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Sample records for excited molecular spectra

  1. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellman, M.E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  2. Capturing molecular multimode relaxation processes in excitable gases based on decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Kesheng

    2017-08-01

    Existing two-frequency reconstructive methods can only capture primary (single) molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases. In this paper, we present a reconstructive method based on the novel decomposition of frequency-dependent acoustic relaxation spectra to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process. This decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra is developed from the frequency-dependent effective specific heat, indicating that a multi-relaxation process is the sum of the interior single-relaxation processes. Based on this decomposition, we can reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation process by capturing the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N interior single-relaxation processes, using the measurements of acoustic absorption and sound speed at 2N frequencies. Experimental data for the gas mixtures CO2-N2 and CO2-O2 validate our decomposition and reconstruction approach.

  3. Spectra from foil-excited molybdenum ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Cecchi, J.L.; Kruse, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    The extreme-ultraviolet spectra (5 to 55 nm) for foil-excited molybdenum ions have been measured using 22 to 200 MeV beams from the Brookhaven National Laboratory MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerator facility, 20 μg/cm 2 C stripping foils, and a grazing incidence spectrometer. The mean ion charge states (13 to 28) and the narrow distribution widths (about 2 charge states) were accurately predictable from experimental parameters. Where possible, comparisons are given with Mo radiation from tokamaks, vacuum sparks, and laser-excited plasmas

  4. Atomic and molecular effects in the VUV spectra of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonntag, B.

    1977-10-01

    The VUV spectra of solids are often dominated by atomic or molecular effects, which clearly manifest themselves in the gross features of the spectra and the fine structure at inner shell excitation thresholds. Evidence for the influence of atomic and molecular matrix elements, multiplet-splitting and correlation is presented. Special emphasis is given to the direct experimental verification based on the comparison of atomic and solid state spectra. (orig.) [de

  5. Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine, for energy losses from 0 to 17.0 eV, have been taken at incident electron energies of 30, 50, and 90 eV and scattering angles from 5 to 140 deg. Features in the spectra above 11.5 eV energy loss agree well with the assignments recently made from optical spectroscopy. Excitations of many of the eleven repulsive valence excited electronic states are observed and their location correlates reasonably well with recent theoretical results. Several of these excitations have been observed for the first time and four features, for which there are no identifications, appear in the spectra.

  6. Astrophysical interpretation of molecular spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoville, N.Z.

    1984-01-01

    As sensitive, high resolution spectrometers are developed throughout the infrared great progress is anticipated in understanding not only the young-stellar objects but also the active galaxy nuclei so luminous in the far-infrared. In the infrared the variety of atomic and molecular spectroscopic transitions is capable of probing conditions ranging from hot circumstellar HII regions, molecular envelopes, and shock fronts at > 2000 K down to cold, low density interstellar gas at < 10 K. The ability to measure both physical conditions and kinematics aids in the separation of the physical regimes and in the building of a coherent dynamic/evolutionary model. The author briefly reviews the characteristics of some of the observed molecular transitions and theoretical considerations important for understanding their excitation. (Auth.)

  7. Proton and electron impact on molecular and atomic oxygen: I. High resolution fluorescence spectra in the visible and VUV spectral range and emission cross-sections for dissociative ionisation and excitation of O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, O.; Schartner, K.H.

    2000-01-01

    For pt.II see ibid., vol.11, p.45-58, 2000. Molecular oxygen O 2 was dissociated in collisions with protons and electrons in the intermediate velocity range (p + -energies: 17-800 keV, e - -energies: 0.2-2 keV). Fluorescence from excited atomic and singly ionised fragments and from singly ionised molecules was detected in the VUV and in the visible and near UV spectral range. Highly resolved spectra are presented for the VUV (46-131 nm) and the near UV/visible (340-605 nm) spectral range. Absolute emission cross-sections have been determined for dissociative ionisation and excitation leading to fluorescence in the VUV. Results are compared with published data. (orig.)

  8. Microstructure ion Nuclear Spectra at High Excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, T.E.O.

    1969-01-01

    The statistical microstructure of highly excited systems is illustrated by the distribution and fluctuations of levels, widths and cross-sections of nuclei both for the case of sharp resonances and the continuum case. The coexistence of simple modes of excitation with statistical effects in terms of strength functions is illustrated by isobaric analogue states. The analogy is made with similar phenomena for coherent light, is solid-state physics and high-energy physics. (author)

  9. Excited State Spectra and Dynamics of Phenyl-Substituted Butadienes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallace-Williams, Stacie E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.; Møller, Søren

    1994-01-01

    indicate that phenyl torsional motion is not important to the excited-state dynamics and reveal alternative excited-state reaction pathways. The results demonstrate how molecular systems that are structually similar can exhibit different electronic properties and excited-state dynamics....

  10. Photoionization of excited molecular states using multiphoton excitation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra are reported for three photon resonant, four photon ionization of H 2 via the B 1 Σ/sub u/ + , v = 7 (J = 2,4) and C 1 π/sub u'/, v = 0-4 (J = 1) levels and of N 2 via the o 3 1 π/sub u'/, v = 1,2, b 1 π/sub u'/, v = 3-5, and c 1 π/sub u'/, v = 0 levels. The results reflect both the spectroscopy and the dynamics of photoionization of excited molecular states and are discussed in terms of the selection rules for photoionization and the relative probabilities of photoionization from Rydberg and valence states. In some cases, in accordance with the Franck-Condon principle, the results demonstrate that resonant multiphoton ionization through Rydberg states may be a powerful technique for the production of electronic, vibrational, and rotational state selected ions. However, in other cases, systematic departures from Franck-Condon factors are observed, which reflect the more subtle dynamics of excited state photoionization. 23 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  11. Photoionization of excited molecular states using multiphoton excitation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra are reported for three photon resonant, four photon ionization of H 2 via the B 1 Σ + /sub u/, v = 7 (J = 2,4) and C 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 0-4 (J = 1) levels and of N 2 via the o 3 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 1,2, b 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 3-5, and c 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 0 levels. The results reflect both the spectroscopy and the dynamics of photoionization of excited molecular states and are discussed in terms of the selection rules for photoionization and the relative probabilities of photoionization from Rydberg and valence states. In some cases, in accordance with the Franck-Condon principle, the results demonstrate that resonant multiphoton ionization through Rydberg states may be a powerful technique for the production of electronic, vibrational, and rotational state selected ions. However, in other cases, systematic departures from Franck-Condon factors are observed, which reflect the more subtle dynamics of excited state photoionization

  12. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Phillip W.K.; Sauer, Stephan P.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Oddershede, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Quantum Theory Project, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sabin, John R., E-mail: sabin@qtp.ufl.edu [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Quantum Theory Project, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state contributing to the mean excitation energy.

  13. Fluorescence, Absorption, and Excitation Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as a Tool for Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Figueroa, A. M.; Ramazan, K. A.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative and qualitative study of the interplay between absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is conducted. The study of five PAH displays the correlation of the above-mentioned properties along with the associated molecular changes.

  14. Study on Properties of Energy Spectra of the Molecular Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    The energy-spectra of nonlinear vibration of molecular crystals such as acetanilide have been calculated by using discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation appropriate to the systems, containing various interactions. The energy levels including higher excited states are basically consistent with experimental values obtained by infrared absorption and Raman scattering in acetanilide. We further give the features of distribution of the energy-spectra for the acetanilide. Using the energy spectra we also explained well experimental results obtained by Careri et al..

  15. LAD Dissertation Prize Talk: Molecular Collisional Excitation in Astrophysical Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kyle M.

    2017-06-01

    While molecular excitation calculations are vital in determining particle velocity distributions, internal state distributions, abundances, and ionization balance in gaseous environments, both theoretical calculations and experimental data for these processes are lacking. Reliable molecular collisional data with the most abundant species - H2, H, He, and electrons - are needed to probe material in astrophysical environments such as nebulae, molecular clouds, comets, and planetary atmospheres. However, excitation calculations with the main collider, H2, are computationally expensive and therefore various approximations are used to obtain unknown rate coefficients. The widely-accepted collider-mass scaling approach is flawed, and alternate scaling techniques based on physical and mathematical principles are presented here. The most up-to-date excitation data are used to model the chemical evolution of primordial species in the Recombination Era and produce accurate non-thermal spectra of the molecules H2+, HD, and H2 in a primordial cloud as it collapses into a first generation star.

  16. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Phillip W.K.; Sauer, Stephan P.A.; Oddershede, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase...

  17. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, ChuanXiang; Zhao, Yi; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra with respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT

  18. Electron-impact excitation of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufeld, D.A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1989-01-01

    A simple expression is derived that relates the rate coefficient for dipole-allowed electron-impact excitation of a molecular ion in the Coulomb-Born approximation to the Einstein A coefficient for the corresponding radiative decay. Results are given for several molecular ions of astrophysical interest. A general analytic expression is obtained for the equilibrium rotational level populations in the ground vibrational state of any molecular ion excited by collisions with electrons. The expression depends only upon the electron temperature, the electron density, and the rotational constant of the molecular ion. A similar expression is obtained for neutral polar molecules

  19. Rotational structure in molecular infrared spectra

    CERN Document Server

    di Lauro, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in infrared molecular spectroscopy have resulted in sophisticated theoretical and laboratory methods that are difficult to grasp without a solid understanding of the basic principles and underlying theory of vibration-rotation absorption spectroscopy. Rotational Structure in Molecular Infrared Spectra fills the gap between these recent, complex topics and the most elementary methods in the field of rotational structure in the infrared spectra of gaseous molecules. There is an increasing need for people with the skills and knowledge to interpret vibration-rotation spectra in many scientific disciplines, including applications in atmospheric and planetary research. Consequently, the basic principles of vibration-rotation absorption spectroscopy are addressed for contemporary applications. In addition to covering operational quantum mechanical methods, spherical tensor algebra, and group theoretical methods applied to molecular symmetry, attention is also given to phase conventions and their effe...

  20. Excited-state Raman spectroscopy with and without actinic excitation: S1 Raman spectra of trans-azobenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobryakov, A. L.; Quick, M.; Ioffe, I. N.; Granovsky, A. A.; Ernsting, N. P.; Kovalenko, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    We show that femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy can record excited-state spectra in the absence of actinic excitation, if the Raman pump is in resonance with an electronic transition. The approach is illustrated by recording S 1 and S 0 spectra of trans-azobenzene in n-hexane. The S 1 spectra were also measured conventionally, upon nπ* (S 0 → S 1 ) actinic excitation. The results are discussed and compared to earlier reports

  1. Rotational Spectra in 29 Vibrationally Excited States of Interstellar Aminoacetonitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, E. R.; Mata, S.; Alonso, J. L. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Área de Química-Física, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Parque Científico UVa, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2017-04-01

    We report a detailed spectroscopic investigation of the interstellar aminoacetonitrile, a possible precursor molecule of glycine. Using a combination of Stark and frequency-modulation microwave and millimeter wave spectroscopies, we observed and analyzed the room-temperature rotational spectra of 29 excited states with energies up to 1000 cm{sup −1}. We also observed the {sup 13}C isotopologues in the ground vibrational state in natural abundance (1.1%). The extensive data set of more than 2000 new rotational transitions will support further identifications of aminoacetonitrile in the interstellar medium.

  2. Molecular excited states from the SCAN functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, David J.; Peach, Michael J. G.

    2018-06-01

    The performance of the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalised gradient approximation exchange-correlation functional is investigated for the calculation of time-dependent density-functional theory molecular excitation energies of local, charge-transfer and Rydberg character, together with the excited ? potential energy curve in H2. The SCAN results frequently resemble those obtained using a global hybrid functional, with either a standard or increased fraction of exact orbital exchange. For local excitations, SCAN can exhibit significant triplet instability problems, resulting in imaginary triplet excitation energies for a number of cases. The Tamm-Dancoff approximation offers a simple approach to improve the situation, but the excitation energies are still significantly underestimated. Understanding the origin of these (near)-triplet instabilities may provide useful insight into future functional development.

  3. Excited-state molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    This review presents a survey of work using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and double-resonance techniques to study excited-state photoionization dynamics in molecules. These techniques routinely provide detail and precision that are difficult to achieve in single-photon ionization from the ground state. The review not only emphasizes new aspects of photoionization revealed in the excited-state experiments but also shows how the excited-state techniques can provide textbook illustrations of some fundamental mechanisms in molecular photoionization dynamics. Most of the examples are confined to diatomic molecules. (author)

  4. Excited state mass spectra of doubly heavy Ξ baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Zalak; Rai, Ajay Kumar [Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Surat, Gujarat (India)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, the mass spectra are obtained for doubly heavy Ξ baryons, namely, Ξ{sub cc}{sup +}, Ξ{sub cc}{sup ++}, Ξ{sub bb}{sup -}, Ξ{sub bb}{sup 0}, Ξ{sub bc}{sup 0} and Ξ{sub bc}{sup +}. These baryons consist of two heavy quarks (cc, bb, and bc) with a light (d or u) quark. The ground, radial, and orbital states are calculated in the framework of the hypercentral constituent quark model with Coulomb plus linear potential. Our results are also compared with other predictions, thus, the average possible range of excited states masses of these Ξ baryons can be determined. The study of the Regge trajectories is performed in (n, M{sup 2}) and (J, M{sup 2}) planes and their slopes and intercepts are also determined. Lastly, the ground state magnetic moments of these doubly heavy baryons are also calculated. (orig.)

  5. Isobar excitations and low energy spectra of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerski, P.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study the possible influence of inner excitations of nucleons into the Δ(3,3)-resonance on the low lying spectra of light nuclei like 12 C and 16 O. Before we can study the effect of such exotic configurations one has to perform a reliable investigation within the normal nuclear model, which is based on a microscopic theory. This is achieved by performing RPA (Random Phase Approximation) calculations using a realistic residual interaction derived from the Brueckner G-matrix. An efficient parametrisation of the residual interaction is introduced and the reliability of the more phenomenological parametrisations which are generally used is discussed. Within such realistic calculations, the isobar effects are small. (orig.) [de

  6. Excited state mass spectra of singly charmed baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Zalak; Kumar Rai, Ajay [Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Surat, Gujarat (India); Thakkar, Kaushal [GIDC Degree Engineering College, Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Abrama (India); Vinodkumar, P.C. [Sardar Patel University, Department of Physics, V.V. Nagar (India)

    2016-10-15

    Mass spectra of excited states of the singly charmed baryons are calculated using the hypercentral description of the three-body system. The baryons consist of a charm quark and light quarks (u, d and s) are studied in the framework of QCD motivated constituent quark model. The form of the confinement potential is hyper-Coloumb plus power potential with potential index ν, varying from 0.5 to 2.0. The first-order correction to the confinement potential is also incorporated in this approach. The radial as well as orbital excited state masses of Σ{sub c}{sup ++}, Σ{sub c}{sup +}, Σ{sub c}{sup 0}, Ξ{sub c}{sup +}, Ξ{sub c}{sup 0}, Λ{sub c}{sup +}, Ω{sub c}{sup 0} baryons, are reported in this paper. We have incorporated spin-spin, spin-orbit and tensor interactions perturbatively in the present study. The semi-electronic decay of Ω{sub c} and Ξ{sub c} are also calculated using the spectroscopic parameters of these baryons. The computed results are compared with other theoretical predictions as well as with the available experimental observations. We also construct the Regge trajectory in (n{sub r},M{sup 2}) and (J,M{sup 2}) planes for these baryons. (orig.)

  7. Photoionization dynamics of excited molecular states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; O'Halloran, M.A.; Tomkins, F.S.; Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of opportunities for exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. Here we will first give a brief overview of the large variety of experimental approaches to excited state phenomena made possible by REMPI. Then we will examine in more detail, recent studies of the three photon resonant, four photon (3 + 1) ionization of H 2 via the C 'PI/sup u/ state. Strong non-Franck-Condon behavior in the photoelectron spectra of this nominally simple Rydberg state has led to the examination of a variety of dynamical mechanisms. Of these, the role of doubly excited autoionizing states now seems decisive. Progress on photoelectron studies of autoionizing states in H 2 , excited in a (2 + 1) REMPI process via the E, F 1 Σ/sub g/ + will also be briefly discussed. 26 refs., 7 figs

  8. Extended Lagrangian Excited State Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorgaard, J A; Sheppard, D; Tretiak, S; Niklasson, A M N

    2018-02-13

    An extended Lagrangian framework for excited state molecular dynamics (XL-ESMD) using time-dependent self-consistent field theory is proposed. The formulation is a generalization of the extended Lagrangian formulations for ground state Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008 100, 123004]. The theory is implemented, demonstrated, and evaluated using a time-dependent semiempirical model, though it should be generally applicable to ab initio theory. The simulations show enhanced energy stability and a significantly reduced computational cost associated with the iterative solutions of both the ground state and the electronically excited states. Relaxed convergence criteria can therefore be used both for the self-consistent ground state optimization and for the iterative subspace diagonalization of the random phase approximation matrix used to calculate the excited state transitions. The XL-ESMD approach is expected to enable numerically efficient excited state molecular dynamics for such methods as time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF), Configuration Interactions Singles (CIS), and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT).

  9. Harnessing molecular excited states with Lanczos chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Stefano; Gebauer, Ralph; Bariş Malcioğlu, O.; Saad, Yousef; Umari, Paolo; Xian, Jiawei

    2010-02-01

    The recursion method of Haydock, Heine and Kelly is a powerful tool for calculating diagonal matrix elements of the resolvent of quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian operators by elegantly expressing them in terms of continued fractions. In this paper we extend the recursion method to off-diagonal matrix elements of general (possibly non-Hermitian) operators and apply it to the simulation of molecular optical absorption and photoemission spectra within time-dependent density-functional and many-body perturbation theories, respectively. This method is demonstrated with a couple of applications to the optical absorption and photoemission spectra of the caffeine molecule.

  10. Harnessing molecular excited states with Lanczos chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, Stefano; Baris Malcioglu, O; Xian Jiawei [SISSA-Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, I-34151 Trieste (Italy); Gebauer, Ralph; Umari, Paolo [CNR DEMOCRITOS Theory-Elettra Group, c/o Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Saad, Yousef [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, and Minnesota Supercomputing Institute, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2010-02-24

    The recursion method of Haydock, Heine and Kelly is a powerful tool for calculating diagonal matrix elements of the resolvent of quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian operators by elegantly expressing them in terms of continued fractions. In this paper we extend the recursion method to off-diagonal matrix elements of general (possibly non-Hermitian) operators and apply it to the simulation of molecular optical absorption and photoemission spectra within time-dependent density-functional and many-body perturbation theories, respectively. This method is demonstrated with a couple of applications to the optical absorption and photoemission spectra of the caffeine molecule.

  11. Harnessing molecular excited states with Lanczos chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Stefano; Gebauer, Ralph; Bariş Malcioğlu, O; Saad, Yousef; Umari, Paolo; Xian, Jiawei

    2010-02-24

    The recursion method of Haydock, Heine and Kelly is a powerful tool for calculating diagonal matrix elements of the resolvent of quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian operators by elegantly expressing them in terms of continued fractions. In this paper we extend the recursion method to off-diagonal matrix elements of general (possibly non-Hermitian) operators and apply it to the simulation of molecular optical absorption and photoemission spectra within time-dependent density-functional and many-body perturbation theories, respectively. This method is demonstrated with a couple of applications to the optical absorption and photoemission spectra of the caffeine molecule.

  12. Harnessing molecular excited states with Lanczos chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroni, Stefano; Baris Malcioglu, O; Xian Jiawei; Gebauer, Ralph; Umari, Paolo; Saad, Yousef

    2010-01-01

    The recursion method of Haydock, Heine and Kelly is a powerful tool for calculating diagonal matrix elements of the resolvent of quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian operators by elegantly expressing them in terms of continued fractions. In this paper we extend the recursion method to off-diagonal matrix elements of general (possibly non-Hermitian) operators and apply it to the simulation of molecular optical absorption and photoemission spectra within time-dependent density-functional and many-body perturbation theories, respectively. This method is demonstrated with a couple of applications to the optical absorption and photoemission spectra of the caffeine molecule.

  13. Excited-state Raman spectroscopy with and without actinic excitation: S{sub 1} Raman spectra of trans-azobenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobryakov, A. L.; Quick, M.; Ioffe, I. N.; Granovsky, A. A.; Ernsting, N. P.; Kovalenko, S. A. [Department of Chemistry, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor-Str. 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-14

    We show that femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy can record excited-state spectra in the absence of actinic excitation, if the Raman pump is in resonance with an electronic transition. The approach is illustrated by recording S{sub 1} and S{sub 0} spectra of trans-azobenzene in n-hexane. The S{sub 1} spectra were also measured conventionally, upon nπ* (S{sub 0} → S{sub 1}) actinic excitation. The results are discussed and compared to earlier reports.

  14. Fluorescence of Bacteria, Pollens, and Naturally Occurring Airborne Particles: Excitation/Emission Spectra

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven C; Mayo, Michael W; Chang, Richard K

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence intensity as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths (EEM spectra) was measured for different species of bacteria, biochemical constituents of cells, pollens, and vegetation...

