WorldWideScience

Sample records for excited state processes

  1. Excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1974-01-01

    Excited States, Volume I reviews radiationless transitions, phosphorescence microwave double resonance through optical spectra in molecular solids, dipole moments in excited states, luminescence of polar molecules, and the problem of interstate interaction in aromatic carbonyl compounds. The book discusses the molecular electronic radiationless transitions; the double resonance techniques and the relaxation mechanisms involving the lowest triplet state of aromatic compounds; as well as the optical spectra and relaxation in molecular solids. The text also describes dipole moments and polarizab

  2. Interference through the resonant Auger process via multiple core-excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Souvik; Nakajima, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the resonant Auger process via multiple core-excited states. The presence of multiple core-excited states sets off interference into the common final continuum, and we show that the degree of interference depends on the various parameters such as the intensity of the employed x-ray pulse and the lifetimes of the core-excited states. For the specific examples we employ the double (1 s-13 p and 1 s-14 p ) core-excited states of Ne atom and numerically solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation to demonstrate that the energy-resolved electron spectra clearly exhibit the signature of interference.

  3. Studies of photoionization processes from ground-state and excited-state atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ederer, D.L.; Parr, A.C.; West, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Recent triply-differential photoelectron spectroscopy experiments designed for the study of correlation effects in atoms and molecules are described. Final-state symmetry of the n=2 state of helium has been determined. The non-Franck-Condon behavior of vibrational branching ratios and large variations of the angular asymmetry parameter has been observed for shape resonances and autoionizing resonances in CO and other molecules. Recent observations of the photoionization of excited sodium atoms are also described.

  4. Construction of Vibronic Diabatic Hamiltonian for Excited-State Electron and Energy Transfer Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Jiang, Shengshi; Zheng, Jie; Lan, Zhenggang

    2017-12-21

    Photoinduced excited-state electron and energy transfer processes are crucial in biological photoharvesting systems and organic photovoltaic devices. We discuss the construction of a diabatic vibronic Hamiltonian for the proper treatment of these processes involving the projection approach acting on both electronic wave functions and vibrational modes. In the electronic part, the wave function projection approach is used to construct the diabatic Hamiltonian in which both local excited states and charge-transfer states are included on the same footing. For the vibrational degrees of freedom, the vibronic couplings in the diabatic Hamiltonian are obtained in the basis of the pseudonormal modes localized on each monomer site by applying delocalized-to-localized mode projection. This systematic approach allows us to construct the vibronic diabatic Hamiltonian in molecular aggregates.

  5. Excited states 2

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that deals with molecules in the excited states. The book describes the geometries of molecules in the excited electronic states. One paper describes the geometries of a diatomic molecule and of polyatomic molecules; it also discusses the determination of the many excited state geometries of molecules with two, three, or four atoms by techniques similar to diatomic spectroscopy. Another paper introduces an ordered theory related to excitons in pure and mixed molecular crystals. This paper also presents some experimental data such as those invo

  6. Excited states 4

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 4 is a collection of papers that deals with the excited states of molecular activity. One paper investigates the resonance Raman spectroscopy as the key to vibrational-electronic coupling. This paper reviews the basic theory of Raman scattering; it also explains the derivation of the Raman spectra, excitation profiles, and depolarization ratios for simple resonance systems. Another paper reviews the magnetic properties of triplet states, including the zero-field resonance techniques, the high-field experiments, and the spin Hamiltonian. This paper focuses on the magnetic

  7. Excited state Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Anthralin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Andersen, Kristine B.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results in an unus......Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results......, associated with an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process....

  8. The mechanisms of Excited states in enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes.......Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes....

  9. Coherent excitation transferring via dark state in light-harvesting process

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, H; Sun, C P

    2011-01-01

    We study the light absorption and energy transferring in a donor-acceptor system with a bionic structure. In the optimal case with uniform couplings, it is found that the quantum dynamics of this seemingly complicated system is reduced as a three-level system of $\\Lambda$-type. With this observation, we show that the dark state based electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) effect could enhance the energy transfer efficiency, through a quantum interference effect suppressing the excited population of the donors. We estimate the optimal parameters of the system to achieve the maximum output power. The splitting behavior of maximum power may be used to explain the phenomenon that the photosynthesis systems mainly absorb two colors of light.

  10. Evidence of a state dependent depletion process in the two-photon fluorescence excitation spectra of saturated amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Arthur M.; Gerrity, D. P.; Rothberg, L. J.; Vaida, V.

    1982-01-01

    The two-photon fluorescence excitation (TPFE) spectra of regions of the ? states of two saturated amines 1-azabicyclo [2.2.2]octane (ABCO) and trimethylamine (TMA) are reported. These spectra are compared with the respective one-photon absorption (OPA), one-photon fluorescence excitation (OPFE), and multiphoton ionization (MPI) spectra for both molecules. For ABCO, this comparison clearly indicates major differences in both the vibronic band intensities and the amount of sequence structure present in the TPFE spectrum relative to the MPI, OPA, and OPFE spectra, which are all comparable. The ''distortions'' of the TPFE spectrum are interpreted in terms of a laser-induced ? state-dependent depletion process from ? which results in ionization. Pressure effects on the TPFE spectrum imply that the rate of this up-pumping process depends strongly upon the particular vibrational modes excited in the two-photon-induced ?←? transition. A further implication of this interpretation is that the intramolecular vibrational relaxation time T1 of some initially prepared levels is ?100 ps. A kinetic model is presented which illustrates how (small) variations in the ionization cross sections of the ? state can have large effects on the TPFE spectrum but not on the MPI spectrum.

  11. The influence of excitation number of photon-added coherent state field on the entanglement swapping process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M.; Tavassoly, M. K.; Pakniat, R.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we outline a scheme for the entanglement swapping procedure based on cavity quantum electrodynamics using the Jaynes-Cummings model consisting of the coherent and photon-added coherent states. In particular, utilizing the photon-added coherent states (|α,m〉≃â†m|α〉, where |α〉 is the Glauber coherent state) in the scheme, enables us to investigate the effect of m, i.e., the number of excitations corresponding to the photon-added coherent field on the entanglement swapping process. In the scheme, two two-level atoms A1 and A2 are initially entangled together, and distinctly two exploited cavity fields F1 and F2 are prepared in an entangled state (a combination of coherent and photon-added coherent states). Interacting the atom A2 with field F1 (via the Jaynes-Cummings model) and then making detection on them, transfers the entanglement from the two atoms A1, A2 and the two fields F1, F2 to the atom-field “A1-F2”, i.e., entanglement swapping occurs. In the continuation, we pay our attention to the evaluation of the fidelity of the swapped entangled state relative to a suitable maximally entangled state, success probability of the performed detections and linear entropy as the degree of entanglement of the swapped entangled state. It is demonstrated that, an increase in the number of excitations, m, leads to the increment of fidelity as well as the amount of entanglement. According to our numerical results, the maximum values of fidelity (linear entropy) 0.98 (0.46) is obtained for m = 9, however, the maximum value of success probability does not significantly change by increasing m.

  12. Quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier: role of second excited state on ultrahigh bit-rate signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadyar, Seyed Mohsen; Razaghi, Mohammad; Hassanzadeh, Abdollah

    2017-04-20

    In this paper, a theoretical model for a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QDSOA) is proposed. The dynamics of carriers in ground, excited, and continuum states and wetting layer are considered in this model. The effects of the second excited state (ES2) inclusion are investigated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in the proposed QDSOA model. Moreover, the inhomogeneous broadening effect due to size distribution of dots, and the homogeneous broadening effect of a single dot in the gain spectrum by grouping of dots based on their optical resonant frequency, are included in the model. Furthermore, grouping of photon modes is considered in the model. It is shown that improvement of QDSOA performance is possible by considering ES2 in rate equations. Gain saturation in different injection currents is obtained for various square-shaped pulse train bit-rates. It is shown that carriers' relaxation time plays an important role in signal amplification and processing of QDSOA. The results illustrate that QDSOA can be used for high bit-rate signal processing devices (up to 450 Gbps) with negligible wave distortion and fast gain recovery.

  13. Ultrafast Excited-State Dynamics of Diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-Based Materials: Static versus Diffusion-Controlled Electron Transfer Process

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana

    2015-06-25

    Singlet-to-triplet intersystem crossing (ISC) and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) of platinum(II) containing diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) oligomer in the absence and presence of strong electron-acceptor tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) were investigated using femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. The role of platinum(II) incorporation in those photophysical properties was evaluated by comparing the excited-state dynamics of DPP with and without the metal centers. The steady-state measurements reveal that platinum(II) incorporation facilitates dramatically the interactions between DPP-Pt(acac) and TCNE, resulting in charge transfer (CT) complex formation. The transient absorption spectra in the absence of TCNE reveal ultrafast ISC of DPP-Pt(acac) followed by their long-lived triplet state. In the presence of TCNE, PET from the excited DPP-Pt(acac) and DPP to TCNE, forming the radical ion pairs. The ultrafast PET which occurs statically from DPP-Pt(acac) to TCNE in picosecond regime, is much faster than that from DPP to TCNE (nanosecond time scale) which is diffusion-controlled process, providing clear evidence that PET rate is eventually controlled by the platinum(II) incorporation.

  14. Deactivation processes of the lowest excited state of [UO2(H2O)5]2+ in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosinho, Sebastião J; Burrows, Hugh D; da Graça Miguel, Maria; Azenha, M Emília D G; Saraiva, Isabel M; Ribeiro, A Catarina D N; Khudyakov, Igor V; Gasanov, Rashid G; Bolte, Michèle; Sarakha, Mohamed

    2003-05-01

    A detailed analysis of the photophysical behaviour of uranyl ion in aqueous solutions at room temperature is given using literature data, together with results of new experimental and theoretical studies to see whether the decay mechanism of the lowest excited state involves physical deactivation by energy transfer or a chemical process through hydrogen atom abstraction. Comparison of the radiative lifetimes determined from quantum yield and lifetime data with that obtained from the Einstein relationship strongly suggests that the emitting state is identical to that observed in the lowest energy absorption band. From study of the experimental rate and that calculated theoretically, from deuterium isotope effects and the activation energy for decay support is given to a deactivation mechanism of hydrogen abstraction involving water clusters to give uranium(v) and hydroxyl radicals. Support for hydroxyl radical formation comes from electron spin resonance spectra observed in the presence of the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide and tert-butyl-N-phenylnitrone and from literature results on photoinduced uranyl oxygen exchange and photoconductivity. It has previously been suggested that the uranyl emission above pH 1.5 may involve an exciplex between excited uranyl ion and uranium(v). Evidence against this mechanism is given on the basis of quenching of uranyl luminescence by uranium(v), together with other kinetic reasoning. No overall photochemical reaction is observed on excitation of aqueous uranyl solutions, and it is suggested that this is mainly due to reoxidation of UO2+ by hydroxyl radicals in a radical pair. An alternative process involving oxidation by molecular oxygen is analysed experimentally and theoretically, and is suggested to be too slow to be a major reoxidation pathway.

  15. Excited state kinetics of anthracene-bridge-aniline intramolecular exciplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling; Hammershøj, Peter; Kjær, Kasper Skov

    2014-01-01

    excited anthracene state (LE) and an excited state complex (exciplex, EP) in non-polar solvents. The kinetics of the excited state processes were established in decalin from the time-resolved emission, and was shown to be strongly influenced by an electron-transfer state (ET). For quantitative studies...

  16. Excited B states at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kluit, Peter M

    2005-01-01

    The first orbitally excited B states were discovered at LEP in 1995. In subsequent years evidence was put forward for the existence of several excited B hadron states. Now, ten years later it is time to review the situation. New analyses have been performed in DELPHI using the full LEP data set with improved and high performance analysis tools. Measurements for the production rate and masses of narrow and broad B/sub u, d//sup **/ mesons will be presented as well as results for the search for B/sub s//sup **/ mesons and Sigma /sub b//sup (*)/ baryons. The results will be compared to earlier measurements, predictions from HQET and measurements in the charm sector.

  17. Electron correlation effect on radiative decay processes of the core-excited states of Be-like ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Cuicui, E-mail: sangcc@126.com [Department of Physics, Qinghai Normal University, Xining 810001 (China); Li, Kaikai [College of Forensic Science, People' s Public Security University of China, Beijing 100038 (China); Sun, Yan; Hu, Feng [School of Mathematic and Physical Science, Xuzhou Institute of Technology, Xuzhou 221400, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiative rates of the states 1s2s{sup 2}2p and 1s2p{sup 3} with Z = 8–54 are studied. • Electron correlation effect on the radiative transition rates is studied. • Forbidden transitions are explored. - Abstract: Energy levels and the radiative decay processes of the core-excited configurations 1s2s{sup 2}2p and 1s2p{sup 3} of Be-like ions with Z = 8–54 are studied. Electron correlation effect on the energy levels and the radiative transition rates are studied in detail. Except for E1 radiative transition rates, the E2, M1 and M2 forbidden transitions are also explored. Further relativistic corrections from the Breit interaction, quantum electrodynamics and the finite nuclear size are included in the calculations to make the results more precise. Good agreement is found between our results and other theoretical data.

  18. Wagging motion of hydrogen-bonded wire in the excited-state multiple proton transfer process of 7-hydroxyquinoline·(NH3)3 cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Hui; Lan, Sheng-Cheng; Li, Chun-Ran

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the dynamics of hydrogen bonds (as well as the hydrogen-bonded wire) in excited-state tautomerization of 7-hydroxyquinoline·(NH3)3 (7HQ·(NH3)3) cluster has been investigated by using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). It shows that upon an excitation, the hydrogen bond between -OH group in 7-hydroxyquinoline (7HQ) and NH3 moiety would extremely strengthened in S1 state, which could effectively facilitate the releasing of the proton from the phenolic group of 7HQ moiety to the hydrogen-bonded wire and the forming an Eigen-like cationic wire (NH3···NH4(+)···NH3) in the cluster. To fulfill the different optimal angles of NH4(+) in the wire, a wagging motion of hydrogen-bonded wire would occur in excited state. Moreover, the wagging motion of the hydrogen-bonded wire would effectively promote excited-state proton transfer reaction. As the results, an excited-state multiple proton transfer (ESMPT) mechanism containing two concerted and asymmetrical processes has been proposed for the proton transfer dynamics of 7HQ·(NH3)3 cluster. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Excited-state Wigner crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Fergus J. M.; Loos, Pierre-François

    2017-01-01

    Wigner crystals (WCs) are electronic phases peculiar to low-density systems, particularly in the uniform electron gas. Since its introduction in the early twentieth century, this model has remained essential to many aspects of electronic structure theory and condensed-matter physics. Although the (lowest-energy) ground-state WC (GSWC) has been thoroughly studied, the properties of excited-state WCs (ESWCs) are basically unknown. To bridge this gap, we present a well-defined procedure to obtain an entire family of ESWCs in a one-dimensional electron gas using a symmetry-broken mean-field approach. While the GSWC is a commensurate crystal (i.e., the number of density maxima equals the number of electrons), these ESWCs are incommensurate crystals exhibiting more or less maxima. Interestingly, they are lower in energy than the (uniform) Fermi fluid state. For some of these ESWCs, we have found asymmetrical band gaps, which would lead to anisotropic conductivity. These properties are associated with unusual characteristics in their electronic structure.

  20. Excited State Spectra and Dynamics of Phenyl-Substituted Butadienes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallace-Williams, Stacie E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.; Møller, Søren

    1994-01-01

    A combination of steady-state and dynamic spectral measurements are used to provide new insights into the nature of the excited-state processes of all-trans-1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiene and several analogs: 1,4-diphenyl- 1,3-cyclopentadiene, 1,1,4,4-tetraphenylbutadiene, 1,2,3,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-cyc...... indicate that phenyl torsional motion is not important to the excited-state dynamics and reveal alternative excited-state reaction pathways. The results demonstrate how molecular systems that are structually similar can exhibit different electronic properties and excited-state dynamics....

  1. Extremely slow relaxation process of a yellow-luminescence-related state in GaN revealed by two-wavelength excited photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanardi Ocampo, J.M.; Kamata, N.; Okamoto, W.; Yamada, K. [Saitama Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Functional Materials Science; Hoshino, K.; Someya, T.; Arakawa, Y. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology

    2001-11-08

    In addition to detection of nonradiative recombination centers by a below-gap excitation (BGE) technique at steady state, we have studied the time-response of both donor-acceptor pair luminescence and yellow luminescence (YL) in GaN after switching off the BGE light. An extremely slow recovery of YL with a time constant of up to 28 s was observed, which is interpreted as a relaxation process of electrons from the state chosen by a BGE energy of 1.17 eV. The dependence of recovery time on the BGE energy and on the above-gap and below-gap excitation power densities became clear for the first time; it reflects the carrier recombination dynamics including YL among below-gap states. (orig.)

  2. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence as a cycling process between excited singlet and triplet states: application to the fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleizão, Carlos; Berberan-Santos, Mário N

    2007-05-28

    In efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) the excited chromophore alternates randomly between the singlet and triplet manifolds a large number of times before emission occurs. In this work, the average number of cycles n is obtained and is shown to have a simple experimental meaning: n+1 is the intensification factor of the prompt fluorescence intensity, owing to the occurrence of TADF. A new method of data analysis for the determination of the quantum yield of triplet formation, combining steady-state and time-resolved data in a single plot, is also presented. Application of the theoretical results to the TADF of [70]fullerenes shows a general good agreement between different methods of fluorescence analysis and allows the determination of several photophysical parameters.

  3. Excited States in Solution through Polarizable Embedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jógvan Magnus; Aidas, Kestutis; Kongsted, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    We present theory and implementation of an advanced quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach using a fully self-consistent polarizable embedding (PE) scheme. It is a polarizable layered model designed for effective yet accurate inclusion of an anisotropic medium in a quantum...... mechanical calculation. The polarizable embedding potential is described by an atomistic representation including terms up to localized octupoles and anisotropic polarizabilities. It is generally applicable to any quantum chemical description but is here implemented for the case of Kohn−Sham density...... functional theory which we denote the PE-DFT method. It has been implemented in combination with time-dependent quantum mechanical linear and nonlinear response techniques, thus allowing for assessment of electronic excitation processes and dynamic ground- and excited-state molecular properties using...

  4. A treatment of excited states in nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjib Shankar

    2002-10-01

    Many isotopes of importance to nucleosynthesis have metastable states whose decay to the ground state is strongly inhibited by a high angular momentum difference. Traditionally, excited states of a nucleus have been treated by assuming attainment of thermal equilibrium; a Hauser-Feshbach calculation is then performed on the whole nucleus to determine nuclear reaction rates. A description of the nucleus when it is not in equilibrium, and a method for computing reaction rates that does not presume thermalization are presented in this work. In nucleosynthesis calculations, we may characterize the internal electromagnetic transitions of a nucleus as a Markov process. This allows us to decompose the interaction of radiation with nucleons into effective interactions between ensembles. Rather than consider a single isotope, we construct the canonical ensembles which are the true nuclear species of interest. We are then in a position to specify nonequilibrium occupations of the ensembles by discretizing the Nuclear Level Density function. The generality of the stochastic process identified at the outset now permits the description of nucleosynthesis as Markov flows in networks of suitably populated ensembles. This allows us to use as many excited states as we wish in nucleosyn thesis while tracking their nonequilibrium evolution as substochastic processes. A website utilizing these principles is discussed in some detail. It accesses the theoretical NLD database from the Brussels Intitute of Astrophysics to supplement adopted experimental data from the ENSDF database (maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratories). The composite is processed by a CGI (Common Gateway Interface) application to dynamically obtain plots and tables of rates on a specified temperature grid. Beta-decay rates are discussed for an isotope important to nuclear astrophysics ( 180TA) as a test-bed for the techniques implemented.

  5. Computational studies on the excited states of luminescent platinum(II) alkynyl systems of tridentate pincer ligands in radiative and nonradiative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wai Han; Lam, Elizabeth Suk-Hang; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2013-10-09

    Platinum(II) alkynyl complexes of various tridentate pincer ligands, [Pt(trpy)(C≡CR)](+) (trpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+) (R'-bzimpy = 2,6-bis(N-alkylbenzimidazol-2'-yl)pyridine and R' = alkyl), [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] (R'-bzimb = 1,3-bis(N-alkylbenzimidazol-2'-yl)benzene and R' = C4H9), have been found to possess rich photophysical properties. The emission in dilute solutions of [Pt(trpy)(C≡CR)](+) originated from a triplet alkynyl-to-tridentate pincer ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT) excited state, with mixing of a platinum-to-tridentate pincer ligand metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state, while that of [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] originated from a triplet excited state of intraligand (IL) character of the tridentate ligand mixed with a platinum-to-tridentate ligand MLCT character. Interestingly, both emissions were observed in [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+) in some cases. In addition, [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] displayed a photoluminescence quantum yield higher than that of [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+). Computational studies have been performed on the representative complexes [Pt(trpy)(C≡CPh)](+) (1), [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CPh)](+) (2), and [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CPh)] (3), where R' = CH3 and Ph = C6H5, to provide an in-depth understanding of the nature of their emissive origin as well as the radiative and nonradiative processes. In particular, the factors governing the ordering of the triplet excited states and radiative decay rate constants of the emissive state ((3)ES) have been examined. The potential energy profiles for the deactivation process from the (3)ES via triplet metal-centered ((3)MC) states have also been explored. This work reveals for the first time the potential energy profiles for the thermal deactivation pathway of square planar platinum(II) complexes.

  6. Relaxation dynamics in the excited states of a ketocyanine dye ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Pramanik et al proposed the twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) process in the S1 state, which .... trile clearly suggests that a photon of 400 nm light excites the molecule to its S2 state, the higher energy emission .... 400 nm photon as well as the dynamics of the re- laxation processes taking place in the S1 state. At.

  7. Rearrangements in ground and excited states

    CERN Document Server

    de Mayo, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Rearrangements in Ground and Excited States, Volume 3 presents essays on the chemical generation of excited states; the cis-trans isomerization of olefins; and the photochemical rearrangements in trienes. The book also includes essays on the zimmerman rearrangements; the photochemical rearrangements of enones; the photochemical rearrangements of conjugated cyclic dienones; and the rearrangements of the benzene ring. Essays on the photo rearrangements via biradicals of simple carbonyl compounds; the photochemical rearrangements involving three-membered rings or five-membered ring heterocycles;

  8. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  9. Search for excited states in 25O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. D.; Fossez, K.; Baumann, T.; DeYoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Frank, N.; Kuchera, A. N.; Michel, N.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rotureau, J.; Smith, J. K.; Stephenson, S. L.; Stiefel, K.; Thoennessen, M.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2017-11-01

    Background: Theoretical calculations suggest the presence of low-lying excited states in 25O. Previous experimental searches by means of proton knockout on 26F produced no evidence for such excitations. Purpose: We search for excited states in 25O using the 24O(d ,p ) 25O reaction. The theoretical analysis of excited states in unbound O,2725 is based on the configuration interaction approach that accounts for couplings to the scattering continuum. Method: We use invariant-mass spectroscopy to measure neutron-unbound states in 25O. For the theoretical approach, we use the complex-energy Gamow Shell Model and Density Matrix Renormalization Group method with a finite-range two-body interaction optimized to the bound states and resonances of O-2623, assuming a core of 22O. We predict energies, decay widths, and asymptotic normalization coefficients. Results: Our calculations in a large s p d f space predict several low-lying excited states in 25O of positive and negative parity, and we obtain an experimental limit on the relative cross section of a possible Jπ=1/2 + state with respect to the ground state of 25O at σ1 /2 +/σg .s .=0 .25-0.25+1.0 . We also discuss how the observation of negative parity states in 25O could guide the search for the low-lying negative parity states in 27O. Conclusion: Previous experiments based on the proton knockout of 26F suffered from the low cross sections for the population of excited states in 25O because of low spectroscopic factors. In this respect, neutron transfer reactions carry more promise.

  10. Cyclopropyl Group: An Excited-State Aromaticity Indicator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Rabia; Papadakis, Raffaello; Jorner, Kjell; Zietz, Burkhard; Ottosson, Henrik

    2017-10-04

    The cyclopropyl (cPr) group, which is a well-known probe for detecting radical character at atoms to which it is connected, is tested as an indicator for aromaticity in the first ππ* triplet and singlet excited states (T 1 and S 1 ). Baird's rule says that the π-electron counts for aromaticity and antiaromaticity in the T 1 and S 1 states are opposite to Hückel's rule in the ground state (S 0 ). Our hypothesis is that the cPr group, as a result of Baird's rule, will remain closed when attached to an excited-state aromatic ring, enabling it to be used as an indicator to distinguish excited-state aromatic rings from excited-state antiaromatic and nonaromatic rings. Quantum chemical calculations and photoreactivity experiments support our hypothesis; calculated aromaticity indices reveal that openings of cPr substituents on [4n]annulenes ruin the excited-state aromaticity in energetically unfavorable processes. Yet, polycyclic compounds influenced by excited-state aromaticity (e.g., biphenylene), as well as 4nπ-electron heterocycles with two or more heteroatoms represent limitations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Computing correct truncated excited state wavefunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacalis, N. C.; Xiong, Z.; Zang, J.; Karaoulanis, D.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that, if a wave function's truncated expansion is small, then the standard excited states computational method, of optimizing one "root" of a secular equation, may lead to an incorrect wave function - despite the correct energy according to the theorem of Hylleraas, Undheim and McDonald - whereas our proposed method [J. Comput. Meth. Sci. Eng. 8, 277 (2008)] (independent of orthogonality to lower lying approximants) leads to correct reliable small truncated wave functions. The demonstration is done in He excited states, using truncated series expansions in Hylleraas coordinates, as well as standard configuration-interaction truncated expansions.

  12. Quantum analysis in the transition process to excited state of an oxygen molecule induced by electron collisions; Denshi shototsu ni tomonau sanso bunshi ni okeru reiki jotai sen`i no ryoshironteki kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimaru, K. [Gifu National College of Technology, Gifu (Japan); Okazaki, K. [Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-06-25

    For understanding of fundamental chemical reactions under a highly non equilibrium condition which is quite often used in plasma processing, the relevant atomic and molecular processes must be clarified. In this study, an analysis of the transition process to the excited state of an oxygen molecule induced by electron collisions in the oxygen plasma has been carried out. First, the electron density distribution in an oxygen molecule has been calculated using the extended Huckel molecular orbital method. Then, the electron potential energy distribution in the transition process to the excited state has been estimated. The electron behavior has been calculated using the estimated unidimensional electron potential energy distribution and unsteady quantum mechanics. As a result, the transition process to the excited state of an oxygen molecule induced by electron collisions and its conditions have been clarified qualitatively. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Excited State Properties of Hybrid Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Michele; Quochi, Francesco; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni

    2016-01-19

    Metal halide perovskites have come to the attention of the scientific community for the progress achieved in solar light conversion. Energy sustainability is one of the priorities of our society, and materials advancements resulting in low-cost but efficient solar cells and large-area lighting devices represent a major goal for applied research. From a basic point of view, perovskites are an exotic class of hybrid materials combining some merits of organic and inorganic semiconductors: large optical absorption, large mobilities, and tunable band gap together with the possibility to be processed in solution. When a novel class of promising semiconductors comes into the limelight, lively discussions ensue on the photophysics of band-edge excitations, because just the states close to the band edge are entailed in energy/charge transport and light emission. This was the case several decades ago for III-V semiconductors, it has been up to 10 years ago for organics, and it is currently the case for perovskites. Our aim in this Account is to rationalize the body of experimental evidence on perovskite photophysics in a coherent theoretical framework, borrowing from the knowledge acquired over the years in materials optoelectronics. A crucial question is whether photon absorption leads to a population of unbound, conductive free charges or instead excitons, neutral and insulating bound states created by Coulomb interaction just below the energy of the band gap. We first focus on the experimental estimates of the exciton binding energy (Eb): at room temperature, Eb is comparable to the thermal energy kBT in MAPbI3 and increases up to values 2-3kBT in wide band gap MAPbBr3 and MAPbCl3. Statistical considerations predict that these values, even though comparable to or larger than thermal energy, let free carriers prevail over bound excitons for all levels of excitation densities relevant for devices. The analysis of photophysics evidence confirms that all hybrid halide

  14. Excited states of muonium in atomic hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muonium formation in excited states in muon-hydrogen charge-exchange collision is investigated using a method developed in a previous paper. Differential cross-section results are found to resemble positronium formation cross-section results of positron-hydrogen charge-exchange problem. Forward differential and ...

  15. Excited states of {sup 4}He droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardiola, R.; Navarro, J.; Portesi, M.

    2001-06-01

    We study low-lying excited states of {sup 4}He clusters up to a cluster size of 40 atoms in a variational framework. The ansatz wave function combines two- and three-body correlations, coming from a translationally invariant configuration interaction description, and Jastrow-type short-range correlation. We have previously used this scheme to determine the ground-state energies of {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He clusters. Here we present an extension of this ansatz wave function having a good quantum angular momentum L. The variational procedure is applied independently to the cases with L=0,2,4, and upper bounds for the corresponding energies are thus obtained. Moreover, centroid energies for L excitations are calculated through the use of sum rules. A comparison with previous calculations is also made.

  16. Rearrangements in ground and excited states

    CERN Document Server

    de Mayo, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Rearrangements in Ground and Excited States, Volume 2 covers essays on the theoretical approach of rearrangements; the rearrangements involving boron; and the molecular rearrangements of organosilicon compounds. The book also includes essays on the polytopal rearrangement at phosphorus; the rearrangement in coordination complexes; and the reversible thermal intramolecular rearrangements of metal carbonyls. Chemists and people involved in the study of rearrangements will find the book invaluable.

  17. Excited electronic state decomposition mechanisms of clusters of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this report, electronically non-adiabatic decomposition pathways of clusters of dimethylnitramine and aluminum (DMNA-Al and DMNA-Al2) are discussed in comparison to isolated dimethylnitramine (DMNA). Electronically excited state processes of DMNA-Al and DMNA-Al2 are explored using the complete active space ...

  18. Excited state electron affinity calculations for aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Adnan Yousif

    2017-08-01

    Excited states of negative aluminum ion are reviewed, and calculations of electron affinities of the states (3s^23p^2)^1D and (3s3p^3){^5}{S}° relative to the (3s^23p)^2P° and (3s3p^2)^4P respectively of the neutral aluminum atom are reported in the framework of nonrelativistic configuration interaction (CI) method. A priori selected CI (SCI) with truncation energy error (Bunge in J Chem Phys 125:014107, 2006) and CI by parts (Bunge and Carbó-Dorca in J Chem Phys 125:014108, 2006) are used to approximate the valence nonrelativistic energy. Systematic studies of convergence of electron affinity with respect to the CI excitation level are reported. The calculated value of the electron affinity for ^1D state is 78.675(3) meV. Detailed Calculations on the ^5S°c state reveals that is 1216.8166(3) meV below the ^4P state.

  19. Three-photon Gaussian–Gaussian–Laguerre–Gaussian excitation of a localized atom to a highly excited Rydberg state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhadi, L.

    2017-12-01

    Optical vortices are currently one of the most intensively studied topics in light–matter interaction. In this work, a three-step axial Doppler- and recoil-free Gaussian–Gaussian-Laguerre–Gaussian (GGLG) excitation of a localized atom to the highly excited Rydberg state is presented. By assuming a large detuning for intermediate states, an effective quadrupole excitation related to the Laguerre–Gaussian (LG) excitation to the highly excited Rydberg state is obtained. This special excitation system radially confines the single highly excited Rydberg atom independently of the trapping system into a sharp potential landscape into the so-called ‘far-off-resonance optical dipole-quadrupole trap’ (FORDQT). The key parameters of the Rydberg excitation to the highly excited state, namely the effective Rabi frequency and the effective detuning including a position-dependent AC Stark shift, are calculated in terms of the basic parameters of the LG beam and of the polarization of the excitation lasers. It is shown that the obtained parameters can be tuned to have a precise excitation of a single atom to the desired Rydberg state as well. The features of transferring the optical orbital and spin angular momentum of the polarized LG beam to the atom via quadrupole Rydberg excitation offer a long-lived and controllable qudit quantum memory. In addition, in contrast to the Gaussian laser beam, the doughnut-shaped LG beam makes it possible to use a high intensity laser beam to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in quadrupole excitation with minimized perturbations coming from stray light broadening in the last Rydberg excitation process.

  20. Holographic construction of excited CFT states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, Ariana; Skenderis, Kostas [STAG Research Centre and Mathematical Sciences, University of Southampton,High-field, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    We present a systematic construction of bulk solutions that are dual to CFT excited states. The bulk solution is constructed perturbatively in bulk fields. The linearised solution is universal and depends only on the conformal dimension of the primary operator that is associated with the state via the operator-state correspondence, while higher order terms depend on detailed properties of the operator, such as its OPE with itself and generally involve many bulk fields. We illustrate the discussion with the holographic construction of the universal part of the solution for states of two dimensional CFTs, either on R×S{sup 1} or on R{sup 1,1}. We compute the 1-point function both in the CFT and in the bulk, finding exact agreement. We comment on the relation with other reconstruction approaches.

  1. Identification of excited states in conjugated polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Hartwell, L J

    2003-01-01

    This thesis reports quasi steady state photoinduced absorption measurements from three conjugated polymers: polypyridine (PPy), polyfluorene (PFO) and the emeraldine base (EB) form of polyaniline. The aim of these experiments was to determine the nature of the photoexcited states existing in these materials in the millisecond time domain, as this has important consequences for the operation of real devices manufactured using these materials. The results from the photoinduced absorption experiments are closely compared with published results from pulse radiolysis experiments. In all cases there is very good correspondence between the two data sets, which has enabled the photoexcited states to be assigned with a high degree of confidence. Quasi steady-state photoinduced absorption involves the measurement of the change in absorption of a material in response to optical excitation with a laser beam. The changes in absorption are small, so a instrument was developed and optimised for each different sample. Lock-i...

  2. First 3- excited state of Fe56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiades, N.; Nelson, R. O.; Devlin, M.

    2010-03-01

    There is no reliable evidence for the existence of the 3.076 MeV (3-) level adopted in the ENSDF evaluation for Fe56 although it has been reported in a few experiments. Previous reports of the observation of this level appear to be based on an incorrect assignment in early (e,e') work. Recent neutron inelastic scattering measurements by Demidov [Phys. At. Nucl. 67, 1884, (2004)] show that the assigned γ-ray decay of this state does not occur at a level consistent with known properties of inelastic scattering. In the present work the Fe56(n,n'γ) reaction was used to populate excited states in Fe56. Neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 250 MeV were provided by the pulsed neutron source of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center’s WNR facility. Deexciting γ rays were detected with the GEANIE spectrometer, a Compton suppressed array of 26 Ge detectors. The γ-γ data obtained with GEANIE were used to establish coincidence relations between transitions. All previously reported levels up to Ex=3.6 MeV excitation energy were observed except for the 3.076 MeV (3-) level. The 991- and 2229-keV transitions, previously reported to deexcite this level, were not observed in the γ-γ coincidence data obtained in the present experiment. The present work supports the assignment of the 4509.6 keV level as the first 3- excited state in Fe56 by observation of two previously known transitions deexciting this state.

  3. Semiclassical quantization of highly excited scar states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergini, Eduardo G.

    2017-04-01

    The semiclassical quantization of Hamiltonian systems with classically chaotic dynamics is restricted to low excited states, close to the ground state, because the number of required periodic orbits grows exponentially with energy. Nevertheless, here we demonstrate that it is possible to find eigenenergies of highly excited states scarred by a short periodic orbit. Specifically, by using 18146 homoclinic orbits (HO)s of the shortest periodic orbit of the hyperbola billiard, we find eigenenergies of the strongest scars over a range which includes 630 even eigenfunctions. The analysis of data reveals that the used semiclassical formula presents two regimes. First, when all HOs with excursion time smaller than the Heisenberg time t H are included, the error is around 3.3% of the mean level spacing. Second, in the energy region defined by \\tilde{t}/ tH > 0.13 , where \\tilde{t} is the maximum excursion time included in the calculation, the error is around 15% of the mean level spacing.

  4. Excited state dynamics of DNA bases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kleinermanns, K.; Nachtigallová, Dana; de Vries, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2013), s. 308-342 ISSN 0144-235X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/12/1318 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) CHE-0911564; NASA(US) NNX12AG77G; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB 663; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) KI 531-29 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA bases * nucleobases * excited state * dynamics * computations * gas phase * conical intersections Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.920, year: 2013

  5. Excited state carbene formation from UV irradiated diazomethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hosik; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Tateyama, Yoshitaka

    2009-01-16

    The laser flash photolysis process of diazomethane has been studied by using a real time propagation time-dependent density functional theory (RTP-TDDFT) combined with molecular dynamics. The activation energy barrier for disintegrating diazomethane into nitrogen (N(2)) and carbene (CH(2)) molecules significantly decreases in the electronic excited S(1) state compared to that in the S(0) ground state. Furthermore, the produced carbene molecule can be in the electronic excited state of (1)CH(2) ((1)B(1)) instead of the lowest state among singlet states (1)CH(2) ((1)A(1)), which is evident in the wave function characteristics of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) throughout the disintegration. This is regarded as the initial stage of the rearrangement in the excited state (RIES), the evidence of which has been given by experiments in the past decade. In the RIES mechanism scheme, we suggest that the photoreaction in the S(1) state contributes considerably to the photochemistry of carbene formation. The passing near the S(1)/S(0) conical intersection, which allows the transition to ground state diazomethane producing the lowest singlet state carbene molecule, is considered a rare event from our molecular dynamics, although this has been regarded as the dominant mechanism in previous theoretical studies.

  6. Neutral excitations in the Gaffnian state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byungmin; Moore, Joel E.

    2017-06-01

    We study a model fractional quantum Hall (FQH) wave function called the Gaffnian state, which is believed to represent a gapless, strongly correlated state that is very different from conventional metals. To understand this exotic gapless state better, we provide a representation based on work of Halperin in which the pairing structure of the Gaffnian state becomes more explicit. We employ the single-mode approximation introduced by Girvin, MacDonald, and Platzman, here extended to three-body interactions, in order to treat a neutral collective excitation mode in order to clarify the physical origin of the gaplessness of the Gaffnian state. We discuss approaches to extract systematically the relevant physics in the long-distance, large-electron-number limit of FQH states using numerical calculations with relatively few electrons. In Appendices, we provide second-quantized expressions for many-body Haldane pseudopotentials in various geometries including the plane, sphere, cylinder, and torus based on the proper definition of the relative angular momentum.

  7. Radiative and Excited State Charmonium Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozef Dudek

    2007-07-30

    Renewed interest in the spectroscopy of charmonium has arisen from recent unexpected observations at $e^+e^-$ colliders. Here we report on a series of works from the previous two years examining the radiative physics of charmonium states as well as the mass spectrum of states of higher spin and internal excitation. Using new techniques applied to Domain-Wall and Clover quark actions on quenched isotropic and anisotropic lattices, radiative transitions and two-photon decays are considered for the first time. Comparisons are made with experimental results and with model approaches. Forthcoming application to the light-quark sector of relevance to experiments like Jefferson Lab's GlueX is discussed.

  8. Electron affinity and excited states of methylglyoxal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauletyarov, Yerbolat; Dixon, Andrew R.; Wallace, Adam A.; Sanov, Andrei

    2017-07-01

    Using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we characterized the anion of methylglyoxal (X2A″ electronic state) and three lowest electronic states of the neutral methylglyoxal molecule: the closed-shell singlet ground state (X1A'), the lowest triplet state (a3A″), and the open-shell singlet state (A1A″). The adiabatic electron affinity (EA) of the ground state, EA(X1A') = 0.87(1) eV, spectroscopically determined for the first time, compares to 1.10(2) eV for unsubstituted glyoxal. The EAs (adiabatic attachment energies) of two excited states of methylglyoxal were also determined: EA(a3A″) = 3.27(2) eV and EA(A1A″) = 3.614(9) eV. The photodetachment of the anion to each of these two states produces the neutral species near the respective structural equilibria; hence, the a3A″ ← X2A″ and A1A″ ← X2A″ photodetachment transitions are dominated by intense peaks at their respective origins. The lowest-energy photodetachment transition, on the other hand, involves significant geometry relaxation in the X1A' state, which corresponds to a 60° internal rotation of the methyl group, compared to the anion structure. Accordingly, the X1A' ← X2A″ transition is characterized as a broad, congested band, whose vertical detachment energy, VDE = 1.20(4) eV, significantly exceeds the adiabatic EA. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the ab initio predictions using several equation-of-motion methodologies, combined with coupled-cluster theory.

  9. Search for excited $B_c^{+}$ states

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Alfonso Albero, Alejandro; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Atzeni, Michele; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Beliy, Nikita; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Berninghoff, Daniel; Bertholet, Emilie; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørn, Mikkel; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brundu, Davide; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Byczynski, Wiktor; Cadeddu, Sandro; Cai, Hao; Calabrese, Roberto; Calladine, Ryan; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Chapman, Matthew George; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu Faye; Chitic, Stefan-Gabriel; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Ciambrone, Paolo; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Colombo, Tommaso; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Da Silva, Cesar Luiz; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Del Buono, Luigi; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Douglas, Lauren; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Durham, John Matthew; Dutta, Deepanwita; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fazzini, Davide; Federici, Luca; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Declara, Placido; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Lopes, Lino; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gabriel, Emmy; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Grabowski, Jascha Peter; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruber, Lukas; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hancock, Thomas Henry; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Hasse, Christoph; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Hecker, Malte; Heinicke, Kevin; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Hu, Wenhua; Huang, Wenqian; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Ibis, Philipp; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kazeev, Nikita; Kecke, Matthieu; Keizer, Floris; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Kress, Felix Johannes; Krokovny, Pavel; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Pei-Rong; Li, Tenglin; Li, Yiming; Li, Zhuoming; Liang, Xixin; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Lisovskyi, Vitalii; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Loi, Angelo; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Macko, Vladimir; Mackowiak, Patrick; Maddrell-Mander, Samuel; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Maisuzenko, Dmitrii; Majewski, Maciej Witold; Malde, Sneha; Malecki, Bartosz; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Marangotto, Daniele; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Mead, James Vincent; Meadows, Brian; Meaux, Cedric; Meier, Frank; Meinert, Nis; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Millard, Edward James; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Minzoni, Luca; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Mombächer, Titus; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nogay, Alla; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Ossowska, Anna; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Pereima, Dmitrii; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pietrzyk, Guillaume; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pisani, Flavio; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Pullen, Hannah Louise; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Qin, Jia-Jia; Quagliani, Renato; Quintana, Boris; Rachwal, Bartlomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Ravonel Salzgeber, Melody; Reboud, Meril; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Robbe, Patrick; Robert, Arnaud; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Ruiz Vidal, Joan; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarpis, Gediminas; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepulveda, Eduardo Enrique; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stepanova, Margarita; Stevens, Holger; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Jiayin; Sun, Liang; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szumlak, Tomasz; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Usachov, Andrii; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagner, Alexander; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Wang, Yilong; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Weisser, Constantin; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Menglin; Xu, Qingnian; Xu, Zehua; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zonneveld, Jennifer Brigitta; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    A search is performed in the invariant mass spectrum of the $B_c^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ system for the excited $B_c^{+}$ states $B_c(2^{1}S_{0})^+$ and $B_c(2^{3}S_{1})^+$ using a data sample of $pp$ collisions collected by the LHCb experiment at the centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 8 \\,{\\mathrm{TeV}}$, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $2 \\,{\\mathrm{fb^{-1}}}$. No evidence is seen for either state. Upper limits on the ratios of the production cross-sections of the $B_c(2^{1}S_{0})^+$ and $B_c(2^{3}S_{1})^+$ states times the branching fractions of ${B_c(2^{1}S_{0})^+} \\to {B_c^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}}$ and ${B_c(2^{3}S_{1})^+} \\to {B_c^{*+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}}$ over the production cross-section of the $B_c^{+}$ state are given as a function of their masses. They are found to be between 0.02 and 0.14 at $95\\%$ confidence level for $B_c(2^{1}S_{0})^+$ and $B_c(2^{3}S_{1})^+$ in the mass ranges $[6830, 6890] \\,{\\mathrm{MeV}}/c^{2}$ and $[6795,6890] \\,{\\mathrm{MeV}}/c^{2}$, respectively.

  10. Quantum marginals from pure doubly excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciążek, Tomasz; Tsanov, Valdemar

    2017-11-01

    The possible spectra of one-particle reduced density matrices that are compatible with a pure multipartite quantum system of finite dimension form a convex polytope. We introduce a new construction of inner- and outer-bounding polytopes that constrain the polytope for the entire quantum system. The outer bound is sharp. The inner polytope stems only from doubly excited states. We find all quantum systems, where the bounds coincide giving the entire polytope. We show, that those systems are: (i) any system of two particles (ii) L qubits, (iii) three fermions on N≤slant 7 levels, (iv) any number of bosons on any number of levels and (v) fermionic Fock space on N≤slant 5 levels. The methods we use come from symplectic geometry and representation theory of compact Lie groups. In particular, we study the images of proper momentum maps, where our method describes momentum images for all representations that are spherical.

  11. Excited states in {sup 155}Yb and

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, K. Y.; Cizewski, J. A.; Seweryniak, D.; Amro, H.; Carpenter, M. P.; Davids, C. N.; Fotiades, N.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J. (and others)

    2001-09-01

    The 270-MeV {sup 58}Ni+{sup 102}Pd reaction was used for the first recoil-decay tagging measurement with Gammasphere coupled to the Fragment Mass Analyzer at Argonne National Laboratory. Level structures of {sup 155}Yb, {sup 156}Lu, and {sup 157}Lu, as well as the excited states associated with the 25/2{sup -} isomer in {sup 155}Lu, are identified for the first time. The systematical behavior of the energy levels is compared with that of neighboring isotones and isotopes. The attractive interaction between h{sub 11/2} protons and h{sub 9/2} neutrons plays an important role in the structure of {sup 155}Yb and {sup 155,156}Lu.

  12. Sunlight-Initiated Photochemistry: Excited Vibrational States of Atmospheric Chromophores

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Vaida; Karl J. Feierabend; Nabilah Rontu; Kaito Takahashi

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric chemical reactions are often initiated by ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation since absorption in that wavelength range coincides to typical chemical bond energies. In this review, we present an alternative process by which chemical reactions occur with the excitation of vibrational levels in the ground electronic state by red solar photons. We focus on the O–H vibrational manifold which can be an atmospheric chromophore for driving vibrationally mediated overtone-induced chemical re...

  13. Coherence Measurements for Excited to Excited State Transitions in Barium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajmar, S.; Kanik, I.; Karaganov, V.; Zetner, P. W.; Csanak, G.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental studies concerning elastic and inelastic electron scattering by coherently ensembles of Ba (...6s6p (sub 1)P(sub 1)) atoms with various degrees of alignment will be described. An in-plane, linearly-polarized laser beam was utilized to prepare these target ensembles and the electron scattering signal as a function of polarization angle was measured for several laser geometries at fixed impact energies and scattering angles. From these measurements, we derived cross sections and electron-impact coherence parameters associated with the electron scattering process which is time reverse of the actual experimentally studied process. This interpretation of the experiment is based on the theory of Macek and Herte. The experimental results were also interpreted in terms of cross sections and collision parameters associated with the actual experimental processes. Results obtained so far will be presented and plans for further studies will be discussed.

  14. Vibronic coupling in the excited-states of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miki, Takeshi [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Buckup, Tiago [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Krause, Marie S. [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Southall, June [College of Medical; Veterinary, and Life Science; University of Glasgow; G12 8QQ Glasgow, UK; Cogdell, Richard J. [College of Medical; Veterinary, and Life Science; University of Glasgow; G12 8QQ Glasgow, UK; Motzkus, Marcus [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany

    2016-01-01

    The ultrafast femtochemistry of carotenoids is governed by the interaction between electronic excited states, which has been explained by the relaxation dynamics within a few hundred femtoseconds from the lowest optically allowed excited state S2to the optically dark state S1.

  15. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Fleming, Saul Cohen, Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-10-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  16. Chemical modulation of electronic structure at the excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Song, C.; Gu, Y. D.; Saleem, M. S.; Pan, F.

    2017-12-01

    Spin-polarized electronic structures are the cornerstone of spintronics, and have thus attracted a significant amount of interest; in particular, researchers are looking into how to modulate the electronic structure to enable multifunctional spintronics applications, especially in half-metallic systems. However, the control of the spin polarization has only been predicted in limited two-dimensional systems with spin-polarized Dirac structures and is difficult to achieve experimentally. Here, we report the modulation of the electronic structure in the light-induced excited state in a typical half-metal, L a1 /2S r1 /2Mn O3 -δ . According to the spin-transport measurements, there appears a light-induced increase in magnetoresistance due to the enhanced spin scattering, which is closely associated with the excited spin polarization. Strikingly, the light-induced variation can be enhanced via alcohol processing and reduced by oxygen annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that in the chemical process, a redox reaction occurs with a change in the valence of Mn. Furthermore, first-principles calculations reveal that the change in the valence of Mn alters the electronic structure and consequently modulates the spin polarization in the excited state. Our findings thus report a chemically tunable electronic structure, demonstrating interesting physics and the potential for multifunctional applications and ultrafast spintronics.

  17. A Simple Hubbard Model for the Excited States of $\\pi$ Conjugated -acene Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeq, Z S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a model that elucidates in a simple way the electronic excited states of $\\pi$ conjugated -acene molecules such as tetracene, pentacene, and hexacene. We use a tight-binding and truncated Hubbard model written in the electron-hole basis to describe the low lying excitations with reasonable quantitative accuracy. We are able to produce semi-analytic wavefunctions for the electronic states of the system, which allows us to compute the density correlation functions for various states such as the ground state, the first two singly excited states, and the lowest lying doubly excited state. We show that in this lowest lying doubly excited state, a state which has been speculated as to being involved in the singlet fission process, the electrons and holes behave in a triplet like manner.

  18. Application of spectroscopy and super-resolution microscopy: Excited state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Ujjal [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Photophysics of inorganic materials and organic molecules in complex systems have been extensively studied with absorption and emission spectroscopy.1-4 Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies are commonly carried out to characterize excited-state properties of fluorophores. Although steady-state fluorescence measurements are widely used for analytical applications, time-resolved fluorescence measurements provide more detailed information about excited-state properties and the environment in the vicinity of the fluorophore. Many photophysical processes, such as photoinduced electron transfer (PET), rotational reorientation, solvent relaxation, and energy transfer, occur on a nanosecond (10-9 s) timescale, thus affecting the lifetime of the fluorophores. Moreover, time-resolved microscopy methods, such as lifetimeimaging, combine the benefits of the microscopic measurement and information-rich, timeresolved data. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy combined with microscopy can be used to quantify these processes and to obtain a deeper understanding of the chemical surroundings of the fluorophore in a small area under investigation. This thesis discusses various photophysical and super-resolution microscopic studies of organic and inorganic materials, which have been outlined below.

  19. Vibrationally excited state stectroscopy of radicals in a supersonic plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Bazalgette Courreges-Lacoste, J. Bulthuis, S. Stolte, T. Motylewski; Linnartz, H.V.J.

