristic inner shell K{sub {alpha}} transitions from hot electron interaction with the bulk copper. However, only the larger-volume foam target produced significant K{sub {beta}} radiation, confirming a lower bulk temperature in the higher volume sample.

  20. Spectrometer for X-ray emission experiments at FERMI free-electron-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, L., E-mail: poletto@dei.unipd.it; Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P. [CNR - Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies (CNR-IFN), via Trasea 7, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Di Cicco, A.; Iesari, F. [Physics Division, School of Science and Technology, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Finetti, P. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Grazioli, C. [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Kivimäki, A. [CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Stagira, S. [Politecnico di Milano – Department of Physics, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Coreno, M. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); CNR – Istituto di Struttura della Materia (CNR-ISM), UOS Basovizza, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    A portable and compact photon spectrometer to be used for photon in-photon out experiments, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy, is presented. The instrument operates in the 25–800 eV energy range to cover the full emissions of the FEL1 and FEL2 stages of FERMI. The optical design consists of two interchangeable spherical varied-lined-spaced gratings and a CCD detector. Different input sections can be accommodated, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror, that allow to mount the spectrometer in different end-stations and at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and at free-electron-laser beamlines. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron (Italy) is presented.

  1. Space- and time-resolved soft x-ray emission from laser-produced magnesium plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S.S.; Bindhu, C.V.; Kunze, H.J. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik V, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany)]. E-mail: hans-joachim.kunze@ep5.ruhr-uni-bochum.de

    2001-02-21

    Soft x-ray emission from plasmas produced by ablation from a magnesium target employing a ruby laser is studied using a grazing incidence spectrograph in the spectral region 3-12 nm. Emission intensities are investigated for different ionic lines as a function of position, time after the maximum of the laser pulse and laser irradiance. A gated pinhole camera is employed for studying the evolution of the plasma at early stages. The propagation distances and velocities are measured. Our results show that the line intensities of all ionic lines increase with laser irradiance until a saturation plateau is observed at high irradiance levels. The increase in ionization and intensity saturation with varying laser irradiance seems to suggest strong interaction of the laser pulse with the dense plasma formed near the target within the pulse duration. (author)

  2. Luminescence of Er3+ doped double lead halide crystals under X-ray, UV, VIS and IR excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serazetdinov, A. R.; Smirnov, A. A.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Isaenko, L. I.

    2017-09-01

    Er3+ doped double lead halide crystals incorporate a number of properties making them interesting for practical use in light conducting materials. X-ray excited luminescence (XRL) spectra, photoluminescence (PL) spectra in region of 1.5-3.5 eV, photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra (2.75-5 eV) and anti-stokes luminescence (ASL) spectra were measured at room temperature in KPb2Cl5 (KPC) and RbPb2Br5 (RPB) matrices doped with Er3+ (1%) ions and in KPC doped with Er3++ Yb3+ ions(1:3 ratio concentration). Intraconfigurational f→f transitions are observed in Er3+ ions in most of the cases. The concrete spectrum form is strongly dependent on the excitation energy. Under 980 nm excitation upper Er3+ levels are excited, showing upconversional processes. In case of 313 nm (UV) and 365 nm (VIS) excitation self trapped exciton luminescence was detected in RPB crystal. Additional Yb3+ doping ions strongly increase quantum yield under 980 nm excitation and this doping cause insignificant influence on quantum yield under VIS or UV excitation.

  3. Red-detuned, high-intensity, short-duration sweet spot for impulsive X-ray Raman excitation in atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ware, Matthew R; Haxton, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Impulsive X-ray Raman excitations of Lithium, Neon, and Sodium are calculated using the Multiconfiguration Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock method. Using linearly polarized laser pulses without chirp, we determine the optimum central frequency, intensity, and duration for maximum population transfer to valence excited states. We demonstrate the existence of two "sweet spots" for optimum population transfer, either of which, depending on the system, may be superior. The "red-detuned hypothesis" is the proposition that population transfer can be maximized by nonresonant Raman transitions, red-detuned below K-edge, because such detuning minimizes core-excited populations and ionization loss. We find that this hypothesis is verified in the case of Neon -- for Neon, the global optimum for population transfer occurs at high intensity (8 $\\times$ 10$^{19}$ W cm$^{-2}$), short duration (82as full-width-at-half-maximum), and 24eV red-detuned from the K-edge.

  4. X-ray emission spectroscopy of bulk liquid water in "no-man's land".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellberg, Jonas A; McQueen, Trevor A; Laksmono, Hartawan; Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; DePonte, Daniel P; Kennedy, Brian; Nordlund, Dennis; Sierra, Raymond G; Schlesinger, Daniel; Tokushima, Takashi; Zhovtobriukh, Iurii; Eckert, Sebastian; Segtnan, Vegard H; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Kubicek, Katharina; Techert, Simone; Bergmann, Uwe; Dakovski, Georgi L; Schlotter, William F; Harada, Yoshihisa; Bogan, Michael J; Wernet, Philippe; Föhlisch, Alexander; Pettersson, Lars G M; Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-28

    The structure of bulk liquid water was recently probed by x-ray scattering below the temperature limit of homogeneous nucleation (TH) of ∼232 K [J. A. Sellberg et al., Nature 510, 381-384 (2014)]. Here, we utilize a similar approach to study the structure of bulk liquid water below TH using oxygen K-edge x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Based on previous XES experiments [T. Tokushima et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 460, 387-400 (2008)] at higher temperatures, we expected the ratio of the 1b1' and 1b1″ peaks associated with the lone-pair orbital in water to change strongly upon deep supercooling as the coordination of the hydrogen (H-) bonds becomes tetrahedral. In contrast, we observed only minor changes in the lone-pair spectral region, challenging an interpretation in terms of two interconverting species. A number of alternative hypotheses to explain the results are put forward and discussed. Although the spectra can be explained by various contributions from these hypotheses, we here emphasize the interpretation that the line shape of each component changes dramatically when approaching lower temperatures, where, in particular, the peak assigned to the proposed disordered component would become more symmetrical as vibrational interference becomes more important.

  5. Soft X-ray emission study of Pd-Ni-Cu-P bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, S. [Center for Materials Research Using Third-Generation Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan)], E-mail: hosokawa@cc.it-hiroshima.ac.jp; Sato, H. [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Mimura, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Happo, N. [Faculty of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Tezuka, Y. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki 036-8561 (Japan); Ichitsubo, T.; Matsubara, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Nishiyama, N. [R and D Institute of Metals and Composites for Future Industries, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    Soft X-ray emission spectra were measured on Pd{sub 42.5}Ni{sub 7.5}Cu{sub 30}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses near the Ni and Cu 2p{sub 3/2} absorption edges to evaluate, respectively, the Ni and Cu 3d partial density of states (DOS) in the valence band. The Pd 4d, and the Ni and Cu 3d partials in the conduction-band were also obtained from X-ray absorption spectra around the Pd 3p{sub 3/2}, Ni, and Cu 2p{sub 3/2} absorption edges, respectively. The partial DOS of each d state was estimated from the spectra, and the feature of the electronic structure in these glasses were discussed in detail. In particular, it was found that the Pd 4d partial DOS near the Fermi energy largely decreases and becomes localized by replacing the Ni atoms with the Cu atoms, which may closely related to the excellent glass-forming ability in the Pd{sub 42.5}Ni{sub 7.5}Cu{sub 30}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass.

  6. Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) and X-ray emission in nitrogen, as well as the transition from a single-pulse mode to a pulse-periodic mode with a high repetition frequency, was studied experimentally. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode, the full width at halfmaximum of the SAEB is larger and the decrease rate of the gap voltage is lower than those in the single-pulse mode. It is found that, when the front duration of the voltage pulse at a nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr decreases from 2.5 to 0.3 ns, the X-ray exposure dose in the pulse-periodic mode increases by more than one order of magnitude and the number of SAEB electrons also increases. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode of a diffuse discharge, gas heating in the discharge gap results in a severalfold increase in the SAEB amplitude (the number of electrons in the beam). At a generator voltage of 25 kV, nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr, and pulse repetition frequency of 3.5 kHz, a runaway electron beam was detected behind the anode foil.

  7. ORIGIN OF THE GeV EMISSION DURING THE X-RAY FLARING ACTIVITY IN GRB 100728A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Haoning; Wang Xiangyu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang Binbin; Meszaros, Peter [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Li Zhuo [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-07-10

    Recently, Fermi-LAT detected GeV emission during the X-ray flaring activity in GRB 100728A. We study various scenarios for its origin. The hard spectrum of the GeV emission favors the external inverse Compton (EIC) origin in which X-ray flare photons are up-scattered by relativistic electrons in the external forward shock. This EIC scenario, with anisotropic scattering effect taken into account, can reproduce the temporal and spectral properties of the GeV emission in GRB 100728A.

  8. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nel, P., E-mail: pnel@unimelb.edu.a [Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Lynch, P.A. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton, Vic. 3168 (Australia); Laird, J.S. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Division of Exploration and Mining, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Centre of Excellence in Ore Deposits (CODES), University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tas. 7001 (Australia); Casey, H.M. [Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Goodall, L.J. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton, Vic. 3168 (Australia); Ryan, C.G. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Division of Exploration and Mining, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Centre of Excellence in Ore Deposits (CODES), University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tas. 7001 (Australia); Sloggett, R.J. [Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3010 (Australia)

    2010-07-21

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  9. X-ray emission at the low-mass end - Results from an extensive Einstein Observatory survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1993-01-01

    We have used available IPC data and a critical compilation of cataloged optical data to measure the 0.16-3.5 keV X-ray emission from 88 K and 169 M stars of luminosity classes IV, V, and VI within 25 pc from the Sun. The IPC detected 54 out of the 88 K stars, 70 out of the 138 M stars with M(v) less than 13.4, and 15 out of the 31 fainter M stars. We have identified a subsample of surveyed stars that is statistically representative of the population of K and M stars in the solar neighborhood. On the basis of this subsample (1) we have shown the occurrence of a drop in the level of X-ray emission for M stars later than approximately M5; (2) we have built unbiased maximum likelihood X-ray luminosity functions for the K, early M, and late M stars; (3) we have confirmed, both for K and M stars, the decrease of X-ray luminosity with increasing stellar age in the range of ages of disk population stars: and (4) we have shown that no obvious correlation is present between X-ray and bolometric luminosities in the entire representative samples of K and M stars, but only within flare stars which also seem to mark a saturation in X-ray luminosity level.

  10. Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, F J; Radha, P B

    2014-11-01

    A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

  11. Discovery of Spatial and Spectral Structure in the X-Ray Emission from the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf; Hester; Tennant; Elsner; Schulz; Marshall; Karovska; Nichols; Swartz; Kolodziejczak; O'Dell

    2000-06-20

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory observed the Crab Nebula and pulsar during orbital calibration. Zeroth-order images with the High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) readout by the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopy array (ACIS-S) show a striking richness of X-ray structure at a resolution comparable to that of the best ground-based visible-light observations. The HETG-ACIS-S images reveal, for the first time, an X-ray inner ring within the X-ray torus, the suggestion of a hollow-tube structure for the torus, and X-ray knots along the inner ring and (perhaps) along the inward extension of the X-ray jet. Although complicated by instrumental effects and the brightness of the Crab Nebula, the spectrometric analysis shows systematic variations of the X-ray spectrum throughout the nebula.

  12. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D. [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); DeYoung, Paul A. [Department of Physics, Hope College, 27 Graves Place, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); Blum, Arlene [Green Science Policy Institute, Box 5455, Berkeley, CA 94705 (United States); Stapleton, Heather M. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, LSRC Box 90328, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Peaslee, Graham F., E-mail: peaslee@hope.edu [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC–MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  13. Application of proton-induced X-ray emission technique to gunshot residue analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, P; Panigrahi, N; Rao, M S; Varier, K M; Sen, S; Mehta, G K

    1982-04-01

    The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique was applied to the identification and analysis of gunshot residues. Studies were made of the type of bullet and bullet hole identification, firearm discharge element profiles, the effect of various target backings, and hand swabbings. The discussion of the results reviews the sensitivity of the PIXE technique, its nondestructive nature, and its role in determining the distance from the gun to the victim and identifying the type of bullet used and whether a wound was made by a bullet or not. The high sensitivity of the PIXE technique, which is able to analyze samples as small as 0.1 to 1 ng, and its usefulness for detecting a variety of elements should make it particularly useful in firearms residue investigations.

  14. Application of proton-induced X-ray emission technique to gunshot residue analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, P.; Panigrahi, N.; Rao, M.S.; Varier, K.M.; Sen, S.; Mehta, G.K.

    1982-04-01

    The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique was applied to the identification and analysis of gunshot residues. Studies were made of the type of bullet and bullet hole identification, firearm discharge element profiles, the effect of various target backings, and hand swabbings. The discussion of the results reviews the sensitivity of the PIXE technique, its nondestructive nature, and its role in determining the distance from the gun to the victim and identifying the type of bullet used and whether a wound was made by a bullet or not. The high sensitivity of the PIXE technique, which is able to analyze samples as small as 0.1 to 1 ng, and its usefulness for detecting a variety of elements should make it particularly useful in firearms residue investigations.

  15. Probing electron acceleration and X-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Brijesh, P; Lambert, G; Mangles, S P D; Bloom, M S; Kneip, S; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam is focused in the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  16. Comparative study of bandwidths in copper delafossites from x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D.; Foord, J. S.; Payne, D. J.; Arnold, T.; Aston, D. J.; Egdell, R. G.; Godinho, K. G.; Scanlon, D. O.; Morgan, B. J.; Watson, G. W.; Mugnier, E.; Yaicle, C.; Rougier, A.; Colakerol, L.; Glans, P. A.; Piper, L. F. J.; Smith, K. E.

    2009-12-01

    The widths of the valence bands in the copper (I) delafossites CuGaO2 , CuInO2 , and CuScO2 have been measured by OK -shell x-ray emission spectroscopy and are compared with previous experimental work on CuAlO2 and CuCrO2 . In agreement with recent density-functional theory calculations it is found that the bandwidth decreases in the series CuAlO2>CuGaO2>CuInO2>CuScO2 . It is shown that states at the top of the valence band are of dominant Cu3dz2 atomic character but with significant mixing with O2p states.

  17. Ultrahigh resolution soft x-ray emission spectrometer at BL07LSU in SPring-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Yoshihisa [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Synchrotron Radiation Research Organization, University of Tokyo, Koto, Shingu-cho, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masaki [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Synchrotron Radiation Research Organization, University of Tokyo, Koto, Shingu-cho, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Niwa, Hideharu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Synchrotron Radiation Research Organization, University of Tokyo, Koto, Shingu-cho, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tokushima, Takashi; Horikawa, Yuka [RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Shin, Shik [RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Oshima, Masaharu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Synchrotron Radiation Research Organization, University of Tokyo, Koto, Shingu-cho, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    An extremely high resolution flat field type slit less soft x-ray emission spectrometer has been designed and constructed for the long undulator beamline BL07LSU in SPring-8. By optimizing the ruling parameters of two cylindrical gratings, a high energy resolution {Delta}E < 100 meV and/or an E/{Delta}E{approx} 10 000 are expected for the energy range of 350 eV - 750 eV taking into account the broadening by the spatial resolution (25 {mu}m) of a CCD detector. A coma-free operation mode proposed by Strocov et al., is also applied to eliminate both defocus and coma aberrations. The spectrometer demonstrated experimentally that E/{Delta}E= 10 050 and 8046 for N 1s (402.1 eV) and Mn 2p (641.8 eV) edges, respectively.

  18. GRB 060714: No Clear Dividing Line Between Prompt Emission and X-Ray Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimm, Hans A.; /NASA, Goddard /Universities Space Research Assoc.; Granot, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Marshal, F.; /NASA, Goddard; Perri, M.; /ASDC, Frascati; Barthelmy, S.D.; /NASA, Goddard; Burrows, D.N.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Gehrels, N.; /NASA, Goddard; Meszaros, P.; Morris, D.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2007-02-26

    The long gamma-ray burst GRB 060714 was observed to exhibit a series of five X-ray flares beginning {approx} 70 s after the burst trigger T{sub 0} and continuing until {approx} T{sub 0} + 200 s. The first two flares were detected by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift satellite, before Swift had slewed to the burst location, while the last three flares were strongly detected by the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) but only weakly detected by the BAT. This burst provides an unusual opportunity to track a complete sequence of flares over a wide energy range. The flares were very similar in their light curve morphology, showing power-law rise and fall components, and in most cases significant sub-structure. The flares also showed strong evolution with time, both spectrally and temporally. The small time scale and large amplitude variability observed are incompatible with an external shock origin for the flares, and support instead late time sporadic activity either of the central source or of localized dissipation events within the outflow. We show that the flares in GRB 060714 cannot be the result of internal shocks in which the contrast in the Lorentz factor of the colliding shells is very small, and that this mechanism faces serious difficulties in most Swift GRBs. The morphological similarity of the flares and the prompt emission and the gradual and continual evolution of the flares with time makes it difficult and arbitrary to draw a dividing line between the prompt emission and the flares.

  19. Separating the BL Lac and cluster X-ray emissions in Abell 689 with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, P. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Lancaster, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a Chandra observation of the galaxy cluster Abell 689 (z = 0.279). Abell 689 is one of the most luminous clusters detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS), but was flagged as possibly including significant point source contamination. The small point spread function of the Chandra telescope allows us to confirm this and separate the point source from the extended cluster X-ray emission. For the cluster, we determine a bolometric luminosity of Lbol= (3.3 ± 0.3) × 1044 erg s-1 and a temperature of kT = 5.1+2.2- 1.3 keV when including a physically motivated background model. We compare our measured luminosity for A689 to that quoted in the RASS, and find L0.1-2.4 keV= 2.8 × 1044 erg s-1, a value ˜10 times lower than the ROSAT measurement. Our analysis of the point source shows evidence for significant pile-up, with a pile-up fraction of ≃60 per cent. Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images lead us to the conclusion that the point source within Abell 689 is a BL Lac object. Using radio and optical observations from the Very Large Array and HST archives, we determine αro= 0.50, αox= 0.77 and αrx= 0.58 for the BL Lac, which would classify it as being of 'high-energy peak BL Lac' type. Spectra extracted of A689 show a hard X-ray excess at energies above 6 keV that we interpret as inverse-Compton emission from aged electrons that may have been transported into the cluster from the BL Lac.

  20. Porphyrin conjugated SiC/SiOx nanowires for X-ray-excited photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, F.; Bedogni, E.; Bigi, F.; Rimoldi, T.; Cristofolini, L.; Pinelli, S.; Alinovi, R.; Negri, M.; Dhanabalan, S. C.; Attolini, G.; Fabbri, F.; Goldoni, M.; Mutti, A.; Benecchi, G.; Ghetti, C.; Iannotta, S.; Salviati, G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of innovative nanosystems opens new perspectives for multidisciplinary applications at the frontier between materials science and nanomedicine. Here we present a novel hybrid nanosystem based on cytocompatible inorganic SiC/SiOx core/shell nanowires conjugated via click-chemistry procedures with an organic photosensitizer, a tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin derivative. We show that this nanosystem is an efficient source of singlet oxygen for cell oxidative stress when irradiated with 6 MV X-Rays at low doses (0.4–2 Gy). The in-vitro clonogenic survival assay on lung adenocarcinoma cells shows that 12 days after irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy, the cell population is reduced by about 75% with respect to control cells. These results demonstrate that our approach is very efficient to enhance radiation therapy effects for cancer treatments. PMID:25556299

  1. First attempt of at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detection in a CEBAF cryomodule for field emission monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Drury, Michael [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, Ari [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the first result of at-cavity X-ray detection in a CEBAF cryomodule for field emission monitoring. In the 8-cavity cryomodule F100, two silicon diodes were installed near the end flange of each cavity. Each cavity was individually tested during the cryomodule test in JLab’s cryomodule test facility. The behaviors of these at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detectors were compared with those of the standard ‘in air’ Geiger-Muller (G-M) tubes. Our initial experiments establish correlation between X-ray response of near diodes and the field emission source cavity in the 8-cavity string. For two out of these eight cavities, we also carried out at-cavity X-ray detection experiment during their vertical testing. The aim is to track field emission behavior uniquely from vertical cavity testing to horizontal cavity testing in the cryomodule. These preliminary results confirmed our expectation and warrant further effort toward the establishment of permanent at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detection for SRF development and operation.

  2. ROSAT Observations of X-ray Emissions from Jupiter During the Impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J H; Gladstone, G R; Franke, K; Lewis, W S; Fabian, A C; Brandt, W N; Na, C; Haberl, F; Clarke, J T; Hurley, K C; Sommer, M; Bolton, S

    1995-06-16

    Röntgensatellit (ROSAT) observations made shortly before and during the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter show enhanced x-ray emissions from the planet's northern high latitudes. These emissions, which occur at System III longitudes where intensity enhancements have previously been observed in Jupiter's ultraviolet aurora, appear to be associated with the comet fragment impacts in Jupiter's southern hemisphere and may represent brightenings of the jovian x-ray aurora caused either by the fragment impacts themselves or by the passage of the fragments and associated dust clouds through Jupiter's inner magnetosphere.

  3. Thermo-enhanced field emission from ZnO nanowires: Role of defects and application in a diode flat panel X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Daokun; Chen, Wenqing; Chen, Yicong; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhan, Runze; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun, E-mail: stscjun@mail.sysu.edu.cn

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • A thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon was observed from dendritic ZnO nanowires under the temperature of 323–723 K. • Defect-assisted field emission mechanism was proposed and quantitative calculation fits well with the experiment results. • The mechanism was verified by the field emission from ZnO nanowires with different defect concentrations. • A diode X-ray source making use of thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon was proposed for separate tuning of dose and energy. - Abstract: A thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon was observed from ZnO nanowires. The field emission current increased by almost two orders of magnitude under a constant applied electric field, and the turn-on field decreased from 6.04 MV/m to 5.0 MV/m when the temperature increased from 323 to 723 K. The Poole–Frenkel electron excitation from the defect-induced trapping centers to the conduction band under high electric fields is believed to be the primary cause of the observed phenomenon. The experimental results fit well with the proposed physical model. The field emission from ZnO nanowires with different defect concentrations further confirmed the role of defects. Using the thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon, a diode flat panel X-ray source was demonstrated, for which the energy and dose can be separately tuned. The thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon observed from ZnO nanowires could be an effective way to realize a large area flat panel multi-energy X-ray source.

  4. A plastic miniature x-ray emission spectrometer based on the cylindrical von Hamos geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, B. A.; Seidler, G. T.; Haave, M.; Pacold, J. I.; Gordon, R. A.; Planillo, J.; Quintana, J.; Rusthoven, B.

    2012-02-01

    We present a short working distance miniature x-ray emission spectrometer (miniXES) based on the cylindrical von Hamos geometry. We describe the general design principles for the spectrometer and detail a specific implementation that covers Kβ and valence level emission from Fe. Large spatial and angular access to the sample region provides compatibility with environmental chambers, microprobe, and pump/probe measurements. The primary spectrometer structure and optic is plastic, printed using a 3-dimensional rapid-prototype machine. The spectrometer is inexpensive to construct and is portable; it can be quickly set up at any focused beamline with a tunable narrow bandwidth monochromator. The sample clearance is over 27 mm, providing compatibility with a variety of environment chambers. An overview is also given of the calibration and data processing procedures, which are implemented by a multiplatform user-friendly software package. Finally, representative measurements are presented. Background levels are below the level of the Kβ2, 5 valence emission, the weakest diagram line in the system, and photometric analysis of count rates finds that the instrument is performing at the theoretical limit.

  5. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy to Study Ligand Valence Orbitals in Mn Coordination Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolentsev, Grigory; Soldatov, Alexander V; Messinger, Johannes; Merz, Kathrin; Weyhermuller, Thomas; Bergmann, Uwe; Pushkar, Yulia; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Glatzel, Pieter

    2009-03-02

    We discuss a spectroscopic method to determine the character of chemical bonding and for the identification of metal ligands in coordination and bioinorganic chemistry. It is based on the analysis of satellite lines in X-ray emission spectra that arise from transitions between valence orbitals and the metal ion 1s level (valence-to-core XES). The spectra, in connection with calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), provide information that is complementary to other spectroscopic techniques, in particular X-ray absorption (XANES and EXAFS). The spectral shape is sensitive to protonation of ligands and allows ligands, which differ only slightly in atomic number (e.g., C, N, O...), to be distinguished. A theoretical discussion of the main spectral features is presented in terms of molecular orbitals for a series of Mn model systems: [Mn(H2O)6]2+, [Mn(H2O)5OH]+, [Mn(H2O)5NH2]+, and [Mn(H2O)5NH3]2+. An application of the method, with comparison between theory and experiment, is presented for the solvated Mn2+ ion in water and three Mn coordination complexes, namely [LMn(acac)N3]BPh4, [LMn(B2O3Ph2)(ClO4)], and [LMn(acac)N]BPh4, where L represents 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, acac stands for the 2,4-pentanedionate anion, and B2O3Ph2 represents the 1,3-diphenyl-1,3-dibora-2-oxapropane-1,3-diolato dianion.

  6. Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission with the DXL Sounding Rocket Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F. S.; Prasai, K.; Robertson, I.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket is a NASA approved mission with a scheduled first launch in December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission of the SWCX from that of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) to improve our understanding of both. To separate the SWCX contribution from the LHB. DXL will use the SWCX signature due to the helium focusing cone at 1=185 deg, b=-18 deg, DXL uses large area propostionai counters, with an area of 1.000 sq cm and grasp of about 10 sq cm sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keY bands. Thanks to the large grasp, DXL will achieve in a 5 minule flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  7. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelby, Megan L.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Jackson, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    and nuclear structure for critical excited electronic states in the relaxation pathway characterize the dependence of the complex's geometry on the electron occupation of the 3d orbitals. Calculated XANES transitions for these excited states assign a short-lived transient signal to the spectroscopic signature...... of the Ni(I) species, resulting from intramolecular charge transfer on a time scale that has eluded previous synchrotron studies. These combined results enable us to examine the excited state structural dynamics of NiTMP prior to thermal relaxation and to capture intermediates of potential photocatalytic...

  8. Hard X-ray Emission along the Z Track in GX 17+ 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE) on board Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer for Z source GX 17+2, we investigate the evolution of its PCA spectra and HEXTE spectra along a `Z' track on its hardness-intensity diagram. A hard X-ray tail is detected ...

  9. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SUPER-EARTH HOST GJ 1214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalitha, S.; Singh, K. P. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Poppenhaeger, K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-07-20

    Stellar activity can produce large amounts of high-energy radiation, which is absorbed by the planetary atmosphere leading to irradiation-driven mass loss. We present the detection and an investigation of high-energy emission in a transiting super-Earth host system, GJ 1214, based on XMM-Newton observations. We derive an X-ray luminosity of L{sub X} = 7.4 × 10{sup 25} erg s{sup –1} and a corresponding activity level of log (L{sub X} /L {sub bol}) ∼ –5.3. Further, we determine a coronal temperature of about ∼3.5 MK, which is typical for coronal emission of moderately active low-mass stars. We estimate that GJ 1214 b evaporates at a rate of 1.3× 10{sup 10} g s{sup –1} and has lost a total of ≈2-5.6 M {sub ⊕}.

  10. The Properties of the Galactic Hot Gaseous Halo from X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunyang; Bregman, Joel

    2017-11-01

    The extended hot X-ray emitting gaseous halo of the Milky Way has an optical depth ˜1 for the dominant emission lines of O vii and O viii, which are used to infer the halo properties. To improve on halo gas properties, we treat optical depth effects with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model, which leads to slightly steeper density profiles (β ≈ 0.5) than if optical depths effects were ignored. For the preferred model where the halo is rotating on cylinders at 180 km s-1, independent fits to both lines lead to identical results, where the core radius is 2.5 kpc and the turbulent component of the Doppler-b parameter is 100-120 km s-1 the turbulent pressure is 20% of the thermal pressure. The fit is improved when emission from a disk is included, with a radial scale length of 3 kpc (assumed) and a fitted vertical scale height of approximately 1.3 kpc. The disk component is a minor mass constituent and has low optical depth, except at low latitudes. The gaseous mass is 3{--}4× {10}10 {M}⊙ within 250 {kpc}, similar to our previous determinations and significantly lower than the mass of the missing baryons, which is 1.7× {10}11 {M}⊙ .

  11. Circular polarization of X-ray radiation emitted by longitudinally polarized electron impact excitation: Under a screened Coulomb interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhan-Bin

    2017-12-01

    Longitudinally polarized electron impact excitation from the ground state 1s2 to the excited state 1s2l (l =s,p) levels of highly charged He-like Fe24+ ions in weakly coupled hot-dense plasmas is investigated using a fully relativistic distorted-wave method. The Debye-Hückel potential is used to describe the plasma screening. Benchmark results such as the total cross sections, the magnetic sublevels cross sections, and the circular polarizations of corresponding X-ray radiations are presented. For the excitation process, results show that the plasma screening has an effect in reducing both the total and magnetic sublevels cross sections. For the de-excitation process, it is found that while the plasma screening as a slightly effect on the circular polarizations of radiations for the 1 s 2 s 3S1 → 1 s21S0,1 s 2 p 3P2 → 1 s21S0 , and 1 s 2 p 1P1 → 1 s21S0 transition lines, it gives a substantial contribution for the same properties of the 1 s 2 p 3P1 → 1 s21S0 line.