  15. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  16. Process and apparatus for determining molecular spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesl, U.; Neusser, H.J.; Schlag, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    A process for determining molecular spectra in unseparated mixtures, in particular unseparated isotopic mixtures, which comprises allowing said mixture to successively flow through a photoreactor which is irradiated by an adjustable-wavelength laser and then through a mass spectrometer wherein the concentration of particles of specified mass is determined by variation of the wavelength of the laser or variation of the mass setting of the mass spectrometer in such a manner that a two-dimensional spectrum results having the parameters of wavelength and mass

  17. Equilibrium Structures and Absorption Spectra for SixOy Molecular Clusters using Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--17-9724 Equilibrium Structures and Absorption Spectra for SixOy Molecular Clusters...TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Equilibrium Structures and Absorption...and electronic excited-state absorption spectra for eqilibrium structures of SixOy molecular clusters using density function theory (DFT) and time

  18. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomin, Vladimir I.; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  19. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomin, Vladimir I., E-mail: tomin@apsl.edu.pl; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-10-15

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  20. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacox, Marilyn E. [Optical Technology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm{sup !1}. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and BF{sub 3} will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H{sub 2} is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, HOCO{sup +}, and HCO{sub 2}{sup !}.

  1. Theoretical investigations of molecular wires: Electronic spectra and electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Julio Leopoldo

    The results of theoretical and computational research are presented for two promising molecular wires, the Nanostar dendrimer, and a series of substituted azobenzene derivatives connected to aluminum electrodes. The electronic absorption spectra of the Nanostar (a phenylene-ethynylene dendrimer attached to an ethynylperylene chromophore) were calculated using a sequential Molecular Dynamics/Quantum Mechanics (MD/QM) method to perform an analysis of the temperature dependence of the electronic absorption process. We modeled the Nanostar as a series of connected units, and performed MD simulations for each chromophore at 10 K and 300 K to study how the temperature affected the structures and, consequently, the spectra. The absorption spectra of the Nanostar were computed using an ensemble of 8000 structures for each chromophore. Quantum Mechanical (QM) ZINDO/S calculations were performed for each conformation in the ensemble, including 16 excited states, for a total of 128,000 excitation energies. The spectral intensity was then scaled linearly with the number of conjugated units. Our calculations for both the individual chromophores and the Nanostar, are in good agreement with experiments. We explain in detail the effects of temperature and the consequences for the absorption process. The second part of this thesis presents a study of the effects of chemical substituents on the electron transport properties of the azobenzene molecule, which has been proposed recently as a component of a light-driven molecular switch. This molecule has two stable conformations (cis and trans) in its electronic ground state, with considerable differences in their conductance. The electron transport properties were calculated using first-principles methods combining non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) techniques with density functional theory (DFT). For the azobenzene studies, we included electron-donating groups and electron-withdrawing groups in meta- and ortho-positions with

  2. Vibrational excitations in molecular layers probed by ballistic electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajen, Rasanayagam Sivasayan; Chandrasekhar, Natarajan [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Feng Xinliang; Muellen, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Postfach 3148, D-55021 Mainz (Germany); Su Haibin, E-mail: n-chandra@imre.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: muellen@mpip-mainz.mpg.de, E-mail: hbsu@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Materials Science, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2011-10-28

    We demonstrate the information on molecular vibrational modes via the second derivative (d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2}) of the ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES) current. The proposed method does not create huge fields as in the case of conventional derivative spectroscopy and maintains a zero bias across the device. BEES studies carried out on three different types of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular layers show that the d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2} spectra consist of uniformly spaced peaks corresponding to vibronic excitations. The peak spacing is found to be identical for molecules within the same PAH family though the BEES onset voltage varies for different molecules. In addition, injection into a particular orbital appears to correspond to a specific vibrational mode as the manifestation of the symmetry principle.

  3. Neutron emission spectra of excited 126–140Sn nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta; Rajasekaran, M.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate one-neutron and two-neutron emission from 132 Sn and its neighboring isotopes due to thermal excitation. The rotational states of 132 Sn at different temperatures are investigated. The effects of separation energy and thermal excitation energy on neutron emission probability are studied. (author)

  4. Melanin fluorescence spectra by step-wise three photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2012-03-01

    Melanin is the characteristic chromophore of human skin with various potential biological functions. Kerimo discovered enhanced melanin fluorescence by stepwise three-photon excitation in 2011. In this article, step-wise three-photon excited fluorescence (STPEF) spectrum between 450 nm -700 nm of melanin is reported. The melanin STPEF spectrum exhibited an exponential increase with wavelength. However, there was a probability of about 33% that another kind of step-wise multi-photon excited fluorescence (SMPEF) that peaks at 525 nm, shown by previous research, could also be generated using the same process. Using an excitation source at 920 nm as opposed to 830 nm increased the potential for generating SMPEF peaks at 525 nm. The SMPEF spectrum peaks at 525 nm photo-bleached faster than STPEF spectrum.

  5. Pairing and deformation effects in nuclear excitation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repko, A. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kvasil, J. [Charles University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Nesterenko, V.O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna (Russian Federation); State University ' ' Dubna' ' , Dubna (Russian Federation); Reinhard, P.G. [Universitaet Erlangen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We investigate effects of pairing and of quadrupole deformation on two sorts of nuclear excitations, γ-vibrational K{sup π} = 2{sup +} states and dipole resonances (isovector dipole, pygmy, compression, toroidal). The analysis is performed within the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) based on the Skyrme energy functional using the Skyrme parametrization SLy6. Particular attention is paid to i) the role of the particle-particle (pp) channel in the residual interaction of QRPA, ii) comparison of volume pairing (VP) and surface pairing (SP), iii) peculiarities of deformation splitting in the various resonances. We find that the impact of the pp-channel on the considered excitations is negligible. This conclusion applies also to any other excitation except for the K{sup π} = 0{sup +} states. Furthermore, the difference between VP and SP is found small (with exception of peak height in the toroidal mode). In the low-energy isovector dipole (pygmy) and isoscalar toroidal modes, the branch K{sup π} = 1{sup -} is shown to dominate over the K{sup π} = 0{sup -} one in the range of excitation energy E < 8-10 MeV. The effect becomes impressive for the toroidal resonance whose low-energy part is concentrated in a high peak of almost pure K{sup π} = 1{sup -} nature. This peculiarity may be used as a fingerprint of the toroidal mode in future experiments. The interplay between pygmy, toroidal and compression resonances is discussed, the interpretation of the observed isoscalar giant dipole resonance is partly revised. (orig.)

  6. Properties of Energy Spectra of Molecular Crystals Investigated by Nonlinear Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Huai-Wu

    We calculate the quantum energy spectra of molecular crystals, such as acetanilide, by using discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation, containing various interactions, appropriate to the systems. The energy spectra consist of many energy bands, in each energy band there are a lot of energy levels including some higher excited states. The result of energy spectrum is basically consistent with experimental values obtained by infrared absorption and Raman scattering in acetanilide and can also explain some experimental results obtained by Careri et al. Finally, we further discuss the influences of variously characteristic parameters on the energy spectra of the systems.

  7. Dual fluorescence excitation spectra of methyl salicylate in a free jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbrook, Lou Ann; Kenny, Jonathan E.; Kohler, Bryan E.; Scott, Gary W.

    1981-11-01

    Separate fluorescence excitation spectra of the blue- and UV-emitting forms of methyl salicylate cooled in a free-jet expansion are reported. This study represents the first observation of the detailed vibrational structure of these transitions. The two excitation spectra have no features in common, and their intensity patterns are very different. Many individual lines are ˜2 cm-1 wide (nearly laser limited), although in the excitation spectrum of the UV emission, spectral congestion persists at high energies despite the high degree of cooling. (AIP)

  8. Floor response spectra of WWER-1000, NPP Kozloduy generated from local seismic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojadziev, Z.; Kostov, M.

    1996-01-01

    The seismic review level characteristics for the Kozloduy NPP site were set to 0.2 g and a respective free field acceleration response spectra were derived after a profound site conformation project. Accordingly a separate investigation is recommended for local seismic excitation. The goals of the analyses are: to define the seismic motion characteristics from local seismic sources; to perform structural analyses and in-structure spectra generation for local seismic excitation; and to compare the forces (spectra) from local events with those generated as seismic design review basis

  9. New formalism for determining excitation spectra of many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, S.; Zhang, S.B.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    We present a new general formalism for determining the excitation spectrum of interacting many-body systems. The basic assumption is that the number of the excitations is equal to the number of sites. Within this approximation, it is shown that the density-density response functions with two different pure-imaginary energies determine the excitation spectrum. The method is applied to the valence electrons of sodium clusters of differing sizes in the time-dependent local-density approximation (TDLDA). A jellium-sphere background model is used for the ion cores. The excitation spectra obtained in this way represent well the excitation spectra given by the full TDLDA calculation along the real energy axis. Important collective modes are reproduced very well

  10. Flow angle dependent photoacoustic Doppler power spectra under intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic Doppler (PAD power spectra showing an evident Doppler shift represent the major characteristics of the continuous wave-excited or burst wave-excited versions of PAD flow measurements. In this paper, the flow angle dependences of the PAD power spectra are investigated using an experiment setup that was established based on intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation. The setup has an overall configuration that is similar to a previously reported configuration, but is more sophisticated in that it accurately aligns the laser illumination with the ultrasound detection process, and in that it picks up the correct sample position. In the analysis of the power spectra data, we find that the background power spectra can be extracted by combining the output signals from the two channels of the lock-in amplifier, which is very useful for identification of the PAD power spectra. The power spectra are presented and analyzed in opposite flow directions, at different flow speeds, and at different flow angles. The power spectra at a 90° flow angle show the unique properties of symmetrical shapes due to PAD broadening. For the other flow angles, the smoothed power spectra clearly show a flow angle cosine relationship.

  11. Excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1974-01-01

    Excited States, Volume I reviews radiationless transitions, phosphorescence microwave double resonance through optical spectra in molecular solids, dipole moments in excited states, luminescence of polar molecules, and the problem of interstate interaction in aromatic carbonyl compounds. The book discusses the molecular electronic radiationless transitions; the double resonance techniques and the relaxation mechanisms involving the lowest triplet state of aromatic compounds; as well as the optical spectra and relaxation in molecular solids. The text also describes dipole moments and polarizab

  12. Decoding Pure Rotational Molecular Spectra for Asymmetric Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Cooke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotational spectroscopy can provide insights of unparalleled precision with respect to the wavefunctions of molecular systems that have relevance in fields as diverse as astronomy and biology. In this paper, we demonstrate how asymmetric molecular pure rotational spectra may be analyzed “pictorially” and with simple formulae. It is shown that the interpretation of such spectra relies heavily upon pattern recognition. The presentation of some common spectral line positions in near-prolate asymmetric rotational spectra provides a means by which spectral assignment, and approximate rotational constant determination, may be usefully explored. To aid in this endeavor we have created a supporting, free, web page and mobile web page.

  13. The photoluminescence spectra of micropowder of aromatic compounds under ultraviolet laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhmatullaev, I.A.; Kurbonov, A.K. et al.; Gorelik, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    The method of diagnostics of aromatic compounds on the example of novocaine, aspirin and anthracene is presented. The method is based on optical detection of photoluminescence spectra at ultraviolet laser (266 nm) excitation. Employing this method the photoluminescence spectra are obtained which allows one to establish the differences of the composition and structure of compounds. The developed method can be used for analysis the quality of the large class of luminescent bioactive structures under the ultraviolet radiation. (authors)

  14. Molecular geometry in the ultraviolet absorption spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, S.F. de; Monteiro, L.S.; Adamis, L.M.B.; Baltar, M.C.P.; Silva, R.M. da

    1977-01-01

    The ultraviolet absorption spectra may be sensibly affected by steric effects. These effects can cause a lot of difficulties and unexpected changes in spectrum. The most general source of such difficulties is steric inhibition of resonance. In addition to this, ultraviolet epectra may be markedly changed by steric factors which change the positions of dipoles in the molecule with respect to each other and by the interaction of nonconjugated chromophores suitably located in space. We have studied in detail each of these effects presenting a lot of usual and importants examples in Organic Chemistry. Others relevants subjects were not considerated in this present work [pt

  15. Excitation dynamics and relaxation in a molecular heterodimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balevičius, V.; Gelzinis, A.; Abramavicius, D.; Mančal, T.; Valkunas, L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dynamics of excitation within a heterogenous molecular dimer. ► Excited states can be swapped due to different reorganization energies of monomers. ► Conventional excitonic basis becomes renormalized due to interaction with the bath. ► Relaxation is independent of mutual positioning of monomeric excited states. -- Abstract: The exciton dynamics in a molecular heterodimer is studied as a function of differences in excitation and reorganization energies, asymmetry in transition dipole moments and excited state lifetimes. The heterodimer is composed of two molecules modeled as two-level systems coupled by the resonance interaction. The system-bath coupling is taken into account as a modulating factor of the molecular excitation energy gap, while the relaxation to the ground state is treated phenomenologically. Comparison of the description of the excitation dynamics modeled using either the Redfield equations (secular and full forms) or the Hierarchical quantum master equation (HQME) is demonstrated and discussed. Possible role of the dimer as an excitation quenching center in photosynthesis self-regulation is discussed. It is concluded that the system-bath interaction rather than the excitonic effect determines the excitation quenching ability of such a dimer.

  16. Exploring the vibrational fingerprint of the electronic excitation energy via molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deyne, Andy Van Yperen-De; Pauwels, Ewald; Ghysels, An; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Hemelsoet, Karen; De Meyer, Thierry; De Clerck, Karen

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed

  17. Excitation spectra of an effective d-wave model for cuprate superconductivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamaguchi, M; Ohta, Y; Eder, R

    An exact-diagonalization technique on finite-size clusters is used to study the ground states and some excitation spectra of the two-dimensional effective Fermi-liquid model derived from numerical studies of the t-J model. We show that there is actually a reasonable range of parameter values where

  18. Modification of Optical Properties of Seawater Exposed to Oil Contaminants Based on Excitation-Emission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2015-10-01

    The optical behaviour of seawater exposed to a residual amount of oil pollution is presented and a comparison of the fluorescence spectra of oil dissolved in both n-hexane and seawater is discussed based on excitation-emission spectra. Crude oil extracted from the southern part of the Baltic Sea was used to characterise petroleum properties after contact with seawater. The wavelength-independent fluorescence maximum for natural seawater and seawater artificially polluted with oil were determined. Moreover, the specific excitation-emission peaks for natural seawater and polluted water were analysed to identify the natural organic matter composition. It was found that fluorescence spectra identification is a promising method to detect even an extremely low concentration of petroleum residues directly in the seawater. In addition, alien substances disturbing the fluorescence signatures of natural organic substances in a marine environment is also discussed.

  19. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  20. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  1. Ab Initio molecular dynamics with excited electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alavi, A.; Kohanoff, J.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1994-01-01

    A method to do ab initio molecular dynamics suitable for metallic and electronically hot systems is described. It is based on a density functional which is costationary with the finite-temperature functional of Mermin, with state being included with possibly fractional occupation numbers.

  2. Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-03

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--16-9681 Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited -State Absorption Spectra...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited -State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using...Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited 59 Samuel G. Lambrakos (202) 767-2601 Calculations are presented of vibrational and electronic excited -state

  3. Excitation spectra and wave functions of quasiparticle bound states in bilayer Rashba superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashi, Yoichi, E-mail: higashiyoichi@ms.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Nagai, Yuki [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 178-4-4, Wakashiba, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0871 (Japan); Yoshida, Tomohiro [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Kato, Masaru [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Yanase, Youichi [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We focus on the pair-density wave state in bilayer Rashba superconductors. • The zero energy Bogoliubov wave functions are localized at the edge and vortex core. • We investigate the excitation spectra of edge and vortex bound states. - Abstract: We study the excitation spectra and the wave functions of quasiparticle bound states at a vortex and an edge in bilayer Rashba superconductors under a magnetic field. In particular, we focus on the quasiparticle states at the zero energy in the pair-density wave state in a topologically non-trivial phase. We numerically demonstrate that the quasiparticle wave functions with zero energy are localized at both the edge and the vortex core if the magnetic field exceeds the critical value.

  4. Development of the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method for Calculating Nonlocal Excitations in Large Molecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Mochizuki, Yuji

    2018-04-19

    We developed the fragment-based method for calculating nonlocal excitations in large molecular systems. This method is based on the multilayer fragment molecular orbital method and the configuration interaction single (CIS) wave function using localized molecular orbitals. The excited-state wave function for the whole system is described as a superposition of configuration state functions (CSFs) for intrafragment excitations and for interfragment charge-transfer excitations. The formulation and calculations of singlet excited-state Hamiltonian matrix elements in the fragment CSFs are presented in detail. The efficient approximation schemes for calculating the matrix elements are also presented. The computational efficiency and the accuracy were evaluated using the molecular dimers and molecular aggregates. We confirmed that absolute errors of 50 meV (relative to the conventional calculations) are achievable for the molecular systems in their equilibrium geometries. The perturbative electron correlation correction to the CIS excitation energies is also demonstrated. The present theory can compute a large number of excited states in large molecular systems; in addition, it allows for the systematic derivation of a model exciton Hamiltonian. These features are useful for studying excited-state dynamics in condensed molecular systems based on the ab initio electronic structure theory.

  5. Simulation of statistical γ-spectra of highly excited rare earth nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, A.; Munos, G.; Guttormsen, M.; Bergholt, L.; Melby, E.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Tveter, T.S.

    1997-05-01

    The statistical γ-spectra of highly excited even-even rare earth nuclei are simulated applying appropriate level density and strength function to a given nucleus. Hindrance effects due to K-conservation are taken into account. Simulations are compared to experimental data from the 163 Dy( 3 He,α) 162 Dy and 173 Yb( 3 He,α) 172 Yb reactions. The influence of the K quantum number at higher energies is discussed. 21 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Classification of a Supersolid: Trial Wavefunctions, Symmetry Breakings and Excitation Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Ye, Jinwu; Tian, Guangshan

    2012-11-01

    A state of matter is characterized by its symmetry breaking and elementary excitations. A supersolid is a state which breaks both translational symmetry and internal U(1) symmetry. Here, we review some past and recent works in phenomenological Ginsburg-Landau theories, ground state trial wavefunctions and microscopic numerical calculations. We also write down a new effective supersolid Hamiltonian on a lattice. The eigenstates of the Hamiltonian contains both the ground state wavefunction and all the excited states (supersolidon) wavefunctions. We contrast various kinds of supersolids in both continuous systems and on lattices, both condensed matter and cold atom systems. We provide additional new insights in studying their order parameters, symmetry breaking patterns, the excitation spectra and detection methods.

  7. Picosecond transient absorption spectra of aminosalicylates in confirmation of the triple excitation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gormin, D.

    1989-01-01

    Using picosecond transient absorption studies, it is shown that the twisted intramolecular charge-transfer state (TICT) and the excited intramolecular proton-transfer state (ESIPT or PT) of specific aminosalicylates both contribute to the long-wavelength fluorescence band, F 2 , observed as an unresolved band to the red of the normal fluorescence band, F 1 . The transient absorption band for 2-hydroxy-4-(dimethylamino)benzoic acid methyl ester (PDASE) is shown to be a composite of the two excited-state absorption modes: S n double-prime(TICT) left-arrow S 1 double-prime (TICT) and S n '(PT)left-arrow S 1 '(PT). This corroborates previous steady-state fluorescence studies of the unresolved F 2 band. The assignments are based on comparison with the excited-state absorption spectra of various substituted aminosalicylates in polar and nonpolar solvents

  8. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V→T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V→T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH 3 production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam

  9. Spectra of elementary excitations of fullerenes C60 and electron irradiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, Yu.S.; Mikushkin, V.M.; Shnitov, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    The electron-stimulated changes in the spectra of the fullerenes C 60 elementary excitations are determined. They are manifested in decreasing the π-plasmon energy, the forbidden zone width, the HOMO-LUMO transition energy and also in smoothing the corresponding peculiarities of the spectra. The observed red shifts are connected with collectivization of the part of the π-electrons, formation of chemically-bound neighbouring molecules (polymerization) and with the corresponding increase in the part of the sp 3 -hybridized electrons. The spectra of the characteristic energy losses of the fullerene electrons, unperturbed by the polymerization process, are measured. The multipole structure of the (σ + π) plasmon and the exciton peculiarity, which manifests high sensitivity to the electron impact and may be used for the fullerene initial structure characterization, is identified [ru

  10. Machine learning molecular dynamics for the simulation of infrared spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastegger, Michael; Behler, Jörg; Marquetand, Philipp

    2017-10-01

    Machine learning has emerged as an invaluable tool in many research areas. In the present work, we harness this power to predict highly accurate molecular infrared spectra with unprecedented computational efficiency. To account for vibrational anharmonic and dynamical effects - typically neglected by conventional quantum chemistry approaches - we base our machine learning strategy on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. While these simulations are usually extremely time consuming even for small molecules, we overcome these limitations by leveraging the power of a variety of machine learning techniques, not only accelerating simulations by several orders of magnitude, but also greatly extending the size of systems that can be treated. To this end, we develop a molecular dipole moment model based on environment dependent neural network charges and combine it with the neural network potential approach of Behler and Parrinello. Contrary to the prevalent big data philosophy, we are able to obtain very accurate machine learning models for the prediction of infrared spectra based on only a few hundreds of electronic structure reference points. This is made possible through the use of molecular forces during neural network potential training and the introduction of a fully automated sampling scheme. We demonstrate the power of our machine learning approach by applying it to model the infrared spectra of a methanol molecule, n -alkanes containing up to 200 atoms and the protonated alanine tripeptide, which at the same time represents the first application of machine learning techniques to simulate the dynamics of a peptide. In all of these case studies we find an excellent agreement between the infrared spectra predicted via machine learning models and the respective theoretical and experimental spectra.