    2001-01-01

    A plasma source based on a multilayer discharge geometry in combination with a time-of-flight REMPI experiment is used to study rotationally cold spectra of highly excited vibrational states of mass selected radicals. The rovibrational state distributions upon discharge excitation are characterised

  20. Probing an Excited-State Atomic Transition Using Hyperfine Quantum Beat Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to observe the dynamics of an excited-state transition in a room temperature atomic vapor using hyperfine quantum beats. Our experiment using cesium atoms consists of a pulsed excitation of the D2 transition, and continuous-wave driving of an excited-state transition from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state to the 7S$_{1/2}$ state. We observe quantum beats in the fluorescence from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state which are modified by the driving of the excited-state transition. The Fourier spectrum of the beat signal yields evidence of Autler-Townes splitting of the 6P$_{3/2}$, F = 5 hyperfine level and Rabi oscillations on the excited-state transition. A detailed model provides qualitative agreement with the data, giving insight to the physical processes involved.

  1. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronca, Enrico, E-mail: enrico@thch.unipg.it; Tarantelli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.tarantelli@unipg.it [Istituto CNR di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, via Elce di Sotto 8, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università degli Studi di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto 8, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Pastore, Mariachiara, E-mail: chiara@thch.unipg.it; Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo [Istituto CNR di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, via Elce di Sotto 8, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, via Borsari 46, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2014-02-07

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  2. Excited-State Deactivation of Branched Phthalocyanine Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huaning; Li, Yang; Chen, Jun; Zhou, Meng; Niu, Yingli; Zhang, Xinxing; Guo, Qianjin; Wang, Shuangqing; Yang, Guoqiang; Xia, Andong

    2015-12-21

    The excited-state relaxation dynamics and chromophore interactions in two phthalocyanine compounds (bis- and trisphthalocyanines) are studied by using steady-state and femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements, where the excited-state energy-transfer mechanism is explored. By exciting phthalocyanine compounds to their second electronically excited states and probing the subsequent relaxation dynamics, a multitude of deactivation pathways are identified. The transient absorption spectra show the relaxation pathway from the exciton state to excimer state and then back to the ground state in bisphthalocyanine (bis-Pc). In trisphthalocyanine (tris-Pc), the monomeric and dimeric subunits are excited and the excitation energy transfers from the monomeric vibrationally hot S1 state to the exciton state of a pre-associated dimer, with subsequent relaxation to the ground state through the excimer state. The theoretical calculations and steady-state spectra also show a face-to-face conformation in bis-Pc, whereas in tris-Pc, two of the three phthalocyanine branches form a pre-associated face-to-face dimeric conformation with the third one acting as a monomeric unit; this is consistent with the results of the transient absorption experiments from the perspective of molecular structure. The detailed structure-property relationships in phthalocyanine compounds is useful for exploring the function of molecular aggregates in energy migration of natural photosynthesis systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Direct conversion of graphite into diamond through electronic excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, H

    2003-01-01

    An ab initio total energy calculation has been performed for electronic excited states in diamond and rhombohedral graphite by the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the framework of the local density approximation (LDA). First, calculations for the core-excited state in diamond have been performed to show that the ab initio calculations based on the LDA describe the wavefunctions in the electronic excited states as well as in the ground state quite well. Fairly good coincidence with both experimental data and theoretical prediction has been obtained for the lattice relaxation of the core exciton state. The results of the core exciton state are compared with nitrogen-doped diamond. Next, the structural stability of rhombohedral graphite has been investigated to examine the possibility of the transition into the diamond structure through electronic excited states. While maintaining the rhombohedral symmetry, rhombohedral graphite can be spontaneously transformed to cubic diamond. Tota...

  4. TDDFT study on the excited-state proton transfer of 8-hydroxyquinoline: key role of the excited-state hydrogen-bond strengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Sheng-Cheng; Liu, Yu-Hui

    2015-03-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations have been employed to study the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ). Infrared spectra of 8HQ in both the ground and the lowest singlet excited states have been calculated, revealing a red-shift of the hydroxyl group (-OH) stretching band in the excited state. Hence, the intramolecular hydrogen bond (O-H···N) in 8HQ would be significantly strengthened upon photo-excitation to the S1 state. As the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction occurs through hydrogen bonding, the ESIPT reaction of 8HQ is effectively facilitated by strengthening of the electronic excited-state hydrogen bond (O-H···N). As a result, the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction would occur on an ultrafast timescale with a negligible barrier in the calculated potential energy curve for the ESIPT reaction. Therefore, although the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction is not favorable in the ground state, the ESIPT process is feasible in the excited state. Finally, we have identified that radiationless deactivation via internal conversion (IC) becomes the main dissipative channel for 8HQ by analyzing the energy gaps between the S1 and S0 states for the enol and keto forms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Two-Photon Excitation of Conjugated Molecules in Solution: Spectroscopy and Excited-State Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elles, Christopher G.; Houk, Amanda L.; de Wergifosse, Marc; Krylov, Anna

    2017-06-01

    We examine the two-photon absorption (2PA) spectroscopy and ultrafast excited-state dynamics of several conjugated molecules in solution. By controlling the relative wavelength and polarization of the two photons, the 2PA measurements provide a more sensitive means of probing the electronic structure of a molecule compared with traditional linear absorption spectra. We compare experimental spectra of trans-stilbene, cis-stilbene, and phenanthrene in solution with the calculated spectra of the isolated molecules using EOM-EE-CCSD. The calculated spectra show good agreement with the low-energy region of the experimental spectra (below 6 eV) after suppressing transitions with strong Rydberg character and accounting for solvent and method-dependent shifts of the valence transitions. We also monitor the excited state dynamics following two-photon excitation to high-lying valence states of trans-stilbene up to 6.5 eV. The initially excited states rapidly relax to the lowest singlet excited state and then follow the same reaction path as observed following direct one-photon excitation to the lowest absorption band at 4.0 eV.

  6. Exciting hot carrier to a high energy state by impact excitation in low density nanocrystalline Si films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wei, E-mail: yuwei_hbu@126.com [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Wang, Xinzhan; Dai, Wanlei; Liu, Yumei; Xu, Yanmei; Lu, Wanbing; Fu, Guangsheng [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2013-02-15

    The carrier recombination processes in low density nanocrystalline (nc-) Si films have been studied by steady and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and the hot carriers have been excited to a high energy state by impact excitation. A yellow-green PL band locating at 580 nm appears when the studied film is excited by two optical beams. The yellow-green PL band results from band-to-band transition in Si nanocrystals with double-bonded oxygen atoms, which is caused by impact excitation among the carriers in the nc-Si film. The decay time of the yellow-green PL band is 230 ns, which is much longer than the hot carrier cooling. The results indicate that the lost energy in the solar cell may be collected from the new recombination center in the further structural design.

  7. A Simple Hubbard Model for the Excited States of Dibenzoterrylene

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeq, Z S

    2016-01-01

    We use a simple Hubbard model to characterize the electronic excited states of the dibenzoterrylene (DBT) molecule; we compute the excited state transition energies and oscillator strengths from the ground state to several singlet excited states. We consider the lowest singlet and triplet states of the molecule, examine their wavefunctions, and compute the density correlation functions that describe these states. We find that the DBT ground state is mostly a closed shell singlet with very slight radical character. We predict a relatively small singlet-triplet splitting of 0.75 eV, which is less than the mid-sized -acenes but larger than literature predictions for this state; this is because the Hubbard interaction makes a very small correction to the singlet and triplet states.

  8. Coherent excitation of a single atom to a Rydberg state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Gaëtan, Alpha; Evellin, Charles

    2010-01-01

    We present the coherent excitation of a single Rubidium atom to the Rydberg state 58d3/2 using a two-photon transition. The experimental setup is described in detail, as are experimental techniques and procedures. The coherence of the excitation is revealed by observing Rabi oscillations between...

  9. Electronically excited states of tryptamine and its microhydrated complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, M.; Brause, R.; Marian, C.M.; Salzmann, S.; Meerts, W.L.

    2006-01-01

    The lowest electronically excited singlet states of tryptamine and the tryptamine (H2O)(1) cluster have been studied, using time dependent density functional theory for determination of the geometries and multireference configuration interaction for the vertical and adiabatic excitation energies,

  10. Excited state of {sup 7}He and its unique structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsheninnikov, A.A.; Golovkov, M.S.; Ozawa, A.; Yoshida, K.; Tanihata, I.; Fulop, Z.; Kusaka, K.; Morimoto, K.; Otsu, H.; Petrascu, H.; Tokanai, F. [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Kuzmin, E.A.; Nikolskii, E.Yu.; Novatskii, B.G.; Ogloblin, A.A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    The transfer reaction p({sup 8}He,d){sup 7}He with the exotic {sup 8}He-beam has been studied by correlational measurements, and an excited state of {sup 7}He was observed. Most likely, it has a structure with a neutron in an excited state coupled to the {sup 6}He-core which itself is in the excited 2{sup +}-state. The transfer reaction p({sup 8}He,{sup 2}He){sup 7}H was also studied, and manifestation on the possible existence of the resonance {sup 7}H was obtained. (orig.)

  11. Excited-State Dynamics of Oxyluciferin in Firefly Luciferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snellenburg, Joris J; Laptenok, Sergey P; DeSa, Richard J; Naumov, Panče; Solntsev, Kyril M

    2016-12-21

    The color variations of light emitted by some natural and mutant luciferases are normally attributed to collective factors referred to as microenvironment effects; however, the exact nature of these interactions between the emitting molecule (oxyluciferin) and the active site remains elusive. Although model studies of noncomplexed oxyluciferin and its variants have greatly advanced the understanding of its photochemistry, extrapolation of the conclusions to the real system requires assumptions about the polarity and proticity of the active site. To decipher the intricate excited-state dynamics, global and target analysis is performed here for the first time on the steady-state and time-resolved spectra of firefly oxyluciferin complexed with luciferase from the Japanese firefly (Luciola cruciata). The experimental steady-state and time-resolved luminescence spectra of the oxyluciferin/luciferase complex in solution are compared with the broadband time-resolved firefly bioluminescence recorded in vivo. The results demonstrate that de-excitation of the luminophore results in a complex cascade of photoinduced proton transfer processes and can be interpreted by the pH dependence of the emitted light. It is confirmed that proton transfer is the central event in the spectrochemistry of this system for which any assignment of the pH-dependent emission to a single chemical species would be an oversimplification.

  12. Excited-State Dynamics of Oxyluciferin in Firefly Luciferase

    KAUST Repository

    Snellenburg, Joris J.

    2016-11-23

    The color variations of light emitted by some natural and mutant luciferases are normally attributed to collective factors referred to as microenvironment effects; however, the exact nature of these interactions between the emitting molecule (oxyluciferin) and the active site remains elusive. Although model studies of noncomplexed oxyluciferin and its variants have greatly advanced the understanding of its photochemistry, extrapolation of the conclusions to the real system requires assumptions about the polarity and proticity of the active site. To decipher the intricate excited-state dynamics, global and target analysis is performed here for the first time on the steady-state and time-resolved spectra of firefly oxyluciferin complexed with luciferase from the Japanese firefly (Luciola cruciata). The experimental steady-state and time resolved luminescence spectra of the oxyluciferin/luciferase complex in solution are compared with the broadband time-resolved firefly bioluminescence recorded in vivo. The results demonstrate that de-excitation of the luminophore results in a complex cascade of photoinduced proton transfer processes and can be interpreted by the pH dependence of the emitted light. It is confirmed that proton transfer is the central event in the spectrochemistry of this system for which any assignment of the pH dependent emission to a single chemical species would be an oversimplification.

  13. Excited State Dynamics of DNA and RNA bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudock, Hanneli; Levine, Benjamin; Martinez, Todd

    2007-03-01

    Recent ultrafast spectroscopic experiments have reported excited state lifetimes for DNA and RNA bases and assigned these lifetimes to various electronic states. We have used theoretical and simulation methods to describe the excited state dynamics of these bases in an effort to provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed lifetimes. Our simulations are based on ab initio molecular dynamics, where the electronic and nuclear Schrodinger equations are solved simultaneously. The results are further verified by comparison to high-level ab initio electronic structure methods, including dynamic electron correlation effects through multireference perturbation theory, at important points along the dynamical pathways. Our results provide an explanation of the photochemical mechanism leading to nonradiative decay of the electronic excited states and some suggestions as to the origin of the different lifetimes. Comparisons between pyrimidines illustrate how chemical differences impact excited state dynamics and may play a role in explaining the propensity for dimer formation in thymine.

  14. Negative Binomial States of the Radiation Field and their Excitations are Nonlinear Coherent States

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao-Guang; Fu, Hong-Chen

    1999-01-01

    We show that the well-known negative binomial states of the radiation field and their excitations are nonlinear coherent states. Excited nonlinear coherent state are still nonlinear coherent states with different nonlinear functions. We finally give exponential form of the nonlinear coherent states and remark that the binomial states are not nonlinear coherent states.

  15. Trapped electronic states in YAG crystal excited by femtosecond radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavedeev, E.V.; Kononenko, V.V.; Konov, V.I. [General Physics Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-15

    The excitation of an electronic subsystem of an yttrium aluminum garnet by 800 nm femtosecond radiation was studied theoretically and experimentally. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the refractive index (n) inside the beam waist was explored by means of the pump-probe interferometric technique with a submicron resolution. The observed increase in n indicated the formation of bound electronic states relaxed for ∝ 150 ps. We showed that the experimental data agreed with the computational simulation based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation only if these transient states were considered to arise from a direct light-induced process but not from the decay of radiatively generated free-electron-hole pairs. (orig.)

  16. Excited state dynamics of liquid water near the surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved photoelectron spectroscopy explores the excited state dynamics of liquid water in presence of cations close to the surface. A transient hydrated electroncation complex is observed.

  17. Vibrational kinetics of electronically excited states in H2 discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, Gianpiero; Pietanza, Lucia D.; D'Ammando, Giuliano; Celiberto, Roberto; Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2017-11-01

    The evolution of atmospheric pressure hydrogen plasma under the action of repetitively ns electrical pulse has been investigated using a 0D state-to-state kinetic model that self-consistently couples the master equation of heavy particles and the Boltzmann equation for free electrons. The kinetic model includes, together with atomic hydrogen states and the vibrational kinetics of H2 ground state, vibrational levels of singlet states, accounting for the collisional quenching, having a relevant role because of the high pressure. The mechanisms of excitations, radiative decay and collisional quenching involving the excited H2 states and the corresponding cross sections, integrated over the non-equilibrium electron energy distribution function (EEDF) to obtain kinetic rates, are discussed in the light of the kinetic simulation results, i.e. the time evolution during the pulse of the plasma composition, of the EEDF and of the vibrational distributions of ground and singlet excited states.

  18. Metastable states of highly excited heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, D. J.; Griffin, P. M.; Sellin, I. A.; Smith, W. W.; Donnally, B.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the method used and results obtained in an experimental study of the metastable states of highly stripped heavy ions, aimed at determining the lifetimes of such states by the rates of autoionization and radiation. The significance and limitations of the results presented are discussed.

  19. The excited state antiaromatic benzene ring: a molecular Mr Hyde?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Ottosson, Henrik

    2015-09-21

    The antiaromatic character of benzene in its first ππ* excited triplet state (T1) was deduced more than four decades ago by Baird using perturbation molecular orbital (PMO) theory [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1972, 94, 4941], and since then it has been confirmed through a range of high-level quantum chemical calculations. With focus on benzene we now first review theoretical and computational studies that examine and confirm Baird's rule on reversal in the electron count for aromaticity and antiaromaticity of annulenes in their lowest triplet states as compared to Hückel's rule for the ground state (S0). We also note that the rule according to quantum chemical calculations can be extended to the lowest singlet excited state (S1) of benzene. Importantly, Baird, as well as Aihara [Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 1978, 51, 1788], early put forth that the destabilization and excited state antiaromaticity of the benzene ring should be reflected in its photochemical reactivity, yet, today these conclusions are often overlooked. Thus, in the second part of the article we review photochemical reactions of a series of benzene derivatives that to various extents should stem from the excited state antiaromatic character of the benzene ring. We argue that benzene can be viewed as a molecular "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" with its largely unknown excited state antiaromaticity representing its "Mr Hyde" character. The recognition of the "Jekyll and Hyde" split personality feature of the benzene ring can likely be useful in a range of different areas.

  20. Direct observation of photoinduced bent nitrosyl excited-state complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Karma R.; Steele, Ryan P.; Glascoe, Elizabeth A.; Cahoon, James F.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-06-28

    Ground state structures with side-on nitrosyl ({eta}{sup 2}-NO) and isonitrosyl (ON) ligands have been observed in a variety of transition-metal complexes. In contrast, excited state structures with bent-NO ligands have been proposed for years but never directly observed. Here we use picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) modeling to study the photochemistry of Co(CO){sub 3}(NO), a model transition-metal-NO compound. Surprisingly, we have observed no evidence for ON and {eta}{sup 2}-NO structural isomers, but have observed two bent-NO complexes. DFT modeling of the ground and excited state potentials indicates that the bent-NO complexes correspond to triplet excited states. Photolysis of Co(CO){sub 3}(NO) with a 400-nm pump pulse leads to population of a manifold of excited states which decay to form an excited state triplet bent-NO complex within 1 ps. This structure relaxes to the ground triplet state in ca. 350 ps to form a second bent-NO structure.

  1. Excited state dynamics in photosynthetic reaction center and light harvesting complex 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    Key to efficient harvesting of sunlight in photosynthesis is the first energy conversion process in which electronic excitation establishes a trans-membrane charge gradient. This conversion is accomplished by the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) that is, in case of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides studied here, surrounded by light harvesting complex 1 (LH1). The RC employs six pigment molecules to initiate the conversion: four bacteriochlorophylls and two bacteriopheophytins. The excited states of these pigments interact very strongly and are simultaneously influenced by the surrounding thermal protein environment. Likewise, LH1 employs 32 bacteriochlorophylls influenced in their excited state dynamics by strong interaction between the pigments and by interaction with the protein environment. Modeling the excited state dynamics in the RC as well as in LH1 requires theoretical methods, which account for both pigment-pigment interaction and pigment-environment interaction. In the present study we describe the excitation dynamics within a RC and excitation transfer between light harvesting complex 1 (LH1) and RC, employing the hierarchical equation of motion method. For this purpose a set of model parameters that reproduce RC as well as LH1 spectra and observed oscillatory excitation dynamics in the RC is suggested. We find that the environment has a significant effect on LH1-RC excitation transfer and that excitation transfers incoherently between LH1 and RC.

  2. Sunlight-Initiated Photochemistry: Excited Vibrational States of Atmospheric Chromophores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Vaida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric chemical reactions are often initiated by ultraviolet (UV solar radiation since absorption in that wavelength range coincides to typical chemical bond energies. In this review, we present an alternative process by which chemical reactions occur with the excitation of vibrational levels in the ground electronic state by red solar photons. We focus on the O–H vibrational manifold which can be an atmospheric chromophore for driving vibrationally mediated overtone-induced chemical reactions. Experimental and theoretical O–H intensities of several carboxylic acids, alcohols, and peroxides are presented. The importance of combination bands in spectra at chemically relevant energies is examined in the context of atmospheric photochemistry. Candidate systems for overtone-initiated chemistry are provided, and their lowest energy barrier for reaction and the minimum quanta of O–H stretch required for reaction are calculated. We conclude with a discussion of the major pathways available for overtone-induced reactions in the atmosphere.

  3. Acute excited states and sudden death

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farnham, Frank R; Kennedy, Henry G

    1997-01-01

    ... mortality. 2 Such deaths, often in police custody or other highly charged situations, commonly give rise to high profile coroner's hearings and inquiries. 3 In the era before neuroleptics death in such agitated states was attributed to exhaustion, though neuroleptic malignant syndrome and the cardiac effects of neuroleptics now often enter into considerat...

  4. Excited states of muonium in atomic hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Differential cross-section results are found to resemble positronium formation cross-section results of positron–hydrogen charge-exchange problem. Forward ... using velocity scaling are compared with the results of the present calculation. .... to carry out calculations for e− capture by muon into n = 2 and n = 3 states.

  5. Entanglement entropy in excited states of the quantum Lifshitz model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Daniel E.; Vasseur, Romain; Moore, Joel E.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the entanglement properties of an infinite class of excited states in the quantum Lifshitz model (QLM). The presence of a conformal quantum critical point in the QLM makes it unusually tractable for a model above one spatial dimension, enabling the ground state entanglement entropy for an arbitrary domain to be expressed in terms of geometrical and topological quantities. Here we extend this result to excited states and find that the entanglement can be naturally written in terms of quantities which we dub ‘entanglement propagator amplitudes’ (EPAs). EPAs are geometrical probabilities that we explicitly calculate and interpret. A comparison of lattice and continuum results demonstrates that EPAs are universal. This work shows that the QLM is an example of a 2  +  1d field theory where the universal behavior of excited-state entanglement may be computed analytically.

  6. Two-neutron decay of excited states of 11Li

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jenna; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    One prominent example of a Borromean nucleus is the two-neutron halo nucleus, 11Li. All excited states of this nucleus are unbound to two-neutron decay. Many theories propose that the two valence neutrons exhibit dineutron behavior in the ground state, but it is unclear what effect such a structure would have on the decay of the excited states. We have recently completed an experiment designed to study the decay of one of these excited states. Unbound 11Li was populated via a two-proton knockout from 13B. The two emitted neutrons were detected with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) in coincidence with the daughter fragment, 9Li. Preliminary results will be discussed.

  7. DETERMINATION OF THE ABSOLUTE EXCITED-STATE DENSITY OF A SODIUM TARGET BY MEANS OF BEAM DEFLECTION MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERSEMA, WP; SCHLATMANN, AR; MORGENSTERN, R

    1994-01-01

    The average deflection of a laser excited, divergent sodium beam with a broad velocity distribution is measured by means of a Langmuir-Taylor detector and exploited for determining the absolute density of the excited state in the interaction area. Simulations of the excitation and deflection process

  8. Photoionization of excited states of neon-like Mg III

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The close coupling -matrix method is used to calculate cross-sections for photoionization of Mg III from its first three excited states. Configuration interaction wave functions are used to represent two target states of Mg III retained in the -matrix expansion. The positions and effective quantum numbers for the Rydberg ...

  9. Excited state conformational dynamics in carotenoids: dark intermediates and excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Warren F; Bishop, Michael M; Roscioli, Jerome D; Ghosh, Soumen; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    A consideration of the excited state potential energy surfaces of carotenoids develops a new hypothesis for the nature of the conformational motions that follow optical preparation of the S2 (1(1)Bu(+)) state. After an initial displacement from the Franck-Condon geometry along bond length alternation coordinates, it is suggested that carotenoids pass over a transition-state barrier leading to twisted conformations. This hypothesis leads to assignments for several dark intermediate states encountered in femtosecond spectroscopic studies. The Sx state is assigned to the structure reached upon the onset of torsional motions near the transition state barrier that divides planar and twisted structures on the S2 state potential energy surface. The X state, detected recently in two-dimensional electronic spectra, corresponds to a twisted structure well past the barrier and approaching the S2 state torsional minimum. Lastly, the S(∗) state is assigned to a low lying S1 state structure with intramolecular charge transfer character (ICT) and a pyramidal conformation. It follows that the bent and twisted structures of carotenoids that are found in photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins yield excited-state structures that favor the development of an ICT character and optimized energy transfer yields to (bacterio)chlorophyll acceptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Excitation energy transfer processes in condensed matter theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Jai

    1994-01-01

    Applying a unified quantum approach, contributors offer fresh insights into the theoretical developments in the excitation energy transfer processes in condensed matter This comprehensive volume examines Frenkel and Wannier excitonic processes; rates of excitonic processes; theory of laser sputter and polymer ablation; and polarons, excitonic polarons and self-trapping

  11. Thermally excited multiplet states in macerals separated from bituminous coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieckowski; Pilawa; Swiatkowska; Wojtowicz; Slowik; Lewandowski

    2000-07-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance searches of thermally excited multiplet states in macerals, exinite, vitrinite, and inertinite of Polish medium-rank coal (85.6 wt% C), were performed. Numerical analysis of lineshape indicates a multicomponent structure of the EPR spectra of macerals heated at 300 degrees and 650 degrees C. EPR spectra of exinite and vitrinite are a superposition of broad Gauss, broad Lorentz (Lorentz 1), and narrow Lorentz (Lorentz 3) lines. Two narrow Lorentz (Lorentz 2 and Lorentz 3) lines were observed in the resonance absorption curves of inertinite. The influence of the measuring temperature (100-300 K) on the EPR lines of the macerals was also studied. The experimentally obtained temperature dependence of the EPR line intensities were fitted by the theoretical functions characteristic for paramagnetic centers with ground doublet state (S = 12) and paramagnetic centers with thermally excited triplet (S = 1) and quadruplet (S = 32) states. Thermally excited multiplet states were found in exinite and vitrinite. Both paramagnetic centers with doublet ground state (S = 12) and paramagnetic centers with thermally excited states, probably quadruplet states (S = 32), exist in the group of paramagnetic centers of exinite and vitrinite with the broad Lorentz 1 lines. Intensities (I) of the broad Gauss and the narrow Lorentz 3 lines of exinite and vitrinite changes with temperature according to the Curie law (I = C/T). The existence of thermally excited multiplet states was not stated for inertinite. The two groups of paramagnetic centers of inertinite with Lorentz 2 and Lorentz 3 lines obey the Curie law. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. Self-Exciting Point Process Modeling of Conversation Event Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Takaguchi, Taro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo

    Self-exciting processes of Hawkes type have been used to model various phenomena including earthquakes, neural activities, and views of online videos. Studies of temporal networks have revealed that sequences of social interevent times for individuals are highly bursty. We examine some basic properties of event sequences generated by the Hawkes self-exciting process to show that it generates bursty interevent times for a wide parameter range. Then, we fit the model to the data of conversation sequences recorded in company offices in Japan. In this way, we can estimate relative magnitudes of the self excitement, its temporal decay, and the base event rate independent of the self excitation. These variables highly depend on individuals. We also point out that the Hawkes model has an important limitation that the correlation in the interevent times and the burstiness cannot be independently modulated.

  13. Accurate Excited State Geometries within Reduced Subspace TDDFT/TDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David

    2014-12-09

    A method for the calculation of TDDFT/TDA excited state geometries within a reduced subspace of Kohn-Sham orbitals has been implemented and tested. Accurate geometries are found for all of the fluorophore-like molecules tested, with at most all valence occupied orbitals and half of the virtual orbitals included but for some molecules even fewer orbitals. Efficiency gains of between 15 and 30% are found for essentially the same level of accuracy as a standard TDDFT/TDA excited state geometry optimization calculation.

  14. Can $\\beta$-decay probe excited state halos?

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In the first experiment at the newly constructed ISOLDE Facility the first-forbidden $\\beta$-decay of $^{17}$Ne into the first excited state of $^{17}$F has been measured. It is a factor two faster than the corresponding mirror decay and thus gives one of the largest recorded asymmetries for $\\beta$-decays feeding bound final states. Shell-model calculations can only reproduce the asymmetry if the halo structure of the $^{17}$F state is taken into account.

  15. Photoionization of excited states of neon-like Mg III

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . In the present work we have used the close coupling R-matrix method [8,11] to ob- tain accurate photoionization cross-section from the first three excited 1s22s22p53s 3 1P0,. 1s22s22p53p 3Se states of Mg III, allowing for the residual ion to ...

  16. Size dependent deactivation of the excited state of DHICA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauden, Magdalena; Pezzella, Alessandro; Panzella, Lucia

    2008-01-01

    Melanin is a natural pigment mainly responsible for the protection of skin and eyes from UV damage. 5,6- dihydroxyindole- 2 carboxylic acid (DHICA) is a key melanin building block. We have investigated the excited state dynamics of DHICA as well as its derivatives and oligomeric units using...

  17. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several.

  18. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several other ...

  19. Lattice QCD determination of patterns of excited baryon states

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Subhasish; Fleming, G T; Juge, K J; Lichtl, A; Morningstar, C; Richards, D G; Sato, I; Wallace, S J

    2007-01-01

    Energies for excited isospin I=1/2 and I=3/2 states that include the nucleon and Delta families of baryons are computed using quenched, anisotropic lattices. Baryon interpolating field operators that are used include nonlocal operators that provide G_2 irreducible representations of the octahedral group. The decomposition of spin 5/2 or higher spin states is realized for the first time in a lattice QCD calculation. We observe patterns of degenerate energies in the irreducible representations of the octahedral group that correspond to the subduction of the continuum spin 5/2 or higher. The overall pattern of low-lying excited states corresponds well to the pattern of physical states subduced to the irreducible representations of the octahedral group.

  20. Sub-50 fs excited state dynamics of 6-chloroguanine upon deep ultraviolet excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sayan; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2016-05-18

    The photophysical properties of natural nucleobases and their respective nucleotides are ascribed to the sub-picosecond lifetime of their first singlet states in the UV-B region (260-350 nm). Electronic transitions of the ππ* type, which are stronger than those in the UV-B region, lie at the red edge of the UV-C range (100-260 nm) in all isolated nucleobases. The lowest energetic excited states in the UV-B region of nucleobases have been investigated using a plethora of experimental and theoretical methods in gas and solution phases. The sub-picosecond lifetime of these molecules is not a general attribute of all nucleobases but specific to the five primary nucleobases and a few xanthine and methylated derivatives. To determine the overall UV photostability, we aim to understand the effect of more energetic photons lying in the UV-C region on nucleobases. To determine the UV-C initiated photophysics of a nucleobase system, we chose a halogen substituted purine, 6-chloroguanine (6-ClG), that we had investigated previously using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We have performed quantitative measurements of the resonance Raman cross-section across the Bb absorption band (210-230 nm) and constructed the Raman excitation profiles. We modeled the excitation profiles using Lee and Heller's time-dependent theory of resonance Raman intensities to extract the initial excited state dynamics of 6-ClG within 30-50 fs after photoexcitation. We found that imidazole and pyrimidine rings of 6-ClG undergo expansion and contraction, respectively, following photoexcitation to the Bb state. The amount of distortions of the excited state structure from that of the ground state structure is reflected by the total internal reorganization energy that is determined at 112 cm(-1). The contribution of the inertial component of the solvent response towards the total reorganization energy was obtained at 1220 cm(-1). In addition, our simulation also yields an instantaneous response of the first

  1. Optimized resonating valence bond state in square lattice: correlations & excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Nourbakhsh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider RVB state as a variational estimate for the ground state of Heisenberg antiferromagnet in square lattice. We present numerical calculation of energy, spin-spin correlation function and spin excitation spectrum. We show, that the quantum flactuations reduce of magnetization respect to Neel order. Our results are in good agreement with other methods such as spin-wave calculation and series expansions.

  2. Excited state evolution towards ligand loss and ligand chelation at group 6 metal carbonyl centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manton, Jennifer C; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Coleman, Anthony C; McMahon, Suzanne; Harvey, Emma C; Greetham, Gregory M; Clark, Ian P; Buma, Wybren Jan; Woutersen, Sander; Pryce, Mary T; Long, Conor

    2014-12-21

    The photochemistry and photophysics of three model "half-sandwich" complexes (η(6)-benzophenone)Cr(CO)3, (η(6)-styrene)Cr(CO)3, and (η(6)-allylbenzene)Cr(CO)3 were investigated using pico-second time-resolved infrared spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory methods. The (η(6)-benzophenone)Cr(CO)3 complex was studied using two excitation wavelengths (470 and 320 nm) while the remaining complexes were irradiated using 400 nm light. Two independent excited states were detected spectroscopically for each complex, one an unreactive excited state of metal-to-arene charge-transfer character and the other with metal-to-carbonyl charge transfer character. This second excited state leads to an arrested release of CO on the pico-second time-scale. Low-energy excitation (470 nm) of (η(6)-benzophenone)Cr(CO)3 populated only the unreactive excited state which simply relaxes to the parent complex. Higher energy irradiation (320 nm) induced CO-loss. Irradiation of (η(6)-styrene)Cr(CO)3, or (η(6)-allylbenzene)Cr(CO)3 at 400 nm provided evidence for the simultaneous population of both the reactive and unreactive excited states. The efficiency at which the unreactive excited state is populated depends on the degree of conjugation of the substituent with the arene π-system and this affects the efficiency of the CO-loss process. The quantum yield of CO-loss is 0.50 for (η(6)-allylbenzene)Cr(CO)3 and 0.43 for (η(6)-styrene)Cr(CO)3. These studies provide evidence for the existence of two photophysical routes to CO loss, a minor ultrafast route and an arrested mechanism involving the intermediate population of a reactive excited state. This reactive excited state either relaxes to reform the parent species or eject CO. Thus the quantum yield of the CO-loss is strongly dependent on the excitation wavelength. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations confirm that the state responsible for ultrafast CO-loss has significant metal-centred character while

  3. Excited S-symmetry states of positronic lithium and beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Krzysztof

    2016-04-14

    The possibility of the existence of excited S-symmetry states of positronic lithium and beryllium, resulting from the positron attachment to high-spin P parent atomic states, is examined and confirmed with variational calculations in the basis of explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The unexpectedly different order of the energies of the S and P states is explained by the formation of the positronium cluster structure and associated disappearance of the destabilizing centrifugal force. The annihilation properties of newly discovered states are discussed in the context of prospective experimental detection.

  4. Excited-state annihilation reduces power dependence of single-molecule FRET experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettels, Daniel; Haenni, Dominik; Maillot, Sacha; Gueye, Moussa; Barth, Anders; Hirschfeld, Verena; Hübner, Christian G; Léonard, Jérémie; Schuler, Benjamin

    2015-12-28

    Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments are an important method for probing biomolecular structure and dynamics. The results from such experiments appear to be surprisingly independent of the excitation power used, in contradiction to the simple photophysical mechanism usually invoked for FRET. Here we show that excited-state annihilation processes are an essential cause of this behavior. Singlet-singlet annihilation (SSA) is a mechanism of fluorescence quenching induced by Förster-type energy transfer between two fluorophores while they are both in their first excited singlet states (S1S1), which is usually neglected in the interpretation of FRET experiments. However, this approximation is only justified in the limit of low excitation rates. We demonstrate that SSA is evident in fluorescence correlation measurements for the commonly used FRET pair Alexa 488/Alexa 594, with a rate comparable to the rate of energy transfer between the donor excited state and the acceptor ground state (S1S0) that is exploited in FRET experiments. Transient absorption spectroscopy shows that SSA occurs exclusively via energy transfer from Alexa 488 to Alexa 594. Excitation-power dependent microsecond correlation experiments support the conclusion based on previously reported absorption spectra of triplet states that singlet-triplet annihilation (STA) analogously mediates energy transfer if the acceptor is in the triplet state. The results indicate that both SSA and STA have a pronounced effect on the overall FRET process and reduce the power dependence of the observed FRET efficiencies. The existence of annihilation processes thus seems to be essential for using FRET as a reliable spectroscopic ruler at the high excitation rates commonly employed in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  5. Super-atom molecular orbital excited states of fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, J Olof; Bohl, Elvira; Campbell, Eleanor E B

    2016-09-13

    Super-atom molecular orbitals are orbitals that form diffuse hydrogenic excited electronic states of fullerenes with their electron density centred at the centre of the hollow carbon cage and a significant electron density inside the cage. This is a consequence of the high symmetry and hollow structure of the molecules and distinguishes them from typical low-lying molecular Rydberg states. This review summarizes the current experimental and theoretical studies related to these exotic excited electronic states with emphasis on femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy experiments on gas-phase fullerenes.This article is part of the themed issue 'Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminster Fullerene'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Electronic excited states at ultrathin dielectric-metal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sementa, L.; Marini, A.; Barcaro, G.; Negreiros, F. R.; Fortunelli, A.

    2013-09-01

    Electronic excited states at a bcc(110) lithium surface, both bare and covered by ionic ultrathin (1-2 monolayers) LiF epitaxial films, are investigated via many-body perturbation theory calculations achieving an atomistic level of detail. The full self-consistent solution of the GW equations is used to account for correlation effects and to properly describe the screened potential in the vacuum. In addition to the correct prediction of image-potential states, we find that the mixing between resonances and image states and the charge compression due to the dielectric ultrathin overlayer give rise to excitations with a hybrid localized but low-lying character whose accurate description cannot intrinsically be achieved via simple models or low-level calculations, but which are expected to play a crucial role in determining the electronic response and transport properties of these systems.

  7. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Joó, Bálint; Lin, Huey-Wen; Negele, John; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Richards, David; Syritsyn, Sergey; Winter, Frank

    2016-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1 flavor ensemble with lattices of size $32^3 \\times 64$ generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at $a=0.081$~fm and with $M_\\pi=312$~MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a two-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation $t_{\\rm sep}$. We show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost-effectiveness. A detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of $t_{\\rm sep}$ needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the $t_{\\rm sep} \\to \\infty $ estimates is presented.

  8. Introduction to gas lasers with emphasis on selective excitation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Willett, Colin S

    1974-01-01

    Introduction to Gas Lasers: Population Inversion Mechanisms focuses on important processes in gas discharge lasers and basic atomic collision processes that operate in a gas laser. Organized into six chapters, this book first discusses the historical development and basic principles of gas lasers. Subsequent chapters describe the selective excitation processes in gas discharges and the specific neutral, ionized and molecular laser systems. This book will be a valuable reference on the behavior of gas-discharge lasers to anyone already in the field.

  9. Signature of nonadiabatic coupling in excited-state vibrational modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Miguel A; Nelson, Tammie; Roitberg, Adrian E; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2014-11-13

    Using analytical excited-state gradients, vibrational normal modes have been calculated at the minimum of the electronic excited-state potential energy surfaces for a set of extended conjugated molecules with different coupling between them. Molecular model systems composed of units of polyphenylene ethynylene (PPE), polyphenylenevinylene (PPV), and naphthacene/pentacene (NP) have been considered. In all cases except the NP model, the influence of the nonadiabatic coupling on the excited-state equilibrium normal modes is revealed as a unique highest frequency adiabatic vibrational mode that overlaps with the coupling vector. This feature is removed by using a locally diabatic representation in which the effect of NA interaction is removed. Comparison of the original adiabatic modes with a set of vibrational modes computed in the locally diabatic representation demonstrates that the effect of nonadiabaticity is confined to only a few modes. This suggests that the nonadiabatic character of a molecular system may be detected spectroscopically by identifying these unique state-specific high frequency vibrational modes.

  10. Tracking excited-state charge and spin dynamics in iron coordination complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenkai; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Crucial to many light-driven processes in transition metal complexes is the absorption and dissipation of energy by 3d electrons(1-4). But a detailed understanding of such non-equilibrium excited-state dynamics and their interplay with structural changes is challenging: a multitude of excited...... states and possible transitions result in phenomena too complex to unravel when faced with the indirect sensitivity of optical spectroscopy to spin dynamics(5) and the flux limitations of ultrafast X-ray sources(6,7). Such a situation exists for archetypal poly-pyridyl iron complexes, such as [Fe(2......,2'-bipyridine)(3)](2+), where the excited-state charge and spin dynamics involved in the transition from a low-to a high-spin state (spin crossover) have long been a source of interest and controversy(6-15). Here we demonstrate that femtosecond resolution X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, with its sensitivity...

  11. Vibronic resonances sustain excited state coherence in light harvesting proteins at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Novelli, Fabio; Roozbeh, Ashkan; Wilk, Krystyna E; Curmi, Paul M G; Davis, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that photosynthesis, a fundamental process for life on earth, could be fully understood with semi-classical models. However, puzzling quantum phenomena have been observed in several photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, prompting questions regarding the nature and role of these effects. Recent attention has focused on discrete vibrational modes that are resonant or quasi-resonant with excitonic energy splittings and strongly coupled to these excitonic states. Here we report a series of experiments that unambiguously identify excited state coherent superpositions that dephase on the timescale of the excited state lifetime. Low energy (56 cm-1) oscillations on the signal intensity provide direct experimental evidence for the role of vibrational modes resonant with excitonic splittings in sustaining coherences involving different excited excitonic states at physiological temperature.

  12. Minimal-excitation states for electron quantum optics using levitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, J; Jullien, T; Portier, F; Roche, P; Cavanna, A; Jin, Y; Wegscheider, W; Roulleau, P; Glattli, D C

    2013-10-31

    The on-demand generation of pure quantum excitations is important for the operation of quantum systems, but it is particularly difficult for a system of fermions. This is because any perturbation affects all states below the Fermi energy, resulting in a complex superposition of particle and hole excitations. However, it was predicted nearly 20 years ago that a Lorentzian time-dependent potential with quantized flux generates a minimal excitation with only one particle and no hole. Here we report that such quasiparticles (hereafter termed levitons) can be generated on demand in a conductor by applying voltage pulses to a contact. Partitioning the excitations with an electronic beam splitter generates a current noise that we use to measure their number. Minimal-excitation states are observed for Lorentzian pulses, whereas for other pulse shapes there are significant contributions from holes. Further identification of levitons is provided in the energy domain with shot-noise spectroscopy, and in the time domain with electronic Hong-Ou-Mandel noise correlations. The latter, obtained by colliding synchronized levitons on a beam splitter, exemplifies the potential use of levitons for quantum information: using linear electron quantum optics in ballistic conductors, it is possible to imagine flying-qubit operation in which the Fermi statistics are exploited to entangle synchronized electrons emitted by distinct sources. Compared with electron sources based on quantum dots, the generation of levitons does not require delicate nanolithography, considerably simplifying the circuitry for scalability. Levitons are not limited to carrying a single charge, and so in a broader context n-particle levitons could find application in the study of full electron counting statistics. But they can also carry a fraction of charge if they are implemented in Luttinger liquids or in fractional quantum Hall edge channels; this allows the study of Abelian and non-Abelian quasiparticles in the

  13. Ultrafast excited state dynamics in 9,9'-bifluorenylidene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyard, Jamie; Heisler, Ismael A; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Buma, Wybren Jan; Woutersen, Sander; Meech, Stephen R

    2014-08-07

    9,9'-Bifluorenylidene has been proposed as an alternative and flexible electron acceptor in organic photovoltaic cells. Here we characterize its excited state properties and photokinetics, combining ultrafast fluorescence and transient IR measurements with quantum chemical calculations. The fluorescence decay is ultrafast (sub-100 fs) and remarkably independent of viscosity. This suggests that large scale structure change is not the primary relaxation mode. The ultrafast decay populates a dark state characterized by distinct vibrational and electronic spectra. This state decays with a 6 ps time constant to a hot ground state that ultimately populates the initial state with a 20 ps time constant; these times are also insensitive to solvent viscosity. No metastable intermediate structures are resolved in the photocycle after population of the dark state. The implications of these results for the operation of 9,9'-bifluorenylidene as an electron acceptor and as a potential molecular switch are discussed.

  14. Probing excited electronic states and ionisation mechanisms of fullerenes

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Olof; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.

    2013-01-01

    Fullerenes are interesting model systems for probing the complex, fundamental electron dynamics and ionisation mechanisms of large molecules and nanoparticles. In this Tutorial Review we explain how recent experimental and theoretical advances are providing insight into the interesting phenomenon of thermal electron emission from molecular systems and the properties of hydrogenic, diffuse, excited electronic states, known as superatom molecular orbitals, which are responsible for relatively s...

  15. Lifetimes of excited states in neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilieva, Stoyanka; Kroell, Thorsten [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: EXILL-FATIMA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The EXILL and FATIMA campaign at ILL, Grenoble is the first prompt-fission γ-ray spectroscopy experiment performed with a mixed array of Ge detectors (EXILL) and fast LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators (FATIMA). The lifetimes of excited states, populated by neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Pu targets, were directly measured. The high-resolution EXILL detector gives us the possibility to identify the nuclides of interest among the large amount of produced fission fragments. Using the generalized centroid difference method to analyse the data from FATIMA we could measure lifetimes down to ∼ 10 ps. The lifetime of an excited state is a direct measure for the strength (collectivity) of a transition. The properties of the excited states in even-even nuclei can be largely described by quadrupole and octupole degrees of freedom. This contribution will present the current status of the analysis for the neutron-rich even-even {sup 138,140,142}Xe isotopes which lie in the vicinity of the double shell closure Z=50 and N=82. Through the direct lifetime measurement we aim to study the evolution of quadrupole and octupole collectivity above {sup 132}Sn.

  16. Self-exciting point process in modeling earthquake occurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, H.; Slamet, I.; Saputro, D. R. S.; Respatiwulan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we present a procedure for modeling earthquake based on spatial-temporal point process. The magnitude distribution is expressed as truncated exponential and the event frequency is modeled with a spatial-temporal point process that is characterized uniquely by its associated conditional intensity process. The earthquakes can be regarded as point patterns that have a temporal clustering feature so we use self-exciting point process for modeling the conditional intensity function. The choice of main shocks is conducted via window algorithm by Gardner and Knopoff and the model can be fitted by maximum likelihood method for three random variables.

  17. Rotational Spectra in 29 Vibrationally Excited States of Interstellar Aminoacetonitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, E. R.; Mata, S.; Alonso, J. L. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Área de Química-Física, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Parque Científico UVa, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2017-04-01

    We report a detailed spectroscopic investigation of the interstellar aminoacetonitrile, a possible precursor molecule of glycine. Using a combination of Stark and frequency-modulation microwave and millimeter wave spectroscopies, we observed and analyzed the room-temperature rotational spectra of 29 excited states with energies up to 1000 cm{sup −1}. We also observed the {sup 13}C isotopologues in the ground vibrational state in natural abundance (1.1%). The extensive data set of more than 2000 new rotational transitions will support further identifications of aminoacetonitrile in the interstellar medium.

  18. Modular Hamiltonian for Excited States in Conformal Field Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkari, Nima

    2016-07-22

    We present a novel replica trick that computes the relative entropy of two arbitrary states in conformal field theory. Our replica trick is based on the analytic continuation of partition functions that break the Z_{n} replica symmetry. It provides a method for computing arbitrary matrix elements of the modular Hamiltonian corresponding to excited states in terms of correlation functions. We show that the quantum Fisher information in vacuum can be expressed in terms of two-point functions on the replica geometry. We perform sample calculations in two-dimensional conformal field theories.

  19. Calculations on the electronic excited states of ureas and oligoureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Mark T; Guichard, Gilles; Hirst, Jonathan D

    2007-03-29

    We report CASPT2 calculations on the electronic excited states of several ureas. For monoureas, we find an electric dipole forbidden n --> pi* transition between 180 and 210 nm, dependent on the geometry and substituents of the urea. We find two intense pinb --> pi* transitions between 150 and 210 nm, which account for the absorptions seen in the experimental spectra. The n' --> pi* and pib --> pi* transitions are at wavelengths below 125 nm, which is below the lower limit of the experimental spectra. Parameter sets modeling the charge densities of the electronic transitions have been derived and permit calculations on larger oligoureas, using the exciton matrix method. For glycouril, a urea dimer, both the CASPT2 method and the matrix method yield similar results. Calculations of the electronic circular dichroism spectrum of an oligourea containing eight urea groups indicate that the experimental spectrum cannot be reproduced without the inclusion of electronic excitations involving the side chains. These calculations are one of the first attempts to understand the relationship between the structure and excited states of this class of macromolecule.

  20. Excited State Atom-Ion Charge-Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2017-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the exothermic charge-exchange reaction between an excited atom and a ground-state positive ion. In particular, we focus on MOT-excited Ca*(4s4p 1P) atoms colliding with ground-state Yb+ ions, which are under active study by the experimental group of E. Hudson at UCLA. Collisions between an excited atom and an ion are guided by two major contributions to the long-range interaction potentials, the induction C4 /R4 and charge-quadrupole C3 /R3 potentials, and their coupling by the electron-exchange interaction. Our model of these forces leads to close-coupling equations for multiple reaction channels. We find several avoided crossings between the potentials that couple to the nearby asymptotic limits of Yb*+Ca+, some of which can possibly provide large charge exchange rate coefficients above 10-10 cm3 / s. We acknowledge support from the US Army Research Office, MURI Grants W911NF-14-1-0378 and the US National Science Foundation, Grant PHY-1619788.

  1. Excited states using semistochastic heat-bath configuration interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Adam A.; Umrigar, C. J.; Sharma, Sandeep

    2017-10-01

    We extend our recently developed heat-bath configuration interaction (HCI) algorithm, and our semistochastic algorithm for performing multireference perturbation theory, to calculate excited-state wavefunctions and energies. We employ time-reversal symmetry, which reduces the memory requirements by more than a factor of two. An extrapolation technique is introduced to reliably extrapolate HCI energies to the full CI limit. The resulting algorithm is used to compute fourteen low-lying potential energy surfaces of the carbon dimer using the cc-pV5Z basis set, with an estimated error in energy of 30-50 μHa compared to full CI. The excitation energies obtained using our algorithm have a mean absolute deviation of 0.02 eV compared to experimental values.

  2. Relaxation processes in optically excites metal clusters; Relaxationsprozesse in optisch angeregten Metallclustern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanzel, J.

    2007-08-10

    The present work is concerned with the dynamics of optically excited metal clusters in the gas phase. Small mass-selected gold and tungsten cluster anions (Au{sup -}{sub n}, n=5-8, 14, 20 and W{sup -}{sub n}, n=3-14) are studied using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Depending on the electronic structure in the valence region as well as on the optical excitation energy fundamentally different relaxation processes are observed. In small gold cluster anions excited with 1.56 eV an isolated electronically excited state is populated. The time-dependent measurements are strongly sizedependent and open insights into photoinduced geometry changes of the nuclear framework. Oscillatory vibrational wavepacket motion in Au{sup -}{sub 5}, an extremely longlived ({tau} >90 ns) electronically excited state in Au{sup -}{sub 6} as well as photoinduced melting in Au{sup -}{sub 7} and Au{sup -}{sub 8} is monitored in real time. By increasing the OPTICAL excitation energy to 3.12 eV a completely different scenario is observed. A multitude of electronically excited states can be reached upon optical excitation and as a consequence electronic relaxation processes that take place on a time scale of 1 ps are dominating. This is shown for Au{sup -}{sub 7}, Au{sup -}{sub 14} and Au{sup -}{sub 20}. Compared to gold clusters, tungsten clusters are characterized by a significantly higher electronic density of states in the valence region. Therefore electronic relaxation processes are much more likely and take place on a significantly faster time scale. The fast electronic relaxation processes are distinguished from pure vibrational relaxation. It is shown that already in the four atomic tungsten cluster W{sup -}{sub 4} electronic relaxation processes take place on a time scale of 30 fs. In all investigated tungsten cluster anions (W{sup -}{sub n}, n=3-14) an equilibrium between electronic and vibrational system is reached within around 1 ps after optical excitation which

  3. Coherence, energy and charge transfers in de-excitation pathways of electronic excited state of biomolecules in photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-01-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin–chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used F¨orster–Dexter th...

  4. Charge-Transfer Dynamics in the Lowest Excited State of a Pentacene–Fullerene Complex: Implications for Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Joseph, Saju

    2017-10-02

    We characterize the dynamic nature of the lowest excited state in a pentacene/C60 complex on the femtosecond time scale, via a combination of ab initio molecular dynamics and time-dependent density functional theory. We analyze the correlations between the molecular vibrations of the complex and the oscillations in the electron-transfer character of its lowest excited state, which point to vibration-induced coherences between the (pentacene-based) local-excitation (LE) state and the complex charge-transfer (CT) state. We discuss the implications of our results on this model system for the exciton-dissociation process in organic solar cells.