  12. L X-ray fluorescence cross-sections of heavy elements excited by 16.04, 16.90 and 17.78 keV photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, K.A. [Department of Physics, University of Jordan, P.O. Box 13099, Amman (Jordan); Saleh, N.S. [Department of Physics, University of Jordan, P.O. Box 13099, Amman (Jordan)

    1999-01-01

    L{sub l}, L{sub {alpha}}, L{sub {beta}}, L{sub {gamma}} X-ray fluorescence cross sections have been measured for the elements Au, Pt, W, Lu, Yb, Tm, Ho, Dy and Tb using photon energies of 16.04, 16.90 and 17.78 keV. Measurements have been performed using an X-ray tube with a secondary-exciter system as an excitation source. The secondary exciters used are Zr, Nb and Mo of pure metal sheets (99.99%). A Mo X-ray tube with a secondary-target arrangement was used to obtain high intensity with a high degree of monochromaticity. Using an X-ray tube made it possible to measure X-ray fluorescence cross-sections and intensity ratios even for low intensity X-ray lines. The experimental values of the cross-sections were determined by measuring the absolute yield of L subshell X-rays emitted from a standard target of a given element irradiated with photons of given energy. The theoretical values of the cross-sections were calculated using theoretically tabulated values of subshell photoionization cross-sections, fluorescence yields, Coster-Kronig transition probabilities and radiative decay rates. Experimental results have been compared with the theoretically calculated values of L X-ray cross-sections. A fairly good agreement is observed between the experimental and the calculated values. The intensity ratios I{sub L{beta}}/I{sub L{alpha}} and I{sub L{gamma}}/I{sub L{alpha}} were measured and found to be in good agreement with the calculated values.

  13. The jet-disk symbiosis. I. Radio to X-ray emission models for quasars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcke, H.; Biermann, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Starting from the assumption that radio jets and accretion disks are symbiotic features present in radio loud and radio quiet quasars we scale the bulk power of radio jets with the accretion power by adding mass- and energy conservation of the whole jet-disk system to the standard Blandford & Koenigl theory for compact radio cores. The jet is described as a conically expanding plasma with maximal sound speed c/sqrt(3) enclosing relativistic particles and a magnetic field. Relativistic speeds of γ_jbeta_ j_>5 make an additional confinement unnecessary and the shape is solely given by the Mach cone. The model depends on only few parameters and can be constrained by observations. Thus we are able to show that radio and X-ray fluxes (SSC emission) of cores and lobes and typical dimensions of radio loud quasars are consistent with a jet being produced in the central engine. We present a synthetic broadband spectrum from radio to X-ray for a jet-disk system. The only way to explain the high efficiency of radio loud objects is to postulate that these objects consist of `maximal jets' with `total equipartition' where the magnetic energy flow of the jet is comparable to the kinetic jet power and the total jet power is a large fraction of the disk power. As the number of electrons is limited by the accretion flow, such a situation is only possible when the minimum Lorentz factor of the electron distribution is γ_e,min_>100(E>50MeV) or/and a large number of pairs are present. Such an electron/positron population would be a necessary consequence of hadronic interactions and may lead to some interesting effects in the low frequency self-absorbed spectrum. Emission from radio weak quasars can be explained with an initially identical jet. The difference between radio loud and radio weak could be due to a different efficiency in accelerating relativistic electrons on the sub-parsec scale only. Finally we demonstrate that in order to appease the ravenous hunger of radio loud jets

  14. Measurement of Trace Constituents by Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis with Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2016-06-01

    Electron-excited X-ray microanalysis performed with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) has been used to measure trace elemental constituents of complex multielement materials, where "trace" refers to constituents present at concentrations below 0.01 (mass fraction). High count spectra measured with silicon drift detector EDS were quantified using the standards/matrix correction protocol embedded in the NIST DTSA-II software engine. Robust quantitative analytical results for trace constituents were obtained from concentrations as low as 0.000500 (mass fraction), even in the presence of significant peak interferences from minor (concentration 0.01≤C≤0.1) and major (C>0.1) constituents. Limits of detection as low as 0.000200 were achieved in the absence of peak interference.

  15. Anisotropy of x-ray reflectivity: chemical and structural effects on K-shell excitations in hexagonal BN crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Filatova, E O

    2002-01-01

    The experimental investigation of the B and N K-reflection spectra using both s-polarized synchrotron radiation and unpolarized radiation for different crystal orientations with respect to the electric field vector E was carried out. The absorption spectra calculated from the reflection spectra using Kramers-Kronig analysis are presented. A strong orientation dependence of both reflection and absorption spectra is exhibited. Analysis of the orientation dependences of the x-ray reflection and absorption spectra near both edges strongly supports a possibility of tracing the role of each excitation canal in the formation of fine structure. The high sensitivity of the reflection spectra fine structure to the vibronic interaction connected with Jahn-Teller distortions as well to the core-hole relaxation is discussed. A very strong dependence of the absolute values of the reflectivity on planar crystal anisotropy was discovered.

  16. A LINK BETWEEN X-RAY EMISSION LINES AND RADIO JETS IN 4U 1630-47?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, Joseph [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Coriat, Mickaël [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Fender, Rob; Broderick, Jess W. [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Lee, Julia C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ponti, Gabriele [Max Planck Institute fur Extraterrestriche Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Tzioumis, Anastasios K.; Edwards, Philip G., E-mail: neilsenj@bu.edu [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2014-03-20

    Recently, Díaz Trigo et al. reported an XMM-Newton detection of relativistically Doppler-shifted emission lines associated with steep-spectrum radio emission in the stellar-mass black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its 2012 outburst. They interpreted these lines as indicative of a baryonic jet launched by the accretion disk. Here we present a search for the same lines earlier in the same outburst using high-resolution X-ray spectra from the Chandra HETGS. While our observations (eight months prior to the XMM-Newton campaign) also coincide with detections of steep spectrum radio emission by the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we find no evidence for any relativistic X-ray emission lines. Indeed, despite ∼5 × brighter radio emission, our Chandra spectra allow us to place an upper limit on the flux in the blueshifted Fe XXVI line that is ≳ 20 × weaker than the line observed by Díaz Trigo et al. We explore several scenarios that could explain our differing results, including variations in the geometry of the jet or a mass-loading process or jet baryon content that evolves with the accretion state of the black hole. We also consider the possibility that the radio emission arises in an interaction between a jet and the nearby interstellar medium, in which case the X-ray emission lines might be unrelated to the radio emission.

  17. Generation of isolated single attosecond hard X-ray pulse in enhanced self-amplified spontaneous emission scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kim, Dong Eon

    2011-04-11

    The generation of isolated attosecond hard x-ray pulse has been studied under the enhanced self-amplified spontaneous emission (ESASE) scheme with the density and energy modulation of an electron bunch. It is demonstrated in simulation that an isolated attosecond hard x-ray pulse of a high contrast ratio can be produced by adjusting a driver laser wavelength and the energy distribution of an electron bunch. An isolated attosecond pulse of ~146 attosecond full-width half-maximum (FWHM) at 0.1 nm wavelength is obtained with a saturation length of 34 meter for the electron beam parameters of Korean X-ray Free Electron laser. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. X-ray Excited Optical Fluorescence and Diffraction Imaging of Reactivity and Crystallinity in a Zeolite Crystal: Crystallography and Molecular Spectroscopy in One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristanović, Zoran; Hofmann, Jan P; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Jiang, Tao; Chahine, Gilbert A; Schülli, Tobias U; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-06-20

    Structure-activity relationships in heterogeneous catalysis are challenging to be measured on a single-particle level. For the first time, one X-ray beam is used to determine the crystallographic structure and reactivity of a single zeolite crystal. The method generates μm-resolved X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) and X-ray excited optical fluorescence (μ-XEOF) maps of the crystallinity and Brønsted reactivity of a zeolite crystal previously reacted with a styrene probe molecule. The local gradients in chemical reactivity (derived from μ-XEOF) were correlated with local crystallinity and framework Al content, determined by μ-XRD. Two distinctly different types of fluorescent species formed selectively, depending on the local zeolite crystallinity. The results illustrate the potential of this approach to resolve the crystallographic structure of a porous material and its reactivity in one experiment via X-ray induced fluorescence of organic molecules formed at the reactive centers.

  19. Origin of X-rays in the low state of the FSRQ 3C 273: evidence of inverse Compton emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Nibedita; Gupta, Alok C.; Wiita, Paul J.; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Duorah, Kalpana

    2017-08-01

    We analyse the 2.5-10 keV X-ray spectra of the luminous quasar 3C 273 and simultaneous observations in UV wavelengths from XMM-Newton between 2000 and 2015. The lowest flux level ever was observed in 2015. The continuum emission from 3C 273 is generally best described by an absorbed power-law but during extremely low states the addition of fluorescence from the K-shell iron line improves the fit. We study the spectral evolution of the source during its extended quiescent state and also examine connections between the X-ray and ultraviolet emissions, which have been seen in some, but not all, previous work. We detect a possible anticorrelation between these two bands during the low state that characterized 3C 273 for most of this period; however, this was not present during a flaring state. A harder-when-brighter trend for the X-ray spectrum was observed in these long-term observations of 3C 273 for the first time. We suggest that the X-ray emission in 3C 273 is the result of inverse Compton scattering of soft UV seed photons (emitted from the local environment of the AGN), most likely in a thermal corona. We can explain the significant temporal variation of the spectral continuum as an outcome of changing optical depth of the Comptonizing medium, along the lines of the wind-shock model proposed by Courvoisier and Camenzind.

  20. X-ray emission from Au-Sm alloy target irradiated with high power sub nanosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, S.; Munda, D. S.; Tripathi, S.; Kumar, M.; Gupta, N. K.; Dhareshwar, L. J.; Bajaj, P. N.

    2010-02-01

    The hohlraum cavity is generally made out of gold (Au) and recently it has been shown that laser-target coupling efficiency can be increased by using cocktail or mixed targets such as gold-samarium (Au-Sm). We report here results of experiments performed on Au-Sm alloy in various spectral regions for various compositions. In these experiments, a 12 Joule/500ps Nd:glass laser has been used. It is observed that the soft x-ray emission in the spectral region 0.7 -1.56 keV is enhanced by about 40-50% by using a composition of Au:Sm:: 3:7 as compared to pure Au .However, in case of hard x-ray emission (3.2 -5 keV), there is a reduction in x-ray emission from Au-Sm target as compared to pure gold. This behaviour, that enhancement occurs in soft x-rays in the case of mixed Au-Sm targets is desirable in the ICF scheme.

  1. Periodic X-Ray Emission from the O7 V Star Theta(sup 1) Orionis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Marc; Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Stauffer, John R.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1997-01-01

    We report the discovery of large-amplitude, periodic X-ray emission from the O7 V star Theta(sup 1) Orionis C, the central star of the Orion Nebula. Ten ROSAT HRI snapshots of the Trapezium cluster taken over the course of 21 days show that the count rate of Theta(sup 1) Ori C varies from 0.26 to 0.41 counts/ s with a clear 15 day period. The soft X-ray variations have the same phase and period as H(alpha) and He II (lambda)4686 variations reported by Stahl et al. and are in antiphase with the C(sub iv) and Si(sub iv) ultraviolet absorption features. We consider five mechanisms which might explain the amplitude, phase, and periodicity of the X-ray variations: (1) colliding-wind emission with an unseen binary companion, (2) coronal emission from an unseen late-type pre-main-sequence star, (3) periodic density fluctuations, (4) absorption of magnetospheric X-rays in a corotating wind, and (5) magnetosphere eclipses. The ROSAT data rule out the first three scenarios but cannot rule out either of the latter two which require the presence of an extended magnetosphere, consistent with the suggestion of Stahl et al. that Theta(sup 1) Ori C is an oblique magnetic rotator. As such, Theta(sup 1) Ori C may be the best example of a high-mass analog to the chemically peculiar, magnetic Bp stars.

  2. Design and characterization of a spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray source for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Xin; Rajaram, Ramya; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Yang Guang; Phan, Tuyen; Lalush, David S.; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27659 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited angle computed tomography technique that can distinguish tumors from its overlying breast tissues and has potentials for detection of cancers at a smaller size and earlier stage. Current prototype DBT scanners are based on the regular full-field digital mammography systems and require partial isocentric motion of an x-ray tube over certain angular range to record the projection views. This prolongs the scanning time and, in turn, degrades the imaging quality due to motion blur. To mitigate the above limitations, the concept of a stationary DBT (s-DBT) scanner has been recently proposed based on the newly developed spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technique using the carbon nanotube. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the performance of the 25-beam MBFEX source array that has been designed and fabricated for the s-DBT system. The s-DBT system records all the projection images by electronically activating the multiple x-ray beams from different viewing angles without any mechanical motion. The configuration of the MBFEX source is close to the published values from the Siemens Mammomat system. The key issues including the x-ray flux, focal spot size, spatial resolution, scanning time, beam-to-beam consistency, and reliability are evaluated using the standard procedures. In this article, the authors describe the design and performance of a distributed x-ray source array specifically designed for the s-DBT system. They evaluate the emission current, current variation, lifetime, and focal spot sizes of the source array. An emission current of up to 18 mA was obtained at 0.5x0.3 mm effective focal spot size. The experimentally measured focal spot sizes are comparable to that of a typical commercial mammography tube without motion blurring. Trade-off between the system spatial resolution, x-ray flux, and scanning time are also discussed. Projection images of a breast phantom were

  3. X-ray excited optical luminescence studies on the system BaXY (X,Y ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For the fluorobromide, the undoped salt gave a broad luminescence peak located at 440 nm, while the ... The undoped BaFBr acquired a bluish pink colour, and the doped salt displayed a pink colour after the .... lived excited state, before decay, allows momentum conservation by the interaction with the lattice, so that the ...

  4. Modeling Gamma-Ray Emission From the High-Mass X-Ray Binary LS 5039

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Owocki

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A few high-mass X-ray binaries–consisting of an OB star plus compact companion– have been observed by Fermi and ground-based Cerenkov telescopes like High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS to be sources of very high energy (VHE; up to 30 TeV γ-rays. This paper focuses on the prominent γ-ray source, LS 5039, which consists of a massive O6.5V star in a 3.9-day-period, mildly elliptical (e ≈ 0.24 orbit with its companion, assumed here to be an unmagnetized compact object (e.g., black hole. Using three dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the Bondi-Hoyle accretion of the O-star wind onto the companion, we find that the orbital phase variation of the accretion follows very closely the simple Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton (BHL rate for the local radius and wind speed. Moreover, a simple model, wherein intrinsic emission of γ-rays is assumed to track this accretion rate, reproduces quite well Fermi observations of the phase variation of γ-rays in the energy range 0.1-10 GeV. However for the VHE (0.1-30 TeV radiation observed by the HESS Cerenkov telescope, it is important to account also for photon-photon interactions between the γ-rays and the stellar optical/UV radiation, which effectively attenuates much of the strong emission near periastron. When this is included, we find that this simple BHL accretion model also quite naturally fits the HESS light curve, thus making it a strong alternative to the pulsar-wind-shock models commonly invoked to explain such VHE γ-ray emission in massive-star binaries.

  5. Structure of the sulfur K x-ray emission spectrum: influence of the oxidation state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, P. D.; Carreras, A. C.; Trincavelli, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    The sulfur K x-ray emission was studied in pure sulfur, anhydrite (CaSO4) and sphalerite (ZnS) samples. The ionizations were induced by electron impact and the spectra were recorded with a wavelength dispersive spectrometer. The spectral processing was performed through a methodology based on the optimization of atomic and experimental parameters. Energies and intensities of diagram and satellite lines were determined for a set of transitions in the Kα and Kβ groups. The lines studied include Kα22, Kα2, Kα1, Kα‧, Kα3, Kα4, Kα5, Kα6, Kβ1,3, Kβ-RAE, KβIII, KβIV, Kβx, Kβ‧ and Kβ″. The main spectral differences between the three oxidation states were analysed, considering the influence of the ligand atoms. The results were compared with data published by other authors and the origin of certain lines was discussed on the basis of data available in the literature.

  6. Determination of Se in soil samples using the proton induced X-ray emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruvinel, Paulo E.; Flocchini, Robert G.

    1993-04-01

    An alternative method for the direct determination of total Se in soil samples is presented. A large number of trace elements is present in soil at concentration values in the range of part per billion and tenths of parts of million. The most common are the trace elements of Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Mo, Cd and Pb. As for biological samples many of these elements are of great importance for the nutrition of plants, while others are toxic and others have an unknown role. Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals but it is also known that in certain areas Se deficiency or toxicity has caused endemic disease to livestock and humans through the soil-plant-animal linkage. In this work the suitability of the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique as a fast and nondestructive technique useful to measure total the Se content in soil samples is demonstrated. To validate the results a comparison of data collected using the conventional atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) method was performed.

  7. The X-ray stable emission in MCG-6-30-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, E.; Papadakis, I.

    2017-10-01

    The flux-flux plot (FFP) method is a model-independent way that allows to extract the variable and stable components from the X-ray spectra of AGNs showing strong variability. We applied this method to the simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of MCG-6-30-15, in the 0.3-40 keV range. The constant component, in the 4-40 keV energy range, is consistent a neutral reflection from distant material ( D > 1.56 × 10^{4} R_{g}) revealing an iron K line in the 6-7 keV band and a Compton hump peaking at ˜ 20 keV. It contributes to ˜ 20% of the total emission, on average. The variable component is consistent with a power-law spectrum with a constant photon index (Γ ˜ 2) varying only in normalization without any hint of a relativistic ionized reflection. The FFPs below 3 keV show a clear evidence of a variable warm absorber with the possibility of having a stable component at these low energies.

  8. Electronic structure of advanced materials studied by x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Galakhov, V. R.; Yarmoshenko, Yu. M.; Trofimova, V. A.; Shamin, S. N.; Cherkashenko, V. M.; Poteryaev, A. I.; Anisimov, V. I.

    1997-01-01

    High resolution soft x-ray emission spectroscopy with high spatial resolution is used to study of the electronic structure and characterize advanced materials: high-Tc superconductors, transition metal compounds, porous silicon, solid-solid buried interfaces and hard materials. In high-Tc, the main attention is focused on the analysis of oxygen-cation interactions and the determination of the location of impurity atoms. In transition metal compounds the participation of different electronic states of constitute atoms in the valence band is analyzed and correctness of LDA band structure calculations is estimated. For CuFeO2 an unusual mutual position of the Cu3d and Fe3d bands was found which is attributed to strong electron-electron correlations. In porous silicon the local structure of silicon atoms is found to depend on the type of doping of the initial Si wafer. Solid-solid buried interfaces in thin semiconducting films irradiated by eximer laser are investigated. For the hard materials boron-carbonitride a structure consisting of hexagonal lattice planes of carbon and boron nitride is proposed.

  9. Thermo-enhanced field emission from ZnO nanowires: Role of defects and application in a diode flat panel X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Daokun; Chen, Wenqing; Chen, Yicong; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhan, Runze; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2017-03-01

    A thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon was observed from ZnO nanowires. The field emission current increased by almost two orders of magnitude under a constant applied electric field, and the turn-on field decreased from 6.04 MV/m to 5.0 MV/m when the temperature increased from 323 to 723 K. The Poole-Frenkel electron excitation from the defect-induced trapping centers to the conduction band under high electric fields is believed to be the primary cause of the observed phenomenon. The experimental results fit well with the proposed physical model. The field emission from ZnO nanowires with different defect concentrations further confirmed the role of defects. Using the thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon, a diode flat panel X-ray source was demonstrated, for which the energy and dose can be separately tuned. The thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon observed from ZnO nanowires could be an effective way to realize a large area flat panel multi-energy X-ray source.

  10. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M. [and others

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E{sub c}, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E{sub c}. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production.

  11. Imaging of high-energy x-ray emission from cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Bradley, D K; Bell, P; Cerjan, C J; Dixit, S; Döppner, T; Jones, O; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G; Landen, O L; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Prasad, R R; Ralph, J; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A; Springer, P T; Suter, L; Town, R P J; Weber, S V; Glenzer, S H

    2012-10-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide broadband time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered implosions. This diagnostic measures the temperature- and density-sensitive bremsstrahlung emission and provides estimates of hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure.

  12. Crystal-field excitations in multiferroic TbMnO3 by Mn L3 and O K resonant inelastic X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiatai; Juhin, Amélie; Delaunay, Renaud; Jarrier, Romain; Jaouen, Nicolas; Nicolaou, Alessandro; Sinclair, Ryan; Zhou, Haidong; Mariot, Jean-Michel; Chiuzbǎian, Sorin G.

    2017-11-01

    d-d excitations in multiferroic TbMnO3 have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the Mn L3,2 and O K edges. Confrontation between experimental data and multiplet crystal-field calculations performed for Mn3+ ions in D4h symmetry has enabled us to identify the origin of the observed excitations and has provided reliable manganese crystal-field parameters that enter the description of the antisymmetric exchange interaction responsible for the multiferroicity in this compound.

  13. Relations among stellar X-ray emission observed from Einstein, stellar rotation and bolometric luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavicini, R.; Golub, L.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.; Ayres, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The correlation between observed stellar X-ray luminosities, bolometric luminosities, and projected rotational velocities for stars of various spectral types and luminosity classes are determined. Early type stars (O3 to A5) have X-ray luminosities independent of rotational velocities, and correlating with bolometric luminosities. Late type stars of spectral type G to M have luminosities well correlated to equatorial rotational velocities, and are independent of luminosity class. The dependence of late type stars is found to be equivalent to a relation between the X-ray surface flux and the stellar angular velocity. F stars are intermediate with X-ray luminosities higher than would be predicted on the basis of the early type star relation, although lower than expected from the late type velocity dependence. The location of RS CVn stars as a class is also discussed, and it is found that the heating of late type stellar coronas does not result from direct conversion of ratational energy.

  14. Femtosecond X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy on zno nanoparticles in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penfold, Thomas J.; Szlachetko, Jakub; Gawelda, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    We have performed femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy measurements after UV photoexcitation of a colloidal solution of ZnO nanoparticles. The results indicate sub-ps hole trapping at oxygen vacancies with shallowly-trapped electrons in the conduction band.......We have performed femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy measurements after UV photoexcitation of a colloidal solution of ZnO nanoparticles. The results indicate sub-ps hole trapping at oxygen vacancies with shallowly-trapped electrons in the conduction band....

  15. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  16. Transition-Metal Nanoparticle Oxidation in a Chemically Nonhomogenous Environment Revealed by 2p3d Resonant X-ray Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schooneveld, Matti M; Suljoti, Edlira; Campos-Cuerva, Carlos; Gosselink, Robert W; van der Eerden, Ad M J; Schlappa, Justine; Zhou, Kejin J; Monney, Claude; Schmitt, Thorsten; de Groot, Frank M F

    2013-04-04

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is often employed in fields such as catalysis to determine whether transition-metal nanoparticles are oxidized. Here we show 2p3/2 XAS and 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) data of oleate-coated cobalt nanoparticles with average diameters of 4.0, 4.2, 5.0, 8.4, and 15.2 nm. Two particle batches were exposed to air for different periods of time, whereas the others were measured as synthesized. In the colloidal nanoparticles, the cobalt sites can have different chemical environments (metallic/oxidized/surface-coordinated), and it is shown that most XAS data cannot distinguish whether the nanoparticles are oxidized or surface-coated. In contrast, the high-energy resolution RXES spectra reveal whether more than the first metal layer is oxidized based on the unique energetic separation of spectral features related to the formal metal (X-ray fluorescence) or to a metal oxide (d-d excitations). This is the first demonstration of metal 2p3d RXES as a novel surface science tool.

  17. The effects of stellar dynamics on the X-ray emission of flat early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Andrea; Ciotti, Luca; Pellegrini, Silvia

    2014-03-01

    Past observational and numerical studies indicated that the hot gaseous haloes of early-type galaxies may be sensitive to the stellar kinematics. With high-resolution ZEUS 2D hydrosimulations, we study the hot gas evolution in flat early-type galaxies of fixed (stellar plus dark) mass distribution, but with variable amounts of azimuthal velocity dispersion and rotational support, including the possibility of a (counter) rotating inner disc. The hot gas is fed by stellar mass-losses, and heated by supernova explosions and thermalization of stellar motions. The simulations provide γth, the ratio between the heating due to the relative velocity between the stellar streaming and the interstellar medium bulk flow, and the heating attainable by complete thermalization of the stellar streaming. We find that (1) X-ray emission-weighted temperatures and luminosities match observed values and are larger in fully velocity dispersion supported systems; X-ray isophotes are boxy where rotation is significant; (2) γth ≃ 0.1-0.2 for isotropic rotators and (3) γth ≃ 1 for systems with an inner (counter) rotating disc. The lower X-ray luminosities of isotropic rotators are not explained just by their low γth but by a complicated flow structure and evolution, consequence of the angular momentum stored at large radii. Rotation is therefore important to explain the lower average X-ray emission and temperature observed in flat and more rotationally supported galaxies.

  18. Possible Evidence for Pulsed X-Ray Emission from the Outer Gap in PSR B1937+21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. G.; Xu, R. X.; Qiao, G. J.

    2002-10-01

    The fastest millisecond pulsar PSR B1937+21 presents an interpulse separated from the main pulse by nearly 180° at radio frequencies. Recently, the ASCA observations detected pulsed X-ray emission from this pulsar. Only a single narrow X-ray pulse is observed, which is coincident with the radio interpulse in phase. We investigate the possible origin of the pulsed X-rays from the polar cap (PC) accelerators or the outer gap (OG) accelerators in the frame of a PC model and an OG model, respectively, by assuming a dipolar magnetic field structure and the same radio emission pattern from its poles for the pulsar. The OG model can naturally explain the main observational facts. For the PC model, the coincidence between the X-ray pulse and the radio interpulse cannot be reproduced in the assumed case. However, when considering possible deviation from our assumption, the PC model may still be valid for this pulsar in some cases.

  19. Detailed Characterization of a Nanosecond-Lived Excited State: X-ray and Theoretical Investigation of the Quintet State in Photoexcited [Fe(terpy) 2 ] 2+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vankó, György; Bordage, Amélie; Pápai, Mátyás; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Glatzel, Pieter; March, Anne Marie; Doumy, Gilles; Britz, Alexander; Galler, Andreas; Assefa, Tadesse; Cabaret, Delphine; Juhin, Amélie; van Driel, Tim B.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Dohn, Asmus; Møller, Klaus B.; Lemke, Henrik T.; Gallo, Erik; Rovezzi, Mauro; Németh, Zoltán; Rozsályi, Emese; Rozgonyi, Tamás; Uhlig, Jens; Sundström, Villy; Nielsen, Martin M.; Young, Linda; Southworth, Stephen H.; Bressler, Christian; Gawelda, Wojciech

    2015-03-19

    Theoretical predictions show that depending on the populations of the Fe 3dxy, 3dxz, and 3dyz orbitals two possible quintet states can exist for the high-spin state of the photoswitchable model system [Fe(terpy)2]2+. The differences in the structure and molecular properties of these 5B2 and 5E quintets are very small and pose a substantial challenge for experiments to resolve them. Yet for a better understanding of the physics of this system, which can lead to the design of novel molecules with enhanced photoswitching performance, it is vital to determine which high-spin state is reached in the transitions that follow the light excitation. The quintet state can be prepared with a short laser pulse and can be studied with cutting-edge time-resolved X-ray techniques. Here we report on the application of an extended set of X-ray spectroscopy and scattering techniques applied to investigate the quintet state of [Fe(terpy)2]2+ 80 ps after light excitation. High-quality X-ray absorption, nonresonant emission, and resonant emission spectra as well as X-ray diffuse scattering data clearly reflect the formation of the high-spin state of the [Fe(terpy)2]2+ molecule; moreover, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy resolves the Fe-ligand bond-length variations with unprecedented bondlength accuracy in time-resolved experiments. With ab initio calculations we determine why, in contrast to most related systems, one configurational mode is insufficient for the description of the low-spin (LS)-high-spin (HS) transition. We identify the electronic structure origin of the differences between the two possible quintet modes, and finally, we unambiguously identify the formed quintet state as 5E, in agreement with our theoretical expectations.

  20. Weak hard X-ray emission from two broad absorption line quasars observed with NuSTAR: Compton-thick absorption or intrinsic X-ray weakness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus...... and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain ≈ 400-600 hard X-ray (≳ 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons...... are not significantly absorbed (NH ≲ 1024 cm-2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain...

  1. Simultaneous modelling of X-ray emission and optical polarization of intermediate polars: the case of V405 Aur

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Lima, I.; Vilega Rodrigues, C.; Medeiros Gomes Silva, K.; Luna, G.; D Amico, F.; Goulart Coelho, J.

    2017-10-01

    Intermediate polars are compact binaries in which mass transfer occurs from a low-mass star onto a magnetic white dwarf. A shock structure is formed in the magnetic accretion column nearby the white-dwarf surface. High-energy emission is produced in the post-shock region and the main physical process envolved is bremsstrahlung and line emission. Some systems show optical polarization, which may be also originated in the post-shock region. Our main goal is to study the magnetic structure of intermediate polars by simultaneously modelling optical polarimetry and X-ray data using the CYCLOPS code. This code was developed by our group to peform multi-wavelength fitting of the accretion column flux. It considers cyclotron and free-free emission from a 3D post-shock region, which is non-homogeneous in terms of density, temperature, and magnetic field. In this study, we present our modelling of the optical polarization and X-ray emission of V405 Aurigae, the intermediate polar that has the highest magnetic field. Previous studies of this system were not successful in proposing a geometry that explains both the optical and X-ray emissions.