  11. Classical and quantum molecular dynamics in NMR spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Szymański, Sławomir

    2018-01-01

    The book provides a detailed account of how condensed-phase molecular dynamics are reflected in the line shapes of NMR spectra. The theories establishing connections between random, time-dependent molecular processes and lineshape effects are exposed in depth. Special emphasis is placed on the theoretical aspects, involving in particular intermolecular processes in solution, and molecular symmetry issues. The Liouville super-operator formalism is briefly introduced and used wherever it is beneficial for the transparency of presentation. The proposed formal descriptions of the discussed problems are sufficiently detailed to be implemented on a computer. Practical applications of the theory in solid- and liquid-phase studies are illustrated with appropriate experimental examples, exposing the potential of the lineshape method in elucidating molecular dynamics NMR-observable molecular phenomena where quantization of the spatial nuclear degrees of freedom is crucial are addressed in the last part of the book. As ...

  12. Probing molecular chirality by coherent optical absorption spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, W. Z. [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wei, L. F. [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2011-11-15

    We propose an approach to sensitively probe the chirality of molecules by measuring their coherent optical-absorption spectra. It is shown that quantum dynamics of the cyclic three-level chiral molecules driven by appropriately designed external fields is total-phase dependent. This will result in chirality-dependent absorption spectra for the probe field. As a consequence, the charality-dependent information in the spectra (such as the locations and relative heights of the characteristic absorption peaks) can be utilized to identify molecular chirality and determinate enantiomer excess (i.e., the percentages of different enantiomers). The feasibility of the proposal with chiral molecules confined in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber is also discussed.

  13. Excited state dynamics & optical control of molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Ted; Sension, Roseanne

    2014-03-01

    Chiral overcrowded alkenes are likely candidates for light driven rotary molecular motors. At their core, these molecular motors are based on the chromophore stilbene, undergoing ultrafast cis/trans photoisomerization about their central double bond. Unlike stilbene, the photochemistry of molecular motors proceeds in one direction only. This unidirectional rotation is a result of helicity in the molecule induced by steric hindrance. However, the steric hindrance which ensures unidirectional excited state rotation, has the unfortunate consequence of producing large ground state barriers which dramatically decrease the overall rate of rotation. These molecular scale ultrafast motors have only recently been studied by ultrafast spectroscopy. Our lab has studied the photochemistry and photophysics of a ``first generation'' molecular motor with UV-visible transient absorption spectroscopy. We hope to use optical pulse shaping to enhance the efficiency and turnover rate of these molecular motors.

  14. Effects of excited state mixing on transient absorption spectra in dimers Application to photosynthetic light-harvesting complex II

    CERN Document Server

    Valkunas, L; Trinkunas, G; Müller, M G; Holzwarth, A R

    1999-01-01

    The excited state mixing effect is taken into account considering the difference spectra of dimers. Both the degenerate (homo) dimer as well as the nondegenerate (hetero) dimer are considered. Due to the higher excited state mixing with the two-exciton states in the homodimer, the excited state absorption (or the difference spectrum) can be strongly affected in comparison with the results obtained in the Heitler-London approximation. The difference spectrum of the heterodimer is influenced by two resonance effects (i) mixing of the ground state optical transitions of both monomers in the dimer and (ii) mixing of the excited state absorption of the excited monomer with the ground state optical transition in the nonexcited monomer. These effects have been tested by simulating the difference absorption spectra of the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC II) experimentally obtained with the 60 fs excitation pulses at zero delay times and various excitation wavelengths. The pairs of coupled chlorophylls...

  15. Ab initio molecular crystal structures, spectra, and phase diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, So; Gilliard, Kandis; He, Xiao; Li, Jinjin; Sode, Olaseni

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Molecular crystals are chemists' solids in the sense that their structures and properties can be understood in terms of those of the constituent molecules merely perturbed by a crystalline environment. They form a large and important class of solids including ices of atmospheric species, drugs, explosives, and even some organic optoelectronic materials and supramolecular assemblies. Recently, surprisingly simple yet extremely efficient, versatile, easily implemented, and systematically accurate electronic structure methods for molecular crystals have been developed. The methods, collectively referred to as the embedded-fragment scheme, divide a crystal into monomers and overlapping dimers and apply modern molecular electronic structure methods and software to these fragments of the crystal that are embedded in a self-consistently determined crystalline electrostatic field. They enable facile applications of accurate but otherwise prohibitively expensive ab initio molecular orbital theories such as Møller-Plesset perturbation and coupled-cluster theories to a broad range of properties of solids such as internal energies, enthalpies, structures, equation of state, phonon dispersion curves and density of states, infrared and Raman spectra (including band intensities and sometimes anharmonic effects), inelastic neutron scattering spectra, heat capacities, Gibbs energies, and phase diagrams, while accounting for many-body electrostatic (namely, induction or polarization) effects as well as two-body exchange and dispersion interactions from first principles. They can fundamentally alter the role of computing in the studies of molecular crystals in the same way ab initio molecular orbital theories have transformed research practices in gas-phase physical chemistry and synthetic chemistry in the last half century. In this Account, after a brief summary of formalisms and algorithms, we discuss applications of these methods performed in our group as compelling

  16. Use of spectra from foil-excited heavy-ion beams to interpret radiation from plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.

    1978-01-01

    Spectra from foil-excited heavy ion beams can be used to investigate the relative abundance and charge state composition of heavy metal contaminants which cause severe radiative energy losses in tokamak-produced plasmas. The degree of ionization of these metals in the tokamak plasma is not well known because of uncertainties in ionization and recombination rates and particle confinement times. Only a few stages of ionization are typically prominent in foil-excited spectra, however, and both the most probable charge state and distribution width are well known. Highly ionized heavy ions (e.g., Ti, Mo, W and Au) which span the range of charge states found in present tokamaks were produced by passing beams from the Brookhaven MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerator facility through 20 μg/cm 2 carbon stripping foils. EUV radiation was recorded with a grazing incidence spectrometer. Comparisons of the beam-foil spectra with radiation from plasmas, and recent direct determinations of atomic oscillator strengths for principal resonance lines of such highly ionized species as Li-like iron (Fe 23+ ), Na-like bromine (Br 24+ ), and Cu-like iodine (I 24+ ) are discussed

  17. On the geometry dependence of molecular dimer spectra with an application to aggregates of perylene bisimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibt, J.; Marquetand, P.; Engel, Volker; Chen, Z.; Dehm, V.; Wuerthner, F.

    2006-01-01

    We study spectroscopic properties of molecular dimers coupled by dipole-dipole interactions within the framework of time-dependent quantum mechanics. A systematic variation of the dimer geometry allows to establish relationships between the latter and structures in the absorption spectrum. The theoretical model is constructed with the purpose to characterize the changes in absorption and emission properties arising upon aggregation of perylene bisimides. Measured and calculated spectra are compared, thereby addressing the question if a simple exciton model is capable to describe excited state properties of nanoaggregates of these molecules

  18. Nonlinear excitations in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Rasmussen, Kim; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1995-01-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of electronic excitations interacting with acoustic phonons in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities. We show that the problem is reduced to the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a varying coefficient. The latter represents the influence...... of the impurity. Transforming the equation to the noninertial frame of reference coupled with the center of mass we investigate the soliton behavior in the close vicinity of the impurity. With the help of the lens transformation we show that the soliton width is governed by an Ermakov-Pinney equation. We also...... excitations. Analytical results are in good agreement with numerical simulations of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation....

  19. Excitation spectra and forward injection electroluminescence of Er/sup 3+/ ions in ZnS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiaqi, Y.; Tianren, Z.; Wenlian, L.

    1985-01-01

    Trivalent rare earth ions (RE/sup 3+/) are efficient luminescent centers for electroluminescence (EL) of thin films of II-VI compounds, which are promising display materials and attract more and more attention. The mechanism of all EL devices of RE/sup 3+/ available so far is hot electron impact excitation. Based on the analysis of excitation spectra of RE/sup 3+/ in ZnS, the authors have pointed out the possibility of a new type of EL of RE/sup 3+/ - forward injection EL, which have potential of reducing operation voltage and raising efficiency. The forward injection EL of RE/sup 3+/ has been observed and experimentally proven in ZnS:Er/sup 3+/ diode for the first time

  20. Many-body effects in the gain spectra of highly excited quantum-dot lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, H. C.; Chow, W. W.; Koch, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    Optical gain spectra are computed for quantum dots under high excitation conditions, where there is a non-negligible two-dimensional carrier density surrounding the dots. Using a screened Hartree-Fock theory to describe the influence of the Coulomb interaction, we find different self-energy shifts for the dot and quantum-well transitions. Furthermore, in contrast to the result for quantum-well and bulk systems, the peak gain at the quantum-dot transition computed including Coulomb effects is reduced from its free carrier value

  1. Computer simulation of molecular absorption spectra for asymmetric top molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bende, A.; Tosa, V.; Cosma, V.

    2001-01-01

    The effective Hamiltonian formalism has been used to develop a model for infrared multiple-photon absorption (IRMPA) process in asymmetric top molecules. Assuming a collisionless regime, the interaction between the molecule and laser field can be described by the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. By using the rotating wave approximation and Laplace transformation, the time-dependent problem reduces to a time-independent eigen problem for an effective Hamiltonian which can be solved only numerically for a real vibrational-rotational structure of polyatomic molecule. The vibrational-rotational structure is assumed to be an anharmonic oscillator coupled to an asymmetric rigid rotor. The main assumptions taken into account for this model are the following: (1) the excitation is coherent, i.e. the collision (if present during the laser pulse) does not influence the excitation; (2) the excitation starts from the ground state and is near resonant to a normal mode, thus, the rotating wave approximation can be applied; (3) after absorbing N photons the vibrational energy of the excited mode leak into a quasicontinuum; (4) the thermal population of the ground state is given by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution law. The energy levels of the asymmetric top molecules cannot be represented by an explicit formula analogous to that for the symmetric top, according to quantum mechanics, but we can consider it a deviation from the prolate or oblate case of the symmetric top, and we can find in the same manner the selection rules of the asymmetric case using the selection rules for the symmetric case. The infrared bands of asymmetric top molecules are not resolved, but if the dispersion used is not too small, so that the envelopes of the bands can be distinguished from simple maxima, it is possible to draw conclusions as to the type of the bands. In this case, the simulation of the absorption spectra can give us some important information about the types of these bands. In

  2. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-01-01

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He + 2 . The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He + 2 , which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD + is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  3. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-07-26

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He{sup +}{sub 2}. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He{sup +}{sub 2}, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD{sup +} is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  4. Molecular excitations: a new way to detect Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' vra, J.

    2014-09-01

    We believe that the Dark Matter (DM) search should be expanded into the domain of detectors sensitive to molecular excitations, and so that we should create detectors which are more sensitive to collisions with very light WIMPs. In this paper we investigate in detail diatomic molecules, such as fused silica material with large OH-molecule content, and water molecules. Presently, we do not have suitable low-cost IR detectors to observe single photons, however some OH-molecular excitations extend to visible and UV wavelengths and can be measured by bialkali photocathodes. There are many other chemical substances with diatomic molecules, or more complex oil molecules, which could be also investigated. This idea invites searches in experiments having large target volumes of such materials coupled to a large array of single-photon detectors with bialkali or infrared-sensitive photocathodes.

  5. ExoCross: Spectra from molecular line lists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Al-Refaie, Ahmed; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2018-03-01

    ExoCross generates spectra and thermodynamic properties from molecular line lists in ExoMol, HITRAN, or several other formats. The code is parallelized and also shows a high degree of vectorization; it works with line profiles such as Doppler, Lorentzian and Voigt and supports several broadening schemes. ExoCross is also capable of working with the recently proposed method of super-lines. It supports calculations of lifetimes, cooling functions, specific heats and other properties. ExoCross converts between different formats, such as HITRAN, ExoMol and Phoenix, and simulates non-LTE spectra using a simple two-temperature approach. Different electronic, vibronic or vibrational bands can be simulated separately using an efficient filtering scheme based on the quantum numbers.

  6. Fluorescence excitation studies of molecular photoionization in external electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliakoff, E.D.; Dehmer, J.L.; Parr, A.C.; Leroi, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Using molecular nitrogen as an example, we show that fluorescence excitation spectroscopy can be used to measure partial photoionization cross sections of free molecules in external electric fields. The production of the N 2 + (B 2 Σ/sub u/ + ) state was studied and the threshold for this process was found to shift linearly with the square root of the applied field. This behavior is compared with the hydrogenic case and with previously studied systems

  7. Optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhizhin, GN

    1995-01-01

    The current volume is a single topic volume on the optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals. The book is divided into two parts. Part I covers both the theoretical and experimental investigations of organic crystals. Part II deals with the investigation of the structure, phase transitions and reorientational motion of molecules in organic crystals. In addition appendices are given which provide the parameters for the calculation of the lattice dynamics of molecular crystals, procedures for the calculation of frequency eigenvectors of utilizing computers, and the frequencies and eigenvectors of lattice modes for several organic crystals. Quite a large amount of Russian literature is cited, some of which has previously not been available to scientists in the West.

  8. Hydration of amino acids: FTIR spectra and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuszko, Aneta; Adamczak, Beata; Czub, Jacek; Gojło, Emilia; Stangret, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    The hydration of selected amino acids, alanine, glycine, proline, valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine, has been studied in aqueous solutions by means of FTIR spectra of HDO isotopically diluted in H2O. The difference spectra procedure and the chemometric method have been applied to remove the contribution of bulk water and thus to separate the spectra of solute-affected HDO. To support interpretation of obtained spectral results, molecular dynamics simulations of amino acids were performed. The structural-energetic characteristic of these solute-affected water molecules shows that, on average, water affected by amino acids forms stronger and shorter H-bonds than those in pure water. Differences in the influence of amino acids on water structure have been noticed. The effect of the hydrophobic side chain of an amino acid on the solvent interactions seems to be enhanced because of the specific cooperative coupling of water strong H-bond chain, connecting the carboxyl and amino groups, with the clathrate-like H-bond network surrounding the hydrocarbon side chain. The parameter derived from the spectral data, which corresponds to the contributions of the population of weak hydrogen bonds of water molecules which have been substituted by the stronger ones in the hydration sphere of amino acids, correlated well with the amino acid hydrophobicity indexes.

  9. Paradigms and challenges for bioapplication of rare earth upconversion luminescent nanoparticles: small size and tunable emission/excitation spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ling-Dong; Wang, Ye-Fu; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2014-04-15

    Rare earth (RE) materials, which are excited in the ultraviolet and emit in the visible light spectrum, are widely used as phosphors for lamps and displays. In the 1960's, researchers reported an abnormal emission phenomenon where photons emitted from a RE element carried more energy than those absorbed, owing to the sequential energy transfer between two RE ions--Yb(3+)-sensitized Er(3+) or Tm(3+)--in the solid state. After further study, researchers named this abnormal emission phenomenon upconversion (UC) emission. More recent approaches take advantage of solution-based synthesis, which allows creation of homogenous RE nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled size and structure that are capable of UC emission. Such nanoparticles are useful for many applications, especially in biology. For these applications, researchers seek small NPs with high upconversion emission intensity. These UCNPs have the potential to have multicolor and tunable emissions via various activators. A vast potential for future development remains by developing molecular antennas and energy transfer within RE ions. We expect UCNPs with optimized spectra behavior to meet the increasing demand of potential applications in bioimaging, biological detection, and light conversion. This Account focuses on efforts to control the size and modulate the spectra of UCNPs. We first review efforts in size control. One method is careful control of the synthesis conditions to manipulate particle nucleation and growth, but more recently researchers have learned that the doping conditions can affect the size of UCNPs. In addition, constructing homogeneous core/shell structures can control nanoparticle size by adjusting the shell thickness. After reviewing size control, we consider how diverse applications impose different requirements on excitation and/or emission photons and review recent developments on tuning of UC spectral profiles, especially the extension of excitation/emission wavelengths and the adjustment

  10. Molecular and excited state properties of isomeric scarlet disperse dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jihye; Szymczyk, Malgorzata; Mehraban, Nahid; Ding, Yi; Parrillo-Chapman, Lisa; El-Shafei, Ahmed; Freeman, Harold S.

    2018-06-01

    This work was part of an investigation aimed at characterizing the molecular and excited state properties of currently available disperse dyes developed to provide stability to extensive sunlight exposures when adsorbed on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers. Having completed the characterization of yellow, magenta, and cyan disperse dyes for PET-based fabrics used outdoors, our attention turned to the colors designed to enhance the color gamut of a standard 4-member (cyan/yellow/magenta/black) color set. The present study pertained specifically to the characterization of commercially available scarlet dyes. In this regard, HPLC analysis showed that a scarlet product used for PET coloration was mainly a 70/30 mixture of dyes, and the use of HRMS and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses indicated that these two dyes were azo compounds derived from isomeric pyridine-based couplers which differed in the location of the primary amino (sbnd NH2) and anilino (sbnd NHPh) groups attached to the pyridine ring. One dye structure has the sbnd NHPh group para to the azo group (Sc2), while the other has that group in the ortho position (Sc3). The presence of either ortho substituent provides photostabilization through intramolecular H-bonding with the azo moiety. Further, results from molecular modeling studies showed that the lower excited state oxidation potential of Sc3 relative to that of Sc2 allows Sc3 to function as an energy quencher for the excited state of Sc2 - through thermodynamically favorable electron transfer.

  11. Dynamic coherence in excitonic molecular complexes under various excitation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenu, Aurélia; Malý, Pavel; Mančal, Tomáš, E-mail: mancal@karlov.mff.cuni.cz

    2014-08-17

    Highlights: • Dynamic coherence does not improve energy transfer efficiency in natural conditions. • Photo-induced quantum jumps are discussed in classical context. • Natural time scale of a light excitation event is identified. • Coherence in FMO complex averages out under excitation by neighboring antenna. • This result is valid even in absence of dissipation. - Abstract: We investigate the relevance of dynamic quantum coherence in the energy transfer efficiency of molecular aggregates. We derive the time evolution of the density matrix for an open quantum system excited by light or by a neighboring antenna. Unlike in the classical case, the quantum description does not allow for a formal decomposition of the dynamics into sudden jumps in an observable quantity – an expectation value. Rather, there is a natural finite time-scale associated with the excitation process. We propose a simple experiment to test the influence of this time scale on the yield of photosynthesis. We demonstrate, using typical parameters of the Fenna–Matthews–Olson (FMO) complex and a typical energy transfer rate from the chlorosome baseplate, that dynamic coherences are averaged out in the complex even when the FMO model is completely free of all dissipation and dephasing.

  12. Interference spectra induced by a bichromatic field in the excited state of a three-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroyannis, C.

    1998-01-01

    The interference spectra for the excited state of a three-level atom have been considered, where the strong and the weak atomic transitions leading to an electric dipole allowed excited state and to a metastable excited state are driven by resonant and nonresonant laser fields, respectively. In the low intensity limit of the strong laser field, there are two short lifetime excitations, the spontaneous one described by the weak signal field and the one induced by the strong laser field, both of which appear at the same frequency, and a long lifetime excitation induced by the weak laser field. The maximum intensities (heights) of the two peaks describing the short lifetime excitations take equal positive and negative values and, therefore, cancel each other out completely, while the long lifetime excitation dominates. This indicates the disappearance of the short lifetime excitations describing the strong atomic transition for a period equal to the lifetime of the long lifetime excitation, which is roughly equal to half of the lifetime of the metastable state. The computed spectra have been graphically presented and discussed at resonance and for finite detunings. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Rotational distributions of molecular photoions following resonant excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliakoff, E.D.; Chan, J.C.K.; White, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    We demonstrate that the photoelectron energy mediates the rotational energy distribution of N + 2 ions created by photoionization, and conversely, that rotational energy determinations probe resonant excitation in molecular photoionization. Experimentally, this is accomplished by monitoring the dispersed fluorescence from N + 2 (B 2 Σ + /sub u/) photoions to determine their rotational energy distribution. These results demonstrate that while dipole selection rules constrain the total angular momentum of the electron--ion complex, the partitioning of angular momentum between the photoelectron and photoion depends on the photoejection dynamics. Implications for photoionization and electron impact ionizatin studies are discussed

  14. Molecular excitation dynamics and relaxation quantum theory and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Valkunas, Leonas; Mancal, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Meeting the need for a work that brings together quantum theory and spectroscopy to convey excitation processes to advanced students and specialists wishing to conduct research and understand the entire field rather than just single aspects.Written by an experienced author and recognized authority in the field, this text covers numerous applications and offers examples taken from different disciplines. As a result, spectroscopists, molecular physicists, physical chemists, and biophysicists will all find this a must-have for their research. Also suitable as supplementary reading in graduate

  15. Analysis of the Alkali Metal Diatomic Spectra; Using molecular beams and ultracold molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Tae

    2014-12-01

    This ebook illustrates the complementarity of molecular beam (MB) spectra and ultracold molecule (UM) spectra in unraveling the complex electronic spectra of diatomic alkali metal molecules, using KRb as a prime example. Researchers interested in molecular spectroscopy, whether physicist, chemist, or engineer, may find this ebook helpful and may be able to apply similar ideas to their molecules of interest.

  16. Vibrational spectra and boson-like excitations in different amorphous forms of ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesnikov, A.I.; Li, J.C.; Uffindell, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Glasses are very interesting objects in the physics of condensed matter, with many universal properties, such as low-energy excitations (LEE) coexisting with the sound waves and giving an excess of vibrational modes with respect to the crystalline spectrum (the so called 'boson' peak) in Raman and inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Recently it was discovered that films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon do not show such LEE, whereas films of amorphous silicon do [1]. Also, the resonant absorption by two-level systems was observed for the high-density amorphous (hda) ice but not for the low-density amorphous (lda) ice in the far infrared spectra [2]. Thus, the nature of these near universal LEE becomes rather puzzling. This report presents the results of INS studies for hda and lda ice produced by high-pressure treatment and for vapor-deposited lda ice. Clear LEE were observed in the spectra for hda and deposited lda ice unlike their crystalline analogues. (author)

  17. CN molecule vibrational spectra excitation in several LTE plasma sources conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iova, I.; Iova, Floriana; Ionita, I.; Bazavan, M.; Ilie, Gh.; Stanescu, G.