  5. States in Process Calculi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Wagner

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Formal reasoning about distributed algorithms (like Consensus typically requires to analyze global states in a traditional state-based style. This is in contrast to the traditional action-based reasoning of process calculi. Nevertheless, we use domain-specific variants of the latter, as they are convenient modeling languages in which the local code of processes can be programmed explicitly, with the local state information usually managed via parameter lists of process constants. However, domain-specific process calculi are often equipped with (unlabeled reduction semantics, building upon a rich and convenient notion of structural congruence. Unfortunately, the price for this convenience is that the analysis is cumbersome: the set of reachable states is modulo structural congruence, and the processes' state information is very hard to identify. We extract from congruence classes of reachable states individual state-informative representatives that we supply with a proper formal semantics. As a result, we can now freely switch between the process calculus terms and their representatives, and we can use the stateful representatives to perform assertional reasoning on process calculus models.

  6. Laguerre polynomial excited coherent state: generation and nonclassical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Zhou, Weidong; Zhang, Haoliang; Liu, Cunjin; Huang, Jiehui; Hu, Liyun

    2017-11-01

    We propose a theoretical protocol to generate a kind of non-Gaussian state—a Laguerre polynomial excited coherent state (LPECS) by exploiting a two-mode squeezing transformation and a conditional measurement with a coherent state input. Then we investigate the nonclassical features of the LPECS according to the Glauber-Sudarshan P(α ) function, photon number distribution, Mandel’s Q parameter, second-order correlation function, and squeezing properties as well as negative Wigner distribution. Our results show that the generated output state presents obvious nonclassical properties which can be modulated by a coherent amplitude, a squeezing parameter and a conditional measurement. In particular, the squeezing and negative Wigner function are clear.

  7. Excited state mass spectra of doubly heavy Ξ baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Zalak; Rai, Ajay Kumar [Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Surat, Gujarat (India)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, the mass spectra are obtained for doubly heavy Ξ baryons, namely, Ξ{sub cc}{sup +}, Ξ{sub cc}{sup ++}, Ξ{sub bb}{sup -}, Ξ{sub bb}{sup 0}, Ξ{sub bc}{sup 0} and Ξ{sub bc}{sup +}. These baryons consist of two heavy quarks (cc, bb, and bc) with a light (d or u) quark. The ground, radial, and orbital states are calculated in the framework of the hypercentral constituent quark model with Coulomb plus linear potential. Our results are also compared with other predictions, thus, the average possible range of excited states masses of these Ξ baryons can be determined. The study of the Regge trajectories is performed in (n, M{sup 2}) and (J, M{sup 2}) planes and their slopes and intercepts are also determined. Lastly, the ground state magnetic moments of these doubly heavy baryons are also calculated. (orig.)

  8. Probing excited electronic states and ionisation mechanisms of fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, J Olof; Campbell, Eleanor E B

    2013-07-07

    Fullerenes are interesting model systems for probing the complex, fundamental electron dynamics and ionisation mechanisms of large molecules and nanoparticles. In this Tutorial Review we explain how recent experimental and theoretical advances are providing insight into the interesting phenomenon of thermal electron emission from molecular systems and the properties of hydrogenic, diffuse, excited electronic states, known as superatom molecular orbitals, which are responsible for relatively simple, well-resolved structure in fs laser photoelectron spectra of fullerenes. We focus on the application of velocity map imaging combined with fs laser photoionisation to study angular-resolved photoelectron emission.

  9. Triaxiality near the 110Ru ground state from Coulomb excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Doherty

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step Coulomb excitation measurement with the GRETINA and CHICO2 detector arrays was carried out with a 430-MeV beam of the neutron-rich 110Ru (t1/2=12 s isotope produced at the CARIBU facility. This represents the first successful measurement following the post-acceleration of an unstable isotope of a refractory element. The reduced transition probabilities obtained for levels near the ground state provide strong evidence for a triaxial shape; a conclusion confirmed by comparisons with the results of beyond-mean-field and triaxial rotor model calculations.

  10. Observation of interference effects via four photon excitation of highly excited Rydberg states in thermal cesium vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, Jorge M; Guttridge, Alex; Wade, Christopher G; De Melo, Natalia R; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and Absorption (EIA) of highly-excited Rydberg states in thermal Cs vapor using a 4-step excitation scheme. The advantage of this 4-step scheme is that the final transition to the Rydberg state has a large dipole moment and one can achieve similar Rabi frequencies to 2 or 3 step excitation schemes using two orders of magnitude less laser power. Consequently each step is driven by a relatively low power infra-red diode laser opening up the prospect for new applications. The observed lineshapes are in good agreement with simulations based on multilevel optical Bloch equations.

  11. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, Franco, E-mail: franco.egidi@sns.it; Segado, Mireia; Barone, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri, 7 I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Koch, Henrik [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Cappelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, via G. Moruzzi, 3 I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-12-14

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π{sup *}, π-π{sup *}, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  12. Excited-State N2 Dissociation Pathway on Fe-Functionalized Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirez, John Mark P; Carter, Emily A

    2017-03-29

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) offer the possibility of light-activated chemical catalysis on surfaces of strongly plasmonic metal nanoparticles. This technology relies on lower-barrier bond formation and/or dissociation routes made available through energy transfer following the eventual decay of LSPRs. The coupling between these decay processes and a chemical trajectory (nuclear motion, charge-transfer, intersystem crossing, etc.) dictates the availability of these alternative (possibly lower barrier) excited-state channels. The Haber-Bosch method of NH3 synthesis from N2 and H2 is notoriously energy intensive. This is due to the difficulty of N2 dissociation despite the overall reaction being thermodynamically favorable at ambient temperatures and pressures. LSPRs may provide means to improve the kinetics of N2 dissociation via induced resonance electronic excitation. In this work, we calculate, via embedded n-electron valence second-order perturbation theory within the density functional embedding theory, the excited-state potential energy surfaces for dissociation of N2 on an Fe-doped Au(111) surface. This metal alloy may take advantage simultaneously of the strong LSPR of Au and the catalytic activity of Fe toward N2 dissociation. We find the ground-state dissociation activation energy to be 4.74 eV/N2, with Fe as the active site on the surface. Consecutive resonance energy transfers (RETs) may be accessed due to the availability of many electronically excited states with intermediate energies arising from the metal surface that may couple to states induced by the Fe-dopant and the adsorbate molecule, and crossing between excited states may effectively lower the dissociation barrier to 1.33 eV. Our work illustrates that large energetic barriers, prohibitive toward chemical reaction, may be overcome through multiple RETs facilitating an otherwise difficult chemical process.

  13. The Astrophysical Weeds: Rotational Transitions in Excited Vibrational States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, José L.; Kolesniková, Lucie; Alonso, Elena R.; Mata, Santiago

    2017-06-01

    The number of unidentified lines in the millimeter and submillimeter wave surveys of the interstellar medium has grown rapidly. The major contributions are due to rotational transitions in excited vibrational states of a relatively few molecules that are called the astrophysical weeds. necessary data to deal with spectral lines from astrophysical weeds species can be obtained from detailed laboratory rotational measurements in the microwave and millimeter wave region. A general procedure is being used at Valladolid combining different time and/or frequency domain spectroscopic tools of varying importance for providing the precise set of spectroscopic constants that could be used to search for this species in the ISM. This is illustrated in the present contribution through its application to several significant examples. Fortman, S. M., Medvedev, I. R., Neese, C.F., & De Lucia, F.C. 2010, ApJ,725, 1682 Rotational Spectra in 29 Vibrationally Excited States of Interstellar Aminoacetonitrile, L. Kolesniková, E. R. Alonso, S. Mata, and J. L. Alonso, The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 2017, (in press).

  14. Excited state mass spectra of singly charmed baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Zalak; Kumar Rai, Ajay [Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Surat, Gujarat (India); Thakkar, Kaushal [GIDC Degree Engineering College, Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Abrama (India); Vinodkumar, P.C. [Sardar Patel University, Department of Physics, V.V. Nagar (India)

    2016-10-15

    Mass spectra of excited states of the singly charmed baryons are calculated using the hypercentral description of the three-body system. The baryons consist of a charm quark and light quarks (u, d and s) are studied in the framework of QCD motivated constituent quark model. The form of the confinement potential is hyper-Coloumb plus power potential with potential index ν, varying from 0.5 to 2.0. The first-order correction to the confinement potential is also incorporated in this approach. The radial as well as orbital excited state masses of Σ{sub c}{sup ++}, Σ{sub c}{sup +}, Σ{sub c}{sup 0}, Ξ{sub c}{sup +}, Ξ{sub c}{sup 0}, Λ{sub c}{sup +}, Ω{sub c}{sup 0} baryons, are reported in this paper. We have incorporated spin-spin, spin-orbit and tensor interactions perturbatively in the present study. The semi-electronic decay of Ω{sub c} and Ξ{sub c} are also calculated using the spectroscopic parameters of these baryons. The computed results are compared with other theoretical predictions as well as with the available experimental observations. We also construct the Regge trajectory in (n{sub r},M{sup 2}) and (J,M{sup 2}) planes for these baryons. (orig.)

  15. Probing the Locality of Excited States with Linear Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Thibaud

    2015-04-14

    This article reports a novel theoretical approach related to the analysis of molecular excited states. The strategy introduced here involves gathering two pieces of physical information, coming from Hilbert and direct space operations, into a general, unique quantum mechanical descriptor of electronic transitions' locality. Moreover, the projection of Hilbert and direct space-derived indices in an Argand plane delivers a straightforward way to visually probe the ability of a dye to undergo a long- or short-range charge-transfer. This information can be applied, for instance, to the analysis of the electronic response of families of dyes to light absorption by unveiling the trend of a given push-pull chromophore to increase the electronic cloud polarization magnitude of its main transition with respect to the size extension of its conjugated spacer. We finally demonstrate that all the quantities reported in this article can be reliably approximated by a linear algebraic derivation, based on the contraction of detachment/attachment density matrices from canonical to atomic space. This alternative derivation has the remarkable advantage of a very low computational cost with respect to the previously used numerical integrations, making fast and accurate characterization of large molecular systems' excited states easily affordable.

  16. Unbound excited states in $^{19}$,$^{17}$C

    CERN Document Server

    Satou, Y; Fukuda, N; Sugimoto, T; Kondo, Y; Matsui, N; Hashimoto, Y; Nakabayashi, T; Okumura, T; Shinohara, M; Motobayashi, T; Yanagisawa, Y; Aoi, N; Takeuchi, S; Gomi, T; Togano, Y; Kawai, S; Sakuraï, H; Ong, H J; Onishi, T K; Shimoura, S; Tamaki, M; Kobayashi, T; Otsu, H; Matsuda, Y; Endo, N; Kitayama, M; Ishihara, M

    2008-01-01

    The neutron-rich carbon isotopes 19,17C have been investigated via proton inelastic scattering on a liquid hydrogen target at 70 MeV/nucleon. The invariant mass method in inverse kinematics was employed to reconstruct the energy spectrum, in which fast neutrons and charged fragments were detected in coincidence using a neutron hodoscope and a dipole magnet system. A peak has been observed with an excitation energy of 1.46(10) MeV in 19C, while three peaks with energies of 2.20(3), 3.05(3), and 6.13(9) MeV have been observed in 17C. Deduced cross sections are compared with microscopic DWBA calculations based on p-sd shell model wave functions and modern nucleon-nucleus optical potentials. Jpi assignments are made for the four observed states as well as the ground states of both nuclei.

  17. Picosecond spectral relaxation of curcumin excited state in toluene–alcohol mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, R.K.; Das, K., E-mail: kaustuv@rrcat.gov.in

    2013-12-15

    Excited state photophysics of Curcumin in a binary solvent mixture of toluene and five different alcohols (Methanol, Ethanol, 1-Propanol, 1-Butanol and 1-Octanol) are compared with an instrument time resolution of ∼40 ps. As the alcohol mole-fraction is varied from zero to unity, the observed trends in the fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime of the pigment in toluene–alcohol mixtures changes significantly in going from Methanol to 1-Octanol. This is attributed to the different degree of modulation of the non-radiative rates associated with the excited state intermolecular H bonding between the pigment and the alcohol. Fluorescence decays taken at the red edge of the emission spectrum started to show measurable rise times (200–30 ps) the magnitude of which decreased gradually with increasing alcohol mole-fraction. As a consequence the solvation times in the binary mixture were observed to slow down considerably at certain solvent compositions compared to that in neat alcohol. However, in toluene-1-Octanol mixture, the rise times and corresponding solvation times did not show a dependence on the 1-Octanol mole-fraction. The observed results suggest that viscosity, polarity and hydrogen bonding property of the alcohol solvent plays an important role in the excited state processes of the pigment in toluene–alcohol mixture. -- Highlights: • Excited state photophysics of Curcumin in a binary solvent mixture of toluene and five different alcohols were studied. • The observed trends in the fluorescence properties are attributed to intermolecular H bonding between the pigment and the alcohol. • Except 1-Octanol, the average solvation times of the pigment were observed to depend upon alcohol mole-fraction. • Viscosity, polarity and hydrogen bonding play an important role in the excited state processes of the pigment.

  18. Reactions of excited states of phenoxazin-3-one dyes with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, M L; Bertolotti, S G; Previtali, C M; Encinas, M V

    2005-01-01

    The interaction with amino acids of the excited states of the N-oxide resazurin and its deoxygenation product resorufin, has been studied in aqueous solution at pH 7.5. Steady-state and time-resolved studies show that the fluorescence is quenched by amino acids. Complexation of the dyes in the ground state with aromatic amino acids was also observed. The singlet quenching is attributed to electron transfer from the amino acids to the excited dye based on the dependence of the bimolecular rate constants with the ionization potential of quenchers. Flash photolysis experiments allowed determination of the quenching rate constants for the triplet deactivation of dyes by several amino acids, as well as the characterization of the transients formed in the process. These data show that the triplet is also deactivated by an electron transfer process. However, the deactivation of the N-oxide dye by tryptophan can be described by a hydrogen atom transfer. The protolytic dissociation constants of the dye radical ions are reported. The irradiation of rezasurin in the presence of amino acids leads to deoxygenation of the dye to give resorufin. This process involves the triplet excited state of resazurin and is efficient only in the presence of amino acids containing the -SH group.

  19. Acceleration of a ground-state reaction by selective femtosecond-infrared-laser-pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensitzki, Till; Yang, Yang; Kozich, Valeri; Ahmed, Ashour A.; Kössl, Florian; Kühn, Oliver; Heyne, Karsten

    2018-02-01

    Infrared (IR) excitation of vibrations that participate in the reaction coordinate of an otherwise thermally driven chemical reaction are believed to lead to its acceleration. Attempts at the practical realization of this concept have been hampered so far by competing processes leading to sample heating. Here we demonstrate, using femtosecond IR-pump IR-probe experiments, the acceleration of urethane and polyurethane formation due to vibrational excitation of the reactants for 1:1 mixtures of phenylisocyanate and cyclohexanol, and toluene-2,4-diisocyanate and 2,2,2-trichloroethane-1,1-diol, respectively. We measured reaction rate changes upon selective vibrational excitation with negligible heating of the sample and observed an increase of the reaction rate up to 24%. The observation is rationalized using reactant and transition-state structures obtained from quantum chemical calculations. We subsequently used IR-driven reaction acceleration to write a polyurethane square on sample windows using a femtosecond IR pulse.

  20. Excited-state Raman spectroscopy with and without actinic excitation: S{sub 1} Raman spectra of trans-azobenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobryakov, A. L.; Quick, M.; Ioffe, I. N.; Granovsky, A. A.; Ernsting, N. P.; Kovalenko, S. A. [Department of Chemistry, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor-Str. 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-14

    We show that femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy can record excited-state spectra in the absence of actinic excitation, if the Raman pump is in resonance with an electronic transition. The approach is illustrated by recording S{sub 1} and S{sub 0} spectra of trans-azobenzene in n-hexane. The S{sub 1} spectra were also measured conventionally, upon nπ* (S{sub 0} → S{sub 1}) actinic excitation. The results are discussed and compared to earlier reports.

  1. Excited state mass spectra and Regge trajectories of bottom baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Kaushal; Shah, Zalak; Rai, Ajay Kumar; C. Vinodkumar, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present the mass spectra of radial and orbital excited states of singly heavy bottom baryons; Σb+, Σb-, Ξb-, Ξb0, Λb0 and Ωb-. The QCD motivated hypercentral quark model is employed for the three body description of baryons and the form of confinement potential is hyper Coulomb plus linear. The first order correction to the confinement potential is also incorporated in this work. The semi-electronic decay of Ωb and Ξb are calculated using the spectroscopic parameters of the baryons. The computed results are compared with other theoretical predictions as well as with the available experimental observations. The Regge trajectories are plotted in (n ,M2) plane.

  2. Coherent secondary emission from resonantly excited two-exciton states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan

    2000-01-01

    The coherent interaction of light and the electronic states of semiconductors near the fundamental bandgap has been a very active topic of research since the advent of ultrafast lasers. While many of the ultrafast nonlinear properties of semiconductors have been well explained within mean field...... to the nonlinear susceptibility. The method exploits that emission from two-exciton coherences can occur in non-specular directions, with the recoil momentum taken up by an exciton left behind in the sample. Using ultrafast spectral interferometry we demonstrate the presence of this new coherent component...... of the secondary emission from quantum wells following ultrafast resonant excitation and find that it provides information on not only the bound biexcitons but also the biexciton continuum. Due to the heterodyne nature of the experimental technique we obtain both amplitude and phase of the coherent emission...

  3. Base sequence and higher-order structure induce the complex excited-state dynamics in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalb, Nina K; Temps, Friedrich

    2008-10-10

    The high photostability of DNA is commonly attributed to efficient radiationless electronic relaxation processes. We used femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to reveal that the ensuing dynamics are strongly dependent on base sequence and are also affected by higher-order structure. Excited electronic state lifetimes in dG-doped d(A)20 single-stranded DNA and dG.dC-doped d(A)20.d(T)20 double-stranded DNA decrease sharply with the substitution of only a few bases. In duplexes containing d(AGA).d(TCT) or d(AG).d(TC) repeats, deactivation of the fluorescing states occurs on the subpicosecond time scale, but the excited-state lifetimes increase again in extended d(G) runs. The results point at more complex and molecule-specific photodynamics in native DNA than may be evident in simpler model systems.

  4. Role of excited state solvent fluctuations on time-dependent fluorescence Stokes shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tanping, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu; Kumar, Revati, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    We explore the connection between the solvation dynamics of a chromophore upon photon excitation and equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent. Using molecular dynamics simulations, fluorescence Stokes shift for the tryptophan in Staphylococcus nuclease was examined using both nonequilibrium calculations and linear response theory. When the perturbed and unperturbed surfaces exhibit different solvent equilibrium fluctuations, the linear response approach on the former surface shows agreement with the nonequilibrium process. This agreement is excellent when the perturbed surface exhibits Gaussian statistics and qualitative in the case of an isomerization induced non-Gaussian statistics. However, the linear response theory on the unperturbed surface breaks down even in the presence of Gaussian fluctuations. Experiments also provide evidence of the connection between the excited state solvent fluctuations and the total fluorescence shift. These observations indicate that the equilibrium statistics on the excited state surface characterize the relaxation dynamics of the fluorescence Stokes shift. Our studies specifically analyze the Gaussian fluctuations of the solvent in the complex protein environment and further confirm the role of solvent fluctuations on the excited state surface. The results are consistent with previous investigations, found in the literature, of solutes dissolved in liquids.

  5. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Alex Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4'-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

  6. Competitive Energy and Electron Transfer in β-Functionalized Free-Base Porphyrin-Zinc Porphyrin Dimer Axially Coordinated to C60 : Synthesis, Supramolecular Formation and Excited-State Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Thomas, Michael B; Jinadasa, R G Waruna; Wang, Hong; D'Souza, Francis

    2017-09-18

    Simultaneous occurrence of energy and electron transfer events involving different acceptor sites in a newly assembled supramolecular triad comprised of covalently linked free-base porphyrin-zinc porphyrin dyad, H2 P-ZnP axially coordinated to electron acceptor fullerene, has been successfully demonstrated. The dyad was connected through the β-pyrrole positions of the porphyrin macrocycle instead of the traditionally used meso-positions for better electronic communication. Interestingly, the β-pyrrole functionalization modulated the optical properties to such an extent that it was possible to almost exclusively excite the zinc porphyrin entity in the supramolecular triad. The measured binding constant for the complex with 1:1 molecular stoichiometry was in the order of 104  m-1 revealing moderately stable complex formation. An energy level diagram constructed using optical, electrochemical and computational results suggested that both the anticipated energy and electron events are thermodynamically feasible in the triad. Consequently, it was possible to demonstrate occurrence of excited state energy transfer to the covalently linked H2 P, and electron transfer to the coordinated ImC60 from studies involving steady-state and time-resolved emission, and femto- and nanosecond transient absorption studies. The estimated energy transfer was around 67 % in the dyad with a rate constant of 1.1×109  s-1 . In the supramolecular triad, the charge separated state was rather long-lived although it was difficult to arrive the exact lifetime of charge separated state from nanosecond transient spectral studies due to overlap of strong triplet excited signals of porphyrin in the monitoring wavelength window. Nevertheless, simultaneous occurrence of energy and electron transfer in the appropriately positioned energy and electron acceptor entities in a supramolecular triad was possible to demonstrate in the present study, a step forward to unraveling the complex

  7. Using Diffusion Monte Carlo to Probe Rotational Excited States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Andrew S.; McCoy, Anne B.

    2009-06-01

    Since its inception in 1975 by Anderson, has been successfully applied to a wide range of electronic and vibrational problems. In the latter case, it has been shown to be a powerful method for studying highly fluxional systems exhibiting large amplitude vibrational motions. We report here our recent work developing a new DMC algorithm capable of treating rotational excited states. We first develop the appropriate coordinates, nodal structures, and re-crossing corrections for this problem. Then, using H_3O^+ and D_3O^+ as model systems, we show that our method can successfully describe a range of rotational states from mid0,0,0> to {1}/{√{2}} (mid10,10,0 > + mid 10,-10,0 >). In particular, we examine the combined effects of rotational and zero-point vibrational motion on the geometric structure of the molecules. Finally, we find the mid 10,0,0 > state to be somewhat problematic but show that the problem is straightforward to identify and has a well-defined solution. J. B. Anderson, J. Chem. Phys., 63, 1499 (1975). X. Huang, S. Carter, and J. Bowman, J. Chem. Phys., 118, 5431 (2003).

  8. Enhanced negative ion formation via electron attachment to electronically-excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnaduwage, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    Recent basic studies on electron attachment to laser-excited molecules show that electron attachment to electronically-excited states can have orders of magnitude larger cross sections compared to the respective ground electronic states. Even though systematic studies have not been conducted, there are indications that electronically-excited states may play a significant role in negative ion formation in gas discharges. The high-lying Rydberg states could be of particular significance since, (i) their production efficiencies are high, and (ii) they have comparatively long lifetimes. Such states could be populated in discharge sources via direct electron impact or via excitation transfer from metastable states of inert gases.

  9. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Yin

    2015-06-07

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational coherence plays during the electron transfer process since vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states is usually temporally and spectrally overlapped. Here, we performed 2-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) measurements on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films. By Fourier transforming the whole 2D ES datasets (S (λ 1, T∼ 2, λ 3)) along the population time (T∼ 2) axis, we develop and propose a protocol capable of separating vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states in 3D rephasing and nonrephasing beating maps (S (λ 1, ν∼ 2, λ 3)). We found that the vibrational coherence from pure excited electronic states appears at positive frequency (+ ν∼ 2) in the rephasing beating map and at negative frequency (- ν∼ 2) in the nonrephasing beating map. Furthermore, we also found that vibrational coherence from excited electronic state had a long dephasing time of 244 fs. The long-lived excited-state vibrational coherence indicates that coherence may be involved in the electron transfer process. Our findings not only shed light on the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in organic photovoltaics but also are beneficial for the study of the coherence effect on photoexcited dynamics in other systems.

  10. State-dependent visual processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane eBritz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The temporal dynamics and anatomical correlates underlying human visual cognition are traditionally assessed as a function of stimulus properties and task demands. Any non-stimulus related activity is commonly dismissed as noise and eliminated to extract an evoked signal that is only a small fraction of the magnitude of the measured signal. We review studies that challenge this view by showing that non-stimulus related activity is not mere noise but that it has a well structured organization which can largely determine the processing of upcoming stimuli. We review evidence from human electrophysiology that shows how different aspects of pre-stimulus activity such as pre-stimulus EEG frequency power and phase and pre-stimulus EEG microstates can determine qualitative and quantitative properties of both lower and higher level visual processing. These studies show that low-level sensory processes depend on the momentary excitability of sensory cortices whereas perceptual processes leading to stimulus awareness depend on momentary pre-stimulus activity in higher-level non-visual brain areas. Speed and accuracy of stimulus identification have likewise been shown to be modulated by pre-stimulus brain states.

  11. The energy structure and decay channels of the 4p6-shell excited states in Sr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupliauskienė, A.; Kerevičius, G.; Borovik, V.; Shafranyosh, I.; Borovik, A.

    2017-11-01

    The ejected-electron spectra arising from the decay of the 4p{}5{{nln}}{\\prime }{l}{\\prime }{n}{\\prime\\prime }{l}{\\prime\\prime } autoionizing states in Sr atoms have been studied precisely at the incident-electron energies close to excitation and ionization thresholds of the 4{{{p}}}6 subshell. The excitation behaviors for 58 lines observed between 12 and 21 eV ejected-electron kinetic energy have been investigated. Also, the ab initio calculations of excitation energies, autoionization probabilities and electron-impact excitation cross sections of the states 4p{}5{{nln}}{\\prime }{l}{\\prime }{n}{\\prime\\prime }{l}{\\prime\\prime } (nl = 4d, 5s, 5p; {n}{\\prime }{l}{\\prime } = 4d, 5s, 5p; {n}{\\prime\\prime }{l}{\\prime\\prime } = 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 9s, 5p, 6p, 5d, 6d, 7d, 8d, 4f, 5g) have been performed by employing the large-scale configuration-interaction method in the basis of the solutions of Dirac–Fock–Slater equations. The obtained experimental and theoretical data have been used for the accurate identification of the 60 lines in ejected-electron spectra and the 68 lines observed earlier in photoabsorption spectra. The excitation and decay processes for 105 classified states in the 4p55s{}2{nl}, 4p54d{}2{nl} and 4p55s{{nln}}{\\prime }{l}{\\prime } configurations have been considered in detail. In particular, most of the states lying below the ionization threshold of the 4p6 subshell at 26.92 eV possess up to four decay channels with formation of Sr+ in 5s{}1/2, 4d{}3/{2,5/2} and 5p{}1/{2,3/2} states. Two-step autoionization and two-electron Auger transitions with formation of Sr2+ in the 4p6 {}1{{{S}}}0 ground state are the main decay paths for high-lying autoionizing states. The excitation threshold of the 4{{{p}}}6 subshell in Sr has been established at 20.98 ± 0.05 eV.

  12. Relaxation of vibrationally excited states in solid "nitrate-nitrite" binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, A. R.; Akhmedov, I. R.; Kakagasanov, M. G.; Aliev, Z. A.; Gafurov, M. M.; Rabadanov, K. Sh.; Amirov, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    The processes of molecular relaxation in the solid NaNO3-NaNO2 and KNO3-KNO2 "nitrate-nitrite" binary systems have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The relaxation time of the vibration ν1(A) of an NO- 3 anion in the binary system is found to be shorter than that in individual nitrate. The increase in the relaxation rate is explained by the existence of an additional mechanism of relaxation of vibrationally excited states of the nitrate ion in the system. This mechanism is related to the excitation of vibration of another anion (NO- 2) and generation of a lattice phonon. It has been established that this relaxation mechanism is implemented provided that the difference between the frequencies of the aforementioned vibrations correspond to the range of sufficiently high density of states in the phonon spectrum.

  13. Manipulating charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in iron coordination complexes with ligand substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenkai; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    state lifetime of iron based complexes due to spin crossover-the extremely fast intersystem crossing and internal conversion to high spin metal-centered excited states. We revitalize a 30 year old synthetic strategy for extending the MLCT excited state lifetimes of iron complexes by making mixed ligand...... iron complexes with four cyanide (CN-;) ligands and one 2,2′-bipyridine (bpy) ligand. This enables MLCT excited state and metal-centered excited state energies to be manipulated with partial independence and provides a path to suppressing spin crossover. We have combined X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL......) Kβ hard X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy with femtosecond time-resolved UV-visible absorption spectroscopy to characterize the electronic excited state dynamics initiated by MLCT excitation of [Fe(CN)4(bpy)]2-. The two experimental techniques are highly complementary; the time-resolved UV...

  14. Pulsed excitation of Rydberg-atom-pair states in an ultracold Cs gas

    CERN Document Server

    Saßmannshausen, Heiner; Deiglmayr, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed laser excitation of a dense ultracold Cs vapor has been used to study the pairwise interactions between Cs atoms excited to $n$p$_{3/2}$ Rydberg states of principal quantum numbers in the range $n=22-36$. Molecular resonances were observed that correspond to excitation of Rydberg-atom-pair states correlated not only to the $n$p$_{3/2}+n$p$_{3/2}$ dissociation asymptotes, but also to $n$s$_{1/2}+(n+1)$s$_{1/2}$, $n$s$_{1/2}+n'$f$_{j}$, and $(n-4)$f$_{j}+(n-3)$f$_{j}$ $(j=5/2,7/2)$ dissociation asymptotes. These pair resonances are interpreted as arising from dipole-dipole, and higher long-range-interaction terms between the Rydberg atoms on the basis of i) their spectral positions, ii) their response to static and pulsed electric fields, and iii) millimeter-wave spectra between pair states correlated to different pair-dissociation asymptotes. The Rydberg-atom--pair states were found to spontaneously decay by Penning ionization and the dynamics of the ionization process were investigated during the first...

  15. Thermodynamical analysis of spin-state transitions in LaCo O3 : Negative energy of mixing to assist thermal excitation to the high-spin excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyômen, Tôru; Asaka, Yoshinori; Itoh, Mitsuru

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity due to the spin-state transition in LaCoO3 were calculated by a molecular-field model in which the energy-level diagram of high-spin state reported by Ropka and Radwanski [Phys. Rev. B 67, 172401 (2003)] is assumed for the excited state, and the energy and entropy of mixing of high-spin Co ions and low-spin Co ions are introduced phenomenologically. The experimental data below 300K were well reproduced by this model, which proposes that the high-spin excited state can be populated even if the energy of high-spin state is much larger than that of low-spin state, because the negatively large energy of mixing reduces the net excitation energy. The stability of each spin state including the intermediate-spin state is discussed based on the present results and other reports.

  16. Theoretical Insights Into the Excited State Double Proton Transfer Mechanism of Deep Red Pigment Alkannin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Dong, Hao; Zheng, Yujun

    2018-01-24

    As the most important component of deep red pigments, alkannin is investigated theoretically in detail based on time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method. Exploring the dual intramolecular hydrogen bonds (O1-H2···O3 and O4-H5···O6) of alkannin, we confirm the O1-H2···O3 may play a more important role in the first excited state than the O4-H5···O6 one. Infrared (IR) vibrational analyses and subsequent charge redistribution also support this viewpoint. Via constructing the S1-state potential energy surface (PES) and searching transition state (TS) structures, we illuminate the excited state double proton transfer (ESDPT) mechanism of alkannin is the stepwise process that can be first launched by the O1-H2···O3 hydrogen bond wire in gas state, acetonitrile (CH3CN) and cyclohexane (CYH) solvents. We present a novel mechanism that polar aprotic solvents can contribute to the first-step proton transfer (PT) process in the S1 state, and nonpolar solvents play important roles in lowering the potential energy barrier of the second-step PT reaction.

  17. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomin, Vladimir I., E-mail: tomin@apsl.edu.pl; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-10-15

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited-state

  18. Vibrational dynamics of aniline (N2)1 clusters in their first excited singlet state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hineman, M. F.; Kim, S. K.; Bernstein, E. R.; Kelley, D. F.

    1992-04-01

    The first excited singlet state S1 vibrational dynamics of aniline(N2)1 clusters are studied and compared to previous results on aniline(CH4)1 and aniline(Ar)1. Intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) and vibrational predissociation (VP) rates fall between the two extremes of the CH4 (fast IVR, slow VP) and Ar (slow IVR, fast VP) cluster results as is predicted by a serial IVR/VP model using Fermi's golden rule to describe IVR processes and a restricted Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory to describe unimolecular VP rates. The density of states is the most important factor determining the rates. Two product states, 00 and 10b1, of bare aniline and one intermediate state ˜(00) in the overall IVR/VP process are observed and time resolved measurements are obtained for the 000 and ˜(000) transitions. The results are modeled with the serial mechanism described above.

  19. Exciting fear in adolescence: Does pubertal development alter threat processing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Spielberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent development encompasses an ostensible paradox in threat processing. Risk taking increases dramatically after the onset of puberty, contributing to a 200% increase in mortality. Yet, pubertal maturation is associated with increased reactivity in threat-avoidance systems. In the first part of this paper we propose a heuristic model of adolescent affective development that may help to reconcile aspects of this paradox, which focuses on hypothesized pubertal increases in the capacity to experience (some fear-evoking experiences as an exciting thrill. In the second part of this paper, we test key features of this model by examining brain activation to threat cues in a longitudinal study that disentangled pubertal and age effects. Pubertal increases in testosterone predicted increased activation to threat cues, not only in regions associated with threat avoidance (i.e., amygdala, but also regions associated with reward pursuit (i.e., nucleus accumbens. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that puberty is associated with a maturational shift toward more complex processing of threat cues—which may contribute to adolescent tendencies to explore and enjoy some types of risky experiences.

  20. Structural Influence on Excited State Dynamics in Simple Amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Liv Bærenholdt

    experiments with calculations, provides new insight into the nature of the internal conversion processes that mediate the dynamical evolution between Rydberg states, and how structural variations in simple amine system have a large impact on the non-adiabatic processes. The experimental method of choice......Simple amines are basic model system of nitrogen-containing chromophores that appear widely in nature. They are also ideal systems for detailed investigation of nonadiabatic dynamical processes and ultrafast temporal evolution of electronic states of the Rydberg type. This investigation, combining...... and sensitive collection of photoelectron spectra. In particular, the angleresolved data available from the VMI approach provides highly detailed mechanistic insight about the relaxation pathways. One striking novel nding is that for tertiary amines, the critical factor driving the non-adiabatic dynamics...

  1. Interplay between singlet and triplet excited states in a conformationally locked donor–acceptor dyad

    KAUST Repository

    Filatov, Mikhail A.

    2015-10-13

    The synthesis and photophysical characterization of a palladium(II) porphyrin – anthracene dyad bridged via short and conformationally rigid bicyclo[2.2.2]octadiene spacer were achieved. A spectroscopic investigation of the prepared molecule in solution has been undertaken to study electronic energy transfer in excited singlet and triplet states between the anthracene and porphyrin units. By using steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy it was shown that excitation of the singlet excited state of the anthracene leads to energy transfer to the lower-lying singlet state of porphyrin. Alternatively, excitation of the porphyrin followed by intersystem crossing to the triplet state leads to very fast energy transfer to the triplet state of anthracene. The rate of this energy transfer has been determined by transient absorption spectroscopy. Comparative studies of the dynamics of triplet excited states of the dyad and reference palladium octaethylporphyrin (PdOEP) have been performed.

  2. Twisting in the excited state of an N-methylpyridinium fluorescent dye modulated by nano-heterogeneous micellar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, A; Carlotti, B; Gentili, P L; Germani, R; Spalletti, A; Elisei, F

    2016-04-01

    A push-pull N-methylpyridinium fluorescent dye with a pyrenyl group as the electron-donor portion was investigated within the nano-heterogeneous media provided by some micellar systems. The molecule was studied by stationary and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques in spherical micellar solutions and viscoelastic hydrogels, in order to throw light on the role played by twisting in its excited state deactivation. As proven by femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion and transient absorption experiments, the excited state dynamics of the molecule is ruled by charge transfer and twisting processes, which, from the locally excited (LE) state initially populated upon excitation, progressively lead to twisted (TICT) and planar (PICT) intramolecular charge transfer states. The inclusion within micellar aggregates was found to slow down and/or limit the rotation of the molecule with respect to what had previously been observed in water, while its confinement within the hydrophobic domains of the gel matrixes prevents any molecular torsion. The increasing viscosity of the medium, when passing from water to micellar systems, implies that the detected steady-state fluorescence comes from an excited state which is not fully relaxed, as is the case with the TICT state in micelles or the LE state in hydrogels, where the detected emission changes its usual orange colour to yellow.

  3. Photoluminescence and excited states dynamics in PbWO4:Pr3+ crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, E; Shalapska, T; Zazubovich, S

    2014-01-01

    Luminescence and photo-thermally stimulated defects creation processes are studied for a Pr3+-doped PbWO4 crystal at 4.2-400 K under excitation in the band-to-band, exciton, and charge-transfer transitions regions, as well as in the Pr3+-related absorption bands. Emission spectra of Pr3+ centers depend on the excitation energy, indicating the presence of Pr3+ centers of two types. The origin of these centers is discussed. The 2.03-2.06 eV emission, arising from the D-1(2) -> H-3(4) transitions of Pr3+ ions, is found to be effectively excited in a broad intense absorption band peaking at 4.2 K at 3.92 eV. By analogy with some other Pe(3+)-doped compounds, this band is suggested to arise from an electron transfer from an impurity Pr3+ ion to the crystal lattice W6+ or Pb2+ ions. The dynamics of the Pr3+-related excited states is clarified. In the PbWO4:Pr crystal studied, the concentration of single oxygen and lead vacancies as traps for electrons and holes is found to be negligible.

  4. Cluster decay of Ba isotopes from ground state and as an excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    122 is studied by modifying the Coulomb and proximity potential model for both the ground and excited state decays ... 20 and they arise as multiple clusters and are accompanied by multiple light particles. (Z ≤ 2). ... all aspects of α and cluster decay from these isotopes from both ground and excited states beginning with ...

  5. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Michał; Kijak, Michał; Piwoński, Hubert; Herbich, Jerzy; Waluk, Jacek

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters. We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donor-acceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  6. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał

    2017-02-03

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  7. Preconditioning and excitability of the human orbicularis oculi reflex as a function of state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, L D; Graham, F K; Calloway, J M

    1980-04-01

    Reflex excitability and unstimulated activity of orbicularis oculi were found to vary as a function of state but the effects of weak conditioning stimuli, preceding reflex stimulation by 30--210 msec, were independent of state. Electromyographic activity was recorded from 23 young adults: 12 subjects with eyes closed during quiet wakefulness, 3 subjects during all-night sleep, 8 subjects during an afternoon nap. Stimulation with a 50 msec, 105 dB(A) white noise burst elicited a reflex response in 92% of waking trials and 87% of trials during REM sleep, but responses occurred in only 54% of trials during NREM sleep. Further, response latency was longer and magnitude less during the NREM state. Despite the differences in reflex excitability associated with state, state did not affect the modifications of reflex activity produced by a 20 msec, 70 dB(A) conditioning tone. At all lead intervals, reflex magnitude was reduced by the weak prestimulation even though, at the shortest interval, reflex activity was initiated more rapidly. The discordant changes in reflex size and latency have been seen in previous waking studies and appear to be mediated by different mechanisms. The persistence of both effects during sleep suggests that neither effect depends on high-level central processes.

  8. State-averaged Monte Carlo configuration interaction applied to electronically excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, J P

    2014-01-01

    We introduce state-averaging into the method of Monte Carlo configuration interaction (SA-MCCI) to allow the stable and efficient calculation of excited states. We show that excited potential curves for H$_{3}$, including a crossing with the ground state, can be accurately reproduced using a small fraction of the FCI space. A recently introduced error measure for potential curves [J. P. Coe and M. J. Paterson, J. Chem. Phys., 137, 204108 (2012)] is shown to also be a fair approach when considering potential curves for multiple states. We demonstrate that potential curves for LiF using SA-MCCI agree well with the FCI results and the avoided crossing occurs correctly. The seam of conical intersections for CH$_{2}$ found by Yarkony [J. Chem. Phys., 104, 2932 (1996)] is used as a test for SA-MCCI and we compare potential curves from SA-MCCI with FCI results for this system for the first three triplet states. We then demonstrate the improvement from using SA-MCCI on the dipole of the $2$ $^{1}A_{1}$ state of carbo...

  9. Hybrid lead halide perovskites for light energy conversion: Excited state properties and photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Joseph S.

    The burgeoning class of metal halide perovskites constitutes a paradigm shift in the study and application of solution-processed semiconductors. Advancements in thin film processing and our understanding of the underlying structural, photophysical, and electronic properties of these materials over the past five years have led to development of perovskite solar cells with power conversion efficiencies that rival much more mature first and second-generation commercial technologies. It seems only a matter of time before the real-world impact of these compounds is put to the test. Like oxide perovskites, metal halide perovskites have ABX3 stoichiometry, where typically A is a monovalent cation, B a bivalent post-transition metal, and X a halide anion. Characterizing the behavior of photogenerated charges in metal halide perovskites is integral for understanding the operating principles and fundamental limitations of perovskite optoelectronics. The majority of studies outlined in this dissertation involve fundamental study of the prototypical organic-inorganic compound methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI 3). Time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy serves as a principle tool in these investigations. Excitation of a semiconductor can lead to formation of a number different excited state species and electronic complexes. Through analysis of excited state decay kinetics and optical nonlinearities in perovskite thin films, we identify spontaneous formation of a large fraction of free electrons and holes, whose presence is requisite for efficient photovoltaic operation. Following photogeneration of charge carriers in a semiconductor absorber, these species must travel large distances across the thickness of the material to realize large external quantum efficiencies and efficient carrier extraction. Using a powerful technique known as transient absorption microscopy, we directly image long-range carrier diffusion in a CH3NH3PbI 3 thin film. Charges are unambiguously shown to

  10. E2 transitions between excited single-phonon states: Role of ground-state correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamerdzhiev, S. P. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Voitenkov, D. A., E-mail: dvoytenkov@ippe.ru [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The probabilities for E2 transitions between low-lying excited 3{sup −} and 5{sup −} single-phonon states in the {sup 208}Pb and {sup 132}Sn magic nuclei are estimated on the basis of the theory of finite Fermi systems. The approach used involves a new type of ground-state correlations, that which originates from integration of three (rather than two, as in the random-phase approximation) single-particle Green’s functions. These correlations are shown to make a significant contribution to the probabilities for the aforementioned transitions.

  11. Emergence of nontrivial magnetic excitations in a spin-liquid state of kagomé volborthite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daiki; Sugii, Kaori; Shimozawa, Masaaki; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Yajima, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Hajime; Hiroi, Zenji; Shibauchi, Takasada; Matsuda, Yuji; Yamashita, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    When quantum fluctuations destroy underlying long-range ordered states, novel quantum states emerge. Spin-liquid (SL) states of frustrated quantum antiferromagnets, in which highly correlated spins fluctuate down to very low temperatures, are prominent examples of such quantum states. SL states often exhibit exotic physical properties, but the precise nature of the elementary excitations behind such phenomena remains entirely elusive. Here, we use thermal Hall measurements that can capture the unexplored property of the elementary excitations in SL states, and report the observation of anomalous excitations that may unveil the unique features of the SL state. Our principal finding is a negative thermal Hall conductivity κxy which the charge-neutral spin excitations in a gapless SL state of the 2D kagomé insulator volborthite Cu3V2O7(OH)2⋅2H2O exhibit, in much the same way in which charged electrons show the conventional electric Hall effect. We find that κxy is absent in the high-temperature paramagnetic state and develops upon entering the SL state in accordance with the growth of the short-range spin correlations, demonstrating that κxy is a key signature of the elementary excitation formed in the SL state. These results suggest the emergence of nontrivial elementary excitations in the gapless SL state which feel the presence of fictitious magnetic flux, whose effective Lorentz force is found to be less than 1/100 of the force experienced by free electrons. PMID:27439874

  12. Transport properties of local thermodynamic equilibrium hydrogen plasmas including electronically excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitelli, M; Celiberto, R; Gorse, C; Laricchiuta, A; Pagano, D; Traversa, P

    2004-02-01

    A study of the dependence of transport coefficients (thermal conductivity, viscosity, electrical conductivity) of local thermodynamic equilibrium H2 plasmas on the presence of electronically atomic excited states, H(n), is reported. The results show that excited states with their "abnormal" cross sections strongly affect the transport coefficients especially at high pressure. Large relative errors are found when comparing the different quantities with the corresponding values obtained by using ground-state transport cross sections. The accuracy of the present calculation is finally discussed in the light of the selection of transport cross sections and in dependence of the considered number of excited states.

  13. Electronic and photophysical properties of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole and its derivatives enhancing in the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer processes: A TD-DFT study on substitution effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daengngern, Rathawat; Kungwan, Nawee, E-mail: naweekung@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    The effect of electron donating and withdrawing substituents on the enol absorption and keto emission spectra of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and its derivatives has been systematically investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods. The enol absorption spectra of HBO were simulated by using five different DFTs with various exchange-correlation functions to validate a suitable functional prior to being further used as a method of choice to study the effect of substituents on the spectral characteristics of HBO derivatives. The popular B3LYP (Becke, three-parameter, Lee–Yang–Parr) exchange-correlation functional is found to provide the best desirable result in predicting the absorption spectrum close to experimental data. In the ground state, enol forms of HBO and its derivatives are more stable than those of keto forms, while in the first lowest excited state, keto forms are found to be more stable than their enol forms. Overall, simulated absorption and emission spectra of HBO and its derivatives from TD-B3LYP calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. For enol, absorption maxima of HBO derivatives having electron-withdrawing groups are red-shift corresponding to their lower HOMO–LUMO energy gaps compared to that of HBO. For keto emission, HBO having electron donating groups (m-MeHBO and MHBO) and withdrawing group (CNHBO) at 4′-position on the phenol fragment as well as electron donating groups (HBOMe and HBOM) at 6-position on the benzoxazole fragment make the position of keto emission peak shift to shorter wavelength (blue-shift). However, HBO derivatives with electron withdrawing groups (HBOF, HBOCl, HBOA and HBOE) at 6-position give redshifted emission compared to the parent compound (HBO). The type of substituent on both 4′- and 6-positions certainly has a pronounced effect on the absorption and emission spectra of HBO derivatives. - Highlights: • Simulated spectra

  14. Reaction of H2with O2in Excited Electronic States: Reaction Pathways and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelevkin, Alexey V; Loukhovitski, Boris I; Sharipov, Alexander S

    2017-12-21

    Comprehensive quantum chemical analysis with the use of the multireference state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field approach was carried out to study the reactions of H 2 with O 2 in a 1 Δ g , b 1 Σ g + , c 1 Σ u - , and A' 3 Δ u electronically excited states. The energetically favorable reaction pathways and possible intersystem crossings have been revealed. The energy barriers were refined employing the extended multiconfiguration quasi-degenerate second-order perturbation theory. It has been shown that the interaction of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (A' 3 Δ u ) with H 2 occurs through the H-abstraction process with relatively low activation barriers that resulted in the formation of the HO 2 molecule in A″ and A' electronic states, respectively. Meanwhile, molecular oxygen in singlet sigma states (b 1 Σ g + and c 1 Σ u - ) was proved to be nonreactive with respect to the molecular hydrogen. Appropriate rate constants for revealed reaction and quenching channels have been estimated using variational transition-state theory including corrections for the tunneling effect, possible nonadiabatic transitions, and anharmonicity of vibrations for transition states and reactants. It was demonstrated that the calculated reaction rate constant for the H 2 + O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) process is in reasonable agreement with known experimental data. The Arrhenius approximations for these processes have been proposed for the temperature range T = 300-3000 K.

  15. Ultrafast excited state dynamics of tris-(2,2'-bipyridine) Ruthenium (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Alvin T.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Time resolved anisotropy measurements and time dependent transient absorption measurements are used to study the evolution of the photoexcited Franck-Condon state to the formation of the long-lived triplet metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (3MLCT) state in tris-(2,2’-bipyridine) ruthenium. [Ru(bpy)3]2+ represents a large class of inorganic compounds with interesting and potentially applicable photophysical properties. These compounds have generated much interest in the inorganic chemistry community because their photophysical properties are easily manipulated by synthetic chemistry methods. However, little remains known about the processes which govern the evolution horn initial photoexcitation to the formation of the long-lived excited state.

  16. Femtosecond photoelectron imaging of transient electronic states and Rydberg atom emission from electronically excited he droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Bünermann, Oliver; Haxton, Daniel J; Leone, Stephen R; Neumark, Daniel M; Gessner, Oliver

    2011-07-14

    Ultrafast relaxation of electronically excited pure He droplets is investigated by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging. Droplets are excited by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses with photon energies below 24 eV. Excited states and relaxation products are probed by ionization with an infrared (IR) pulse with 1.6 eV photon energy. An initially excited droplet state decays on a time scale of 220 fs, leading predominantly to the emission of unaligned 1s3d Rydberg atoms. In a second relaxation channel, electronically aligned 1s4p Rydberg atoms are emitted from the droplet within less than 120 fs. The experimental results are described within a model that approximates electronically excited droplet states by localized, atomic Rydberg states perturbed by the local droplet environment in which the atom is embedded. The model suggests that, below 24 eV, EUV excitation preferentially leads to states that are localized in the surface region of the droplet. Electronically aligned 1s4p Rydberg atoms are expected to originate from excitations in the outermost surface regions, while nonaligned 1s3d Rydberg atoms emerge from a deeper surface region with higher local densities. The model is used to simulate the He droplet EUV absorption spectrum in good agreement with previously reported fluorescence excitation measurements.

  17. Alternative definition of excitation amplitudes in multi-reference state-specific coupled cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garniron, Yann; Giner, Emmanuel; Malrieu, Jean-Paul; Scemama, Anthony

    2017-04-01

    A central difficulty of state-specific Multi-Reference Coupled Cluster (MR-CC) in the multi-exponential Jeziorski-Monkhorst formalism concerns the definition of the amplitudes of the single and double excitation operators appearing in the exponential wave operators. If the reference space is a complete active space (CAS), the number of these amplitudes is larger than the number of singly and doubly excited determinants on which one may project the eigenequation, and one must impose additional conditions. The present work first defines a state-specific reference-independent operator T˜ ^ m which acting on the CAS component of the wave function |Ψ0m⟩ maximizes the overlap between (1 +T˜ ^ m ) |Ψ0m⟩ and the eigenvector of the CAS-SD (Singles and Doubles) Configuration Interaction (CI) matrix |ΨCAS-SDm⟩ . This operator may be used to generate approximate coefficients of the triples and quadruples, and a dressing of the CAS-SD CI matrix, according to the intermediate Hamiltonian formalism. The process may be iterated to convergence. As a refinement towards a strict coupled cluster formalism, one may exploit reference-independent amplitudes provided by (1 +T˜ ^ m ) |Ψ0m⟩ to define a reference-dependent operator T^ m by fitting the eigenvector of the (dressed) CAS-SD CI matrix. The two variants, which are internally uncontracted, give rather similar results. The new MR-CC version has been tested on the ground state potential energy curves of 6 molecules (up to triple-bond breaking) and two excited states. The non-parallelism error with respect to the full-CI curves is of the order of 1 mEh.