  2. Thermal components in the early X-ray afterglows of GRBs: likely cocoon emission and constraints on the progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valan, Vlasta; Larsson, Josefin; Ahlgren, Björn

    2018-02-01

    The early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are usually well described by absorbed power laws. However, in some cases, additional thermal components have been identified. The origin of this emission is debated, with proposed explanations including supernova shock breakout, emission from a cocoon surrounding the jet, as well as emission from the jet itself. A larger sample of detections is needed in order to place constraints on these different models. Here, we present a time-resolved spectral analysis of 74 GRBs observed by Swift X-ray Telescope in a search for thermal components. We report six detections in our sample, and also confirm an additional three cases that were previously reported in the literature. The majority of these bursts have a narrow range of blackbody radii around ˜2 × 1012 cm, despite having a large range of luminosities (Lpeak ˜ 1047-1051 erg s-1). This points to an origin connected to the progenitor stars, and we suggest that emission from a cocoon breaking out from a thick wind may explain the observations. For two of the bursts in the sample, an explanation in terms of late prompt emission from the jet is instead more likely. We also find that these thermal components are preferentially detected when the X-ray luminosity is low, which suggests that they may be hidden by bright afterglows in the majority of GRBs.

  3. Inverse Compton Origin of the Hard X-ray and Soft gamma-ray Emission from the Galactic Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Orlando, Elena; Bouchet, Laurent

    2008-09-30

    A recent re-determination of the non-thermal component of the hard X-ray to soft {gamma}-ray emission from the Galactic ridge, using the SPI instrument on the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Observatory, is shown to be well reproduced as inverse-Compton emission from the interstellar medium. Both cosmic-ray primary electrons and secondary electrons and positrons contribute to the emission. The prediction uses the GALPROP model and includes a new calculation of the interstellar radiation field. This may solve a long-standing mystery of the origin of this emission, and potentially opens a new window on Galactic cosmic rays.

  4. Analysis of memory consolidation and evocation in rats by proton induced X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobim, P.F.C., E-mail: pjobim@uol.com.br [Ion Implantation Laboratory, Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, CP 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Paulo Gama 90050-170, Porto Alegre (Brazil); University Hospital Research Center (HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Santos, C.E.I. dos [Ion Implantation Laboratory, Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, CP 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Maurmann, N.; Reolon, G.K. [Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Paulo Gama 90050-170, Porto Alegre (Brazil); University Hospital Research Center (HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Debastiani, R. [Ion Implantation Laboratory, Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, CP 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Pedroso, T.R.; Carvalho, L.M. [Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Paulo Gama 90050-170, Porto Alegre (Brazil); University Hospital Research Center (HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Dias, J.F. [Ion Implantation Laboratory, Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, CP 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    It is well known that trace elements such as Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn have a key role in synapse plasticity and learning. Learning process is conventionally divided in three distinct and complementary stages: memory acquisition, consolidation and evocation. Consolidation is the stabilization of the synaptic trace formed by acquisition, while evocation is the recall of this trace. Ion-based techniques capable of providing information concerning the elemental composition of organic tissues may be helpful to improve our understanding on memory consolidation and evocation processes. In particular, the Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique can be used to analyze different biological tissues with good accuracy. In this work we explore the versatility of PIXE to measure the elemental concentrations in rat brain tissues in order to establish any possible correlation between them and the memory consolidation and evocation processes. To this end, six groups of middle-age male Wistar rats were trained and tested in a step-down Inhibitory Avoidance conditioning. After the behavior tests, the animals were decapitated in accordance with the legal procedures and their brains were removed and dissected for the PIXE analyses. The results demonstrated that there are differences in the elemental concentration among the groups and such variations may be associated with their availability to the learning processes (by memory consolidation and evocation). Moreover, the control groups circumvent the possibility that a non-specific event involved in learning tasks cause such variations. Our results suggest that PIXE may be a useful tool to investigate memory consolidation and evocation in animal models.

  5. A Link Between X-ray Emission Lines and Radio Jets in 4U 1630-47?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, Joseph; Coriat, Mickaël; Fender, Rob; Lee, Julia C.; Ponti, Gabriele; Tzioumis, A.; Edwards, Phillip; Broderick, Jess

    2014-06-01

    Recently, Díaz Trigo et al. reported an XMM-Newton detection of relativistically Doppler-shifted emission lines associated with steep-spectrum radio emission in the stellar-mass black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its 2012 outburst. They interpreted these lines as indicative of a baryonic jet launched by the accretion disk. We present a search for the same lines earlier in the same outburst using high-resolution X-ray spectra from the Chandra HETGS. While our observations (eight months prior to the XMM-Newton campaign) also coincide with detections of steep spectrum radio emission by the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we find a strong disk wind but no evidence for any relativistic X-ray emission lines. Indeed, despite ˜5× brighter radio emission, our Chandra spectra allow us to place an upper limit on the flux in the blueshifted Fe XXVI line that is ˜20× weaker than the line observed by Díaz Trigo et al. Thus we can conclusively say that radio emission is not universally associated with relativistically Doppler-shifted emission lines in 4U 1630-47. We explore several scenarios that could explain our differing results, including variations in the geometry of the jet or a mass-loading process or jet baryon content that evolves with the accretion state of the black hole. We also consider the possibility that the radio emission arises in an interaction between a jet and the nearby ISM, in which case the X-ray emission lines might be unrelated to the radio emission.

  6. Research on pinches driven by Speed-2 generator: Hard X-ray and neutron emission in plasma focus configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, L.; Moreno, J.; Silva, P.; Sylvester, G.; Zambra, M.; Pavez, C. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile); Pavez, C. [Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Raspa, V. [Buenos Aires Univ., PLADEMA, CONICET and INFIP (Argentina); Castillo, F. [Insitituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM (Mexico); Kies, W. [Heinrich-Heine-Univ., Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Speed-2 is a generator based on Marx technology and was designed in the University of Dusseldorf. Speed-2 consists on 40 +/- Marx modules connected in parallel (4.1 {mu}F equivalent Marx generator capacity, 300 kV, 4 MA in short circuit, 187 kJ, 400 ns rise time, dI/dt {approx} 10{sup 13} A/s). Currently Speed-2 is operating at CCHEN (Chilean nuclear energy commission), being the most powerful and energetic device for dense transient plasma in the Southern Hemisphere. Most of the previous works developed in Speed-2 at Dusseldorf were done in a plasma focus configuration for soft X-ray emission and the neutron emission from Speed-2 was not completely studied. The research program at CCHEN considers experiments in different pinch configurations (plasma focus, gas puffed plasma focus, gas embedded Z-pinch, wire arrays) at current of hundred of kilo- to mega-amperes, using the Speed-2 generator. The Chilean operation has begun implementing and developing diagnostics in a conventional plasma focus configuration operating in deuterium in order to characterize the neutron emission and the hard X-ray production. Silver activation counters, plastics CR39 and scintillator-photomultiplier detectors are used to characterize the neutron emission. Images of metallic plates with different thickness are obtained on commercial radiographic film, Agfa Curix ST-G2, in order to characterize an effective energy of the hard X-ray outside of the discharge. (authors)

  7. Simulating 3D Stellar Winds and Diffuse X-ray Emissions from Gases in Non-equilibrium Ionization State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Min; Sun, Wei; Niu, Shu; Zhou, Xin; Ji, Li

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the physical properties of stellar winds launched in super stellar clusters (SSCs). Chandra observations have detected the presence of diffuse X-ray emission caused by hot gas from such winds in SSCs, and provide the best probe for understanding interactions between the stellar winds and the complex nursery regions. However, the details of the origin of cluster winds, the mass and energy ejection, the formation of diffuse X-ray emission, the fraction of winds contribution to the distribution of diffuse X-ray emission still remain unclear. We developed a multiphysics hydrodynamic model including self-gravity, head conduction and performed 3D simulations with an unprecedented grid resolution due to adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability in a case study of NGC 3603, as a supplement to the analysis of the archived 500 ks Chandra observations. The synthetic emission will be computed by assuming the gas in a non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) state indicated by Chandra observation, not coronal ionization equilibrium (CIE) that most works assumed, by using a customized NEI calculation module based on AtomDB. The results will be compared to the Chandra observations.

  8. NuSTAR detection of high-energy X-ray emission and rapid variability from sagittarius A* flares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrière, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2014-01-01

    Sagittarius A* harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A* spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours...... at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum...... of Sagittarius A* X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cutoff. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra...

  9. Catching a glimpse of the X-ray emission from galaxies in the early Universe by studying nearby low-metallicity galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Zych, Antara; Hornschemeier, Ann; Lehmer, Bret; Ptak, Andrew; Yukita, Mihoko

    2015-09-01

    Deep studies of X-ray emission from galaxies, such as the Chandra Deep Field-South 4 Ms (soon to be 7Ms) survey, have allowed us to peer back in history at X-ray binary formation and evolution over cosmic timescales. X-ray stacking observations of z=1-4 star-forming galaxies reveal that the metallicity evolution of the Universe drives the evolution of the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity per star formation rate (SFR), which is dominated by high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). By finding local (z=0.02-0.2), rare, analogs of these high redshift galaxies, we have found further evidence that the X-ray emission per SFR is elevated compared to typical local star-forming galaxies and this appears to be due to the lower metallicities of these galaxies. Theoretically, metal poor stars produce weaker stellar winds, which results in higher numbers of more massive binaries and therefore leads to higher X-ray luminosities in metal poor populations. Since galaxies in the early universe (and their binaries) formed in a more pristine universe, with few metals, the analogs that we have been studying have cosmological significance. X-ray emission from X-ray binaries and hot gas within galaxies at these early epochs is expected to be important for heating and reionization of the Universe. We will present our current results on the study of HMXB populations in nearby metal-poor starbursts. These primordial analog galaxies represent a challenge for current X-ray facilities, but with modest exposures with Athena, we will obtain high-resolution X-ray spectra permitting detailed study of their properties. We use simulations of the X-ray spectra from these galaxies with Athena to explore the potential capability for measuring column densities (n_H) and metallicities, as well as line shifts to detect outflows that may ultimately enrich the intergalactic medium (IGM).

  10. Luminescence of Ce3+ at two different sites in ?-Sr2P2O7 under vacuum ultraviolet-UV and x-ray excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hou, D.; Han, B.; Chen, W.; Liang, H.; Su, Q.; Dorenbos, P.; Huang, Y.; Gao, Z.; Tao, Y.

    2010-01-01

    A series of Ce3+ doped ?-Sr2?2xCexNaxP2O7 phosphor compounds has been prepared using a high-temperature solid-state reaction technique. The luminescence properties under vacuum ultraviolet-UV and x-ray excitation were studied. Luminescence spectra reveal three UV-emitting peaks at about 310, 330,

  11. Observations of soft X-ray emission and plasma dynamics of a compact capillary discharge operated in xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.; Chuaqui, H. [Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-09-15

    We report observations of a low stored energy, low inductance compact capillary discharge operated in xenon. Even though the stored electrical energy is less than 1 J, significant output in the optical windows at 110 and 135 Å is measured. The soft X-ray emission is time-resolved and the conversion energy of the source is obtained. A lower bound to the conversion efficiency at 110 Å ± 2% and 135 Å ± 1% of 3.6% and 1.6% is obtained, respectively. The use of moiré-schlieren optical diagnostic allows the evolution of the line electron density. In particular, we observe a significant degree of compression in a tight on axis pinch as well as radial compression waves. The temporal evolution of the X-ray emission, which occurs during the current reversal and later, is discussed in relation to work in argon discharges and in relation to model calculations.

  12. Model for electron emission of high-Z radio-sensitizing nanoparticle irradiated by X-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Casta, R.; Champeaux, J. -P.; Sence, M.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Cafarelli, P.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we develop a new model for the electron emission of high-Z nanoparticle irradiated by X-rays. This study is motivated by the recent advances about the nanoparticle enhancement of cancer treatment by radiotherapy. Our original approach combines a pure probabilistic analytical model for the photon trajectories inside the nanoparticle and subsequent electron cascade trajectories based here on a Monte-Carlo simulation provided by the Livermore model implemented in Geant4. To compare...

  13. Structure of Quasar Continuum Emission Regions and Cosmology from Optical and X-Ray Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-02

    15. NUMBER OF PAGES 42 14. SUBJECT TERMS cosmology : observations — accretion, accretion disks — dark matter — gravitational lensing...black hole. Subject headings: cosmology : observations — accretion, accretion disks — dark matter — gravitational lensing — quasars: general 2...U.S.N.A. – Trident Scholar project report; no. 365 (2008) STRUCTURE OF QUASAR CONTINUUM EMISSION REGIONS AND COSMOLOGY FROM OPTICAL AND X-RAY

  14. Quantum self-amplified spontaneous emission regime of the x-ray Compton laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Avetissian

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we consider in general the high-gain SASE x-ray Compton FEL in the quantum regime of amplification arising from the self-consistent set of the Maxwell and relativistic quantum kinetic equations. The analytical solutions are obtained which are valid before the saturation. The quantum seed-shot noise and subsequent SASE power are calculated. A considerable increase in start-up and narrowing of the spectrum of the SASE power for amplifying x-ray frequencies is shown compared with the classical SASE regime.

  15. Charge exchange and X-ray emission in 70 MeV/u Bi-Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, P. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany) and Vaish College, Rohtak 124 001 (India) and J. Liebig University, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)]. E-mail: P.Verma@gsi.de; Mokler, P.H. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); JMI University, New Delhi 110 025 (India); Braeuning-Demian, A. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning, H. [JMI University, New Delhi 110 025 (India); Berdermann, E. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Chatterjee, S. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Gumberidze, A. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [J.W. Goethe University, D-60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Kozhuharov, C. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Orsic-Muthig, A. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Reuschl, R. [J.W. Goethe University, D-60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Schoeffler, M. [J.W. Goethe University, D-60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Spillmann, U. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Stachura, Z. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland); Tashenov, S. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Wahab, M.A. [Vaish College, Rohtak 124 001 (India)

    2005-07-01

    Charge exchange and X-ray emission for 70 MeV/u highly charged ions of Bi {sup q+} [77 q 82] colliding with thin Au targets [21 t in {mu}g/cm{sup 2} 225] were measured at the heavy ion synchrotron SIS at GSI. For the innermost shells this beam energy implies a quasiadiabatic collision regime. The charge state distribution of the emerging ions was measured by a position sensitive CVD-diamond detector after being analyzed by a magnet spectrometer. Charge exchange cross sections have been deduced from the target thickness dependence of the charge state distribution. Electron capture at distant collision dominates completely over ionization at close collision. The X-ray emission from the collision partners were measured by solid state detectors, Ge(i). The K X-ray emission for closed and open incoming projectile K vacancies gives access to vacancy transfer in the superheavy quasi-molecule transiently formed during collision for the innermost shells.

  16. Transition Metal Nanoparticle Oxidation in a Chemically Non-Homogenous Environment Revealed by 2p3d Resonant X-ray Emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, M.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315032863; Suljoti, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315032995; Campos-Cuerva, C.; Gosselink, R.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326164081; van der Eerden, A.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304840483; Schlappa, J.; Zhou, K.J.; Monney, C.; Schmitt, T.; de Groot, F.M.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X

    2013-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is often employed in fields such as catalysis to determine whether transition-metal nanoparticles are oxidized. Here we show 2p3/2 XAS and 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) data of oleate-coated cobalt nanoparticles with average diameters of 4.0,

  17. Luminescence studies of zinc borates activated with different concentrations of Ce and La under x-ray and electron excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçük, N; Ayvacikli, M; Akça, S; Yüksel, M; Guinea, J Garcia; Karabulut, Y; Canimoglu, A; Topaksu, M; Can, N

    2017-09-01

    Several ZnB2O4 powder samples having dopants concentrations of 0.1, 0.01, 0.04wt% Ce and La were prepared using the nitric acid method via the starting oxides. Several complementary methods such as powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analyses environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), Radioluminescence (RL) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) techniques were used. Unique luminescence properties of Ce doped ZnB2O4 powder samples are reported for the first time. A new luminescence bands appearing in red part of the spectrum and having all the characteristics of Ce(3+) were obtained from RL results. Changing the Ce and La concentration of 0.01-0.1wt% leads to an increase in RL and CL intensities of Ce(3+) and La(3+) ions and also CL emission spectra of ZnB2O4 show gradual shift towards longer wavelength. When we compare the luminescence intensity of the samples it is seen that Ce doped ZnB2O4 has the highest intense whereas La doped ZnB2O4 has the lowest one. However, emission spectra of both Ce and La doped samples kept unchanged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative reconstruction of PIXE-tomography data for thin samples using GUPIX X-ray emission yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelet, C., E-mail: michelet@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Barberet, Ph., E-mail: barberet@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Devès, G., E-mail: deves@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bouguelmouna, B., E-mail: bbouguel@gmail.com [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bourret, S., E-mail: bourret@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Delville, M.-H., E-mail: delville@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB, UPR9048) CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Le Trequesser, Q., E-mail: letreque@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB, UPR9048) CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Gordillo, N., E-mail: nuri.gordillo@gmail.com [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Beasley, D.G., E-mail: d.beasley@ucl.ac.uk [Center of Medical Imaging Computing (CMIC), Department of Medical Physics & Bioengineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-04-01

    We present here a new development of the TomoRebuild software package, to perform quantitative Particle Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXET) reconstruction. X-ray yields are obtained from the GUPIX code. The GUPIX data base is available for protons up to 5 MeV and also in the 20–100 MeV energy range, deuterons up to 6 MeV, {sup 3}He and alphas up to 12 MeV. In this version, X-ray yields are calculated for thin samples, i.e. without simulating X-ray attenuation. PIXET data reconstruction is kept as long as possible independent from Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIMT). In this way, the local mass distribution (in g/cm{sup 3}) of each X-ray emitting element is reconstructed in all voxels of the analyzed volume, only from PIXET data, without the need of associated STIMT data. Only the very last step of data analysis requires STIMT data, in order to normalize PIXET data to obtain concentration distributions, in terms of normalized mass fractions (in μg/g). For this, a noise correction procedure has been designed in ImageJ. Moreover sinogram or image misalignment can be corrected, as well as the difference in beam size between the two experiments. The main features of the TomoRebuild code, user friendly design and modular C++ implementation, were kept. The software package is portable and can run on Windows and Linux operating systems. An optional user-friendly graphic interface was designed in Java, as a plugin for the ImageJ graphic software package. Reconstruction examples are presented from biological specimens of Caenorhabditis elegans – a small nematode constituting a reference model for biology studies. The reconstruction results are compared between the different codes TomoRebuild, DISRA and JPIXET, and different reconstruction methods: Filtered BackProjection (FBP) and Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM)

  19. Quantitative reconstruction of PIXE-tomography data for thin samples using GUPIX X-ray emission yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelet, C.; Barberet, Ph.; Devès, G.; Bouguelmouna, B.; Bourret, S.; Delville, M.-H.; Le Trequesser, Q.; Gordillo, N.; Beasley, D. G.; Marques, A. C.; Farau, R.; Toko, B. R.; Campbell, J.; Maxwell, J.; Moretto, Ph.; Seznec, H.

    2015-04-01

    We present here a new development of the TomoRebuild software package, to perform quantitative Particle Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXET) reconstruction. X-ray yields are obtained from the GUPIX code. The GUPIX data base is available for protons up to 5 MeV and also in the 20-100 MeV energy range, deuterons up to 6 MeV, 3He and alphas up to 12 MeV. In this version, X-ray yields are calculated for thin samples, i.e. without simulating X-ray attenuation. PIXET data reconstruction is kept as long as possible independent from Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIMT). In this way, the local mass distribution (in g/cm3) of each X-ray emitting element is reconstructed in all voxels of the analyzed volume, only from PIXET data, without the need of associated STIMT data. Only the very last step of data analysis requires STIMT data, in order to normalize PIXET data to obtain concentration distributions, in terms of normalized mass fractions (in μg/g). For this, a noise correction procedure has been designed in ImageJ. Moreover sinogram or image misalignment can be corrected, as well as the difference in beam size between the two experiments. The main features of the TomoRebuild code, user friendly design and modular C++ implementation, were kept. The software package is portable and can run on Windows and Linux operating systems. An optional user-friendly graphic interface was designed in Java, as a plugin for the ImageJ graphic software package. Reconstruction examples are presented from biological specimens of Caenorhabditis elegans - a small nematode constituting a reference model for biology studies. The reconstruction results are compared between the different codes TomoRebuild, DISRA and JPIXET, and different reconstruction methods: Filtered BackProjection (FBP) and Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM).

  20. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  1. Optimization of soft x-ray line emission from laser-produced carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since this line lies in the water window spectral region, it has potential application in x-ray microscopic imaging of biological sample in wet condition. ... Laser Plasma Division, Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, India; Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 ...

  2. Surface roughness-aided hard X-ray emission from carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MWNT) irradiated by intense, femtosecond laser over an intensity range of 1015 –1017 W cm−2 2 is reported. The MWNT targets yield two orders of magnitude higher X-rays (indicating significant enhancement of laser coupling) and three ...

  3. A comparative study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    model, the hydrodynamic and atomic rate equations were solved to model the non-LTE plasma relevant to X-ray laser experiments. However, one can use a simple hydrodynamic model to estimate the ionization time during plasma expansion [39]. For one-dimensional expansion of the plasma, which is valid for time t ...

  4. Role of local absorption on the X-ray emission from MHD accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accretion processes onto classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs are believed to generate shocks at the stellar surface due to the impact of supersonic downflowing plasma. Although current models of accretion streams provide a plausible global picture of this process, several aspects are still unclear. For example, the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is, in general, well below the predicted value. A possible explanation discussed in the literature is in terms of significant absorption of the emission due to the thick surrounding medium. Here we consider a 2D MHD model describing an accretion stream propagating through the atmosphere of a CTTS and impacting onto its chromosphere. The model includes all the relevant physics, namely the gravity, the thermal conduction, and the radiative cooling, and a realistic description of the unperturbed stellar atmosphere (from the chromosphere to the corona. From the model results, we synthesize the X-ray emission emerging from the hot slab produced by the accretion shock, exploring different configurations and strengths of the stellar magnetic field. The synthesis includes the local absorption by the thick surrounding medium and the Doppler shift of lines due to the component of plasma velocity along the line-of-sight. We explore the effects of absorption on the emerging X-ray spectrum, considering different inclinations of the accretion stream with respect to the observer. Finally we compare our results with the observations.

  5. Deep Limits on the X-ray and Radio Emission From the Nearby Type Iax SN2014dt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Candice; Margutti, Raffaella; Coppejans, Deannne

    2018-01-01

    Type Iax Supernovae (SN Iax) have been recently recognized as a new class of stellar explosions in 2012. SN Iax constitute the largest class of ``peculiar thermonuclear explosions'' from white dwarf (WD) stellar progenitors in binary systems. They are characterized by lower ejecta velocity, lower luminsity and non-standard late-time spectral evolution, when compared to the more common Type Ia SNe. Here I present deep radio and X-ray observations of the closest type Iax SN yet discovered, SN2014dt. The SN shock interaction with the medium is a very well known source of radio and X-ray emission. My observations of SN2014dt uniquely constrain the density in the SN sub-pc environment (which cannot be investigated otherwise), and allow me to put constraints on the mysterious nature of the stellar companion.

  6. In-air Rutherford Backscattering and Particle Induced X-ray Emission for Biophysics and Material Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, James

    2015-03-01

    Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) are methods of nondestructive analysis of elemental composition. Rebounding particles or emitted x-rays can be ``collected'' and then analyzed to reveal the number ratio of the elements in a sample. Due to the nondestructive feature of these processes, RBS and PIXE are useful in many diverse fields of study such as archaeology, art, and biology; however, these experiments usually require large, expensive particle accelerators and detectors. Instead, I am attempting to use a radioactive source, photodiodes, and computer software to perform the same methods at a fraction of the cost. I am exploring cost, time, and resolution benefits and losses of my approach versus the traditional accelerator-based approach.

  7. Evidence for the Importance of Resonance Scattering in X-Ray Emission Line Profiles of the O Star Zeta Puppis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutenegger, M.A.; /Columbia U.; Owocki, S.P.; /Bartol Research Inst.; Kahn, S.M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Paerels, F.B.S.; /Columbia U.

    2006-10-10

    We fit the Doppler profiles of the He-like triplet complexes of O VII and N VI in the X-ray spectrum of the O star {zeta} Pup, using XMM-Newton RGS data collected over {approx} 400 ks of exposure. We find that they cannot be well fit if the resonance and intercombination lines are constrained to have the same profile shape. However, a significantly better fit is achieved with a model incorporating the effects of resonance scattering, which causes the resonance line to become more symmetric than the intercombination line for a given characteristic continuum optical depth {tau}{sub *}. We discuss the plausibility of this hypothesis, as well as its significance for our understanding of Doppler profiles of X-ray emission lines in O stars.

  8. Non-Quiescent X-ray Emission from Neutron Stars and Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tournear, Derek M

    2003-08-18

    X-ray astronomy began with the detection of the persistent source Scorpius X-1. Shortly afterwards, sources were detected that were variable. Centaurus X-2, was determined to be an X-ray transient, having a quiescent state, and a state that was much brighter. As X-ray astronomy progressed, classifications of transient sources developed. One class of sources, believed to be neutron stars, undergo extreme luminosity transitions lasting a few seconds. These outbursts are believed to be thermonuclear explosions occurring on the surface of neutron stars (type I X-ray bursts). Other sources undergo luminosity changes that cannot be explained by thermonuclear burning and last for days to months. These sources are soft X-ray transients (SXTs) and are believed to be the result of instabilities in the accretion of matter onto either a neutron star or black hole. Type I X-ray bursts provide a tool for probing the surfaces of neutron stars. Requiring a surface for the burning has led authors to use the presence of X-ray bursts to rule out the existence of a black hole (where an event horizon exists not a surface) for systems which exhibit type I X-ray bursts. Distinguishing between neutron stars and black holes has been a problem for decades. Narayan and Heyl have developed a theoretical framework to convert suitable upper limits on type I X-ray bursts from accreting black hole candidates (BHCs) into evidence for an event horizon. We survey 2101.2 ks of data from the USA X-ray timing experiment and 5142 ks of data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) experiment to obtain the first formal constraint of this type. 1122 ks of neutron star data yield a population averaged mean burst rate of 1.7 {+-} 0.4 x 10{sup -5} bursts s{sup -1}, while 6081 ks of BHC data yield a 95% confidence level upper limit of 4.9 x 10{sup -7} bursts s{sup -1}. Applying the framework of Narayan and Heyl we calculate regions of luminosity where the neutron stars are expected to burst and the BHCs

  9. THE CHANDRA SURVEY OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES IN THE 3CR CATALOG: X-RAY EMISSION FROM NUCLEI, JETS, AND HOTSPOTS IN THE CHANDRA ARCHIVAL OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Wilkes, B. J.; Kuraszkiewicz, J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Liuzzo, E.; Orienti, M.; Paladino, R. [Istituto di Radioastronomia, INAF, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy); Tremblay, G. R. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Baum, S. A.; O’Dea, C. P. [University of Manitoba, Dept of Physics and Astronomy, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    As part of our program to build a complete radio and X-ray database of all Third Cambridge catalog extragalactic radio sources, we present an analysis of 93 sources for which Chandra archival data are available. Most of these sources have already been published. Here we provide a uniform re-analysis and present nuclear X-ray fluxes and X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots and hotspots using both publicly available radio images and new radio images that have been constructed from data available in the Very Large Array archive. For about 1/3 of the sources in the selected sample, a comparison between the Chandra and radio observations was not reported in the literature: we find X-ray detections of 2 new radio jet knots and 17 hotspots. We also report the X-ray detection of extended emission from the intergalactic medium for 15 galaxy clusters.

  10. Temporal behavior of unresolved transition array emission in water window soft x-ray spectral region from multiply charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, Thanh-Hung, E-mail: dinh@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Li, Bowen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dunne, Padraig; O' Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Fujioka, Shinsuke [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Nishikino, Masaharu [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2015-09-21

    We have characterized the spectral structure and the temporal history of the laser-produced high-Z multi-charged ion plasmas for the efficient water window soft x-ray sources. Strong unresolved transition array emission was observed due to 4d–4f and 4f–5g transitions from Au, Pb, and Bi plasmas in the 280–700 eV photon energy region. The temporal behavior of the emission was essentially similar of that of the laser pulse with a slight delay between different transitions. These results provide feedback for accurate modeling of the atomic processes with the radiative hydrodynamic simulations.

  11. A New Model for Iron Emission Lines and Re-Burst in GRB X-Ray Afterglows

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, W. H.; Wei, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    Recently iron emission features have been observed in several X-ray afterglows of GRBs. It is found that the energy obtained from the illuminating continuum which produces the emission lines is much higher than that of the main burst.The observation of SN-GRB association indicates a fallback disk should be formed after the supernovae explosion. The disk is optically thick and advection-dominated and dense. We suggest that the delayed injection energy after the initial main burst, much higher ...

  12. Periodicities in the X-ray Emission from the Solar Corona: SphinX and SOXS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steślicki, M.; Awasthi, A. K.; Gryciuk, M.; Jain, R.

    The structure and evolution of the solar magnetic field is driven by a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo operating in the solar interior, which induces various solar activities that exhibit periodic variations on different timescales. Therefore, probing the periodic nature of emission originating from the solar corona may provide insights of the convection-zone-photosphere-corona coupling processes. We present the study of the mid-range periodicities, between rotation period (˜27 days) and the Schwabe cycle period (˜11 yr), in the solar soft X-ray emission, based on the data obtained by two instruments: SphinX and SOXS in various energy bands.

  13. X-MIME: An Imaging X-ray Spectrometer for Detailed Study of Jupiter's Icy Moons and the Planet's X-ray Aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from these moons is certainly due to bombardment of their surfaces of highly energetic protons, oxygen and sulfur ions from the region near the Torus exciting atoms in their surfaces and leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping (down to 40 m spatial resolution) of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Such maps would provide important constraints on formation and evolution scenarios for the surfaces of these moons. Here we describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer under going a feasibility study for the JIMO mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  14. X-ray emission from the planet pulsar B1257+12

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlov, G. G.; Kargaltsev, O.; Garmire, G. P.; Wolszczan, A.