    2001-01-01

    Our interest in CN plasma study steams of the facilities to obtain the CN radicals in a free atmosphere electric discharge where the C of the coal electrodes can to combine in the enough high temperature plasma with the atmospheric nitrogen. Also of much interest is the very important phenomena in which the CN vibrational spectra can be implied and used as a diagnostic tool (plasma chemistry, astrophysics and so on). A peculiar importance presents the CN vibrational spectra in the transient plasmas. It is the reason why we have investigated here some internal processes of a continued and interrupted arc of various pulse lengths. To these purposes we present with enough accuracy the behaviour of the relative band head intensities of the sequences Δ v = +1 and Δ v = 0 belonging to the CN electronic transition (B 2 Σ - X 2 Σ), as a function of the pulse length (50 - 200 ms) as well as a function of the cathode to anode separation. These behaviours give us indications on the vibrational levels of the electronic state populations in several regions of the arc plasma as well on the efficiency of these levels excitation for several plasma pulse lengths. (authors)

  18. A comparative theoretical study on core-hole excitation spectra of azafullerene and its derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yunfeng [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Gao, Bin, E-mail: bin.gao@uit.no [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry (CTCC), Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø—The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Deng, Mingsen, E-mail: deng@gznc.edu.cn [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Luo, Yi [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Department of Theoretical Chemistry, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-03-28

    The core-hole excitation spectra—near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shake-up satellites have been simulated at the level of density functional theory for the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its derivatives (C{sub 59}N){sup +}, C{sub 59}HN, (C{sub 59}N){sub 2}, and C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60}, in which the XPS shake-up satellites were simulated using our developed equivalent core hole Kohn-Sham (ECH-KS) density functional theory approach [B. Gao, Z. Wu, and Y. Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234704 (2008)] which aims for the study of XPS shake-up satellites of large-scale molecules. Our calculated spectra are generally in good agreement with available experimental results that validates the use of the ECH-KS method in the present work. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS, XES, and XPS shake-up satellites spectra in general can be used as fingerprints to distinguish the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its different derivatives. Meanwhile, different carbon K-edge spectra could also provide detailed information of (local) electronic structures of different molecules. In particular, a peak (at around 284.5 eV) in the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectrum of the heterodimer C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60} is confirmed to be related to the electron transfer from the C{sub 59}N part to the C{sub 60} part in this charge-transfer complex.

  19. Benchmarking the stochastic time-dependent variational approach for excitation dynamics in molecular aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorošajev, Vladimir [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Department of Molecular Compound Physics, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Sauletekio 3, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Abramavicius, Darius, E-mail: darius.abramavicius@ff.vu.lt [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2016-12-20

    Highlights: • The Davydov ansatze can be used for finite temperature simulations with an extension. • The accuracy is high if the system is strongly coupled to the environmental phonons. • The approach can simulate time-resolved fluorescence spectra. - Abstract: Time dependent variational approach is a convenient method to characterize the excitation dynamics in molecular aggregates for different strengths of system-bath interaction a, which does not require any additional perturbative schemes. Until recently, however, this method was only applicable in zero temperature case. It has become possible to extend this method for finite temperatures with the introduction of stochastic time dependent variational approach. Here we present a comparison between this approach and the exact hierarchical equations of motion approach for describing excitation dynamics in a broad range of temperatures. We calculate electronic population evolution, absorption and auxiliary time resolved fluorescence spectra in different regimes and find that the stochastic approach shows excellent agreement with the exact approach when the system-bath coupling is sufficiently large and temperatures are high. The differences between the two methods are larger, when temperatures are lower or the system-bath coupling is small.

  20. Atomic substitution in selected high-temperature superconductors: Elucidating the nature of Raman spectra excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Kevin Cecil

    2000-10-01

    In this thesis, the effects of atomic substitution on the vibrational and electronic excitations found in the Raman spectra of selected high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are studied. In particular, atomic and isotopic substitution methods have been used to determine the character of features observed in the Raman spectra of Bi2Sr2Ca n-1CunO2 n+4+delta (n = 1 - Bi2201, n = 2 - Bi2212) and YBa2Cu3O7-delta (Y123). In Bi2201, Pb substitution for Bi (and Sr) has led to the reduction and eventual removal of the structural modulation, characteristic of all members of the Bi-family of HTS. The high quality single crystals and our sensitive triple spectrometer enabled identification of a pair of low frequency modes. The modes are determined to arise from shear and compressional rigid-layer vibrations. The normal state of underdoped cuprates is characterized by a pseudogap of unknown origin. In crystals of underdoped Bi2212 a spectral peak found at 590 cm-1, previously attributed to the pairing of quasiparticles (above Tc) and hence to the formation of a normal state pseudogap, has been found to soften by 3.8% with oxygen isotope exchange. In addition, the feature is absent in fully oxygenated and yttrium underdoped crystals. In this study, the first of its kind on underdoped and isotope substituted Bi2212, the feature has been assigned to stretching vibrations of oxygen in the a-b plane. Bi2212 crystals with varying hole concentrations (0.07 Raman scattering experiments that sample the diagonal (B 2g) and principal axes (B1 g) of the BZ have led us to conclude that the superconducting gap possesses dx2-y2 symmetry, in the underdoped and overdoped regimes. It is found that the magnitude of the superconducting gap (Delta(k)) is sensitive to changes in p. Studies of the pair-breaking peak found in the B1g spectra allow us to conclude that the magnitude of the maximum gap (Deltamax) decreases monotonically with increasing hole doping, for p > 0.13. The pair

  1. Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics: On-the-fly limiting of essential excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Tammie [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Naumov, Artem [Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow 143026 (Russian Federation); Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian [Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Roque Saenz Pea 352, B1876BXD Bernal (Argentina); Tretiak, Sergei, E-mail: serg@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The simulation of nonadiabatic dynamics in extended molecular systems involving hundreds of atoms and large densities of states is particularly challenging. Nonadiabatic coupling terms (NACTs) represent a significant numerical bottleneck in surface hopping approaches. Rather than using unreliable NACT cutting schemes, here we develop “on-the-fly” state limiting methods to eliminate states that are no longer essential for the non-radiative relaxation dynamics as a trajectory proceeds. We propose a state number criteria and an energy-based state limit. The latter is more physically relevant by requiring a user-imposed energy threshold. For this purpose, we introduce a local kinetic energy gauge by summing contributions from atoms within the spatial localization of the electronic wavefunction to define the energy available for upward hops. The proposed state limiting schemes are implemented within the nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics framework to simulate photoinduced relaxation in poly-phenylene vinylene (PPV) and branched poly-phenylene ethynylene (PPE) oligomers for benchmark evaluation.

  2. Modification of erbium photoluminescence excitation spectra for the emission wavelength 1.54 μm in mesoscopic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, N.V.; Unuchak, D.M.; Mudryi, A.V.; Malyarevich, G.K.; Gusev, O.B.; Stepikhova, M.V.; Krasilnikova, L.V.; Stupak, A.P.; Kleshcheva, S.M.; Samoilovich, M.I.; Tsvetkov, M.Yu.

    2006-01-01

    Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra for the emission wavelength 1.54 μm were studied for erbium-doped xerogels embedded in artificial opals and porous anodic alumina films. Opals were chosen with photonic stop-band in green spectral range, where excitation of 1.54 μm occurs most efficiently. In comparison to the structure erbium-doped titania xerogel/porous anodic alumina/silicon the photoluminescence excitation spectra for 1.54 μm emission wavelength significantly changes for the same xerogels embedded in artificial opals. Enhancement of erbium-related 1.54 μm emission was observed from the structure Fe 2 O 3 xerogel/porous anodic alumina fabricated on silicon, having some incompletely anodized aluminium, under excitation with either the lasing source at 532 nm or xenon lamp. Evident difference in PLE spectra for erbium doped TiO 2 and Fe 2 O 3 xerogels in porous anodic alumina is observed

  3. Molecular-alignment dependence in the transfer excitation of H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.D.; McGuire, J.H.; Weaver, O.L.; Corchs, S.E.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular-alignment effects in the transfer excitation of H 2 by high-velocity heavy ions are studied using a two-step mechanism with amplitudes evaluated from first-order perturbation theory. Two-electron transfer excitation is treated as a result of two independent collision processes (excitation and electron transfer). Cross sections for each one-electron subprocess as well as the combined two-electron process are calculated as functions of the molecular-alignment angle. Within the independent-electron approximation, the dynamic roles of electron excitation and transfer in conjunction with molecular alignment are explored. While both excitation and transfer cross sections may strongly depend on molecular alignment, it is electron transfer that is largely responsible for the molecular-alignment dependence in the transfer excitation process. Interpretation of some experimental observations based on this model will also be discussed

  4. Simultaneous measurement of quantum yield ratio and absorption ratio between acceptor and donor by linearly unmixing excitation-emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Lin, F; DU, M; Qu, W; Mai, Z; Qu, J; Chen, T

    2018-02-13

    Quantum yield ratio (Q A /Q D ) and absorption ratio (K A /K D ) in all excitation wavelengths used between acceptor and donor are indispensable to quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurement based on linearly unmixing excitation-emission spectra (ExEm-spFRET). We here describe an approach to simultaneously measure Q A /Q D and K A /K D values by linearly unmixing the excitation-emission spectra of at least two different donor-acceptor tandem constructs with unknown FRET efficiency. To measure the Q A /Q D and K A /K D values of Venus (V) to Cerulean (C), we used a wide-field fluorescence microscope to image living HepG2 cells separately expressing each of four different C-V tandem constructs at different emission wavelengths with 435 nm and 470 nm excitation respectively to obtain the corresponding excitation-emission spectrum (S DA ). Every S DA was linearly unmixed into the contributions (weights) of three excitation-emission spectra of donor (W D ) and acceptor (W A ) as well as donor-acceptor sensitisation (W S ). Plot of W S /W D versus W A /W D for the four C-V plasmids from at least 40 cells indicated a linear relationship with 1.865 of absolute intercept (Q A /Q D ) and 0.273 of the reciprocal of slope (K A /K D ), which was validated by quantitative FRET measurements adopting 1.865 of Q A /Q D and 0.273 of K A /K D for C32V, C5V, CVC and VCV constructs respectively in living HepG2 cells. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. High excitation rovibrational molecular analysis in warm environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziwei; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Ferland, Gary J.

    2017-06-01

    Inspired by advances in infrared observation (e.g., Spitzer, Herschel and ALMA), we investigate rovibrational emission CO and SiO in warm astrophysical environments. With recent innovation in collisional rate coefficients and rescaling methods, we are able to construct more comprehensive collisional data with high rovibrational states (vibration up to v=5 and rotation up to J=40) and multiple colliders (H2, H and He). These comprehensive data sets are used in spectral simulations with the radiative transfer codes RADEX and Cloudy. We obtained line ratio diagnostic plots and line spectra for both near- and far-infrared emission lines over a broad range of density and temperature for the case of a uniform medium. Considering the importance of both molecules in probing conditions and activities of UV-irradiated interstellar gas, we model rovibrational emission in photodissociation region (PDR) and AGB star envelopes (such as VY Canis Majoris, IK Tau and IRC +10216) with Cloudy. Rotational diagrams, energy distribution diagrams, and spectra are produced to examine relative state abundances, line emission intensity, and other properties. With these diverse models, we expect to have a better understanding of PDRs and expand our scope in the chemical architecture and evolution of AGB stars and other UV-irradiated regions. The soon to be launched James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will provide high resolution observations at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths, which opens a new window to study molecular vibrational emission calling for more detailed chemical modeling and comprehensive laboratory astrophysics data on more molecules. This work was partially supported by NASA grants NNX12AF42G and NNX15AI61G. We thank Benhui Yang, Kyle Walker, Robert Forrey, and N. Balakrishnan for collaborating on the collisional data adopted in the current work.

  6. Optical properties of ion-implanted InP and GaAs: Selectivity-excited photoluminescence spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makita, Yunosuke; Yamada, Akimasa; Kimura, Shinji; Niki, Shigeru; Yoshinaga, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Tokue; Iida, Tsutomu; Uekusa, Ichiro

    1993-01-01

    Implantation of Mg+ ions was carried out into high purity InP grown by liquid encapsulated Czochralski method. Mg+ ion-implanted InP presented the formation of plural novel emissions with increasing Mg concentration, [Mg] in the low temperature photoluminescence spectra. Selectively-excited photoluminescence (SPL) measurements were made to examine the features of two-hole replicas pertinent to the emissions of excitons bound to neutral Mg and residual Zn acceptors. Systematic variation of the emission intensities from the two types of two-hole replicas was found to be utilized for the evaluation of ion-implanted materials. The significant discrepancy of emission spectra between PL and SPL was attributed to the difference of the depth examined by using the excitation light with high and low absorption coefficient. The results revealed that the diffusion of ion-implanted Mg is extremely enhanced when [Mg] exceeds 1x10 17 cm -3

  7. Computer simulation of ICP spectra: A new tool for the study of excitation, emission, and line overlap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blades, M.W.; Burton, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that the relatively high temperature of ICP sources provides an excitation environment relatively free from dissociation and vaporization interferences and, in addition, produces intense analyte line spectra and hence high analytical sensitivity. However, this feature also introduces the potential for spectral overlaps from sample concomitants. The degree to which an analyte spectral line intensity can be corrected for interfering spectral overlaps depends on many factors including spectrometer resolution, sample composition and ICP operating conditions. The authors have been using a computer program to assist them in the study of ICP analyte emission spectra. This program is being used to study the spectral distribution of line intensity information and also to do detailed investigations on spectral overlaps in complex sample mixtures. As input data the program uses tabulated wavelengths, transition probabilities (gA values), partition functions, excitation energies of the transitions, ionization energy, temperature, and Doppler and Stark linewidths

  8. Deconvolution of overlapping features in electron energy-loss spectra: the determination of absolute differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of electronic states of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.; Brunger, M.J.; Teubner, O.J.P.; Mojarrabi, B.

    1996-06-01

    A set of three computer programs is reported which allow for the deconvolution of overlapping molecular electronic state structure in electron energy-loss spectra, even in highly perturbed systems. This procedure enables extraction of absolute differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of electronic states of diatomic molecules from electron energy-loss spectra. The first code in the sequence uses the Rydberg-Klein-Rees procedure to generate potential energy curves from spectroscopic constants, while the second calculates Franck-Condon factors by numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation, given the potential energy curves. The third, given these Franck-Condon factors, the previously calculated relevant energies for the vibrational levels of the respective electronic states and the experimental energy-loss spectra, extracts the differential cross sections for each state. Each program can be run independently, or the three can run in sequence to determine these cross sections from the spectroscopic constants and the experimental energy-loss spectra. The application of these programs to the specific case of electron scattering from nitric oxide (NO) is demonstrated. 25 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  9. Excitation energy transfer in molecular complexes: transport processes, optical properties and effects of nearby placed metal nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Volkhard; Megow, Jörg; Zelinskyi, Iaroslav

    2012-04-01

    Excitation energy transfer (EET) in molecular systems is studied theoretically. Chromophore complexes are considered which are formed by a butanediamine dendrimer with four pheophorbide-a molecules. To achieve a description with an atomic resolution and to account for the effect of an ethanol solvent a mixed quantum classical methodology is utilized. Details of the EET and spectra of transient anisotropy showing signatures of EET are presented. A particular control of intermolecular EET is achieved by surface plasmons of nearby placed metal nanoparticles (MNP). To attain a quantum description of the molecule-MNP system a microscopic theory is introduced. As a particular application surface plasmon affected absorption spectra of molecular complexes placed in the proximity of a spherical MNP are discussed.

  10. Comparison of Cherenkov excited fluorescence and phosphorescence molecular sensing from tissue with external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huiyun; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gunn, Jason R; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David J; Jarvis, Lesley A; Pogue, Brian W

    2016-05-21

    Ionizing radiation delivered by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates Cherenkov emission within the treated tissue. A fraction of this light, in the 600-900 nm wavelength region, propagates through centimeters of tissue and can be used to excite optical probes in vivo, enabling molecular sensing of tissue analytes. The success of isolating the emission signal from this Cherenkov excitation background is dependent on key factors such as: (i) the Stokes shift of the probe spectra; (ii) the excited state lifetime; (iii) the probe concentration; (iv) the depth below the tissue surface; and (v) the radiation dose used. Previous studies have exclusively focused on imaging phosphorescent dyes, rather than fluorescent dyes. However there are only a few biologically important phosphorescent dyes and yet in comparison there are thousands of biologically relevant fluorescent dyes. So in this study the focus was a study of efficacy of Cherenkov-excited luminescence using fluorescent commercial near-infrared probes, IRDye 680RD, IRDye 700DX, and IRDye 800CW, and comparing them to the well characterized phosphorescent probe Oxyphor PtG4, an oxygen sensitive dye. Each probe was excited by Cherenkov light from a 6 MV external radiation beam, and measured in continuous wave or time-gated modes. The detection was performed by spectrally resolving the luminescence signals, and measuring them with spectrometer-based separation on an ICCD detector. The results demonstrate that IRDye 700DX and PtG4 allowed for the maximal signal to noise ratio. In the case of the phosphorescent probe, PtG4, with emission decays on the microsecond (μs) time scale, time-gated acquisition was possible, and it allowed for higher efficacy in terms of the probe concentration and detection depth. Phantoms containing the probe at 5 mm depth could be detected at concentrations down to the nanoMolar range, and at depths into the tissue simulating phantom near 3 cm. In vivo studies showed that 5

  11. Determination of Al concentration in Al doped ZnO using Auger spectra excited by Mo X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, J.; Koever, L.; Cserny, I.; Varga, D.

    2006-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. A good conductor with excellent transparency is of crucial importance for the window layer of CIGS solar cells. Al doped ZnO is a good candidate for this purpose, its conductivity depends on the concentration and chemical state of the Al dopant atoms. It was demonstrated that the non-conventional XPS using Mo X-rays for excitation is a very sensitive tool for the detection of Al, P, Si [1, 2, 3]. The present paper compares the experimental ratios for Zn/Al photoinduced peak intensity ratios obtained using both Al and Mo X-ray excitations. The Mo excited Zn/Al intensity ratios can be determined with higher selectivity and sensitivity than the Zn/Al intensity ratios excited by Al X-rays. The experiments were performed with a hemispherical deflector electron spectrometer [4]. The chemical state of the Al was identified to be close to that in Al 2 O 3 . The atomic concentrations were determined using a calibration curve based on ZnO/Al samples with known composition of Al. The energy dependent efficiency of the electron spectrometer was determined comparing REELS spectra of Cu specimen to standard spectra measured by K. Goto (Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan). For evaluation of the Al atomic concentrations from the measured photoelectron intensities the photoionisation cross-sections of Band et al [5] and the IMFP data of S. Tanuma et al [6] and C.J. Powell and A. Jablonski [7] were used. (author)

  12. The Vibrational Spectra of the Boron Halides and their Molecular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structures, interaction energies and vibrational spectra of the van derWaals complexes formed between boron trifluoride, as Lewis acid, and water and hydrogen sulphide, as Lewis bases, have been determined by means of ab initio calculations at the second-order level of Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, using a ...

  13. Study of atomic and molecular emission spectra of Sr by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Chet R; Alfarraj, Bader; Ayyalasomayajula, Krishna K; Ghany, Charles; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P

    2015-12-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an ideal analytical technique for in situ analysis of elemental composition. We have performed a comparative study of the quantitative and qualitative analysis of atomic and molecular emission from LIBS spectra. In our experiments, a mixture of SrCl2 and Al2O3 in powder form was used as a sample. The atomic emission from Sr and molecular emission from SrCl and SrO observed in LIBS spectra were analyzed. The optimum laser energies, gate delays, and gate widths for selected atomic lines and molecular bands were determined from spectra recorded at various experimental parameters. These optimum experimental conditions were used to collect calibration data, and the calibration curves were used to predict the Sr concentration. Limits of detection (LODs) for selected atomic and molecular emission spectra were determined.

  14. Using Molecular Modeling in Teaching Group Theory Analysis of the Infrared Spectra of Organometallic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    A new method is introduced for teaching group theory analysis of the infrared spectra of organometallic compounds using molecular modeling. The main focus of this method is to enhance student understanding of the symmetry properties of vibrational modes and of the group theory analysis of infrared (IR) spectra by using visual aids provided by…

  15. Luminiscent emission of molecular levels excited by ionizant radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz Ramis, M.

    1977-01-01

    The emission spectra and the time dependence of scintillations produced by alpha particles, gamma rays and ultraviolet light in some organic compounds crystals and liquids solutions normally used as radiation detectors has been studied. (author) [es

  16. Molecular vibration-rotation spectra starting from the Fues potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley Koo, E.