  18. Role of two-electron processes in the excitation-ionization of lithium atoms by fast ion impact

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchner, T; Gulyás, L

    2015-01-01

    We study excitation and ionization in the 1.5 MeV/amu O$^{8+}$-Li collision system, which was the subject of a recent reaction-microscope-type experiment [Fischer \\textit{et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{109}, 113202 (2012)]. Starting from an independent-electron model based on determinantal wave functions and using single-electron basis generator method and continuum distorted-wave with eikonal initial-state calculations we show that pure single ionization of a lithium $K$-shell electron is too weak a process to explain the measured single differential cross section. Rather, our analysis suggests that two-electron excitation-ionization processes occur and have to be taken into account when comparing with the data. Good agreement is obtained only if we replace the independent-electron calculation by an independent-event model for one of the excitation-ionization processes and also take a shake-off process into account.

  19. Excited-state dynamics of hybrid multichromophoric systems: toward an excitation wavelength control of the charge separation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Natalie; Duvanel, Guillaume; Perez-Velasco, Alejandro; Maity, Santanu; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan; Vauthey, Eric

    2009-07-23

    The photophysical properties of two hybrid multichromophoric systems consisting of an oligophenylethynyl (OPE) scaffold decorated by 10 red or blue naphthalene diimides (NDIs) have been investigated using femtosecond spectroscopy. Ultrafast charge separation was observed with both red and blue systems. However, the nature of the charge-separated state and its lifetime were found to differ substantially. For the red system, electron transfer occurs from the OPE scaffold to an NDI unit, independently of whether the OPE or an NDI is initially excited. However, charge separation upon OPE excitation is about 10 times faster, and takes place with a 100 fs time constant. The average lifetime of the ensuing charge-separated state amounts to about 650 ps. Charge separation in the blue system depends on which of the OPE scaffold or an NDI is excited. In the first case, an electron is transferred from the OPE to an NDI and the hole subsequently shifts to another NDI unit, whereas in the second case symmetry-breaking charge separation between two NDI units occurs. Although the charges are located on two NDIs in both cases, different recombination dynamics are observed. This is explained by the location of the ionic NDI moieties that depends on the charge separation pathway, hence on the excitation wavelength. The very different dynamics observed with red and blue systems can be accounted for by the oxidation potentials of the respective NDIs that are higher and lower than that of the OPE scaffold. Because of this, the relative energies of the two charge-separated states (hole on the OPE or an NDI) are inverted.

  20. Resonance-Enhanced Excited-State Raman Spectroscopy of Conjugated Thiophene Derivatives: Combining Experiment with Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Matthew S.; Quincy, Timothy J.; Caricato, Marco; Elles, Christopher G.

    2017-06-01

    Resonance-enhanced Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) is an ultrafast experimental method that allows for the study of excited-state structural behaviors, as well as the characterization of higher electronically excited states accessible through the resonant conditions of the observed vibrations. However, interpretation of the experiment is difficult without an accurate vibrational assignment of the resonance-enhanced spectra. We therefore utilize simulations of off-resonant excited-state Raman spectra, in which we employ a numerical derivative of the analytical excited-state polarizabilities along the normal mode displacements, in order to identify and interpret the resonance-enhanced vibrations observed in experiment. We present results for a benchmark series of conjugated organic thiophene derivatives, wherein we have computed the off-resonant excited-state Raman spectra for each molecule and matched it with its resonance-enhanced experimental spectrum. This comparison allows us to successfully identify the vibrational displacements of the observed FSRS bands, as well as validate the accuracy of the theoretical results through an experimental benchmark. The agreement between the experimental and computed results demonstrates that we are able to predict qualitatively accurate excited-state Raman spectra for these conjugated thiophenes, allowing for a more thorough interpretation of excited-state Raman signals at relatively low computational cost.

  1. High-energy excited states in {sup 98}Cd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazhev, A; Braun, N; Jolie, J [Universitaet zu Koeln, Cologne (Germany); Grawe, H; Boutachkov, P; Gorska, M; Pietri, S; Domingo-Pardo, C; Kojouharov, I; Caceres, L; Engert, T; Farinon, F; Gerl, J; Goel, N [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Singh, B S Nara; Brock, T; Wadsworth, R [University of York, York (United Kingdom); Liu, Zh [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Nowacki, F [IPHC, Strasbourg (France); Grebosz, J, E-mail: a.blazhev@ikp.uni-koeln.d [IFJ PAN, Krakow (Poland)

    2010-01-01

    In {sup 98}Cd a new high-energy isomeric {gamma}-ray transition was identified, which confirms previous spin-parity assignments and enables for the first time the measurement of the E2 and E4 strength for the two decay branches of the isomer. Preliminary results on the {sup 98}Cd high-excitation level scheme are presented. A comparison to shell-model calculations as well as implications for the nuclear structure around {sup 100}Sn are discussed.

  2. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelby, Megan L.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Jackson, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    and nuclear structure for critical excited electronic states in the relaxation pathway characterize the dependence of the complex's geometry on the electron occupation of the 3d orbitals. Calculated XANES transitions for these excited states assign a short-lived transient signal to the spectroscopic signature...... of the Ni(I) species, resulting from intramolecular charge transfer on a time scale that has eluded previous synchrotron studies. These combined results enable us to examine the excited state structural dynamics of NiTMP prior to thermal relaxation and to capture intermediates of potential photocatalytic...

  3. Size effect of water cluster on the excited-state proton transfer in aqueous solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Hui; Chu, Tian-Shu

    2011-03-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) was used to investigate the excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) dynamics of 6-hydroxyquinolinium (6HQc) in aqueous solvent, resulting in the excited zwitterionic form (6HQz). The optimized excited-state energy profiles of 6HQc:(H 2O) n complexes have been calculated along the phenolic O sbnd H bond to simulate the minimum energy pathway (MEP) in the excited state. The results suggested that the threshold of the size of the water cluster is 3 for the excited-state proton transfer of 6HQc in aqueous solvent, since the conformation of the stable hydrated proton requires proton transferring to the second or deeper shell of water solvent. Moreover, the stability of the hydrated proton can be improved significantly by adding one more H 2O molecule to form an Eigen cation in the excited-state 6HQz:H 9O 4+. The effect of the size of water cluster on the proton transfer is investigated theoretically in the excited state for the first time.

  4. Structures of Annulenes and Model Annulene Systems in the Ground and Lowest Excited States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Remigio Salvi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces general considerations on structural properties of aromatic, antiaromatic and non-aromatic conjugated systems in terms of potential energy along bond length alternation and distortion coordinates, taking as examples benzene, cyclobutadiene and cyclooctatetraene. Pentalene, formally derived from cyclooctatetraene by cross linking, is also considered as a typical antiaromatic system. The main interest is concerned with [n]annulenes and model [n]annulene molecular systems, n ranging from 10 to 18. The rich variety of conformational and  configurational isomers and of dynamical processes among them is described. Specific attention is devoted to bridged [10]- and [14]annulenes in the ground and lowest excited states as well as to s-indacene and biphenylene. Experimental data obtained from vibrational and electronic spectroscopies are discussed and compared with ab initio calculation results. Finally, porphyrin, tetraoxaporphyrin dication and diprotonated porphyrin are presented as annulene structures adopting planar/non-planar geometries depending on the steric hindrance in the inner macrocycle ring. Radiative and non-radiative relaxation processes from excited state levels have been observed by means of time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A short account is also given of porphycene, the structural isomer of porphyrin, and of porphycene properties.

  5. The exciton excitations and relaxation processes in low-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures with quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Gavrilenko, L. V.; Gaponova, D. M., E-mail: dmg@ipmras.ru; Krasil’nik, Z. F.; Kryzhkov, D. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The processes associated with the transfer of excitonic excitations between tunnel-uncoupled quantum wells (QW) and the influence of the local electric field were investigated in AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures by the method of photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy at low (4.2 K) temperature. The variation in the intensity of photoluminescence (PL) from the wider QW under resonant excitation of excitonic transition in the adjacent narrow QW has been observed. The difference in the PL maximum position and intensity of the wider QW under resonance excitation of the narrow one is explained by the influence of quantum-confined Stark effect on the process of exciton recombination.

  6. Excited States of Dicyanovinyl-Substituted Oligothiophenes from Many-Body Green's Functions Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeier, Björn; Andrienko, Denis; Ma, Yuchen; Rohlfing, Michael

    2012-03-13

    Excited states of dicyanovinyl-substituted oligothiophenes are studied using many-body Green's functions theory within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation. By varying the number of oligomer repeat units, we investigate the effects of resonant-antiresonant transition coupling, dynamical screening, and molecular conformations on calculated excitations. We find that the full dynamically screened Bethe-Salpeter equation yields absorption and emission energies in good agreement with experimental data. The effect of resonant-antiresonant coupling on the first singlet π → π* excitation monotonically decreases with increasing size of the molecule, while dynamical screening effects uniformly lower the excitation energies.

  7. Radiative Decay Widths of Ground and Excited States of Vector Charmonium and Bottomonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hluf Negash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the radiative decay widths of vector quarkonia for the process of J/ψ(nS→ηc(nSγ and Υ(nS→ηb(nSγ (for principal quantum numbers n=1,2,3 in the framework of Bethe-Salpeter equation under the covariant instantaneous ansatz using a 4×4 form of BSE. The parameters of the framework were determined by a fit to the mass spectrum of ground states of pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia, such as ηc, ηb, J/ψ, and Υ. These input parameters so fixed were found to give good agreements with data on mass spectra of ground and excited states of pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia, leptonic decay constants of pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia, two-photon decays, and two-gluon decays of pseudoscalar quarkonia in our recent paper. With these input parameters so fixed, the radiative decay widths of ground (1S and excited (2S,3S states of heavy vector quarkonia (J/Ψ and Υ are calculated and found to be in reasonable agreement with data.

  8. Periodic calculations of excited state properties for solids using a semiempirical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadaczek, Immanuel; Hintze, Kim Julia; Bredow, Thomas

    2012-01-14

    The semiempirical SCF MO method MSINDO (modified symmetrically orthogonalized intermediate neglect of differential overlap) [T. Bredow and K. Jug, Electronic Encyclopedia of Computational Chemistry, 2004] is extended to the calculation of excited state properties through implementation of the configuration interaction singles (CIS) approach. MSINDO allows the calculation of periodic systems via the cyclic cluster model (CCM) [T. Bredow et al., J. Comput. Chem., 2001, 22, 89] which is a direct-space approach and therefore can be in principle combined with all molecular quantum-chemical techniques. The CIS equations are solved for a cluster with periodic boundary conditions using the Davidson-Liu iterative block diagonalization approach. As a proof-of-principle, MSINDO-CCM-CIS is applied for the calculation of optical spectra of ZnO and TiO(2), oxygen-defective rutile, and F-centers in NaCl. The calculated spectra are compared to available experimental and theoretical literature data. After re-adjustment of the empirical parameters the quantitative agreement with experiment is satisfactory. The present approximate approach is one of the first examples of a quantum-chemical methodology for solids where excited states are correctly described as n-electron state functions. After careful benchmark testing it will allow calculation of photophysical and photochemical processes relevant to materials science and catalysis.

  9. Excited-state entanglement and thermal mutual information in random spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yichen; Moore, Joel E.

    2014-12-01

    Entanglement properties of excited eigenstates (or of thermal mixed states) are difficult to study with conventional analytical methods. We approach this problem for random spin chains using a recently developed real-space renormalization group technique for excited states ("RSRG-X"). For the random XX and quantum Ising chains, which have logarithmic divergences in the entanglement entropy of their (infinite-randomness) critical ground states, we show that the entanglement entropy of excited eigenstates retains a logarithmic divergence while the mutual information of thermal mixed states does not. However, in the XX case the coefficient of the logarithmic divergence extends from the universal ground-state value to a universal interval due to the degeneracy of excited eigenstates. These models are noninteracting in the sense of having free-fermion representations, allowing strong numerical checks of our analytical predictions.

  10. Stochastic stability of mechanical systems under renewal jump process parametric excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwankiewicz, R.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Larsen, Jesper Winther

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic system under parametric excitation in the form of a non-Erlang renewal jump process is considered. The excitation is a random train of nonoverlapping rectangular pulses with equal, deterministic heights. The time intervals between two consecutive jumps up (or down), are the sum of two...... independent, negative exponential distributed variables; hence, the arrival process may be termed as a generalized Erlang renewal process. The excitation process is governed by the stochastic equation driven by two independent Poisson processes, with different parameters. If the response in a single mode...

  11. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelby, Megan L. [Chemical; Department; Lestrange, Patrick J. [Department; Jackson, Nicholas E. [Department; Haldrup, Kristoffer [Physics; Mara, Michael W. [Chemical; Department; Stickrath, Andrew B. [Chemical; Zhu, Diling [LCLS, SLAC National Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, United States; Lemke, Henrik T. [LCLS, SLAC National Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, United States; Chollet, Matthieu [LCLS, SLAC National Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, United States; Hoffman, Brian M. [Department; Li, Xiaosong [Department; Chen, Lin X. [Chemical; Department

    2016-07-06

    Photoexcited Nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), like many open-shell metalloporphyrins, relaxes rapidly through multiple electronic states following an initial porphyrin-based excitation, some involving metal centered electronic configuration changes that could be harnessed catalytically before excited state relaxation. While a NiTMP excited state present at 100 ps was previously identified by X-ray transient absorption (XTA) spectroscopy at a synchrotron source as a relaxed (d,d) state, the lowest energy excited state (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 9616 and Chem. Sci., 2010, 1, 642), structural dynamics before thermalization were not resolved due to the similar to 100 ps duration of the available X-ray probe pulse. Using the femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the Ni center electronic configuration from the initial excited state to the relaxed (d,d) state has been obtained via ultrafast Ni K-edge XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) on a time scale from hundreds of femtoseconds to 100 ps. This enabled the identification of a short-lived Ni(I) species aided by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods. Computed electronic and nuclear structure for critical excited electronic states in the relaxation pathway characterize the dependence of the complex's geometry on the electron occupation of the 3d orbitals. Calculated XANES transitions for these excited states assign a short-lived transient signal to the spectroscopic signature of the Ni(I) species, resulting from intramolecular charge transfer on a time scale that has eluded previous synchrotron studies. These combined results enable us to examine the excited state structural dynamics of NiTMP prior to thermal relaxation and to capture intermediates of potential photocatalytic significance.

  12. Effect of xanthophyll composition on the chlorophyll excited state lifetime in plant leaves and isolated LHCII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Zia, Ahmad [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Horton, Peter [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Ruban, Alexander V., E-mail: a.ruban@qmul.ac.uk [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-19

    Xanthophyll excited states have been implicated by transient absorption and two-photon excitation studies in playing a key role in the regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting via photoprotective energy dissipation. For any proposed quenching mechanism to be effective it must reduce the chlorophyll excited state lifetime from 2 ns to {approx}0.5-0.4 ns. In the presented study the effect of xanthophyll composition on the chlorophyll excited state lifetime in Arabidopsis leaves in the light harvesting (F{sub m}) and photoprotective (NPQ) states was determined. The data was compared to the chlorophyll excited state lifetime of native isolated LHCII and CP26 in detergent micelles with varying xanthophyll composition. It was found that although the differences in xanthophyll composition between LHC complexes from various Arabidopsis mutants were sufficient to explain the varying F{sub m} lifetime (and varying PSII efficiency), they were not of a sufficient scale to fully explain the observed differences in the NPQ lifetimes. Only when the LHC complexes were exposed to a low detergent/low pH media, a condition known to mimic the conformational state of LHCII associated with NPQ in vivo, were variations in excited state lifetime large enough to explain the differences observed in leaves. Furthermore, the data reveal that the replacement of lutein by either zeaxanthin or violaxanthin in the internal xanthophyll binding sites of LHCII and CP26 reduces the efficiency of energy dissipation in the photoprotective state in leaves and isolated complexes.

  13. Dual fluorescent polyaniline model compounds: steric and temperature effects on excited state charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelle, Sabine; Rettig, Wolfgang; Lapouyade, René

    2002-07-01

    Low temperature dual fluorescence of several derivatives of 4-aminodiphenylamine is investigated quantitatively. A strong thermochromic and solvatochromic redshift is indicative of the high dipole moment of the CT state emitting at long wavelength. The combination of steady state and time-resolved data allowed the calculation of the excited-state equilibrium. The absence of CT-risetimes in diethyl ether and their presence in butyronitrile points to the complication by additional ground state conformational equilibria. Both ground and excited state equilibria depend on solvent polarity and temperature. High solvent polarity favours one of the ground state conformers.

  14. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esboui, Mounir, E-mail: mounir.esboui@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Technical and Vocational Training Corporation, Hail College of Technology, P.O. Box 1960, Hail 81441 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-21

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocation analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″({sup 1}πσ{sup ∗}) and A′({sup 1}nσ{sup ∗}) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A′({sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}) and A″({sup 1}nπ{sup ∗}) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two {sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}-{sup 1}πσ{sup ∗} conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect.

  15. Effects of crossed states on photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy of InAs quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chien-Hung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this report, the influence of the intrinsic transitions between bound-to-delocalized states (crossed states or quasicontinuous density of electron-hole states on photoluminescence excitation (PLE spectra of InAs quantum dots (QDs was investigated. The InAs QDs were different in size, shape, and number of bound states. Results from the PLE spectroscopy at low temperature and under a high magnetic field (up to 14 T were compared. Our findings show that the profile of the PLE resonances associated with the bound transitions disintegrated and broadened. This was attributed to the coupling of the localized QD excited states to the crossed states and scattering of longitudinal acoustical (LA phonons. The degree of spectral linewidth broadening was larger for the excited state in smaller QDs because of the higher crossed joint density of states and scattering rate.

  16. An amorphous silicon photodiode with 2 THz gain-bandwidth product based on cycling excitation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lujiang; Yu, Yugang; Zhang, Alex Ce; Hall, David; Niaz, Iftikhar Ahmad; Raihan Miah, Mohammad Abu; Liu, Yu-Hsin; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2017-09-01

    Since impact ionization was observed in semiconductors over half a century ago, avalanche photodiodes (APDs) using impact ionization in a fashion of chain reaction have been the most sensitive semiconductor photodetectors. However, APDs have relatively high excess noise, a limited gain-bandwidth product, and high operation voltage, presenting a need for alternative signal amplification mechanisms of superior properties. As an amplification mechanism, the cycling excitation process (CEP) was recently reported in a silicon p-n junction with subtle control and balance of the impurity levels and profiles. Realizing that CEP effect depends on Auger excitation involving localized states, we made the counter intuitive hypothesis that disordered materials, such as amorphous silicon, with their abundant localized states, can produce strong CEP effects with high gain and speed at low noise, despite their extremely low mobility and large number of defects. Here, we demonstrate an amorphous silicon low noise photodiode with gain-bandwidth product of over 2 THz, based on a very simple structure. This work will impact a wide range of applications involving optical detection because amorphous silicon, as the primary gain medium, is a low-cost, easy-to-process material that can be formed on many kinds of rigid or flexible substrates.

  17. Chromophore twisting in the excited state of a photoswitchable fluorescent protein captured by time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquelle, Nicolas; Sliwa, Michel; Woodhouse, Joyce; Schirò, Giorgio; Adam, Virgile; Aquila, Andrew; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Byrdin, Martin; Carbajo, Sergio; de La Mora, Eugenio; Doak, R. Bruce; Feliks, Mikolaj; Fieschi, Franck; Foucar, Lutz; Guillon, Virginia; Hilpert, Mario; Hunter, Mark S.; Jakobs, Stefan; Koglin, Jason E.; Kovacsova, Gabriela; Lane, Thomas J.; Lévy, Bernard; Liang, Mengning; Nass, Karol; Ridard, Jacqueline; Robinson, Joseph S.; Roome, Christopher M.; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Seaberg, Matthew; Thepaut, Michel; Cammarata, Marco; Demachy, Isabelle; Field, Martin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Bourgeois, Dominique; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Schlichting, Ilme; Weik, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Chromophores absorb light in photosensitive proteins and thereby initiate fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, vision and biofluorescence. An important goal in their understanding is the provision of detailed structural descriptions of the ultrafast photochemical events that they undergo, in particular of the excited states that connect chemistry to biological function. Here we report on the structures of two excited states in the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2. We populated the states through femtosecond illumination of rsEGFP2 in its non-fluorescent off state and observed their build-up (within less than one picosecond) and decay (on the several picosecond timescale). Using an X-ray free-electron laser, we performed picosecond time-resolved crystallography and show that the hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone chromophore in one of the excited states assumes a near-canonical twisted configuration halfway between the trans and cis isomers. This is in line with excited-state quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics and classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our new understanding of the structure around the twisted chromophore enabled the design of a mutant that displays a twofold increase in its off-to-on photoswitching quantum yield.

  18. Spin-state transition in LaCoO3: direct neutron spectroscopic evidence of excited magnetic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnyak, A; Streule, S; Mesot, J; Medarde, M; Pomjakushina, E; Conder, K; Tanaka, A; Haverkort, M W; Khomskii, D I

    2006-12-15

    A gradual spin-state transition occurs in LaCoO3 around T approximately 80-120 K, whose detailed nature remains controversial. We studied this transition by means of inelastic neutron scattering and found that with increasing temperature an excitation at approximately 0.6 meV appears, whose intensity increases with temperature, following the bulk magnetization. Within a model including crystal-field interaction and spin-orbit coupling, we interpret this excitation as originating from a transition between thermally excited states located about 120 K above the ground state. We further discuss the nature of the magnetic excited state in terms of intermediate-spin (t(2g)(5)e(g)(1), S=1) versus high-spin (t(2g)(4)e(g)(2), S=2) states. Since the g factor obtained from the field dependence of the inelastic neutron scattering is g approximately 3, the second interpretation is definitely favored.

  19. Contribution of the excited 1+ states of 100Tc to the 2ν2β-amplitude of 100Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    The total and differential intensities of the two-neutrino double beta transition in 100Mo are calculated by taking into account experimental data on the charge-exchange reactions on 100Mo. It is shown that excited 1+ states should be considered in addition to the ground state of the intermediate nucleus 100Tc, which leads to the generalization of the SSD mechanism for the two-neutrino process.

  20. Interception of excited vibrational quantum states by O2 in atmospheric association reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, David R; Lockhart, James; Blitz, Mark A; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Pilling, Michael J; Robertson, Struan H; Seakins, Paul W

    2012-08-31

    Bimolecular reactions in Earth's atmosphere are generally assumed to proceed between reactants whose internal quantum states are fully thermally relaxed. Here, we highlight a dramatic role for vibrationally excited bimolecular reactants in the oxidation of acetylene. The reaction proceeds by preliminary adduct formation between the alkyne and OH radical, with subsequent O(2) addition. Using a detailed theoretical model, we show that the product-branching ratio is determined by the excited vibrational quantum-state distribution of the adduct at the moment it reacts with O(2). Experimentally, we found that under the simulated atmospheric conditions O(2) intercepts ~25% of the excited adducts before their vibrational quantum states have fully relaxed. Analogous interception of excited-state radicals by O(2) is likely common to a range of atmospheric reactions that proceed through peroxy complexes.

  1. Tracking the Excited-State Time Evolution of the Visual Pigment with Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luis Manuel Frutos; Tadeusz Andruniów; Fabrizio Santoro; Nicolas Ferré; Massimo Olivucci

    2007-01-01

    ...). Here, we use a scaled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potential that reproduces the isomerization path determined with multiconfigurational perturbation theory to follow the excited-state evolution of bovine Rh...

  2. The origin of radiationless conversion of the excited state in the kindling fluorescent protein (KFP): femtosecond studies and quantum modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelaev, I.; Mironov, V.; Rusanov, A.; Gostev, F.; Bochenkova, A.; Sarkisov, O.; Nemukhin, A.; Savitsky, A.

    2011-06-01

    The Ala143Gly variant of the chromoprotein asCP from the sea anemony Anemonia sulcata, called the kindling fluorescent protein (KFP), is a promising candidate for the development of novel subdiffraction method of fluorescent microscopy. The pump-probe method with the delay times between the pump and probe pulses up to 5 ps was applied to study dynamics of the primary processes upon excitation of KFP. The differential absorption spectra at 80 fs delay showed the absorption peak in the range 450-510 nm with the maximum wavelength at 490 nm, which diminished almost twice by intensity by 400 fs and practically disappeared by 1.5 ps. The quantum calculations showed that upon photo-excitation of KFP to the first excited state S1, the fast radiationless relaxation occurred to the ground state S0 due to rotation of the phenolic fragment of the chromophore.

  3. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  4. Metastable states in parametrically excited multimode Hamiltonian systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kirr, E

    2003-01-01

    Consider a linear autonomous Hamiltonian system with time periodic bound state solutions. In this paper we study their dynamics under time almost periodic perturbations which are small, localized and Hamiltonian. The analysis proceeds through a reduction of the original infinite dimensional dynamical system to the dynamics of two coupled subsystems: a dominant m-dimensional system of ordinary differential equations (normal form), governing the projections onto the bound states and an infinite dimensional dispersive wave equation. The present work generalizes previous work of the authors, where the case of a single bound state is considered. Here, the interaction picture is considerably more complicated and requires deeper analysis, due to a multiplicity of bound states and the very general nature of the perturbation's time dependence. Parametric forcing induces coupling of bound states to continuum radiation modes, bound states directly to bound states, as well as coupling among bound states, which is mediate...

  5. Description of ground and excited electronic states by ensemble density functional method with extended active space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Michael; Martínez, Todd J.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2017-08-01

    An extended variant of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, the REKS(4,4) method, designed to describe the ground electronic states of strongly multireference systems is modified to enable calculation of excited states within the time-independent variational formalism. The new method, the state-interaction state-averaged REKS(4,4), i.e., SI-SA-REKS(4,4), is capable of describing several excited states of a molecule involving double bond cleavage, polyradical character, or multiple chromophoric units. We demonstrate that the new method correctly describes the ground and the lowest singlet excited states of a molecule (ethylene) undergoing double bond cleavage. The applicability of the new method for excitonic states is illustrated with π stacked ethylene and tetracene dimers. We conclude that the new method can describe a wide range of multireference phenomena.

  6. Nonaxial shapes of even–even lantanide and actinide nuclei in excited collective states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadirbekov, M. S., E-mail: nodirbekov@inp.uz; Bozarov, O. A. [Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Uzbekistan)

    2016-07-15

    Quadrupole-type excited states of even–even nuclei are studied on the basis of arbitrary-triaxiality model. It is shown that the inclusion of high-order terms in the expansion of the rotational-energy operator in the variable γ improves substantially agreement between our theoretical results and respective experimental data. The proposed model makes it possible to explain the intricate character of the spectrum of excited states of even–even lanthanide and actinide nuclei.

  7. OPTIMIZATION OF A BOXCAR INTEGRATOR AVERAGER SYSTEM FOR EXCITED-STATE LIFETIME MEASUREMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    NOVO, JBM; PESSINE, FBT

    1992-01-01

    The instrumental distortions due to adjustable parameters of the SR250 boxcar integrator/averager system and a pulsed-laser luminescence spectrometer on the excited-state lifetime decay waveforms were investigated. A theoretical model which takes into account the exponential moving average for this instrument and also RC distortion on the time-dependent luminescence signal is presented. An analytical expression relating the sample's excited-state lifetime and the adjustable instrumental param...

  8. Influence of excited states on the energy loss of fast ions in a hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-8046 Garching, Germany (DE)); Peter, T. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, D-6500 Mainz, Germany (DE))

    1991-04-01

    Stopping power calculations of fast ions penetrating a hydrogen plasma target in local thermodynamic equilibrium at arbitrary temperatures are performed. Excited state contributions to the energy loss are included in the framework of the Bethe formalism. Average ionization potentials for the excited ions are given in a quasiclassical approximation. It is shown that the net effect is an enhancement of the stopping power compared to the energy loss when assuming all atoms to be in their ground state.

  9. Sum rule analysis of vector and axial-vector spectral functions with excited states in vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Hohler, Paul M.; Rapp, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    We simultaneously analyze vector and axial-vector spectral functions in vacuum using hadronic models constrained by experimental data and the requirement that Weinberg-type sum rules are satisfied. Upon explicit inclusion of an excited vector state, viz. rho', and the requirement that the perturbative continua are degenerate in vector and axial-vector channels, we deduce the existence of an excited axial-vector resonance state, a1', in order that the Weinberg sum rules are satisfied. The resu...

  10. Vibronic energy map and excited state vibrational characteristics of magnesium myoglobin determined by energy-selective fluorescence.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaposi, A D; Vanderkooi, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies of the singlet excited state of Mg-substituted myoglobin and relative absorption probabilities were determined by fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy. These spectra contain information on the structure of the excited state species, and the availability of vibrationally resolved spectra from excited state biomolecules should aid in elucidating their structure and reactivity.

  11. Non-orthogonal configuration interaction for the calculation of multielectron excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundstrom, Eric J., E-mail: eric.jon.sundstrom@berkeley.edu; Head-Gordon, Martin [Department of Chemistry, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    We apply Non-orthogonal Configuration Interaction (NOCI) to molecular systems where multielectron excitations, in this case double excitations, play a substantial role: the linear polyenes and β-carotene. We demonstrate that NOCI when applied to systems with extended conjugation, provides a qualitatively correct wavefunction at a fraction of the cost of many other multireference treatments. We also present a new extension to this method allowing for purification of higher-order spin states by utilizing Generalized Hartree-Fock Slater determinants and the details for computing 〈S{sup 2}〉 for the ground and excited states.

  12. Dark excited states of carotenoid in light harvesting complex probing with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational dynamics of dark excited states in carotenoids have been investigated using tunable Raman pump pulses. The S1 state has same vibrational dynamics in light-harvesting complex (LH1 and solution. The S* state in LH1 has similar vibrational modes with the triplet state of carotenoid. However, the so-called S* state in solution does not have the modes and is concluded to be different from the S* state in LH1.

  13. Excited state proton transfer in 9-aminoacridine carboxamides in water and in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Charles A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-09-26

    The 9-aminoacridine molecule is important in several different fields of chemistry. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of this compound are pH sensitive and it is this property that allowed it to be used as a pH probe in different chemical environments. The compound exhibits proton transfer reactions which are among the most fundamental of chemical reactions. The planarity of 9-aminoacridine allows it to intercalate into DNA. Intercalation is a process in which the aromatic flat surface of the intercalator inserts between adjacent base pairs of DNA. The large surface area of 9-aminoacridine`s fused tricyclic ring system allows strong intercalative binding through van der Waals attractions. 9-aminoacridine and many of its derivatives have been tried as possible antitumor drugs. The cytotoxicity of an antitumor agent can be dramatically increased through the addition of one or two cationic side chains. This increase in cytotoxicity using the 9-aminoacridine compound as a parent molecule has been investigated through various derivatives with cationic side chains consisting of different number of carbon atoms between the proximal and distal N atoms. Similar derivatives varied the position of the carboxamide side chain on the aromatic ring system. The objective of this work is to first create a baseline study of the excited state kinetics of the 9-aminoacridine carboxamides in the absence of DNA. The baseline study will allow the excited state kinetics of these antitumor drugs when placed in DNA to be more fully understood.

  14. Photochemistry of excited-state species in natural waters: a role for particulate organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Barbara A; Timko, Stephen A; Devera, Lianne; Robinson, Alice K; Gonsior, Michael; Vizenor, Ashley E; Simpson, André J; Cooper, William J

    2013-09-15

    Laser flash photolysis (LFP) was used to characterize a triplet excited state species isolated from Black River and San Joaquin wetlands particulate organic matter (POM). The solubilized organic matter, isolated from POM by pH-independent diffusion in distilled water, was named PdOM. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs), and (1)H NMR were used to characterize the PdOM. While LFP of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is known to generate the solvated electron, LFP of the PdOM transient in argon-, air-, and nitrous oxide-saturated solutions indicated that this was a triplet excited state species ((3)PdOM*). The lifetime and the reactivity of (3)PdOM* with sorbic acid, a triplet state quencher, were compared with that of the triplet excited state of benzophenone, a DOM proxy. A second excited state species (designated DOM*), with a longer lifetime, was reported in a number of previous studies but not characterized. The lifetime of DOM*, measured for seventeen organic matter isolates, lignin, tannic acid, and three wetlands plant extracts, was shown to differentiate allochthonous from autochthonous DOM. (3)POM* and DOM* were also observed in lake water and a constructed wetlands' water. Aqueous extracts of fresh and aged plant material from the same wetland were shown to be one source of these excited state species. This study provides evidence of a role for POM in the photochemistry of natural and constructed wetland waters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. High-energy excited states in {sup 98}Cd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Norbert; Blazhev, Andrey; Jolie, Jan [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Koeln (Germany); Boutachkov, Plamen; Gorska, Magda; Grawe, Hubert; Pietri, Stephane [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Brock, Tim; Nara Singh, B.S.; Wadsworth, Robert [Department of Physics, University of York, York (United Kingdom); Liu, Zhong [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Studies of isomerism in the proton-rich N {approx_equal}Z nuclei around {sup 100}Sn give important insights into the role of proton-neutron pairing and also serve as testing grounds for nuclear models. In summer 2008, an experiment on {sup 96,97,98}Cd was performed using the FRS fragment separator and the RISING germanium array at GSI. These exotic nuclei of interest were produced using fragmentation of a 850 MeV/u {sup 124}Xe beam on a 4 g/cm{sup 2} {sup 9}Be target and finally implanted into an active stopper consisting of 9 double-sided silicon strip detectors. In {sup 98}Cd, a new high-energy isomeric transition was identified. Preliminary results on {sup 98}Cd are presented and their implications for the high-excitation level scheme are discussed.

  16. Steady-state photoluminescent excitation characterization of semiconductor carrier recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhosale, J. S. [Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Moore, J. E.; Wang, X.; Bermel, P.; Lundstrom, M. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy is a contactless characterization technique that can provide valuable information about the surface and bulk recombination parameters of a semiconductor device, distinct from other sorts of photoluminescent measurements. For this technique, a temperature-tuned light emitting diode (LED) has several advantages over other light sources. The large radiation density offered by LEDs from near-infrared to ultraviolet region at a low cost enables efficient and fast photoluminescence measurements. A simple and inexpensive LED-based setup facilitates measurement of surface recombination velocity and bulk Shockley-Read-Hall lifetime, which are key parameters to assess device performance. Under the right conditions, this technique can also provide a contactless way to measure the external quantum efficiency of a solar cell.

  17. On excited states in real-time AdS/CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botta-Cantcheff, Marcelo; Martínez, Pedro J.; Silva, Guillermo A. [Instituto de Física de La Plata - CONICET & Departamento de Física - UNLP,C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-02-25

    The Skenderis-van Rees prescription, which allows the calculation of time-ordered correlation functions of local operators in CFT’s using holographic methods is studied and applied for excited states. Calculation of correlators and matrix elements of local CFT operators between generic in/out states are carried out in global Lorentzian AdS. We find the precise form of such states, obtain an holographic formula to compute the inner product between them, and using the consistency with other known prescriptions, we argue that the in/out excited states built according to the Skenderis-Van Rees prescription correspond to coherent states in the (large-N) AdS-Hilbert space. This is confirmed by explicit holographic computations. The outcome of this study has remarkable implications on generalizing the Hartle-Hawking construction for wave functionals of excited states in AdS quantum gravity.

  18. Excited-State Dynamics of Carotenoids Studied by Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ingu; Pang, Yoonsoo [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sebok [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Carotenoids, natural antenna pigments in photosynthesis share a symmetric backbone of conjugated polyenes. Contrary to the symmetric and almost planar geometries of carotenoids, excited state structure and dynamics of carotenoids are exceedingly complex. In this paper, recent infrared and visible transient absorption measurements and excitation dependent dynamics of 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al and 7',7'-dicyano-7'-apo-β-carotene will be reviewed. The recent visible transient absorption measurements of 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al in polar and nonpolar solvents will also be introduced to emphasize the complex excited-state dynamics and unsolved problems in the S{sub 2} and S{sub 1} excited states.

  19. First-order derivative couplings between excited states from adiabatic TDDFT response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Qi; Bellchambers, Gregory D; Furche, Filipp; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-02-14

    We present a complete derivation of derivative couplings between excited states in the framework of adiabatic time-dependent density functional response theory. Explicit working equations are given and the resulting derivative couplings are compared with derivative couplings from a pseudo-wavefunction ansatz. For degenerate excited states, i.e., close to a conical intersection (CI), the two approaches are identical apart from an antisymmetric overlap term. However, if the difference between two excitation energies equals another excitation energy, the couplings from response theory exhibit an unphysical divergence. This spurious behavior is a result of the adiabatic or static kernel approximation of time-dependent density functional theory leading to an incorrect analytical structure of the quadratic response function. Numerical examples for couplings close to a CI and for well-separated electronic states are given.

  20. Prototropic studies in vitreous and in solid phases: Pyranine and 2-naphthol excited state proton transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Fátima Aparecida das Chagas [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rezende, Eduardo Triboni [Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Filho, Décio Briotto [Departamento de Bioquímica Instituto de Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Brito Rezende, Daisy de [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cuccovia, Iolanda Midea [Departamento de Bioquímica Instituto de Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gome, Ligia Ferreira [Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Mauro Francisco Pinheiro da [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); and others

    2014-02-15

    Excited state proton transfer processes in vitreous glasses and in solid mixtures are investigated by steady state fluorimetry and laser flash photolysis kinetic studies with the photoacids pyranine and 2-naphthol. Glasses were derived from TEOS by the sol–gel condensation process and hydrated solid mixtures from NaCl or KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}/K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} crystals. The extent of the water content necessary for the reaction is determined. Shrinkage of TEOS derived monoliths from water loss leads to an increase in proton transfer extent due to the increase in local concentrations of accepting and donor buffer species, but the concomitant increase in the ionic strength actuates in an opposite direction. Furthermore, water losses by aging of air-exposed gel goes to a critical 20% weight fraction, beyond it proton transfer reactions are hindered. Similar studies with solid NaCl or solid phosphate buffer mixtures demonstrated the same critical water level indicating that free water molecules are crucial for the proton to escape from the original cage where the geminate ion pair [–||RO{sup −⁎}H{sup +}||–] is formed and can undergo coupled proton transfer reactions. -- Highlights: • Pyranine and 2-naphthol excited state proton transfer in SiO{sub 2} gel, solid phosphate buffer and NaCl. • Sol–gel formation leads to contraction and concentration of donor and accepting species. • 20% weight fraction water is required for the ESPT to go forward.

  1. Dual fluorescence of ellipticine: excited state proton transfer from solvent versus solvent mediated intramolecular proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sanghamitra; Pabbathi, Ashok; Sekhar, M Chandra; Samanta, Anunay

    2011-08-25

    Photophysical properties of a natural plant alkaloid, ellipticine (5,11-dimethyl-6H-pyrido[4,3-b]carbazole), which comprises both proton donating and accepting sites, have been studied in different solvents using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques primarily to understand the origin of dual fluorescence that this molecule exhibits in some specific alcoholic solvents. Ground and excited state calculations based on density functional theory have also been carried out to help interpretation of the experimental data. It is shown that the long-wavelength emission of the molecule is dependent on the hydrogen bond donating ability of the solvent, and in methanol, this emission band arises solely from an excited state reaction. However, in ethylene glycol, both ground and excited state reactions contribute to the long wavelength emission. The time-resolved fluorescence data of the system in methanol and ethylene glycol indicates the presence of two different hydrogen bonded species of ellipticine of which only one participates in the excited state reaction. The rate constant of the excited state reaction in these solvents is estimated to be around 4.2-8.0 × 10(8) s(-1). It appears that the present results are better understood in terms of solvent-mediated excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction from the pyrrole nitrogen to the pyridine nitrogen leading to the formation of the tautomeric form of the molecule rather than excited state proton transfer from the solvents leading to the formation of the protonated form of ellipticine. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. Accounting for highly excited states in detailed opacity calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In multiply-charged ion plasmas, a significant number of electrons may occupy high-energy orbitals. These "Rydberg" electrons, when they act as spectators, are responsible for a number of satellites of X-ray absorption or emission lines, yielding a broadening of the red wing of the resonance lines. The contribution of such satellite lines may be important, because of the high degeneracy of the relevant excited configurations which give these large Boltzmann weights. However, it is in general difficult to take these configurations into account since they are likely to give rise to a large number of lines. We propose to model the perturbation induced by the spectators in a way similar to the Partially-Resolved-Transition-Array approach recently published by C. Iglesias. It consists in a partial detailed-line-accounting calculation in which the effect of the Rydberg spectators is included through a shift and width, expressed in terms of the canonical partition functions, which are key-ingredients of the Super-Tr...

  3. Permanent Magnet Synchronous Condenser with Solid State Excitation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, P.; Muljadi, E.; Wu, Z.; Gao, W.

    2015-04-07

    A typical synchronous condenser (SC) consists of a free-spinning, wound-field synchronous generator and a field excitation controller. In this paper, we propose an SC that employs a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) instead of a wound-field machine. PMSGs have the advantages of higher efficiency and reliability. In the proposed configuration, the reactive power control is achieved by a voltage converter controller connected in series to the PMSG. The controller varies the phase voltage of the PMSG and creates the same effect on the reactive power flow as that of an over- or underexcited wound-field machine. The controller’s output voltage magnitude controls the amount of the reactive power produced by the SC. The phase of the controller’s output is kept within a small variation from the grid voltage phase. This small phase variation is introduced so that a small amount of power can be drawn from the grid into the controller to maintain its DC bus voltage. Because the output voltage of the controller is only a fraction of the line voltage, its VA rating is only a fraction of the rating of the PMSG. The proposed scheme is shown to be effective by computer simulations.

  4. Theoretical study on the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer reaction of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline in methanol and cyclohexane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Meng [Department of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); State Key Lab of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhao, Jinfeng [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); State Key Lab of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Cui, Yanling; Wang, Qianyu [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Dai, Yumei [Normal College, Shenyang University, Shenyang 110044 (China); Song, Peng, E-mail: songpeng@lnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Xia, Lixin, E-mail: lixinxia@lnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-05-15

    The dynamics of the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) reaction of 10-hydroxybenzoquinoline (HBQ) in different solvents, have been investigated based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) in detail. Upon excitation, the intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl and phenanthrene functionality is significantly strengthened in the S{sub 1} state, which can be used as a reasonable tendency for facilitating the ESIPT process. In addition, the calculated vertical excitation energies in the S{sub 0} state and S{sub 1} state reproduce the experimental UV–vis absorbance and fluorescence emission spectra well. Through calculating the fluorescence spectra of the HBQ chromophore, two outcomes for this chromophore were found in the S{sub 1} state, which demonstrates that the ESIPT process occurs. The potential energy curves have been calculated to account for the mechanism of the proton-transfer process in the excited-state. As a result, the barrierless ESIPT process can occur in the S{sub 1} state with proton transfer from the O atom to the N atom. And maybe the ESIPT process is easier in methanol solvent due to the higher potential energy difference. - Highlights: • The hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl and phenanthrene is strengthened. • The hydrogen bond facilitates the proton transfer from the hydroxyl group to the N atom. • The spontaneous excited-state intramolecular proton transfer reaction can be observed.

  5. Relaxation dynamics in the excited states of a ketocyanine dye ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    propdienylaniline)-cyclopentanone (MPAC), a ketocyanine dye, have been investigated using steady-state absorption and emission as well as femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic techniques. Following photoexcitation using 400 ...

  6. Existence of excited states for a nonlinear Dirac equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balabane, M.; Cazenave, T.; Douady, A.; Merle, F.

    1988-01-21

    We prove the existence of infinitely many stationary states for the nonlinear Dirac equation. Seeking eigenfunctions splitted in spherical coordinates leads to analyse a nonautonomous dynamical system in R/sup 2/. The number of eigenfunctions is given by the number of intersections of the stable manifold of the origin with the curve of admissible data. This proves the existence of infinitely many stationary states ordered by the number of nodes of the components

  7. Laser excitation of 8-eV electronic states in Th{sup +}. A first pillar of the electronic bridge toward excitation of the Th-229 nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera-Sancho, Oscar-Andrey

    2012-11-23

    The possibility to realize a nuclear clock based on the optical magnetic dipole transition from the ground state to the low-energy isomeric state in the {sup 229}Th nucleus has motivated experiments and proposals toward highly accurate clocks with trapped ions and highly stable optical frequency standards with Th-doped solids. These systems hold great promise to open a field of research in the borderland between atomic and nuclear physics, which will enable highly sensitive tests of postulates from fundamental physics and also will allow us to coherently excite and control nuclear states, opening a wonderful and intriguing new field in physics. A major experimental obstacle that has to be overcome before any precision spectroscopy can be performed with this system is however the insufficient knowledge on the exact transition energy. The best experimental result so far is an indirect determination from {gamma}-spectroscopy with a relative uncertainty of about 6%. To facilitate the search for the nuclear transition within a wide uncertainty range around 8 eV, we investigate two-photon excitation in the dense electronic level structure of Th{sup +}, which enables the nuclear excitation via a resonantly enhanced inverse electronic bridge process. Experiments on one- and two-photon laser excitation of buffer gas cooled {sup 232}Th{sup +} ions in a radio-frequency ion trap are reported in this thesis. The strongest resonance line at 402 nm from the (6d{sup 2}7s)J=3/2 ground state to the (6d7s7p)J=5/2 state is driven as the first excitation step. Using nanosecond laser pulses in the 250-nm wavelength range for the second step of a two-photon excitation, we have observed seven previously unknown levels in the unexplored region of the electronic level structure around 8 eV. This investigation shows that the Th{sup +} ion seems to be well suited for the search of the isomer transition because both, theory and experimental results, agree on the density of strong transitions

  8. Effects of excited state mixing on transient absorption spectra in dimers Application to photosynthetic light-harvesting complex II

    CERN Document Server

    Valkunas, L; Trinkunas, G; Müller, M G; Holzwarth, A R

    1999-01-01

    The excited state mixing effect is taken into account considering the difference spectra of dimers. Both the degenerate (homo) dimer as well as the nondegenerate (hetero) dimer are considered. Due to the higher excited state mixing with the two-exciton states in the homodimer, the excited state absorption (or the difference spectrum) can be strongly affected in comparison with the results obtained in the Heitler-London approximation. The difference spectrum of the heterodimer is influenced by two resonance effects (i) mixing of the ground state optical transitions of both monomers in the dimer and (ii) mixing of the excited state absorption of the excited monomer with the ground state optical transition in the nonexcited monomer. These effects have been tested by simulating the difference absorption spectra of the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC II) experimentally obtained with the 60 fs excitation pulses at zero delay times and various excitation wavelengths. The pairs of coupled chlorophylls...

  9. Solvent-dependent excited-state hydrogen transfer and intersystem crossing in 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-02-12

    The excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl) benzothiazole (HBT) has been investigated in a series of nonpolar, polar aprotic, and polar protic solvents. A variety of state-of-the-art experimental methods were employed, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. We show that the dynamics and mechanism of ESIHT of the singlet excited HBT are strongly solvent-dependent. In nonpolar solvents, the data demonstrate that HBT molecules adopt a closed form stabilized by O-H⋯N chelated hydrogen bonds with no twisting angle, and the photoinduced H transfer occurs within 120 fs, leading to the formation of a keto tautomer. In polar solvents, owing to dipole-dipole cross talk and hydrogen bonding interactions, the H transfer process is followed by ultrafast nonradiative deactivation channels, including ultrafast internal conversion (IC) and intersystem crossing (ISC). This is likely to be driven by the twisting motion around the C-C bond between the hydroxyphenyl and thiazole moieties, facilitating the IC back to the enol ground state or to the keto triplet state. In addition, our femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence experiments indicate, for the first time, that the lifetime of the enol form in ACN is approximately 280 fs. This observation indicates that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the H bond and deactivating the excited state of the HBT. Interestingly, the broadband transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion data clearly demonstrate that the intermolecular proton transfer from the excited HBT to the DMSO solvent is about 190 fs, forming the HBT anion excited state.

  10. Ultrafast fluorescence detection in tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex in solution: relaxation dynamics involving higher excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasikuttan, Achikanath C; Suzuki, Masaya; Nakashima, Satoru; Okada, Tadashi

    2002-07-17

    The excited-state dynamics of a transition metal complex, tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+), has been investigated using femtosecond fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy. The relaxation dynamics in these molecules is of great importance in understanding the various ultrafast processes related to interfacial electron transfer, especially in semiconductor nanoparticles. Despite several experimental and theoretical efforts, direct observation of a Franck-Condon singlet excited state in this molecule was missing. In this study, emission from the Franck-Condon excited singlet state of [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) has been observed for the first time, and its lifetime has been estimated to be 40 +/- 15 fs. Biexponential decays with a fast rise component observed at longer wavelengths indicated the existence of more than one emitting state in the system. From a detailed data analysis, it has been proposed that, on excitation at 410 nm, crossover from higher excited (1)(MLCT) states to the vibrationally hot triplet manifold occurs with an intersystem crossing time constant of 40 +/- 15 fs. Mixing of the higher levels in the triplet state with the singlet state due to strong spin-orbit coupling is proposed. This enhances the radiative rate constant, k(r), of the vibrationally hot states within the triplet manifold, facilitating the upconversion of the emitted photons. The vibrationally excited triplet, which is emissive, undergoes vibrational cooling with a decay time in the range of 0.56-1.3 ps and relaxes to the long-lived triplet state. The results on the relaxation dynamics of the higher excited states in [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) are valuable in explaining the role of nonequilibrated higher excited sensitizer states of transition metal complexes in the electron injection and other ultrafast processes.

  11. Excited-State Dynamics of Melamine and Its Lysine Derivative Investigated by Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyuan Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Melamine may have been an important prebiotic information carrier, but its excited-state dynamics, which determine its stability under UV radiation, have never been characterized. The ability of melamine to withstand the strong UV radiation present on the surface of the early Earth is likely to have affected its abundance in the primordial soup. Here, we studied the excited-state dynamics of melamine (a proto-nucleobase and its lysine derivative (a proto-nucleoside using the transient absorption technique with a UV pump, and UV and infrared probe pulses. For melamine, the excited-state population decays by internal conversion with a lifetime of 13 ps without coupling significantly to any photochemical channels. The excited-state lifetime of the lysine derivative is slightly longer (18 ps, but the dominant deactivation pathway is otherwise the same as for melamine. In both cases, the vast majority of excited molecules return to the electronic ground state on the aforementioned time scales, but a minor population is trapped in a long-lived triplet state.

  12. Dynamics of charge-transfer excited states relevant to photochemical energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, E.C.