    2007-01-01

    We report the detection of the millisecond pulsar B1257+12 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In a 20 ks exposure we detected 25 photons from the pulsar, with energies between 0.4 and 2.0 keV, corresponding to the flux F_X=(4.4+/- 0.9)*10^{-15} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} in this energy range. The X-ray spectrum can be described by a power-law model with photon index Gamma = 2.8 and luminosity L_X \\approx 2.5*10^{29} ergs s^{-1} in the 0.3--8 keV band, for a plausible distance of 500 pc and hydrogen...

  15. INTEGRAL detection of continued hard X-ray emission from MAXI J0911-655

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, J.-G.; Kuulkers, E.; Sidoli, L.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; Watanabe, K.; Pavan, L.; Bozzo, E.

    2017-05-01

    During the observations performed in the direction of the Carina Region and IGR J11014-6103 between 2017 May 8 at 04:50 and May 24 at 17:39, INTEGRAL detected activity from the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP) MAXI J0911-655 (Sanna et al., 2017, A & A, 598, 34; Atel #8872, #8884, #8914, #8971, #8986, #9738, #9740).

  16. SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM X-RAY-SELECTED SEYFERT GALAXIES WITH FERMI-LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3,F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Caliandro, G. A., E-mail: mahaya@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: bechtol@stanford.edu, E-mail: madejski@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: stawarz@astro.isas.jaxa.jp, E-mail: mahaya@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: stawarz@astro.isas.jaxa.jp, E-mail: bechtol@stanford.edu, E-mail: madejski@slac.stanford.edu [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2012-03-10

    We report on a systematic investigation of the {gamma}-ray properties of 120 hard X-ray-selected Seyfert galaxies classified as 'radio-quiet' objects, utilizing the three-year accumulation of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. Our sample of Seyfert galaxies is selected using the Swift Burst Alert Telescope 58 month catalog, restricting the analysis to the bright sources with average hard X-ray fluxes F{sub 14-195keV} {>=} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10 Degree-Sign ). In order to remove 'radio-loud' objects from the sample, we use the 'hard X-ray radio loudness parameter', R{sub rX}, defined as the ratio of the total 1.4 GHz radio to 14-195 keV hard X-ray energy fluxes. Among 120 X-ray bright Seyfert galaxies with R{sub rX} <10{sup -4}, we did not find a statistically significant {gamma}-ray excess (TS > 25) positionally coincident with any target Seyferts, with possible exceptions of ESO 323-G077 and NGC 6814. The mean value of the 95% confidence level {gamma}-ray upper limit for the integrated photon flux above 100 MeV from the analyzed Seyferts is {approx_equal} 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} , and the upper limits derived for several objects reach {approx_equal} 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} . Our results indicate that no prominent {gamma}-ray emission component related to active galactic nucleus activity is present in the spectra of Seyferts around GeV energies. The Fermi-LAT upper limits derived for our sample probe the ratio of {gamma}-ray to X-ray luminosities L{sub {gamma}}/L{sub X} < 0.1, and even <0.01 in some cases. The obtained results impose novel constraints on the models for high-energy radiation of 'radio-quiet' Seyfert galaxies.

  17. X-ray emission of the young stellar population of the Orion B molecular cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Garcia, M.; Stelzer, B.; Pillitteri, I.; López-Santiago, J.; de Castro, E.

    2014-07-01

    We carried out an analysis of nine XMM-Newton archive observations covering a significant part of the Orion B molecular Cloud. We completed the analysis by using Infrared (Spitzer, WISE, and 2MASS) and Optical (Optical Monitor and UCAC4) photometry data. This work is focused on the classification and characterization of young stellar objects and the inhomogeneity along the cloud. From nine X-ray observations we detected 604 sources in which 490 of them have at least a counterpart. We obtained the X-ray coronal properties of 49 sources with more than 100 net counts, using the 1T or 2T-model of XSPEC. After rejecting the background sources we classified the sample in 332 Classes III, 141 Classes II and 11 Classes 0/I based on their infrared properties. We explored the differences along the cloud and discovered 5 different groups where Class 0/I and Class II objects are located, coincident with NGC2023, NGC2024, NGC2068, NGC2071 and around V1647-Ori. We compared the X-ray luminosity functions for the different classes obtained, and also the complete sample with the COUP distribution, which reveals similar populations.

  18. Further Constraints on Thermal Quiescent X-Ray Emission from SAX J1808.4-3658

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinke, C. O.; Jonker, P. G.; Wijnands, R.; Deloye, C. J.; Taam, R. E.

    2009-02-01

    We observed SAX J1808.4-3658 (1808), the first accreting millisecond pulsar, in deep quiescence with XMM-Newton and (near simultaneously) Gemini-South. The X-ray spectrum of 1808 is similar to that observed in quiescence in 2001 and 2006, describable by an absorbed power law with photon index 1.74 ± 0.11 and unabsorbed X-ray luminosity LX = 7.9 ± 0.7 × 1031 ergs s-1, for NH = 1.3 × 1021 cm-2. Fitting all the quiescent XMM-Newton X-ray spectra with a power law, we constrain any thermally emitting neutron star (NS) with a hydrogen atmosphere to have a temperature less than 30 eV and L NS (0.01-10 keV) history or initial NS mass in these otherwise similar systems. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  19. An Experimental Benchmark for Improved Simulation of Absolute Soft X-Ray Emission from Polystyrene Targets Irradiated With the Nike Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weaver, J. L; Busquet, M; Colombant, D. G; Mostovych, A. N; Feldman, U; Klapisch, M; Seely, J. F; Brown, C; Holland, G

    2005-01-01

    Absolutely calibrated, time-resolved spectral intensity measurements of soft x-ray emission from laser-irradiated polystyrene targets are compared to radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that include...

  20. High resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy of water and aqueous ions using the micro-jet technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Kathrin M.; Koennecke, Rene; Ghadimi, Samira; Golnak, Ronny [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, c/o BESSY GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Soldatov, Mikhail A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, c/o BESSY GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Research Center for Nanoscale Structure of Matter, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu 344090 (Russian Federation); Hodeck, Kai F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, c/o BESSY GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Soldatov, Alexander [Research Center for Nanoscale Structure of Matter, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu 344090 (Russian Federation); Aziz, Emad F., E-mail: Emad.Aziz@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, c/o BESSY GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin, FB Physik, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Soft X-ray absorption (XA) and emission (XE) spectroscopy is a powerful method for probing the local electronic structure of light elements (e.g. C, O, N, S) and transition metals, which are all of importance for biochemical systems. Here, we report for the first time on the XE spectra of a liquid micro-jet sample in a vacuum environment. We developed a high resolution X-ray emission spectrometer and recorded the spectra of pure water in full agreement with those of the literature, as well as of an aqueous solution of NiCl{sub 2}. For the latter system, ground state Hartree-Fock calculations using a self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) approach were carried out to specify the nature of the d-occupied orbital. Our results confirm the dark-channel-fluorescence-yield mechanism that we recently proposed for the case of metal ions in aqueous solutions. The ability to record absorption and emission spectra of an aqueous liquid-jet opens the way for the study of biochemical systems in physiological media. - Abstract: Soft X-ray absorption (XA) and emission (XE) spectroscopy is a powerful method for probing the local electronic structure of light elements (e.g. C, O, N, S) and transition metals, which are all of importance for biochemical systems. Here, we report for the first time on the XE spectra of a liquid micro-jet sample in a vacuum environment. We developed a high resolution X-ray emission spectrometer and recorded the spectra of pure water in full agreement with those of the literature, as well as of an aqueous solution of NiCl{sub 2}. For the latter system, ground state Hartree-Fock calculations using a self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) approach were carried out to specify the nature of the d-occupied orbital. Our results confirm the dark-channel-fluorescence-yield mechanism that we recently proposed for the case of metal ions in aqueous solutions. The ability to record absorption and emission spectra of an aqueous liquid-jet opens the

  1. The soft-X-ray emission of Ark 120. XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and the importance of taking the broad view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matt, G.; Marinucci, A.; Guainazzi, M.

    2014-01-01

    , a cutoff power law best explains the soft-X-ray emission. This model likely corresponds to Comptonization of the accretion disc seed UV photons by a population of warm electrons: using Comptonization models, a temperature of similar to 0.3 keV and an optical depth of similar to 13 are found. If the UV......We present simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the 'bare' Seyfert 1 galaxy, Ark 120, a system in which ionized absorption is absent. The NuSTAR hard-X-ray spectral coverage allows us to constrain different models for the excess soft-X-ray emission. Among phenomenological models...

  2. First hard X-ray detection of the non-thermal emission around the Arches cluster: morphology and spectral studies with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Bauer, Franz E.

    2014-01-01

    The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe Ku line emission at 6.4 keV from material that is n......The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe Ku line emission at 6.4 keV from material...... that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper, we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 10 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology...... and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity...

  3. X-ray emission at low-mass end of the MS - Results from an extensive Einstein Observatory survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1992-01-01

    The 0.16-4.0 keV X-ray emission from K and M stars of luminosity classes IV, V, and VI within 25 parsec of the sun was measured using all available Einstein Observatory IPC data and a critical compilation of catalogued optical data. Fifty four of 88 stars were detected, 70 of 138 M stars with Mv less than 13.4 (corresponding to M6) and 15 or 31 fainter M stars. The surveyed stars were grouped, on the basis of U, V, W space velocity components, into old-disk, young-disk, and halo population stars. Then, a subsample was selected which is statistically representative of the population of K and M stars in the solar neighborhood, on the basis of which unbiased Maximum Likelihood X-ray luminosity functions were constructed for K, early M, and late M stars. The investigation revealed a decrease of X-ray luminosity with increasing stellar age in the range of ages of disk population stars.

  4. Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy of liquid water: novel instrumentation, high resolution, and the"map" approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; B& #228; r, M.; Weigand, M.; Denlinger, J.D.; Zubavichus, Y.; Zharnikov, M.; Grunze, M.; Heske, C.; Umbach, E.

    2008-06-17

    Techniques to study the electronic structure of liquids are rare. Most recently, resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has been shown to be an extremely versatile spectroscopy to study both occupied and unoccupied electronic states for liquids in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, XES requires high-brilliance soft x-ray synchrotron radiation and poses significant technical challenges to maintain a liquid sample in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Our group has therefore developed and constructed a novel experimental setup for the study of liquids, with the long-term goal of investigating the electronic structure of biological systems in aqueous environments. We have developed a flow-through liquid cell in which the liquid is separated from vacuum by a thin Si3N4 or SiC window and which allows a precise control of temperature. This approach has significant advantages compared to static liquids cells used in the past. Furthermore, we have designed a dedicated high-transmission, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer. The high transmission makes it possible to measure complete resonant XES"maps" in less than an hour, giving unprecedented detailed insight into the electronic structure of the investigated sample. Using this new equipment we have investigated the electronic structure of liquid water. Furthermore, our XES spectra and maps give information about ultra-fast dissociation on the timescale of the O 1s core hole lifetime, which is strongly affected by the initial state hydrogen bonding configuration.

  5. Variable H13CO+ Emission in the IM Lup Disk: X-Ray Driven Time-dependent Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A.; Öberg, Karin I.; Andrews, Sean; Wilner, David; Loomis, Ryan

    2017-07-01

    We report the first detection of a substantial brightening event in an isotopologue of a key molecular ion, HCO+, within a protoplanetary disk of a T Tauri star. The H13CO+ J=3-2 rotational transition was observed three times toward IM Lup between 2014 July and 2015 May with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The first two observations show similar spectrally integrated line and continuum fluxes, while the third observation shows a doubling in the disk-integrated J=3-2 line flux compared to the continuum, which does not change between the three epochs. We explore models of an X-ray active star irradiating the disk via stellar flares, and find that the optically thin H13CO+ emission variation can potentially be explained via X-ray-driven chemistry temporarily enhancing the HCO+ abundance in the upper layers of the disk atmosphere during large or prolonged flaring events. If the HCO+ enhancement is indeed caused by an X-ray flare, future observations should be able to spatially resolve these events and potentially enable us to watch the chemical aftermath of the high-energy stellar radiation propagating across the face of protoplanetary disks, providing a new pathway to explore ionization physics and chemistry, including electron density, in disks.

  6. Radiation by energetic electrons accelerated by wave-particle interaction: a plausible mechanism for X-ray emission from the Venus mantle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab., Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom). Space Science and Technology Dept.; Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom). Physics Dept.; Quest, K.B. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). ECE Dept.; Shapiro, V.D. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Physics Dept.; Kellett, B.J. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab., Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom). Space Science and Technology Dept.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper it is argued that recently observed X-ray emission from non-magnetic planets (Dennerl et al., 2002) can be explained as a combination of bremsstrahlung and line K-shell radiation produced by the interaction of energetic electrons with the neutral atmosphere. Numerical simulations show that the modified two stream instability can generate energetic 100 eV electrons that are observed and these electrons can produce X-ray emission. (orig.)

  7. Radiation by energetic electrons accelerated by wave-particle interaction: a plausible mechanism for x-ray emission from the Venus mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bingham

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is argued that recently observed x-ray emission from non-magnetic planets (Dennerl et al., 2002 can be explained as a combination of bremsstrahlung and line K-shell radiation produced by the interaction of energetic electrons with the neutral atmosphere. Numerical simulations show that the modified two stream instability can generate energetic 100 eV electrons that are observed and these electrons can produce x-ray emission.

  8. A Restricted Open Configuration Interaction with Singles Method To Calculate Valence-to-Core Resonant X-ray Emission Spectra: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new protocol for the calculation of valence-to-core resonant X-ray emission (VtC RXES) spectra is introduced. The approach is based on the previously developed restricted open configuration interaction with singles (ROCIS) method and its parametrized version, based on a ground-state Kohn–Sham determinant (DFT/ROCIS) method. The ROCIS approach has the following features: (1) In the first step approximation, many-particle eigenstates are calculated in which the total spin is retained as a good quantum number. (2) The ground state with total spin S and excited states with spin S′ = S, S ± 1, are obtained. (3) These states have a qualitatively correct multiplet structure. (4) Quasi-degenerate perturbation theory is used to treat the spin–orbit coupling operator variationally at the many-particle level. (5) Transition moments are obtained between the relativistic many-particle states. The method has shown great potential in the field of X-ray spectroscopy, in particular in the field of transition-metal L-edge, which cannot be described correctly with particle–hole theories. In this work, the method is extended to the calculation of resonant VtC RXES [alternatively referred to as 1s-VtC resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS)] spectra. The complete Kramers–Dirac–Heisenerg equation is taken into account. Thus, state interference effects are treated naturally within this protocol. As a first application of this protocol, a computational study on the previously reported VtC RXES plane on a molecular managanese(V) complex is performed. Starting from conventional X-ray absorption spectra (XAS), we present a systematic study that involves calculations and electronic structure analysis of both the XAS and non-resonant and resonant VtC XES spectra. The very good agreement between theory and experiment, observed in all cases, allows us to unravel the complicated intensity mechanism of these spectroscopic techniques as a synergic function of state

  9. Impacts of fragmented accretion streams onto classical T Tauri stars: UV and X-ray emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, S.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Argiroffi, C.; Reale, F.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The accretion process in classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) can be studied through the analysis of some UV and X-ray emission lines which trace hot gas flows and act as diagnostics of the post-shock downfalling plasma. In the UV-band, where higher spectral resolution is available, these lines are characterized by rather complex profiles whose origin is still not clear. Aims: We investigate the origin of UV and X-ray emission at impact regions of density structured (fragmented) accretion streams. We study if and how the stream fragmentation and the resulting structure of the post-shock region determine the observed profiles of UV and X-ray emission lines. Methods: We modeled the impact of an accretion stream consisting of a series of dense blobs onto the chromosphere of a CTTS through two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We explored different levels of stream fragmentation and accretion rates. From the model results, we synthesize C IV (1550 Å) and O VIII (18.97 Å) line profiles. Results: The impacts of accreting blobs onto the stellar chromosphere produce reverse shocks propagating through the blobs and shocked upflows. These upflows, in turn, hit and shock the subsequent downfalling fragments. As a result, several plasma components differing for the downfalling velocity, density, and temperature are present altoghether. The profiles of C IV doublet are characterized by two main components: one narrow and redshifted to speed ≈ 50 km s-1 and the other broader and consisting of subcomponents with redshift to speed in the range 200-400 km s-1. The profiles of O VIII lines appear more symmetric than C IV and are redshifted to speed ≈ 150 km s-1. Conclusions: Our model predicts profiles of C IV line remarkably similar to those observed and explains their origin in a natural way as due to stream fragmentation. Movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Local moments and electronic correlations in Fe-based Heusler alloys: Kα x-ray emission spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svyazhin, Artem, E-mail: svyazhin@imp.uran.ru [M.N. Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences – Ural Division, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kurmaev, Ernst; Shreder, Elena; Shamin, Sergey [M.N. Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences – Ural Division, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sahle, Christoph J. [ESRF – The European Synchrotron, CS40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2016-09-15

    Heusler alloys are a property-rich class of materials, intensively investigated today from both theoretical and real-world application points of view. In this paper, we attempt to shed light on the role of electronic correlations in the Fe{sub 2}MeAl group (where Me represents all 3d elements from Ti to Ni) of Heusler alloys. For this purpose, we have investigated the local moments of iron by means of the x-ray emission spectroscopy technique. To obtain numerical values of local moments, the Kα-FWHM method has been employed for the first time. In every compound of the group, the presence of a local moment on the Fe atom was detected. As has been revealed, the values of these moments are temperature-independent, pointing to an insufficiency of a pure itinerant approach to magnetism in these alloys. We also comprehensively compare the usage of Kβ main lines and Kα spectra as tools for the probing of local moments and point out the significant advantages of the latter. - Highlights: • Local spin moments of iron in Fe{sub 2}MeAl (Me = Ti … Ni) Heusler alloys were investigated by means of x-ray emission spectroscopy. • Independence of the local moments from temperature confirms their localized nature. • A local moment value of iron in Fe{sub 2}MeAl raises with the atomic number of element Me. • The applicability of the Kα x-ray emission line for extracting local moment values of 3d elements was established.

  11. Time and spatially resolved measurements of x-ray burnthrough and re-emission in Au and Au:Dy:Nd foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Dropinski, S. C.; Mix, L. P.; Rochau, G. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Jones, O. S.; Suter, L. J.; Kaae, J. L.; Shearer, C. H.; Smith, J. N.

    2003-03-01

    In experiments at the Omega laser facility, x-ray framing and streak cameras were used to explore a technique for simultaneously measuring the relative x-ray burnthrough and re-emission properties of pure Au and high-Z mixture "cocktail" foils exposed to a Hohlraum radiation field. For the Au:Dy:Nd cocktail used in these preliminary experiments, the burnthrough measurements indicated a cocktail opacity ˜1.5 times that of pure Au. The x-ray re-emission fluxes from the cocktail and Au appeared to be equivalent. In the future, we propose to use this experimental arrangement to compare the relative x-ray burnthrough and re-emission properties of other potential wall materials proposed for use in National Ignition Facility Hohlraums.

  12. Temporal characteristics of the X-ray emission of NGC 7469

    OpenAIRE

    Nandra, K.; Papadakis, I. E.

    2001-01-01

    We present a study of the time variability of NGC 7469, based on a ~30 d RXTE/PCA observation. Variability is seen across the X-ray band, and spectral changes are observed. The softness ratio is correlated with the ultraviolet flux, but appears to show more rapid variability. The RMS variability parameter calculated on ~1d time scales is significantly variable, and sharp increases are seen close to the periods where the spectrum is hardest. Cross correlation of 2-4 keV, 4-10 keV and 10-15 keV...

  13. XUV emission features from the Livermore soft x-ray laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckart, M.J.; Scofield, J.H.; Hazi, A.U.

    1987-09-08

    The measured wavelengths in the soft x-ray region for 3p to 3s and 3d to 3p transitions in neon-, sodium-, and magnesium-like selenium are presented. The experimental results for the neon-like ions are compared to theoretical wavelength values and with values extrapolated along the isoelectronic sequence. The ions were contained in a plasma heated in a line-focus of a Nd-glass laser. The measurements were made with a time-gated microchannel-plate-intensified grazing incidence spectrograph.

  14. Femtosecond laser excitation of mixed Ar/Kr clusters: peculiarities of K-line x-ray production from nanoplasma under varied fraction of initial gas components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhvaniya, I. A.; Dzhidzhoev, M. S.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2017-09-01

    For the first time, we defined the range of krypton fraction (C Kr) in an initial binary Ar-Kr gas mixture that provides the production of large (N ~ 106 atoms/cluster) mixed Ar/Kr clusters under co-expansion of the mixture at room temperature and the stagnant pressure of 25 bar. Mixed Ar/Kr clusters exist at the krypton fraction of 3-15%. The presence of mixed clusters is detected by the simultaneous generation of both x-ray Kα lines of argon (E  =  3.1 keV) and krypton (E  =  12.7 keV) from nanoplasma originating as a result of femtosecond nonlinear laser excitation with intensity about 5 · 1017 W cm-2. It was shown that the amplitude of lines in dual-energy x-ray spectrum can be controlled by proper selection of the fraction of initial gas mixture components. Maximal laser energy conversion efficiency to krypton x-ray line is achieved for pure krypton clusters (i.e. C Kr  =  100%) and reaches 2 · 10-7 at laser intensity of 5 · 1017 W cm-2. The laser energy conversion efficiency to argon x-ray line reaches the maximal value of 3 · 10-6 at C kr  =  0%.

  15. Characterization of the Electronic Structure of Silicon Nanoparticles Using X-ray Absorption and Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaverka, April Susan Montoya [Univ.of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Resolving open questions regarding transport in nanostructures can have a huge impact on a broad range of future technologies such as light harvesting for energy. Silicon has potential to be used in many of these applications. Understanding how the band edges of nanostructures move as a function of size, surface termination and assembly is of fundamental importance in understanding the transport properties of these materials. In this thesis work I have investigated the change in the electronic structure of silicon nanoparticle assemblies as the surface termination is changed. Nanoparticles are synthesized using a thermal evaporation technique and sizes are determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). By passivating the particles with molecules containing alcohol groups we are able to modify the size dependent band edge shifts. Both the valence and conduction bands are measured using synchrotron based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) techniques. Particles synthesized via recrystallization of amorphous silicon/SiO2 multilayers of thicknesses below 10 nm are also investigated using the synchrotron techniques. These samples also show quantum confinement effects but the electronic structure is different from those synthesized via evaporation methods. The total bandgap is determined for all samples measured. The origins of these differences in the electronic structures are discussed.

  16. Benchmarking transition energies and emission strengths for X-ray astrophysics with measurements at the Livermore EBITs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Natalie

    2017-03-01

    K-shell transitions in astrophysically abundant metals and L-shell transitions in Fe group elements show characteristic signatures in the soft X-ray spectrum in the energy range 0.1-10 keV. These signatures have great diagnostic value for plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, and can thus help understand the physics controlling the energetic processes in astrophysical sources. This diagnostic power increases with advances in spectral resolution and effective area of the employed X-ray observatories. However, to make optimal use of the diagnostic potential - whether through global spectral modeling or through diagnostics from local modeling of individual lines - the underlying atomic physics has to be complete and well known. With the next generation of soft X-ray observatories featuring micro-calorimeters such as the SXS on Astro-H /Hitomi and the X-IFU on Athena, broadband high-resolution spectroscopy with large effective area will become more commonly available in the next decade. With these spectrometers, the accuracy of the plasma parameters derived from spectral modeling will be limited by the uncertainty of the reference atomic data rather than by instrumental factors, as is sometimes already the case for the high-resolution grating observations with Chandra-HETG and XMM-Newton-RGS. To take full advantage of the measured spectra, assessment of the accuracy of and improvements to the available atomic reference data are therefore important. Dedicated measurements in the laboratory are essential to benchmark the theoretical calculations providing the bulk of the reference data used in astrophysics. Experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion traps (EBIT-I and SuperEBIT) have a long history of providing this service. In this work, I present new measurements of transition energies and absolute electron impact excitation cross sections geared towards currently open atomic physics data needs. First, I

  17. The contribution of young core-collapse supernova remnants to the X-ray emission near quiescent supermassive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, A.; Rossi, E. M.; Costantini, E.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2016-03-01

    Appreciable star formation, and, therefore, numerous massive stars, are frequently found near supermassive black holes (SMBHs). As a result, core-collapse supernovae in these regions should also be expected. In this paper, we consider the observational consequences of predicting the fate of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the sphere of influence of quiescent SMBHs. We present these results in the context of `autarkic' nuclei, a model that describes quiescent nuclei as steady-state and self-sufficient environments where the SMBH accretes stellar winds with no appreciable inflow of material from beyond the sphere of influence. These regions have properties such as gas density that scale with the mass of the SMBH. Using predictions of the X-ray lifetimes of SNRs originating in the sphere of influence, we make estimates of the number of core collapse SNRs present at a given time. With the knowledge of lifetimes of SNRs and their association with young stars, we predict a number of core-collapse SNRs that grows from ˜1 around Milky Way-like (4.3 × 106 M⊙) SMBHs to ˜100 around the highest mass (1010 M⊙) SMBHs. The presence of young SNRs will amplify the X-ray emission near quiescent SMBHs, and we show that the total core-collapse SNR emission has the potential to influence soft X-ray searches for very low-luminosity SMBHs. Our SNR lifetime estimates also allow us to predict star formation rates in these regions. Assuming a steady-state replenishment of massive stars, we estimate a star formation rate density of 2 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 pc-2 around the Milky Way SMBH, and a similar value around other SMBHs due to a weak dependence on SMBH mass. This value is consistent with currently available observations.

  18. Femtosecond X-ray solution scattering reveals that bond formation mechanism of a gold trimer complex is independent of excitation wavelength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Hwan Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The [Au(CN2−]3 trimer in water experiences a strong van der Waals interaction between the d10 gold atoms due to large relativistic effect and can serve as an excellent model system to study the bond formation process in real time. The trimer in the ground state (S0 exists as a bent structure without the covalent bond between the gold atoms, and upon the laser excitation, one electron in the antibonding orbital goes to the bonding orbital, thereby inducing the formation of a covalent bond between gold atoms. This process has been studied by various time-resolved techniques, and most of the interpretation on the structure and dynamics converge except that the structure of the first intermediate (S1 has been debated due to different interpretations between femtosecond optical spectroscopy and femtosecond X-ray solution scattering. Recently, the excitation wavelength of 267 nm employed in our previous scattering experiment was suggested as the culprit for misinterpretation. Here, we revisited this issue by performing femtosecond X-ray solution scattering with 310 nm excitation and compared the results with our previous study employing 267 nm excitation. The data show that a linear S1 structure is formed within 500 fs regardless of excitation wavelength and the structural dynamics observed at both excitation wavelengths are identical to each other within experimental errors.

  19. Benchmarking transition energies and emission strengths for X-ray astrophysics with measurements at the Livermore EBITs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, Natalie [Friedrich Alexander Univ., Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    K-shell transitions in astrophysically abundant metals and L-shell transitions in Fe group elements show characteristic signatures in the soft X-ray spectrum in the energy range 0.1–10 keV. These signatures have great diagnostic value for plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, and can thus help understand the physics controlling the energetic processes in astrophysical sources. This diagnostic power increases with advances in spectral resolution and effective area of the employed X-ray observatories. However, to make optimal use of the diagnostic potential – whether through global spectral modeling or through diagnostics from local modeling of individual lines – the underlying atomic physics has to be complete and well known. With the next generation of soft X-ray observatories featuring micro-calorimeters such as the SXS on Astro- H/Hitomi and the X-IFU on Athena, broadband high-resolution spectroscopy with large effective area will become more commonly available in the next decade. With these spectrometers, the accuracy of the plasma parameters derived from spectral modeling will be limited by the uncertainty of the reference atomic data rather than by instrumental factors, as is sometimes already the case for the high-resolution grating observations with Chandra-HETG and XMM-Newton-RGS. To take full advantage of the measured spectra, assessment of the accuracy of and improvements to the available atomic reference data are therefore important. Dedicated measurements in the laboratory are essential to benchmark the theoretical calculations providing the bulk of the reference data used in astrophysics. Experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion traps (EBIT-I and SuperEBIT) have a long history of providing this service. In this work, I present new measurements of transition energies and absolute electron impact excitation cross sections geared towards currently open atomic physics data needs.

  20. THE ORIGIN OF THE HOT GAS IN THE GALACTIC HALO: TESTING GALACTIC FOUNTAIN MODELS' X-RAY EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Kwak, Kyujin [School of Natural Science, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 50 UNIST-gil, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Hill, Alex S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield, NSW (Australia); Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark, E-mail: dbh@physast.uga.edu [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We test the X-ray emission predictions of galactic fountain models against XMM-Newton measurements of the emission from the Milky Way's hot halo. These measurements are from 110 sight lines, spanning the full range of Galactic longitudes. We find that a magnetohydrodynamical simulation of a supernova-driven interstellar medium, which features a flow of hot gas from the disk to the halo, reproduces the temperature but significantly underpredicts the 0.5-2.0 keV surface brightness of the halo (by two orders of magnitude, if we compare the median predicted and observed values). This is true for versions of the model with and without an interstellar magnetic field. We consider different reasons for the discrepancy between the model predictions and the observations. We find that taking into account overionization in cooled halo plasma, which could in principle boost the predicted X-ray emission, is unlikely in practice to bring the predictions in line with the observations. We also find that including thermal conduction, which would tend to increase the surface brightnesses of interfaces between hot and cold gas, would not overcome the surface brightness shortfall. However, charge exchange emission from such interfaces, not included in the current model, may be significant. The faintness of the model may also be due to the lack of cosmic ray driving, meaning that the model may underestimate the amount of material transported from the disk to the halo. In addition, an extended hot halo of accreted material may be important, by supplying hot electrons that could boost the emission of the material driven out from the disk. Additional model predictions are needed to test the relative importance of these processes in explaining the observed halo emission.