    1976-01-01

    The solution of Schroedinger's equation for the Fues potential is analyzed and compared with the corresponding problems for the Coulomb, harmonic oscillator and molecular potentials. These comparisons allow us to emphasize certain pedagogical, conceptual and computational advantages of the Fues potential which make it a favorable alternative as the starting point in the analysis of molecular vibration-rotation and in the determination of potential energy curves. (author)

  17. Evaluation of Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy and Comparison to Computational Background Correction Methods Applied to Biochemical Raman Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Eliana; Korinth, Florian; Stiebing, Clara; Krafft, Christoph; Schie, Iwan W; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-07-27

    Raman spectroscopy provides label-free biochemical information from tissue samples without complicated sample preparation. The clinical capability of Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated in a wide range of in vitro and in vivo applications. However, a challenge for in vivo applications is the simultaneous excitation of auto-fluorescence in the majority of tissues of interest, such as liver, bladder, brain, and others. Raman bands are then superimposed on a fluorescence background, which can be several orders of magnitude larger than the Raman signal. To eliminate the disturbing fluorescence background, several approaches are available. Among instrumentational methods shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) has been widely applied and studied. Similarly, computational techniques, for instance extended multiplicative scatter correction (EMSC), have also been employed to remove undesired background contributions. Here, we present a theoretical and experimental evaluation and comparison of fluorescence background removal approaches for Raman spectra based on SERDS and EMSC.

  18. Calculation of nuclear level density parameters of some light deformed medical radionuclides using collective excitation modes of observed nuclear spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuducu, S.; Sarac, H.; Akti, N. N.; Boeluekdemir, M. H.; Tel, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the nuclear energy level density based on nuclear collective excitation mechanism has been identified in terms of the low-lying collective level bands at near the neutron binding energy. Nuclear level density parameters of some light deformed medical radionuclides used widely in medical applications have been calculated by using different collective excitation modes of observed nuclear spectra. The calculated parameters have been used successfully in estimation of the neutron-capture cross section basic data for the production of new medical radionuclides. The investigated radionuclides have been considered in the region of mass number 40< A< 100. The method used in the present work assumes equidistance spacing of the collective coupled state bands of the interest radionuclides. The present calculated results have been compared with the compiled values from the literatures for s-wave neutron resonance data.

  19. The multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments and its applications to the analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao Qiong; Wang, Xue; Li Xu, Min; Zhai, Hong Lin; Chen, Jing; Liu, Jin Jin

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy with an excitation-emission matrix (EEM) is a fast and inexpensive technique and has been applied to the detection of a very wide range of analytes. However, serious scattering and overlapping signals hinder the applications of EEM spectra. In this contribution, the multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments was investigated in depth and applied to the analysis of two EEM data sets (data set 1 consisted of valine-tyrosine-valine, tryptophan-glycine and phenylalanine, and data set 2 included vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and vitamin B6) for the first time. By means of the Tchebichef moments with different orders, the different information in the EEM spectra can be represented. It is owing to this multi-resolution capability that the overlapping problem was solved, and the information of chemicals and scatterings were separated. The obtained results demonstrated that the Tchebichef moment method is very effective, which provides a promising tool for the analysis of EEM spectra. It is expected that the applications of Tchebichef moment method could be developed and extended in complex systems such as biological fluids, food, environment and others to deal with the practical problems (overlapped peaks, unknown interferences, baseline drifts, and so on) with other spectra.

  20. Analytic treatment of the excited instability spectra of the magnetically charged SU(2) Reissner-Nordström black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer 40250 (Israel); The Hadassah Academic College, Jerusalem 91010 (Israel)

    2017-03-14

    The magnetically charged SU(2) Reissner-Nordström black-hole solutions of the coupled nonlinear Einstein-Yang-Mills field equations are known to be characterized by infinite spectra of unstable (imaginary) resonances {ω_n(r_+,r_−)}{sub n=0}{sup n=∞} (here r{sub ±} are the black-hole horizon radii). Based on direct numerical computations of the black-hole instability spectra, it has recently been observed that the excited instability eigenvalues of the magnetically charged black holes exhibit a simple universal behavior. In particular, it was shown that the numerically computed instability eigenvalues of the magnetically charged black holes are characterized by the small frequency universal relation ω{sub n}(r{sub +}−r{sub −})=λ{sub n}, where {λ_n} are dimensionless constants which are independent of the black-hole parameters. In the present paper we study analytically the instability spectra of the magnetically charged SU(2) Reissner-Nordström black holes. In particular, we provide a rigorous analytical proof for the numerically-suggested universal behavior ω{sub n}(r{sub +}−r{sub −})=λ{sub n} in the small frequency ω{sub n}r{sub +}≪(r{sub +}−r{sub −})/r{sub +} regime. Interestingly, it is shown that the excited black-hole resonances are characterized by the simple universal relation ω{sub n+1}/ω{sub n}=e{sup −2π/√3}. Finally, we confirm our analytical results for the black-hole instability spectra with numerical computations.

  1. Restricted active space calculations of L-edge X-ray absorption spectra: from molecular orbitals to multiplet states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinjari, Rahul V; Delcey, Mickaël G; Guo, Meiyuan; Odelius, Michael; Lundberg, Marcus

    2014-09-28

    The metal L-edge (2p → 3d) X-ray absorption spectra are affected by a number of different interactions: electron-electron repulsion, spin-orbit coupling, and charge transfer between metal and ligands, which makes the simulation of spectra challenging. The core restricted active space (RAS) method is an accurate and flexible approach that can be used to calculate X-ray spectra of a wide range of medium-sized systems without any symmetry constraints. Here, the applicability of the method is tested in detail by simulating three ferric (3d(5)) model systems with well-known electronic structure, viz., atomic Fe(3+), high-spin [FeCl6](3-) with ligand donor bonding, and low-spin [Fe(CN)6](3-) that also has metal backbonding. For these systems, the performance of the core RAS method, which does not require any system-dependent parameters, is comparable to that of the commonly used semi-empirical charge-transfer multiplet model. It handles orbitally degenerate ground states, accurately describes metal-ligand interactions, and includes both single and multiple excitations. The results are sensitive to the choice of orbitals in the active space and this sensitivity can be used to assign spectral features. A method has also been developed to analyze the calculated X-ray spectra using a chemically intuitive molecular orbital picture.

  2. Separation of extrinsic and intrinsic plasmon excitations in Ge KLL Auger spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenyi, Z.; Aszalos-Kiss, B.; Csik, A.; Toth, J.; Koever, L.; Varga, D.

    2002-01-01

    The nature of the Ge satellite structure and the contributions from extrinsic and intrinsic processes were investigated using the ESA-31 electron spectrometer. These measurements are providing the first high energy resolution Ge KLL data. The intensity ratio of the plasmon peaks induced by intrinsic and extrinsic excitation processes is found. (R.P.)

  3. Excited hydrogen bonds in the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalova, S V; Tolpygo, K B

    1991-11-21

    The mechanism of muscle contraction is considered. The hydrolysis of an ATP molecule is assumed to produce the excitation of hydrogen bonds A--H...B between electronegative atoms A and B, which are contained in the myosin head and actin filament. This excitation energy epsilon f depends on the interatomic distance AB = R and generates the tractive force f = -delta epsilon f/delta R, that makes atoms AB approach each other. The swing of the myosin head results in macroscopic mutual displacement of actin and myosin polymers. The motion of the actin filament under the action of this force is studied. The conditions under which a considerable portion of the excitation energy converts into the potential tension energy of the actin filament are analysed, and the probability of higher muscle efficiency existence is discussed.

  4. Single photon simultaneous K-shell ionization and K-shell excitation. II. Specificities of hollow nitrogen molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carniato, S.; Selles, P.; Andric, L.; Palaudoux, J.; Penent, F.; Lablanquie, P.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Nakano, M.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.

    2015-01-01

    The formalism developed in the companion Paper I is used here for the interpretation of spectra obtained recently on the nitrogen molecule. Double core-hole ionization K −2 and core ionization-core excitation K −2 V processes have been observed by coincidence electron spectroscopy after ionization by synchrotron radiation at different photon energies. Theoretical and experimental cross sections reported on an absolute scale are in satisfactory agreement. The evolution with photon energy of the relative contribution of shake-up and conjugate shake-up processes is discussed. The first main resonance in the K −2 V spectrum is assigned to a K −2 π ∗ state mainly populated by the 1s→ lowest unoccupied molecular orbital dipolar excitation, as it is in the K −1 V NEXAFS (Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) signals. Closer to the K −2 threshold Rydberg resonances have been also identified, and among them a K −2 σ ∗ resonance characterized by a large amount of 2s/2p hybridization, and double K −2 (2σ ∗ /1π/3σ) −1 1π ∗2 shake-up states. These resonances correspond in NEXAFS spectra to, respectively, the well-known σ ∗ shape resonance and double excitation K −1 (2σ ∗ /1π/3σ) −1 1π ∗2 resonances, all being positioned above the threshold

  5. Adsorption geometry and core excitation spectra of three phenylpropene isomers on Cu(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolczewski, C.; Williams, F. J.; Cropley, R. L.; Vaughan, O. P. H.; Urquhart, A. J.; Tikhov, M. S.; Lambert, R. M.; Hermann, K.

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical C 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra for the C 9 H 10 isomers trans-methylstyrene, α-methylstyrene, and allylbenzene in gas phase and adsorbed at Cu(111) surfaces have been obtained from density functional theory calculations where adsorbate geometries were determined by corresponding total energy optimizations. The three species show characteristic differences in widths and peak shapes of the lowest C 1s→π* transitions which are explained by different coupling of the π-electron system of the C 6 ring with that of the side chain in the molecules as well as by the existence of nonequivalent carbon centers. The adsorbed molecules bind only weakly with the substrate which makes the use of theoretical NEXAFS spectra of the oriented free molecules meaningful for an interpretation of experimental angle-resolved NEXAFS spectra of the adsorbate systems obtained in this work. However, a detailed quantitative account of relative peak intensities requires theoretical angle-resolved NEXAFS spectra of the complete adsorbate systems which have been evaluated within the surface cluster approach. The comparison with experiment yields almost perfect agreement and confirms the reliability of the calculated equilibrium geometries of the adsorbates. This can help to explain observed differences in the catalytic epoxidation of the three molecules on Cu(111) based on purely geometric considerations

  6. Fluorescence of Bacteria, Pollens, and Naturally Occurring Airborne Particles: Excitation/Emission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    35 Figure 29. EEM spectra of kaolin particles, dry...Warrington, PA. Glass beads were obtained from Peirce Chemical Co., Rockford, IL. Kaolin particles were obtained from Particle Information Services...solution concentration of 1 mg/ml. The samples were vortexed and pipetted vigorously to disperse aggregates. Stock bacteria solutions were diluted to a

  7. Algebraic descriptions of nuclear and molecular rotation-vibration spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosmalen, O.S. van.

    1982-01-01

    The application of algebraic models to the description of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of nuclei and molecules are discussed. Simple model Hamiltonians are shown to give good agreement with the energy spectra of diatomic molecules and nuclei. Some formal aspects of path integral methods for many-boson systems are treated. The two representations for the quantum mechanical propagator are compared and appear to be identical in leading order in 1/N (N is the number of bosons). Approximations for both are static and dynamic problems are discussed. Applications of mean field techniques are also treated. A description of tri- and tetra-atomic molecules in terms of a U(4)xU(4) and U(4)xU(4)xU(4) group structure is given. Linear molecules appear to correspond with symmetries of O(4) type. S-matrix elements are calculated to test mean field methods, and the results compared with exact calculations. (Auth.)

  8. Identification of krypton Kr XVIII to Kr XXIX spectra excited in TFR Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyart, J.F.

    1985-02-01

    The emission spectrum of krypton (injected into TFR tokamak plasmas) has been recorded photographically in the 15-300 A spectral range by means of a 2m grazing incidence spectrograph. Preliminary identification work, based on isoelectronic regularities from known spectra of other ions and ionization equilibrium calculations, has allowed 48 lines (belonging to the O I, F I, Na I, Mg I, Al I, Ar I and K I sequences) to be identified

  9. Field-dependent molecular ionization and excitation energies: Implications for electrically insulating liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Davari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular ionization potential has a relatively strong electric-field dependence as compared to the excitation energies which has implications for electrical insulation since the excited states work as an energy sink emitting light in the UV/VIS region. At some threshold field, all the excited states of the molecule have vanished and the molecule is a two-state system with the ground state and the ionized state, which has been hypothesized as a possible origin of different streamer propagation modes. Constrained density-functional theory is used to calculate the field-dependent ionization potential of different types of molecules relevant for electrically insulating liquids. The low singlet-singlet excitation energies of each molecule have also been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. It is shown that low-energy singlet-singlet excitation of the type n → π* (lone pair to unoccupied π* orbital has the ability to survive at higher fields. This type of excitation can for example be found in esters, diketones and many color dyes. For alkanes (as for example n-tridecane and cyclohexane on the other hand, all the excited states, in particular the σ → σ* excitations vanish in electric fields higher than 10 MV/cm. Further implications for the design of electrically insulating dielectric liquids based on the molecular ionization potential and excitation energies are discussed.

  10. Molecular Geometry And Vibrational Spectra of 2'-chloroacetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokce, H.

    2008-01-01

    The molecular structure, vibrational frequencies and the corresponding vibrational assingments of 2'-chloroacetanilide in the ground state have been calculated by using Hartree-Fock (HF) and Density Functional Theory (DFT/B3LYP) methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The obtained vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lenghts and angles) are in very good agreement with the experimental data. The comparison of the observed and calculated vibrational frequencies assignments of 2'-chloroacetanilide exhibit that the scaled DFT/B3LYP method is superior to be scaled HF method. Furthermore the calculated Infrared and Raman intensities are also reported

  11. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  12. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-11-16

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  13. Molecular absorption spectra of beryllium, cerium, lanthanum, iron, and platinum salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daidoji, Hidehiro

    1980-01-01

    The absorption spectra of some salts of beryllium, cerium, lanthanum, iron and platinum in air-acetylene flame were measured in the wavelength range from 200 to 400 nm. A Hitachi 207 type atomic absorption spectrophotometer was used. A deuterium lamp, a home-made continuous radiation lamp and some hollow cathode lamps were used as light sources. The new molecular absorption spectra of cerium, lanthanum and platinum and the absorption spectra due to Be(OH) 2 , LaO, PtH, FeO and FeCl in 200-400 nm region were obtained. Emission spectra of CeO, LaO and FeOH were also obtained. These molecular absorption bands were estimated as absorption errors of maximum 15 times to the sensitivity of each elements in atomic absorption spectrometry. In addition, spectral line interferences of iron were observed in atomic absorption spectrometry of Zn, Cd, Ni, Cu and Cr. (author)

  14. High-resolution K-shell spectra from laser excited molybdenum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabo C.I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available X-ray spectra from Molybdenum plasmas were recorded by a Cauchois-type cylindrically bent Transmission Crystal Spectrometer (TCS. The absolutely calibrated spectrometer provides an unprecedented resolution of inner shell transitions (K x-ray radiation. This tool allows us to resolve individual lines from different charge states existing inside the laser-produced plasma. The inner shell transitions from highly charged Molybdenum shown in this report have never been resolved before in such detail in a laser-produced plasma.

  15. Atomic and molecular excitation mechanisms in the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    The detailed infrared response of dense molecular hydrogen gas to intense ultraviolet radiation fields in photodissociation regions is presented. The thermal and chemical structures of photodissociation regions are analyzed, and the relationship between the emission by molecular hydrogen and trace atomic and molecular species is explored. The ultraviolet spectrum of radiation generated by cosmic rays inside dense molecular clouds is presented, and the resulting rates of photodissociation for a variety of interstellar molecules are calculated. Effects of this radiation on the chemistry of dense molecular clouds are discussed, and it is argued that the cosmic ray induced photons will significantly inhibit the production of complex molecular species. It is argued that the annihilation of electrons and positrons at the galactic center may result in observable infrared line emission by atomic hydrogen. A correlation between the intensity variations of the 511 keV line and the hydrogen infrared lines emitted by the annihilation region is predicted. The observed infrared fluxes from compact infrared sources at the galactic center may be used to constrain theories of pair production there

  16. Quantitative analysis of valence photoemission spectra and quasiparticle excitations at chromophore-semiconductor interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Christopher E; Giustino, Feliciano

    2012-09-14

    Investigating quasiparticle excitations of molecules on surfaces through photoemission spectroscopy forms a major part of nanotechnology research. Resolving spectral features at these interfaces requires a comprehensive theory of electron removal and addition processes in molecules and solids which captures the complex interplay of image charges, thermal effects, and configurational disorder. Here, we develop such a theory and calculate the quasiparticle energy-level alignment and the valence photoemission spectrum for the prototype biomimetic solar cell interface between anatase TiO(2) and the N3 chromophore. By directly matching our calculated photoemission spectrum to experimental data, we clarify the atomistic origin of the chromophore peak at low binding energy. This case study sets a new standard in the interpretation of photoemission spectroscopy at complex chromophore-semiconductor interfaces.

  17. Nucleon, Δ and Ω excited state spectra in Nf=2+1 lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulava, J.; Edwards, R.G.; Joo, B.; Richards, D.G.; Engelson, E.; Wallace, S.J.; Lin, H.W.; Morningstar, C.

    2010-04-01

    The energies of the excited states of the Nucleon, Δ and Ω and are computed in lattice QCD, using two light quarks and one strange quark on anisotropic lattices. The calculation is performed at three values of the light quark mass, corresponding to pion masses m π =392(4), 438(3) and 521(3) MeV. We employ the variational method with a large basis of interpolating operators enabling six energies in each irreducible representation of the lattice to be distinguished clearly. We compare our calculation with the low-lying experimental spectrum, with which we nd reasonable agreement in the pattern of states. The need to include operators that couple to the expected multi-hadron states in the spectrum is clearly identified. (orig.)

  18. Photodissociation dynamics of core-excited molecular oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, L.H.; Homem, M.G.P.; Marinho, R.R.T.; Mocellin, A.; Naves de Brito, A.; Burmeister, F.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The fragmentation of molecules after the excitation of a core orbital is of particular interest due to the localization of these orbitals and the possibility to observe dissociation in the same time scale as the electronic decay. This process, which occurs in a few femtoseconds and is known as ultrafast dissociation, has been observed for O 2 and the results will be presented. We used the PhotoElectron-PhotoIon COincidence (PEPICO) and PhotoElectron-PhotoIon-PhotoIon COincidence (PEPIPICO) spectroscopy technique to analyze the produced fragments in the 529 to 540 eV photon energy range. Usually Electron Spectroscopy (ES) is employed to establish whether this peculiar phenomenon occurs or not. Here we successfully put forward the use of partial ion yield (PIY) spectroscopy to investigate ultrafast dissociation. The experiment was performed at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). The SGM beamline was equipped with an end-station composed by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer able to rotate with respect to the polarization of the exciting beam. The measurements were taken with the TOF axis performing an angle of 54.7 deg with respect to the polarization vector of the light. The data were corrected for non-unitary detection efficiency in the detectors

  19. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd 3+ lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho 3+ was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb 3+ to Yb 3+ was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar + laser, Kr + laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc

  20. Metal ion sequestration: An exciting dimension for molecularly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of a tight binding macrocyclic ligand to complex a metal ion so that this serves as receptee on the Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP) receptor as described here affords a sequestration route for a targeted metal ion, with potential for environmental remediation and restoration applications. Ethylene glycol ...

  1. Manipulation of molecular vibrational motions via pure rotational excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2015-01-01

    The coupling between different molecular degrees of freedom plays a decisive role in many quantum phenomena, including electron transfer and energy redistribution. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-mechanical time-dependent simulation to explore how a vibrational motion in a molecule can be affected...

  2. How does the plasmonic enhancement of molecular absorption depend on the energy gap between molecular excitation and plasmon modes: a mixed TDDFT/FDTD investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin; Li, Guang; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-07-14

    A real-time time-dependent density functional theory coupled with the classical electrodynamics finite difference time domain technique is employed to systematically investigate the optical properties of hybrid systems composed of silver nanoparticles (NPs) and organic adsorbates. The results demonstrate that the molecular absorption spectra throughout the whole energy range can be enhanced by the surface plasmon resonance of Ag NPs; however, the absorption enhancement ratio (AER) for each absorption band differs significantly from the others, leading to the quite different spectral profiles of the hybrid complexes in contrast to those of isolated molecules or sole NPs. Detailed investigations reveal that the AER is sensitive to the energy gap between the molecular excitation and plasmon modes. As anticipated, two separate absorption bands, corresponding to the isolated molecules and sole NPs, have been observed at a large energy gap. When the energy gap approaches zero, the molecular excitation strongly couples with the plasmon mode to form the hybrid exciton band, which possesses the significantly enhanced absorption intensity, a red-shifted peak position, a surprising strongly asymmetric shape of the absorption band, and the nonlinear Fano effect. Furthermore, the dependence of surface localized fields and the scattering response functions (SRFs) on the geometrical parameters of NPs, the NP-molecule separation distance, and the external-field polarizations has also been depicted.