    1991-11-01

    The primary objective of the research program is to gain a fundamental understanding of the factors governing the efficiency of excited-state charge transfer CT interactions between two chromophores that are brought together in close proximity, either by a very short covalent linkage or by ground-state complex formation. CT and van der Walls (vdW), interactions in covalently bonded bichromophoric compounds in condensed phase, as well as those in vdW complexes in supersonic jets, are being investigated using laser-based techniques under a variety of experimental conditions. This progress report is divided into three parts, according to the class of molecular systems and the phase (liquid vs. gas) in which the excited-state interactions are probed. The first is concerned with the excited states of bridged diaryl compounds in the condensed phase. The second involves the excited states of vdW complexes in supersonic jets. Finally, the third, is concerned with the excited states of electron donor-acceptor (EDA) systems in both the condensed phase and supersonic jets. In each of these studies, we are concerned with the interchromophore interactions ranging from weak vdW forces to strong CT forces, and the factors determining whether the interaction forces are weak or strong in related molecules.

  13. Doppler- and recoil-free laser excitation of Rydberg states via three-photon transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Ryabtsev, I. I.; Beterov, I. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    Three-photon laser excitation of Rydberg states by three different laser beams can be arranged in a star-like geometry that simultaneously eliminates the recoil effect and Doppler broadening. Our analytical and numerical calculations for a particular laser excitation scheme 5S_{1/2}->5P_{3/2}->6S_{1/2}->nP in Rb atoms have shown that compared to the one- and two-photon laser excitation this approach provides much narrower line width and longer coherence time for both cold atom samples and hot...

  14. Fluorescence excitation and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations for benzocyclobutane: vibrations and structure of its excited S(1)(π,π(*)) electronic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Won; Ocola, Esther J; Kim, Sunghwan; Laane, Jaan

    2014-01-21

    The fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled benzocyclobutane have been recorded and together with its ultraviolet absorption spectra have been used to assign the vibrational frequencies for this molecule in its S1(π,π(*)) electronic excited state. Theoretical calculations at the CASSCF(6,6)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory were carried out to compute the structure of the molecule in its excited state. The calculated structure was compared to that of the molecule in its electronic ground state as well as to the structures of related molecules in their S0 and S1(π,π(*)) electronic states. In each case the decreased π bonding in the electronic excited states results in longer carbon-carbon bonds in the benzene ring. The skeletal vibrational frequencies in the electronic excited state were readily assigned and these were compared to the ground state and to the frequencies of five similar molecules. The vibrational levels in both S0 and S1(π,π(*)) states were remarkably harmonic in contrast to the other bicyclic molecules. The decreases in the frequencies of the out-of-plane skeletal modes reflect the increased floppiness of these bicyclic molecules in their S1(π,π(*)) excited state.

  15. Fluorescence excitation and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations for benzocyclobutane: Vibrations and structure of its excited S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) electronic state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Won; Ocola, Esther J.; Laane, Jaan, E-mail: laane@mail.chem.tamu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States); Kim, Sunghwan [National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20894 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    The fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled benzocyclobutane have been recorded and together with its ultraviolet absorption spectra have been used to assign the vibrational frequencies for this molecule in its S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) electronic excited state. Theoretical calculations at the CASSCF(6,6)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory were carried out to compute the structure of the molecule in its excited state. The calculated structure was compared to that of the molecule in its electronic ground state as well as to the structures of related molecules in their S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) electronic states. In each case the decreased π bonding in the electronic excited states results in longer carbon-carbon bonds in the benzene ring. The skeletal vibrational frequencies in the electronic excited state were readily assigned and these were compared to the ground state and to the frequencies of five similar molecules. The vibrational levels in both S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) states were remarkably harmonic in contrast to the other bicyclic molecules. The decreases in the frequencies of the out-of-plane skeletal modes reflect the increased floppiness of these bicyclic molecules in their S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) excited state.

  16. Fluorescence excitation and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations for benzocyclobutane: Vibrations and structure of its excited S1(π,π*) electronic state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Won; Ocola, Esther J.; Kim, Sunghwan; Laane, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled benzocyclobutane have been recorded and together with its ultraviolet absorption spectra have been used to assign the vibrational frequencies for this molecule in its S1(π,π*) electronic excited state. Theoretical calculations at the CASSCF(6,6)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory were carried out to compute the structure of the molecule in its excited state. The calculated structure was compared to that of the molecule in its electronic ground state as well as to the structures of related molecules in their S0 and S1(π,π*) electronic states. In each case the decreased π bonding in the electronic excited states results in longer carbon-carbon bonds in the benzene ring. The skeletal vibrational frequencies in the electronic excited state were readily assigned and these were compared to the ground state and to the frequencies of five similar molecules. The vibrational levels in both S0 and S1(π,π*) states were remarkably harmonic in contrast to the other bicyclic molecules. The decreases in the frequencies of the out-of-plane skeletal modes reflect the increased floppiness of these bicyclic molecules in their S1(π,π*) excited state. PMID:25669377

  17. Fluorescence excitation and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations for benzocyclobutane: Vibrations and structure of its excited S1(π,π*) electronic state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Won; Ocola, Esther J.; Kim, Sunghwan; Laane, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled benzocyclobutane have been recorded and together with its ultraviolet absorption spectra have been used to assign the vibrational frequencies for this molecule in its S1(π,π*) electronic excited state. Theoretical calculations at the CASSCF(6,6)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory were carried out to compute the structure of the molecule in its excited state. The calculated structure was compared to that of the molecule in its electronic ground state as well as to the structures of related molecules in their S0 and S1(π,π*) electronic states. In each case the decreased π bonding in the electronic excited states results in longer carbon-carbon bonds in the benzene ring. The skeletal vibrational frequencies in the electronic excited state were readily assigned and these were compared to the ground state and to the frequencies of five similar molecules. The vibrational levels in both S0 and S1(π,π*) states were remarkably harmonic in contrast to the other bicyclic molecules. The decreases in the frequencies of the out-of-plane skeletal modes reflect the increased floppiness of these bicyclic molecules in their S1(π,π*) excited state.

  18. Analysis of excited-state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter at 1529 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Junyu; Yin, Longfei; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2016-06-27

    In this work, a detailed theoretical analysis of 1529 nm ES-FADOF (excited state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter) based on rubidium atoms pumped by 780 nm laser is introduced, where Zeeman splitting, Doppler broadening, and relaxation processes are considered. Experimental results are carefully compared with the derivation. The results prove that the optimal pumping frequency is affected by the working magnetic field. The population distribution among all hyperfine Zeeman sublevels under the optimal pumping frequency has also been obtained, which shows that 85Rb atoms are the main contribution to the population. The peak transmittance above 90% is obtained, which is in accordance with the experiment. The calculation also shows that the asymmetric spectra observed in the experiment are caused by the unbalanced population distribution among Zeeman sublevels. This theoretical model can be used for all kinds of calculations for FADOF.

  19. Impact Assessment of Various Methods for Control of Synchronous Generator Excitation on Quality of Transient Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. Filipchik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an impact of various methods for control of an exciting current pertaining to a synchronous generator on the nature of transient processes. A control algorithm for the exciting current in relation to changes in sliding and acceleration of a generator rotor has been proposed in the paper. The algorithm makes it possible to improve quality of the transient processes due to reduction of oscillation range concerning as an active power so a δ-angle as well.

  20. Rotationally resolved IR-diode laser studies of ground-state CO2 excited by collisions with vibrationally excited pyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremy A; Kim, Kilyoung; Mayhew, Maurine; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2008-03-27

    Relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyridine (C5NH5) by collisions with carbon dioxide has been investigated using diode laser transient absorption spectroscopy. Vibrationally hot pyridine (E' = 40,660 cm(-1)) was prepared by 248 nm excimer laser excitation followed by rapid radiationless relaxation to the ground electronic state. Pyridine then collides with CO2, populating the high rotational CO2 states with large amounts of translational energy. The CO2 nascent rotational population distribution of the high-J (J = 58-80) tail of the 00(0)0 state was probed at short times following the excimer laser pulse to measure rate constants and probabilities for collisions populating these CO2 rotational states. Doppler spectroscopy was used to measure the CO2 recoil velocity distribution for J = 58-80 of the 00(0)0 state. The energy-transfer distribution function, P(E,E'), from E' - E approximately 1300-7000 cm(-1) was obtained by re-sorting the state-indexed energy-transfer probabilities as a function of DeltaE. P(E,E') is fit to an exponential or biexponential function to determine the average energy transferred in a single collision between pyridine and CO2. Also obtained are fit parameters that can be compared to previously studied systems (pyrazine, C6F6, methylpyrazine, and pyrimidine/CO2). Although the rotational and translational temperatures that describe pyridine/CO2 energy transfer are similar to previous systems, the energy-transfer probabilities are much smaller. P(E,E') fit parameters for pyridine/CO2 and the four previously studied systems are compared to various donor molecular properties. Finally, P(E,E') is analyzed in the context of two models, one indicating that P(E,E') shape is primarily determined by the low-frequency out-of-plane donor vibrational modes, and the other that indicates that P(E,E') shape can be determined from how the donor molecule final density of states changes with DeltaE.

  1. Discrimination of nuclear spin isomers exploiting the excited state dynamics of a quinodimethane derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obaid, Rana [Institut für Theoretische Chemie, Universität Wien, Währinger Str. 17, 1090 Wien (Austria); Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Quds University, Abu Dis, Palestine (Country Unknown); Kinzel, Daniel; Oppel, Markus, E-mail: markus.oppel@univie.ac.at; González, Leticia [Institut für Theoretische Chemie, Universität Wien, Währinger Str. 17, 1090 Wien (Austria)

    2014-10-28

    Despite the concept of nuclear spin isomers (NSIs) exists since the early days of quantum mechanics, only few approaches have been suggested to separate different NSIs. Here, a method is proposed to discriminate different NSIs of a quinodimethane derivative using its electronic excited state dynamics. After electronic excitation by a laser field with femtosecond time duration, a difference in the behavior of several quantum mechanical operators can be observed. A pump-probe experimental approach for separating these different NSIs is then proposed.

  2. Analytic model for low energy excitation states and phase transitions in spin-ice systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bara, F. I.; López-Aguilar, F.

    2017-04-01

    Low energy excitation states in magnetic structures of the so-called spin-ices are produced via spin flips among contiguous tetrahedra of their crystal structure. These spin flips generate entities which mimic magnetic dipoles in every two tetrahedra according to the dumbbell model. When the temperature increases, the spin-flip processes are transmitted in the lattice, generating so-called Dirac strings, which constitute structural entities that can present mimetic behavior similar to that of magnetic monopoles. In recent studies of both specific heat and ac magnetic susceptibility, two (even possibly three) phases have been shown to vary the temperature. The first of these phases presents a sharp peak in the specific heat and another phase transition occurs for increasing temperature whose peak is broader than that of the former phase. The sharp peak occurs when there are no free individual magnetic charges and temperature of the second phase transition coincides with the maximum proliferation of free deconfined magnetic charges. In the present paper, we propose a model for analyzing the low energy excitation many-body states of these spin-ice systems. We give analytical formulas for the internal energy, specific heat, entropy and their temperature evolution. We study the description of the possible global states via the nature and structure of their one-body components by means of the thermodynamic functions. Below 0.37 K, the Coulomb-like magnetic charge interaction can generate a phase transition to a condensation of pole-antipole pairs, possibly having Bose-Einstein structure which is responsible for the sharp peak of the first phase transition. When there are sufficient free positive and negative charges, the system tends to behave as a magnetic plasma, which implies the broader peak in the specific heat appearing at higher temperature than the sharper experimental peak.

  3. Analytic model for low energy excitation states and phase transitions in spin-ice systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bara, F I; López-Aguilar, F

    2017-04-20

    Low energy excitation states in magnetic structures of the so-called spin-ices are produced via spin flips among contiguous tetrahedra of their crystal structure. These spin flips generate entities which mimic magnetic dipoles in every two tetrahedra according to the dumbbell model. When the temperature increases, the spin-flip processes are transmitted in the lattice, generating so-called Dirac strings, which constitute structural entities that can present mimetic behavior similar to that of magnetic monopoles. In recent studies of both specific heat and ac magnetic susceptibility, two (even possibly three) phases have been shown to vary the temperature. The first of these phases presents a sharp peak in the specific heat and another phase transition occurs for increasing temperature whose peak is broader than that of the former phase. The sharp peak occurs when there are no free individual magnetic charges and temperature of the second phase transition coincides with the maximum proliferation of free deconfined magnetic charges. In the present paper, we propose a model for analyzing the low energy excitation many-body states of these spin-ice systems. We give analytical formulas for the internal energy, specific heat, entropy and their temperature evolution. We study the description of the possible global states via the nature and structure of their one-body components by means of the thermodynamic functions. Below 0.37 K, the Coulomb-like magnetic charge interaction can generate a phase transition to a condensation of pole-antipole pairs, possibly having Bose-Einstein structure which is responsible for the sharp peak of the first phase transition. When there are sufficient free positive and negative charges, the system tends to behave as a magnetic plasma, which implies the broader peak in the specific heat appearing at higher temperature than the sharper experimental peak.

  4. Excited electronic states from a variational approach based on symmetry-projected Hartree--Fock configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2013-01-01

    Recent work from our research group has demonstrated that symmetry-projected Hartree--Fock (HF) methods provide a compact representation of molecular ground state wavefunctions based on a superposition of non-orthogonal Slater determinants. The symmetry-projected ansatz can account for static correlations in a computationally efficient way. Here we present a variational extension of this methodology applicable to excited states of the same symmetry as the ground state. Benchmark calculations on the C$_2$ dimer with a modest basis set, which allows comparison with full configuration interaction results, indicate that this extension provides a high quality description of the low-lying spectrum for the entire dissociation profile. We apply the same methodology to obtain the full low-lying vertical excitation spectrum of formaldehyde, in good agreement with available theoretical and experimental data, as well as to a challenging model $C_{2v}$ insertion pathway for BeH$_2$. The variational excited state methodolo...

  5. Quantum Entanglement and Shannon Information Entropy for the Doubly Excited Resonance State in Positronium Negative Ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hao Lin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we report an investigation on quantum entanglement in the doubly excited 2s2 1Se resonance state of the positronium negative ion by using highly correlated Hylleraas type wave functions, determined by calculation of the density of resonance states with the stabilization method. Once the resonance wave function is obtained, the spatial (electron-electron orbital entanglement entropies (von Neumann and linear can be quantified using the Schmidt decomposition method. Furthermore, Shannon entropy in position space, a measure for localization (or delocalization for such a doubly excited state, is also calculated.

  6. Shannon information entropy in position space for doubly excited states of helium with finite confinements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jen-Hao; Ho, Yew Kam

    2017-12-01

    Quantifying electron localization in quantum confined systems remains challenging, especially for excited states. A quantum dot (QD) is represented by a helium atom in a finite oscillator potential. The effect of dot width variation on the electron localization in QD is systematically examined via Shannon entropy for low-lying doubly excited states (2s21Se, 2p21Se, 2s3s 1Se) obtained using highly correlated Hylleraas functions. In particular, the most effective dot width where the electron density is the most localized is determined successfully and justified by the electron density plot for all three states.

  7. Resonant coherent excitation of hydrogen-like ions planar channeled in a crystal; Transition into the first excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, A.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2012-03-01

    The presented program is designed to simulate the characteristics of resonant coherent excitation of hydrogen-like ions planar-channeled in a crystal. The program realizes the numerical algorithm to solve the Schrödinger equation for the ion-bound electron at a special resonance excitation condition. The calculated wave function of the bound electron defines probabilities for the ion to be in the either ground or first excited state, or to be ionized. Finally, in the outgoing beam the fractions of ions in the ground state, in the first excited state, and ionized by collisions with target electrons, are defined. The program code is written on C++ and is designed for multiprocessing systems (clusters). The output data are presented in the table. Program summaryProgram title: RCE_H-like_1 Catalogue identifier: AEKX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2813 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 34 667 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ (g++, icc compilers) Computer: Multiprocessor systems (clusters) Operating system: Any OS based on LINUX; program was tested under Novell SLES 10 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Contains MPI directives RAM: C++, Intel C++ compilers Nature of problem: When relativistic hydrogen-like ion moves in the crystal in the planar channeling regime, in the ion rest frame the time-periodic electric field acts on the bound electron. If the frequency of this field matches the transition frequency between electronic energy levels, the resonant coherent excitation can take place. Therefore, ions in the different states may be observed in the outgoing beam behind the crystal. To get the probabilities for the ion to be

  8. Switching of the triplet excited state of rhodamine-C60 dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Cui, Xiaoneng; Lou, Zhangrong; Zhao, Jianzhang; Bao, Ming; Li, Xingwei

    2014-12-21

    Acid-switching of the triplet excited state in rhodamine-C60 dyads was achieved. The rhodamine moiety acts as an acid-activated visible light-harvesting antenna and C60 as the singlet energy acceptor and the spin converter, and production of the triplet state was enhanced in the presence of acid.

  9. Electron impact excitation of the D states of Mg, Ca and Sr atoms ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have used non-relativistic and relativistic distorted wave approximation methods to study the excitation of the 1 states of magnesium ( = 3), calcium ( = 4) and strontium ( = 5) from the ground 1 state. Calculations have been performed for the complete set of parameters ( , L ~ ⊥ + , L ~ ⊥ − , ~ + , ~ − ) .

  10. Thermality and excited state Rényi entropy in two-dimensional CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Feng-Li [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University,Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Wang, Huajia [Department of Physics, University of Illinois,Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Zhang, Jia-ju [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca,Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Theoretical Physics Division, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,19B Yuquan Rd, Beijing 100049 (China); Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, Chinese Academy of Sciences,19B Yuquan Rd, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-11-21

    We evaluate one-interval Rényi entropy and entanglement entropy for the excited states of two-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) on a cylinder, and examine their differences from the ones for the thermal state. We assume the interval to be short so that we can use operator product expansion (OPE) of twist operators to calculate Rényi entropy in terms of sum of one-point functions of OPE blocks. We find that the entanglement entropy for highly excited state and thermal state behave the same way after appropriate identification of the conformal weight of the state with the temperature. However, there exists no such universal identification for the Rényi entropy in the short-interval expansion. Therefore, the highly excited state does not look thermal when comparing its Rényi entropy to the thermal state one. As the Rényi entropy captures the higher moments of the reduced density matrix but the entanglement entropy only the average, our results imply that the emergence of thermality depends on how refined we look into the entanglement structure of the underlying pure excited state.

  11. ARTICLE Volume-conserved Twist Excited-state of π-Conjugated Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qin-chao; Liu, Jian-yong; Hao, Yan; Yang, Xi-chuan

    2010-12-01

    The excited state characters of HY103 have been studied by means of time-resolved photon emission (time-correlated single photon counting) and time dependent density functional theory calculations. The experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that HY103 dyes undergo an efficient one-bond-flip motion after photoexicitation at room temperature, which leads to a very short lifetime of the normal fluorescence state, and a weak fluorescence emission around 670 nm. However, when HY103 are excited in amorphous glasses at 77 K, the normal fluorescence emission is prolonged to nanoseconds time scale about 2 ns, and the fluorescence emission is enhanced. Furthermore, a new emission state is produced, which is characterized as a volume-conserved twisted (VCT) state. This is the first observation of a VCT state. The experiment indicates that the VCT motion of excited state of π-conjugated molecules in restricted environment can form a stable emission state, and the excited state character of π-conjugated molecules in restricted environment is complex.

  12. Relativistic and correlated calculations on the ground, excited, and ionized states of iodine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, W.A.; Visscher, L; Nieuwpoort, W.C

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure, spectroscopic, and bonding properties of the ground, excited, and ionized states of iodine are studied within a four-component relativistic framework using the MOLFDIR program package, The experimentally determined properties of the (1) Sigma(g)(+) ground state are well

  13. Tunneling times and excited state interactions between chromophores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stomphorst, R.

    2001-01-01

    This Thesis consists of two related parts. The first part (Chapters 2 and 3) presents the results of a fundamental theoretical study of the interpretation of quantum mechanics, and particularly of tunneling processes. Part two (Chapters 4, 5, and 6) describes the experimental results of

  14. Investigations into photo-excited state dynamics in colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gaurav

    Colloidal Quantum dots (QDs) have garnered considerable scientific and technological interest as a promising material for next generation solar cells, photo-detectors, lasers, bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and reliable biomarkers. However, for practical realization of these applications, it is crucial to understand the complex photo-physics of QDs that are very sensitive to surface chemistry and chemical surroundings. Depending on the excitation density, QDs can support single or multiple excitations. The first part of this talk addresses evolution of QD excited state dynamics in the regime of low excitation intensity. We use temperature-resolved time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to study exciton dynamics from picoseconds to microseconds and use kinetic modeling based on classical electron transfer to show the effect of surface trap states on dynamics of ground-state exciton manifold in core-shell CdSe/CdS QDs. We show that the thickness of CdS shell plays an important role in interaction of CdSe core exciton states with nanocrystal environment, and find that a thicker shell can minimize the mixing of QD exciton states with surface trap states. I will then present an investigation into the dynamics of multiply-excited states in QDs. One of the key challenges in QD spectroscopy is to reliably distinguish multi- from single-excited states that have similar lifetime components and spectroscopic signatures. I will describe the development of a novel multi-pulse fluorescence technique to selectively probe multi-excited states in ensemble QD samples and determine the nature of the multi-excited state contributing to the total fluorescence even in the limit of low fluorescent yields. We find that in our sample of CdSe/CdS core/shell QDs the multi-excited emission is dominated by emissive trion states rather than biexcitons. Next, I will discuss the application of this technique to probe exciton-plasmon coupling in layered hybrid films of QD/gold nanoparticles

  15. Investigation on Formation and Hardening Process of Microcapsules Under Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tien-Chu

    This research investigates the micro-encapsulation process with a pressure-type micro-atomizer. Alginate and CaCl2 aqueous solution are used as the membrane material and hardening agent, respectively. The high speed images were taken to investigate the formation processes of the microcapsules. Results show that the geometric shape of the microcapsules was sensitive to the droplet flying distant and the concentration of alginate aqueous, however, insensitive to the concentration of CaCl2 aqueous. Results also show that the membrane thickness of the microcapsules was controlled by the diffusion processes of calcium chloride. An empirical formula was derived to describe the rate change of the membrane thickness in the hardening processes.

  16. Excited-state dynamics of mononucleotides and DNA strands in a deep eutectic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyuan; de La Harpe, Kimberly; Hariharan, Mahesh; Kohler, Bern

    2018-01-31

    The photophysics of several mono- and oligonucleotides were investigated in a deep eutectic solvent for the first time. The solvent glyceline, prepared as a 1 : 2 mole ratio mixture of choline chloride and glycerol, was used to study excited-state deactivation in a non-aqueous solvent by the use of steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy. DNA strands in glyceline retain the secondary structures that are present in aqueous solution to some degree, thus enabling a study of the effects of solvent properties on the excited states of stacked bases and stacked base pairs. The excited-state lifetime of the mononucleotide 5'-AMP in glyceline is 630 fs, or twice as long as in aqueous solution. Even slower relaxation is seen for 5'-TMP in glyceline, and a possible triplet state with a lifetime greater than 3 ns is observed. Circular dichroism spectra show that the single strand (dA)18 and the duplex d(AT)9·d(AT)9 adopt similar structures in glyceline and in aqueous solution. Despite having similar conformations in both solvents, femtosecond transient absorption experiments reveal striking changes in the dynamics. Excited-state decay and vibrational cooling generally take place more slowly in glyceline than in water. Additionally, the fraction of long-lived excited states in both oligonucleotide systems is lower in glyceline than in aqueous solution. For a DNA duplex, water is suggested to favor decay pathways involving intrastrand charge separation, while the deep eutectic solvent favors interstrand deactivation channels involving neutral species. Slower solvation dynamics in the viscous deep eutectic solvent may also play a role. These results demonstrate that the dynamics of excitations in stacked bases and stacked base pairs depend not only on conformation, but are also highly sensitive to the solvent.

  17. Production of excited beauty states in Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Meinhard, H; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stierlin, U; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Duarte, H; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rossowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Si Mohand, D; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Van Gemmeren, P; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    A data sample of about 3.0 million hadronic Z decays collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP in the years 1991 through 1994, is used to make an inclusive selection of B~hadron events. In this event sample 4227 \\pm 140 \\pm 252 B^* mesons in the decay B^* \\to B \\gamma and 1944 \\pm 108 \\pm 161 B^{**} mesons decaying into a B~meson and a charged pion are reconstructed. For the well established B^* meson the following quantities areobtained: \\Delta M = M_{B^*} - M_{B} = (45.30\\pm 0.35\\pm 0.87)~\\mathrm{MeV}/c^2 and N_{B^*}/(N_B+N_{B^*}) = (77.1 \\pm 2.6 \\pm 7.0)\\%. The angular distribution of the photons in the B^* rest frame is used to measure the relative contribution of longitudinal B^* polarization states to be \\sigma_L/(\\sigma_L + \\sigma_T)= (33 \\pm 6 \\pm 5)\\%. \\\\ Resonance structure in the M(B\\pi)-M(B) mass difference is observed at (424 \\pm 4 \\pm 10)~\\mathrm{MeV}/c^2. Its shape and position is in agreement with the expectation for B^{**}_{u,d} states decaying into B_{u,d}^{(*)} \\pi^\\pm. The signal is therefo...

  18. Transient Development of Excited State Densities in Atomic Helium Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-03-01

    n s t i t u e n t s caus ing a t . ransfer to bound e l e c t r o n s b e t w e e n the l o w - l y i n g s t a t e s and u p p e r s t a t...r y and t h e s e a r e d i s c u s s e d in de ta i l . 4.1 ENERGY LEVELS The h e l i u m e n e r g y l e v e l s u s e d in th i s s...e t h e n d e t e r m i n e d f r o m t h e s e v a l u e s . 4] AEDC-TR-76-5 Table 1. Helium Energy Lwel$ State g E (i/cm) State g E (i

  19. Excited-state properties from ground-state DFT descriptors: A QSPR approach for dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayet, Guillaume; Jacquemin, Denis; Wathelet, Valérie; Perpète, Eric A; Rotureau, Patricia; Adamo, Carlo

    2010-02-26

    This work presents a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR)-based approach allowing an accurate prediction of the excited-state properties of organic dyes (anthraquinones and azobenzenes) from ground-state molecular descriptors, obtained within the (conceptual) density functional theory (DFT) framework. The ab initio computation of the descriptors was achieved at several levels of theory, so that the influence of the basis set size as well as of the modeling of environmental effects could be statistically quantified. It turns out that, for the entire data set, a statistically-robust four-variable multiple linear regression based on PCM-PBE0/6-31G calculations delivers a R(adj)(2) of 0.93 associated to predictive errors allowing for rapid and efficient dye design. All the selected descriptors are independent of the dye's family, an advantage over previously designed QSPR schemes. On top of that, the obtained accuracy is comparable to the one of the today's reference methods while exceeding the one of hardness-based fittings. QSPR relationships specific to both families of dyes have also been built up. This work paves the way towards reliable and computationally affordable color design for organic dyes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Energy-Looping Nanoparticles: Harnessing Excited-State Absorption for Deep-Tissue Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Elizabeth S; Tajon, Cheryl A; Bischof, Thomas S; Iafrati, Jillian; Fernandez-Bravo, Angel; Garfield, David J; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Maharbiz, Michel M; Sohal, Vikaas S; Schuck, P James; Cohen, Bruce E; Chan, Emory M

    2016-09-27

    Near infrared (NIR) microscopy enables noninvasive imaging in tissue, particularly in the NIR-II spectral range (1000-1400 nm) where attenuation due to tissue scattering and absorption is minimized. Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanocrystals are promising deep-tissue imaging probes due to their photostable emission in the visible and NIR, but these materials are not efficiently excited at NIR-II wavelengths due to the dearth of lanthanide ground-state absorption transitions in this window. Here, we develop a class of lanthanide-doped imaging probes that harness an energy-looping mechanism that facilitates excitation at NIR-II wavelengths, such as 1064 nm, that are resonant with excited-state absorption transitions but not ground-state absorption. Using computational methods and combinatorial screening, we have identified Tm(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles as efficient looping systems that emit at 800 nm under continuous-wave excitation at 1064 nm. Using this benign excitation with standard confocal microscopy, energy-looping nanoparticles (ELNPs) are imaged in cultured mammalian cells and through brain tissue without autofluorescence. The 1 mm imaging depths and 2 μm feature sizes are comparable to those demonstrated by state-of-the-art multiphoton techniques, illustrating that ELNPs are a promising class of NIR probes for high-fidelity visualization in cells and tissue.

  1. Structural Monitoring of the Onset of Excited-State Aromaticity in a Liquid Crystal Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Masaki; Saito, Shohei; Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Sato, Ryuma; Yoshimura, Masahiko; Mouri, Kazuhiro; Matsuo, Kyohei; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro; Hara, Mitsuo; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Röhricht, Fynn; Herges, Rainer; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Onda, Ken; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2017-11-08

    Aromaticity of photoexcited molecules is an important concept in organic chemistry. Its theory, Baird's rule for triplet aromaticity since 1972 gives the rationale of photoinduced conformational changes and photochemical reactivities of cyclic π-conjugated systems. However, it is still challenging to monitor the dynamic structural change induced by the excited-state aromaticity, particularly in condensed materials. Here we report direct structural observation of a molecular motion and a subsequent packing deformation accompanied by the excited-state aromaticity. Photoactive liquid crystal (LC) molecules featuring a π-expanded cyclooctatetraene core unit are orientationally ordered but loosely packed in a columnar LC phase, and therefore a photoinduced conformational planarization by the excited-state aromaticity has been successfully observed by time-resolved electron diffractometry and vibrational spectroscopy. The structural change took place in the vicinity of excited molecules, producing a twisted stacking structure. A nanoscale torque driven by the excited-state aromaticity can be used as the working mechanism of new photoresponsive materials.

  2. Solvent effects on excitation energies obtained using the state-specific TD-DFT method with a polarizable continuum model based on constrained equilibrium thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Ting-Jun; Xu, Long-Kun; Wang, Fan; Ming, Mei-Jun; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2017-12-13

    Nonequilibrium solvation effects need to be treated properly in the study of electronic absorption processes of solutes since solvent polarization is not in equilibrium with the excited-state charge density of the solute. In this work, we developed a state specific (SS) method based on the novel nonequilibrium solvation model with constrained equilibrium manipulation to account for solvation effects in electronic absorption processes. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is adopted to calculate electronic excitation energies and a polarizable continuum model is employed in the treatment of bulk solvent effects on both the ground and excited electronic states. The equations based on this novel nonequilibrium solvation model in the framework of TDDFT to calculate vertical excitation energy are presented and implemented in the Q-Chem package. The implementation is validated by comparing reorganization energies for charge transfer excitations between two atoms obtained from Q-Chem and those obtained using a two-sphere model. Solvent effects on electronic transitions of coumarin 153 (C153), acetone, pyridine, (2E)-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (DMHP), and uracil in different solvents are investigated using the newly developed code. Our results show that the obtained vertical excitation energies as well as spectral shifts generally agree better with the available experimental values than those obtained using the traditional nonequlibrium solvation model. This new model is thus appropriate to study nonequilibrium excitation processes in solution.

  3. Investigation of two-photon absorption induced excited state absorption in a fluorenyl-based chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changwei; Yang, Kun; Feng, Yan; Su, Xinyan; Yang, Junyi; Jin, Xiao; Shui, Min; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xueru; Song, Yinglin; Xu, Hongyao

    2009-12-03

    Two-photon absorption induced excited state absorption in the solution of a new fluorenyl-based chromophore is investigated by a time-resolved pump-probe technique using femtosecond pulses. With the help of an additional femtosecond open-aperture Z-scan technique, numerical simulations based on a three-energy level model are used to interpret the experimental results, and we determine the nonlinear optical parameters of this new chromophore uniquely. Large two-photon absorption cross section and excited state absorption cross section for singlet excited state are obtained, indicating a good candidate for optical limiting devices. Moreover, the influence of two-beam coupling induced energy transfer in neat N,N'-dimethylformamide solvent is also considered, although this effect is strongly restrained by the instantaneous two-photon absorption.

  4. Development and implementation of theoretical methods for the description of electronically core-excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, Jan

    2016-03-23

    results are generally more accurate with the latter method, the use of CVS ADC(3) is not justified. Compared to general ADC(2)-x, the speed-up at the CVS-ADC(2)-x level is about a factor of 4.0, but this factor strongly depends on the size of the system and the size of the core space. Next, I present applications from the field of organic electronics. I present X-ray absorption spectra of the pentacene and the anthracene cation. Other applications concentrate on the trends of core-excited state properties along important potential energy surfaces (PES) of ANQ, phenol and bithiophene. Therefore, static dipole moments, energies, and exciton sizes are analyzed as a function of the C-O distances of ANQ and phenol, as well as the torsion around the central dihedral angle of bithiophene. The calculation of coreexcited state absorption (CESA) transition moments using the CVS-ADC/CVS-ISR approach is straightforward. Hence, first results of CESA processes were calculated and are presented in this thesis.

  5. Determination and Comparison of Carbonyl Stretching Frequency of a Ketone in Its Ground State and the First Electronic Excited State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Subhajit; Roy, Saswata

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an inexpensive experiment to determine the carbonyl stretching frequency of an organic keto compound in its ground state and first electronic excited state. The experiment is simple to execute, clarifies some of the fundamental concepts of spectroscopy, and is appropriate for a basic spectroscopy laboratory course. The…

  6. Low-threshold wavelength-switchable organic nanowire lasers based on excited-state intramolecular proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yan, Yongli; Gu, Jianmin; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2015-06-08

    Coherent light signals generated at the nanoscale are crucial to the realization of photonic integrated circuits. Self-assembled nanowires from organic dyes can provide both a gain medium and an effective resonant cavity, which have been utilized for fulfilling miniaturized lasers. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT), a classical molecular photoisomerization process, can be used to build a typical four-level system, which is more favorable for population inversion. Low-power driven lasing in proton-transfer molecular nanowires with an optimized ESIPT energy-level process has been achieved. With high gain and low loss from the ESIPT, the wires can be applied as effective FP-type resonators, which generated single-mode lasing with a very low threshold. The lasing wavelength can be reversibly switched based on a conformation conversion of the excited keto form in the ESIPT process. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Contribution of electronically excited states to the radiation chemistry of organic systems. Progress report, September 1, 1978-August 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipsky, S.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of n-perfluorohexane to quench both the emission and photoionization current of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in isooctane and in tetramethylsilane has been shown to be consistent with an interaction of perfluorohexane with some relatively long-lived, coherently excited state of TMPD that is generated at the photoionization threshold and which decays either to the emitting state of TMPD or to a geminate ion-pair. The 0/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/ electron impact spectra of the stable isomers of C/sub 3/, C/sub 4/, and C/sub 5/ saturated hydrocarbons are being determined. Preliminary results show large structural effects on the lowest Rydberg singlet-triplet splittings. Two photon excited emission spectra of decalin, bicyclohexyl, and cyclohexane have been observed in good agreement with previously reported one-photon spectra. A weak emission from propylene has also been detected. From measurement of the photosensitized singlet emission of p-xylene by bicyclohexyl excited at 1740 A, it appears that the bicyclohexyl triplet contributes importantly to the sensitization. Also previously reported deviations from Stern-Volmer behavior in the fast-electron-excited process are found too in the photo-excited process (at 1740 A) and therefore cannot be attributed exclusively to ionic processes. The much larger ratio of excimer to monomer intensity in polystyrene as compared to neat liquid benzene appears to be due mainly to a reduced entropy of dissociation of the excimer when the phenyls are tied to the polymer backbone. Excimers formed therefore from distant phenyl groups may manifest themselves at high quencher concentrations and thus provide a new technique for probing polymer conformation.

  8. RESONANT PROCESSES IN STARTING MODES OF SYNCHRONOUS MOTORS WITH CAPACITORS IN THE EXCITATION WINDINGS CIRCUIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Malyar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of a mathematical model that enables to detect resonance modes during asynchronous startup of salient-pole synchronous motors, in which capacitors are switched on to increase the electromagnetic moment in the circuit of the excitation winding. Methodology. The asynchronous mode is described by a system of differential equations of the electric equilibrium of motor circuits written in orthogonal coordinate axes. The basis of the developed algorithm is the mathematical model of the high-level adequacy motor and the projection method for solving the boundary value problem for the equations of the electric equilibrium of the circuits written in orthogonal coordinate axes, taking into account the presence of capacitors in the excitation winding. The coefficients of differential equations are the differential inductances of the motor circuits, which are determined on the basis of the calculation of its magnetic circuit. As a result of the asymmetry of the rotor windings in the asynchronous mode, the current coupling and currents change according to the periodic law. The problem of its definition is solved as a boundary one. Results. A mathematical model for studying the asynchronous characteristics of synchronous motors with capacitors in an excitation winding is developed, by means of which it is possible to investigate the influence of the size of the capacity on the motor's starting properties and the resonance processes which may arise in this case. Scientific novelty. The developed method of mathematical modeling is based on a fundamentally new mathematical basis for the calculation of stationary dynamic modes of nonlinear electromagnetic circuits, which enables to obtain periodic coordinate dependencies, without resorting to the calculation of the transients. The basis of the developed algorithm is based on the approximation of state variables by cubic splines, the projection method of decomposition for the boundary value

  9. Excitation of the lowest CO2 vibrational states by electrons in hypersonic boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenise, I.

    2017-07-01

    The state-to-state vibrational kinetics of a CO2/O2/CO/C/O/e- mixture in a hypersonic boundary layer under conditions compatible with the Mars re-entry is studied. The model adopted treats three CO2 modes (the two degenerated bending modes are approximated as a unique one) as not independent ones. Vibrational-translational transitions in the bending mode, inter-mode exchanges within CO2 molecule and between molecules of different chemical species as well as dissociation-recombination reactions are considered. Attention is paid to the electron-CO2 collisions that cause transitions from the ground vibrational state, CO2(0,0,0), to the first excited ones, CO2(1,0,0), CO2(0,1,0) and CO2(0,0,1). The corresponding processes rate coefficients are obtained starting from the electron energy distribution function, calculated either as an equilibrium Boltzmann distribution at the local temperature or by solving the Boltzmann equation. Results obtained either neglecting or including in the kinetic scheme the electron-CO2 collisions are compared and explained by analysing the rate coefficients of the electron-CO2 collisions.

  10. Minimum in the high-order harmonic generation spectrum from molecules: role of excited states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Yong-Chang; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    that the coherent laser coupling induced between the 2Σ+g(1sσg) ground state and the first excited 2Σ+u(2pσu) state leads to two dominating amplitudes for the high-order harmonic generation that may interfere: amplitudes describing recombination back into the σg and σu states, respectively. These two amplitudes may......We model the process of high-order harmonic generation by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for H+2 in the fixed nuclei approximation including full 3D electron motion for nonvanishing angles between the nuclear axis and the linear polarization of the driving pulse. We show...... interfere destructively or constructively. The effect of a destructive interference is very clear through the occurrence of a minimum in the high-order harmonic spectrum. We show cases where such a minimum in the spectrum is approximately at the position predicted by the simple two-centre interference...

  11. Bimolecular Excited-State Electron Transfer with Surprisingly Long-Lived Radical Ions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2015-09-02

    We explored the excited-state interactions of bimolecular, non-covalent systems consisting of cationic poly[(9,9-di(3,3’-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and 1,4-dicyanobenzene (DCB) using steady-state and time-resolved techniques, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and femtosecond infrared spectroscopies with broadband capabilities. The experimental results demonstrated that photo-induced electron transfer from PFN to DCB occurs on the picosecond time scale, leading to the formation of PFN+• and DCB-• radical ions. Interestingly, real-time observations of the vibrational marker modes on the acceptor side provided direct evidence and insight into the electron transfer process indirectly inferred from UV-Vis experiments. The band narrowing on the picosecond time scale observed on the antisymmetric C-N stretching vibration of the DCB radical anion provides clear experimental evidence that a substantial part of the excess energy is channeled into vibrational modes of the electron transfer product and that the geminate ion pairs dissociate. More importantly, our nanosecond time-resolved data indicate that the charge-separated state is very long lived ( 30 ns) due to the dissociation of the contact radical ion pair into free ions. Finally, the fast electron transfer and slow charge recombination anticipate the current donor−acceptor system with potential applications in organic solar cells.

  12. Picosecond excited state spectroscopy of organic bulk heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieseking, Bjoern; Jaeck, Berthold; Deibel, Carsten [Experimental Physics VI, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Julius- Maximilians-University Wuerzburg, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Dyakonov, Vladimir [Experimental Physics VI, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Julius- Maximilians-University Wuerzburg, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Bavarian Centre for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Bulk heterojunction solar cells comprised of conjugated polymers and fullerene derivatives approach efficiencies of 8 % making this composite system a promising candidate for the application in organic photovoltaics. Different approaches for improving the device performance aim at the physical properties of the material system itself, but a further optimization requires a deeper insight into the elementary processes following the photoexcitation of these blends. Here we present recent time-resolved spectroscopic studies on the conjugated Polymer P3HT blended with different fullerene derivatives employing femtosecond transient absorption (TA) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. For both methods we use an Ti:sapphire-based femtosecond laser system together with two optical parametric amplifiers and a streak camera providing a time resolution in the sub picosecond (TA) and picosecond (PL) regime, respectively. Applying these techniques we studied the recombination dynamics of singlet excitons and polarons after photoexcitation. We discuss our results in terms of performance optimisation of organic solar cells.

  13. Excited states behavior of nucleobases in solution: insights from computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, Roberto; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We review the most significant results obtained in the study of isolated nucleobases in solution by quantum mechanical methods, trying to highlight also the most relevant open issues. We concisely discuss some methodological issues relevant to the study of molecular electronic excited molecular states in condensed phases, focussing on the methods most commonly applied to the study of nucleobases, i.e. continuum models as the Polarizable Continuum Model and explicit solvation models. We analyse how the solvent changes the relative energy of the lowest energy excited states in the Franck-Condon region, their minima and the Conical Intersections among the different states, interpreting the experimental optical spectra, both steady state and time-resolved. Several methods are available for accurately including solvent effects in the Franck-Condon region, and for most of the nucleobases the solvent shift on the different excited states can be considered assessed. The study of the excited state decay, both radiative and non-radiative, in solution still poses instead significant theoretical challenges.

  14. Surface-catalyzed recombination into excited electronic, vibrational, rotational, and kinetic energy states: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofsky, I. L.; Barrett, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments in which recombined CO, CO2, D2O, OH, N2, H2, and O2 molecules desorb from surfaces in excited internal and translational states are briefly reviewed. Unequilibrated distributions predominate from the principally catalytic metal substrates so far investigated. Mean kinetic energies have been observed up to approx. 3x, and in some cases less than, wall-thermal; the velocity distributions generally vary with emission angle, with non-Lambertian particle fluxes. The excitation state populations are found to depend on surface impurities, in an as yet unexplained way.

  15. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelby, Megan L.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Jackson, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Photoexcited Nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), like many open-shell metalloporphyrins, relaxes rapidly through multiple electronic states following an initial porphyrin-based excitation, some involving metal centered electronic configuration changes that could be harnessed catalytically......), structural dynamics before thermalization were not resolved due to the similar to 100 ps duration of the available X-ray probe pulse. Using the femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the Ni center electronic configuration from the initial excited state to the relaxed (d...

  16. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of {beta}-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar ({approx}1 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for {beta}-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower ({approx}0.5 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for {beta}-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number

  17. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C60 fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J; Clikeman, Tyler T; Larson, Bryon W; Boltalina, Olga V; Strauss, Steven H; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-08-17

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1 → T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (ΦISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1 → S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ΦISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (τavg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (τavg ≈ 17 μs and 54 μs for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas τavg ≈ 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited-state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene.

  18. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C 60 fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J.; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Larson, Bryon W.; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-01-01

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1--T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (..phi..ISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1--S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ..phi..ISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (..tau..avg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (..tau..avg approx. 17 us and 54 us for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas ..tau..avg approx. 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited- state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene.

  19. Tracking the charge and spin dynamics of electronic excited states in inorganic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Kelly

    2015-03-01

    Inorganic complexes have many advantageous properties for solar energy applications, including strong visible absorption and photocatalytic activity. Whether used as a photocatalyst or a photosensitizer, the lifetime of electronic excited states and the earth abundance of the molecular components represent a key property for solar energy applications. These dual needs have undermined the usefulness of many coordination compounds. Isoelectronic iron and ruthenium based complexes represent a clear example. Ru-polypyridal based molecules have been the workhorse of solar energy related research and dye sensitized solar cells for decades, but the replacement of low abundance Ru with Fe leads to million-fold reductions in metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state lifetimes. Understanding the origin of this million-fold reduction in lifetime and how to control excited state relaxation in 3d-metal complexes motivates the work I will discuss. We have used the spin sensitivity of hard x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and the intense femtosecond duration pulses generated by the LCLS x-ray laser to probe the spin dynamics in a series of electronically excited [Fe(CN)6-2N(2,2'-bipyridine)N]2 N - 4 complexes, with N = 1-3. These femtosecond resolution measurements demonstrate that modification of the solvent and ligand environment can lengthen the MLCT excited state lifetime by more than two orders of magnitude. They also verify the role of triplet ligand field excited states in the spin crossover dynamics from singlet to quintet spin configurations. Work supported by the AMOS program within the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Probing the excited state dynamics of a new family of Cu(I)-complexes with an enhanced light absorption capacity: excitation-wavelength dependent population of states through branching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Panagiotis A; Tkachenko, Nikolai V

    2013-08-21

    The ultrafast dynamics of six homoleptic Cu(I)-complexes and their respective ligands was examined through time-resolved electronic absorption spectroscopy in the subpicosecond time domain, in a variety of solvents, and at different excitation wavelengths. Results indicate that after excitation of the complexes in the blue part of the spectrum, the initially formed intraligand (IL) singlet excited state decays via two pathways yielding simultaneously both the lower-lying MLCT excited state and the ligand locally excited triplet state. The latter is also observed in the case of the free ligands and relaxes back to the ground state in a timescale of 40 ps. Excitation in the red part results in the formation of the MLCT excited state of the complexes which decays to the ground state through the same intraligand triplet excited state. The solvent viscosity does not affect the overall relaxation kinetics. The short time constant observed for the intersystem crossing of the MLCT singlet excited state is discussed in terms of the contribution of the d-orbitals of copper to the wavefunction of these states.

  1. The MRSDCI/CIS study of excited electronic states of the SF 2 radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.-J.; Huang, M.-B.; Zhou, X.; Yu, S.

    2001-09-01

    The vertical ( Tv) and adiabatic ( T0) excitation energies for singlet electronic excited states of the SF 2 radical have been calculated by using the multireference single and double excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) method and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets augmented by Rydberg functions. The MRSDCI Tv calculations indicate that the X1A1, 1 1A2, 1 1B1, 2 1B1, 2 1A2, 2 1A1, 3 1B1, 4 1B1, 3 1A1, and 1 1B2 states are the 10 lowest-lying singlet states. Based on the MRSDCI//CIS T0 calculations (using CIS optimized geometries for excited states), the A, B, C, E, F, G, H, and I states of SF 2 are assigned to 1 1B1, 2 1B1, 3 1B1, 2 1A2, 2 1A1, 3 1A1, 4 1B1, and 1 1B2, respectively.

  2. The structure of low-lying states in ${}^{140}$Sm studied by Coulomb excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Klintefjord, M.; Görgen, A.; Bauer, C.; Bello Garrote, F.L.; Bönig, S.; Bounthong, B.; Damyanova, A.; Delaroche, J.P.; Fedosseev, V.; Fink, D.A.; Giacoppo, F.; Girod, M.; Hoff, P.; Imai, N.; Korten, W.; Larsen, A.C.; Libert, J.; Lutter, R.; Marsh, B.A.; Molkanov, P.L.; Naïdja, H.; Napiorkowski, P.; Nowacki, F.; Pakarinen, J.; Rapisarda, E.; Reiter, P.; Renstrøm, T.; Rothe, S.; Seliverstov, M.D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Srebrny, J.; Stora, T.; Thöle, P.; Tornyi, T.G.; Tveten, G.M.; Van Duppen, P.; Vermeulen, M.J.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; De Witte, H.; Zielińska, M.

    2016-05-02

    The electromagnetic structure of $^{140}$Sm was studied in a low-energy Coulomb excitation experiment with a radioactive ion beam from the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN. The $2^+$ and $4^+$ states of the ground-state band and a second $2^+$ state were populated by multi-step excitation. The analysis of the differential Coulomb excitation cross sections yielded reduced transition probabilities between all observed states and the spectroscopic quadrupole moment for the $2_1^+$ state. The experimental results are compared to large-scale shell model calculations and beyond-mean-field calculations based on the Gogny D1S interaction with a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian formalism. Simpler geometric and algebraic models are also employed to interpret the experimental data. The results indicate that $^{140}$Sm shows considerable $\\gamma$ softness, but in contrast to earlier speculation no signs of shape coexistence at low excitation energy. This work sheds more light on the onset of deformation and collectivit...

  3. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and ChargeTransfer Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tassle, Aaron Justin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes the development andimplementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probeapparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation ofinvestigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specificattention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highlysymmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes thedevelopment and construction of the experimental apparatus usedthroughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss theinvestigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resultingfrom a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of itsmethyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we areable to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provideevidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT)type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of thecarotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidencefor the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systemsand found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigationof the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsiblefor the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allowsfor a more detailed understanding of the importance of structuraldynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting.

  4. Extended Eckart Theorem and New Variation Method for Excited States of Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Zhuang; Bacalis, N C; Zhou, Qin

    2016-01-01

    We extend the Eckart theorem, from the ground state to excited statew, which introduces an energy augmentation to the variation criterion for excited states. It is shown that the energy of a very good excited state trial function can be slightly lower than the exact eigenvalue. Further, the energy calculated by the trial excited state wave function, which is the closest to the exact eigenstate through Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization to a ground state approximant, is lower than the exact eigenvalue as well. In order to avoid the variation restrictions inherent in the upper bound variation theory based on Hylleraas, Undheim, and McDonald [HUM] and Eckart Theorem, we have proposed a new variation functional Omega-n and proved that it has a local minimum at the eigenstates, which allows approaching the eigenstate unlimitedly by variation of the trial wave function. As an example, we calculated the energy and the radial expectation values of Triplet-S(even) Helium atom by the new variation functional, and by HUM a...