  1. DXL: A Sounding Rocket Mission for the Study of Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M.; Prasai, K.; Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Koutroumpa, D.; Porter, F. S.; Snowden, S.; Cravens, T.; Robertson, I.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy (DXL) mission is an approved sounding rocket project with a first launch scheduled around December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission generated by solar wind charge exchange from that of the local hot bubble to improve our understanding of both. With 1,000 square centimeters proportional counters and grasp of about 10 square centimeters sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keV bands, DXL will achieve in a 5-minute flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  2. Femtosecond dynamics of momentum-dependent magnetic excitations from resonant inelastic X-ray scattering in CaCu2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisogni, Valentina; Kourtis, Stefanos; Monney, Claude; Zhou, Kejin; Kraus, Roberto; Sekar, Chinnathambi; Strocov, Vladimir; Büchner, Bernd; van den Brink, Jeroen; Braicovich, Lucio; Schmitt, Thorsten; Daghofer, Maria; Geck, Jochen

    2014-04-11

    Taking spinon excitations in the quantum antiferromagnet CaCu2O3 as an example, we demonstrate that femtosecond dynamics of magnetic electronic excitations can be probed by direct resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). To this end, we isolate the contributions of single and double spin-flip excitations in experimental RIXS spectra, identify the physical mechanisms that cause them, and determine their respective time scales. By comparing theory and experiment, we find that double spin flips need a finite amount of time to be generated, rendering them sensitive to the core-hole lifetime, whereas single spin flips are, to a very good approximation, independent of it. This shows that RIXS can grant access to time-domain dynamics of excitations and illustrates how RIXS experiments can distinguish between excitations in correlated electron systems based on their different time dependence.

  3. Mapping of electron-hole excitations in the charge-density-wave system 1T-TiSe2 using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monney, C; Zhou, K J; Cercellier, H; Vydrova, Z; Garnier, M G; Monney, G; Strocov, V N; Berger, H; Beck, H; Schmitt, T; Aebi, P

    2012-07-27

    In high-resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the Ti L edge of the charge-density-wave system 1T-TiSe(2), we observe sharp low energy loss peaks from electron-hole pair excitations developing at low temperature. These excitations are strongly dispersing as a function of the transferred momentum of light. We show that the unoccupied bands close to the Fermi level can effectively be probed in this broadband material. Furthermore, we extract the order parameter of the charge-density-wave phase from temperature-dependent measurements.

  4. The Soft-X-Ray Emission of Ark 120. XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and the Importance of Taking the Broad View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, G.; Marinucci, A.; Guainazzi, M.; Brenneman, L. W.; Elvis, M.; Lohfink, A.; Arevalo, P.; Boggs, S. E.; Cappi, M.; Stern, D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the 'bare' Seyfert 1 galaxy, Ark 120, a system in which ionized absorption is absent. The NuSTAR hard-X-ray spectral coverage allows us to constrain different models for the excess soft-X-ray emission. Among phenomenological models, a cutoff power law best explains the soft-X-ray emission. This model likely corresponds to Comptonization of the accretion disc seed UV photons by a population of warm electrons: using Comptonization models, a temperature of approximately 0.3 kiloelectronvolts and an optical depth of approximately 13 are found. If the UV-to-X-ray OPTXAGNF model is applied, the UV fluxes from the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor suggest an intermediate black hole spin. Contrary to several other sources observed by NuSTAR, no high-energy cutoff is detected with a lower limit of 190 kiloelectronvolts.

  5. Fermi Detection of Gamma-Ray Emission from the M2 Soft X-Ray Flare on 2010 June 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The GOES M2-class solar flare, SOL2010-06-12T00:57, was modest in many respects yet exhibited remarkable acceleration of energetic particles. The flare produced an approximately 50 s impulsive burst of hard X- and gamma-ray emission up to at least 400 MeV observed by the Fermi GBM and LAT experiments. The remarkably similar hard X-ray and high-energy gamma-ray time profiles suggest that most of the particles were accelerated to energies greater than or equal to 300 MeV with a delay of approximately 10 s from mildly relativistic electrons, but some reached these energies in as little as approximately 3 s. The gamma-ray line fluence from this flare was about ten times higher than that typically observed from this modest GOES class of X-ray flare. There is no evidence for time-extended greater than 100 MeV emission as has been found for other flares with high-energy gamma rays.

  6. THERMAL EMISSION IN THE EARLY X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: FOLLOWING THE PROMPT PHASE TO LATE TIMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friis, Mette [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Watson, Darach, E-mail: mef4@hi.is, E-mail: darach@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-07-01

    Thermal radiation, peaking in soft X-rays, has now been detected in a handful of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and has to date been interpreted as shock break-out of the GRB's progenitor star. We present a search for thermal emission in the early X-ray afterglows of a sample of Swift bursts selected by their brightness in X-rays at early times. We identify a clear thermal component in eight GRBs and track the evolution. We show that at least some of the emission must come from highly relativistic material since two show an apparent super-luminal expansion of the thermal component. Furthermore, we determine very large luminosities and high temperatures for many of the components-too high to originate in a supernova shock break-out. Instead, we suggest that the component may be modeled as late photospheric emission from the jet, linking it to the apparently thermal component observed in the prompt emission of some GRBs at gamma-ray and hard X-ray energies. By comparing the parameters from the prompt emission and the early afterglow emission, we find that the results are compatible with the interpretation that we are observing the prompt quasi-thermal emission component in soft X-rays at a later point in its evolution.

  7. Hard X-Ray Emission from SH 2-104: A NuSTAR Search for Gamma-Ray Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Mori, K.; Aliu, E.; Paredes, J. M.; Tomsick, J. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of Sh 2-104, a compact H II region containing several young massive stellar clusters (YMSCs). We have detected distinct hard X-ray sources coincident with localized VERITAS TeV emission recently resolved from the giant gamma-ray complex MGRO J2019+37 in the Cygnus region. Fainter, diffuse X-rays coincident with the eastern YMSC in Sh2-104 likely result from the colliding winds of a component star. Just outside the radio shell of Sh 2-104 lies 3XMM J201744.7+365045 and a nearby nebula, NuSTAR J201744.3+364812, whose properties are most consistent with extragalactic objects. The combined XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectrum of 3XMM J201744.7+365045 is well-fit to an absorbed power-law model with N(sub H) = (3.1 +/- 1.0) x 10(exp 22) cm(exp -2) and a photon index gamma = 2.1 +/- 0.1. Based on possible long-term flux variation and the lack of detected pulsations (less than or equal to 43% modulation), this object is likely a background active galactic nucleus rather than a Galactic pulsar. The spectrum of the NuSTAR nebula shows evidence of an emission line at E = 5.6 keV, suggesting an optically obscured galaxy cluster at z = 0.19 +/- 0.02 (d = 800 Mpc) and L(sub X) = 1.2 x 10(exp 44) erg s(exp -1). Follow-up Chandra observations of Sh 2-104 will help identify the nature of the X-ray sources and their relation to MGRO J2019+37. We also show that the putative VERITAS excess south of Sh 2-104, is most likely associated with the newly discovered Fermi pulsar PSR J2017+3625 and not the H II region.

  8. REFLECTION-DOMINATED NUCLEAR X-RAY EMISSION IN THE EARLY-TYPE GALAXY ESO 565-G019

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, P.; Takahashi, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Terashima, Y. [Department of Physics, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Yamada, S. [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Mushotzky, R. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ueda, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Baumgartner, W. H. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Alexander, D. M.; Done, C. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1-3LE (United Kingdom); Malzac, J. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse (France); Vaghmare, K. [IUCAA, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2013-08-10

    We present the discovery of a reflection-dominated active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the early-type radio-quiet galaxy ESO 565-G019 with Suzaku and Swift/Burst Alert Telescope. The source X-ray spectrum below 10 keV is characteristic of other Compton-thick (CT) AGNs, clearly showing an inverted continuum and prodigious fluorescence iron emission above {approx}3 keV. A Compton shoulder to the neutral Fe K{alpha} line also appears to be present. There is evidence for long-term hard X-ray flux variability that we associate with changes in the intrinsic AGN power law. More of such reflection-dominated AGNs should be uncovered in the near future with the increased sensitivity of ongoing and new hard X-ray surveys. ESO 565-G019 is hosted in an early-type galaxy whose morphology has been variously classified as either type E or type S0. Only about 20 bona fide CT-AGNs have been identified in the local universe so far, and all exist in host galaxies with late Hubble types (S0 or later). CT columns of nuclear obscuring gas are uncommon in early-type galaxies in the local universe, so confirmation of the exact morphological class of ESO 565-G019 is important. Infrared photometry also shows the presence of large quantities of cool dust in the host, indicative of significant ongoing star formation. ESO 565-G019 may be the first identified local example of minor-merger-driven CT-AGN growth in an early-type host, or may be the result of interaction with its neighboring galaxy ESO 565-G018 in a wide pair.

  9. Direct Detection of Oxygen Ligation to the Mn4Ca Cluster of Photosystem II by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushkar, Yulia; Long, Xi; Glatzel, Pieter; Brudvig, Gary W.; Dismukes, G. Charles; Collins, Terrence J.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-06-16

    Ligands play critical roles during the catalytic reactions in metalloproteins through bond formation/breaking, protonation/deprotonation, and electron/spin delocalization. While there are well-defined element-specific spectroscopic handles, such as X-ray spectroscopy and EPR, to follow the chemistry of metal catalytic sites in a large protein matrix, directly probing particular ligand atoms like C, N, and O is challenging due to their abundance in the protein. FTIR/Raman and ligand-sensitive EPR techniques such as ENDOR and ESEEM have been applied to study metal-ligand interactions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can also indirectly probe the ligand environment; its element-specificity allows us to focus only on the catalytic metal site, and EXAFS and XANES provide metal-ligand distances, coordination numbers, and symmetry of ligand environments. However, the information is limited, since one cannot distinguish among ligand elements with similar atomic number (i.e. C, N. and O). As an alternative and a more direct method to probe the specific metal-ligand chemistry in the protein matrix, we investigated the application of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Using this technique we have identified the oxo-bridging ligands of the Mn{sub 4}Ca complex of photosystem II (PS II), a multisubunit membrane protein, that catalyzes the water oxidizing reaction. The catalytic mechanism has been studied intensively by Mn XAS. The fundamental question of this reaction, however, is how the water molecules are ligated to the Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster and how the O-O bond formation occurs before the evolution of O{sub 2}. This implies that it is necessary to follow the chemistry of the oxygen ligands in order to understand the mechanism.

  10. X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopic analysis of arborescent lycopsid cell wall composition and Carboniferous coal ball preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, C. Kevin [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Abrecht, Mike; Zhou, Dong; Gilbert, P.U.P.A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Two alternative processes complicate understanding of the biochemical origins and geochemical alteration of organic matter over geologic time: selective preservation of original biopolymers and in situ generation of new geopolymers. One of the best constrained potential sources of bio- and geochemical information about extinct fossil plants is frequently overlooked. Permineralized anatomically preserved plant fossils allow analysis of individual cell and tissue types that have an original biochemical composition already known from living plants. The original composition of more enigmatic fossils can be constrained by geochemical comparisons to tissues of better understood fossils from the same locality. This strategy is possible using synchrotron-based techniques for submicron-scale imaging with X-rays over a range of frequencies in order to provide information concerning the relative abundance of different organic bonds with X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy. In this study, X-ray PhotoElectron Emission spectroMicroscopy (X-PEEM) was used to analyze the tissues of Lepidodendron, one of the lycopsid trees that were canopy dominants of many Pennsylvanian coal swamp forests. Its periderm or bark - the single greatest biomass contributor to many Late Paleozoic coals - is found to have a greater aliphatic content and an overall greater density of organic matter than lignified wood. Because X-PEEM allows simultaneous analysis of organic matter and matrix calcite in fully mineralized fossils, this technique also has great potential for analysis of fossil preservation, including documentation of significant traces of organic matter entrained in the calcite crystal fabric that fills the cell lumens. (author)

  11. A new particle-induced X-ray emission set-up for laterally resolved analysis over wide areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanf, D., E-mail: d.hanf@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Buchriegler, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Renno, A.D.; Merchel, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Munnik, F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Ziegenrücker, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Scharf, O.; Nowak, S.H. [IFG Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Borany, J. von [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The recently installed and unique PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission) set-up at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) is mainly dedicated to applications for a detailed overview of elemental composition over large sample areas within a short time even at trace level. The so-called High-Speed-PIXE (HS-PIXE), a combination of a pnCCD-based pixel-detector with polycapillary X-ray optics, offers simultaneous imaging of sample areas up to 12 × 12 mm{sup 2} with a lateral resolution better than 100 μm. Each of the 264 × 264 individual pixels detects X-ray photons in an energy range from 2 keV to 20 keV with an energy resolution of 152 eV (@Mn-K{sub α}). A high precision sample manipulator offers the inspection of areas up to 250 × 250 mm{sup 2}. During first experiments the determined resolution is (76 ± 23) μm using a sample of well-known sharp-edged chromium patterns. Trace element analysis has been performed using a geological sample, a tin ore, with an average Ta-concentration below 0.1 at.%. Fine-zoned structures became visible in the Ta-L{sub α} intensity map within only 45 min. The High-Speed-PIXE closes a gap in the analytical process flow chain especially for geoanalytical characterisations. It is a unique and fast detection system to identify areas of interest in comparably short time at large-area scale for further analysis.

  12. Characterization of continuous and pulsed emission modes of a hybrid micro focus x-ray source for medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Rong, John X. [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Wu, Xizeng [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Liu, Hong, E-mail: liu@ou.edu [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterize a micro focus x-ray tube that can operate in both continuous and pulsed emission modes. The micro focus x-ray source (Model L9181-06, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) has a varying focal spot size ranging from 16 µm to 50 µm as the source output power changes from 10 to 39 W. We measured the source output, beam quality, focal spot sizes, kV accuracy, spectra shapes and spatial resolution. Source output was measured using an ionization chamber for various tube voltages (kVs) with varying current (µA) and distances. The beam quality was measured in terms of half value layer (HVL), kV accuracy was measured with a non-invasive kV meter, and the spectra was measured using a compact integrated spectrometer system. The focal spot sizes were measured using a slit method with a CCD detector with a pixel pitch of 22 µm. The spatial resolution was quantitatively measured using the slit method with a CMOS flat panel detector with a 50 µm pixel pitch, and compared to the qualitative results obtained by imaging a contrast bar pattern. The focal spot sizes in the vertical direction were smaller than that of the horizontal direction, the impact of which was visible when comparing the spatial resolution values. Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam quality, spectra shape and spatial resolution effects. There were no significantly large differences, thus providing the motivation for future studies to design and develop stable and robust cone beam imaging systems for various diagnostic applications. - Highlights: • A micro focus x-ray source that operates in both continuous and pulse emission modes was quantitatively characterized. • The source output, beam quality, focal spot measurements, kV accuracy, spectra analyses and spatial resolution were measured. • Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam

  13. The detection of variable radio emission from the fast rotating magnetic hot B-star HR\\xA07355 and evidence for its X-ray aurorae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Oskinova, L.; Ignace, R.; Buemi, C. S.; Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Todt, H.; Leone, F.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the multiwavelength properties of the magnetic early B-type star HR 7355. We present its radio light curves at several frequencies, taken with the Jansky Very Large Array, and X-ray spectra, taken with the XMM-Newton X-ray telescope. Modelling of the radio light curves for the Stokes I and V provides a quantitative analysis of the HR 7355 magnetosphere. A comparison between HR 7355 and a similar analysis for the Ap star CU Vir allows us to study how the different physical parameters of the two stars affect the structure of the respective magnetospheres where the non-thermal electrons originate. Our model includes a cold thermal plasma component that accumulates at high magnetic latitudes that influences the radio regime, but does not give rise to X-ray emission. Instead, the thermal X-ray emission arises from shocks generated by wind stream collisions close to the magnetic equatorial plane. The analysis of the X-ray spectrum of HR 7355 also suggests the presence of a non-thermal radiation. Comparison between the spectral index of the power-law X-ray energy distribution with the non-thermal electron energy distribution indicates that the non-thermal X-ray component could be the auroral signature of the non-thermal electrons that impact the stellar surface, the same non-thermal electrons that are responsible for the observed radio emission. On the basis of our analysis, we suggest a novel model that simultaneously explains the X-ray and the radio features of HR 7355 and is likely relevant for magnetospheres of other magnetic early-type stars.

  14. The STORM and CuPID soft X-ray cameras on the DXL sounding rocket mission: Employment of slumped micropore optics to image solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission in the magnetosheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N.

    2016-12-01

    The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) and the Cusp Plasma Imaging Detector (CuPID) instruments are soft X-ray cameras the utilize slumped micropore ('lobster-eye') optics. These lobster-eye optics, developed by the University of Leicester and the Photonis Corporation, provide for wide field-of-view imaging of X-ray line emission produced via charge exchange between hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and heavy ions in the solar wind. Both instruments have position sensitize, chevron configuration, microchannel plate detectors in their respective focal planes. STORM possess two, 4 cm by 4 cm, lobster-eye optics, each with a focal length of 37.5 cm. It flew as a piggy back payload on the Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket mission which was launched in December of 2012 from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. STORM operated successfully during this mission and represents the first use of lobster-eye optics in space. A future version of STORM, in high orbit, could image a significant portion of the magnetosheath to infer the locations of the magnetopause and the bow shock. CuPID is a 3U CubeSat variant of STORM that uses a single optic with a 27.5 cm focal length. A sounding rocket borne CuPID flew as a science payload with DXL from White Sands in December of 2015 with results forthcoming.

  15. Evidence for quiescent synchrotron emission in the black hole X-ray transient Swift J1357.2–0933

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahbaz T.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present high time-resolution optical and infrared observations of the edge-on black hole X-ray transient Swift J1357.2-0933. Our data taken in 2012 shows the system to be at its pre-outburst magnitude and so the system is in quiescence. In contrast to other X-ray transients, the quiescent light curves of Swift J1357.2-0933 do not show the secondary star’s ellipsoidal modulation. The optical and infrared light curves is dominated by variability with an optical fractional rms of about 20 per cent, much larger than what is observed in other systems. The quiescent ultraviolet to mid-IR spectral energy distribution in quiescence is dominated by a nonthermal component with a power–law index of −1.4, (the broad-band rms SED has a similar index which arises from optically thin synchrotron emission from a jet; the lack of a peak in the spectral energy distribution rules out advection-dominated models (based on [19].

  16. Energy loss and electron and x-ray emission of slow highly charged Arq+ ions in grazing incidence on an Al(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xianwen; Hu, Bitao; Zhang, Chengjun; Wang, Jijin; Chen, Chunhua

    2010-05-01

    Within the framework of the classical over-barrier model, energy loss, electron emission, and x-ray emission of slow highly charged ion Arq+ grazing on the Al(111) single-crystal surface under various azimuthal angles have been studied. The enhancement of energy loss, potential electron emission yields, intensity of KL1 satellite lines, or x-ray yields for the Ar17+ ion grazing along low-index crystallographic directions was observed. The calculated energy-loss spectra of atomic projectiles Ar0 interacting with metallic surface agree reasonably well with experiment. The inner-shell filling contributions through the side feeding mechanism, Auger transitions, and the radiative decay process are discussed by analyzing the final charge-state distributions of the reflected ions, potential electron emission yields, and x-ray yields under different azimuthal angles.

  17. Applications of a table-top time-resolved luminescence spectrometer with nanosecond soft X-ray pulse excitation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brůža, P.; Pánek, D.; Fidler, V.; Benedikt, P.; Čuba, V.; Gbur, T.; Boháček, Pavel; Nikl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2014), s. 448-451 ISSN 0018-9499 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09876S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : LiCaAlF 6 * luminescence * scintillators * soft x-ray * SrHfO 3 * time-resolved spectroscopy * ZnO :Ga Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2014

  18. Correlation of electron beams and hard x-ray emissions in ISTTOK Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowski, L.; Malinowski, K.; Sadowski, M.J.; Zebrowski, J.; Rabinski, M.; Jakubowski, M.J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), Otwock (Poland); Plyusnin, V.V.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Duarte, P. [Association Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-11-15

    The paper reports on experimental studies of electron beams in the ISTTOK tokamak, those were performed by means of an improved four-channel detector. The Cherenkov-type detector measuring head was equipped with four radiators made of two types of alumina-nitrate (AlN) poly-crystals: machinable and translucent ones, both of 10 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in thickness. The movable support that enabled the whole detectors to be placed inside the tokamak vacuum chamber, at chosen positions along the ISTTOK minor radius. Since the electron energy distribution is one of the most important characteristics of tokamak plasmas, the main aim of the study was to perform estimations of an energy spectrum of the recorded electrons. For this purpose the radiators were coated with molybdenum (Mo) layers of different thickness. The technique based on the use of Cherenkov-type detectors enabled the detection of fast electrons (of energy above 66 keV) and determination of their spatial and temporal characteristics in the ISTTOK experiment. Measurements of hard X-rays (HXR), which were emitted during ISTTOK discharges, have also been performed. Particular attention was paid to the correlation measurements of HXR pulses with run-away electron beams. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Analysis of hard X-ray emission from selected very high energy {gamma}-ray sources observed with INTEGRAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Agnes Irene Dorothee

    2009-11-13

    A few years ago, the era of very high energy {gamma}-ray astronomy started, when the latest generation of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) like H.E.S.S. began to operate and to resolve the sources of TeV emission. Identifications via multi-wavelength studies reveal that the detected sources are supernova remnants and active galactic nuclei, but also pulsar wind nebulae and a few binaries. One widely discussed open question is, how these sources are able to accelerate particles to such high energies. The understanding of the underlying particle distribution, the acceleration processes taking place, and the knowledge of the radiation processes which produce the observed emission, is, therefore, of crucial interest. Observations in the hard X-ray domain can be a key to get information on these particle distributions and processes. Important for this thesis are the TeV and the hard X-ray range. The two instruments, H.E.S.S. and INTEGRAL, whose data were used, are, therefore, described in detail. The main part of this thesis is focused on the X-ray binary system LS 5039/RX J1826.2-1450. It was observed in several energy ranges. The nature of the compact object is still not known, and it was proposed either to be a microquasar system or a non-accreting pulsar system. The observed TeV emission is modulated with the orbital cycle. Several explanations for this variability have been discussed in recent years. The observations with INTEGRAL presented in this thesis have provided new information to solve this question. Therefore, a search for a detection in the hard X-ray range and for its orbital dependence was worthwhile. Since LS 5039 is a faint source and the sky region where it is located is crowded, a very careful, non-standard handling of the INTEGRAL data was necessary, and a cross-checking with other analysis methods was essential to provide reliable results. We found that LS 5039 is emitting in the hard X-ray energy range. A flux rate and an upper

  20. Evaluation of the Fast-Electron Source Function for Two-Plasmon Decay from Temporal Hard X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Follett, R. K.; Myatt, J. F.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    The modeling of the fast-electron transport in the 1-D hydrodynamic code LILAC requires the description of the source electrons as a function of time. The particle-in-cell code OSIRIS and the interaction code FPSE provide some guidance but have not provided an algorithm for the energy fraction from the laser pulse as the coronal parameters change with time. The original algorithm, based on the measured hard x-ray (HXR) emission as a function of laser intensity, depended exponentially on the two-plasmon-decay threshold parameter up to about 0.9 and saturates above it. This algorithm along with FPSE simulations produced HXR emissions much earlier than observed. Analysis of the measured HXR emissions from implosions with near-constant threshold parameter values show that the rise time of the emission can be described with an exponential curve with roughly a rise time of 200 ps. Trial and error set the start of the rise at the threshold value of 0.75. Causes for this rise time will be discussed. Comparison between measured and computed HXR emissions for different implosion scenarios will be presented, including those for cryogenic targets. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  1. Spatially resolved X-ray emission measurements of the residual velocity during the stagnation phase of inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruby, J. J.; Pak, A., E-mail: pak5@llnl.gov; Field, J. E.; Ma, T.; Spears, B. K.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D.; Fittinghoff, D.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Hinkel, D. E.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kritcher, A. L.; Moody, J. D.; Nagel, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2016-07-15

    A technique for measuring residual motion during the stagnation phase of an indirectly driven inertial confinement experiment has been implemented. This method infers a velocity from spatially and temporally resolved images of the X-ray emission from two orthogonal lines of sight. This work investigates the accuracy of recovering spatially resolved velocities from the X-ray emission data. A detailed analytical and numerical modeling of the X-ray emission measurement shows that the accuracy of this method increases as the displacement that results from a residual velocity increase. For the typical experimental configuration, signal-to-noise ratios, and duration of X-ray emission, it is estimated that the fractional error in the inferred velocity rises above 50% as the velocity of emission falls below 24 μm/ns. By inputting measured parameters into this model, error estimates of the residual velocity as inferred from the X-ray emission measurements are now able to be generated for experimental data. Details of this analysis are presented for an implosion experiment conducted with an unintentional radiation flux asymmetry. The analysis shows a bright localized region of emission that moves through the larger emitting volume at a relatively higher velocity towards the location of the imposed flux deficit. This technique allows for the possibility of spatially resolving velocity flows within the so-called central hot spot of an implosion. This information would help to refine our interpretation of the thermal temperature inferred from the neutron time of flight detectors and the effect of localized hydrodynamic instabilities during the stagnation phase. Across several experiments, along a single line of sight, the average difference in magnitude and direction of the measured residual velocity as inferred from the X-ray and neutron time of flight detectors was found to be ∼13 μm/ns and ∼14°, respectively.

  2. The Evolution of Normal Galaxy X-Ray Emission Through Cosmic History: Constraints from the 6 MS Chandra Deep Field-South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Basu-Zych, A. R.; Mineo, S.; Brandt, W. N.; Eurfrasio, R. T.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Lou, B.; Xue, Y. Q.; Bauer, F. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the evolution of normal-galaxy X-ray emission from z (is) approx. 0-7 using local galaxies and galaxy samples in the approx. 6 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. The majority of the CDF-S galaxies are observed at rest-frame energies above 2 keV, where the emission is expected to be dominated by X-ray binary (XRB) populations; however, hot gas is expected to provide small contributions to the observed-frame (is) less than 1 keV emission at z (is) less than 1. We show that a single scaling relation between X-ray luminosity (L(sub x)) and star-formation rate (SFR) literature, is insufficient for characterizing the average X-ray emission at all redshifts. We establish that scaling relations involving not only SFR, but also stellar mass and redshift, provide significantly improved characterizations of the average X-ray emission from normal galaxy populations at z (is) approx. 0-7. We further provide the first empirical constraints on the redshift evolution of X-ray emission from both low-mass XRB (LMXB) and high-mass XRB (HMXB) populations and their scalings with stellar mass and SFR, respectively. We find L2 -10 keV(LMXB)/stellar mass alpha (1+z)(sub 2-3) and L2 -10 keV(HMXB)/SFR alpha (1+z), and show that these relations are consistent with XRB population-synthesis model predictions, which attribute the increase in LMXB and HMXB scaling relations with redshift as being due to declining host galaxy stellar ages and metallicities, respectively. We discuss how emission from XRBs could provide an important source of heating to the intergalactic medium in the early universe, exceeding that of active galactic nuclei.

  3. Benchmark results and theoretical treatments for valence-to-core x-ray emission spectroscopy in transition metal compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, D. R.; Seidler, G. T.; Kas, Joshua J.; Govind, Niranjan; Schwartz, Craig P.; Pemmaraju, Sri; Prendergast, David G.

    2017-09-01

    We report measurement of the valence-to-core (VTC) region of the K-shell x-ray emission spectra from several Zn and Fe inorganic compounds, and their critical comparison with several existing theoretical treatments. We find generally good agreement between the respective theories and experiment, and in particular find an important admixture of dipole and quadrupole character for Zn materials that is much weaker in Fe-based systems. These results on materials whose simple crystal structures should not, a prior, pose deep challenges to theory, will prove useful in guiding the further development of DFT and time-dependent DFT methods for VTC-XES predictions and their comparison to experiment.

  4. Development and Applications of a Laboratory Micro X-ray Fluorescence (μXRF) Spectrometer Using Monochromatic Excitation for Quantitative Elemental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Bauters, Stephen; Demey, Arne; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-07-07

    The analytical characterization and an application example of a novel laboratory X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) microprobe is presented, which combines monochromatic, focused X-ray beam excitation with a high-performance silicon drift detector (SDD) and two-dimensional/three-dimensional (2D/3D) scanning capability. Because of the monochromatic excitation, below the (multiple) Compton/Rayleigh scattering peak region, the XRF spectra obtained by this laboratory spectrometer has similarly high peak-to-background ratios as those which can be obtained at synchrotron sources. However, the flux density difference between the proposed laboratory instrument and current synchrotron end stations is on the order of several orders of magnitude. As a result, sub-ppm minimum detection limits (MDL) for transition metals are obtained for a variety of sample matrices. The monochromatic excitation also allows for the efficient use of an iterative Monte Carlo simulation algorithm to obtain quantitative information on the analyzed samples. The analytical characteristics of this instrument and quantitative results, in combination with an iterative reverse Monte Carlo simulation algorithm, will be demonstrated using measurements conducted on an iron-containing meteorite.