  3. A disordered polaron model for polarized fluorescence excitation spectra of LH1 and LH2 bacteriochlorophyll antenna aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinkunas, Gediminas; Freiberg, Arvi

    2006-01-01

    Excitonic polarons in antenna complexes are subject to static lattice disorder. A model has been developed to analyze polarized fluorescence excitation spectra of circular light-harvesting complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria containing bacteriochlorophyll as the main photoactive pigment that includes both diagonal (energetic) and off-diagonal (structural) disorders. Essential differences of disorder realizations seem to exist between the core LH1 and peripheral LH2 complexes from the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The disorder in LH1 appears to be dominated by the structural disorder, while that in LH2, by energetic one. These differences may be due to relatively bigger size of the LH1 complex and, consequently, with its enhanced structural flexibility

  4. Moessbauer spectra studied of spin-wave excitation for amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhigao

    1992-01-01

    The average hyperfine fields of amorphous Fe 70 Co 20 Zr 10 , Fe 80 Co 10 Zr 10 and Fe 86 Co 4 -Zr 10 alloys at different temperature were measured by the Moessbauer technique. According to Bloch's T 3/2 relation, spin-wave excitations of above amorphous alloys were studied and their B 3/2 values were found to be 0.40 +- 0.02, 0.45 +- 0.02 and 0.88 +- 0.04, respectively. Comparing the B 3/2 values of crystals, a-Fe-(Co, Ni)-ME, a-Fe-(Cr, Mn, W)-ME and a-Fe-B or TM-Zr invar alloys, the obvious difference among them was observed. Above results can be explained well by the exchange coupling fluctuation and the disorder of spatial arrangement. In this work, the difference between the stiffness coefficients obtained from the inelastic neutron scattering and the magnetization measurements for amorphous Invar alloys was also explained

  5. Compton scattering artifacts in electron excited X-ray spectra measured with a silicon drift detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Nicholas W M; Newbury, Dale E; Lindstrom, Abigail P

    2011-12-01

    Artifacts are the nemesis of trace element analysis in electron-excited energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Peaks that result from nonideal behavior in the detector or sample can fool even an experienced microanalyst into believing that they have trace amounts of an element that is not present. Many artifacts, such as the Si escape peak, absorption edges, and coincidence peaks, can be traced to the detector. Others, such as secondary fluorescence peaks and scatter peaks, can be traced to the sample. We have identified a new sample-dependent artifact that we attribute to Compton scattering of energetic X-rays generated in a small feature and subsequently scattered from a low atomic number matrix. It seems likely that this artifact has not previously been reported because it only occurs under specific conditions and represents a relatively small signal. However, with the advent of silicon drift detectors and their utility for trace element analysis, we anticipate that more people will observe it and possibly misidentify it. Though small, the artifact is not inconsequential. Under some conditions, it is possible to mistakenly identify the Compton scatter artifact as approximately 1% of an element that is not present.

  6. The D(D3)-anyon chain: integrable boundary conditions and excitation spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, Peter E; Frahm, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Chains of interacting non-Abelian anyons with local interactions invariant under the action of the Drinfeld double of the dihedral group D 3 are constructed. Formulated as a spin chain the Hamiltonians are generated from commuting transfer matrices of an integrable vertex model for periodic and braided as well as open boundaries. A different anyonic model with the same local Hamiltonian is obtained within the fusion path formulation. This model is shown to be related to an integrable fusion interaction round the face model. Bulk and surface properties of the anyon chain are computed from the Bethe equations for the spin chain. The low-energy effective theories and operator content of the models (in both the spin chain and fusion path formulation) are identified from analytical and numerical studies of the finite-size spectra. For all boundary conditions considered the continuum theory is found to be a product of two conformal field theories. Depending on the coupling constants the factors can be a Z 4 parafermion or a M (5,6) minimal model. (paper)

  7. Properties of the Excited States of Molecular Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-13

    FIg. 1). techniques have beest applied to the study of quartet states of Oi. The four potential curves most relevant Guyon et al., using a synchrotron...8217 a’ a a C ’U ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 2 2,~ C a ’I C~- C ’ 𔃺 𔃺 𔃺 ’ ’ C- ~ C-E-38- ’- u A() A09a 265 SRI INTERNATIONAL 14FNLO PARK CA MOLECULAR PHYSICS LAB F

  8. Selective excitation, relaxation, and energy channeling in molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, W.C.

    1993-08-01

    Research involves theoretical studies of response, relaxation, and correlated motion in time-dependent behavior of large molecular systems ranging from polyatomic molecules to protein molecules in their natural environment. Underlying theme is subsystem modulation dynamics. Main idea is that quantum mechanical correlations between components of a system develop with time, playing a major role in determining the balance between coherent and dissipative forces. Central theme is interplay of coherence and dissipation in determining the nature of dynamic structuring and energy flow in molecular transformation mechanisms. Subsystem equations of motion are being developed to show how nonlinear, dissipative dynamics of a particular subsystem arise from correlated interactions with the rest of the system (substituent groups, solvent, lattice modes, etc.); one consequence is resonance structures and networks. Quantum dynamics and thermodynamics are being applied to understand control and energy transfer mechanisms in biological functions of protein molecules; these mechanisms are both global and local. Besides the above theory, the research deals with phenomenological aspects of molecular systems

  9. Vibrational infrared and Raman spectra of polypeptides: Fragments-in-fragments within molecular tailoring approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Nityananda; Gadre, Shridhar R., E-mail: gadre@iitk.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2016-03-21

    The present work reports the calculation of vibrational infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of large molecular systems employing molecular tailoring approach (MTA). Further, it extends the grafting procedure for the accurate evaluation of IR and Raman spectra of large molecular systems, employing a new methodology termed as Fragments-in-Fragments (FIF), within MTA. Unlike the previous MTA-based studies, the accurate estimation of the requisite molecular properties is achieved without performing any full calculations (FC). The basic idea of the grafting procedure is implemented by invoking the nearly basis-set-independent nature of the MTA-based error vis-à-vis the respective FCs. FIF has been tested out for the estimation of the above molecular properties for three isomers, viz., β-strand, 3{sub 10}- and α-helix of acetyl(alanine){sub n}NH{sub 2} (n = 10, 15) polypeptides, three conformers of doubly protonated gramicidin S decapeptide and trpzip2 protein (PDB id: 1LE1), respectively, employing BP86/TZVP, M06/6-311G**, and M05-2X/6-31G** levels of theory. For most of the cases, a maximum difference of 3 cm{sup −1} is achieved between the grafted-MTA frequencies and the corresponding FC values. Further, a comparison of the BP86/TZVP level IR and Raman spectra of α-helical (alanine){sub 20} and its N-deuterated derivative shows an excellent agreement with the existing experimental spectra. In view of the requirement of only MTA-based calculations and the ability of FIF to work at any level of theory, the current methodology provides a cost-effective solution for obtaining accurate spectra of large molecular systems.

  10. Electronic spectra of azaindole and its excited state mixing: A symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arulmozhiraja, Sundaram, E-mail: raja@cat.hokudai.ac.jp; Coote, Michelle L. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, 2601 ACT (Australia); Hasegawa, Jun-ya [Institute for Catalysis, Hokkaido University, Kita 21, Nishi 10, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan)

    2015-11-28

    Electronic structures of azaindole were studied using symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction theory utilizing Dunning’s cc-pVTZ basis set augmented with appropriate Rydberg spd functions on carbon and nitrogen atoms. The results obtained in the present study show good agreement with the available experimental values. Importantly, and contrary to previous theoretical studies, the excitation energy calculated for the important n–π{sup ∗} state agrees well with the experimental value. A recent study by Pratt and co-workers concluded that significant mixing of π-π{sup ∗} and n-π{sup ∗} states leads to major change in the magnitude and direction of the dipole moment of the upper state vibrational level in the 0,0 + 280 cm{sup −1} band in the S{sub 1}←S{sub 0} transition when compared to that of the zero-point level of the S{sub 1} state. The present study, however, shows that all the four lowest lying excited states, {sup 1}L{sub b} π-π{sup ∗}, {sup 1}L{sub a} π-π{sup ∗}, n-π{sup ∗}, and π-σ{sup ∗}, cross each other in one way or another, and hence, significant state mixing between them is likely. The upper state vibrational level in the 0,0 + 280 cm{sup −1} band in the S{sub 1}←S{sub 0} transition benefits from this four-state mixing and this can explain the change in magnitude and direction of the dipole moment of the S{sub 1} excited vibrational level. This multistate mixing, and especially the involvement of π-σ{sup ∗} state in mixing, could also provide a route for hydrogen atom detachment reactions. The electronic spectra of benzimidazole, a closely related system, were also investigated in the present study.

  11. The fluorescence action spectra of some saturated hydrocarbon liquids for excitation energies above and below their ionization thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostafin, A.E.; Lipsky, S.

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence action spectra have been obtained for the neat liquids, cis-decalin, trans-decalin, bicyclohexyl, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, isobutylcyclohexane, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, 3-methylhexane, 3-methylpentane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-pentadecane at excitation energies, ε, ranging from their absorption onsets (at ca. 7 eV) to 10.3 eV. For all compounds, with the exception of cis-decalin, the fluorescence quantum yield is observed to monotonically decline with increasing ε, reaching a minimum value at an energy, ε m (a few tenths of an eV above the liquid phase ionization threshold, ε l ) followed by a slow increase. In the case of cis-decalin, the fluorescence quantum yield remains constant over the entire range of excitation energies studied, permitting its use as a quantum counter replacing the standard sodium salicylate, at least over a spectral range from 185 to 120 nm. The recovery of the fluorescence quantum yield for ε>ε m is attributed to an increasing probability for electron ejection followed by e - +RH + geminate recombination, to produce an excited state of RH with energy less than ε l . From a simple analysis of the action spectrum, a lower bound estimate of the electron ejection probability, φ ± , is obtained as a function of ε. In the case of cyclohexane, where φ ± has been obtained by other techniques at ε congruent 10 eV, the lower bound estimate agrees with the experimental value. From this agreement, arguments are presented to make plausible the conjecture that in all these liquids, the initially produced e - +RH + geminate ion pair first rapidly internally converts to an ion-pair state ca

  12. Theoretical Studies Of Molecular Structure And Vibrational Spectra Of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Hexyl Ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comert, H.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of The 5-Aminolevulinic acid's hexyl ester (ALA-H) in the ground state have been calculated using Hartree-Fock (HF) and Density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-31++G(d) basis set. The calculated vibrational spectra and geometric parameters of title compound were compered with experimental ones.

  13. On the effects of transforming the vibrational spectra of molecular systems under microwave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serikov, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    This problem is analyzed within the quantum-classical theory of molecular spectra. It is shown that the above-mentioned spectrum transformation could be, in principle, realized in macromolecular systems with strong interaction, and attention is drawn to the resonance character of the effect. (author). 19 refs., 1 fig

  14. The structure of quasi-molecular KX-ray spectra from heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaun, K.-N.; Frank, W.; Manfrass, P.

    1976-01-01

    In the experiments with Ge, Nb, Kr and La ions continuum X-ray spectra having a two-component structure have been observed. Both components atr interpreted as quasi-molecular X-radiation caused by transitions to the 2psigma and 1ssigma states in the quasimolecule

  15. Studies of isotopic effects in the excited electronic states of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Rare gas halogen (RGH) lasers serve as convenient tools for a range of photophysical processes which exhibit isotope effects. This document summarizes progress in the production of molecular systems in their electronic excited states with the aid of RGH lasers, and the various isotopic effects one can study under these conditions. We conclude that the basic physical mechanisms involved in the isotopically sensitive characteristics of excited molecular electronic states are sufficiently selective to be useful in both the detection and separation of many atomic materials

  16. Spectra of soft X-ray excitation potentials of titanium and vanadium compounds with carbon and nitrogen of a variable composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brytov, I.A.; Bleher, B. Eh.; Neshpor, V.S.

    1979-01-01

    Lsub(3,2) spectra of excitation potentials (SEP) of a soft X-ray radiation of titanium and vanadium carbides and titanium nitrides in their homogeneity range, as well as solid solutions of nitrogen in α-titanium, are studied. The binding energies of electrons of the exciting levels relatively to the Fermi level are determined, adequacy of different quantomechanical calculations is experimentally proved. The observed changes in SEP at the variation of the metalloid concentration are explained by a quantitative transformation model of valent state energetic spectra when metalloid vacancies and connected with them local levels form

  17. Emission spectroscopic studies on dynamics of molecular excitation and dissociation by controlled electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Teiichiro

    1986-01-01

    Emission spectrum by controlled electron impact has been a successful technique for the investigation of molecular dynamics. (1) Molecular excitation. Aromatic molecules give an optical emission similar to fluorescence. However, as is shown by the vibrational structure and the electron energy dependence of benzene emission, its excitation process is not necessarily optical. Some aliphatic molecules also exhibit an emission band at the ultraviolet region. (2) Molecular dissociation. Analysis of the Doppler profile, the threshold energy, the excitation function and the isotope effect of the atomic emission produced in electron-molecule collisions has clarified the dynamics of the molecular dissociation. Especially the Doppler profile has given the translational energy distribution of the fragment atom, which is very useful to disclose the potential energy curve. Its angular dependence has recently found to allow determination of the symmetry of the intermediate excited state and the magnetic sublevel distribution of the fragment atom. These finding has revealed detailed state-to-state dynamics of the molecular dissociation. (author)

  18. Molecular approaches to solar energy conversion: the energetic cost of charge separation from molecular-excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, James R

    2013-08-13

    This review starts with a brief overview of the technological potential of molecular-based solar cell technologies. It then goes on to focus on the core scientific challenge associated with using molecular light-absorbing materials for solar energy conversion, namely the separation of short-lived, molecular-excited states into sufficiently long-lived, energetic, separated charges capable of generating an external photocurrent. Comparisons are made between different molecular-based solar cell technologies, with particular focus on the function of dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical solar cells as well as parallels with the function of photosynthetic reaction centres. The core theme of this review is that generating charge carriers with sufficient lifetime and a high quantum yield from molecular-excited states comes at a significant energetic cost-such that the energy stored in these charge-separated states is typically substantially less than the energy of the initially generated excited state. The role of this energetic loss in limiting the efficiency of solar energy conversion by such devices is emphasized, and strategies to minimize this energy loss are compared and contrasted.

  19. Effects of phonon broadening on x-ray near-edge spectra in molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, John; Jach, Terrence; Elam, Tim; Denlinger, Jonathon

    2014-03-01

    Calculations of near-edge x-ray spectra are often carried out using the average atomic coordinates from x-ray or neutron scattering experiments or from density functional theory (DFT) energy minimization. This neglects disorder from thermal and zero-point vibrations. Here we look at the nitrogen K-edge of ammonium chloride and ammonium nitrate, comparing Bethe-Salpeter calculations of absorption and fluorescence to experiment. We find that intra-molecular vibrational effects lead to significant, non-uniform broadening of the spectra, and that for some features zero-point motion is the primary source of the observed shape.

  20. The geometric content of the interacting boson model for molecular spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levit, S.; Smilansky, U.

    1981-12-01

    The recently proposed algebraic model for collective spectra of diatomic molecules is analysed in terms of conventional geometrical degrees of freedom. We present a mapping of the algebraic Hamiltonian onto an exactly solvable geometrical Hamiltonian with the Morse potential. This mapping explains the success of the algebraic model in reproducing the low lying part of molecular spectra. At the same time the mapping shows that the expression for the dipole transition operator in terms of boson operators differs from the simplest IBM expression and in general must include many-body boson terms. The study also provides an insight into the problem of possible interpretations of the bosons in the nuclear IBM. (author)

  1. X-ray spectra of He-like ions of Ga and Ge, excited in the low-inductance spark plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitsky, E.V.; Antsiferov, P.S.; Panin, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    The spectra of Ga XXX and Ge XXXI ions in the interval 1.2-1.4 A excited in the low-inductance vacuum spark plasma have been obtained for the first time. The resonance line 1s 2 -1s2p of Ga XXX and Ge XXXI and a group of satellites, corresponding to transitions in Ga XXIX and Ge XXX can be seen distinctly in the spectra. The spectra were obtained by an electronic-optical image-intensifier tube for one discharge. (orig.)

  2. Reduction of the Glauber amplitude for electron impact rotational excitation of quadrupolar molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, K.C.; Gupta, G.P.; Pundir, R.S.

    1981-06-01

    A reduction of the Glauber amplitude for the rotational excitation of pure quadrupolar molecular ions by electron impact is presented in a form suitable for numerical evaluation. The differential cross-section is expressed in terms of one dimensional integrals over impact parameter. (author)

  3. Molecular hydrogen line ratios in four regions of shock-excited gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    Five emission lines of molecular hydrogen, with wavelengths in the ranges of 2.10-2.25 and 3.80-3.85 μm, have been observed in four objects of different type in which the line emission is believed to be excited by shocks. (author)

  4. Plasmon assisted control of photo-induced excitation energy transfer in a molecular chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2017-08-01

    The strong and ultrafast laser pulse excitation of a molecular chain in close vicinity to a spherical metal nano-particle (MNP) is studied theoretically. Due to local-field enhancement around the MNP, pronounced excited-state formation has to be expected for the part of the chain which is in proximity to the MNP. Here, the description of this phenomenon will be based on a uniform quantum theory of the MNP-molecule system. It accounts for local-field effects due to direct consideration of the strong excitation energy transfer coupling between the MNP and the various molecules. The molecule-MNP distances are chosen in such a way as to achieve a correct description of the MNP via dipole-plasmon excitations. Short plasmon life-times are incorporated in the framework of a density matrix approach. By extending earlier work the present description allows for multi-exciton formation and multiple dipole-plasmon excitation. The region of less intense and not-too-short optical excitation is identified as being best suited for excitation energy localization in the chain.

  5. Computing UV/vis spectra using a combined molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry approach: bis-triazin-pyridine (BTP) ligands studied in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfener, Sebastian; Trumm, Michael; Koke, Carsten; Heuser, Johannes; Ekström, Ulf; Skerencak-Frech, Andrej; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Panak, Petra J

    2016-03-21

    We report a combined computational and experimental study to investigate the UV/vis spectra of 2,6-bis(5,6-dialkyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (BTP) ligands in solution. In order to study molecules in solution using theoretical methods, force-field parameters for the ligand-water interaction are adjusted to ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Based on these parameters, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out from which snapshots are extracted as input to quantum chemical excitation-energy calculations to obtain UV/vis spectra of BTP ligands in solution using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) employing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The range-separated CAM-B3LYP functional is used to avoid large errors for charge-transfer states occurring in the electronic spectra. In order to study environment effects with theoretical methods, the frozen-density embedding scheme is applied. This computational procedure allows to obtain electronic spectra calculated at the (range-separated) DFT level of theory in solution, revealing solvatochromic shifts upon solvation of up to about 0.6 eV. Comparison to experimental data shows a significantly improved agreement compared to vacuum calculations and enables the analysis of relevant excitations for the line shape in solution.

  6. An analytic approach to 2D electronic PE spectra of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoecs, V.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The three-pulse photon echo (3P-PE) spectra of finite molecular systems using direct calculation from electronic Hamiltonians allows peak classification from 3P-PE spectra dynamics. Display Omitted Highlights: → RWA approach to electronic photon echo. → A straightforward calculation of 2D electronic spectrograms in finite molecular systems. → Importance of population time dynamics in relation to inter-site coherent coupling. - Abstract: The three-pulse photon echo (3P-PE) spectra of finite molecular systems and simplified line broadening models is presented. The Fourier picture of a heterodyne detected three-pulse rephasing PE signal in the δ-pulse limit of the external field is derived in analytic form. The method includes contributions of one and two-excitonic states and allows direct calculation of Fourier PE spectrogram from corresponding Hamiltonian. As an illustration, the proposed treatment is applied to simple systems, e.g. 2-site two-level system (TLS) and n-site TLS model of photosynthetic unit. The importance of relation between Fourier picture of 3P-PE dynamics (corresponding to nonzero population time, T) and coherent inter-state coupling is emphasized.

  7. Range-separated density-functional theory for molecular excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebolini, E.

    2014-01-01

    Linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is nowadays a method of choice to compute molecular excitation energies. However, within the usual adiabatic semi-local approximations, it is not able to describe properly Rydberg, charge-transfer or multiple excitations. Range separation of the electronic interaction allows one to mix rigorously density-functional methods at short range and wave function or Green's function methods at long range. When applied to the exchange functional, it already corrects most of these deficiencies but multiple excitations remain absent as they need a frequency-dependent kernel. In this thesis, the effects of range separation are first assessed on the excitation energies of a partially-interacting system in an analytic and numerical study in order to provide guidelines for future developments of range-separated methods for excitation energy calculations. It is then applied on the exchange and correlation TDDFT kernels in a single-determinant approximation in which the long-range part of the correlation kernel vanishes. A long-range frequency-dependent second-order correlation kernel is then derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation and added perturbatively to the range-separated TDDFT kernel in order to take into account the effects of double excitations. (author)

  8. Calculations of the excitation energies of all-trans and 11,12s-dicis retinals using localized molecular orbitals obtained by the elongation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Youji; Aoki, Yuriko; Imamura, Akira

    1997-09-01

    In the present article, the excitation energies of the all-trans and the 11,12s-dicis retinals were calculated by using the elongation method. The geometries of these molecules were optimized with the 4-31G basis set by using the GAUSSIAN 92 program. The wave functions for the calculation of the excitation energies were obtained with CNDO/S approximation by the elongation method, which enables us to analyze electronic structures of aperiodic polymers in terms of the exciton-type local excitation and the charge transfer-type excitation. The excitation energies were calculated by using the single excitation configuration interaction (SECI) on the basis of localized molecular orbitals (LMOs). The LMOs were obtained in the process of the elongation method. The configuration interaction (CI) matrices were diagonalized by Davidson's method. The calculated results were in good agreement with the experimental data for absorption spectra. In order to consider the isomerization path from 11,12s-dicis to all-trans retinals, the barriers to the rotations about C11-C12 double and C12-C13 single bonds were evaluated.

  9. IRAS observations of the exciting stars of Herbig-Haro objects. II. The Reipurth and Graham sample and low-resolution spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.