  5. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-05-01

    We combine ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular hydrogen-transfer dynamics in 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) in tetrachloroethene, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol. We analyze the electronic excited states of DHAQ with various possible hydrogen-bonding schemes and provide a general description of the electronic excited-state dynamics based on a systematic analysis of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ exhibits ESIHT dynamics. In this equilibration process, the excited-state population is distributed between the 9,10-quinone (S2) and 1,10-quinone (S1) states while undergoing vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational cooling, and solvation dynamics on the 0.1-50 ps time scale. Transient UV/vis pump-probe data in methanol also suggest additional relaxation dynamics on the subnanosecond time scale, which we tentatively ascribe to hydrogen bond dynamics of DHAQ with the protic solvent, affecting the equilibrium population dynamics within the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. Ultimately, the two excited singlet states decay with a solvent-dependent time constant ranging from 139 to 210 ps. The concomitant electronic ground-state recovery is, however, only partial because a large fraction of the population relaxes to the first triplet state. From the similarity of the time scales involved, we conjecture that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the intramolecular hydrogen bond of DHAQ during the S2/S1 relaxation to either the ground or triplet state. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  6. Cellular hyper-excitability caused by mutations that alter the activation process of voltage-gated sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed-Yassine eAMAROUCH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav are widely expressed as macro-molecular complexes in both excitable and non-excitable tissues. In excitable tissues, the upstroke of the action potential is the result of the passage of a large and rapid influx of sodium ions through these channels. NaV dysfunction has been associated with an increasingly wide range of neurological, muscular and cardiac disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recently identified sodium channel mutations that are linked to hyper-excitability phenotypes and associated with the alteration of the activation process of voltage gated sodium channels. Indeed, several clinical manifestations that demonstrate an alteration of tissue excitability were recently shown to be strongly associated with the presence of mutations that affect the activation process of the voltage-gated sodium channels. These emerging genotype-phenotype correlations have expanded the clinical spectrum of sodium channelopathies to include disorders which feature a hyper-excitability phenotype that may or may not be associated with a cardiomyopathy. The p.I141V mutation in SCN4A and SCN5A, as well as its homologous p.I136V mutation in SCN9A, are interesting examples of mutations that have been linked to inherited hyperexcitability myotonia, exercise-induced polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and erythromelalgia, respectively. Regardless of which sodium channel isoform is investigated, the substitution of the isoleucine to valine in the locus 141 induces similar modifications in the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated sodium channels by shifting the voltage-dependence of steady state activation towards more negative potentials.

  7. Photostability of a fluorescent marker under pulsed excited-state depletion through stimulated emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyba, Marcus; Hell, Stefan W

    2003-09-01

    Saturated stimulated-emission depletion (STED) of a fluorescent marker has been shown to break the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy and to facilitate spatial resolution down to a few tens of nanometers. Here we investigate the photostability of a fluorophore that, in this concept, is repeatedly excited and depleted by synchronized laser pulses. Our study of bacteria labeled with RH-414, a membrane marker, reveals that increasing the duration of the STED pulse from approximately 10 to 160 ps fundamentally improves the photostability of the dye. At the same time the STED efficiency is maintained. The observed photobleaching of RH-414 is due primarily to multiphoton absorption from its ground state. One can counteract photobleaching by employing STED pulses that range from 150 ps to approximately half of the lifetime of the excited state. The results also have implications for multiphoton excitation microscopy.

  8. Conformational analysis of acetamide in the ground and lowest excited electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukachev, N. V.; Bataev, V. A.; Godunov, I. A.

    2017-05-01

    For acetamide molecule (CH3CONH2) in the ground (S0) and lowest excited singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) electronic states calculations of equilibrium geometry parameters, harmonic vibrational frequencies and barriers to conformational transitions (also conformer energy differences in excited states) using following ab initio methods: MP2, CCSD(T), CASSCF, CASPT2 and MRCI were performed. One-, two- and three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) sections by different large amplitude motions (LAM) coordinates were calculated by means of MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ (S0) and CASPT2/cc-pVTZ (S1, T1). As a result of electronic excitation, both CCON and CNH2 fragments become pyramidal. On 2D PES sections by torsion (CN) and inversion coordinates there are six minima forming three pairs of enantiomers. Using PES sections different anharmonic vibrational problems were solved and the frequencies of large amplitude vibrations were estimated.

  9. First experimental evidence of 2He decay from 18Ne excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Rapisarda, E; Cardella, G; De Napoli, M; Raciti, G; Sfienti, C

    2010-01-01

    Two-proton decay from 18Ne excited states has been studied by complete kinematical detection of the decay products. The 18Ne nucleus has been produced as a radioactive beam by 20Ne projectile fragmentation at 45 AMeV on a 9Be target, using the FRIBs in-flight facility of the LNS. The 18Ne at 33 AMeV incident energy has been excited via Coulomb excitation on a natPb target. The correlated 2p emission has been disentangled from the uncorrelated 2p emission using a high granularity particle detector setup allowing the reconstruction of momentum and angle correlations of the two emitted protons. The obtained results unambiguously show that the 6.15 MeV 18Ne state two-proton decay proceeds through 2He emission (31%) and democratic or virtual sequential decay (69%).

  10. Selective two-photon excitation of a vibronic state by correlated photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Hisaki

    2011-03-28

    We theoretically investigate the two-photon excitation of a molecular vibronic state by correlated photons with energy anticorrelation. A Morse oscillator having three sets of vibronic states is used, as an example, to evaluate the selectivity and efficiency of two-photon excitation. We show that a vibrational mode can be selectively excited with high efficiency by the correlated photons, without phase manipulation or pulse-shaping techniques. This can be achieved by controlling the quantum correlation so that the photon pair concurrently has two pulse widths, namely, a temporally narrow width and a spectrally narrow width. Though this concurrence is seemingly contradictory, we can create such a photon pair by tailoring the quantum correlation between two photons.

  11. Charge-transfer excited states in aqueous DNA: Insights from many-body Green's function theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huabing; Ma, Yuchen; Mu, Jinglin; Liu, Chengbu; Rohlfing, Michael

    2014-06-06

    Charge-transfer (CT) excited states play an important role in the excited-state dynamics of DNA in aqueous solution. However, there is still much controversy on their energies. By ab initio many-body Green's function theory, together with classical molecular dynamics simulations, we confirm the existence of CT states at the lower energy side of the optical absorption maximum in aqueous DNA as observed in experiments. We find that the hydration shell can exert strong effects (∼1  eV) on both the electronic structure and CT states of DNA molecules through dipole electric fields. In this case, the solvent cannot be simply regarded as a macroscopic screening medium as usual. The influence of base stacking and base pairing on the CT states is also discussed.

  12. Fluorescence and picosecond induced absorption from the lowest singlet excited states of quercetin in solutions and polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, S. L.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Buganov, O. V.; Knyukshto, V. N.; Raichenok, T. F.

    2017-03-01

    The spectroscopic and photophysical properties of the biologically important plant antioxidant quercetin in organic solvents, polymer films of polyvinyl alcohol, and a buffer solution at pH 7.0 are studied by stationary luminescence and femtosecond laser spectroscopy at room temperature and 77 K. The large magnitude of the dipole moment of the quercetin molecule in the excited Franck-Condon state μ e FC = 52.8 C m indicates the dipolar nature of quercetin in this excited state. The transient induced absorption spectra S 1→ S n in all solvents are characterized by a short-wave band at λ abs max = 460 nm with exponential decay times in the range of 10.0-20.0 ps. In the entire spectral range at times of >100 ps, no residual induced absorption was observed that could be attributed to the triplet-triplet transitions T 1 → T k in quercetin. In polar solvents, two-band fluorescence was also recorded at room temperature, which is due to the luminescence of the initial enol form of quercetin ( 415 nm) and its keto form with a transferred proton (550 nm). The short-wave band is absent in nonpolar 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF). The spectra of fluorescence and fluorescence excitation exhibit a low dependence on the wavelength of excitation and detection, which may be related to the solvation and conformational changes in the quercetin molecule. Decreasing the temperature of a glassy-like freezing quercetin solution in ethanol and 2-MTHF to 77 K leads to a strong increase in the intensity (by a factor of 100) of both bands. The energy circuits for the proton transfer process are proposed depending on the polarity of the medium. The main channel for the exchange of electronic excitation energy in the quercetin molecule at room temperature is the internal conversion S 1 ⇝ S 0, induced by the state with a proton transfer.

  13. Theoretical study on water-mediated excited-state multiple proton transfer in 7-azaindole: significance of hydrogen bond rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xue-fang; Yamazaki, Shohei; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2012-11-01

    Excited-state multiple proton transfer (ESMPT) in the cluster of 7-azaindole with three water molecules [7-azaindole(H(2)O)(3)] is theoretically investigated by the TDDFT, CASPT2, and CC2 methods. Examination of the potential energy surface in the first excited state indicates that ESMPT in 7-azaindole(H(2)O)(3) proceeds initially with the rearrangement of hydrogen bond structure of water molecules from a bridged-planar isomer to a cyclic-nonplanar isomer, followed by triple proton transfer in the latter. This reaction is found to be energetically more favorable than quadruple proton transfer in the bridged-planar isomer without hydrogen bond reorganization. It is also shown that all proton-transfer processes follow a concerted mechanism rather than a stepwise mechanism. The computational results show good consistency with the unexpected experimental observations as to the electronic spectra and excited-state lifetime. In particular, the barrier of the hydrogen bond rearrangement is found to be less than 1 kcal/mol, consistent with the missing vibronic bands for 7-azaindole(H(2)O)(3) with an excess energy of more than 200 cm(-1) in the S(1) state.

  14. Stark-induced adiabatic Raman ladder for preparing highly vibrationally excited quantum states of molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Nandini; Perreault, William E.; Zare, Richard N.

    2017-07-01

    We present a multi-color ladder excitation scheme that exploits Stark-induced adiabatic Raman passage to selectively populate a highly excited vibrational level of a molecule. We suggest that this multi-color coherent ladder excitation provides a practical way of accessing levels near the vibrational dissociation limit as well as the dissociative continuum, which would allow the generation of an entangled pair of fragments with near-zero relative kinetic energy. Specifically, we consider four- and six-photon coherent excitation of molecular hydrogen to high vibrational levels via intermediate vibrational levels, which are pairwise coupled by two-photon resonant interaction. Using a sequence of three partially overlapping, single-mode, nanosecond laser pulses we show that the sixth vibrational level of H2, which is too weakly coupled to be easily accessed by direct two-photon Raman excitation from the ground vibrational level, can be efficiently populated without leaving any population stranded in the intermediate level. Furthermore, we show that the fourteenth vibrational level of H2, which is the highest vibrational level in the ground electronic state with a binding energy of 22 meV, can be efficiently and selectively populated using a sequence of four pulses. The present technique offers the unique possibility of preparing entangled quantum states of H atoms without resorting to an ultracold system.

  15. Tetracarboxy-phthalocyanines: From excited state dynamics to photodynamic inactivation against Bovine herpesvirus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocca, Leandro H Z; Oliveira, Taise M A; Gotardo, Fernando; Teles, Amanda V; Menegatti, Ricardo; Siqueira, Jonathas P; Mendonça, Cleber R; Bataus, Luiz A M; Ribeiro, Anderson O; Souza, Thalita F M; Souza, Guilherme R L; Gonçalves, Pablo J; De Boni, Leonardo

    2017-10-01

    Herein we present the excited state dynamic of zinc and aluminum tetracarboxy-phthalocyanines (ZnPc and AlPc) and its application in the photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) in vitro. The excited state dynamic provides valuable data to describe the excited state properties of potential optical limiters and/or photosensitizers (PSs), such as: the excited state cross-sections, fluorescence lifetime and triplet state quantum yield. The excited state characterization was performed using three different Z-scan techniques: Single Pulse, White Light Continuum and Pulse Train. Considering the photodynamic inactivation of BoHV-1, an initial viral suspension containing 10 5.75 TCID 50 /mL was incubated with the PSs for 1h at 37°C under agitation and protected from light. The samples were placed in microtiter plates and irradiated (180mW/cm 2 ). During irradiation, a sample was taken every 15min and the viability of the virus was evaluated. The results show that both phthalocyanines were efficient against viruses. However, a higher photodynamic efficiency was observed by ZnPc, which can be attributed to its higher triplet and singlet quantum yields. The results presented here are important for animal health (treatment of BoHV-1) and also open up a field of studies to use AlPc and ZnPc as potential agents against a wide range of microorganisms of veterinary interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Before there was light : Excited state dynamics in luminescent (nano)materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouw, F.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413318036

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we examine two types of luminescent materials: colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (also known as quantum dots), and crystals doped with lanthanide ions. These materials convert one color of light to another. By investigating the dynamics of the excited state, we gain new insights

  17. Excited states populated via nucleon transfer in the reaction [sup 32]S+[sup 208]Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradi, L.; Petrache, C.M.; Ackermann, D.; De Angelis, G.; Moreno, H.; Napoli, D.R.; Spolaore, P.; Stefanini, A.M. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)); Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.F.; Signorini, C. (Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica INFN, Padua (Italy)); Pollarolo, G. (Turin Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica INFN, Turin (Italy))

    1993-01-01

    The population strengths of excited states in nuclei produced via transfer reactions in the 185 MeV[sup 32]S+[sup 208]Pb reaction have been investigated by heavy-ion-[gamma] coincidence techniques. The cross sections extracted from the [gamma] spectra, have been analyzed in the framework of the Complex WKB approximation theory. (orig.).

  18. Discrete excitation of mode pulses using a diode-pumped solid-state digital laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, Sandile

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate novel method of generating discrete excitation of on-demand Lagaurre-Gaussian (LG) mode pulses, in a diode pumped solid-state digital laser. The digital laser comprises of an intra-cavity spatial light...

  19. Supporting Information for the article entitled, “Excited State Charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supporting Information for the article entitled, “Excited State Charge Transfer Reaction in (Mixed Solvent + Electrolyte) Systems: Role of Reactant-Solvent and ... S2: Composition dependence of the reaction time (, upper panels) and long time ( , lower panels) constants obtained from bi-exponential fit of the collected LE ...

  20. Temperature dependent excited state relaxation of a red emitting DNA-templated silver nanocluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerretani, Cecilia; Carro-Temboury, Miguel R.; Krause, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The nanosecond excited state temporal and spectral relaxation of a purified, red-emitting DNA-templated silver nanocluster (DNA–AgNC) was characterized as a function of temperature. The findings are explained by introducing a phenomenological electronic structure diagram. The reproducibility...

  1. Ponderomotive dressing of doubly-excited states with intensity-controlled laser light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We laser-dress several doubly-excited states in helium. Tuning the coupling-laser intensity from perturbative to the strong-coupling regime, we are able to measure phases imprinted on the two-electron wavefunctions, and observe a new continuum coupling mechanism.

  2. Symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state of meso-linked BODIPY dyads

    KAUST Repository

    Whited, Matthew T.

    2012-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of symmetric BODIPY dyads where the chromophores are attached at the meso position, using either a phenylene bridge or direct linkage. Both molecules undergo symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state, and the directly linked dyad serves as a visible-light-absorbing analogue of 9,9′-bianthryl.

  3. Fractionalized excitations in the spin-liquid state of a kagome-lattice antiferromagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tian-Heng; Helton, Joel S; Chu, Shaoyan; Nocera, Daniel G; Rodriguez-Rivera, Jose A; Broholm, Collin; Lee, Young S

    2012-12-20

    The experimental realization of quantum spin liquids is a long-sought goal in physics, as they represent new states of matter. Quantum spin liquids cannot be described by the broken symmetries associated with conventional ground states. In fact, the interacting magnetic moments in these systems do not order, but are highly entangled with one another over long ranges. Spin liquids have a prominent role in theories describing high-transition-temperature superconductors, and the topological properties of these states may have applications in quantum information. A key feature of spin liquids is that they support exotic spin excitations carrying fractional quantum numbers. However, detailed measurements of these 'fractionalized excitations' have been lacking. Here we report neutron scattering measurements on single-crystal samples of the spin-1/2 kagome-lattice antiferromagnet ZnCu(3)(OD)(6)Cl(2) (also called herbertsmithite), which provide striking evidence for this characteristic feature of spin liquids. At low temperatures, we find that the spin excitations form a continuum, in contrast to the conventional spin waves expected in ordered antiferromagnets. The observation of such a continuum is noteworthy because, so far, this signature of fractional spin excitations has been observed only in one-dimensional systems. The results also serve as a hallmark of the quantum spin-liquid state in herbertsmithite.

  4. Ab initio excited states from the in-medium similarity renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzuchowski, N. M.; Morris, T. D.; Bogner, S. K.

    2017-04-01

    We present two new methods for performing ab initio calculations of excited states for closed-shell systems within the in-medium similarity renormalization group (IMSRG) framework. Both are based on combining the IMSRG with simple many-body methods commonly used to target excited states, such as the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) and equations-of-motion (EOM) techniques. In the first approach, a two-step sequential IMSRG transformation is used to drive the Hamiltonian to a form where a simple TDA calculation (i.e., diagonalization in the space of 1 p 1 h excitations) becomes exact for a subset of eigenvalues. In the second approach, EOM techniques are applied to the IMSRG ground-state-decoupled Hamiltonian to access excited states. We perform proof-of-principle calculations for parabolic quantum dots in two dimensions and the closed-shell nuclei 16O and 22O. We find that the TDA-IMSRG approach gives better accuracy than the EOM-IMSRG when calculations converge, but it is otherwise lacking the versatility and numerical stability of the latter. Our calculated spectra are in reasonable agreement with analogous EOM-coupled-cluster calculations. This work paves the way for more interesting applications of the EOM-IMSRG approach to calculations of consistently evolved observables such as electromagnetic strength functions and nuclear matrix elements, and extensions to nuclei within one or two nucleons of a closed shell by generalizing the EOM ladder operator to include particle-number nonconserving terms.

  5. Polarization of the excited states of twisted ethylene in a non-symmetrical environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, R.W J; van Duijnen, P.T.; de Vries, Alex

    1996-01-01

    The polarization behavior of the low lying excited states in the vicinity of the perpendicularly twisted (D-2d) ethylene has been investigated in a quantum mechanical CISD approach, in which the quantum system was embedded in a polarized dielectric continuum modeling a non-symmetrical distribution

  6. Excited-state spectroscopy of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanath, M; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3)$_F$ symmetry for flavour, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) symmetry for orbital angular momenta. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6)$\\otimes$O(3) symmetry.

  7. Excited-state spectroscopy of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanath, M. [Tata Institute; Edwards, Robert G. [JLAB; Mathur, Nilmani [Tata Institute; Peardon, Michael [Trinity College

    2014-07-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3)F symmetry for flavour, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) symmetry for orbital angular momenta. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6)ⓍO(3) symmetry.

  8. Selective excitation in a three-state system using a hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yunheung; Jo, Hanlae; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    The chirped-pulse interaction in the adiabatic coupling regime induces cyclic permutations of the energy states of a three-level system in the $V$-type configuration, which process is known as the three-level chirped rapid adiabatic passage. Here we show that a spectral hole in a chirped pulse can turn on and off one of the two adiabatic crossing points of this process, reducing the system to an effective two-level system. The given hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic transition results in selective excitation of the three-level system, controlled by the laser intensity and spectral position of the hole as well as the sign of the chirp parameter. Experiments are performed with shaped femtosecond laser pulses and the three lowest energy-levels (5S$_{1/2}$, 5P$_{1/2}$, and 5P$_{3/2}$) of atomic rubidium ($^{85}$Rb), of which the result shows good agreement with the theoretically analyzed dynamics. The result indicates that our method, being combined with the ordinary chirped-RAP, implements an adiabatic transitions b...

  9. Triplet excited state properties in variable gap π-conjugated donor–acceptor–donor chromophores

    KAUST Repository

    Cekli, Seda

    2016-02-12

    A series of variable band-gap donor–acceptor–donor (DAD) chromophores capped with platinum(II) acetylide units has been synthesized and fully characterized by electrochemical and photophysical methods, with particular emphasis placed on probing triplet excited state properties. A counter-intuitive trend of increasing fluorescence quantum efficiency and lifetime with decreasing excited state energy (optical gap) is observed across the series of DAD chromophores. Careful study of the excited state dynamics, including triplet yields (as inferred from singlet oxygen sensitization), reveals that the underlying origin of the unusual trend in the fluorescence parameters is that the singlet–triplet intersystem crossing rate and yield decrease with decreasing optical gap. It is concluded that the rate of intersystem crossing decreases as the LUMO is increasingly localized on the acceptor unit in the DAD chromophore, and this result is interpreted as arising because the extent of spin–orbit coupling induced by the platinum heavy metal centers decreases as the LUMO is more localized on the acceptor. In addition to the trend in intersystem crossing, the results show that the triplet decay rates follow the Energy Gap Law correlation over a 1.8 eV range of triplet energy and 1000-fold range of triplet decay rates. Finally, femtosecond transient absorption studies for the DAD chromophores reveals a strong absorption in the near-infrared region which is attributed to the singlet excited state. This spectral band appears to be general for DAD chromophores, and may be a signature of the charge transfer (CT) singlet excited state.

  10. Structure of excited states in nuclei near doubly magic {sup 100}SN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorska, M.

    1998-11-01

    The three neutron-deficient nuclei {sup 94}Pd, {sup 98}Cd and {sup 104}Sn in the vicinity of {sup 100}Sn were investigated by means of in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of excited states. The isomeric decays in {sup 94}Pd and {sup 98}Cd were studied for the first time with an exclusive experimental setup for delayed {gamma}-ray detection with complete exit channel identification based on information from neutron and charged-particle filter detectors. The structure of excited states of {sup 94}Pd showed the first indication of increasing proton-neutron interaction towards the N=Z line in this region of nuclei, that in turn might be related to increased proton-neutron pairing correlations predicted in T{sub z}=0 nuclei. The closest neighbours of {sup 100}Sn with two active particles, {sup 98}Cd and {sup 102}Sn, are now known with their lowest excited states. The measured reduced transition probabilities for the decay of the isomeric 8{sup +} and 6{sup +} states in {sup 98}Cd and {sup 102}Sn, respectively, allowed to extract an effective quadrupole charge for neutron and proton in this region of nuclei based on the high configurational purity of the states. While the neutron effective charge appeared to be large and in agreement with expectation, the proton effective charge value is very small (e{sub {pi}}{<=}1). This controversial result, which would indicate that {sup 100}Sn is a very good closed shell nucleus with respect to quadrupole excitation, is not understood. An experimental reason for this result, related to existence of a core excited isomer, observed in the experiment by means of its half life but not {gamma}-rays, which may have escaped observation, can not be definitely excluded and is left as possible explanation. (orig.)

  11. Electron impact excitation of the D states of Mg, Ca and Sr atoms ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    decay of the atom from D → P and then P → S) is required [3,7–9]. ... for the excitation of helium from its ground 1S state to the 3 1D state at 40 eV. We ..... Further, we use for the projectile electron distorted wave function. FDW i(f) the following relativistic form of partial wave expansion: F± ch,µch (kch, r) = 1. (2π)3/2 ∑ κm.

  12. Neutron correlations in the decay of the first excited state of {sup 11}Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.K., E-mail: jsmith@triumf.ca [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Baumann, T.; Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Brown, J. [Department of Physics, Wabash College, Crawfordsville, IN 47933 (United States); DeYoung, P.A. [Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422 (United States); Frank, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Augustana College, Rock Island, IL 61201 (United States); Jones, M.D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Kohley, Z. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Luther, B. [Department of Physics, Concordia College, Moorhead, MN 56562 (United States); Marks, B. [Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422 (United States); Spyrou, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Stephenson, S.L. [Department of Physics, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA 17325 (United States); Thoennessen, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Volya, A. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The decay of unbound excited {sup 11}Li was measured after being populated by a two-proton removal from a {sup 13}B beam at 71 MeV/nucleon. Decay energy spectra and Jacobi plots were obtained from measurements of the momentum vectors of the {sup 9}Li fragment and neutrons. A resonance at an excitation energy of ∼1.2 MeV was observed. The kinematics of the decay are equally well fit by a simple dineutron-like model or a phase-space model that includes final state interactions. A sequential decay model can be excluded.

  13. Structure and conformational dynamics of molecules in the excited electronic states: theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godunov, I. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Maslov, D. V.; Yakovlev, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    The structure of conformational non-rigid molecules in the excited electronic states are investigated by joint theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical part of work consist of two stages. In first stage the ab initio quantum-chemical calculations are carried out using high level methods. In second stage the vibrational problems of the various dimensions are solved by variational method for vibrations of large amplitude. In experimental part of work the vibronic spectra are investigated: gas-phase absorption and also, fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules. Some examples are considered.

  14. Electronic, structural and optical properties of hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals: the role of the excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantele, G.; Ninno, D.; Iadonisi, G. [Coherentia-INFM and Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' - Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Degoli, Elena; Bisi, O.; Ossicini, Stefano [INFM-S' ' 3 and Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Fogliani, 42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Luppi, Eleonora; Magri, Rita [INFM-S' ' 3 and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy)

    2005-06-01

    In this paper we report on a first-principle calculation of the electronic and structural properties of hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals both in the ground- and in an excited-state configuration. The presence of an electron-hole pair created under excitation is taken into account and its effects on both the electronic spectrum and the cluster geometry are pointed out. The interpretation of the results is done within a four-level model, which also allows the explanation of the experimentally observed Stokes shift. Size-related aspects are also analysed and discussed. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Fermionic Basis in Conformal Field Theory and Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz for Excited States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Boos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We generalize the results of [Comm. Math. Phys. 299 (2010, 825-866] (hidden Grassmann structure IV to the case of excited states of the transfer matrix of the six-vertex model acting in the so-called Matsubara direction. We establish an equivalence between a scaling limit of the partition function of the six-vertex model on a cylinder with quasi-local operators inserted and special boundary conditions, corresponding to particle-hole excitations, on the one hand, and certain three-point correlation functions of conformal field theory (CFT on the other hand. As in hidden Grassmann structure IV, the fermionic basis developed in previous papers and its conformal limit are used for a description of the quasi-local operators. In paper IV we claimed that in the conformal limit the fermionic creation operators generate a basis equivalent to the basis of the descendant states in the conformal field theory modulo integrals of motion suggested by A. Zamolodchikov (1987. Here we argue that, in order to completely determine the transformation between the above fermionic basis and the basis of descendants in the CFT, we need to involve excitations. On the side of the lattice model we use the excited-state TBA approach. We consider in detail the case of the descendant at level 8.

  16. Excitation energy and spins of the Yrast superdeformed states in {sup 193}Tl; Energie d`excitation et spins des etats superdeformes Yrast de {sup 193}Tl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouneau, S.; Duprat, J.; Azaiez, F. [Experimental Research Division, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)] [and others

    1999-11-01

    Discrete {gamma}-rays of high energy connecting states of the two Yrast superdeformed bands in {sup 193}Tl to the normal deformed states have been identified. Thus, for the first time, in an odd SD nucleus, it has been possible to propose an excitation energy and spins of the two lowest bands. (authors) 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Depopulation of lowly excited ns-states of Rb colliding with the He atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, S.K. [Jagdam College, Chapra (India). Dept. of Physics; Khan, A.A. [ZAI College, Siwan (India). Dept. of Physics; Kumar, V. [Rajendra College, Chapra (India). Dept. of Physics; Kumar, A. [JP University, Chapra (India). Dept. of Physics

    1996-03-28

    A semiclassical impact-parameter method has been used to study the total depopulation of lowly excited ns-states of the Rb atom colliding with ground-state He in the thermal energy region. A fairly large basis set of STO has been used to generate MO states and then a 14-state calculation has been carried out to evaluate the total as well as individual cross sections for quenching. A comparative study with the previously investigated Li-He and Na-He pairs is also presented. (Author).

  18. Role of two-electron excitation-ionization processes in the ionization of lithium atoms by fast ion impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, T.; Khazai, N.; Gulyás, L.

    2014-06-01

    We study excitation and ionization in the 1.5-MeV/amu O8+-Li collision system, which was the subject of a recent reaction-microscope-type experiment [D. Fischer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 113202 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.113202]. Starting from an independent-electron model based on determinantal wave functions and using a single-electron basis generator method calculation and a single-electron continuum distorted-wave with eikonal initial-state calculation, we show that pure single ionization of a lithium K-shell electron is too weak a process to explain the measured electron-energy-differential cross section. Rather, our analysis suggests that two-electron excitation-ionization processes occur and have to be taken into account when comparing with the data. Good agreement is obtained only if we replace the independent-electron calculation by an independent-event model for one of the excitation-ionization processes and also take a shake-off process into account.

  19. Doppler- and recoil-free laser excitation of Rydberg states via three-photon transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabtsev, I. I.; Beterov, I. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A. [A. V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, Prospekt Lavrentyeva 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    Three-photon laser excitation of Rydberg states by three different laser beams can be arranged in a starlike geometry that simultaneously eliminates the recoil effect and Doppler broadening. Our analytical and numerical calculations for a particular laser excitation scheme 5S{sub 1/2}{yields}5P{sub 3/2}{yields}6S{sub 1/2}{yields}nP in Rb atoms have shown that, compared to the one- and two-photon laser excitation, this approach provides much narrower linewidth and longer coherence time for both cold atom samples and hot vapors, if the intermediate one-photon resonances of the three-photon transition are detuned by more than respective single-photon Doppler widths. This method can be used to improve fidelity of Rydberg quantum gates and precision of spectroscopic measurements in Rydberg atoms.

  20. Time-resolved study of excited states of N2 near its first ionization threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Angelica; Prince, Kevin C.; Richter, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Two-photon, two-color double-resonance ionization spectroscopy combining synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet radiation with a tunable near-infrared (NIR) laser has been used to investigate gerade symmetry states of the nitrogen molecule. The rotationally resolved spectrum of an autoionizing 1Σg- state has been excited via the intermediate c4 (v = 0) 1Πu Rydberg state. We present the analysis of the band located at Tv = 10 800.7 ± 2 cm-1 with respect to the intermediate state, 126 366 ± 11 cm-1 with respect to the ground state, approximately 700 cm-1 above the first ionization threshold. From the analysis a rotational constant of Bv = 1.700 ± 0.005 cm-1 has been determined for this band. Making use of the pulsed structure of the two radiation beams, lifetimes of several rotational levels of the intermediate state have been measured. We also report rotationally-averaged fluorescence lifetimes (300 K) of several excited electronic states accessible from the ground state by absorption of one photon in the range of 13.85-14.9 eV. The averaged lifetimes of the c4 (0) and c5 (0) states are 5.6 and 4.4 ns, respectively, while the b' (12), c'4 (4, 5, 6), and c'5 (0) states all have lifetimes in the range of hundreds of picoseconds.

  1. Measurement of the excited-state transverse hyperfine coupling in NV centers via dynamic nuclear polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggiali, F.; Cappellaro, P.; Fabbri, N.

    2017-05-01

    Precise knowledge of a quantum system's Hamiltonian is a critical pre-requisite for its use in many quantum information technologies. Here, we report a method for the precise characterization of the nonsecular part of the excited-state Hamiltonian of an electronic-nuclear spin system in diamond. The method relies on the investigation of the dynamic nuclear polarization mediated by the electronic spin, which is currently exploited as a primary tool for initializing nuclear qubits and performing enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance. By measuring the temporal evolution of the population of the ground-state hyperfine levels of a nitrogen-vacancy center, we obtain the first direct estimation of the excited-state transverse hyperfine coupling between its electronic and nitrogen nuclear spin. Our method could also be applied to other electron-nuclear spin systems, such as those related to defects in silicon carbide.

  2. Dynamics of charge-transfer excited states relevant to photochemical energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, E.C.

    1993-01-01

    A systematic study of intramolecular photoassociation and photoinduced charge transfer (CT) was initiated in bichromophoric systems of M-X-M, where two identical aromatic hydrocarbons M are joined by X=CH[sub 2], O, NH, etc. Dinaphthylamines, dinaphthylethers, and dinaphthylmethanes in nonpolar solvents form triplet excimers, following inter system crossing of singlets to the triplet manifold; in polar solvents, the molecule forms an intramolecular CT state. The interchromophore interaction study was extended to N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine. The lowest excited singlet states of the dinaphthylamines were studied by semiempirical quantum chemical methods. Exciplex formation was studied in excited states of jet-cooled van der Waals complexes, such as fluorene/substituted benzenes and 1-cyanonaphthalene-aliphatic amines.

  3. Excited state potential energy surfaces of bistridentate RuII complexes - A TD-DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österman, Tomas; Persson, Petter

    2012-10-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations have been used to investigate low-energy singlet and triplet excited state potential energy surfaces (PES) of two prototype RuII-bistridentate complexes: [RuII(tpy)2]2+ (tpy is 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) and [RuII(dqp)2]2+ (dqp is 2,6-di(quinolin-8-yl)pyridine). Solvent effects were considered using a self-consistent reaction field scheme. The calculations provide information about the excited state manifold along pathways for activated decay of metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited states via metal-centered (MC) states for the two complexes. Significant differences in the energy profiles of the investigated PESs are explained through characterization of the electronic properties of the involved states calculated by the TD-DFT calculations. Finally, implications of the computational results for the design of octahedral metal complexes utilizing ligand field splitting (LFS) strategies for efficient light-harvesting in photochemical applications such as artificial photosynthesis are discussed.

  4. Search for excited quarks of light and heavy flavor in $ \\gamma $+jet final states in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Marchesini, Ivan; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Beghin, Diego; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dorney, Brian; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Seva, Tomislav; Starling, Elizabeth; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caputo, Claudio; Caudron, Adrien; David, Pieter; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Saggio, Alessia; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Zobec, Joze; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Coelho, Eduardo; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Sanchez Rosas, Luis Junior; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Thiel, Mauricio; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Yuan, Li; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Sijing; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Jing; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Segura Delgado, Manuel Alejandro; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Starodumov, Andrei; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; El-khateeb, Esraa; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Kirschenmann, Henning; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Havukainen, Joona; Heikkilä, Jaana Kristiina; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Laurila, Santeri; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Siikonen, Hannu; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Leloup, Clément; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Amendola, Chiara; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Khvedelidze, Arsen; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Guthoff, Moritz; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Aggleton, Robin; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Malte; Karavdina, Anastasia; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Lapsien, Tobias; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baselga, Marta; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Faltermann, Nils; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Harrendorf, Marco Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Karathanasis, George; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Gianneios, Paraskevas; Katsoulis, Panagiotis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Tsitsonis, Dimitrios; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Surányi, Olivér; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Borgonovi, Lisa; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Ravera, Fabio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Beschi, Andrea; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lujan, Paul; Margoni, Martino; Maron, Gaetano; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Torassa, Ezio; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Reyes-Almanza, Rogelio; Ramirez-Sanchez, Gabriel; Duran-Osuna, Cecilia; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Rabadán-Trejo, Raúl Iraq; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Eysermans, Jan; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Galinhas, Bruno; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Strong, Giles; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Alexakhin, Vadim; Bunin, Pavel; Golunov, Alexander; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbounov, Nikolai; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sosnov, Dmitry; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Godizov, Anton; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Mandrik, Petr; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Bachiller, Irene; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Moran, Dermot; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Curras, Esteban; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Akgun, Bora; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bendavid, Joshua; Bianco, Michele; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Deelen, Nikkie; Dobson, Marc; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fallavollita, Francesco; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gilbert, Andrew; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jafari, Abideh; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Rabady, Dinyar; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Stakia, Anna; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Verweij, Marta; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Caminada, Lea; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Backhaus, Malte; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dorfer, Christian; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Reichmann, Michael; Sanz Becerra, Diego Alejandro; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Del Burgo, Riccardo; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Schweiger, Korbinian; Seitz, Claudia; Takahashi, Yuta; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Cheng, Kai-yu; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Steen, Arnaud; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Bat, Ayse; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Tok, Ufuk Guney; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Nazlim Agaras, Merve; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Köseoglu, Ilknur; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Davignon, Olivier; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Linacre, Jacob; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Auzinger, Georg; Bainbridge, Robert; Borg, Johan; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Elwood, Adam; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Matsushita, Takashi; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Palladino, Vito; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wardle, Nicholas; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Zahid, Sema; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Smith, Caleb; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hadley, Mary; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Lee, Jangbae; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Pazzini, Jacopo; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Breedon, Richard; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Stolp, Dustin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Regnard, Simon; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Si, Weinan; Wang, Long; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Gilbert, Dylan; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Quach, Dan; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Alyari, Maral; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Joshi, Bhargav Madhusudan; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Shi, Kun; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Santra, Arka; Sharma, Varun; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Trauger, Hallie; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Feng, Yongbin; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Hu, Miao; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Hiltbrand, Joshua; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Wadud, Mohammad Abrar; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Freer, Chad; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wamorkar, Tanvi; Wang, Bingran; Wisecarver, Andrew; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Bucci, Rachael; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Li, Wenzhao; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Siddireddy, Prasanna; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wightman, Andrew; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Higginbotham, Samuel; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Das, Souvik; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Peng, Cheng-Chieh; Qiu, Hao; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xiao, Rui; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Freed, Sarah; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Kilpatrick, Matthew; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Shi, Wei; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Zhang, Aobo; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Ciesielski, Robert; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Mengke, Tielige; Muthumuni, Samila; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Padeken, Klaas; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Joyce, Matthew; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Poudyal, Nabin; Sturdy, Jared; Thapa, Prakash; Zaleski, Shawn; Brodski, Michael; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    A search is presented for excited quarks of light and heavy flavor that decay to $ \\gamma $+jet final states. The analysis is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV at the LHC. A signal would appear as a resonant contribution to the invariant mass spectrum of the $ \\gamma $+jet system, above the background expected from standard model processes. No resonant excess is found, and upper limits are set on the product of the excited quark cross section and its branching fraction as a function of its mass. These are the most stringent limits to date in the $ \\gamma $+jet final state, and exclude excited light quarks with masses below 5.5 TeV and excited b quarks with masses below 1.8 TeV, assuming standard model couplings.

  5. Switching of the triplet excited state of rhodamine/naphthaleneimide dyads: an experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoneng; Zhao, Jianzhang; Lou, Zhangrong; Li, Shujing; Wu, Huijian; Han, Ke-Li

    2015-01-02

    Rhodamine-bromonaphthaleneimide (RB-NI) and rhodamine-bromonaphthalenediimide (RB-NDI) dyads were prepared for switching of the triplet excited states. Bromo-NI or bromo-NDI parts in the dyads are the spin converters, i.e., the triplet state producing modules, whereas the RB unit is the acid-activatable electron donor/energy acceptor. NI and NDI absorb at 359 and 541 nm, and the T1 state energy levels are 2.25 and 1.64 eV, respectively. RB undertakes the reversible spirolactam (RB-c) ↔ opened amide (RB-o) transformation. RB-c shows no visible light absorption, and the triplet-state energy level is ET1 = 3.36 eV. Conversely RB-o shows strong absorption at 557 nm, and ET1 is 1.73 eV. Thus, the acid-activated fluorescence-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET) competes with the ISC of NI or NDI. No triplet state was observed for the dyads with nanosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. Upon addition of acid, strong fluorescence and long-living triplet excited states were observed. Thus, the producing of triplet state is acid-activatable. The triplet state of RB-NI is localized on RB-o part, whereas in RB-NDI the triplet state is delocalized on both the NDI and RB-o units. The ISC of spin converter was not outcompeted by RET. These studies are useful for switching of triplet excited state.

  6. Radius of {sup 12}C in the excited 2{sub 2} {sup +} Hoyle state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogloblin, A.A.; Danilov, A.N.; Demyanova, A.S. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belyaeva, T.L. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, C.P. 50000, Toluca (Mexico); Goncharov, S.A. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    The differential cross sections of the inelastic {alpha} + {sup 12}C scattering leading to the excitation of the short-lived 2{sub 2} {sup +} (E{sub x} = 9.84 or 9.6 MeV) state in {sup 12}C have been analysed within a modified diffraction model. We determined the diffraction radii of {sup 12}C in this excited state at E{sub {alpha}} = 386 and 240 MeV and compared them with the diffraction radius for the 0{sub 2} {sup +} (E{sub x} = 7.65 MeV) Hoyle state. We found that the rms radii for the 2{sub 2} {sup +} state is left angle R(2{sub 2} {sup +}) right angle = 3.07 {+-} 0.13fm, which agrees well with the rms radius of the 0{sub 2} {sup +}, 7.65 MeV Hoyle state and is a factor of 1.3 larger than the rms radius for the ground state of {sup 12}C. The similarity between the rms radii of the 0{sub 2} {sup +} and 2{sub 2} {sup +} states provides a strong argument in favor of a hypothesis that the 2{sub 2} {sup +} state is the first member of a rotational band based on the 0{sub 2} {sup +} Hoyle state. (orig.)

  7. Characterising excited states in and around the semi-magic nucleus $^{68}$ Ni using Coulomb excitation and one-neutron transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to investigate the structure of excited states in $^{68, 70}$Ni(Z =28, N=40, 42) via the measurement of electromagnetic matrix elements in a Coulomb excitation experiment in order to study the N = 40 harmonic-oscillator shell and the Z = 28 proton shell closures. The measured B(E2) values connecting low-lying 0$^{+}$ and 2$^{+}$ can be compared to shell-model predictions. It is also proposed to perform the one-neutron transfer reaction ${d}$($^{68}$Ni,$^{69}$Ni)${p}$, with the aim of populating excited states in $^{69}$Ni. Comparisons with the states populated in the recently performed ${d}$($^{66}$Ni,$^{67}$Ni)${p}$ reaction will be useful in determining the role of the neutron $d_{5/2}$ orbital in the semi-magic properties of $^{68}$Ni.

  8. Phonon-like excitations in the two-state Bose-Hubbard model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Stasyuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of phonon-like collective excitations in the system of Bose-atoms in optical lattice (more generally, in the system of quantum particles described by the Bose-Hubbard model is investigated. Such excitations appear due to displacements of particles with respect to their local equilibrium positions. The two-level model taking into account the transitions of bosons between the ground state and the first excited state in potential wells, as well as interaction between them, is used. Calculations are performed within the random phase approximation in the hard-core boson limit. It is shown that excitation spectrum in normal phase consists of the one exciton-like band, while in the phase with BE condensate an additional band appears. The positions, spectral weights and widths of bands strongly depend on chemical potential of bosons and temperature. The conditions of stability of a system with respect to the lowering of symmetry and displacement modulation are discussed.

  9. Studies on ionization and excitation processes in Ps–Li scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    excitation, elastic scattering is the only active process. The energy region close to the thresholds of ..... target-elastic Ps-ionization is highly sensitive to the choice of target representa- tion. Similar findings are observed in ... active when valence electron keeps itself silent (target-elastic channel). On the other hand, if valence ...

  10. Beyond Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Using Only Single Excitations: Methods for Computational Studies of Excited States in Complex Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, John M; Zhang, Xing; Morrison, Adrian F; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-17

    Single-excitation methods, namely, configuration interaction singles and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), along with semiempirical versions thereof, represent the most computationally affordable electronic structure methods for describing electronically excited states, scaling as [Formula: see text] absent further approximations. This relatively low cost, combined with a treatment of electron correlation, has made TDDFT the most widely used excited-state quantum chemistry method over the past 20+ years. Nevertheless, certain inherent problems (beyond just the accuracy of this or that exchange-correlation functional) limit the utility of traditional TDDFT. For one, it affords potential energy surfaces whose topology is incorrect in the vicinity of any conical intersection (CI) that involves the ground state. Since CIs are the conduits for transitions between electronic states, the TDDFT description of photochemistry (internal conversion and intersystem crossing) is therefore suspect. Second, the [Formula: see text] cost can become prohibitive in large systems, especially those that involve multiple electronically coupled chromophores, for example, the antennae structures of light-harvesting complexes or the conjugated polymers used in organic photovoltaics. In such cases, the smallest realistic mimics might already be quite large from the standpoint of ab initio quantum chemistry. This Account describes several new computational methods that address these problems. Topology around a CI can be rigorously corrected using a "spin-flip" version of TDDFT, which involves an α → β spin-flipping transition in addition to occupied → virtual excitation of one electron. Within this formalism, singlet states are generated via excitation from a high-spin triplet reference state, doublets from a quartet, etc. This provides a more balanced treatment of electron correlation between ground and excited states. Spin contamination is problematic away from the

  11. Steady-State Process Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    This chapter covers the basic principles of steady state modelling and simulation using a number of case studies. Two principal approaches are illustrated that develop the unit operation models from first principles as well as through application of standard flowsheet simulators. The approaches...... illustrate the “equation oriented” approach as well as the “sequential modular” approach to solving complex flowsheets for steady state applications. The applications include the Williams-Otto plant, the hydrodealkylation (HDA) of toluene, conversion of ethylene to ethanol and a bio-ethanol process....

  12. An excited-state intramolecular photon transfer fluorescence probe for localizable live cell imaging of cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Wen; Liu, Si-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2017-03-01

    Small molecule probes suitable for selective and specific fluorescence imaging of some important but low-concentration intracellular reactive sulfur species such as cysteine (Cys) pose a challenge in chemical biology. We present a readily available, fast-response fluorescence probe CHCQ-Ac, with 2-(5‧-chloro-2-hydroxyl-phenyl)-6-chloro-4(3 H)-quinazolinone (CHCQ) as the fluorophore and acrylate group as the functional moiety, that enables high-selectivity and high-sensitivity for detecting Cys in both solution and biological system. After specifically reacted with Cys, the probe undergoes a seven-membered intramolecular cyclization and released the fluorophore CHCQ with excited-state intramolecular photon transfer effect. A highly fluorescent, insoluble aggregate was then formed to facilitate high-sensitivity and high-resolution imaging. The results showed that probe CHCQ-Ac affords a remarkably large Stokes shift and can detect Cys under physiological pH condition with no interference from other analytes. Moreover, this probe was proved to have excellent chemical stability, low cytotoxicity and good cell permeability. Our design of this probe provides a novel potential tool to visualize and localize cysteine in bioimaging of live cells that would greatly help to explore various Cys-related physiological and pathological cellular processes in cell biology and diagnostics.

  13. Three-body recombination and dynamics of electrons and excited states in the low-pressure argon afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsankov, Tsanko Vaskov; Johnsen, Rainer; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    The afterglow phase occurs naturally during the power-off period in pulsed low-pressure plasmas and in atmospheric pressure ns discharges. During that period the electron energy rapidly declines and the charged particles are lost due to diffusion and recombination. In low-pressure discharges the dominant process is three-body recombination (TBR) of Ar+ ions with electrons. It leads to complex dynamics of the excited states, dominated by collisional-radiative cascades that eventually repopulate the metastable states. In this contribution the afterglow dynamics of an argon discharge is analyzed in detail to elucidate the roles played by the various processes. An analytical model for the fast drop of the electron energy by evaporative cooling and electron-ion collisions is combined with a time-dependent collisional radiative model for the atomic excited states that numerically solves the electron energy and density balance equations. By including further gas heating and cooling, the model leads to excellent agreement with experiments utilizing different diagnostic techniques, and hence gives insight into the interplay of the various processes in the afterglow. Work Supported by the DFG (Grant No. TS 307/1-1).

  14. Electronic excitation energy transfer and nonstationary processes in KH2PO4:Tl crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikov, I. N.; Pustovarov, V. A.

    2017-04-01

    We report the results of our experimental study and numerical simulation of the electronic excitation energy transfer to impurity centers under conditions where nonstationary processes take place in the hydrogen sublattice of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4) single crystals doped with mercury-like Tl+ ions (KDP:Tl). We present the experimental results of our investigation of the decay kinetics of the transient optical absorption (100 ns-50 s) of intrinsic defects in the hydrogen sublattice of KDP:Tl obtained by pulsed absorption spectroscopy and the results of our study of the dynamics of the change in steady-state luminescence intensity with irradiation time (1-5000 s). To explain the transfer of the energy being released during electron recombination involving intrinsic KDP:Tl lattice defects, we formulate a mathematical model for the transfer of this energy to impurity Tl+ luminescence centers. Within the model being developed, we present the systems of differential balance equations describing the nonstationary processes in the electron subsystem and the hydrogen sublattice; provide a technique for calculating the pair correlation functions Y( r, t) of dissimilar defects based on the solution of the Smoluchowski equation for the system of mobile hydrogen sublattice defects; calculate the time-dependent reaction rate constants K( t) for various experimental conditions; and outline the peculiarities and results of the model parametrization based on our experimental data. Based on our investigation, the dramatic and significant effect of a gradual inertial increase by a factor of 50-100 in steady-state luminescence intensity in the 4.5-eV band in KDP:Tl crystals due to the luminescence of mercury-like Tl+ ions has been explained qualitatively and quantitatively.

  15. Ground State and Excited State Tuning in Ferric Dipyrrin Complexes Promoted by Ancillary Ligand Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinlein, Claudia; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Betley, Theodore A.

    2017-04-24

    Three ferric dipyrromethene complexes featuring different ancillary ligands were synthesized by one electron oxidation of ferrous precursors. Four-coordinate iron complexes of the type (ArL)FeX2 [ArL = 1,9-(2,4,6-Ph3C6H2)2-5-mesityldipyrromethene] with X = Cl or tBuO were prepared and found to be high-spin (S = 5/2), as determined by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, electron paramagnetic resonance, and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The ancillary ligand substitution was found to affect both ground state and excited properties of the ferric complexes examined. While each ferric complex displays reversible reduction and oxidation events, each alkoxide for chloride substitution results in a nearly 600 mV cathodic shift of the FeIII/II couple. The oxidation event remains largely unaffected by the ancillary ligand substitution and is likely dipyrrin-centered. While the alkoxide substituted ferric species largely retain the color of their ferrous precursors, characteristic of dipyrrin-based ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT), the dichloride ferric complex loses the prominent dipyrrin chromophore, taking on a deep green color. Time-dependent density functional theory analyses indicate the weaker-field chloride ligands allow substantial configuration mixing of ligand-to-metal charge transfer into the LLCT bands, giving rise to the color changes observed. Furthermore, the higher degree of covalency between the alkoxide ferric centers is manifest in the observed reactivity. Delocalization of spin density onto the tert-butoxide ligand in (ArL)FeCl(OtBu) is evidenced by hydrogen atom abstraction to yield (ArL)FeCl and HOtBu in the presence of substrates containing weak C–H bonds, whereas the chloride (ArL)FeCl2 analogue does not react under these conditions.

  16. Probing ground and low-lying excited states for HIO{sub 2} isomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Gabriel L. C. de [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Cuiabá, Mato Grosso 78060-900 (Brazil); Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Itacoatiara, Amazonas 69100-000 (Brazil); Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Brown, Alex, E-mail: alex.brown@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2014-12-21

    We present a computational study on HIO{sub 2} molecules. Ground state properties such as equilibrium structures, relative energetics, vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities were obtained for all the isomers at the coupled-cluster with single and double excitations as well as perturbative inclusion of triples (CCSD(T)) level of theory with the aug-cc-pVTZ-PP basis set and ECP-28-PP effective core potential for iodine and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set for hydrogen and oxygen atoms. The HOIO structure is confirmed as the lowest energy isomer. The relative energies are shown to be HOIO < HOOI < HI(O)O. The HO(O)I isomer is only stable at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory. The transition states determined show interconversion of the isomers is possible. In order to facilitate future experimental identification, vibrational frequencies are also determined for all corresponding deuterated species. Vertical excitation energies for the three lowest-lying singlet and triplet excited states were determined using the configuration interaction singles, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT)/B3LYP, TD-DFT/G96PW91, and equation of motion-CCSD approaches with the LANL2DZ basis set plus effective core potential for iodine and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set for hydrogen and oxygen atoms. It is shown that HOIO and HOOI isomers have excited states accessible at solar wavelengths (<4.0 eV) but these states have very small oscillator strengths (<2 × 10{sup −3})

  17. Unbound Excited States of the N = 16 Closed Shell Nucleus 24O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, W. F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The energies of two low-lying neutron-unbound excited states of 24O, which were populated by proton-knockout reactions on 26F, have been measured using the MoNA and LISA arrays in combination with the Sweeper Magnet at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at the NSCL using invariant mass spectroscopy. The current measurement confirms for the first time the separate identity of 2+ and (1+) neutron-unbound excited states in 24O with decay energies 0.51(5) MeV state and 1.20(7) MeV, respectively, to the 23O ground state. These measured decay energies are consistent with two previous lower resolution measurements to within 2 σ. The level energies for the two states are computed using the decay energies and the 1-neutron separation energy for 24O, resulting in 4.70(15) MeV for the 2+ state and 5.39(16) MeV for the (1+) state. Errors in the level energies are dominated by uncertainty in the 24O neutron separation energy, underscoring the need for a higher resolution 24O ground state mass measurement. Results will be compared with 3 phenomenological and 2 ab initio model calculations. Work Supported by NSF Grants PHY-0922335, PHY-0922409, PHY-0922446, PHY-0922462, PHY-0922473, PHY-0922537, PHY-0922559, PHY-0922622, PHY-0922794, PHY-0969173, PHY-1101745, PHY-1205357, PHY- 1205537.