  5. The Electronic Structure of Carbon and its Allotropes as Determined by Soft X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Steven

    1993-01-01

    A study of the electronic structure of the stage I and stage II alkali graphite intercalation compounds using soft x-ray emission spectroscopy has been done. The pi band of the alkali graphite intercalation compounds is strongly affected by the intercalation process as witnessed by the apparent change in shape of the density of states in comparison to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. From the change in shape, it is possible to determine the amount of charge transferred from the intercalant to the graphite. Our result of complete charge transfer is in disagreement with the results of Wiech and his co-workers. A thorough discussion of both methods of analysis is presented. A comparison of the observed density of states of synthetically grown diamond with natural diamond indicates that synthetic diamond is not the same as natural diamond. A brief discussion of various techniques for growing diamond is presented, as well as the construction of a chemical vapor deposition apparatus to grow diamond-like thin films along with soft x-ray emission and Raman spectroscopy measurements. We find that diamond can only be grown at low pressures if it is highly defective. This is in agreement with theoretical models of chemical vapor deposition. We also discuss the electronic structure of a very rare form of diamond, Lonsdaleite (hexagonal diamond). Lonsdaleite is sp^3 bonded carbon but in a hexagonal matrix. It is only found in highly shocked systems and appears to be the metastable phase between graphite and diamond on the carbon phase diagram. We also briefly discuss the most recently discovered member of the carbon family, Buckminsterfullerene. We present electronic structure data on C_ {60} samples produced in a carbon-arc generator designed and built at the University. Comparison of our data to other published data shows very good agreement.

  6. Massive Warm/Hot Galaxy Coronae as Probed by UV/X-Ray Oxygen Absorption and Emission. I. Basic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faerman, Yakov; Sternberg, Amiel; McKee, Christopher F.

    2017-01-01

    We construct an analytic phenomenological model for extended warm/hot gaseous coronae of L* galaxies. We consider UV O vi Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS)-Halos absorption line data in combination with Milky Way (MW) X-ray O vii and O viii absorption and emission. We fit these data with a single model representing the COS-Halos galaxies and a Galactic corona. Our model is multi-phased, with hot and warm gas components, each with a (turbulent) log-normal distribution of temperatures and densities. The hot gas, traced by the X-ray absorption and emission, is in hydrostatic equilibrium in an MW gravitational potential. The median temperature of the hot gas is 1.5× {10}6 K and the mean hydrogen density is ˜ 5× {10}-5 {{cm}}-3. The warm component as traced by the O vi, is gas that has cooled out of the high density tail of the hot component. The total warm/hot gas mass is high and is 1.2× {10}11 {M}⊙ . The gas metallicity we require to reproduce the oxygen ion column densities is 0.5 solar. The warm O vi component has a short cooling time (˜ 2× {10}8 years), as hinted by observations. The hot component, however, is ˜ 80 % of the total gas mass and is relatively long-lived, with {t}{cool}˜ 7× {10}9 years. Our model supports suggestions that hot galactic coronae can contain significant amounts of gas. These reservoirs may enable galaxies to continue forming stars steadily for long periods of time and account for “missing baryons” in galaxies in the local universe.

  7. Electronic Raman scattering with excitation between localized states observed in the zinc M{sub 2,3} soft x-ray spectra of ZnS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, L.; Callcott, T.A.; Jia, J.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Zn M{sub 2,3} soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectra of ZnS and ZnS{sub .5}Se{sub .5} excited near threshold show strong inelastic scattering effects that can be explained using a simple model and an inelastic scattering theory based on second order perturbation theory. This scattering is often called electronic resonance Raman scattering. Tulkki and Aberg have developed this theory in detail for atomic systems, but their treatment can be applied to solid systems by utilizing electronic states characteristic of solids rather than of atomic systems.

  8. X-ray emission analysis of a plasma source using an yttrium and a mylar target for the generation of 2.48 nm wavelength microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palladino, Libero; Lorenzo, Ramon Gimenez De; Emilio, Maurizio Di Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita’ de L’Aquila (Italy); INFN, Laboratorio Nazionale del Gran Sasso, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Limongi, Tania, E-mail: tania.limongi@gmail.com [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    In this work, the characteristics of X-ray beam generated from a plasma produced by focusing a Nd-Yag/glass laser beam on mylar or yttrium target were presented. For each target material, the conversion efficiencies of the soft X-ray emission in two different energy ranges, (i) 300–510 eV (almost coincident with the Water Window), (ii) 450–850 eV were measured. The experimental results of the conversion efficiencies will be utilized at the PLASMA-X laboratory of L’Aquila University for the realization of an intense monochromatic X-ray microbeam to be used in radiobiological and in transmission X-ray microscopy applications. In the presented experimental set-up, at the wavelength of 2.48 nm, a monochromatic soft X-rays beam was collected by multilayer spherical mirrors reflecting at an incidence angle close to the normal of the surface. The optical system geometry, the monochromatic beam intensity and the measures of efficiency of conversion of X-ray were described in this paper [5].

  9. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... High-resolution K-shell emission in the 1–2 keV energy range from the plasma pro- duced by the ... the j-k dielectronic satellite lines of the Li-like transitions at λ = 9.32 Å, K-α emission. 366. Pramana – J. Phys. ... The spectrum was computed by time-dependent solution of rate equations considering NLTE ...

  10. Imaging properties of cerium doped Yttrium Aluminum Oxide (YAP:Ce) powder scintillating screens under X-ray excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivas, N.; Valais, I.; Salemis, G.; Karagiannis, C.; Konstantinidis, A.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Loudos, G.; Sakelios, N.; Karakatsanis, N.; Nikita, K.; Gayshan, V. L.; Gektin, A. V.; Sianoudis, I.; Giokaris, N.; Nomicos, C. D.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Cavouras, D.; Panayiotakis, G.; Kandarakis, I.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the imaging performance of YAP:Ce powder scintillating screens under exposure conditions employed in diagnostic radiology (50-140 kV). Various screens were prepared in our laboratory from YAP: Ce powder (Phosphor Technology, Ltd.), with coating thickness ranging from 53 to 110 mg/cm 2. The imaging performance of the screens was assessed by experimental determination of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the noise transfer function (NTF). MTF was determined by the edge spread function (ESF) method while NTF was estimated by noise power spectrum (NPS) measurements after uniform screen irradiation. In addition, parameters related to overall image quality, such as the signal-to-noise ratio transfer (MTF/NTF), were estimated. MTF curves were affected by the beam hardening effects caused by the patient simulating 20 mm thick aluminum phantom. Under these conditions MTF values were found to increase with the mean X-ray photon energy. A similar effect was observed for NTF curves. Results were compared with data obtained on CsI:Tl scintillator. Taking into consideration the very fast response of YAP:Ce, these data may be of interest in designing X-ray imaging detectors.

  11. Performance of a carbon nanotube field emission X-ray source array for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidcumb, Emily Morgan

    This work describes the performance of a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) X-ray tube based on carbon nanotube (CNT) cathodes, and the imaging system developed around it. The s-DBT system has the potential to improve the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer over commercially available digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems. DBT is growing in popularity in the United States, and around the world, as a potential replacement for traditional 2D mammography. The main advantage of DBT over 2D mammography lies in the pseudo-3D nature of the technique allowing the removal of overlapping breast tissue within the image. s-DBT builds on this advantage by removing blur from focal spot motion. Introductions to breast imaging techniques and the DBT modality are given, followed by an introduction to carbon nanotube field emission, the foundation of the s-DBT technology. Details of the s-DBT X-ray tube design and system integration are discussed including specific design parameters, system requirements, and the development process. Also included are summaries of the X-ray tube and system performance over time, and results from characterization measurements. Specific focus is given to the development and completion of a fabrication procedure for tungsten gate mesh, characterization of the CNT cathodes, and improving the system's spatial resolution with use of the focusing electrodes. The tungsten gate mesh is an essential component for extracting electrons from CNTs. A successful deep reactive ion etching fabrication procedure was developed, and the improved gate mesh allowed for higher cathode current and longer pulse widths to be employed in the s-DBT system. Characterization of the CNT cathodes revealed their high-current capacity and the ability to produce relatively long pulse widths, mimicking a 2D imaging modality. This work confirmed that the cathodes are well suited for the task of breast imaging, and explored possible improvements. Lastly, it was

  12. A pulsating auroral X-ray hot spot on Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, G R; Waite, J H; Grodent, D; Lewis, W S; Crary, F J; Elsner, R F; Weisskopf, M C; Majeed, T; Jahn, J-M; Bhardwaj, A; Clarke, J T; Young, D T; Dougherty, M K; Espinosa, S A; Cravens, T E

    2002-02-28

    Jupiter's X-ray aurora has been thought to be excited by energetic sulphur and oxygen ions precipitating from the inner magnetosphere into the planet's polar regions. Here we report high-spatial-resolution observations that demonstrate that most of Jupiter's northern auroral X-rays come from a 'hot spot' located significantly poleward of the latitudes connected to the inner magnetosphere. The hot spot seems to be fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and occurs in a region where anomalous infrared and ultraviolet emissions have also been observed. We infer from the data that the particles that excite the aurora originate in the outer magnetosphere. The hot spot X-rays pulsate with an approximately 45-min period, a period similar to that reported for high-latitude radio and energetic electron bursts observed by near-Jupiter spacecraft. These results invalidate the idea that jovian auroral X-ray emissions are mainly excited by steady precipitation of energetic heavy ions from the inner magnetosphere. Instead, the X-rays seem to result from currently unexplained processes in the outer magnetosphere that produce highly localized and highly variable emissions over an extremely wide range of wavelengths.

  13. Optical and X-ray emission spectroscopy of high-power laser-induced dielectric breakdown in molecular gases and their mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babankova, Dagmar; Civis, Svatopluk; Juha, Libor; Bittner, Michal; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skala, Jirí; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Ryć, Leszek; Sedivcova, Tereza

    2006-11-09

    Large-scale plasma was created in molecular gases (CO, CO2, N2, H2O) and their mixtures by high-power laser-induced dielectric breakdown (LIDB). Compositions of the mixtures used are those suggested for the early earth's atmosphere of neutral and/or mildly reducing character. Time-integrated optical spectra emitted from the laser spark have been measured and analyzed. The spectra of the plasma generated in the CO-containing mixtures are dominated by emission of both C2 and CN radicals. A vibrational temperature of approximately 10(4) K was determined according to an intensity distribution in a vibronic structure of the CN (B2Sigma(+)u-X2Sigma(+)g) violet band. For comparison, the NH3-CH4-H2-H2O mixture has been irradiated as a model of the strongly reducing version of the early earth's atmosphere. In this mixture, excited CN seems to be significantly less abundant than C2. The LIDB experiments were in the molecular gases carried out not only in the static cell but also using a large, double stream pulse jet (gas puff target) placed in the vacuum interaction chamber. The obtained soft X-ray emission spectra indicate the presence of highly charged atomic ions in the hot core of high-power laser sparks.

  14. Calculation of electron emission from a tantalum foil irradiated by 100-kV and 50-kV x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, M.J.

    1998-03-01

    Two Monte Carlo programs, XITRAN and XMTRAN, were developed for calculating the emission of electrons from high-Z foils irradiated with x rays. XITRAN follows all individual elastic collisions of electrons with atoms, whereas XMTRAN uses the condensed-random-walk model. Both codes take into account photo-electrons, fluorescence radiation, and Auger electrons. Comparisons are made with an experiment by Dolan at Sandia Laboratories involving the backward and forward emission of electrons from a tantalum foil irradiated by 100-kV and 50-kV x-ray beams. There is good agreement between results from the XITRAN and XMTRAN codes. There emitted per incident x-ray photon, and in regard to the angular distribution of the emerging electrons. In regard to the electron energy spectra, there is fair agreement down to a spectral energy of 20 keV, whereas below 20 keV the calculated spectra lie considerably below the measurements.

  15. Low-energy X-ray line emission from IC 443

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, P. A.; Kahn, S. M.; Mason, K. O.; Tuohy, I. R.

    1981-01-01

    HEAO 1 observations of the spectrum of the supernova remnant IC 443 in the energy range of 0.4-3 keV reveal the presence of a complex structure suggestive of emission from Fe XVIII-XX, S XV-XVI, and Si XIII-XIV ions. The best electron temperature in the band for simple model fits is about (6-11) x 10 to the 6th K. Raymond and Smith collisional equilibrium emission models do not adequately fit the data. These results are discussed in terms of possible nonequilibrium effects in the remnant.

  16. A simple X-ray emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroaki; Ono, Ryoichi; Hirai, Atsuhiko; Hosokawa, Yoshinori; Kawai, Jun

    2005-07-01

    A compact X-ray emission instrument is made, and the X-ray spectra are measured by changing the applied electric potential. Strong soft X-rays are observed when evacuating roughly and applying a high voltage to an insulator settled in this device. The X-ray intensity is higher as the applied voltage is increased. A light-emitting phenomenon is observed when this device emits X-rays. The present X-ray emitter is made of a small cylinder with a radius of 20 mm and a height of 50 mm. This X-ray generator has a potential to be used as an X-ray source in an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

  17. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the chiral molecules fenchone, α-pinene, limonene and carvone in the C1s excitation region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozga, Christian, E-mail: ozga@physik.uni-kassel.de [Institute for Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett Str. 40, 34132 Kassel (Germany); Jänkälä, Kari [Centre for Molecular Materials Research, University of Oulu, PO Box 3000, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Schmidt, Philipp; Hans, Andreas; Reiß, Philipp; Ehresmann, Arno; Knie, André [Institute for Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett Str. 40, 34132 Kassel (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Determination of the X-ray absorption spectra for two terpenoids and two terpenes. • Allocation of predominant or even site-selective excitation of stereocenters. • Fragment fluorescence spectra of the prototype molecules are identical. • Presented data can be used for future fluorescence circular dichroism experiments. - Abstract: Relative ionization cross sections and fluorescence intensities as functions of the exciting-photon energy were recorded for the chiral molecules carvone, α-pinene, limonene and fenchone after excitation by monochromatized synchrotron radiation with energies of the exciting-photons between 284 eV and 289 eV. At selected exciting-photon energies dispersed fragment fluorescence spectra in the wavelength range between 365 nm and 505 nm were obtained. Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) computations were performed to analyze the experimentally observed resonance-structures. Comparison of the computed and recorded spectra demonstrates the possibility of a predominant or even specific excitation of one particular stereocenter site in a molecule with more than one stereocenter.

  18. Efficient Excitation of Gain-Saturated Sub-9-nm-Wavelength Tabletop Soft-X-Ray Lasers and Lasing Down to 7.36 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Alessi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated the efficient generation of sub-9-nm-wavelength picosecond laser pulses of microjoule energy at 1-Hz repetition rate with a tabletop laser. Gain-saturated lasing was obtained at λ=8.85  nm in nickel-like lanthanum ions excited by collisional electron-impact excitation in a precreated plasma column heated by a picosecond optical laser pulse of 4-J energy. Furthermore, isoelectronic scaling along the lanthanide series resulted in lasing at wavelengths as short as λ=7.36  nm. Simulations show that the collisionally broadened atomic transitions in these dense plasmas can support the amplification of subpicosecond soft-x-ray laser pulses.

  19. Communication: The formation of rarefaction waves in semiconductors after ultrashort excitation probed by grazing incidence ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Höfer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We explore the InSb-semiconductor lattice dynamics after excitation of high density electron-hole plasma with an ultrashort and intense laser pulse. By using time resolved x-ray diffraction, a sub-mÅ and sub-ps resolution was achieved. Thus, a strain of 4% was measured in a 3 nm thin surface layer 2 ps after excitation. The lattice strain was observed for the first 5 ps as exponentially decaying, changing rapidly by time and by depth. The observed phenomena can only be understood assuming nonlinear time dependent laser absorption where the absorption depth decreases by a factor of twenty compared to linear absorption.

  20. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. I. Hard X-ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Krivonos, Roman

    2015-01-01

    -ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95-0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses M-WD similar to 0.9M(circle dot). Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95-0.04 is likely...

  1. Functionalized SU-8 patterned with X-ray Lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Søren; Romanato, F.

    2005-01-01

    spontaneous emission light source that couples out light normal to the chip plane. In addition we examine the influence of the x-ray irradiation on the fluorescence of thin films of dye doped SU-8. The dye embedded in the SU-8 is optically excited during, characterization by an external light source tuned...

  2. Joint x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  3. Comparative evaluation of single crystal scintillators under x-ray imaging conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valais, I G; David, S; Michail, C [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, 265 00 Patras (Greece); Nomicos, C D [Department of Electronics, Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos, Egaleo, 122 10 Athens (Greece); Panayiotakis, G S; Kandarakis, I S [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos, Egaleo, 122 10 Athens (Greece)], E-mail: kandarakis@teiath.gr

    2009-06-15

    The present study is a comparative investigation of the luminescence properties of (Lu,Y){sub 2}SiO{sub 5}: Ce (LYSO: Ce), YAlO{sub 3}: Ce (YAP: Ce), Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}: Ce (GSO: Ce) and (Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}) BGO single crystal scintillators under x-ray excitation. Results will be of value in designing dual modality tomographic systems (PET/CT, SPECT/CT) based on a common scintillator crystal. All scintillating crystals have dimensions of 10 x 10 x 10 cm{sup 3} are non-hygroscopic exhibiting high radiation absorption efficiency in the energy range used in medical imaging applications. The comparative investigation was performed by determining the x-ray luminescence efficiency (emitted light flux over incident x-ray energy flux) in the range of x-ray energies employed in: (i) general x-ray imaging (40-140 kV, using a W/Al x-ray spectrum) and (ii) x-ray mammography imaging (22-49 kV, using a Mo/Mo x-ray spectrum). Additionally, light emission spectra of crystals at various x-ray energies were measured, in order to determine the intrinsic conversion efficiency and the spectral compatibility to optical photon detectors incorporated in medical imaging systems. The light emission performance of LYSO:Ce scintillator studied was found very high for x-ray imaging.

  4. Study of microstress state of P91 steel using complementary mechanical Barkhausen, magnetoacoustic emission, and X-ray diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustyniak, Bolesław, E-mail: bolek@mif.pg.gda.pl; Piotrowski, Leszek; Maciakowski, Paweł; Chmielewski, Marek [Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Lech-Grega, Marzena; Żelechowski, Janusz [The Institute of Non-Ferrous Metals, 32-050 Skawina (Poland)

    2014-05-07

    The paper deals with assessment of microstress state of martensite P91 steel using three complementary techniques: mechanical Barkhausen emission, magnetoacoustic emission (MAE), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile analysis. Magnetic coercivity Hc and microstructure were investigated with inductive magnetometry and magnetic force microscopy (MFM), respectively. Internal stress level of P91 steel was modified by heat treatment. Steel samples were austenitized, quenched, and then tempered at three temperatures (720 °C, 750 °C, and 780 °C) during increasing time (from 15 min up to 240 min). The microstrain level ε{sub i} was evaluated using Williamson–Hall method. It was revealed that during tempering microstrain systematically decreases from ε{sub i} = 2.5 × 10{sup −3} for as quenched state down to ε{sub i} = 0.3 × 10{sup −3} for well tempered samples. Both mechanical hardness (Vicker's HV) and magnetic hardness (coercivity) decrease almost linearly with decreasing microstrain while the MAE and MBE intensities strongly increase. Tempering leads to evident shift of the MeBN intensity maximum recorded for the first load towards lower applied strain values and to increase of MAE intensity. This indicates that the microstress state deduced by magnetic techniques is correlated with microstrains evaluated with XRD technique.

  5. Early Soft X-Ray to UV Emission from Double Neutron Star Mergers: Implications from the Long-term Observations of GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Yu; Huang, Zhi-Qiu

    2018-01-01

    Recent long-term radio follow-up observations of GW170817 reveal a simple power-law rising light curve, with a slope of {t}0.78, up to 93 days after the merger. The latest X-ray detection at 109 days is also consistent with such a temporal slope. Such a shallow rise behavior requires a mildly relativistic outflow with a steep velocity gradient profile, so that slower material with larger energy catches up with the decelerating ejecta and re-energizes it. It has been suggested that this mildly relativistic outflow may represent a cocoon of material. We suggest that the velocity gradient profile may form during the stage that the cocoon is breaking out of the merger ejecta, resulting from shock propagation down a density gradient. The cooling of the hot relativistic cocoon material immediately after it breaks out should have produced soft X-ray to UV radiation at tens of seconds to hours after the merger. The soft X-ray emission has a luminosity of {L}{{X}}∼ {10}45 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 over a period of tens of seconds for a merger event like GW170817. The UV emission shows a rise initially and peaks at about a few hours with a luminosity of {L}{UV}∼ {10}42 {erg} {{{s}}}-1. The soft X-ray transients could be detected by future wide-angle X-ray detectors, such as the Chinese mission Einstein Probe. This soft X-ray/UV emission would serve as one of the earliest electromagnetic counterparts of gravitation waves from double neutron star mergers and could provide the earliest localization of the sources.

  6. NuSTAR detection of high-energy X-ray emission and rapid variability from Sagittarius A{sup *} flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrière, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Baganoff, Frederick K. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Dexter, Jason [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grefenstette, Brian; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Zhang, Shuo [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William W. [X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Sagittarius A{sup *} harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A{sup *} spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum of Sagittarius A{sup *} X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cutoff. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra of the two brightest flares (∼55 times quiescence in the 2-10 keV band) are compared to simple physical models in an attempt to identify the main X-ray emission mechanism, but the data do not allow us to significantly discriminate between them. However, we confirm the previous finding that the parameters obtained with synchrotron models are, for the X-ray emission, physically more reasonable than those obtained with inverse Compton models. One flare exhibits large and rapid (<100 s) variability, which, considering the total energy radiated, constrains the location of the flaring region to be within ∼10 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole.

  7. NuSTAR Detection of High-Energy X-Ray Emission and Rapid Variability from Sagittarius A(star) Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriere, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Dexter, Jason; Grefenstette, Brian; Hailey, Charles J.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Sagittarius A(star) harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A(star) spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum of Sagittarius A(star) X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cut off. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra of the two brightest flares (approx. 55 times quiescence in the 2- 10 keV band) are compared to simple physical models in an attempt to identify the main X-ray emission mechanism, but the data do not allow us to significantly discriminate between them. However, we confirm the previous finding that the parameters obtained with synchrotron models are, for the X-ray emission, physically more reasonable than those obtained with inverse-Compton models. One flare exhibits large and rapid (less than 100 s) variability, which, considering the total energy radiated, constrains the location of the flaring region to be within approx. 10 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole.

  8. X-ray excited photoluminescence near the giant resonance in solid-solution Gd(1-x)Tb(x)OCl nanocrystals and their retention upon solvothermal topotactic transformation to Gd(1-x)Tb(x)F3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waetzig, Gregory R; Horrocks, Gregory A; Jude, Joshua W; Zuin, Lucia; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2016-01-14

    Design rules for X-ray phosphors are much less established as compared to their optically stimulated counterparts owing to the absence of a detailed understanding of sensitization mechanisms, activation pathways and recombination channels upon high-energy excitation. Here, we demonstrate a pronounced modulation of the X-ray excited photoluminescence of Tb(3+) centers upon excitation in proximity to the giant resonance of the host Gd(3+) ions in solid-solution Gd1-xTbxOCl nanocrystals prepared by a non-hydrolytic cross-coupling method. The strong suppression of X-ray excited optical luminescence at the giant resonance suggests a change in mechanism from multiple exciton generation to single thermal exciton formation and Auger decay processes. The solid-solution Gd1-xTbxOCl nanocrystals are further topotactically transformed with retention of a nine-coordinated cation environment to solid-solution Gd1-xTbxF3 nanocrystals upon solvothermal treatment with XeF2. The metastable hexagonal phase of GdF3 can be stabilized at room temperature through this topotactic approach and is transformed subsequently to the orthorhombic phase. The fluoride nanocrystals indicate an analogous but blue-shifted modulation of the X-ray excited optical luminescence of the Tb(3+) centers upon X-ray excitation near the giant resonance of the host Gd(3+) ions.

  9. Spitzer Reveals Infrared Optically Thin Synchrotron Emission from the Compact Jet of the Neutron Star X-Ray Binary 4U 0614+091

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Migliari, S.; Tomsick, J.A.; Maccarone, T.J.; Gallo, E.; Fender, R.P.; Nelemans, G.A.; Russell, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Spitzer observations of the neutron star (ultracompact) X-ray binary (XRB) 4U 0614+091 with the Infrared Array Camera reveal emission of nonthermal origin in the range 3.5-8 mum. The mid-infrared spectrum is well fit by a power law with spectral index of alpha=-0.57+/-0.04 (where the flux density is

  10. Simultaneous optical/X-ray study of GS 1354-64 (=BW Cir) during hard outburst: evidence for optical cyclo-synchrotron emission from the hot accretion flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahari, Mayukh; Gandhi, Poshak; Charles, Philip A.; Kotze, Marissa M.; Altamirano, Diego; Misra, Ranjeev

    2017-07-01

    We present results from simultaneous optical [South African Large Telescope (SALT)] and X-ray (Swift and INTEGRAL) observations of GS 1354-64/BW Cir during the 2015 hard state outburst. During the rising phase, optical/X-ray time series shows a strong anti-correlation with X-ray photons lagging optical. Optical and X-ray power spectra show quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) at a frequency of ˜18 mHz with a confidence level of at least 99 per cent. Simultaneous fitting of Swift/XRT and INTEGRAL spectra in the range 0.5-1000.0 keV shows non-thermal, power-law-dominated (>90 per cent) spectra with a hard power-law index of 1.48 ± 0.03, inner disc temperature of 0.12 ± 0.01 keV and an inner disc radius of ˜3000 km. All evidence is consistent with cyclo-synchrotron radiation in a non-thermal, hot electron cloud extending to ˜100 Schwarzschild radii being a major physical process for the origin of optical photons. At outburst peak about one month later, when the X-ray flux rises and the optical drops, the apparent features in the optical/X-ray correlation vanish and the optical auto correlation widens. Although ˜0.19 Hz QPO is observed from the X-ray power spectra, the optical variability is dominated by the broad-band noise, and the inner disc temperature increases. These results support a change in the dominant optical emission source between outburst rise and peak, consistent with a weakening of hot flow as the disc moves in.

  11. Identification of the Hard X-Ray Source Dominating the E > 25 keV Emission of the Nearby Galaxy M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukita, M.; Ptak, A.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Wik, D.; Maccarone, T. J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Ballhausen, R.; Lehmer, B. D.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We report the identification of a bright hard X-ray source dominating the M31 bulge above 25 keV from a simultaneous NuSTAR-Swift observation. We find that this source is the counterpart to Swift J0042.6+4112, which was previously detected in the Swift BAT All-Sky Hard X-Ray Survey. This Swift BAT source had been suggested to be the combined emission from a number of point sources; our new observations have identified a single X-ray source from 0.5 to 50 keV as the counterpart for the first time. In the 0.5-10 keV band, the source had been classified as an X-ray Binary candidate in various Chandra and XMM-Newton studies; however, since it was not clearly associated with Swift J0042.6+4112, the previous E is less than 10keVobservations did not generate much attention. This source has a spectrum with a soft X-ray excess (kT approximately equal to 0.2 keV) plus a hard spectrum with a power law of gamma approximately equal to 1 and a cutoff around 15-20 keV, typical of the spectral characteristics of accreting pulsars. Unfortunately, any potential pulsation was undetected in the NuSTAR data, possibly due to insufficient photon statistics. The existing deep HST (Hubble Space Telescope) images exclude high-mass (greater than 3 times the radius of the moon) donors at the location of this source. The best interpretation for the nature of this source is an X-ray pulsar with an intermediate-mass (less than 3 times the radius of the moon M) companion or a symbiotic X-ray binary. We discuss other possibilities in more detail.

  12. Tracing the Mass-Dependent Star Formation History of Late-Type Galaxies using X-ray Emission: Results from the CHANDRA Deep Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, B.D; Brandt, W.N.; Schneider, D.P.; Steffen, A.T.; Alexander, D.M.; Bell, E.F.; Hornschemeier, A.E.; McIntosh, D.H.; Bauer, F.E.; Gilli, R.; hide

    2008-01-01

    We report on the X-ray evolution over the last approx.9 Gyr of cosmic history (i.e., since z = 1.4) of late-type galaxy populations in the Chandra Deep Field-North and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-N and E-CDF-S. respectively; jointly CDFs) survey fields. Our late-type galaxy sample consists of 2568 galaxies. which were identified using rest-frame optical colors and HST morphologies. We utilized X-ray stacking analyses to investigate the X-ray emission from these galaxies, emphasizing the contributions from normal galaxies that are not dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Over this redshift range, we find significant increases (factors of approx. 5-10) in the X-ray-to-optical mean luminosity ratio (L(sub x)/L(sub B)) and the X-ray-to-stellar-mass mean ratio (L(sub x)/M(sub *)) for galaxy populations selected by L(sub B) and M(sub *), respectively. When analyzing galaxy samples selected via SFR, we find that the mean X-ray-to-SFR ratio (L(sub x)/SFR) is consistent with being constant over the entire redshift range for galaxies with SFR = 1-100 Solar Mass/yr, thus demonstrating that X-ray emission can be used as a robust indicator of star-formation activity out to z approx. 1.4. We find that the star-formation activity (as traced by X-ray luminosity) per unit stellar mass in a given redshift bin increases with decreasing stellar mass over the redshift range z = 0.2-1, which is consistent with previous studies of how star-formation activity depends on stellar mass. Finally, we extend our X-ray analyses to Lyman break galaxies at z approx. 3 and estimate that L(sub x)/L(sub B) at z approx. 3 is similar to its value at z = 1.4.