    1990-01-01

    Using IRAS COADDed images, candidates are suggested for the exciting stars of Herbig-Haro objects from the Reipurth and Graham sample. The IRAS low-resolution spectrometer provides spectra for 20 of the 46 candidate stars so far identified as exciting young, unevolved H-H systems. These reveal 10-micron silicate absorption features, or are too red to show detectable flux near 10 microns. The histogram of bolometric luminosities for 46 young Herbig-Haro exciting stars has a median of 13 solar luminosities and a mode between 16 and 32 solar luminosities. Although the enlarged sample of known exciting stars has more of the higher luminosity objects than an earlier sample, the histogram still represents a generally low-luminosity distribution. 27 refs

  10. Molecular structure and vibrational spectra of Bis(melaminium) terephthalate dihydrate: A DFT computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanak, Hasan; Marchewka, Mariusz K.; Drozd, Marek

    2013-03-01

    The experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of Bis(melaminium) terephthalate dihydrate were studied. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra of the Bis(melaminium) terephthalate dihydrate and its deuterated analogue were recorded in the solid phase. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of Bis(melaminium) terephthalate dihydrate in the ground state have been calculated by using the density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. The results of the optimized molecular structure are presented and compared with the experimental X-ray diffraction. The molecule contains the weak hydrogen bonds of Nsbnd H⋯O, Nsbnd H⋯N and Osbnd H⋯O types, and those bonds are calculated with DFT method. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential, frontier molecular orbitals and natural bond orbital analysis of the title compound were investigated by theoretical calculations. The lack of the second harmonic generation (SHG) confirms the presence of macroscopic center of inversion.

  11. Bibliography of atomic and molecular excitation in heavy particle collisions, 1950--1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, S.W.; Thomas, E.W.; Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1979-02-01

    This annotated bibliography lists published work on atomic and molecular excitation in heavy particle collisions for the period 1950 to 1975. Sources include scientific journals, abstract compilations, conference proceedings, books, and reports. The bibliography is arranged alphabetically by author. Each entry indicates whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, and what reactants were investigated. Following the bibliographical listing are indexes of reactions and authors

  12. Equations describing coherent and partially coherent multilevel molecular excitation induced by pulsed Raman transitions: III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.; Sacks, R.; Karr, T.

    1987-01-01

    This memo discusses the equations of motion used to describe multilevel molecular excitation induced by Raman transitions. These equations are based upon the time-dependent Schroedinger equation expressed in a basis of molecular energy states. A partition of these states is made into two sets, those that are far from resonance (and hence unpopulated) and those that are close to resonance, either by one-photon transition or two-photon (Raman) processes. By adiabatic elimination an effective Schroedinger equation is obtained for the resonance states alone. The effective Hamiltonian is expressible in terms of a polarizibility operator

  13. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra and density functional computations of the vibrational spectra, molecular geometry and atomic charges of the biomolecule: 5-bromouracil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rastogi, V.K.; Palafox, M. A.; Mittal, L.; Peica, N.; Keifer, W.; Lang, Kamil; Ojha, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 10 (2007), s. 1227-1241 ISSN 0377-0486 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : FTIR and FT-Raman spectra * density functional computations * molecular geometry Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.514, year: 2007

  14. Comparative studies on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and hyperpolarizabilies of NLO chromophore Ethyl 4-Dimethylaminobenzoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalanathan, M.; Jasmine, G. Femina; Roy, S. Dawn Dharma

    2017-08-01

    The molecular structure, vibrational spectra and polarizabilities of Ethyl 4-Dimethylaminobenzoate (EDAB) was investigated by density functional theory employing Becke's three parameter hybrid exchange functional with Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) co-relational functional involving 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and compared with some other levels. A detailed interpretation of the IR and Raman spectra of EDBA have been reported and analyzed. Complete vibrational assignments of the vibrational modes have been done on the basis of the potential energy distribution (TED) using VEDA software. The molecular electrostatic potential mapped onto total density surface has been obtained. A study on the electronic properties, such as absorption wavelength, and frontier molecular orbitals energy, was performed using DFT approach. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions and accompanying charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The natural and Mulliken charge also calculated and compared with different level of calculation. The dipole moment, polarizability and first, second order hyperpolarizabilities of the title molecule were calculated and compared with the experimental values. The energy gap between frontier orbitals has been used along with electric moments and first order hyperpolarizability, to understand the non linear optical (NLO) activity of the molecule. The NLO activity of molecule was confirmed by SHG analysis.

  15. Core-level spectra and molecular deformation in adsorption: V-shaped pentacene on Al(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Floreano, Luca; Fratesi, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Summary By first-principle simulations we study the effects of molecular deformation on the electronic and spectroscopic properties as it occurs for pentacene adsorbed on the most stable site of Al(001). The rationale for the particular V-shaped deformed structure is discussed and understood. The molecule–surface bond is made evident by mapping the charge redistribution. Upon X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) from the molecule, the bond with the surface is destabilized by the electron density rearrangement to screen the core hole. This destabilization depends on the ionized carbon atom, inducing a narrowing of the XPS spectrum with respect to the molecules adsorbed hypothetically undistorted, in full agreement to experiments. When looking instead at the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, individual contributions from the non-equivalent C atoms provide evidence of the molecular orbital filling, hybridization, and interchange induced by distortion. The alteration of the C–C bond lengths due to the V-shaped bending decreases by a factor of two the azimuthal dichroism of NEXAFS spectra, i.e., the energy splitting of the sigma resonances measured along the two in-plane molecular axes. PMID:26734516

  16. Core-level spectra and molecular deformation in adsorption: V-shaped pentacene on Al(001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Baby

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available By first-principle simulations we study the effects of molecular deformation on the electronic and spectroscopic properties as it occurs for pentacene adsorbed on the most stable site of Al(001. The rationale for the particular V-shaped deformed structure is discussed and understood. The molecule–surface bond is made evident by mapping the charge redistribution. Upon X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS from the molecule, the bond with the surface is destabilized by the electron density rearrangement to screen the core hole. This destabilization depends on the ionized carbon atom, inducing a narrowing of the XPS spectrum with respect to the molecules adsorbed hypothetically undistorted, in full agreement to experiments. When looking instead at the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS spectra, individual contributions from the non-equivalent C atoms provide evidence of the molecular orbital filling, hybridization, and interchange induced by distortion. The alteration of the C–C bond lengths due to the V-shaped bending decreases by a factor of two the azimuthal dichroism of NEXAFS spectra, i.e., the energy splitting of the sigma resonances measured along the two in-plane molecular axes.

  17. Autoionization spectra of He excited by fast (MeV) H+, He+, and Li/sup n+/ (n = 1,2,3) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.; Arcuni, P.; Bruch, P.; Stoeffler, W.

    1983-01-01

    Autoionization spectra of He following excitation by 1 to 3 MeV H + , He + , and Li/sup n+/ (n = 1,2,3) have been measured as a function of observation angle. The (2p 2 ) 1 D and (2s2p) 1 P resonances have been examined and a strong dependence on projectile velocities, charge state and observation angle was found

  18. Autoionization spectra of He excited by fast (MeV) H/sup +/, He/sup +/, and Li/sup n+/ (n = 1,2,3) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, D.; Arcuni, P.; Bruch, P.; Stoeffler, W.

    1983-01-01

    Autoionization spectra of He following excitation by 1 to 3 MeV H/sup +/, He/sup +/, and Li/sup n+/ (n = 1,2,3) have been measured as a function of observation angle. The (2p/sup 2/)/sup 1/D and (2s2p)/sup 1/P resonances have been examined and a strong dependence on projectile velocities, charge state and observation angle was found.

  19. Magnetophonon resonance in photoluminescence excitation spectra of magnetoexcitons in GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As superlattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickmann, S.; Tartakovskii, A. I.; Timofeev, V. B.

    2000-01-01

    A strong increase in the intensity of the peaks of excited magnetoexciton (ME) states in the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra recorded for the ground heavy-hole magnetoexcitons (of the 1sHH type) has been found in a GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As superlattice in strong magnetic field B applied normal...... to the sample layers. While varying B, the intensities of the PLE peaks have been measured as functions of energy separation Delta E between excited ME peaks and the ground state of the system. The resonance profiles have been found to have maxima at Delta E-max close to the energy of the GaAs LO phonon...

  20. Energy spectra of vibron and cluster models in molecular and nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili Majarshin, A.; Sabri, H.; Jafarizadeh, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    The relation of the algebraic cluster model, i.e., of the vibron model and its extension, to the collective structure, is discussed. In the first section of the paper, we study the energy spectra of vibron model, for diatomic molecule then we derive the rotation-vibration spectrum of 2α, 3α and 4α configuration in the low-lying spectrum of 8Be, 12C and 16O nuclei. All vibrational and rotational states with ground and excited A, E and F states appear to have been observed, moreover the transitional descriptions of the vibron model and α-cluster model were considered by using an infinite-dimensional algebraic method based on the affine \\widehat{SU(1,1)} Lie algebra. The calculated energy spectra are compared with experimental data. Applications to the rotation-vibration spectrum for the diatomic molecule and many-body nuclear clusters indicate that there are solvable models and they can be approximated very well using the transitional theory.

  1. Cooperativity in Molecular Dynamics Structural Models and the Dielectric Spectra of 1,2-Ethanediol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usacheva, T. M.

    2018-05-01

    Linear relationships are established between the experimental equilibrium correlation factor and the molecular dynamics (MD) mean value of the O-H···O bond angle and the longitudinal component of the unit vector of the mean statistical dipole moment of the cluster in liquid 1,2-ethanediol (12ED). The achievements of modern MD models in describing the experimental dispersion of the permittivity of 12ED by both continuous and discrete relaxation time spectra are analyzed. The advantage computer MD experiments have over dielectric spectroscopy for calculating relaxation time and determining the molecular diffusion mechanisms of the rearrangement of the network 12ED structure, which is more complex than water, is demonstrated.

  2. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le; James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E.; Redding, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  3. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chuji [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, 39759 (United States); Pan, Yong-Le, E-mail: yongle.pan.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Redding, Brandon [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  4. Resonance Raman and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectra of LH2 antenna complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ectothiorhodospira sp. excited in the Qx and Qy transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumanov, G; Picorel, R; Ortiz de Zarate, I; Cotton, T M; Seibert, M

    2000-05-01

    Well-resolved vibrational spectra of LH2 complex isolated from two photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ectothiorhodospira sp., were obtained using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) exciting into the Qx and the Qy transitions of bacteriochlorophyll a. High-quality SERRS spectra in the Qy region were accessible because the strong fluorescence background was quenched near the roughened Ag surface. A comparison of the spectra obtained with 590 nm and 752 nm excitation in the mid- and low-frequency regions revealed spectral differences between the two LH2 complexes as well as between the LH2 complexes and isolated bacteriochlorophyll a. Because peripheral modes of pigments contribute mainly to the low-frequency spectral region, frequencies and intensities of many vibrational bands in this region are affected by interactions with the protein. The results demonstrate that the microenvironment surrounding the pigments within the two LH2 complexes is somewhat different, despite the fact that the complexes exhibit similar electronic absorption spectra. These differences are most probably due to specific pigment-pigment and pigment-protein interactions within the LH2 complexes, and the approach might be useful for addressing subtle static and dynamic structural variances between pigment-protein complexes from different sources or in complexes altered chemically or genetically.

  5. The effect of ultraviolet irradiation on the photothermal, photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectra of Mn-doped ZnS nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briones Cruz, Almira; Shen Qing; Toyoda, Taro

    2006-01-01

    Research involving Mn doped nanocrystalline ZnS (ZnS:Mn) has grown in recent years, partly due to the high quantum luminescence efficiencies that have been reported. We measured the photoacoustic (PA), the photoluminescence (PL) and the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of surface-passivated and unpassivated ZnS:Mn. The effects of UV irradiation on the PL and PLE spectra were also studied. A decrease in the PA intensity after UV exposure was observed for the ZnS:Mn, indicating a decrease in the nonradiative relaxation probability. The observed increase in PL intensity indicates a corresponding increase in the radiative transition probability. For the PLE spectra, possible aggregation of the primary particles could have resulted in the lower measured energy of the PLE peak compared to the value predicted by the effective mass approximation theory

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Sgr B2 los molecular absorption line spectra (Corby+, 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corby, J. F.; McGuire, B. A.; Herbst, E.; Remijan, A. J.

    2017-11-01

    Spectra covering transitions of c-C3H2, c-H1 SO, CCS, H2CS, HCS+, OH, SiO, 29SiO, H2CO, H2(13C)O, l-C3H, and l-C3H+ with line-of-sight absorption observed in the 1-50 GHz data from the PRebiotic Interstellar MOlecular Survey (PRIMOS) taken with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Data were observed between 2001 and 2014, with the majority of the data obtained in 2007 in GBT Key Science project ID GBT07A-051. Spectra have been baseline-subtracted using best fit polynomials as described in the paper, and normalized by the continuum, so that the y-axis represents (T/TC-1). Data are provided in the FITS format; each FITS file contains all lines of a single molecule that are observed to have foreground absorption. Please refer to Table 1 of the paper to obtain molecular transition rest frequencies, energies, GBT beam sizes, and transition quantum numbers. (2 data files).

  7. Approximate inclusion of triple excitations in combined coupled cluster/molecular mechanics: Calculations of electronic excitation energies in solution for acrolein, water, formamide, and n-methylacetamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneskov, Kristian; Gras, Eduard Matito; Kongsted, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    as being applicable for averaging over many solvent configurations derived from, for example, molecular simulations. We test the proposed model using as a benchmark the two lowest-lying valence singlet excitations (n → π* and π → π*) of acrolein, formamide, and N-methylacetamide in aqueous solution as well...

  8. Directing the path of light-induced electron transfer at a molecular fork using vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, Milan; Archer, Stuart A.; Keane, Theo; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in condensed-phase molecular systems is often strongly coupled to intramolecular vibrations that can promote, suppress and direct electronic processes. Recent experiments exploring this phenomenon proved that light-induced electron transfer can be strongly modulated by vibrational excitation, suggesting a new avenue for active control over molecular function. Here, we achieve the first example of such explicit vibrational control through judicious design of a Pt(II)-acetylide charge-transfer donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge-donor 'fork' system: asymmetric 13C isotopic labelling of one of the two -C≡C- bridges makes the two parallel and otherwise identical donor→acceptor electron-transfer pathways structurally distinct, enabling independent vibrational perturbation of either. Applying an ultrafast UVpump(excitation)-IRpump(perturbation)-IRprobe(monitoring) pulse sequence, we show that the pathway that is vibrationally perturbed during UV-induced electron transfer is dramatically slowed down compared to its unperturbed counterpart. One can thus choose the dominant electron transfer pathway. The findings deliver a new opportunity for precise perturbative control of electronic energy propagation in molecular devices.

  9. Evolution of complex organic molecules in hot molecular cores. Synthetic spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, R.; Schilke, P.; Stéphan, G.; Bergin, E.; Möller, T.; Schmiedeke, A.; Zernickel, A.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Hot molecular cores (HMCs) are intermediate stages of high-mass star formation and are also known for their rich chemical reservoirs and emission line spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands. Complex organic molecules (COMs) such as methanol (CH3OH), ethanol (C2H5OH), dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3), and methyl formate (HCOOCH3) produce most of these observed lines. The observed spectral feature of HMCs such as total number of emission lines and associated line intensities are also found to vary with evolutionary stages. Aims: We aim to investigate the spectral evolution of these COMs to explore the initial evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation including HMCs. Methods: We developed various 3D models for HMCs guided by the evolutionary scenarios proposed by recent empirical and modeling studies. We then investigated the spatio-temporal variation of temperature and molecular abundances in HMCs by consistently coupling gas-grain chemical evolution with radiative transfer calculations. We explored the effects of varying physical conditions on molecular abundances including density distribution and luminosity evolution of the central protostar(s) among other parameters. Finally, we simulated the synthetic spectra for these models at different evolutionary timescales to compare with observations. Results: Temperature has a profound effect on the formation of COMs through the depletion and diffusion on grain surface to desorption and further gas-phase processing. The time-dependent temperature structure of the hot core models provides a realistic framework for investigating the spatial variation of ice mantle evaporation as a function of evolutionary timescales. We find that a slightly higher value (15 K) than the canonical dark cloud temperature (10 K) provides a more productive environment for COM formation on grain surface. With increasing protostellar luminosity, the water ice evaporation font (~100 K) expands and the spatial distribution of gas phase abundances of

  10. Simulation of the energy spectra of original versus recombined H2+ molecular ions transmitted through thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.; Garcia-Molina, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    This work presents the results of computer simulations for the energy spectra of original versus recombined H 2 + molecular ions transmitted through thin amorphous carbon foils, for a broad range of incident energies. A detailed description of the projectile motion through the target has been done, including nuclear scattering and Coulomb repulsion as well as electronic self-retarding and wake forces; the two latter are calculated in the dielectric formalism framework. Differences in the energy spectra of recombined and original transmitted H 2 + molecular ions clearly appear in the simulations, in agreement with the available experimental data. Our simulation code also differentiates the contributions due to original and to recombined H 2 + molecular ions when the energy spectra contain both contributions, a feature that could be used for experimental purposes in estimating the ratio between the number of original and recombined H 2 + molecular ions transmitted through thin foils

  11. Simulations of the dissociation of small helium clusters with ab initio molecular dynamics in electronically excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closser, Kristina D.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics resulting from electronic excitations of helium clusters were explored using ab initio molecular dynamics. The simulations were performed with configuration interaction singles and adiabatic classical dynamics coupled to a state-following algorithm. 100 different configurations of He 7 were excited into the 2s and 2p manifold for a total of 2800 trajectories. While the most common outcome (90%) was complete fragmentation to 6 ground state atoms and 1 excited state atom, 3% of trajectories yielded bound, He 2 * , and <0.5% yielded an excited helium trimer. The nature of the dynamics, kinetic energy release, and connections to experiments are discussed

  12. Theory of Excitation Transfer between Two-Dimensional Semiconductor and Molecular Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Judith F.; Verdenhalven, Eike; Bieniek, Björn; Rinke, Patrick; Knorr, Andreas; Richter, Marten

    2018-04-01

    The geometry-dependent energy transfer rate from an electrically pumped inorganic semiconductor quantum well into an organic molecular layer is studied theoretically. We focus on Förster-type nonradiative excitation transfer between the organic and inorganic layers and include quasimomentum conservation and intermolecular coupling between the molecules in the organic film. (Transition) partial charges calculated from density-functional theory are used to calculate the coupling elements. The partial charges describe the spatial charge distribution and go beyond the common dipole-dipole interaction. We find that the transfer rates are highly sensitive to variations in the geometry of the hybrid inorganic-organic system. For instance, the transfer efficiency is improved by up to 2 orders of magnitude by tuning the spatial arrangement of the molecules on the surface: Parameters of importance are the molecular packing density along the effective molecular dipole axis and the distance between the molecules and the surface. We also observe that the device performance strongly depends on the orientation of the molecular dipole moments relative to the substrate dipole moments determined by the inorganic crystal structure. Moreover, the operating regime is identified where inscattering dominates over unwanted backscattering from the molecular layer into the substrate.

  13. Mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the hydroxyl stretch in methanol/carbon-tetrachloride mixtures II: excited state hydrogen bonding structure and dynamics, infrared emission spectrum, and excited state lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2012-03-08

    We present a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics of a vibrationally excited hydroxyl stretch in methanol/carbon-tetrachloride mixtures. The adiabatic Hamiltonian of the quantum-mechanical hydroxyl is diagonalized on-the-fly to obtain the ground and first-excited adiabatic energy levels and wave functions which depend parametrically on the instantaneous configuration of the classical degrees of freedom. The dynamics of the classical degrees of freedom are determined by Hellmann-Feynman forces obtained by taking the expectation value of the force with respect to the ground or excited vibrational wave functions. Polarizable force fields are used which were previously shown to reproduce the experimental infrared absorption spectrum rather well, for different isotopomers and over a wide composition range [Kwac, K.; Geva, E. J. Phys. Chem. B 2011, 115, 9184]. We show that the agreement of the absorption spectra with experiment can be further improved by accounting for the dependence of the dipole moment derivatives on the configuration of the classical degrees of freedom. We find that the propensity of a methanol molecule to form hydrogen bonds increases upon photoexcitation of its hydroxyl stretch, thereby leading to a sizable red-shift of the corresponding emission spectrum relative to the absorption spectrum. Treating the relaxation from the first excited to the ground state as a nonadiabatic process, and calculating its rate within the framework of Fermi's golden rule and the harmonic-Schofield quantum correction factor, we were able to predict a lifetime which is of the same order of magnitude as the experimental value. The experimental dependence of the lifetime on the transition frequency is also reproduced. Nonlinear mapping relations between the hydroxyl transition frequency and bond length in the excited state and the electric field along the hydroxyl bond axis are established. These mapping relations

  14. Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment of laser dyes C504T and C521T using solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraja, Jana; Suresh Kumar, H M; Inamdar, S R; Wari, M N

    2016-02-05

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of laser dyes: coumarin 504T (C504T) and coumarin 521T (C521T) have been recorded at room temperature in a series of non-polar and polar solvents. The spectra of these dyes showed bathochromic shift with increasing in solvent polarity indicating the involvement of π→π⁎ transition. Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent parameters were used to analyze the effect of solvents on C504T and C521T molecules. The study reveals that both general solute-solvent interactions and specific interactions are operative in these two systems. The ground state dipole moment was estimated using Guggenheim's method and also by quantum mechanical calculations. The solvatochromic data were used to determine the excited state dipole moment (μ(e)). It is observed that dipole moment value of excited state (μ(e)) is higher than that of the ground state in both the laser dyes indicating that these dyes are more polar in nature in the excited state than in the ground state. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Excited state mass spectra of doubly heavy baryons Ω{sub cc}, Ω{sub bb} and Ω{sub bc}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Zalak; Rai, Ajay Kumar [Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Surat, Gujarat (India); Thakkar, Kaushal [GIDC Degree Engineering college, Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Abrama, Navsari (India)

    2016-10-15

    We discuss the mass spectrum of Ω baryon with two heavy quarks and one light quark (ccs, bbs, and bcs). The main goal of the paper is to calculate the ground state masses and after that, the positive and negative parity excited states masses are also obtained within a hypercentral constituent quark model, using Coulomb plus linear potential framework. We also added a first order correction to the potential. The mass spectra up to 5S for radial excited states and 1P-5P, 1D-4D, and 1F-2F states for orbital excited states are computed for Ω{sub cc}, Ω{sub bb} and Ω{sub bc} baryons. Our obtained results are compared with other theoretical predictions, which could be a useful complementary tool for the interpretation of experimentally unknown heavy baryon spectra. The Regge trajectory is constructed in both the (n{sub r}, M{sup 2}) and the (J, M{sup 2}) planes for Ω{sub cc}, Ω{sub bb} and Ω{sub bc} baryons and their slopes and intercepts are also determined. Magnetic moments of doubly heavy Ω{sup '}s are also calculated. (orig.) 8.