  18. Scalable implementations of accurate excited-state coupled cluster theories: application of high-level methods to porphyrin based systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Karol; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Olson, Ryan M.; Tipparaju, Vinod; Apra, Edoardo

    2011-11-30

    The development of reliable tools for excited-state simulations is emerging as an extremely powerful computational chemistry tool for understanding complex processes in the broad class of light harvesting systems and optoelectronic devices. Over the last years we have been developing equation of motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) methods capable of tackling these problems. In this paper we discuss the parallel performance of EOMCC codes which provide accurate description of the excited-state correlation effects. Two aspects are discuss in details: (1) a new algorithm for the iterative EOMCC methods based on the novel task scheduling algorithms, and (2) parallel algorithms for the non-iterative methods describing the effect of triply excited configurations. We demonstrate that the most computationally intensive non-iterative part can take advantage of 210,000 cores of the Cray XT5 system at OLCF. In particular, we demonstrate the importance of non-iterative many-body methods for achieving experimental level of accuracy for several porphyrin-based system.

  19. Transition rate diagrams — A new approach to the study of selective excitation processes: The spectrum of manganese in a Grimm-type glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Zdeněk [LECO Instrumente Plzeň spol. s r.o., Plaská 66, 323 25 Plzeň (Czech Republic); Steers, Edward B.M. [London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London N7 8DB (United Kingdom); Pickering, Juliet C. [Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Mushtaq, Sohail [London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London N7 8DB (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    The emission spectra of manganese observed using a Grimm-type glow discharge in pure argon, argon with 0.3% v/v hydrogen and pure neon were studied in order to identify major excitation and ionization processes of manganese in the plasma. A new procedure is proposed, in which each observed emission line is associated with the corresponding transition between different states of the Mn atom or Mn ion, and, by considering all the observed transitions from and into a specific state, a measure of the total rate is determined at which this state is radiatively populated and depopulated. These resulting population/depopulation rates are then plotted as function of level energy. Such plots, called here “transition rate diagrams”, show the role of individual states in the formation of the observed spectrum and can be used to identify possible selective excitation processes. Also, cascade excitation by radiative decay of higher excited states can be conveniently evaluated in this way. A detailed description of the observed Mn I and Mn II spectra is given for Ar, Ar–H{sub 2} and Ne plasmas and relevant excitation/ionization mechanisms are discussed. Matrix effects in analysis of manganese by glow discharge spectroscopy are discussed. A list of important Mn I and Mn II lines excited in the glow discharge plasma is given. - Highlights: • We measured GD-OES spectra of Mn in Ar, Ar(H) and Ne discharges. • We determined transition rate diagrams of Mn I and Mn II in these discharges. • Using those diagrams, we identified major excitation processes involved.

  20. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  1. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    de Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible...

  2. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra short pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible....

  3. Importance of local exact exchange potential in hybrid functionals for accurate excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jaewook; Hwang, Sang-Yeon; Ryu, Seongok; Choi, Sunghwan; Kim, Woo Youn

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory has been an essential analysis tool for both theoretical and experimental chemists since accurate hybrid functionals were developed. Here we propose a local hybrid method derived from the optimized effective potential (OEP) method and compare its distinct features with conventional nonlocal ones from the Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange operator. Both are formally exact for ground states and thus show similar accuracy for atomization energies and reaction barrier heights. For excited states, the local version yields virtual orbitals with N-electron character, while those of the nonlocal version have mixed characters between N- and (N+1)-electron orbitals. As a result, the orbital energy gaps from the former well approximate excitation energies with a small mean absolute error (MAE = 0.40 eV) for the Caricato benchmark set. The correction from time-dependent density functional theory with a simple local density approximation kernel further improves its accuracy by incorporating multi-config...

  4. On large amplitude motions of simplest amides in the ground and excited electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukachev, N. V.; Bataev, V. A.; Godunov, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    For the formamide, acetamide, N-methylformamide and N-methylacetamide molecules in the ground (S0) and lowest excited singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) electronic states equilibrium geometry parameters, harmonic vibrational frequencies, barriers to conformational transitions and conformer energy differences were estimated by means of MP2, CCSD(T), CASSCF, CASPT2 and MRCI ab initio methods. One-, two- and three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) sections corresponding to different large amplitude motions (LAM) were calculated by means of MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ (S0) and CASPT2/cc-pVTZ (S1,T1). For these molecules, in each excited electronic state six minima were found on 2D PES sections. Using PES sections, different anharmonic vibrational problems were solved and the frequencies of large amplitude vibrations were determined.

  5. Heat capacity for systems with excited-state quantum phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejnar, Pavel; Stránský, Pavel, E-mail: stransky@ipnp.troja.mff.cuni.cz

    2017-03-18

    Heat capacities of model systems with finite numbers of effective degrees of freedom are evaluated using canonical and microcanonical thermodynamics. Discrepancies between both approaches, which are observed even in the infinite-size limit, are particularly large in systems that exhibit an excited-state quantum phase transition. The corresponding irregularity of the spectrum generates a singularity in the microcanonical heat capacity and affects smoothly the canonical heat capacity. - Highlights: • Thermodynamics of systems with excited-state quantum phase transitions • ESQPT-generated singularities of the microcanonical heat capacity • Non-monotonous dependences of the canonical heat capacity • Discord between canonical and microcanonical pictures in the infinite-size limit.

  6. On large amplitude motions of simplest amides in the ground and excited electronic states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukachev N.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the formamide, acetamide, N-methylformamide and N-methylacetamide molecules in the ground (S0 and lowest excited singlet (S1 and triplet (T1 electronic states equilibrium geometry parameters, harmonic vibrational frequencies, barriers to conformational transitions and conformer energy differences were estimated by means of MP2, CCSD(T, CASSCF, CASPT2 and MRCI ab initio methods. One-, two- and three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES sections corresponding to different large amplitude motions (LAM were calculated by means of MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ (S0 and CASPT2/cc-pVTZ (S1,T1. For these molecules, in each excited electronic state six minima were found on 2D PES sections. Using PES sections, different anharmonic vibrational problems were solved and the frequencies of large amplitude vibrations were determined.

  7. Two-neutrino double β decay of 96Zr to excited 2+ state of 96Mo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp. 517–522. Two-neutrino double β decay of 96Zr to excited. 2+ state of 96Mo. J SINGH1, R CHANDRA1, P K RAINA2 and P K RATH1. 1Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226 007, India. 2Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India. E-mail: pkrath lu@yahoo.co.in.

  8. Formation of H-atom in 2s excited state of proton-lithium and proton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The differential and total cross-sections have been investigated in the forma- tion of H-atom in the 2s excited state of proton-lithium and proton-sodium scattering by using the Coulomb projected Born (CPB) approximation in the energy range from 50 to. 10,000 keV. The results thus obtained are compared with the ...

  9. Determination of the Excited State Density Distribution within a Nonequilibrium, Freely Expanding Argon Arcjet Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    transport problem for the radially dependent number densi- ties is required. The details of this inversion technique, based upon an " onion peel... chat of the arcJeC. The reference signal from the chopper and the preampllfled photomultlpller cube output signal were input to a PAR ® synchronous...condition for equilibrium with the free electron density and thus shows Chat the four lowest excited states are demonstrably nonequllibrium and lie

  10. The Microwave Spectroscopy of HCOO^{13}CH_3 in the Second Torsional Excited State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Kuwahara, Takuro; Urata, Yuki; Ohashi, Nobukimi; Fujitake, Masaharu

    2017-06-01

    Methyl formate (HCOOCH_3) is an abundant interstellar molecule, found almost everywhere in the star-forming region. The interstellar abundance of the ^{13}C is about 1/50 of ^{12}C. The ^{13}C substituted methyl formate in the ground and first excited states were already found toward massive star-forming regions including Orion KL. With the aid of the state-of-the-art telescope like ALMA, the pure rotational transitions in the second torsional excited may be identified in the near future and laboratory data are necessary. We recorded the spectra of HCOOCH_3 below 340 GHz by using conventional source-modulation microwave spectrometer. The assignment of the pure rotational spectra in the second torsional excited state and the analysis by using pseudo-PAM Hamiltonian, which was effective to analyze the normal species, will be reported. C. Favre, M. Carvajal, D. Field, J. K. Jørgensen, S. E. Bisschop, N. Brouillet, D. Despois, A. Baudry, I. Kleiner, E. A. Bergin, N. R. Crockett, J. L. Neill, L. Marguès, T. R. Huet, and J. Demaison, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 215, 25 (2014).

  11. Electronic structures and population dynamics of excited states of xanthione and its derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedunov, Roman G.; Rogozina, Marina V.; Khokhlova, Svetlana S.; Ivanov, Anatoly I.; Tikhomirov, Sergei A.; Bondarev, Stanislav L.; Raichenok, Tamara F.; Buganov, Oleg V.; Olkhovik, Vyacheslav K.; Vasilevskii, Dmitrii A.

    2017-09-01

    A new compound, 1,3-dimethoxy xanthione (DXT), has been synthesized and its absorption (stationary and transient) and luminescence spectra have been measured in n-hexane and compared with xanthione (XT) spectra. The pronounced broadening of xanthione vibronic absorption band related to the electronic transition to the second singlet excited state has been observed. Distinctions between the spectra of xanthione and its methoxy derivatives are discussed. Quantum chemical calculations of these compounds in the ground and excited electronic states have been accomplished to clarify the nature of electronic spectra changes due to modification of xanthione by methoxy groups. Appearance of a new absorption band of DXT caused by symmetry changes has been discussed. Calculations of the second excited state structure of xanthione and its methoxy derivatives confirm noticeable charge transfer (about 0.1 of the charge of an electron) from the methoxy group to thiocarbonyl group. Fitting of the transient spectra of XT and DXT has been fulfilled and the time constants of internal conversion S2 →S1 and intersystem crossing S1 →T1 have been determined. A considerable difference between the time constants of internal conversion S2 →S1 in XT and DXT is uncovered.

  12. Excited-State Interaction of Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Their Wrapping Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahmann, Simon; Salazar Rios, Jorge M; Zink, Matthias; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich; Dos Santos, Maria C; Brabec, Christoph J; Loi, Maria A

    2017-11-16

    We employ photoluminescence and pump-probe spectroscopy on films of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of different chirality wrapped with either a wide band gap polyfluorene derivative (PF12) or a polythiophene with narrower gap (P3DDT) to elucidate the excited states' interplay between the two materials. Excitation above the polymer band gap gives way to an ultrafast electron transfer from both polymers toward the CNTs. By monitoring the hole polaron on the polymer via its mid infrared signature, we show that also illumination below the polymer band gap leads to the formation of this fingerprint and infer that holes are also transferred toward the polymer. As this contradicts the standard way of discussing the involved energy levels, we propose that polymer-wrapped CNTs should be considered as a single hybrid system, exhibiting states shared between the two components. This proposition is validated through quantum chemical calculations that show hybridization of the first excited states, especially for the thiophene-CNT sample.

  13. Carotenoids as electron or excited-state energy donors in artificial photosynthesis: an ultrafast investigation of a carotenoporphyrin and a carotenofullerene dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Smitha; Ravensbergen, Janneke; Antoniuk-Pablant, Antaeres; Sherman, Benjamin D; van Grondelle, Rienk; Frese, Raoul N; Moore, Thomas A; Gust, Devens; Moore, Ana L; Kennis, John T M

    2013-04-07

    Photophysical investigations of molecular donor-acceptor systems have helped elucidate many details of natural photosynthesis and revealed design principles for artificial photosynthetic systems. To obtain insights into the factors that govern the partition between excited-state energy transfer (EET) and electron transfer (ET) processes among carotenoids and tetrapyrroles and fullerenes, we have designed artificial photosynthetic dyads that are thermodynamically poised to favor ET over EET processes. The dyads were studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with ∼100 femtosecond time resolution. For dyad , a carotenoporphyrin, excitation to the carotenoid S2 state induces ultrafast ET, competing with internal conversion (IC) to the carotenoid S1 state. In addition, the carotenoid S1 state gives rise to ET. In contrast with biological photosynthesis and many artificial photosynthetic systems, no EET at all was detected for this dyad upon carotenoid S2 excitation. Recombination of the charge separated state takes place in hundreds of picoseconds and yields a triplet state, which is interpreted as a triplet delocalized between the porphyrin and carotenoid moieties. In dyad , a carotenofullerene, excitation of the carotenoid in the S2 band results in internal conversion to the S1 state, ET and probably EET to fullerene on ultrafast timescales. From the carotenoid S1 state EET to fullerene occurs. Subsequently, the excited-state fullerene gives rise to ET from the carotenoid to the fullerene. Again, the charge separated state recombines in hundreds of picoseconds. The results illustrate that for a given rate of EET, the ratio of ET to EET can be controlled by adjusting the driving force for electron transfer.

  14. Excited-state free energy surfaces in solution: time-dependent density functional theory∕reference interaction site model self-consistent field method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minezawa, Noriyuki

    2013-06-28

    Constructing free energy surfaces for electronically excited states is a first step toward the understanding of photochemical processes in solution. For that purpose, the analytic free energy gradient is derived and implemented for the linear-response time-dependent density functional theory combined with the reference interaction site model self-consistent field method. The proposed method is applied to study (1) the fluorescence spectra of aqueous acetone and (2) the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer reaction of ortho-hydroxybenzaldehyde in an acetonitrile solution.

  15. Equation of Motion Theory for Excited States in Variational Monte Carlo and the Jastrow Antisymmetric Geminal Power in Hilbert Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luning; Neuscamman, Eric

    2016-08-09

    An equation of motion formalism for excited states in variational Monte Carlo is derived, and a pilot implementation for the Jastrow-modified antisymmetric geminal power is tested. In single excitations across a range of small molecules, this combination is shown to be intermediate in accuracy between configuration interaction singles and equation of motion coupled cluster with singles and doubles. For double excitations, energy errors are found to be similar to those for coupled cluster.

  16. Excitation of the 3p states in electron-sodium scattering at intermediate energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, M. Z. M.; Wong, B. R.; Chin, J. H.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-03-01

    A coupled-channel-optical method (CCOM), to investigate the excitation of the 3p states for e--Na scattering at intermediate energies, is reported. Nine atomic states( Na(3s), Na(3p), Na(4s), Na(3d), Na(4p), Na(5s), Na(4d), Na(5p), Na(5d) ) together with three optical potentials are used in this work. The inelastic differential cross sections (DCS) as well as the reduced Stokes parameters are compared with latest theoretical data and experimental measurements.

  17. Relative entropy of excited states in conformal field theories of arbitrary dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sárosi, Gábor [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussels and International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, Brussels, B-1050 (Belgium); David Rittenhouse Laboratory, University of Pennsylvania,Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Ugajin, Tomonori [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    Extending our previous work, we study the relative entropy between the reduced density matrices obtained from globally excited states in conformal field theories of arbitrary dimensions. We find a general formula in the small subsystem size limit. When one of the states is the vacuum of the CFT, our result matches with the holographic entanglement entropy computations in the corresponding bulk geometries, including AdS black branes. We also discuss the first asymmetric part of the relative entropy and comment on some implications of the results on the distinguishability of black hole microstates in AdS/CFT.

  18. The Total Gaussian Class of Quasiprobabilities and its Relation to Squeezed-State Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuensche, Alfred

    1996-01-01

    The class of quasiprobabilities obtainable from the Wigner quasiprobability by convolutions with the general class of Gaussian functions is investigated. It can be described by a three-dimensional, in general, complex vector parameter with the property of additivity when composing convolutions. The diagonal representation of this class of quasiprobabilities is connected with a generalization of the displaced Fock states in direction of squeezing. The subclass with real vector parameter is considered more in detail. It is related to the most important kinds of boson operator ordering. The properties of a specific set of discrete excitations of squeezed coherent states are given.

  19. Efficient enhancement of below-threshold harmonic generation by laser-driven excited states of Cs atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiao-Ling; Li, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Xiao-Xin; Chu, Shih-I.

    2018-03-01

    We propose an efficient method for the enhancement of below-threshold harmonic generation (BTHG) by mid-infrared laser-driven excited states of a Cs atom. The BTHG is calculated by solving three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation accurately and efficiently using the time-dependent generalized pseudospectral method. We adopt an excited state as the initial state of a Cs atom. As a result, the BTHG is significantly enhanced by two orders of magnitude compared with the case of the initial ground state. Furthermore, we find that a single vacuum-ultraviolet pulse can be generated by mid-infrared laser-driven excited states by superposing several below-threshold harmonics of a Cs atom. Our finding suggests that the generation of below-threshold harmonics by laser-driven excited states of an atom can provide a powerful methodology for the production of intense vacuum-ultraviolet pulses.

  20. Excited-state dynamics in fac-[Re(CO)3(Me4phen)(L)]+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrocinio, Antonio Otavio T; Brennaman, M Kyle; Meyer, Thomas J; Murakami Iha, Neyde Y

    2010-11-25

    Excited-state dynamics in fac-[Re(CO)(3)(Me(4)phen)(cis-L)](+) (Me(4)phen = 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, L = 4-styrylpyridine (stpy) or 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (bpe)) were investigated by steady-state and time-resolved techniques. A complex equilibrium among three closely lying excited states, (3)IL(cis-L), (3)MLCT(Re→Me(4)phen), and (3)IL(Me(4)phen), has been established. Under UV irradiation, cis-to-trans isomerization of coordinated cis-L is observed with a quantum yield of 0.15 in acetonitrile solutions. This photoreaction competes with radiative decay from (3)MLCT(Re→Me(4)phen) and (3)IL(Me(4)phen) excited states, leading to a decrease in the emission quantum yield relative to the nonisomerizable complex fac-[Re(CO)(3)(Me(4)phen)(bpa)](+) (bpa = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane). From temperature-dependent time-resolved emission measurements in solution and in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films, energy barriers (ΔE(a)) for interconversion between (3)MLCT(Re→Me(4)phen) and (3)IL(Me(4)phen) emitting states were determined. For L = cis-stpy, ΔE(a) = 11 (920 cm(-1)) and 15 kJ mol(-1) (1254 cm(-1)) in 5:4 propionitrile/butyronitrile and PMMA, respectively. For L = cis-bpe, ΔE(a) = 13 kJ mol(-1) (1087 cm(-1)) in 5:4 propionitrile/butyronitrile. These energy barriers are sufficient to decrease the rate constant for internal conversion from higher-lying (3)IL(Me(4)phen) state to (3)MLCT(Re→Me(4)phen), k(i) ≅ 10(6) s(-1). The decrease in rate allows for the observation of intraligand phosphorescence, even in fluid medium at room temperature. Our results provide additional insight into the role of energy gap and excited-state dynamics on the photochemical and photophysical properties of Re(I) polypyridyl complexes.

  1. Small-Scale Drilling Test Rig For Investigation of Axial Excitation On The Drilling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austefjord A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design, construction and operation of a small-scale drilling rig for the purpose of investigation of the effect of axial excitation on the drilling process. The rig is bench top in size and has been designed to drill small rock samples, whilst at the same allowing axial excitation to be induced into the drilling process. The rig has been designed to drill the rock without any drilling fluids – so allowing improved observation of the chip generation process. Additionally, the drilling weight on bit is applied via masses, so allowing greater representation of the dynamic behavior of the drilling process – i.e. capturing more natural frequencies. The results from the rig have been obtained over two frequency ranges – low frequency (0-50 Hz and high frequency (50-250 Hz. Results show that improved rate of penetration is obtained with axial excitation – with low and high frequency optima occurring. These optima can be related to the behavior of the string in the two frequency ranges – in the low frequency range, the entire string acts in unison; whereas at high frequency, only the bit/rock system is active. As a result, it is concluded that for low frequency operation, only information about the drill string is required to optimize performance; whereas for high frequency operation, information about the bit/rock system is required to optimize performance. Observation of the chip generation process via high speed video has shown that during axial excitation, regular shaped bricks are ejected when compared with the typical wedge- shaped chips that are normally ejected during the drilling process. It is concluded that, during the axial excitation process, the chips are being ejected via a levering action, so allowing a more efficient and quicker process. MIT [1] provided background classes, project guidance and project review as part of an NOV/MIT advanced technology program. Larger scale lab tests and/or field tests

  2. Theoretical study of the low-lying excited states of ABCO, DABCO and homologous cage amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galasso, V.

    1997-02-01

    The electronic spectra of 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (ABCO), 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO), and their [1.1.1] and [3.3.3] congeners have been studied at the ab initio level using the symmetry adapted cluster configuration interaction method. A comprehensive theoretical prediction of the discrete excitation spectra, up to the HOMO → 5s transition, is presented. All the low-lying singlet and triplet electronic states of these symmetric cage amines are found to have essentially Rydberg nature and originate from excitations out of the n-type molecular orbitals. The theoretical results correlate with the available spectroscopic data satisfactorily and provide quantitative support to a number of experimental assignments based on REMPI and MCD measurements.

  3. Dynamics of Excited State Proton Transfer in Nitro Substituted 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marciak, H; Hristova, S.; Deneva, V

    2017-01-01

    of the ground state enol–keto tautomeric equilibrium (ΔG values of 1.03 and 0.62 kcal mol−1 respectively for 2 and 3). The fluorescence stems from the keto form even if the enol form is optically excited as proven by the shape of the excitation spectra indicating that ESIPT takes place. The Stokes shift...... of the substituted compounds is substantially lower compared to HBQ, which follows from the fact that the substitution occurs in the formal cyclohexa-2,4-dienone moiety and leads to a decrease of the HOMO level of the keto tautomer. The pump–probe experiments show that in the nitro substituted HBQs 2 and 3 ESIPT...

  4. Highly-sensitive Eu3+ ratiometric thermometers based on excited state absorption with predictable calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Adelmo S.; Nunes, Luiz A. O.; Silva, Ivan G. N.; Oliveira, Fernando A. M.; da Luz, Leonis L.; Brito, Hermi F.; Felinto, Maria C. F. C.; Ferreira, Rute A. S.; Júnior, Severino A.; Carlos, Luís D.; Malta, Oscar L.

    2016-02-01

    Temperature measurements ranging from a few degrees to a few hundreds of Kelvin are of great interest in the fields of nanomedicine and nanotechnology. Here, we report a new ratiometric luminescent thermometer using thermally excited state absorption of the Eu3+ ion. The thermometer is based on the simple Eu3+ energy level structure and can operate between 180 and 323 K with a relative sensitivity ranging from 0.7 to 1.7% K-1. The thermometric parameter is defined as the ratio between the emission intensities of the 5D0 --> 7F4 transition when the 5D0 emitting level is excited through the 7F2 (physiological range) or 7F1 (down to 180 K) level. Nano and microcrystals of Y2O3:Eu3+ were chosen as a proof of concept of the operational principles in which both excitation and detection are within the first biological transparent window. A novel and of paramount importance aspect is that the calibration factor can be calculated from the Eu3+ emission spectrum avoiding the need for new calibration procedures whenever the thermometer operates in different media.Temperature measurements ranging from a few degrees to a few hundreds of Kelvin are of great interest in the fields of nanomedicine and nanotechnology. Here, we report a new ratiometric luminescent thermometer using thermally excited state absorption of the Eu3+ ion. The thermometer is based on the simple Eu3+ energy level structure and can operate between 180 and 323 K with a relative sensitivity ranging from 0.7 to 1.7% K-1. The thermometric parameter is defined as the ratio between the emission intensities of the 5D0 --> 7F4 transition when the 5D0 emitting level is excited through the 7F2 (physiological range) or 7F1 (down to 180 K) level. Nano and microcrystals of Y2O3:Eu3+ were chosen as a proof of concept of the operational principles in which both excitation and detection are within the first biological transparent window. A novel and of paramount importance aspect is that the calibration factor can be

  5. Emission cross sections for spectral lines transiting from the In2+ lower laser 4d105pP states excited by electron impact on the In+ ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomonai, A. N.; Hutych, Yu. I.; Gomonai, A. I.

    2013-09-01

    Energy dependences of ionization-with-excitation cross sections of the λ174.9 nm and λ162.6 nm lines related to the 4d105pP → 4d105sS transitions in the In2+ ion were studied using a spectroscopic method in crossed electron and In+ ion beams. A well-defined structure related to the excitation of the 4d95s2nl autoionizing states of the In+ ion as well as 4d10nl,4d95s2 discrete states and 4d95p2,4d95s5d, and 4d9npn'l autoionizing states of the In2+ ion was observed in the excitation functions for both lines. The absolute cross section values for the lines under investigation were determined and found to be 0.7 × 10-17 cm2 and 1.4 × 10-17 cm2, respectively, at the 100 eV energy. The effective population of the In2+ ion lower 4d105pP laser levels under ionization-with-excitation is shown to result from the contribution of cascade processes as well as excitation-autoionization process related mainly to the correlation interaction between the outer s-shell and inner d-shell.

  6. Spectroscopic and excited-state properties of tri-9-anthrylborane I: Solvent polarity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Noboru; Sakuda, Eri

    2005-08-25

    Spectroscopic and excited-state properties of tri-9-anthrylborane (TAB), showing unique absorption and fluorescence characteristics originating from p(boron)-pi(anthryl group) orbital interactions, were studied in 12 solvents. Although the absorption maximum energy (nu(a)) of TAB which appeared at around 21 x 10(3) cm(-1) (band I) was almost independent of the solvent polarity parameter, f(X) (f(X) = (D(s) - 1)/(2D(s) + 1) - (n(2) - 1)/(2n(2) + 1) where D(s) and n represent the static dielectric constant and the refractive index of a solvent, respectively), the fluorescence maximum energy (nu(f)) showed a linear correlation with f(X). The f(X) dependence of the value of nu(a) - nu(f) demonstrated that the change in the dipole moment of TAB upon light excitation was approximately 8.0 D, indicating that absorption band I was ascribed to an intramolecular charge-transfer transition in nature. The excited electron of TAB was thus concluded to localize primarily on the p orbital of the boron atom. Furthermore, it was shown that the fluorescence lifetime and quantum yield of TAB varied from 11.8 to 1.1 ns and from 0.41 to 0.02, respectively, with an increase in f(X). The present results indicated that the nonradiative decay rate constant (k(nr)) of TAB was influenced significantly by f(X). Excited-state decay of TAB was understood by intramolecular back-electron (charge) transfer from the p orbital of the boron atom to the pi orbital of the anthryl group, which was discussed in terms of the energy gap dependence of k(nr). Specific solvent interactions of TAB revealed by the present spectroscopic and photophysical studies are also discussed.

  7. Benchmarks for electronically excited states: Time-dependent density functional theory and density functional theory based multireference configuration interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Schreiber, Marko; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations are reported for a recently proposed benchmark set of 28 medium-sized organic molecules. Vertical excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state dipole...

  8. Assignment of the Charge-Transfer Excited States of Bis(N-Heterocyclic) Complexes of Copper(I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-21

    Excited States of Bis (N-Heterocyclic) Complexes of Copper ( I) 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S( W. L. Parker and G. A. Crosby 3a 7YPE OF REPORT i b ’!ME COVERED ~ aDATE...Assignment of the Charge-Transfer Excited States of Bis (N-Heterocyclic) Complexes of Copper (I) by W. L. Parker and G. A. Crosby Prepared for Publication in...IHmited. Assignment of the Charge-Transfer Excited States of Bis (N-Heterocycl ic) Complexes of Copper (I) W. L. Parker and G. A. Crosby* Chemical

  9. UV excitation of single DNA and RNA strands produces high yields of exciplex states between two stacked bases

    OpenAIRE

    Takaya, Tomohisa; Su, Charlene; de La Harpe, Kimberly; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Kohler, Bern

    2008-01-01

    Excited electronic states created by UV excitation of the diribonucleoside monophosphates ApA, ApG, ApC, ApU, and CpG were studied by the femtosecond transient-absorption technique. Bleach recovery signals recorded at 252 nm show that long-lived excited states are formed in all five dinucleosides. The lifetimes of these states exceed those measured in equimolar mixtures of the constituent mononucleotides by one to two orders of magnitude, indicating that electronic coupling between proximal n...

  10. Excited state absorption measurement in the 900-1250 nm wavelength range for bismuth-doped silicate fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seongwoo; Kalita, Mridu P; Nilsson, Johan; Sahu, Jayanta

    2009-02-15

    The feasibility of direct laser diode pumping of Bi-doped fiber lasers at the wavelengths of 915 and 975 nm was examined by measuring excited state absorption in Bi-doped silicate fibers for the wavelength range of 900-1250 nm. When the Bi-doped fibers were pumped at 1047 nm a strong excited state absorption was found at 915 and 975 nm, whereas no significant excited state absorption was observed in the 1080 nm pumping band nor in the emission band, approximately 1160 nm, of Bi-doped fiber lasers.

  11. Photophysical Model of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline: Internal Conversion and Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Junghwa; Joo, Taiha [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Photophysics of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (HBQ) has been in controversy, in particular, on the nature of the electronic states before and after the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT), even though the dynamics and mechanism of the ESIPT have been well established. We report highly time resolved fluorescence spectra over the full emission frequency regions of the enol and keto isomers and the anisotropy in time domain to determine the accurate rates of the population decay, spectral relaxation and anisotropy decay of the keto isomer. We have shown that the ∼300 fs component observed frequently in ESIPT dynamics arises from the S{sub 2}→S{sub 1} internal conversion in the reaction product keto isomer and that the ESIPT occurs from the enol isomer in S{sub 1} state to the keto isomer in S{sub 2} state.

  12. Influence of base stacking geometry on the nature of excited states in G-quadruplexes: a time-dependent DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Christopher J; Phan, Anh Tuân; Michel-Beyerle, Maria-Elisabeth; Voityuk, Alexander A

    2015-03-05

    G-quadruplexes are four-stranded structures of nucleic acids that are formed from the association of guanine nucleobases into cyclical arrangements known as tetrads. G-quadruplexes are involved in a host of biological processes and are of interest in nanomaterial applications. However, not much is known about their electronic properties. In this paper, we analyze electronic excited states of G-quadruplexes using a combination of time-dependent DFT calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. We systematically consider experimentally observed arrangements of stacked guanine tetrads. The effects of structural features on exciton delocalization and photoinduced charge separation are explored using a quantitative analysis of the transition electron density. It is shown that collective coherent excitations shared between two guanine nucleobases dominate in the absorption spectrum of stacked G-tetrads. These excitations may also include a significant contribution of charge transfer states. Large variation in exciton localization is also observed between different structures with a general propensity toward localization between two bases. We reveal large differences in how charge separation occurs within different nucleobase arrangements, with some geometries favoring separation within a single tetrad and others favoring separation between tetrads. We also investigate the effects of the coordinating K(+) ion located in the central cavity of G-quadruplexes on the relative excited state properties of such systems. Our results demonstrate how the nature of excited states in G-quadruplexes depends on the nucleobase stacking geometry resulting from the mutual arrangement of guanine tetrads.

  13. Multi-photon ionization and fragmentation of uracil: Neutral excited-state ring opening and hydration effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barc, B.; Ryszka, M.; Spurrell, J.; Dampc, M.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Parajuli, R.; Mason, N. J.; Eden, S. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-28

    Multi-photon ionization (MPI) of the RNA base uracil has been studied in the wavelength range 220–270 nm, coinciding with excitation to the S{sub 2}(ππ*) state. A fragment ion at m/z = 84 was produced by 2-photon absorption at wavelengths ≤232 nm and assigned to C{sub 3}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}O{sup +} following CO abstraction. This ion has not been observed in alternative dissociative ionization processes (notably electron impact) and its threshold is close to recent calculations of the minimum activation energy for a ring opening conical intersection to a σ(n-π)π* closed shell state. Moreover, the predicted ring opening transition leaves a CO group at one end of the isomer, apparently vulnerable to abstraction. An MPI mass spectrum of uracil-water clusters is presented for the first time and compared with an equivalent dry measurement. Hydration enhances certain fragment ion pathways (particularly C{sub 3}H{sub 3}NO{sup +}) but represses C{sub 3}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}O{sup +} production. This indicates that hydrogen bonding to water stabilizes uracil with respect to neutral excited-state ring opening.

  14. An ALMA Imaging Study of Methyl Formate (HCOOCH3) in Torsionally Excited States toward Orion KL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Kaori; Hirota, Tomoya

    2015-04-01

    We recently reported the first identification of rotational transitions of methyl formate (HCOOCH3) in the second torsionally excited state toward Orion Kleinmann-Low (KL), observed with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. In combination with the identified transitions of methyl formate in the ground state and the first torsional excited state, it was found that there is a difference in rotational temperature and vibrational temperature, where the latter is higher. In this study, high spatial resolution analysis by using Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) science verification data was carried out to verify and understand this difference. Toward the Compact Ridge, two different velocity components at 7.3 and 9.1 km s-1 were confirmed, while a single component at 7.3 km s-1 was identified toward the Hot Core. The intensity maps in the ground, first, and second torsional excited states have quite similar distributions. Using extensive ALMA data, we determined the rotational and vibrational temperatures for the Compact Ridge and Hot Core by the conventional rotation diagram method. The rotational temperature and vibrational temperatures agree for the Hot Core and for one component of the Compact Ridge. At the 7.3 km s-1 velocity component for the Compact Ridge, the rotational temperature was found to be higher than the vibrational temperature. This is different from what we obtained from the results by using the single-dish observation. The difference might be explained by the beam dilution effect of the single-dish data and/or the smaller number of observed transitions within the limited range of energy levels (≤30 K) of Eu in the previous study.

  15. Electron impact excitation cross sections and rates from the ground state of atomic calcium

    CERN Document Server

    Samson, A M

    2001-01-01

    New R-matrix calculations are presented for electron excitation of atomic calcium. The target state expansion includes 22 states: 4s sup 2 sup 1 S; 4snl sup 1 sup , sup 3 L, where nl is 3d, 4p, 5s, 5p, 4d and 4f; 3d4p sup 1 sup , sup 3 P,D,F; and 4p sup 2 sup 3 P, sup 1 D, sup 1 S terms. The calculation is in LS coupling, and configuration interaction involving 3p subshell correlation is included. Electron impact excitation cross sections from the 4s sup 2 ground state to the next 10 states are tabulated for low energies, and thermally averaged effective collision strengths are tabulated over a range of electron temperatures from 1000 to 10,000 K. Comparisons are made with previous cross sections calculations for the 4s sup 2 -4s4p sup 3 P deg. transition; excellent agreement is found with experimentally derived rates for 4s sup 2 -4s4p sup 1 P deg

  16. An analytical description of balanced steady-state free precession with finite radio-frequency excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Oliver

    2011-02-01

    Conceptually, the only flaw in the standard steady-state free precession theory is the assumption of quasi-instantaneous radio-frequency pulses, and 10-20% signal deviations from theory are observed for common balanced steady-state free precession protocols. This discrepancy in the steady-state signal can be resolved by a simple T(2) substitution taking into account reduced transverse relaxation effects during finite radio-frequency excitation. However, finite radio-frequency effects may also affect the transient phase of balanced steady-state free precession, its contrast or its spin-echo nature and thereby have an adverse effect on common steady-state free precession magnetization preparation methods. As a result, an in-depth understanding of finite radio-frequency effects is not only of fundamental theoretical interest but also has direct practical implications. In this article, an analytical solution for balanced steady-state free precession with finite radio-frequency pulses is derived for the transient phase (under ideal conditions) and in the steady state demonstrating that balanced steady-state free precession key features are preserved but revealing an unexpected dependency of finite radio-frequency effects on relaxation times for the transient decay. Finally, the mathematical framework reveals that finite radio-frequency theory can be understood as a generalization of alternating repetition time and fluctuating equilibrium steady-state free precession sequence schemes. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Photocycloaddition of the T1 excited state of thioinosine to uridine and adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenska, Grazyna; Filipiak, Piotr; Burdziński, Gotard; Pedzinski, Tomasz; Hug, Gordon L; Gdaniec, Zofia

    2009-10-01

    Novel photoadducts were obtained by irradiation of thioinosine (6-thiopurine riboside, TI) in deaerated aqueous solution without and in the presence of uridine and adenosine. Excitation (lambda > 300 nm) of TI to its excited S2 state yields a single bimolecular photoproduct. It is a purine-pyrimidine diriboside in which the purine ring is attached to the amide nitrogen of 6-amino-4-thioxo-5-formamidopyrimidine. When TI was irradiated in the presence of an excess of adenosine, two photoproducts were isolated: diribosides of N-(4,6-diaminopirymidin-5-yl)-N-formyl-6-aminopurine and N-(4-amino-6-formylamino-pyrimidin-5-yl)-6-aminopurine, both containing a purine and a formylaminopyrimidine (Fapy) fragment. The photoreaction of TI with uridine gave two regioisomeric photoproducts identified as diribosides containing either 5- or 6-(purin-6-yl)uracil as aglycones. A multistep mechanism leading to the stable photoproducts is proposed. In the first step of the mechanism, the C=S group of the excited TI undergoes a [2 + 2] cycloaddition regioselectively to the N(7)=C(8) bond of the purine ring or adds in a non-regioselective manner to the C(5)=C(6) bond of uracil. The unstable photoproducts thus formed undergo a series of dark reactions at room temperature. The photocycloaddition reactions originate from the excited T1 state of TI. This conclusion is supported by a combination of evidence from reaction quenching studies using both steady-state quantum yield determinations and kinetics results from nanosecond laser flash photolysis. The T1 state of TI is quenched by other TI molecules in their S0 state (self-quenching) and also by uridine and adenosine, all with large rate constants (0.8-5) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The quantum yields of the reactions are in general very low (phi(R) < or = 8 x 10(-3)). The sources of the inefficiency in the photocycloaddition of TI to uridine and adenosine are discussed. The photoproducts containing the Fapy residue undergo deformylation and

  18. Energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and photochemistry in cob(III)alamins and ferric porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rury, Aaron S; Wiley, Theodore E; Sension, Roseanne J

    2015-03-17

    Porphyrins and the related chlorins and corrins contain a cyclic tetrapyrrole with the ability to coordinate an active metal center and to perform a variety of functions exploiting the oxidation state, reactivity, and axial ligation of the metal center. These compounds are used in optically activated applications ranging from light harvesting and energy conversion to medical therapeutics and photodynamic therapy to molecular electronics, spintronics, optoelectronic thin films, and optomagnetics. Cobalt containing corrin rings extend the range of applications through photolytic cleavage of a unique axial carbon-cobalt bond, permitting spatiotemporal control of drug delivery. The photochemistry and photophysics of cyclic tetrapyrroles are controlled by electronic relaxation dynamics including internal conversion and intersystem crossing. Typically the electronic excitation cascades through ring centered ππ* states, ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) states, metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states, and metal centered states. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for the investigation of the electronic state dynamics in metal containing tetrapyrroles. The UV-visible spectrum is sensitive to the oxidation state, electronic configuration, spin state, and axial ligation of the central metal atom. Ultrashort broadband white light probes spanning the range from 270 to 800 nm, combined with tunable excitation pulses, permit the detailed unravelling of the time scales involved in the electronic energy cascade. State-of-the-art theoretical calculations provide additional insight required for precise assignment of the states. In this Account, we focus on recent ultrafast transient absorption studies of ferric porphyrins and corrin containing cob(III)alamins elucidating the electronic states responsible for ultrafast energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and the resulting photoreactivity or photostability of these compounds. Iron

  19. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guorong [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information & Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Neville, Simon P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Schalk, Oliver [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Sekikawa, Taro [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Worth, Graham A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Stolow, Albert, E-mail: astolow@uottawa.ca [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-01-07

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B{sub 1}(π3p{sub y}) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH{sub 3} dissociation coordinate.

  20. Search for excited states of light and heavy flavor quarks in the $\\gamma$+jet final state in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 13 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-11-13

    A search is presented for excited quarks of light and heavy flavor that decay to $\\gamma$+jet final states. The analysis is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV at the LHC. A signal would appear as a resonant contribution to the invariant mass spectrum of the $\\gamma$+jet system, above the background expected from standard model processes. No resonant excess is found, and upper limits are set on the product of the excited quark cross section and its branching fraction as a function of its mass. These are the most stringent limits to date in the $\\gamma$+jet final state, and exclude excited light quarks with masses below 5.5 TeV and excited b quarks with masses below 1.8 TeV, assuming standard model couplings.

  1. Excited State Chemistry in the Free Stream of the NASA IHF Arc Jet Facility Observed by Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael W.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of non-equilibrium emission were made in the free stream of the 60 megawatts Interaction Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. In the visible near infrared wavelength region, the most prominent emission was from molecular N2, and in the ultra violet region, the spectra were dominated by emission from molecular NO. The only atomic lines observed were those of copper (an erosion product of the electrodes). The bands of the 1st Positive system of N2 (if B is true then A is true) differed significantly from spectra computed spectra assuming only thermal excitation, suggesting overpopulation of the high vibrational states of the B state of N2. Populations of these high vibrational levels (peaking at v (sub upper) equals 13) of the N2 B state were determined by scaling simulated spectra; calculations were performed for each upper vibrational state separately. The experimental-theoretical procedure was repeated for several radial positions away from the nozzle axis to obtain spatial distributions of the upper state populations; rotational symmetry of the flow was assumed in simulations. The overpopulation of the high vibrational levels has been interpreted as the effect of inverse pre-dissociation of neutral atoms in the N2 A state, which populates the N2 B state through a level crossing process at v (sub upper) is greater than 10.

  2. EOMCC over excited state Hartree-Fock solutions (ESHF-EOMCC: An efficient approach for the entire ground state potential energy curves of higher-order bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sajeev

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC method based on the excited state Hartree-Fock (ESHF solutions is shown to be appropriate for computing the entire ground state potential energy curves of strongly correlated higher-order bonds. The new approach is best illustrated for the homolytic dissociation of higher-order bonds in molecules. The required multireference character of the true ground state wavefunction is introduced through the linear excitation operator of the EOMCC method. Even at the singles and doubles level of cluster excitation truncation, the nonparallelity error of the ground state potential energy curve from the ESHF based EOMCC method is small.

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Dessent, Caroline E. H.

    2015-11-01

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ˜1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl62- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl62- ṡ thymine and PtCl62- ṡ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)42- ṡ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl62- ṡ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)42- ṡ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a "dynamic tag" which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  4. A New Method To Evaluate Excited States Lifetimes Based on Green's Function: Application to Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzer, David; Iuchi, Satoru; Yasuda, Koji

    2016-07-12

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSCs) are the promising device for electricity generation. However, the initial stage in which an electron is injected from a dye to the semiconductor has not been precisely understood. Standard quantum chemistry methods cannot handle infinite number of orbitals coming from the band structure of the semiconductor, whereas solid state calculations cannot handle many excited states at a reasonable computational cost. In this regard, we propose a new method to evaluate lifetimes of many excited states of a molecule on a semi-infinite surface. On the basis of the theory of resonance state, the effect of the semi-infinite semiconductor is encoded into the complex self-energy from surface Green's function. The lifetimes of excited states are evaluated through the imaginary part of the self-energy, and the self-energy correction is included into excitation energies obtained from time-dependent density functional theory calculations. This new method is applied to a DSSC system composed of black dye attached to the TiO2 semiconductor, and the computed lifetimes are linked to the natures of excited states and to the surface properties. The present method provides the firm ground for analysis of interplay between many excited states of the dye and band structure of the semiconductor.

  5. Reactions of excited triplet states of metal substituted myoglobin with dioxygen and quinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, S; Vanderkooi, J M; Owen, C S; Holtom, G R; Phillips, C M

    1990-01-01

    The triplet state absorption and phosphorescence of Zn and Pd derivatives of myoglobin were compared. Both metal derivatives exhibit long triplet state lifetimes at room temperature, but whereas the Pd derivative showed exponential decay and an isosbestic point in the transient absorption spectra, the decay of the Zn derivative was nonsingle exponential and the transient absorption spectra showed evidence of more than one excited state species. No difference was seen in triplet quenching by oxygen for either derivative, indicating that differences in the polypeptide chain between the two derivatives are not large enough to affect oxygen penetrability. Quenching was also observed by anthraquinone sulfonate. In this case, the possibility of long-range transfer by an exchange mechanism is considered. PMID:2383630

  6. Dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to excited states of Be-like oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Izumi; Safronova, Ulyana I.; Kato, Takako

    2001-05-01

    We have calculated energy levels, radiative transition probabilities, and autoionization rates for Be-like oxygen (O{sup 4+}) including ls{sup 2}2lnl' (n=2 - 8, l {<=} n - 1) and 1s{sup 2}3l'nl (n=3 - 6, l {<=} n - l) states by multi-configurational Hartree-Fock method (Cowan code) and perturbation theory Z-expansion method (MZ code). The state selective dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to excited states of Be-like O ions are obtained. Configuration mixing plays an important role for the principal quantum number n distribution of the dielectronic recombination rate coefficients for 2snl (n {<=} 5) levels at low electron temperature. The orbital angular momentum quantum number l distribution of the rate coefficients shows a peak at l = 4. The total dielectronic recombination rate coefficient is derived as a function of electron temperature. (author)

  7. Ab initio calculation of resonance Raman cross sections based on excited state geometry optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaff, J F; Franzen, S; Delley, B

    2010-11-04

    A method for the calculation of resonance Raman cross sections is presented on the basis of calculation of structural differences between optimized ground and excited state geometries using density functional theory. A vibrational frequency calculation of the molecule is employed to obtain normal coordinate displacements for the modes of vibration. The excited state displacement relative to the ground state can be calculated in the normal coordinate basis by means of a linear transformation from a Cartesian basis to a normal coordinate one. The displacements in normal coordinates are then scaled by root-mean-square displacement of zero point motion to calculate dimensionless displacements for use in the two-time-correlator formalism for the calculation of resonance Raman spectra at an arbitrary temperature. The method is valid for Franck-Condon active modes within the harmonic approximation. The method was validated by calculation of resonance Raman cross sections and absorption spectra for chlorine dioxide, nitrate ion, trans-stilbene, 1,3,5-cycloheptatriene, and the aromatic amino acids. This method permits significant gains in the efficiency of calculating resonance Raman cross sections from first principles and, consequently, permits extension to large systems (>50 atoms).

  8. Equation-of-motion coupled cluster method for the description of the high spin excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musiał, Monika, E-mail: musial@ich.us.edu.pl; Lupa, Łukasz; Kucharski, Stanisław A. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, Szkolna 9, 40-006 Katowice (Poland)

    2016-04-21

    The equation-of-motion (EOM) coupled cluster (CC) approach in the version applicable for the excitation energy (EE) calculations has been formulated for high spin components. The EE-EOM-CC scheme based on the restricted Hartree-Fock reference and standard amplitude equations as used in the Davidson diagonalization procedure yields the singlet states. The triplet and higher spin components require separate amplitude equations. In the case of quintets, the relevant equations are much simpler and easier to solve. Out of 26 diagrammatic terms contributing to the R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} singlet equations in the case of quintets, only R{sub 2} operator survives with 5 diagrammatic terms present. In addition all terms engaging three body elements of the similarity transformed Hamiltonian disappear. This indicates a substantial simplification of the theory. The implemented method has been applied to the pilot study of the excited states of the C{sub 2} molecule and quintet states of C and Si atoms.

  9. Ground- and excited-state structural orientation of 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzazoles in cyclodextrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, E.L.; Dey, J.; Warner, I.M. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1996-12-12

    The effects of {alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}-, and 2,6-di-O-methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrins (CDs) on the ground- and excited-state properties of 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole, 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, and 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole in aqueous media are investigated. Steady-state fluorescence measurements are used to characterize the interaction of CDs with these azoles. Absorbance measurements indicate increased solubility of the azoles in aqueous solutions of CDs. Measurements of acidity constants (pK{sub a}) and data from induced circular dichroism indicate increased ground- and excited-state acidities of the phenolic protons of the molecules in the presence of CDs and axial orientation of the molecules within the CD cavity, respectively. The data further suggest a planar structure for HBO and a twisted confirmation for both HBT and HBI. The association constants of the inclusion complexes have also been estimated. These studies are further supplemented by comparative spectroscopic studies of 2-(2`-methoxyphenyl)benzothiazole in aqueous solutions of CDs. On the basis of the spectral data acquired, it is believed that the HBA molecules exist as zwitterionic tautomers in the presence of CDs. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Nelson, T.; Kalinin, K.; Kuzmenko, V.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2015-07-01

    An efficient method of treating solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics (ESMD) is implemented and tested by exploring the solvatochromic effects in substituted p-phenylene vinylene oligomers. A continuum solvent model is used which has very little computational overhead. This allows simulations of ESMD with solvent effects on the scale of hundreds of picoseconds for systems of up to hundreds of atoms. At these time scales, solvatochromic shifts in fluoresence spectra can be described. Solvatochromic shifts in absorption and fluorescence spectra from ESMD are compared with time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experiments.

  11. Peroxidase-promoted aerobic oxidation of 2-nitropropane: mechanism of excited state formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indig, G L; Cilento, G

    1987-03-19

    Using sensitized emission, the horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of the toxic pollutant 2-nitropropane to nitrite and acetone is shown to produce the latter in the electronically excited triplet state. In turn, this chemiexcitation implies a hydroperoxide precursor. Taking into account the stoichiometry of the reaction and available isotopic data it is inferred that the hydroperoxide reacts with a second molecule of the substrate (aci form). While triplet acetone formed from isobutanal (enol form) is generated within the enzyme, in the present case triplet acetone is formed in the bulk solution.

  12. Electron impact excitation and assignment of the low-lying electronic states of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. I.; Trajmar, S.

    1973-01-01

    Electron scattering spectra of CO2 are reported in the 7 to 10 eV energy-loss range, at energies of 0.2, 0.35, 0.6, 0.7, and 7.0 eV above threshold, and at a scattering angle of 90 deg. Several new distinct overlapping continua with weak, diffuse bands superimposed are observed to lie in this energy-loss range. The experimental spectra are discussed in the light of recent ab initio configuration-interaction calculations of the vertical transition energies of CO2. The experimental spectra are shown to be consistent with the excitation states of CO2.