  13. Confronting X-Ray Emission Models with theHighest-Redshift Kiloparsec-Scale Jets: The z = 3.89 Jet in Quasar 1745+624

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C.C.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Stawarz, L.; /Heidelberg Observ.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2006-06-28

    A newly identified kiloparsec-scale X-ray jet in the high-redshift z=3.89 quasar 1745+624 is studied with multi-frequency Very Large Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray imaging data. This is only the third large-scale X-ray jet beyond z > 3 known and is further distinguished as being the most luminous relativistic jet observed at any redshift, exceeding 10{sup 45} erg/s in both the radio and X-ray bands. Apart from the jet's extreme redshift, luminosity, and high inferred equipartition magnetic field (in comparison to local analogues), its basic properties such as X-ray/radio morphology and radio polarization are similar to lower-redshift examples. Its resolved linear structure and the convex broad-band spectral energy distributions of three distinct knots are also a common feature among known powerful X-ray jets at lower-redshift. Relativistically beamed inverse Compton and ''non-standard'' synchrotron models have been considered to account for such excess X-ray emission in other jets; both models are applicable to this high-redshift example but with differing requirements for the underlying jet physical properties, such as velocity, energetics, and electron acceleration processes. One potentially very important distinguishing characteristic between the two models is their strongly diverging predictions for the X-ray/radio emission with increasing redshift. This is considered, though with the limited sample of three z > 3 jets it is apparent that future studies targeted at very high-redshift jets are required for further elucidation of this issue. Finally, from the broad-band jet emission we estimate the jet kinetic power to be no less than 10{sup 46} erg/s, which is about 10% of the Eddington luminosity corresponding to this galaxy's central supermassive black hole mass M{sub BH} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} estimated here via the virial relation. The optical luminosity of the quasar core is about ten times

  14. Reprocessing of Soft X-ray Emission Lines in Black Hole Accretion Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauche, C W; Liedahl, D A; Mathiesen, B F; Jimenez-Garate, M A; Raymond, J C

    2003-10-17

    By means of a Monte Carlo code that accounts for Compton scattering and photoabsorption followed by recombination, we have investigated the radiation transfer of Ly{alpha}, He{alpha}, and recombination continua photons of H- and He-like C, N, O, and Ne produced in the photoionized atmosphere of a relativistic black hole accretion disk. We find that photoelectric opacity causes significant attenuation of photons with energies above the O VIII K-edge; that the conversion efficiencies of these photons into lower-energy lines and recombination continua are high; and that accounting for this reprocessing significantly (by factors of 21% to 105%) increases the flux of the Ly{alpha} and He{alpha} emission lines of H- and He-like C and O escaping the disk atmosphere.

  15. Sensitivity of Inferred Electron Temperature from X-ray Emission of NIF Cryogenic DT Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klem, Michael [Univ. of Dallas, Irving, TX (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory seeks to achieve thermonuclear ignition through inertial confinement fusion. The accurate assessment of the performance of each implosion experiment is a crucial step. Here we report on work to derive a reliable electron temperature for the cryogenic deuteriumtritium implosions completed on the NIF using the xray signal from the Ross filter diagnostic. These Xrays are dominated by bremsstrahlung emission. By fitting the xray signal measured through each of the individual Ross filters, the source bremsstrahlung spectrum can be inferred, and an electron temperature of the implosion hot spot inferred. Currently, each filter is weighted equally in this analysis. We present work quantifying the errors with such a technique and the results from investigating the contribution of each filter to the overall accuracy of the temperature inference. Using this research, we also compare the inferred electron temperature against other measured implosion quantities to develop a more complete understanding of the hotspot physics.

  16. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  17. Search for differences in the velocities and directions of the kiloparsec-scale jets of quasars with and without X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butuzova, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    The X-ray emission of the kiloparsec-scale jets of core-dominant quasars is usually interpreted as inverse Compton scattering on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) emission (Sample I). By analogy with the situation on parsec scales, ultrarelativistic motion along a jet oriented at a small angle to the line of sight is usually invoked to explain the X-ray emission while also satisfying the condition of equipartition between the energies associated with the relativistic particles and the magnetic field on kiloparsec scales. This leads to an increase in the energy flux of the CMB radiation in the rest frame of the kiloparsec-scale jets. Consequently, the intensity of the CMB radiation is enhanced to the level required for detectable X-ray emission. This suggests that kiloparsec jets of quasars with similar extents and radio flux densities that are not detected in the X-ray (Sample II) could have subrelativistic speeds and larger angles to the line of sight, due to deceleration and bending of the jet between parsec and kiloparsec scales. This suggests the possible presence of differences in the distributions of the difference between the position angle for the parsec-scale and kiloparsec-scale jets for these two groups of quasars; this is not confirmed by a statistical analysis of the data for Samples I and II. It is deduced that most of the sources considered exhibit bending of their jets by less than about 1.5 times the angle of the parsec-scale jet to the line of sight. This suggests that the X-ray emission is generated by other mechanisms that there is no equipartition.

  18. Soft x-ray emission from clusters of galaxies and related phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Mittaz, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Since the discovery of the cluster soft excess (CSE) over eight years ago, its properties and origin have been the subject of debate With the recent launch of new missions such as XMM-Newton and FUSE, we are beginning to answer some of the complex issues regarding the phenomenon This conference proceedings is an attempt to bring together the latest research results and covers both observational and theoretical work on the CSE and related topics One of the main topics is the possible relationship between the CSE and the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), which is believed to harbor 50% of the baryons in the near Universe New data from both XMM-Newton and FUSE have indicated a possible causal link between the WHIM and CSE Evidence is based on the apparent detection of O VII emission lines in the soft excess spectrum of the outskirts of several clusters, as well as reports of absorption lines at local and higher redshifts (seen in the spectra of distant sources) as signature of the WHIM However, while there h...

  19. Comparison of the O Kalpha x-ray emission bands in micro- and mesoporous silica materials and in alpha-quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khyzhun, O Yu; Strunskus, T; Wöll, Ch; Gies, H; Staemmler, V

    2008-08-28

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the O Kalpha threshold has been used to investigate the electronic structure of a microporous pure calcined zeolite with the crystal structure of the MFI-type framework (silicalite), a deboronated MFI zeolite (DB-MFI), a pure mesoporous cubic MCM-48 material, a MCM-48 loaded with copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles (CuZnO-MCM-48), and a crystalline layered silicic acid H-RUB-18. For comparison, the XES O Kalpha spectrum of pure alpha-quartz has also been recorded. In the nonresonant energy regime the XES O Kalpha spectra for all these compounds look very similar indicating that the electronic structure of the micro- and mesoporous silica materials is very similar to that of quartz. In the resonant regime, however, the spectra exhibit significant differences. In all the materials under study, the resonant XES O Kalpha spectra recorded at photon energies close to the positions of the O K edges show Raman-type inelastic peaks with an energy loss of 11 eV, originating from electronic excitations within these insulating materials. The prominent features in the XES O Kalpha spectra of alpha-quartz and H-RUB-18 are analyzed by means of quantum chemical ab initio cluster calculations.

  20. Electronic structure in the bulk and at the surface of lanthanide materials. A detailed study with X-ray emission and inverse photoemission

    CERN Document Server

    Huebinger, F

    2000-01-01

    LaTe. With measurements of the O3-XE in the Lanthanum-Chalcogenides we could demonstrate the transfer of s-like valence electrons from the Lanthanum atom to the Chalcogen atom. Furthermore, the binding energy of the state at the Lanthanum atom was determined. The surface core-level shift is smaller by 25 % in the Chalcogenides than in La-metal. We also describe a theoretical model, which qualitatively explains the observed larger shifts of the core-level binding energy in PE than in IPE from Lanthan-Chalcogenides. This dissertation is concerned with the occupied and unoccupied electronic structure of lanthanide materials. With surface sensitive electron-excited x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) we could experimentally determine a surface and bulk partial density of states (p-DOS) for the metals Lanthanum, Lutetium and Samarium. From calculations of the O3-XE transition probability we anticipate a three times higher probability for s-like than for d-like electrons to fill the 5p3/2-hole; this was confirmed exp...

  1. Conceptual design of the tomographic system for simultaneous studying of soft and hard X-ray emission from dense magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielecki, J., E-mail: jakub.bielecki@ifj.edu.edu; Wójcik-Gargula, A.; Scholz, M.

    2016-11-15

    The article presents a new approach for investigation of spatial distributions of soft and hard X-rays emitted from dense magnetized plasma. The approach is based on the application of tomographic methods to the X-ray emission reconstruction in a plasma focus (PF) device. Quantitative investigation of the anisotropy of the reconstructed X–ray plasma emissivity may help to explain the nature of fusion reaction mechanisms in a PF device. The aim of this work is to present a conceptual design of a novel dual-energy X-ray emission tomographic system dedicated to the PF-24 plasma focus device. The system, which enables the simultaneous registration of soft and hard X-rays, is composed of three X‐ray pinhole cameras. Each camera is equipped with a pair of 16-element Si photodiode arrays arranged in two layers separated by an aluminum attenuator. The Geant4 code was used to optimize the layout and parameters of the applied detectors. In addition, a method of tomographic reconstruction from a sparse data set provided by the experimental setup has been presented.

  2. Radio emission from the X-ray pulsar Her X-1: a jet launched by a strong magnetic field neutron star?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eijnden, J.; Degenaar, N.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Wijnands, R.; Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Rupen, M. P.

    2018-01-01

    Her X-1 is an accreting neutron star (NS) in an intermediate-mass X-ray binary. Like low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), it accretes via Roche lobe overflow, but similar to many high-mass X-ray binaries containing a NS; Her X-1 has a strong magnetic field and slow spin. Here, we present the discovery of radio emission from Her X-1 with the Very Large Array. During the radio observation, the central X-ray source was partially obscured by a warped disc. We measure a radio flux density of 38.7 ± 4.8 μJy at 9 GHz but cannot constrain the spectral shape. We discuss possible origins of the radio emission, and conclude that coherent emission, a stellar wind, shocks and a propeller outflow are all unlikely explanations. A jet, as seen in LMXBs, is consistent with the observed radio properties. We consider the implications of the presence of a jet in Her X-1 on jet formation mechanisms and on the launching of jets by NSs with strong magnetic fields.

  3. Bond Shortening (1.4 Å) in the Singlet and Triplet Excited States of [Ir2(dimen)4]2+ in Solution Determined by Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer; Harlang, Tobias; Christensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Ground- and excited-state structures of the bimetallic, ligand-bridged compound Ir2(dimen)42+ are investigated in acetonitrile by means of time-resolved X-ray scattering. Following excitation by 2 ps laser pulses at 390 nm, analysis of difference scattering patterns obtained at eight different ti...

  4. Strong soft X-ray emission from a double-stream gas puff target irradiated with a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Rakowski, R.; Szczurek, M. [Military Univ. of Technology, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. of Optoelectronics; Daido, H.; Suzuki, M.; Yamagami, S.; Choi, I.W.; Tang, H.J. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Soft X-ray emission from a new double-stream gas puff target irradiated with a nanosecond, high-power Nd:YAG laser pulse has been studied. The target was formed by pulsed injection of gas into a hollow gas stream made from helium by using a double-nozzle setup. Strong X-ray emissions near 10 nm from the double-stream krypton/helium, near 11 nm from the xenon/helium, and at 13 nm from the oxygen/helium targets were observed. The emission from the double-stream gas puff target was several times higher as compared to the ordinary gas puff targets, and comparable to the emission from the solid targets irradiated in the same conditions. (orig.)

  5. Study of self-generated electric field at shock front by broadband proton probing and soft X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Rui; Sio, Hong; Wilks, Scott; McGuffey, Christopher; Bailly-Grandvaux, Mathieu; Heeter, Bob; Beg, Farhat; Collins, Gilbert; Ping, Yuan; MIT Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration; UCSD Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Self-generated electric fields arise from gradients in the electron pressure at shock fronts. We report observations of such E-fields from experiments conducted on OMEGA EP. In the experiments, strong shock waves were generated in low density gas under a quasi-planar geometry and diagnosed by broadband proton radiography. The broad proton spectrum allows energy-dependent measurements of deflection from which one can quantitatively constrain the electrical potential and field thickness. Three UV beams delivering up to 6.4 kJ energy in 2ns were used for shock generation and a short laser pulse of energy up to 850 J, 10 ps duration, was used to accelerate the broadband proton beam for point-projection radiography. Observations show the existence of electric fields with potential 300 V at the front of a Mach 9 shock in helium gas. A Mach 16 shock is also studied, from which both the field thickness and electric potential are reproduced. Simultaneous spatially resolved soft-x-ray spectroscopy provided additional measurements of shock velocity, particle velocity and thermal emission. This work was performed under DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27 344 with support from OFES Early Career program and LLNL LDRD program. This work has been partially supported by the University of California Office of the President Lab Fee Grant Number LFR-17-449059.

  6. The Medical Case for a Positron Emission Tomography and X-ray Computed Tomography Combined Service in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bulushi, Naima K; Bailey, Dale; Mariani, Giuliano

    2013-11-01

    The value of a positron emission tomography and X-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) combined service in terms of diagnostic accuracy, cost-effectiveness and impact on clinical decision-making is well-documented in the literature. Its role in the management of patients presenting with cancer is shifting from early staging and restaging to the early assessment of the treatment response. Currently, the application of PET/CT has extended to non-oncological specialties-mainly neurology, cardiology and rheumatology. A further emerging application for PET/CT is the imaging of infection/inflammation. This article illustrates some of the PET/CT applications in both oncological and non-oncological disorders. In view of the absence of this modality in Oman, this article aims to increase the awareness of the importance of these imaging modalities and their significant impact on diagnosis and management in both oncological and non-oncological specialties for patients of all age groups as well as the decision-makers.

  7. Suzaku Observation of Strong Fluorescent Iron Line Emission from the Young Stellar Object V1647 Ori during Its New X-ray Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Grosso, Nicolas; Kastner, Joel H.; Weintraub, David A.; Richmond, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Suzaku X-ray satellite observed the young stellar object V1647 Ori on 2008 October 8 during the new mass accretion outburst reported in August 2008. During the 87 ksec observation with a net exposure of 40 ks, V1647 Ori showed a. high level of X-ray emission with a gradual decrease in flux by a factor of 5 and then displayed an abrupt flux increase by an order of magnitude. Such enhanced X-ray variability was also seen in XMM-Newton observations in 2004 and 2005 during the 2003-2005 outburst, but has rarely been observed for other young stellar objects. The spectrum clearly displays emission from Helium-like iron, which is a signature of hot plasma (kT approx.5 keV). It also shows a fluorescent iron Ka line with a remarkably large equivalent width of approx. 600 eV. Such a, large equivalent width indicates that a part of the incident X-ray emission that irradiates the circumstellar material and/or the stellar surface is hidden from our line of sight. XMM-Newton spectra during the 2003-2005 outburst did not show a strong fluorescent iron Ka line ; so that the structure of the circumstellar gas very close to the stellar core that absorbs and re-emits X-ray emission from the central object may have changed in between 2005 and 2008. This phenomenon may be related to changes in the infrared morphology of McNeil's nebula between 2004 and 2008.

  8. The Effect of Stress in the Density of States of Amorphous Carbon Films Determined by X-Ray Excited Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Barbieri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous carbon films can be prepared with a large variety of structure and have been used in a number of technological applications. Many of their properties have been determined, but very little is known concerning the effect of pressure on their properties. In this work we investigate the influence of pressure of graphite-like amorphous carbon films on the density of states (DOS using X-ray Excited Auger Electron Spectroscopy (XAES and the second derivate method of the XAES. The films were deposited by ion beam deposition and simultaneously bombarded with argon, which is responsible for the variation of the film stress, reaching extremely high values (4.5 GPa. Marked variations of the density of states of the pπ, pσ, sp, and s components were observed with increasing stress.

  9. dd excitations in CPO-27-Ni metal-organic framework: comparison between resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and UV-vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Erik; Lamberti, Carlo; Glatzel, Pieter

    2013-05-20

    We identify the dd excitations in the metal-organic framework CPO-27-Ni by coupling resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and UV-vis spectroscopy, and we show that the element selectivity of RIXS is crucial to observing the full dd multiplet structure, which is not visible in UV-vis. The combination of calculations using crystal-field multiplet theory and density functional theory can reproduce the RIXS spectral features, crucially improving interpretation of the experimental data. We obtain the crystal-field splitting and magnitude of the electron-electron interactions and correct previously reported values. RIXS instruments at synchrotron radiation sources are accessible to all researchers, and the technique can be applied to a broad range of systems.

  10. The X-ray corona of Procyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.; Peres, G.; Serio, S.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray emission from the nearby system Procyon A/B (F5 IV + DF) was detected, using the IPC (Imaging Proportional Counter) on board the Einstein Observatory. Analysis of the X-ray pulse height spectrum suggests that the observed X-ray emission originates in Procyon A rather than in the white dwarf companion Procyon B, since the derived X-ray temperature, log T = 6.2, agrees well with temperatures found for quiescent solar X-ray emission. Modeling Procyon's corona with loops characterized by some apex temperature Tmax and emission length scale L, it is found that Tmax is well constrained, but L, and consequently the filling factor of the X-ray emitting gas, are essentially unconstrained even when EUV emission from the transition region is included in the analysis.

  11. UNDERSTANDING THE UNUSUAL X-RAY EMISSION PROPERTIES OF THE MASSIVE, CLOSE BINARY WR 20a: A HIGH ENERGY WINDOW INTO THE STELLAR WIND INITIATION REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel, E-mail: gmontes@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  12. Understanding the Unusual X-Ray Emission Properties of the Massive, Close Binary WR 20a: A High Energy Window into the Stellar Wind Initiation Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  13. Evaluation of heavy metals in atmospheric emissions from automotive industry by total reflection X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana; Weber Neto, Jose, E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Dept. de Saneamento e Ambiente; Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de, E-mail: aesvives@unimep.b [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo

    2009-07-01

    This study had as goal to determine heavy metals and other elements (Ba, Br, Ca, Pb, Cl, Cr, Sr, Fe, Mn, Ni, K, Si, Ti and Zn) in atmospheric pollutants generated by an automotive industry located in the city of Engenheiro Coelho, state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The sampling and sample preparation procedures were based on methods established by the Company of Sanitation and Technology (CETESB L9.234) and also by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA - Method 29). The analysis was performed at XRF Beamline (D09B-XRF) in the Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory (Campinas/SP). A white beam of synchrotron radiation was used for sample and standard excitation which were irradiated by 100 seconds. For X-ray lines detection, a Ge (HP) detector with 150 eV of resolution at 5.9 keV was employed. For zinc, iron, barium, calcium and potassium, the values obtained were in the range of 30 mg/Nm{sup 3} and, for other elements, the concentrations were approximately 1 mg/Nm{sup 3}. The sum of As, Be, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Te and Zn concentration was compared with the limits established by CONAMA 264/1999 and SEMA 041/2002 resolutions (7.0 mg/Nm{sup 3}) and it was observed that, for all samples, sums are higher than the permissive value mainly due to the high concentration of zinc. Detection limits for SR-TXRF technique were 0.10 mug/Nm{sup 3} for Pb and 0.02 mug/Nm{sup 3} for Zn. (author)

  14. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.R.; /SLAC; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  15. The analysis and the three-dimensional, forward-fit modeling of the X-ray and the microwave emissions of major solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Natsuha; Wang, Haimin; Gary, Dale E.

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that the time profiles of the hard X-ray (HXR) emission and the microwave (MW) emission during the impulsive phase of the solar flare are well correlated, and that their analysis can lead to the understandings of the flare-accelerated electrons. In this work, we first studied the source locations of seven distinct temporal peaks observed in HXR and MW lightcurves of the 2011-02-15 X2.2 flare using the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Nobeyama Radioheliograph. We found that the seven emission peaks did not come from seven spatially distinct sites in HXR and MW, but rather in HXR we observed a sudden change in location only between the second and the third peak, with the same pattern occurring, but evolving more slowly in MW, which is consistent with the tether-cutting model of solar flares. Next, we closely examine the widely-used notion of a "common population" of the accelerated electrons producing the HXR and the MW, which has been challenged by some studies suggesting the differences in the inferred energy spectral index and emitting energies of the HXR- and MW- producing electrons. We use the Non-linear Force Free Field model extrapolated from the observed photospheric magnetogram in the three-dimensional, multi-wavelength modeling platform GX Simulator, and attempt to create a unified electron population model that can simultaneously reproduce the observed X-ray and MW observations of the 2015-06-22 M6.5 flare. We constrain the model parameters by the observations made by the highest-resolving instruments currently available in two wavelengths, the RHESSI for X-ray and the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array for MW. The results suggest that the X-ray emitting electron population model fits to the standard flare model with the broken, hardening power-law spectrum at ~300 keV that simultaneously produces the HXR footpoint emission and the MW high frequency emission, and also reveals that there could be a “X-ray

  16. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of minor and trace elements in gallstones of Nigerian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatise, Olusegun I; Obiajunwa, Eusebius I; Lawal, Oladejo O; Adesunkanmi, Abdulrasheed R K

    2010-04-01

    Gallstone disease is a major health problem in many parts of the world. In Nigeria, however, only a few cases of gallstone disease are reported. Minor/trace elements are reported to play a significant role in the formation of gallstones. This study was conducted to assess the minor elements in gallstone of Nigerian patients who had cholecystectomy in our institution using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. We also compare the findings with previous reports from outside Nigeria. Fourteen patients who had cholecystectomy for calculous cholecystitis at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, between March 2006 and July 2008, had the stone retrieved. The stones were analyzed for trace elements at the Center for Energy Research and Developments of the University using PIXE experiments. Certified standard reference material, NIST 1577a (bovine liver), was equally analyzed to confirm the accuracy of the experimental procedure. Computer code GUPIXWIN was used to analyze the data. Fourteen elements, phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, potassium, calcium, manganese, iron, copper, zinc, bromide, lead, titanium, rubidium, and strontium, were detected in most of the samples. The concentrations of the elements varied in the different samples, ranging from a few parts per million to a few percent. Ca was the major constituent of all samples. The black sand-like samples had very high levels of P, S, K, and Pb, which were different from a previous report. The distribution of trace elements in stones in Nigeria patients is different from previous report outside Nigeria, and this may have some role in the occurrence of gallstones in the black African.

  17. Element analysis of the eutardigrades Richtersius coronifer and Milnesium cf. asiaticum using Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotta Nilsson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Semi-terrestrial tardigrades are well-known for their tolerance to a variety of environmental extremes, including desiccation, freezing and radiation. Despite several attempts to reveal the genetic and molecular mechanisms behind the resilience of tardigrades, it is still unknown how these animals are able to maintain the integrity of their cellular components under severe stress. Quantitative or qualitative changes in molecular compounds (e.g., carbohydrates, proteins are expected, and have been the main line of research towards understanding the tolerance of tardigrades. In radiation tolerant bacteria, a tolerance mechanism based on manganese has been proposed. We evaluate this hypothesis in tardigrades and provide the first data on element composition in desiccated and non-desiccated specimens of two eutardigrade species, Richtersius coronifer and Milnesium cf. asiaticum. A focused 2 MeV proton microbeam was utilised to determine the elemental content, distributions and concentrations, using the ion beam analytical technique particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE. The presence of six elements – phosphorus, sulphur, chlorine, potassium, calcium and iron – were confirmed in all tardigrade specimens, at levels up to a few mg g–1. However, manganese was found in less than 10% of the analysed specimens, and in low amounts, thus our study provides no evidence for the manganese hypothesis. We also show that the distributions and/or concentrations of some elements differ between the two species as well as between the dehydrated and hydrated state. In particular, very low levels of iron were found in dehydrated M. cf. asiaticum. Our analysis shows that the PIXE technique is a useful tool for investigating questions on the distribution of elements both in dehydrated and hydrated tardigrades.

  18. Lattice location of impurities in semiconductors: a RBS/channeling and proton-induced x-ray emission study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kringhoj, P. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1993-12-31

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)/channeling and proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are two well established and characterised techniques. Over the last three decades RBS/channeling measurements has been performed to extract the substitutional fraction of impurities in both elemental and compound semiconductors. However, due to the limitation of RBS, only elements heavier than the host crystal can be examined (except for a few elements, where a nuclear reaction or a resonance can be used). In silicon this limitation is acceptable, due to the low mass of Si, but in the III-V compounds (e.g. InP), the technique is limited to a few elements of hardly no technological or fundamental interest. One can overcome this by combining RBS/channeling with PIXE, where PIXE is applied to detect elements with a mass lower than the host crystal. In the present work, the lattice location of Ge in InP has been studied and compared to the group-III impurity Ga, and the group-VI impurity Se which is known to be a donor. The (RBS)/channeling technique has been used to detect not only the substitutional fraction, but also the relative population of the two sublattices. The half-width is approximately equal to the characteristic angle, {psi}{sub 1}. The channeling data obtained indicate that all three dopants are located exclusively on substitutional sites and that Ga is occuping the In position, Se theP position and that Ge is distributed equally between both sublattices. 6 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  19. Element-based prognostics of occupational pneumoconiosis using micro-proton-induced X-ray emission analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaodong; Shen, Hao; Chen, Zidan; Rong, Caicai; Ren, Minqin; Hou, Likun; Wu, Chunyan; Mao, Ling; Lu, Quan; Su, Bo

    2017-12-01

    Pneumoconiosis is an occupational disease accompanied by long-term lung impairment, for which prediction of prognosis is poorly understood because of the complexity of the inhaled particles. Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) analysis, which is advantageous for high-sensitivity, two-dimensional element mapping of lung tissues, was used to investigate element-based predictive factors of prognosis in Chinese patients with welder's and coal miner's pneumoconiosis. Chest radiographs and lung function tests showed that most of the coal miners deteriorated, whereas symptoms in some welders were alleviated after 5 yr, as determined by comparing percent vital capacity (%VC) and forced expiratory volume in the 1st second over forced vital capacity (FEV1.0/FVC) to values taken at the initial diagnosis. Micro-PIXE analysis suggested that the most abundant particulates in welder's pneumoconiosis were Fe, Mn, and Ti (metallic oxide),which were accompanied by particulates containing Si, Al, and Ca (aluminum silicate) or only Si (SiO2); the most abundant particulates in coal miner's pneumoconiosis were composed of C, Si, Al, K, and Ti, which were accompanied by particulates containing Ca or Fe. Particulates containing Al, Si, S, K, Ca, and Ti (orthoclase and anorthite) were correlated with severity of fibrosis. Multivariable linear regression suggested that long-term FEV1.0/FVC decrease was independently associated with Si and smoking index, whereas %VC decrease was associated with Si and Ti. A risk index comprised of these factors was developed to predict the prognosis of pneumoconiosis. Micro-PIXE analysis is feasible for the evaluation of elemental composition and dust exposure, especially for patients whose exposure is mixed or uncertain. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Constraints on Porosity and Mass Loss in O-star Winds from the Modeling of X-ray Emission Line Profile Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2013-01-01

    We fit X-ray emission line profiles in high resolution XMM-Newton and Chandra grating spectra of the early O supergiant Zeta Pup with models that include the effects of porosity in the stellar wind. We explore the effects of porosity due to both spherical and flattened clumps. We find that porosity models with flattened clumps oriented parallel to the photosphere provide poor fits to observed line shapes. However, porosity models with isotropic clumps can provide acceptable fits to observed line shapes, but only if the porosity effect is moderate. We quantify the degeneracy between porosity effects from isotropic clumps and the mass-loss rate inferred from the X-ray line shapes, and we show that only modest increases in the mass-loss rate (40%) are allowed if moderate porosity effects (h(sub infinity) less than approximately R(sub *)) are assumed to be important. Large porosity lengths, and thus strong porosity effects, are ruled out regardless of assumptions about clump shape. Thus, X-ray mass-loss rate estimates are relatively insensitive to both optically thin and optically thick clumping. This supports the use of X-ray spectroscopy as a mass-loss rate calibration for bright, nearby O stars

  1. Theoretical X-ray photoelectron and emission spectra of Si- and S-containing polymers by density-functional theory calculations using model molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, K.; Shimada, S.; Ida, T.; Suhara, M.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Chong, D. P.

    2001-04-01

    The X-ray photoelectron and emission spectra (XPS and XES) of Si- and S-containing polymers [(-Si{-CH 2-} 3) n (PCS), (-Si(CH 3)(OH)-O-) n (PMHSO), (-Si(C 6H 5)(OH)-O-) n (PTES), (-Si(C 6H 5)(OH)-O-Si(CH 3)(OH)-O-) n (PPMHSO), (-C 6H 4-O-C 6H 4-SO 2-) n (PES)] were simulated by the deMon density-functional theory (DFT) calculations using the model molecules. The theoretical valence photoelectron and C Kα X-ray emission spectra showed good accordance with some experimental ones. The combined analysis of the valence XPS and C and O Kα XES enables us to divide the observed valence electronic distribution into the individual contributions for pσ-, pπ- and non-bonding MOs of the polymers.

  2. Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-03-03

    We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

  3. High-energy x-ray detection of G359.89–0.08 (SGR A–E): magnetic flux tube emission powered by cosmic rays?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2014-01-01

    monitoring campaign. The featureless power-law spectrum with a photon index Γ ≈ 2.3 confirms a non-thermal emission mechanism. The observed flux in the 3-79 keV band is FX = (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1, corresponding to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity LX = (2.6 ± 0.8) × 1034 erg s–1 assuming a distance...

  4. The X-ray emission mechanism of large scale powerful quasar jets: Fermi rules out IC/CMB for 3C 273.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georganopoulos Markos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The process responsible for the Chandra-detected X-ray emission from the large-scale jets of powerful quasars is not clear yet. The two main models are inverse Compton scattering off the cosmic microwave background photons (IC/CMB and synchrotron emission from a population of electrons separate from those producing the radio-IR emission. These two models imply radically different conditions in the large scale jet in terms of jet speed, kinetic power, and maximum energy of the particle acceleration mechanism, with important implications for the impact of the jet on the larger-scale environment. Georganopoulos et al. (2006 proposed a diagnostic based on a fundamental difference between these two models: the production of synchrotron X-rays requires multi-TeV electrons, while the EC/CMB model requires a cutoff in the electron energy distribution below TeV energies. This has significant implications for the γ-ray emission predicted by these two models. Here we present new Fermi observations that put an upper limit on the gamma-ray flux from the large-scale jet of 3C 273 that clearly violates the flux expected from the IC/CMB X-ray interpretation found by extrapolation of the UV to X-ray spectrum of knot A, thus ruling out the IC/CMB interpretation entirely for this source. Further, the upper limit from Fermi puts a limit on the Doppler beaming factor of at least δ <9, assuming equipartition fields, and possibly as low as δ <5 assuming no major deceleration of the jet from knots A through D1.

  5. Spin Transition of Iron and Crystal Structure in FeO from X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and Diffraction Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, H.; Hirose, K.; Ishii, H.; Hiraoka, N.; Ohishi, Y.

    2010-12-01

    FeO is definitely an important component in the Earth’s core because of high oxygen solubility into liquid iron at high pressure. High-pressure behavior of FeO is, therefore, of our great interest to geophysics. However, phase relationships in FeO at high pressure and high temperature still remain controversial, which is mainly due to lack of information on magnetic state of iron. The spin state of iron in FeO has been experimentally investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) to Mbar pressures [Pasternak et al., 1997 PRL; Badro et al., 1999 PRL]. However, there is a discrepancy between these studies probably because of sluggish structural transition at room temperature from rhombohedral to NiAs-type (B8) in FeO. Here we examined the spin state of iron and the crystal structure in FeO with combination of XES and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements at SPring-8. Starting material was commercially available Fe0.95O powder. The high-pressure phases of FeO were synthesized at high pressure and high temperature using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell and examined by in-situ XRD measurements. XES spectra of the Fe Kβ fluorescence lines were collected up to 146 GPa. At 36 GPa, FeO with rhombohedral structure shows high-spin state, which is consistent with the previous studies. The satellite peak Kβ’ of iron in B8 phase completely disappeared at 146 GPa, indicating the loss of the 3d magnetic moment. We further collected XES spectra at 119 and 103 GPa with decreasing pressure. The presence of the Kβ’ peak of iron in B8 phase was clearly observed at 103 GPa whereas it was absent at 119 GPa, which suggests that the spin collapse occurred between these pressures. Furthermore, the volume measurements of B8 phase were conducted at P=77-132 GPa and 88-139 GPa at T=300 K and 1500-1700 K, respectively, using in-situ XRD. Sharp density discontinuity was observed at around 120 GPa at both 300 K and 1500-1700 K, which is most likely

  6. Water adsorption on SrTiO3(001) studied by x-ray standing wave excited photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegenhagen, Jorg; Solokha, Vladyslav; Wilson, Axel; Duncan, David; Garai, Debi; Hingerl, Kurt

    We investigated the nature of water adsorption and in particular the H2O and/or OH- bonding sites on different SrTiO3(001) surfaces using the powerful technique of standing wave excited photoelectron spectroscopy. This allowed us determining whether the H2O adsorption is associative or dissociative and additionally localizing the exact bonding site of the different oxygen species (water oxygen and OH- oxygen species). We deposited water in ultra high vacuum on several differently structured or reconstruction SrTiO3(001) surfaces in the range from 100K to room temperature. Our results provide valuable insight into water adsorption on STO(001) surfaces and its specific catalytic activity in view of water splitting applications. They also help clarify previous conflicting previous results.

  7. Handbook of X-Ray Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornack, Günter

    2007-01-01

    This sourcebook is intended as an X-ray data reference for scientists and engineers working in the field of energy or wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry and related fields of basic and applied research, technology, or process and quality controlling. In a concise and informative manner, the most important data connected with the emission of characteristic X-ray lines are tabulated for all elements up to Z = 95 (Americium). This includes X-ray energies, emission rates and widths as well as level characteristics such as binding energies, fluorescence yields, level widths and absorption edges. The tabulated data are characterized and, in most cases, evaluated. Furthermore, all important processes and phenomena connected with the production, emission and detection of characteristic X-rays are discussed. This reference book addresses all researchers and practitioners working with X-ray radiation and fills a gap in the available literature.

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to ... to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit ...

  9. Hard X-ray emission clumps in the gamma-Cygni supernova remnant: An INTEGRAL-ISGRI view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bykov, A.M.; Krassilchtchikov, A.M.; Uvarov, Y.A.; Bloemen, H.; Chevalier, R.A.; Gustov, M.Y.; Hermsen, W.; Lebrun, F.; Lozinskaya, T.A.; Rauw, G.; Smirnova, T.V.; Sturner, S.J.; Swings, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Toptygin, I.N.

    2004-01-01

    Spatially resolved images of the galactic supernova remnant G78.2+2.1 (gamma-Cygni) in hard X-ray energy bands from 25 keV to 120 keV are obtained with the IBIS-ISGRI imager aboard the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory INTEGRAL. The images are dominated by localized clumps of about ten

  10. The Variable Quiescent X-Ray Emission of the Neutron Star Transient XTE J1701-462

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fridriksson, Joel K.; Homan, J.; Wijnands, R.; Cackett, E. M.; Degenaar, N.; Mendez, M.; Altamirano, D.; Brown, E. F.; Belloni, T. M.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    We have monitored the cooling of the neutron star in the transient low-mass X-ray binary XTE J1701-462 with Chandra and XMM-Newton since the source entered quiescence in 2007 after an exceptionally luminous 19-month outburst. A recent Chandra observation made almost 1200 days into quiescence

  11. Far-ultraviolet and X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks: a grid of models. II. Gas diagnostic line emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Kamp, I.; Spaans, M.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Most of the mass in protoplanetary disks is in the form of gas. The study of the gas and its diagnostics is of fundamental importance in order to achieve a detailed description of the thermal and chemical structure of the disk. Both radiation from the central star (from optical to X-ray

  12. Far-ultraviolet and X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks: a grid of models : II. Gas diagnostic line emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Kamp, I.; Spaans, M.; Thi, W. -F; Woitke, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Most of the mass in protoplanetary disks is in the form of gas. The study of the gas and its diagnostics is of fundamental importance in order to achieve a detailed description of the thermal and chemical structure of the disk. Both radiation from the central star (from optical to X-ray

  13. Far-ultraviolet and X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks : a grid of models II. Gas diagnostic line emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Kamp, I.; Spaans, M.; Thi, W. -F.; Woitke, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Most of the mass in protoplanetary disks is in the form of gas. The study of the gas and its diagnostics is of fundamental importance in order to achieve a detailed description of the thermal and chemical structure of the disk. Both radiation from the central star (from optical to X-ray

  14. Discovery of a 34 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation in the X-ray emission of GRS 1915+105

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belloni, T.M.; Altamirano, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery in the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of GRS 1915+105 of a second quasi-periodic oscillation at 34 Hz, simultaneous with that observed at 68 Hz in the same observation. The data corresponded to those observations from 2003 where the 68 Hz oscillation was very strong. The

  15. X ray emission: a tool and a probe for laser - clusters interaction; L'emission X: un outil et une sonde pour l'interaction laser - agregats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prigent, Ch

    2004-12-01

    In intense laser-cluster interaction, the experimental results show a strong energetic coupling between radiation and matter. We have measured absolute X-ray yields and charge state distributions under well control conditions as a function of physical parameters governing the interaction; namely laser intensity, pulse duration, wavelength or polarization state of the laser light, the size and the species of the clusters (Ar, Kr, Xe). We have highlighted, for the first time, an intensity threshold in the X-ray production very low ({approx} 2.10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} for a pulse duration of 300 fs) which can results from an effect of the dynamical polarisation of clusters in an intense electric field. A weak dependence with the wavelength (400 nm / 800 nm) on the absolute X-ray yields has been found. Moreover, we have observed a saturation of the X-ray emission probability below a critical cluster size. (author)

  16. Suzaku Observations of Thermal and Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission from the Middle-Aged Supernova Remnant G156.2+5.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hwang, Una; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We present results from X-ray analysis of a Galactic middle-aged supernova remnant (SNR) G156.2+5.7 which is bright and largely extended in X-ray wavelengths, showing a clear circular shape (radius approx.50'). Using the Suzaku satellite, we observed this SNR in three pointings; partially covering the northwestern (NW) rim, the eastern (E) rim, and the central portion of this SNR. In the NW rim and the central portion, we confirm that the X-ray spectra consist of soft and hard-tail emission, while in the E rim we find no significant hard-tail emission. The soft emission is well fitted by either a one-component or two-component non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) model. In the NW and E rims, a one-component (the swept-up interstellar medium) NEI model well represents the soft emission. On the other hand, in the central portion, a two-component (the interstellar medium and the metal-rich ejecta) NEI model fits the soft emission better than the one-component NEI model from a statistical point of view. The relative abundances in the ejecta component suggest that G156.2+5.7 is a remnant from a core-collapse SN explosion whose progenitor mass is less than 15 Solar Mass. The origin of the hard-tail emission detected in the NW rim and the central portion of the SNR is highly likely non-thermal synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons. In the NW rim, the relativistic electrons seems to be accelerated by a forward shock with a slow velocity of APPROX.500 km/sec.

  17. Hand x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  18. X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... show up on chest X-rays. Breast cancer. Mammography is a special type of X-ray test used to examine breast tissue. Enlarged heart. This sign of congestive heart failure shows up clearly on X-rays. Blocked blood vessels. Injecting a contrast material that contains iodine can help highlight sections ...

  19. Detectability of Sungrazing Comet Soft X-ray Irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yeon Oh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Originating from the Oort cloud, some comets disappear to impact against the Sun or to split up by strong gravitational force. Then they don't go back to the Oort cloud. They are called sungrazing comets. The comets are detected by sublimation of ices and ejection of gas and dust through solar heat close to the Sun. There exists the charge transfer from heavy ions in the solar wind to neutral atoms in the cometary atmosphere by interaction with the solar wind. Cometary atoms would be excited to high electronic levels and their de-excitation would result in X-ray emission, or it would be scattering of solar X-ray emission by very small cometary grains. We calculated the X-ray emission applying the model suggested by Mendis & Flammer (1984 and Cravens (1997. In our estimation, the sungrazing comet whose nucleus size is about 1 km in radius might be detectable within a distance of 3 solar radius from the sun on soft X-ray solar camera.

  20. Principles of femtosecond X-ray/optical cross-correlation with X-ray induced transient optical reflectivity in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, S., E-mail: sebastian.eckert@helmholtz-berlin.de, E-mail: martin.beye@helmholtz-berlin.de; Beye, M., E-mail: sebastian.eckert@helmholtz-berlin.de, E-mail: martin.beye@helmholtz-berlin.de; Pietzsch, A.; Quevedo, W.; Hantschmann, M. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Ochmann, M.; Huse, N. [Institute for Nanostructure and Solid State Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, 20355 Hamburg, Germany and Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ross, M.; Khalil, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Box 351700, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Minitti, M. P.; Turner, J. J.; Moeller, S. P.; Schlotter, W. F.; Dakovski, G. L. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Föhlisch, A. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-02-09

    The discovery of ultrafast X-ray induced optical reflectivity changes enabled the development of X-ray/optical cross correlation techniques at X-ray free electron lasers worldwide. We have now linked through experiment and theory the fundamental excitation and relaxation steps with the transient optical properties in finite solid samples. Therefore, we gain a thorough interpretation and an optimized detection scheme of X-ray induced changes to the refractive index and the X-ray/optical cross correlation response.

  1. X-ray satellite spectra of Ti, V, Cr and Mn induced by photons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K X-ray emission spectra of Ti, V, Cr and Mn generated by photon excitation have been studied with a crystal spectrometer. The measured energy shifts of K satellite relative to the diagram line are compared with values obtained by electron excitation and with different theoretical estimates. The present experimental ...

  2. Evaluation of computational models and cross sections used by MCNP6 for simulation of characteristic X-ray emission from thick targets bombarded by kiloelectronvolt electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poškus, A., E-mail: andrius.poskus@ff.vu.lt

    2016-09-15

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of the single-event (SE) and condensed-history (CH) models of electron transport in MCNP6.1 when simulating characteristic K{sub α}, total K (=K{sub α} + K{sub β}) and L{sub α} X-ray emission from thick targets bombarded by electrons with energies from 5 keV to 30 keV. It is shown that the MCNP6.1 implementation of the CH model for the K-shell impact ionization leads to underestimation of the K yield by 40% or more for the elements with atomic numbers Z < 15 and overestimation of the K{sub α} yield by more than 40% for the elements with Z > 25. The L{sub α} yields are underestimated by more than an order of magnitude in CH mode, because MCNP6.1 neglects X-ray emission caused by electron-impact ionization of L, M and higher shells in CH mode (the L{sub α} yields calculated in CH mode reflect only X-ray fluorescence, which is mainly caused by photoelectric absorption of bremsstrahlung photons). The X-ray yields calculated by MCNP6.1 in SE mode (using ENDF/B-VII.1 library data) are more accurate: the differences of the calculated and experimental K yields are within the experimental uncertainties for the elements C, Al and Si, and the calculated K{sub α} yields are typically underestimated by (20–30)% for the elements with Z > 25, whereas the L{sub α} yields are underestimated by (60–70)% for the elements with Z > 49. It is also shown that agreement of the experimental X-ray yields with those calculated in SE mode is additionally improved by replacing the ENDF/B inner-shell electron-impact ionization cross sections with the set of cross sections obtained from the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), which are also used in the PENELOPE code system. The latter replacement causes a decrease of the average relative difference of the experimental X-ray yields and the simulation results obtained in SE mode to approximately 10%, which is similar to accuracy achieved with PENELOPE. This confirms that the DWBA inner

  3. Delocalization and occupancy effects of 5f orbitals in plutonium intermetallics using L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, C. H.; Medling, S. A.; Jiang, Yu; Bauer, E. D.; Tobash, P. H.; Mitchell, J. N.; Veirs, D. K.; Wall, M. A.; Allen, P. G.; Kas, J. J.; Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T. -C.

    2014-06-24

    Although actinide (An) L3 -edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy has been very effective in determining An oxidation states in insulating, ionically bonded materials, such as in certain coordination compounds and mineral systems, the technique fails in systems featuring more delocalized 5f orbitals, especially in metals. Recently, actinide L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spec- troscopy (RXES) has been shown to be an effective alternative. This technique is further demonstrated here using a parameterized partial unoccupied density of states method to quantify both occupancy and delocalization of the 5f orbital in ?-Pu, ?-Pu, PuCoGa5 , PuCoIn5 , and PuSb2. These new results, supported by FEFF calculations, highlight the effects of strong correlations on RXES spectra and the technique?s ability to differentiate between f-orbital occupation and delocalization.

  4. Modeling energy dependence of the inner-shell x-ray emission produced by femtosecond-pulse laser irradiation of xenon clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkelbach, Timothy C; Colgan, James; Abdallah, Joseph; Faenov, Anatoly Ya; Pikuz, Tatiana A; Fukuda, Yuji; Yamakawa, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    We employ the Los Alamos suite of atomic physics codes to model the inner-shell x-ray emission spectrum of xenon and compare results with those obtained via high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of xenon clusters irradiated by 30fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulses. We find that the commonly employed configuration-average approximation breaks down and significant spin-orbit splitting necessitates a detailed level accounting. We reproduce an interesting spectral trend for a series of experimental spectra taken with varying pulse energy for fixed pulse duration. To simulate the experimental measurements at increasing beam energies, we find that spectral modeling requires an increased hot electron fraction, but decreased atomic density and bulk electron temperature. We believe these latter conditions to be a result of partial cluster destruction due to the increased energy in the laser prepulse.

  5. Transform-limited x-ray pulse generation from a high-brightness self-amplified spontaneous-emission free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, B W J; Thompson, N R; Dunning, D J

    2013-03-29

    A method to achieve high-brightness self-amplified spontaneous emission (HB-SASE) in the free-electron laser (FEL) is described. The method uses repeated nonequal electron beam delays to delocalize the collective FEL interaction and break the radiation coherence length dependence on the FEL cooperation length. The method requires no external seeding or photon optics and so is applicable at any wavelength or repetition rate. It is demonstrated, using linear theory and numerical simulations, that the radiation coherence length can be increased by approximately 2 orders of magnitude over SASE with a corresponding increase in spectral brightness. Examples are shown of HB-SASE generating transform-limited FEL pulses in the soft x-ray and near transform-limited pulses in the hard x-ray. Such pulses may greatly benefit existing applications and may also open up new areas of scientific research.

  6. Modeling energy dependence of the inner-shell x-ray emission produced by femtosecond-pulse laser irradiation of xenon clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We employ the Los Alamos suite of atomic physics codes to model the inner-shell x-ray emission spectrum of xenon and compare results with those obtained via high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of xenon clusters irradiated by 30 fs Ti:Sa laser pulses. We find that the commonly employed configuration average approximation breaks down and significant spin-orbit splitting necessitates a detailed level accounting. Additionally, we reproduce an interesting spectral trend for a series of experimental spectra taken with varying pulse energy for fixed pulse duration. To simulate the experimental measurements at increasing beam energies, we find that spectral modeling requires an increased hot electron fraction, but decreased atomic density and bulk electron temperature. We believe these latter conditions to be a result of partial cluster destruction due to the increased energy in the laser prepulse.

  7. Jovian X-Ray Aurora and Energetic Oxygen Ion Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weihong; Schultz, D. R.

    1999-11-20

    The X-ray line spectra of highly charged oxygen ions excited by charge transfer interaction with the molecular hydrogen in the auroral atmosphere of Jupiter are calculated. The calculations utilize our calculated cross sections of state-selective charge transfer and the available cross-section data of ionization and stripping. Comparison of these spectra with high-resolution spectral observations may provide a sensitive probe of the characteristics of the heavy ions precipitating into the Jovian auroral atmosphere. On the basis of the much higher X-ray efficiency of heavy ions than of electrons, it is concluded that the Jovian aurora may be accounted for by a combination of energetic heavy-ion precipitation and energetic electron precipitation, which produces the auroral X-ray and ultraviolet emissions, respectively. (c) (c) 1999. The American Astronomical Society.

  8. Extracting the differential inverse inelastic mean free path and differential surface excitation probability of Tungsten from X-ray photoelectron spectra and electron energy loss spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanas’ev, V. P.; Gryazev, A. S.; Efremenko, D. S.; Kaplya, P. S.; Kuznetcova, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    Precise knowledge of the differential inverse inelastic mean free path (DIIMFP) and differential surface excitation probability (DSEP) of Tungsten is essential for many fields of material science. In this paper, a fitting algorithm is applied for extracting DIIMFP and DSEP from X-ray photoelectron spectra and electron energy loss spectra. The algorithm uses the partial intensity approach as a forward model, in which a spectrum is given as a weighted sum of cross-convolved DIIMFPs and DSEPs. The weights are obtained as solutions of the Riccati and Lyapunov equations derived from the invariant imbedding principle. The inversion algorithm utilizes the parametrization of DIIMFPs and DSEPs on the base of a classical Lorentz oscillator. Unknown parameters of the model are found by using the fitting procedure, which minimizes the residual between measured spectra and forward simulations. It is found that the surface layer of Tungsten contains several sublayers with corresponding Langmuir resonances. The thicknesses of these sublayers are proportional to the periods of corresponding Langmuir oscillations, as predicted by the theory of R.H. Ritchie.

  9. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  10. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays.

  11. Soft X-ray production by photon scattering in pulsating binary neutron star sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, R. W.; Meszaros, P.; Alexander, S.

    1985-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed as a source of soft (less than 1 keV) radiation in binary pulsating X-ray sources, in the form of photon scattering which leaves the electron in an excited Landau level. In a plasma with parameters typical of such sources, the low-energy X-ray emissivity of this mechanism far exceeds that of bremsstrahlung. This copious source of soft photons is quite adequate to provide the seed photons needed to explain the power-law hard X-ray spectrum by inverse Comptonization on the hot electrons at the base of the accretion column.

  12. INTEGRAL detects an X-ray burst from SAX J1747.0-2853 with no detectable persistent emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chenevez, J.; Brandt, S.; Kuulkers, E.; Beckmann, V.; Bird, T.; Domingo, A.; Ebisawa, K.; Jonker, P.; Kretschmar, P.; Markwardt, C.; Oosterbroek, T.; Paizis, A.; Risquez, D.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; Shaw, S.; Wijnands, R.

    2009-01-01

    A new season of observations for the INTEGRAL Galactic Bulge monitoring (see ATel #438) has started on 2009 Feb. 21st. During the latest observation between 2009 Feb 25 13:21 and 17:02 (UT) a type I X-ray burst from SAX J1747.0-2853 (1A 1743-288, aka GX .2-0.2) was detected by JEM-X at UT 14:50:51

  13. INTEGRAL detects an X-ray burst from SAX J1747.0-2853 with no detectable persistent emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Brandt, Søren Kristian; Kuulkers, Erik

    2009-01-01

    A new season of observations for the INTEGRAL Galactic Bulge monitoring (see ATel #438) has started on 2009 Feb. 21st. During the latest observation between 2009 Feb 25 13:21 and 17:02 (UT) a type I X-ray burst from SAX J1747.0-2853 (1A 1743-288, aka GX .2-0.2) was detected by JEM-X at UT 14:50:5...

  14. Enhanced X-ray emission from Lyman Break Analogues and a Possible $L_{\\rm X}$--SFR--Metallicity Plane

    OpenAIRE

    Brorby, Matthew; Kaaret, Philip; Prestwich, Andrea; Mirabel, I. Felix

    2016-01-01

    The source of energetic photons that heated and reionized the early Universe remains uncertain. Early galaxies had low metallicity and recent population synthesis calculations suggest that the number and luminosity of high-mass X-ray binaries are enhanced in star-forming galaxies with low metallicity, offering a potentially important and previously overlooked source of heating and reionization. Lyman break analogue (LBA) galaxies are local galaxies that strongly resemble the high-redshift, st...

  15. ROSAT Observations of Soft X-ray Emission from the Solar Wind Interaction with the Lunar Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael

    We analyze the ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray image of the moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges, two wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 degrees off (19 degrees wide) the terminator towards the dark side and one wedge 38 degrees wide centered on the antisolar point. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show substantial limb brightening that is absent in the 38 degree wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the moon represents another solar system body at which solar wind charge exchange has been observed.

  16. Changes in the pulse phase dependence of X-ray emission lines in 4U 1626-67 with a torque reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beri, Aru; Paul, Biswajit; Dewangan, Gulab C.

    2018-03-01

    We report results from an observation with the XMM-Newton observatory of a unique X-ray pulsar 4U 1626-67. European Photon Imaging Camera-pn data during the current spin-up phase of 4U 1626-67 have been used to study pulse phase dependence of low-energy emission lines. We found strong variability of low-energy emission line at 0.915 keV with the pulse phase, varying by a factor of 2, much stronger than the continuum variability. Another interesting observation is that behaviour of one of the low-energy emission lines across the pulse phase is quite different from that observed during the spin-down phase. This indicates that the structures in the accretion disc that produce pulse phase dependence of emission features have changed from spin-down to spin-up phase. This is well supported by the differences in the timing characteristics (like pulse profiles, quasi periodic oscillations, etc.) between spin-down and spin-up phases. We have also found that during the current spin-up phase of 4U 1626-67, the X-ray pulse profile below 2 keV is different compared to the spin-down phase. The X-ray light curve also shows flares which produce a feature around 3 mHz in power density spectrum of 4U 1626-67. Since flares are dominant at lower energies, the feature around 3 mHz is prominent at low energies.

  17. SHORT-TIMESCALE MONITORING OF THE X-RAY, UV, AND BROAD DOUBLE-PEAK EMISSION LINE OF THE NUCLEUS OF NGC 1097

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Campus do Vale, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Grupe, Dirk [Space Science Center, Morehead State University, 235 Martindale Drive, Morehead, KY 40351 (United States); Eracleous, Michael [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Peterson, Bradley M. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Baldwin, Jack A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Nemmen, Rodrigo S. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil); Winge, Cláudia, E-mail: silva.schimoia@ufrgs.br [Gemini South Observatory, c/o AURA Inc., Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-02-10

    Recent studies have suggested that the short-timescale (≲ 7 days) variability of the broad (∼10,000 km s{sup –1}) double-peaked Hα profile of the LINER nucleus of NGC 1097 could be driven by a variable X-ray emission from a central radiatively inefficient accretion flow. To test this scenario, we have monitored the NGC 1097 nucleus in X-ray and UV continuum with Swift and the Hα flux and profile in the optical spectrum using SOAR and Gemini-South from 2012 August to 2013 February. During the monitoring campaign, the Hα flux remained at a very low level—three times lower than the maximum flux observed in previous campaigns and showing only limited (∼20%) variability. The X-ray variations were small, only ∼13% throughout the campaign, while the UV did not show significant variations. We concluded that the timescale of the Hα profile variation is close to the sampling interval of the optical observations, which results in only a marginal correlation between the X-ray and Hα fluxes. We have caught the active galaxy nucleus in NGC 1097 in a very low activity state, in which the ionizing source was very weak and capable of ionizing just the innermost part of the gas in the disk. Nonetheless, the data presented here still support the picture in which the gas that emits the broad double-peaked Balmer lines is illuminated/ionized by a source of high-energy photons which is located interior to the inner radius of the line-emitting part of the disk.

  18. Simulation of intense laser-dense matter interactions. X-ray production and laser absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueshima, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Tajima, Toshiki

    1998-03-01

    The development of short-pulse ultra high intensity lasers will enable us to generate short-pulse intense soft and hard X-rays. Acceleration of an electron in laser field generates intense illuminated located radiation, Larmor radiation, around KeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with 100 TW and 1 {mu}m wave length laser. The Coulomb interaction between rest ions and relativistic electron generates broad energy radiation, bremsstrahlung emission, over MeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with the same condition. These intense radiations come in short pulses of the same order as that of the irradiated laser. The generated intense X-rays, Larmor and bremsstrahlung radiation, can be applied to sources of short pulse X-ray, excitation source of inner-shell X-ray laser, position production and nuclear excitation, etc. (author)

  19. Experimental study of X-ray emission in laser-cluster interaction; Etude experimentale de l'emission X issue de l'interaction laser-agregats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillaud, T

    2004-09-01

    Rare gas cluster jets are an intermediate medium between solid and gas targets. Laser-cluster jets interaction may generate a great number of energetic particles as X-rays, UV, high harmonics, ions, electrons and neutrons. To understand all the mechanisms involved in such an interaction we need to make a complete study of individual cluster response to an ultra-short laser pulse. We studied the laser interaction with our argon cluster gas jet, which is well characterized in cluster size and density, to enlarge the knowledge of this interaction. We measured absorption, heating and X-ray emission spectra versus laser parameters and clusters size ({approx} 15-30 nm). We show that there is a strong refraction effect on laser propagation due to the residual gas density. This effect was confirmed by laser propagation simulation with a cylindrical 2-dimensional particle code WAKE. The role played by refraction was to limit maximum laser intensity on the focal spot and to increase interaction volume. By this way, X-ray emission was observed with laser intensity not so far from the ionization threshold (few 10{sup 14} W.cm{sup -2}). We also studied plasma expansion both at cluster scale and focal volume scale and deduced the deposited energy distribution as a function of time. Thanks to a simple hydrodynamic model, we used these results to study cluster expansion. X-ray emission is then simulated by TRANSPEC code in order to reproduce X-ray spectra and duration. Those results revealed an extremely brief X-ray emission consistent with a preliminary measure by streak camera (on ps scale). (author)

  20. Analyzing the Spectra of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Michael

    This proposal seeks funding for the analysis of accretion-powered X-ray pulsar spectra from NASA/ HEASARC archived X-ray data. Spectral modeling of accreting X-ray pulsars can tell us a great deal about the physical conditions in and near high mass X-ray binary systems. Such systems have accretion flows where plasma is initially channeled from an accretion disk by the strong neutron star magnetic field, eventually falling onto the magnetic polar cap of the neutron star compact object. Many of these accreting X-ray pulsars have X-ray spectra that consist of broad power-law continua with superposed cyclotron resonant scattering features indicating magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. The energies of these cyclotron line features have recently been shown to vary with X-ray luminosity in a number of sources such as Her X-1 and V 0332+53, a phenomenon not well understood. Another recent development is the relatively new analytic model for the spectral continuum formation in accretion-powered pulsar systems developed by Becker & Wolff. In their formalism the accretion flows are assumed to go through radiation- dominated radiative shocks and settle onto the neutron star surface. The radiation field consists of strongly Comptonized bremsstrahlung emission from the entire plasma, Comptonized cyclotron emission from the de-excitations of Landau-excited electrons in the neutron star magnetic field, and Comptonized black-body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface. We seek to develop the data analysis tools to apply this model framework to the X-ray data from a wide set of sources to make progress characterizing the basic accretion properties (e.g., magnetic field strength, plasma temperatures, polar cap size, accretion rate per unit area, dominance of bulk vs. thermal Comptonization) as well as understanding the variations of the cyclotron line energies with X-ray luminosity. The three major goals of our proposed work are as follows: In the first year

  1. X-Ray Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band ...

  2. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  3. X-ray emission studies in relativistic collisions of Li-like uranium ions with gaseous target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banas, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany) and Institute of Physics, Swietokrzyska Academy, 25-406 Kielce (Poland)]. E-mail: dariusz.banas@pu.kielce.pl; Stoehlker, Th. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt, 60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Ionescu, D.C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Beyer, H.F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bosch, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Gumberidze, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt, 60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Tbilisi State University, 380128 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Hagmann, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kozhuharov, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Ma, X. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute of Modern Physics, 730000 Lanzhou (China); Mokler, P.H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Mann, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Sierpowski, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Tachenov, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt, 60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Stachura, Z. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Physics, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Warczak, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

    2005-07-01

    The X-ray spectra produced by K-shell ionization in collisions of Li-like (U{sup 89+}) uranium ions at an energy of 397 MeV/u with gaseous N{sub 2} target have been measured. The very high level selectivity during such collision has been found. The effect allows us to measure undistorted two-photon energy distribution from a decay of the 1s2s{sup 1}S{sub 0} state in He-like uranium.

  4. Dual-array valence