  13. First identification of excited states in sup 5 sup 9 Zn

    CERN Document Server

    Andreoiu, C; Fahlander, C; Mineva, M N; Rudolph, D; Axiotis, M; Angelis, G D; Farnea, E; Gadea, A; Kröll, T; Martínez, T; Lenzi, S M; Rossi-Alvarez, C; Marginean, N; Ur, C A

    2002-01-01

    Excited states in sup 5 sup 9 Zn were observed for the first time following the fusion-evaporation reaction sup 2 sup 4 Mg+ sup 4 sup 0 Ca at a beam energy of 60 MeV. The GASP array in conjunction with the ISIS Silicon ball and the NeutronRing allowed for the detection of gamma-rays in coincidence with evaporated light particles. The mirror symmetry of sup 5 sup 9 Zn and sup 5 sup 9 Cu is discussed. (orig.)

  14. The H$_2^+$ ion in a strong magnetic field. Lowest excited states

    OpenAIRE

    Turbiner, A. V.; Vieyra, J. C. Lopez

    2003-01-01

    As a continuation of our previous work ({\\it Phys. Rev. A68, 012504 (2003)}) an accurate study of the lowest $1\\si_g$ and the low-lying excited $1\\si_u$, $2\\si_g$, $1\\pi_{u,g}$, $1\\de_{g,u}$ electronic states of the molecular ion $H_2^+$ is made. Since the parallel configuration where the molecular axis coincides with the magnetic field direction is optimal, this is the only configuration which is considered. The variational method is applied and the {\\it same} trial function is used for diff...

  15. Variety in excitation energy transfer processes from phycobilisomes to photosystems I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Niwa, Kyosuke; Abe, Tomoko; Murakami, Akio; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-09-01

    The light-harvesting antennas of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms capture light energy and transfer it to the reaction centers of their photosystems. The light-harvesting antennas of cyanobacteria and red algae, called phycobilisomes (PBSs), supply light energy to both photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). However, the excitation energy transfer processes from PBS to PSI and PSII are not understood in detail. In the present study, the energy transfer processes from PBS to PSs in various cyanobacteria and red algae were examined in vivo by selectively exciting their PSs or PBSs, and measuring the resulting picosecond to nanosecond time-resolved fluorescences. By observing the delayed fluorescence spectrum of PBS-selective excitation in Arthrospira platensis, we demonstrated that energy transfer from PBS to PSI via PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer) occurs even for PSI trimers. The contribution of PBS→PSII→PSI transfer was species dependent, being largest in the wild-type of red alga Pyropia yezoensis (formerly Porphyra yezoensis) and smallest in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Comparing the time-resolved fluorescence after PSs- and PBS-selective excitation, we revealed that light energy flows from CP43 to CP47 by energy transfer between the neighboring PSII monomers in PBS-PSII supercomplexes. We also suggest two pathways of energy transfer: direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI (PBS→PSI transfer) and indirect transfer through PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer). We also infer that PBS→PSI transfer conveys light energy to a lower-energy red chlorophyll than PBS→PSII→PSI transfer.

  16. New measurements of the lifetimes of excited states of Mn55 below 2.7 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggiano, J. A.; Hasty, R. D.; Korbly, S. E.; Park, W. H.; Warren, G. A.

    2009-09-01

    The lifetimes of the excited states of Mn55 between 1.5 and 2.7 MeV were measured using nuclear resonance fluorescence. The absolute lifetimes of the excited levels were determined from simultaneous measurements of manganese and aluminum. In this approach, the precisely known aluminum state serves as a means to normalize the results. Our findings differ from the evaluated level lifetimes in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), but agree with earlier nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements.

  17. Quantum mechanical modeling of excited electronic states and their relationship to cathodoluminescence of BaZrO3

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Mario L.; Andrés Bort, Juan; Gracia Edo, Lourdes; Beltrán Flors, Armando; Montoro, Luciano A.; Varela, José A.; Longo, E.

    2013-01-01

    First-principles calculations set the comprehension over performance of novel cathodoluminescence (CL) properties of BaZrO3 prepared through microwave-assisted hydrothermal. Ground (singlet, s*) and excited (singlet s** and triplet t** ) electronic states were built from zirconium displacement of 0.2 Å in {001} direction. Each ground and excited states were characterized by the correlation of their corresponding geometry with electronic structures and Raman vibrational frequencies which were ...

  18. Excited-State Dynamics of the Thiopurine Prodrug 6-Thioguanine: Can N9-Glycosylation Affect Its Phototoxic Activity?

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan Ashwood; Steffen Jockusch; Carlos E. Crespo-Hernández

    2017-01-01

    6-Thioguanine, an immunosuppressant and anticancer prodrug, has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell death following exposure to UVA radiation. Its metabolite, 6-thioguanosine, plays a major role in the prodrug’s overall photoreactivity. However, 6-thioguanine itself has proven to be cytotoxic following UVA irradiation, warranting further investigation into its excited-state dynamics. In this contribution, the excited-state dynamics and photochemical properties of 6-thioguanine are studie...

  19. Stochastic Hierarchical Systems: Excitable Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardt, Helmar; Zaks, Michael A.; Falcke, Martin; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    We present a discrete model of stochastic excitability by a low-dimensional set of delayed integral equations governing the probability in the rest state, the excited state, and the refractory state. The process is a random walk with discrete states and nonexponential waiting time distributions, which lead to the incorporation of memory kernels in the integral equations. We extend the equations of a single unit to the system of equations for an ensemble of globally coupled oscillators, derive...

  20. Observation of an Excited B± Meson State with the ATLAS Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.

    2014-01-01

    A search for excited states of the B±c meson is performed using 4.9  fb−1 of 7 TeV and 19.2  fb−1 of 8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. A new state is observed through its hadronic transition to the ground state, with the latter detected in the decay B......±c→J/ψπ±. The state appears in the m(B±cπ+π−)−m(B±c)−2m(π±) mass difference distribution with a significance of 5.2 standard deviations. The mass of the observed state is 6842±4±5  MeV, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The mass and decay of this state are consistent with expectations...... for the second S-wave state of the B±c meson, B±c(2S)....

  1. Generation of excited coherent states for a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojaveri, B., E-mail: bmojaveri@azaruniv.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, P.O. Box 51745-406, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehghani, A., E-mail: a-dehghani@tabrizu.ac.ir, E-mail: alireza.dehghani@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Payame Noor University, P.O. Box 19395-3697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    We introduce excited coherent states, |β,α;nгЂ‰≔a{sup †n}|β,αгЂ‰, where n is an integer and states |β,αгЂ‰ denote the coherent states of a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field. States |β,αгЂ‰ minimize the Schrödinger-Robertson uncertainty relation while having the nonclassical properties. It has been shown that the resolution of identity condition is realized with respect to an appropriate measure on the complex plane. Some of the nonclassical features such as sub-Poissonian statistics and quadrature squeezing of these states are investigated. Our results are compared with similar Agarwal’s type photon added coherent states (PACSs) and it is shown that, while photon-counting statistics of |β,α,nгЂ‰ are the same as PACSs, their squeezing properties are different. It is also shown that for large values of |β|, while they are squeezed, they minimize the uncertainty condition. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that by changing the magnitude of the external magnetic field, B{sub ext}, the squeezing effect is transferred from one component to another. Finally, a new scheme is proposed to generate states |β,α;nгЂ‰ in cavities. .

  2. Observation of an excited Bc(±) meson state with the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allison, L J; Allport, P P; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baas, A; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Backus Mayes, J; Badescu, E; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Balek, P; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Bartsch, V; Bassalat, A; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Beringer, J; Bernard, C; Bernat, P; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertsche, D; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, T T; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borri, M; Borroni, S; Bortfeldt, J; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boutouil, S; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Brelier, B; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, K; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Brown, J; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, L; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bundock, A C; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burghgrave, B; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Butt, A I; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Byszewski, M; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarda, S; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Caminal Armadans, R; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Campoverde, A; Canale, V; Canepa, A; Cano Bret, M; Cantero, J; Cantrill, R; 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    2014-11-21

    A search for excited states of the Bc(±) meson is performed using 4.9  fb(-1) of 7 TeV and 19.2  fb(-1) of 8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. A new state is observed through its hadronic transition to the ground state, with the latter detected in the decay Bc(±)→J/ψπ(±). The state appears in the m(Bc(±)π(+)π(-))-m(Bc(±))-2m(π(±)) mass difference distribution with a significance of 5.2 standard deviations. The mass of the observed state is 6842±4±5  MeV, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The mass and decay of this state are consistent with expectations for the second S-wave state of the Bc(±) meson, Bc(±)(2S).

  3. Observation of an Excited $B^{\\pm}_c$ Meson State with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; 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Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; 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Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; 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Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; 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Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-11-21

    A search for excited states of the $B^{\\pm}_c$ meson is performed using 4.9 fb$^{-1}$ of 7 TeV and 19.2 fb$^{-1}$ of 8 TeV $pp$ collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. A new state is observed through its hadronic transition to the ground state, with the latter detected in the decay $B_c^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}$. The state appears in the $m(B_c^{\\pm}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-})-m(B_c^{\\pm})-2m(\\pi^{\\pm})$ mass difference distribution with a significance of 5.2 standard deviations. The mass of the observed state is $6842 \\pm 4 \\pm 5$~MeV, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The mass and decay of this state are consistent with expectations for the second $S\\mbox{-}$wave state of the $B^{\\pm}_c$ meson, $B^{\\pm}_c(2S)$.

  4. Dynamic Raman Line Shapes on an Evolving Excited-State Landscape: Insights from Tunable Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, Breland G; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Weimin; Zhu, Liangdong; Fang, Chong

    2017-07-27

    Tracking molecular motions in real time remains a formidable challenge in science and engineering fields because the experimental methodology requires simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Building on early successes and future potential of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) as a structural dynamics technique, we present a comprehensive study of stimulated Raman line shapes of a photosensitive molecule in solution with tunable Raman pump and probe pulses. Following femtosecond 400 nm electronic excitation, the model photoacid pyranine exhibits dynamic and mode-dependent Raman line shapes when the Raman pump is tuned from the red side toward and across the excited-state absorption (ESA) band (e.g., from S1) with varying resonance conditions. On the anti-Stokes FSRS side, low-frequency modes below ∼1000 cm-1 exhibit a line shape change from gain to dispersive to loss, whereas the dispersive intermediate is much less notable for high-frequency modes. The characteristic mode frequency blue shift involving vibrationally hot states in S1 with time constants of ∼9.6 and 58.6 ps reveals the sensitivity of anti-Stokes FSRS to vibrational cooling and solvation. This work lays the foundation for expanding tunable FSRS technology on both the Stokes and anti-Stokes sides to investigate a variety of photoinduced processes in solution with sufficient resolution to expose functional motions and increased sensitivity to monitor vibrational cooling.

  5. Theoretical study on the electronic structure of triphenyl sulfonium salts: Electronic excitation and electron transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsalakis, Ioannis D.; Theodorakopoulos, Giannoula; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N.; Georgiadou, Dimitra G.; Vasilopoulou, Maria; Argitis, Panagiotis

    2014-05-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and Time Dependent DFT calculations on triphenyl sulfonium cation (TPS) and the salts of TPS with triflate, nonaflate, perfluoro-1-octanesulfonate and hexafluoro antimonate anions are presented. These systems are widely used as cationic photoinitiators and as electron ejection layer for polymer light-emitting diodes. While some differences exist in the electronic structure of the different salts, their lowest energy intense absorption maxima are calculated at nearly the same energy for all systems. The first excited state of TPS and of the TPS salts is dissociating. Electron addition to the TPS salts lowers their energy by 1.0-1.33 eV.

  6. Role of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the excited-state intramolecular double proton transfer (ESIDPT of calix[4]arene: A TDDFT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Se

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT method was performed to investigate the excited-state intramolecular double proton transfer (ESIDPT reaction of calix[4]arene (C4A and the role of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the ESIDPT process. The geometries of C4A in the ground state and excited states (S1, S2 and T1 were optimized. Four intramolecular hydrogen bonds formed in the C4A are strengthened or weakened in the S2 and T1 states compared to those in the ground state. Interestingly, upon excitation to the S1 state of C4A, two protons H1 and H2 transfer along the two intramolecular hydrogen bonds O1-H1···O2 and O2-H2···O3, while the other two protons do not transfer. The ESIDPT reaction breaks the primary symmetry of C4A in the ground state. The potential energy curves of proton transfer demonstrate that the ESIDPT process follows the stepwise mechanism but not the concerted mechanism. Findings indicate that intramolecular hydrogen bonding is critical to the ESIDPT reactions in intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems.

  7. Improved film morphology reduces charge carrier recombination into the triplet excited state in a small bandgap polymer-fullerene photovoltaic cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Nuzzo, Daniele; Shahid, Munazza; Gevaerts, Veronique S. [Molecular Materials and Nanosystems, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), P.O. Box 902, 5600 AX Eindhoven (Netherlands); Aguirre, Aranzazu; Meskers, Stefan C.J.; Janssen, Rene A.J. [Molecular Materials and Nanosystems, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-10-08

    The use of diiodooctane as processing additive for construction of PCPDTBT:PCBM solar cells results in a profound change in photophysical behavior of this blend. In the improved morphology obtained with the additive, recombination of charge carriers to the lowest triplet excited state is suppressed. This contributes to the boost in solar power conversion efficiency induced by the use of the processing agent. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Fluorescence excitation involving multiple electron transition states of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.Y.R.; Chen, F.Z.; Hung, T.; Judge, D.L. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The electronic states and electronic structures of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in the 8-50 eV energy region have been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically. In the energy region higher than 25 eV there exists many electronic states including multiple electron transition (MET) states which are responsible for producing most of the dissociative photoionization products. The electronic states at energies higher than 50 eV have been mainly determined by Auger spectroscopy, double charge transfer, photofragment spectroscopy and ion-ion coincidence spectroscopy. The absorption and ionization spectra of these molecules at energies higher than 50 eV mainly show a monotonic decrease in cross section values and exhibit structureless features. The decay channels of MET and Rydberg (or superexcited) states include autoionization, ionization, dissociative ionization, predissociation, and dissociation while those of single ion and multiple ion states may involve predissociation. and dissociation processes. The study of fluorescence specifically probes electronically excited species resulting from the above-mentioned decay channels and provides information for understanding the competition among these channels.

  9. Deactivation of 6-Aminocoumarin Intramolecular Charge Transfer Excited State through Hydrogen Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystkowiak, Ewa; Dobek, Krzysztof; Maciejewski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results of the spectral (absorption and emission) and photophysical study of 6-aminocoumarin (6AC) in various aprotic hydrogen-bond forming solvents. It was established that solvent polarity as well as hydrogen-bonding ability influence solute properties. The hydrogen-bonding interactions between S1-electronic excited solute and solvent molecules were found to facilitate the nonradiative deactivation processes. The energy-gap dependence on radiationless deactivation in aprotic solvents was found to be similar to that in protic solvents. PMID:25244014

  10. Ground and excited states for exotic three-body atomic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasaneo G.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available An Angular Correlated Configuration Interaction method is extended and applied to exotic threebody atomic systems with general masses. A recently proposed angularly correlated basis set is used to construct, simultaneously and with a single diagonalization, ground and excited states wave functions which: (i satisfy exactly Kato cusp conditions at the two-body coalescence points; (ii have only linear parameters; (iii show a fast convergency rate for the energy; (iv form an orthogonal set. The efficiency of the construction is illustrated by the study a variety of three-body atomic systems [m1− m2− m3z3+ ] with two negatively charged light particles, with 123 diverse masses m1− and m2−, and a heavy positively charged nucleus m3z3+. The calculated ground 11S and several excited n1,3S state energies are compared with those given in the literature, when available. We also present a short discussion on the critical charge necessary to get a stable three-body system supporting two electrons, an electron and a muon, or two muons.

  11. Excited States and Optical Spectra Based on GW-BSE: Dimensionality and Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Steven G.

    In this talk, I discuss some recent developments and applications of first-principles GW plus Bethe Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) approach to the understanding and prediction of photo-excited states, optical responses, and related spectroscopic properties of materials, in particular atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals. Owing to their reduced dimensionality, quasi-2D materials and their nanostructures can exhibit highly unusual behaviors. Symmetry, many-body interactions, doping, and substrate screening effects play a critical role in shaping qualitatively and quantitatively their excited-state properties. Accurate treatment of these effects, in particular many-electron interactions, poses new theoretical and computational challenges. I will present some new developments in addressing these challenges, and present studies on monolayer and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides and metal monochalcogenides, as well as black phosphorus and other 2D crystals. Several highly interesting and unexpected phenomena are discovered: unusual excitonic level structures and optical selection rules; exchange-induced light-like (massless) exciton dispersion in 2D; tunable optical and plasmonic properties; and the dominant influence of substrate screening. I would like to acknowledge collaborations with members of the Louie group. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences & Engineering Division, and by National Science Foundation.

  12. Monitored steady-state excitation and recovery (MSSER) radiation force imaging using viscoelastic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, F W; Haider, M A; Loboa, E G; Behler, R H; Euliss, L E; Pfeiler, T W; Gallippi, C M

    2008-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force imaging methods distinguish tissue structure and composition by monitoring tissue responses to applied radiation force excitations. Although these responses are a complex, multidimensional function of the geometric and viscoelastic nature of tissue, simplified discrete biomechanical models offer meaningful insight to the physical phenomena that govern induced tissue motion. Applying Voigt and standard linear viscoelastic tissue models, we present a new radiation force technique - monitored steady-state excitation and recovery (MSSER) imaging - that tracks both steady-state displacement during prolonged force application and transient response following force cessation to estimate tissue mechanical properties such as elasticity and viscosity. In concert with shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) estimates for Young's modulus, MSSER methods are useful for estimating tissue mechanical properties independent of the applied force magnitude. We test our methods in gelatin phantoms and excised pig muscle, with confirmation through mechanical property measurement. Our results measured 10.6 kPa, 14.7 kPa, and 17.1 kPa (gelatin) and 122.4 kPa (pig muscle) with less than 10% error. This work demonstrates the feasibility of MSSER imaging and merits further efforts to incorporate relevant mechanical tissue models into the development of novel radiation force imaging techniques.

  13. Generalization of the variational principle and the Hohenberg and Kohn theorems for excited states of Fermion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonis, A., E-mail: gonis@comcast.net

    2017-01-05

    Through the entanglement of a collection of K non-interacting replicas of a system of N interacting Fermions, and making use of the properties of reduced density matrices the variational principle and the theorems of Hohenberg and Kohn are generalized to excited states. The generalization of the variational principle makes use of the natural orbitals of an N-particle density matrix describing the state of lowest energy of the entangled state. The extension of the theorems of Hohenberg and Kohn is based on the ground-state formulation of density functional theory but with a new interpretation of the concept of a ground state: It is the state of lowest energy of a system of KN Fermions that is described in terms of the excited states of the N-particle interacting system. This straightforward implementation of the line of reasoning of ground-state density functional theory to a new domain leads to a unique and logically valid extension of the theory to excited states that allows the systematic treatment of all states in the spectrum of the Hamiltonian of an interacting system. - Highlights: • Use of entanglement in connection with the properties of density matrices. • An anti-symmetric entangled state of order KN expressed in terms of excited states of an interacting N-particle system.

  14. Probing the excited-state quantum phase transition through statistics of Loschmidt echo and quantum work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Quan, H. T.

    2017-09-01

    By analyzing the probability distributions of the Loschmidt echo (LE) and quantum work, we examine the nonequilibrium effects of a quantum many-body system, which exhibits an excited-state quantum phase transition (ESQPT). We find that depending on the value of the controlling parameter the distribution of the LE displays different patterns. At the critical point of the ESQPT, both the averaged LE and the averaged work show a cusplike shape. Furthermore, by employing the finite-size scaling analysis of the averaged work, we obtain the critical exponent of the ESQPT. Finally, we show that at the critical point of ESQPT the eigenstate is a highly localized state, further highlighting the influence of the ESQPT on the properties of the many-body system.

  15. Reduced probabilities for E2 transitions between excited collective states of triaxial even–even nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadyrbekov, M. S., E-mail: nodirbekov@inp.uz; Bozarov, O. A. [Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Uzbekistan)

    2017-01-15

    Reduced probabilities for intra- and interband E2 transitions in excited collective states of even–even lanthanide and actinide nuclei are analyzed on the basis of a model that admits an arbitrary triaxiality. They are studied in detail in the energy spectra of {sup 154}Sm, {sup 156}Gd, {sup 158}Dy, {sup 162,164}Er, {sup 230,232}Th, and {sup 232,234,236,238}U even–even nuclei. Theoretical and experimental values of the reduced probabilities for the respective E2 transitions are compared. This comparison shows good agreement for all states, including high-spin ones. The ratios of the reduced probabilities for the E2 transitions in question are compared with results following from the Alaga rules. These comparisons make it possible to assess the sensitivity of the probabilities being considered to the presence of quadrupole deformations.

  16. Shape coexistence at the proton drip-line: First identification of excited states in 180Pb

    CERN Document Server

    Rahkila, P; Pakarinen, J; Gray-Jones, C; Greenlees, P T; Jakobsson, U; Jones, P; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Ketelhut, S; Koivisto, H; Leino, M; Nieminen, P; Nyman, M; Papadakis, P; Paschalis, S; Petri, M; Peura, P; Roberts, O J; Ropponen, T; Ruotsalainen, P; Saren, J; Scholey, C; Sorri, J; Tuff, A G; Uusitalo, J; Wadsworth, R; Bender, M; Heenen, P -H

    2010-01-01

    Excited states in the extremely neutron-deficient nucleus, 180Pb, have been identified for the first time using the JUROGAM II array in conjunction with the RITU recoil separator at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyvaskyla. This study lies at the limit of what is presently achievable with in-beam spectroscopy, with an estimated cross-section of only 10 nb for the 92Mo(90Zr,2n)180Pb reaction. A continuation of the trend observed in 182Pb and 184Pb is seen, where the prolate minimum continues to rise beyond the N=104 mid-shell with respect to the spherical ground state. Beyond mean-field calculations are in reasonable correspondence with the trends deduced from experiment.

  17. Maximum Theoretical Efficiency Limit of Photovoltaic Devices: Effect of Band Structure on Excited State Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterloh, Frank E

    2014-10-02

    The Shockley-Queisser analysis provides a theoretical limit for the maximum energy conversion efficiency of single junction photovoltaic cells. But besides the semiconductor bandgap no other semiconductor properties are considered in the analysis. Here, we show that the maximum conversion efficiency is limited further by the excited state entropy of the semiconductors. The entropy loss can be estimated with the modified Sackur-Tetrode equation as a function of the curvature of the bands, the degeneracy of states near the band edges, the illumination intensity, the temperature, and the band gap. The application of the second law of thermodynamics to semiconductors provides a simple explanation for the observed high performance of group IV, III-V, and II-VI materials with strong covalent bonding and for the lower efficiency of transition metal oxides containing weakly interacting metal d orbitals. The model also predicts efficient energy conversion with quantum confined and molecular structures in the presence of a light harvesting mechanism.

  18. Storing single photons emitted by a quantum memory on a highly excited Rydberg state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distante, Emanuele; Farrera, Pau; Padrón-Brito, Auxiliadora; Paredes-Barato, David; Heinze, Georg; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2017-01-19

    Strong interaction between two single photons is a long standing and important goal in quantum photonics. This would enable a new regime of nonlinear optics and unlock several applications in quantum information science, including photonic quantum gates and deterministic Bell-state measurements. In the context of quantum networks, it would be important to achieve interactions between single photons from independent photon pairs storable in quantum memories. So far, most experiments showing nonlinearities at the single-photon level have used weak classical input light. Here we demonstrate the storage and retrieval of a paired single photon emitted by an ensemble quantum memory in a strongly nonlinear medium based on highly excited Rydberg atoms. We show that nonclassical correlations between the two photons persist after retrieval from the Rydberg ensemble. Our result is an important step towards deterministic photon-photon interactions, and may enable deterministic Bell-state measurements with multimode quantum memories.

  19. Optical limiting and excited-state absorption in fullerene solutions and doped glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBranch, D.; Smilowitz, L.; Klimov, V. [and others

    1995-09-01

    We report the ground state and excited state optical absorption spectra in the visible and near infrared for several substituted fullerenes and higher fullerenes in toluene solutions. Based on these measurements, broadband predictions of the optical limiting performance of these molecules can be deduced. These predictions are then tested at 532 to 700 nm in intensity-dependent transmission measurements. We observe optical limiting in all fullerenes measured; higher fullerenes show the greatest potential for limiting in the near infrared (650-1000 nm), while substituted C{sub 60} shows optimal limiting in the visible (450-700 nm). We observe dramatically reduced limiting for solid forms of C{sub 60} (thin films and C{sub 60}-doped porous glasses), indicating that efficient optical limiting in fullerenes requires true molecular solutions.

  20. Symmetry Constraints and Diffusion Monte Carlo Calculations of Excited State Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, W. M. C.; Hood, Randolph Q.; Needs, R. J.

    1998-03-01

    It is now well established that the fixed--node diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method can be used to carry out very accurate calculations of the ground state electronic properties of solids and molecules. For a system containing N electrons in three dimensions, a trial N--electron wavefunction is used to fix a nodal surface (the 3N - 1 dimensional surface on which the trial wavefunction is zero), and the DMC algorithm then projects out the lowest energy variational wavefunction consistent with that imposed nodal surface. In attempts to use DMC to calculate excited--state information, it has often been assumed that the DMC energy must be greater than or equal to the energy of the lowest exact eigenfunction with the same symmetry as the trial function. We show by constructing an explicit example that this common assumption is wrong, and that only a weaker and much less useful variational principle applies.

  1. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdobintsev, P Yu; Rakcheeva, L P; Murashov, S V; Melnikov, A S; Lyubchik, S; Timofeev, N A; Pastor, A A; Khodorkovskii, M A

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  2. Theoretical study of excited-state proton transfer of 2,7-diazaindole·(H2O)2 cluster via hydrogen bonding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Tang, Zhe; Wang, Yi; Tian, Jing; Fei, Xu; Cao, Fang; Li, GuangYue

    2017-12-01

    A new chromophore, 2,7-diazaindole (2,7-DAI), has been designed to surpass the limitation of 7-azaindole (7AI). It exhibits remarkable water catalyzed proton-transfer properties. Excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) has been investigated based on the time-dependent density functional theory method. The calculated vertical excitation energies in the S0 and S1 states agree well with the experimental values. Proton transfer couples with hydrogen-bonding dynamics between the 2,7-diazaindole and the surrounding water molecules. Hydrogen bond strengthening has been testified in the S1 state based on a comparison of primary bond lengths and hydrogen bond energy that is involved in the intermolecular hydrogen bond between the S0 and S1 states. Frontier molecular further suggest that the electron density changes between the ground and excited states serve as basic driving forces for proton transfer. We determined the potential-energy curves of the S0 and S1 states to characterize the ESPT process. This work explains that the ESPT process for 2,7-DAI·(H2O)2 clusters at the molecular level, and highlights the importance of hydrogen bonding in ESPT.

  3. Picosecond excite-and-probe absorption measurement of the 4T2 state nonradiative lifetime in ruby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, S. K.; Wang, W. B.; Petricevic, V.; Dorsinville, R.; Alfano, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    In a picosecond excite-and-probe absorption measurement, a 527-nm picosecond pulse excites the 4T2 state of the Cr(3+) ion in ruby and a 3.4-micron picosecond probe pulse monitors the growth and decay of population in the 2E state as a function of pump-probe delay. From the growth of population in the metastable 2E state, an upper limit of 7 ps for the nonradiative lifetime of the 4T2 state is determined.

  4. Quantum control spectroscopy of vibrational modes: Comparison of control scenarios for ground and excited states in {beta}-carotene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, Juergen; Buckup, Tiago [Fachbereich Chemie, Physikalische Chemie, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, D-35043 Marburg (Germany); Motzkus, Marcus [Fachbereich Chemie, Physikalische Chemie, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, D-35043 Marburg (Germany)], E-mail: motzkus@staff.uni-marburg.de

    2008-06-23

    Quantum control spectroscopy (QCS) is used as a tool to study, address selectively and enhance vibrational wavepacket motion in large solvated molecules. By contrasting the application of Fourier-limited and phase-modulated excitation on different electronic states, the interplay between the controllability of vibrational coherence and electronic resonance is revealed. We contrast control on electronic ground and excited state by introducing an additional pump beam prior to a DFWM-sequence (Pump-DFWM). Via phase modulation of this initial pump pulse, coherent control is extended to structural evolution on the vibrationally hot ground state (hot-S{sub 0}) and lowest lying excited state (S{sub 1}) of {beta}-carotene. In an open loop setup, the control scenarios for these different electronic states are compared in their effectiveness and mechanism.

  5. Observation of abnormally large radii of nuclei in excited states in the vicinity of neutron thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogloblin, A. A., E-mail: ogloblina@bk.ru; Danilov, A. N. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Belyaeva, T. L. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) (Mexico); Demyanova, A. S. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Goncharov, S. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Trzaska, W. [University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2011-11-15

    Differential cross sections for inelastic scattering leading to the excitation of some nuclear states situated near neutron-emission thresholds were analyzed. With the aid of a modified diffraction model, abnormally large radii were found for the 1/2{sub 1}{sup +} state of the {sup 13}C nucleus at 3.09 MeV, for the first levels of positive-parity rotational bands in the {sup 9}Be (1/2{sup +} level at 1.68 MeV and 5/2{sup +} level at 3.05 MeV) and {sup 11}Be (5/2{sup +} level at 1.78 MeV and 3/2{sup +} level at 3.41 MeV) nuclei, and for the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state of the {sup 14}Be nucleus at 1.54 MeV and 1{sub 1}{sup -} state of the {sup 12}Be nucleus at 2.7 MeV. All of these states possess signatures typical of neutron halos.

  6. Bilayer Graphene: Interaction-Induced Quantum Hall States and Unusual Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhi, Shivaji; Abanin, D. A.; Parameswaran, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, new interaction-induced quantum Hall (QH) states were observedfootnotetextB. Feldman et al., Nature Physics, doi:10.1038/nphys1406 (2009); Y. Zhao et al., arXiv:0910.0217 (2009). in bilayer graphene (BG). In this talk we address the nature of these QH states, as well as their propertiesfootnotetextD. Abanin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 076802 (2009), and to be published.. We focus on the ferromagnetic (FM) states at even filling factors, which, in the leading approximation, result from the spontaneous breaking of valley/spin SU(4) symmetry. Calculating microscopic anisotropies of the QHFM, we find the order in which Landau level (LL) degeneracies are lifted. Furthermore, we discuss the phase diagram of the system as a function of perpendicular electric field and parallel magnetic field, and find that they can be used to drive transitions between different QH states. We show that, as a result of unusual LL structure of BG, some of the QHFM states support new type of excitations -- spin/valley textures (skyrmions) that carry charge two, which provides a unique example of pairing of charges in a system with purely repulsive interactions. We propose several experiments to test our findings.

  7. Photophysics of trioxatriangulenium ion. Electrophilic reactivity in the ground state and excited singlet state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynisson, J.; Wilbrandt, R.; Brinck, V.

    2002-01-01

    of the long wavelength absorption band. A strong fluorescence is observed at 520 nm (tau(n) = 14.6 ns, phi(n) = 0.12 in deaerated acetonitrile). The fluorescence is quenched by 10 aromatic electron donors predominantly via a dynamic charge transfer mechanism, but ground state complexation is shown...

  8. Excited-state behavior of tryptamine and related indoles. Remarkably efficient intramolecular proton-induced quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuka, H.; Serizawa, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Kameta, K.; Sugiyama, H.; Matsuura, T.; Saito, I.

    1988-03-16

    The excited state behavior of tryptamine and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazoles possessing alkylamino side chains in the absence and presence of 18-crown-6 in MeOH-H/sub 2/O (9:1) mixtures has been studied by means of nanosecond single-photon counting, fluorimetry, and photochemical H-D isotope exchange. The fluorescence intensity of these indoles increases significantly with increasing concentration of 18-crown-6. The relatively short lifetime of the tryptamine ammonium ion 1 is not ascribed to external quenching but rather to internal quenching. The rate constant k/sub q/ for internal quenching can be estimated from the equation k/sub q/ = tau/sub 0//sup -1/ - tau/sub max//sup -1/, where tau/sub 0/ and tau/sub max/ represent the fluorescence lifetimes for free 1 and the 1:1 1-crown ether complex, respectively. Internal quenching originates from electrophilic proton attack by the -N/sup +/H/sub 3/ (or -N/sup +/D/sub 3/) group of 1 at the C-4 position of the excited indole ring. For 3 (the tetrahydrocarbazole derivative R(CH/sub 2/)/sub 3/N/sup +/H/sub 3/) the k/sub q/ value comprises the electrophilic proton attack at the C-8 position plus other quenching (probably charge-transfer quenching) between the excited indole moiety (R*) and the -N/sup +/H/sub 3/ (or -N/sup +/D/sub 3/) group. The stabilization constant K/sub g/ for the corresponding ammonium ion and 18-crown-6 can be determined by fluorimetry. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the internal quenching and the complex formation, respectively, have been described.

  9. Doubly-excited state effects on two-photon double ionization of helium by time-delayed, oppositely circularly-polarized attosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoko Djiokap, J. M.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2017-12-01

    We study two-photon double ionization (TPDI) of helium by a pair of time-delayed (non-overlapping), oppositely circularly-polarized attosecond pulses whose carrier frequencies are resonant with 1P o doubly-excited states. All of our TPDI results are obtained by numerical solution of the two-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the six-dimensional case of circularly-polarized attosecond pulses, and they are analyzed using perturbation theory (PT). As compared with the corresponding nonresonant TPDI process, we find that the doubly-excited states change the character of vortex patterns in the two-electron momentum distributions for the case of back-to-back detection of the two ionized electrons in the polarization plane. The doubly-excited states also completely change the structure of fixed-energy, two-electron angular distributions. Moreover, both the fixed-energy and energy-integrated angular distributions, as well as the two-electron energy distributions, exhibit a periodicity with time delay τ between the two attosecond pulses of about 69 as, i.e. the beat period between the (2s2p){}1{{{P}}}o doubly-excited state and the He ground state. Using PT we derive an expression for an angle-integrated energy distribution that is sensitive to the slower beat period ∼1.2 fs between different doubly-excited states as well as to the long timescale ∼17 fs of autoionization lifetimes. However, with our current computer codes we are only able to study numerically the time-dependent phenomena occurring on an attosecond time scale.

  10. Luminescence and excited state dynamics of Bi{sup 3+} centers in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babin, V. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16200 Prague (Czech Republic); Chernenko, K., E-mail: nuclearphys@yandex.ru [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University, Polytekhnicheskaya 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lipińska, L. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 133, 01919 Warsaw (Poland); Mihokova, E.; Nikl, M. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16200 Prague (Czech Republic); Schulman, L.S. [Physics Department, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5820 (United States); Shalapska, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Suchocki, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Physics, University of Bydgoszcz, Weyssenhoffa 11, 85072 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Zazubovich, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Zhydachevskii, Ya. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Lviv Polytechnic National University, Bandera 12, 79646 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2015-11-15

    Photoluminescence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi nanopowder synthesized by the modified sol–gel method is studied using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy in the 4.2–300 K temperature range. Bi{sup 3+} ions are substituted for Y{sup 3+} ions in two different crystal lattice sites, one having S{sub 6} symmetry (Bi(S{sub 6})) and the other C{sub 2} symmetry (Bi(C{sub 2})). The luminescence characteristics of these two centers are found to have strongly different electron–phonon interactions. The luminescence of Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers peak at 3.04 eV and 2.41 eV, respectively, and arise from the radiative decay of the triplet relaxed excited state (RES) of Bi{sup 3+} ions. The model and structure of the RES, responsible for the luminescence of Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi, as well as radiative and nonradiative processes, taking place in the excited states of these centers, are investigated. The parameters of the triplet RES (the separation between the metastable and radiative levels and probabilities of radiative and nonradiative transitions from these levels) are determined. Low-temperature quenching of the triplet luminescence of these centers is explained by nonradiative quantum tunneling transitions from the metastable minima of their triplet RES to closely located defect- or exciton-related levels. - Highlights: • Photoluminescence of Bi{sup 3+} centers of two types in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi is investigated. • Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers reveal strongly different electron–phonon interaction. • Radiative and nonradiative processes in their triplet excited states are clarified. • Low-temperature luminescence quenching in Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers is studied. • New fast weak ≈2.9 eV emission is suggested to arise from Bi(C{sub 2}) centers.

  11. Proton-hole and core-excited states in the semi-magic nucleus 131In82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taprogge, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Grawe, H.; Borzov, I. N.; Nishimura, S.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P. -A.; Sumikama, T.; Xu, Z. Y.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gey, G.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jung, H. S.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y. -K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Li, Z.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Vajta, Zs.; Watanabe, H.; Wu, J.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.; Benzoni, G.; Bönig, S.; Chae, K. Y.; Coraggio, L.; Daugas, J. -M.; Drouet, F.; Gadea, A.; Gargano, A.; Ilieva, S.; Itaco, N.; Kondev, F. G.; Kröll, T.; Lane, G. J.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Mücher, D.; Naqvi, F.; Niikura, M.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Wendt, A.

    2016-11-01

    The decay of the N = 83 nucleus Cd-131 has been studied at the RIBF facility at the RIKEN Nishina Center. The main purpose of the study was to identify the position of the and proton-hole states and the energies of core-excited configurations in the semi-magic nucleus In-131. From the radiation emitted following the decay, a level scheme of In-131 was established and the feeding to each excited state determined. Similarities between the single-particle transitions observed in the decays of the N = 83 isotones In-132 and Cd-131 are discussed. Finally the excitation energies of several core-excited configurations in In-131 are compared to QRPA and shell-model calculations.

  12. Proton-hole and core-excited states in the semi-magic nucleus {sup 131}In{sub 82}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taprogge, J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Jungclaus, A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Grawe, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Borzov, I.N. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Nishimura, S.; Doornenbal, P.; Soederstroem, P.A.; Baba, H.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kameda, D.; Kubo, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Watanabe, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Lorusso, G. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); National Physical Laboratory, NPL, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom); Simpson, G.S.; Drouet, F. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, Grenoble Cedex (France); Sumikama, T. [Tohoku University, Department of Physics, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Xu, Z.Y.; Niikura, M. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Browne, F. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); University of Brighton, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, Brighton (United Kingdom); Gernhaeuser, R.; Steiger, K.; Muecher, D. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E12, Garching (Germany); Gey, G. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, Grenoble Cedex (France); Institut Laue-Langevin, B.P. 156, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Jung, H.S. [Chung-Ang University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G.D.; Kwon, Y.K. [Institute for Basic Science, Rare Isotope Science Project, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.K. [Institute for Basic Science, Rare Isotope Science Project, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Schaffner, H. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Li, Z. [Peking University, School of Physics and State key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Sakurai, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Vajta, Zs. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); MTA Atomki, P.O. Box 51, Debrecen (Hungary); Wu, J. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Peking University, School of Physics and State key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Yagi, A.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A. [Osaka University, Department of Physics, Toyonaka (Japan); Yoshinaga, K. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Benzoni, G. [INFN, Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Boenig, S.; Ilieva, S.; Kroell, T. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Chae, K.Y. [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Physics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Coraggio, L.; Gargano, A. [Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Napoli (Italy); Daugas, J.M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon cedex (France); Gadea, A.; Montaner-Piza, A. [CSIC-Univ. of Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Paterna (Spain); Itaco, N. [Seconda Universita di Napoli, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Caserta (Italy); Kondev, F.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne, IL (United States); Lane, G.J. [Australian National University, Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Canberra (Australia); Moschner, K.; Wendt, A. [University of Cologne, IKP, Cologne (Germany); Naqvi, F. [Yale University, Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT (United States); Orlandi, R. [K.U. Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en StralingsFysica, Heverlee (Belgium); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Patel, Z.; Podolyak, Zs. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    The β decay of the N = 83 nucleus {sup 131}Cd has been studied at the RIBF facility at the RIKEN Nishina Center. The main purpose of the study was to identify the position of the 1p{sub 3/2} and 0f{sub 5/2} proton-hole states and the energies of core-excited configurations in the semi-magic nucleus {sup 131}In. From the radiation emitted following the β decay, a level scheme of {sup 131}In was established and the β feeding to each excited state determined. Similarities between the single-particle transitions observed in the β decays of the N = 83 isotones {sup 132}In and {sup 131}Cd are discussed. Finally the excitation energies of several core-excited configurations in {sup 131}In are compared to QRPA and shell-model calculations. (orig.)

  13. Coulomb Excitation of a Neutron-Rich $^{88}$Kr Beam Search for Mixed Symmetry States

    CERN Document Server

    Andreoiu, C; Napiorkowski, P J; Iwanicki, J S

    2002-01-01

    We propose to use the ISOLDE/REX/MINIBALL/CD set-up to perform a Coulomb Excitation experiment with a $^{88}$Kr radioactive beam. The motivation includes a search for $Mixed$ $Symmetry$ states predicted by the IBM-2 model, gathering more spectroscopy data about the $^{88}$Kr nucleus and extending shape coexistence studies (performed previously by the proposers for neutron-deficient Kr isotopes) to the neutron-rich side. The proposed experiment will provide data complementary to the Coulomb Excitation of a relativistic $^{88}$Kr beam proposed by D. Tonev et al. for a RISING experiment. A total of 12 days of beam time is necessary for the experiment, equally divided into two runs. One run with a 2.2 MeV/A beam energy on a $^{48}$Ti target and a second run with the maximum available REX energy of 3.1 MeV/A on a $^{208}$Pb target are requested. Using either a UC$_{x}$ or ThC$_{x}$ fissioning primary target coupled with a plasma source by a cooled transfer line seems to be the best choice for the proposed experime...

  14. An experimental and theoretical investigation into the excited electronic states of phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B.; Chiari, L. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Silva, G. B. da [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); and others

    2014-08-21

    We present experimental electron-energy loss spectra (EELS) that were measured at impact energies of 20 and 30 eV and at angles of 90° and 10°, respectively, with energy resolution ∼70 meV. EELS for 250 eV incident electron energy over a range of angles between 3° and 50° have also been measured at a moderate energy resolution (∼0.9 eV). The latter spectra were used to derive differential cross sections and generalised oscillator strengths (GOS) for the dipole-allowed electronic transitions, through normalization to data for elastic electron scattering from benzene. Theoretical calculations were performed using time-dependent density functional theory and single-excitation configuration interaction methods. These calculations were used to assign the experimentally measured spectra. Calculated optical oscillator strengths were also compared to those derived from the GOS data. This provides the first investigation of all singlet and triplet excited electronic states of phenol up to the first ionization potential.

  15. Dynamics of charge-transfer excited states relevant to photochemical energy conversion. Progress report, June 1, 1991--November 15, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, E.C.

    1991-11-01

    The primary objective of the research program is to gain a fundamental understanding of the factors governing the efficiency of excited-state charge transfer CT interactions between two chromophores that are brought together in close proximity, either by a very short covalent linkage or by ground-state complex formation. CT and van der Walls (vdW), interactions in covalently bonded bichromophoric compounds in condensed phase, as well as those in vdW complexes in supersonic jets, are being investigated using laser-based techniques under a variety of experimental conditions. This progress report is divided into three parts, according to the class of molecular systems and the phase (liquid vs. gas) in which the excited-state interactions are probed. The first is concerned with the excited states of bridged diaryl compounds in the condensed phase. The second involves the excited states of vdW complexes in supersonic jets. Finally, the third, is concerned with the excited states of electron donor-acceptor (EDA) systems in both the condensed phase and supersonic jets. In each of these studies, we are concerned with the interchromophore interactions ranging from weak vdW forces to strong CT forces, and the factors determining whether the interaction forces are weak or strong in related molecules.

  16. Capturing Invisible Motions in the Transition from Ground to Rare Excited States of T4 Lysozyme L99A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Jamie M; Feher, Victoria A; Malmstrom, Robert D; Sida, Roxana; Amaro, Rommie E

    2016-10-18

    Proteins commonly sample a number of conformational states to carry out their biological function, often requiring transitions from the ground state to higher-energy states. Characterizing the mechanisms that guide these transitions at the atomic level promises to impact our understanding of functional protein dynamics and energy landscapes. The leucine-99-to-alanine (L99A) mutant of T4 lysozyme is a model system that has an experimentally well characterized excited sparsely populated state as well as a ground state. Despite the exhaustive study of L99A protein dynamics, the conformational changes that permit transitioning to the experimentally detected excited state (∼3%, ΔG ∼2 kcal/mol) remain unclear. Here, we describe the transitions from the ground state to this sparsely populated excited state of L99A as observed through a single molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory on the Anton supercomputer. Aside from detailing the ground-to-excited-state transition, the trajectory samples multiple metastates and an intermediate state en route to the excited state. Dynamic motions between these states enable cavity surface openings large enough to admit benzene on timescales congruent with known rates for benzene binding. Thus, these fluctuations between rare protein states provide an atomic description of the concerted motions that illuminate potential path(s) for ligand binding. These results reveal, to our knowledge, a new level of complexity in the dynamics of buried cavities and their role in creating mobile defects that affect protein dynamics and ligand binding. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Theoretical Studies of Possible Synthetic Routes for the High Energy Density Material Td N4: Excited Electronic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    Vertical electronic excitation energies for single states have been computed for the high energy density material (HEDM) Td N4 in order to assess possible synthetic routes that originate from excited electronic states of N2 molecules. Several ab initio theoretical approaches have been used, including complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF), state averaged CASSCF (SA-CASSCF), singles configuration interaction (CIS), CIS with second-order and third-order correlation corrections [CIS(D)) and CIS(3)], and linear response singles and doubles coupled-cluster (LRCCSD), which is the highest level of theory employed. Standard double zeta polarized (DZP) and triple zeta double polarized (TZ2P) one-particle basis sets were used. The CASSCF calculations are found to overestimate the excitation energies, while the SA-CASSCF approach rectifies this error to some extent, but not completely. The accuracy of the CIS calculations varied depending on the particular state, while the CIS(D), CIS(3), and LRCCSD results are in generally good agreement. Based on the LRCCSD calculations, the lowest six excited singlet states are 9.35(l(sup)T1), 10.01(l(sup)T2), 10.04(1(sup)A2), 10.07(1(sup)E), 10.12(2(sup)T1), and 10.42(2(sup)T2) eV above the ground state, respectively. Comparison of these excited state energies with the energies of possible excited states of N2+N2 fragments, leads us to propose that the most likely synthetic route for Td N4 involving this mechanism arises from combination of two bound quintet states of N2.

  18. The reactions of ground and excited state sodium atoms with hydrogen halide molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, P. S.; Mestdagh, J. M.; Covinsky, M. H.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1988-10-01

    The reactions of ground and excited state Na atoms with hydrogen halide (HX) molecules have been studied using the crossed molecular beams method. With both increasing translational and increasing electronic energy, the reactive cross sections increase in the reactions of HCl and HBr. From product angular and velocity distributions detailed center-of-mass information is derived. For the reactions of Na (3 2S 1/2, 3 2P 1/2, 4 2D 5/2, 5 2S 1/2) with HCl, the product NaCl is back-scattered with respect to the incoming Na atom in the center-of-mass frame of reference. The reaction of each Na state studied with HCl is direct and proceeds via collinear and near-collinear Na-Cl-H approach geometries. For the Na (3 2P 3/2) and Na (4 2D 5/2) reactions with HCl the predominant transition state symmetry is 2Σ in a collinear (C ∞ν) Na-Cl-H geometry. This is consistent with the reaction proceeding via electron transfer from the Na atom to the halide atom. Absolute reactive cross sections for each state of Na studied with HCl were determined by comparison with both small and large angle elastic scattering. We were unable to observe Na atoms with over 4 eV of electronic energy react with HF up to collision energies of 13 kcal/mole.

  19. Rydberg and valence state excitation dynamics: a velocity map imaging study involving the E-V state interaction in HBr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaouris, Dimitris; Kartakoullis, Andreas; Glodic, Pavle; Samartzis, Peter C; Rafn Hróðmarsson, Helgi; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2015-04-28

    Photoexcitation dynamics of the E((1)Σ(+)) (v' = 0) Rydberg state and the V((1)Σ(+)) (v') ion-pair vibrational states of HBr are investigated by velocity map imaging (VMI). H(+) photoions, produced through a number of vibrational and rotational levels of the two states were imaged and kinetic energy release (KER) and angular distributions were extracted from the data. In agreement with previous work, we found the photodissociation channels forming H*(n = 2) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) to be dominant. Autoionization pathways leading to H(+) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) via either HBr(+)((2)Π3/2) or HBr(+)*((2)Π1/2) formation were also present. The analysis of KER and angular distributions and comparison with rotationally and mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra revealed the excitation transition mechanisms and characteristics of states involved as well as the involvement of the E-V state interactions and their v' and J' dependence.

  20. Renormalized energy of ground and first excited state of Fröhlich polaron in the range of weak coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Tkach

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The partial summing of infinite range of diagrams for the two-phonon mass operator of polaron described by Frohlich Hamiltonian is performed using the Feynman-Pines diagram technique. The renormalized spectral parameters of ground and first excited (phonon repeat polaron state are accurately calculated for the weak electron-phonon coupling at T=0 K. It is shown that the stronger electron-phonon interaction shifts the energy of both states into low-energy region of the spectra. The ground state stays stationary and the excited one - decays at bigger coupling constant.

  1. Dynamic response of mechanical systems to impulse process stochastic excitations: Markov approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwankiewicz, R.

    2016-05-01

    Methods for determination of the response of mechanical dynamic systems to Poisson and non-Poisson impulse process stochastic excitations are presented. Stochastic differential and integro-differential equations of motion are introduced. For systems driven by Poisson impulse process the tools of the theory of non-diffusive Markov processes are used. These are: the generalized Itô’s differential rule which allows to derive the differential equations for response moments and the forward integro-differential Chapman-Kolmogorov equation from which the equation governing the probability density of the response is obtained. The relation of Poisson impulse process problems to the theory of diffusive Markov processes is given. For systems driven by a class of non-Poisson (Erlang renewal) impulse processes an exact conversion of the original non-Markov problem into a Markov one is based on the appended Markov chain corresponding to the introduced auxiliary pure jump stochastic process. The derivation of the set of integro-differential equations for response probability density and also a moment equations technique are based on the forward integro-differential Chapman-Kolmogorov equation. An illustrating numerical example is also included.

  2. Group excitation control of generators in state regional electric power plant transformer station automatic control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumin, M.I.; Rosman, L.V.; Tarnavskii, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Group excitation control of electric generators according to standard methods is essential for the management of power plant conditions according to voltage and reactive power. A system is described that provides coordinated changes in the automatic excitation controller set point for generators that operate on common buses. The advantages of the excitation control system are discussed.

  3. Photoionization cross section measurements of the excited states of cobalt in the near-threshold region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfeng Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of photoionization cross-sections of the excited states of cobalt using a two-color, two-step resonance ionization technique in conjunction with a molecular beam time of flight (TOF mass spectrometer. The atoms were produced by the laser vaporization of a cobalt rod, coupled with a supersonic gas jet. The absolute photoionization cross-sections at threshold and near-threshold regions (0-1.2 eV were measured, and the measured values ranged from 4.2±0.7 Mb to 10.5±1.8 Mb. The lifetimes of four odd parity energy levels are reported for the first time.

  4. On the ground and excited state of glycine-glutaric acid: A new organic material

    Science.gov (United States)