  16. Effect of anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols on chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra in apple fruit: signature analysis, assessment, modelling, and relevance to photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlyak, Mark N; Melø, Thor Bernt; Naqvi, K Razi

    2008-01-01

    Whole apple fruit (Malus domestica Borkh.) widely differing in pigment content and composition has been examined by recording its chlorophyll fluorescence excitation and diffuse reflection spectra in the visible and near UV regions. Spectral bands sensitive to the pigment concentration have been identified, and linear models for non-destructive assessment of anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols via chlorophyll fluorescence measurements are put forward. The adaptation of apple fruit to high light stress involves accumulation of these protective pigments, which absorb solar radiation in broad spectral ranges extending from UV to the green and, in anthocyanin-containing cultivars, to the red regions of the spectrum. In ripening apples the protective effect in the blue region could be attributed to extrathylakoid carotenoids. A simple model, which allows the simulation of chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra in the visible range and a quantitative evaluation of competitive absorption by anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols, is described. Evidence is presented to support the view that anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols play, in fruit with low-to-moderate pigment content, the role of internal traps (insofar as they compete with chlorophylls for the absorption of incident light in specific spectral bands), affecting thereby the shape of the chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum.

  17. Semiconductor color-center structure and excitation spectra: Equation-of-motion coupled-cluster description of vacancy and transition-metal defect photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2018-03-01

    Valence excitation spectra are computed for deep-center silicon-vacancy defects in 3C, 4H, and 6H silicon carbide (SiC), and comparisons are made with literature photoluminescence measurements. Optimizations of nuclear geometries surrounding the defect centers are performed within a Gaussian basis-set framework using many-body perturbation theory or density functional theory (DFT) methods, with computational expenses minimized by a QM/MM technique called SIMOMM. Vertical excitation energies are subsequently obtained by applying excitation-energy, electron-attached, and ionized equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOMCC) methods, where appropriate, as well as time-dependent (TD) DFT, to small models including only a few atoms adjacent to the defect center. We consider the relative quality of various EOMCC and TD-DFT methods for (i) energy-ordering potential ground states differing incrementally in charge and multiplicity, (ii) accurately reproducing experimentally measured photoluminescence peaks, and (iii) energy-ordering defects of different types occurring within a given polytype. The extensibility of this approach to transition-metal defects is also tested by applying it to silicon-substituted chromium defects in SiC and comparing with measurements. It is demonstrated that, when used in conjunction with SIMOMM-optimized geometries, EOMCC-based methods can provide a reliable prediction of the ground-state charge and multiplicity, while also giving a quantitative description of the photoluminescence spectra, accurate to within 0.1 eV of measurement for all cases considered.

  18. Preparation of actinide targets by molecular plating for Coulomb excitation studies at ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular plating is now routinely used to prepare sources and targets of actinide elements. Although the technique is simple and fairly reproducible, because of the radioactive nature of the target it is very useful to record various parameters in the preparation of such targets. At Argonne, ∼200 microg/cm 2 thick targets of Pu and Cm were required for Coulomb Excitation (COULEX) Studies with the Argonne-Notre Dame BGO gamma ray facility and later with the GAMMASPHERE. These targets were plated on 50 mg/cm 2 Au backing and were covered with 150 microg/cm 2 Au foil. Targets of 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 242 Pu, 244 Pu and 248 Cm were prepared by dissolving the material in isopropyl alcohol and electroplating the actinide ions by applying 600 volts. The amount of these materials on the target was determined by alpha particle counting and gamma ray counting. Details of the molecular plating and counting will be discussed

  19. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M.; Regeta, K.; Gorfinkiel, J.D.; Masin, Z.; Grimme, S.; Bannwarth, C.

    2016-01-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: 1) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, 2) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and 3) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds. (authors)

  20. Dielectric relaxation spectra of liquid crystals in relation to molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrobel, S.

    1986-07-01

    The dielectric spectra obtained for some members of two homologous series, i.e. for di-alkoxyazoxybenzenes and penthyl-alkoxythiobenzoates, are discussed qualitatively on the basis of the Nordio-Rigatti-Segre diffusion model. It is additionally assumed that the molecular reorientations take place about the principal axes of the inertia tensor. The distribution of correlation times, which is strongly temperature dependent in the vicinity of the clearing point, is interpreted as being caused by fluctuations of the principal axes frame which are due to conformation changes inside the end chains. The Bauer equation is used to describe both principal molecular reorientations, i.e. the reorientations about the long and short axis, observed in liquid crystalline structure by means of dielectric relaxation methods. The energies and entropies of activation have been computed for both principal reorientations. The differences between the high frequency limit of the dielectric permittivity and the refractive index squared of liquid crystals are explained in terms of two librational motions of the molecules observed by other experimental techniques, viz. far infra-red, Raman and inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopies, and found in this work on the basis of dielectrically measured energy barriers. It has been shown qualitatively that intramolecular libratory motions greatly effect the high frequency dielectric spectrum. Finally, molecular motions in liquid crystals are divided into two types: coherent and incoherent. 127 refs., 56 figs., 17 tabs. (author)

  1. Fluorescent molecular probes based on excited state prototropism in lipid bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-03-01

    Excited state prototropism (ESPT) is observed in molecules having one or more ionizable protons, whose proton transfer efficiency is different in ground and excited states. The interaction of various ESPT molecules like naphthols and intramolecular ESPT (ESIPT) molecules like hydroxyflavones etc. with different microheterogeneous media have been studied in detail and excited state prototropism as a probe concept has been gaining ground. The fluorescence of different prototropic forms of such molecules, on partitioning to an organized medium like lipid bilayer membrane, often show sensitive response to the local environment with respect to the local structure, physical properties and dynamics. Our recent work using 1-naphthol as an ESPT fluorescent molecular probe has shown that the incorporation of monomeric bile salt molecules into lipid bilayer membranes composed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a lung surfactant) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), in solid gel and liquid crystalline phases, induce appreciable wetting of the bilayer up to the hydrocarbon core region, even at very low (fisetin, an ESIPT molecule having antioxidant properties, in lipid bilayer membrane has been sensitively monitored from its intrinsic fluorescence behaviour.

  2. Direct Electron Impact Excitation of Rydberg-Valence States of Molecular Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, C. P.; Johnson, P. V.; Liu, X.; Ajdari, B.; Muleady, S.; Kanik, I.; Khakoo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Collisions between electrons and neutral N2 molecules result in emissions that provide an important diagnostic probe for understanding the ionospheric energy balance and the effects of space weather in upper atmospheres. Also, transitions to singlet ungerade states cause N2 to be a strong absorber of solar radiation in the EUV spectral range where many ro-vibrational levels of these Rydberg-valence (RV) states are predissociative. Thus, their respective excitation and emission cross sections are important parameters for understanding the [N]/[N2] ratio in the thermosphere of nitrogen dominated atmospheres. The following work provides improved constraints on absolute and relative excitation cross sections of numerous RV states of N2, enabling more physically accurate atmospheric modeling. Here, we present recent integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of RV states of N2 [6], which were based on the differential cross sections (DCSs) derived from electron energy-loss (EEL) spectra of [5]. This work resulted in electronic excitation cross sections over the following measured vibrational levels: b 1Πu (v‧=0-14), c3 1Πu (v‧=0-3), o3 1Πu (v‧=0-3), b‧ 1Σu+ (v‧=0-10), c‧4 1Σu+ (v‧=0-3), G 3Πu (v‧=0-3), and F 3Πu (v‧=0-3). We further adjusted the cross sections of the RV states by extending the vibronic contributions to unmeasured v‧-levels via the relative excitation probabilities (REPs) as discussed in [6]. This resulted in REP-scaled ICSs over the following vibrational levels for the singlet ungerade states: b(0-19), c3(0-4), o3(0-4), b‧(0-16), and c‧4(0-8). Comparison of the ICSs of [6] with available EEL based measurements, theoretical calculations, and emission based work generally shows good agreement within error estimations, except with the recent reevaluation provided by [1]. Further, we have extended these results, using the recent EEL data of [3], to include the unfolding of better resolved features above ~13

  3. Studies on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and molecular docking analysis of 3-Methyl-1,4-dioxo-1,4-dihydronaphthalen-2-yl 4-aminobenzoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, D. M.; Amalanathan, M.; Hubert Joe, I.; Bena Jothy, V.; Diao, Yun-Peng

    2014-09-01

    The molecular structure, vibrational analysis and molecular docking analysis of the 3-Methyl-1,4-dioxo-1,4-dihydronaphthalen-2-yl 4-aminobenzoate (MDDNAB) molecule have been carried out using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic techniques and DFT method. The equilibrium geometry, harmonic vibrational wave numbers, various bonding features have been computed using density functional method. The calculated molecular geometry has been compared with experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out by using VEDA program. The hyper-conjugative interactions and charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The simulated FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra satisfactorily coincide with the experimental spectra. The PES and charge analysis have been made. The molecular docking was done to identify the binding energy and the Hydrogen bonding with the cancer protein molecule.

  4. A hysteresis phenomenon in NMR spectra of molecular nanomagnets Fe8: a resonant quantum tunneling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Tomoaki; Ueda, Miki; Maegawa, Satoru

    2003-05-01

    A molecular nanomagnet Fe8 with a total spin S=10 in the ground state attracts much attention as a substance which exhibits the quantum tunneling of magnetization below 300 mK. We performed 1H NMR measurements for a single crystal of Fe8 in temperature range between 20 and 800 mK. The spectra below 300 mK strongly depend on the sequence of the applied field and those in the positive and negative fields are not symmetric about zero field, while they are symmetric above 300 mK. We discuss the origin of this hysteresis phenomenon, relating to the initial spin state of molecules, the resonant quantum tunneling and the nuclear spin relaxation process.

  5. A hysteresis phenomenon in NMR spectra of molecular nanomagnets Fe8: a resonant quantum tunneling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Tomoaki; Ueda, Miki; Maegawa, Satoru

    2003-01-01

    A molecular nanomagnet Fe8 with a total spin S=10 in the ground state attracts much attention as a substance which exhibits the quantum tunneling of magnetization below 300 mK. We performed 1 H NMR measurements for a single crystal of Fe8 in temperature range between 20 and 800 mK. The spectra below 300 mK strongly depend on the sequence of the applied field and those in the positive and negative fields are not symmetric about zero field, while they are symmetric above 300 mK. We discuss the origin of this hysteresis phenomenon, relating to the initial spin state of molecules, the resonant quantum tunneling and the nuclear spin relaxation process

  6. Analysis of molecular structure and vibrational spectra of hexadecyl (cetyl) trimethylammonium brode (CTAB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goekce, H.; Bahceli, S.

    2010-01-01

    FT-IR and Raman spectra of CTAB [C 1 6H 3 3N(CH 3 ) 3 ] + Br - have been experimentally recorded in the region 550-4000 cm - 1 and 400-3100 cm - 1, respectively. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of CTAB in the ground state have been calculated by using ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) methods with the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set. The obtained optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) and vibrational frequencies were in very good agreement with the experimental data. The comparisons of the observed fundamental vibrational frequencies and calculated results for the fundamental vibrational frequencies of CTAB shows that the scaled B3LYP method is superior compared to the scaled HF method.

  7. Spectroscopic study on deuterated benzenes. I. Microwave spectra and molecular structure in the ground state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunishige, Sachi; Katori, Toshiharu; Baba, Masaaki, E-mail: baba@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nakajima, Masakazu; Endo, Yasuki [Department of Basic Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    We observed microwave absorption spectra of some deuterated benzenes and accurately determined the rotational constants of all H/D isotopomers in the ground vibrational state. Using synthetic analysis assuming that all bond angles are 120°, the mean bond lengths were obtained to be r{sub 0}(C–C) = 1.3971 Å and r{sub 0}(C–H) = r{sub 0}(C–D) = 1.0805 Å. It has been concluded that the effect of deuterium substitution on the molecular structure is negligibly small and that the mean bond lengths of C–H and C–D are identical unlike small aliphatic hydrocarbons, in which r{sub 0}(C–D) is about 5 mÅ shorter than r{sub 0}(C–H). It is considered that anharmonicity is very small in the C–H stretching vibration of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  8. Communications: On artificial frequency shifts in infrared spectra obtained from centroid molecular dynamics: Quantum liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Sergei D.; Witt, Alexander; Shiga, Motoyuki; Marx, Dominik

    2010-01-01

    Centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) is a popular method to extract approximate quantum dynamics from path integral simulations. Very recently we have shown that CMD gas phase infrared spectra exhibit significant artificial redshifts of stretching peaks, due to the so-called "curvature problem" imprinted by the effective centroid potential. Here we provide evidence that for condensed phases, and in particular for liquid water, CMD produces pronounced artificial redshifts for high-frequency vibrations such as the OH stretching band. This peculiar behavior intrinsic to the CMD method explains part of the unexpectedly large quantum redshifts of the stretching band of liquid water compared to classical frequencies, which is improved after applying a simple and rough "harmonic curvature correction."

  9. kspectrum: an open-source code for high-resolution molecular absorption spectra production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymet, V.; Coustet, C.; Piaud, B.

    2016-01-01

    We present the kspectrum, scientific code that produces high-resolution synthetic absorption spectra from public molecular transition parameters databases. This code was originally required by the atmospheric and astrophysics communities, and its evolution is now driven by new scientific projects among the user community. Since it was designed without any optimization that would be specific to any particular application field, its use could also be extended to other domains. kspectrum produces spectral data that can subsequently be used either for high-resolution radiative transfer simulations, or for producing statistic spectral model parameters using additional tools. This is a open project that aims at providing an up-to-date tool that takes advantage of modern computational hardware and recent parallelization libraries. It is currently provided by Méso-Star (http://www.meso-star.com) under the CeCILL license, and benefits from regular updates and improvements. (paper)

  10. Sharp Absorption Peaks in THz Spectra Valuable for Crystal Quality Evaluation of Middle Molecular Weight Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Otsuka, Makoto

    2018-05-01

    Middle molecular weight (MMW) pharmaceuticals (MW 400 4000) are attracting attention for their possible use in new medications. Sharp absorption peaks were observed in MMW pharmaceuticals at low temperatures by measuring with a high-resolution terahertz (THz) spectrometer. As examples, high-resolution THz spectra for amoxicillin trihydrate, atorvastatin calcium trihydrate, probucol, and α,β,γ,δ-tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)porphyrin p-toluenesulfonate (TMPyP) were obtained at 10 K. Typically observed as peaks with full width at half-height (FWHM) values as low as 5.639 GHz at 0.96492 THz in amoxicillin trihydrate and 8.857 GHz at 1.07974 THz for probucol, many sharp peaks of MMW pharmaceuticals could be observed. Such narrow absorption peaks enable evaluation of the crystal quality of MMW pharmaceuticals and afford sensitive detection of impurities.

  11. Orbital momentum profiles and binding energy spectra for the complete valence shell of molecular fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Y.; Brion, C.E.; Brunger, M.J.; Zhao, K.; Grisogono, A.M.; Braidwood, S.; Weigold, E.; Chakravorty, S.J.; Davidson, E.R.; Sgamellotti, A.; von Niessen, W.

    1996-01-01

    The first electronic structural study of the complete valence shell binding energy spectrum of molecular fluorine, encompassing both the outer and inner valence regions, is reported. These binding energy spectra as well as the individual orbital momentum profiles have been measured using an energy dispersive multichannel electron momentum spectrometer at a total energy of 1500 eV, with an energy resolution of 1.5 eV and a momentum resolution of 0.1 a.u. The measured binding energy spectra in the energy range of 14-60 eV are compared with the results of ADC(4) many-body Green's function and also direct-Configuration Interaction (CI) and MRSD-CI calculations. The experimental orbital electron momentum profiles are compared with SCF theoretical profiles calculated using the target Hartree-Fock approximation with a range of basis sets and with Density Functional Theory predictions in the target Kohn-Sham approximation with non-local potentials. The truncated (aug-cc-pv5z) Dunning basis sets were used for the Density Functional Theory calculations which also include some treatment of correlation via the exchange and correlation potentials. Comparisons are also made with the full ion-neutral overlap amplitude calculated with MRSD-CI wave functions. Large, saturated basis sets (199-GTO) were employed for both the high level SCF near Hartree-Fock limit and MRSD-CI calculations to investigate the effects of electron correlation and relaxation. 66 refs., 9 tabs., 9 figs

  12. Realisation and crossed molecular beams study of H2/O chemical reactions at several excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, Jacqueline

    1986-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the reactive collision O + H 2 OH + H in a crossed beam experiment. This process including several channels taken a part in the chemistry of the upper atmosphere as well as in the combustion of hydrogen. According to the electronic or vibrational state of the reactants, the OH radical is produced in its ground electronic state OH (X 2 π) or in its first excited state OH (A 2 Σ + ). When the reactants are in their ground state, the reaction is endothermic in the conditions of the experiment (center of mass kinetic energy ≅ 0.12 eV). The following reactions have been obtained: O( 1 D) +H 2 (v=O) → OH (X 2 π) +H( 2 S) and O( 1 D) +H 2 (v≥5) → OH (A 2 Σ + ) +H( 2 S). The atomic oxygen is produced in its excited state O( 1 D) in a radio-frequency discharge which dissociates the molecular oxygen seeded in a carrier gas (He or Ar) and the hydrogen molecules are excited vibrationally by electron bombardment. The first reaction is studied by time-of-flight measurements. In this way, it has been possible to observe the different vibrational levels on which the OH radical is produced. The analysis of this vibrational distribution shows the competition between the abstraction and insertion-dissociation mechanisms. In the second reaction, the analysis of the spontaneous fluorescence of OH (A 2 Σ + ) reveals a very hot and non-Boltzmann rotational excitation. (author) [fr

  13. Electronic Raman scattering with excitation between localized states observed in the zinc M{sub 2,3} soft x-ray spectra of ZnS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, L.; Callcott, T.A.; Jia, J.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Zn M{sub 2,3} soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectra of ZnS and ZnS{sub .5}Se{sub .5} excited near threshold show strong inelastic scattering effects that can be explained using a simple model and an inelastic scattering theory based on second order perturbation theory. This scattering is often called electronic resonance Raman scattering. Tulkki and Aberg have developed this theory in detail for atomic systems, but their treatment can be applied to solid systems by utilizing electronic states characteristic of solids rather than of atomic systems.

  14. Classical electron ionization mass spectra in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Alexander; Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2008-09-01

    A major benefit of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with a supersonic molecular beam (SMB) interface and its fly-through ion source is the ability to obtain electron ionization of vibrationally cold molecules (cold EI), which show enhanced molecular ions. However, GC/MS with an SMB also has the flexibility to perform 'classical EI' mode of operation which provides mass spectra to mimic those in commercial 70 eV electron ionization MS libraries. Classical EI in SMB is obtained through simple reduction of the helium make-up gas flow rate, which reduces the SMB cooling efficiency; hence the vibrational temperatures of the molecules are similar to those in traditional EI ion sources. In classical EI-SMB mode, the relative abundance of the molecular ion can be tuned and, as a result, excellent identification probabilities and very good matching factors to the NIST MS library are obtained. Classical EI-SMB with the fly-through dual cage ion source has analyte sensitivity similar to that of the standard EI ion source of a basic GC/MS system. The fly-through EI ion source in combination with the SMB interface can serve for cold EI, classical EI-SMB, and cluster chemical ionization (CCI) modes of operation, all easily exchangeable through a simple and quick change (not involving hardware). Furthermore, the fly-through ion source eliminates sample scattering from the walls of the ion source, and thus it offers full sample inertness, tailing-free operation, and no ion-molecule reaction interferences. It is also robust and enables increased column flow rate capability without affecting the sensitivity.

  15. Exceptionally slow rise in differential reflectivity spectra of excitons in GaN: effect of excitation-induced dephasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanton, C.J.; Kenrow, J.; El Sayed, K.; Jho, Y.D.; Kim, D.S.; Song, J.J.; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Femtosecond differential reflectivity spectroscopy (DRS) and four-wave mixing (FWM) experiments were performed simultaneously to study the initial temporal dynamics of the exciton line-shapes in GaN epilayers. Beats between the A-B excitons were found only for positive time delay in both DRS and FWM experiments. The rise time at negative time delay for the DRS was much slower than the FWM signal or differential transmission spectroscopy at the exciton resonance. A numerical solution of a six band semiconductor Bloch equation model including nonlinearities at the Hartree-Fock level shows that this slow rise in the DRS results from excitation induced dephasing, that is, the strong density dependence of the dephasing time which changes with the laser excitation energy.

  16. HIGHLY EXCITED H2 IN HERBIG–HARO 7: FORMATION PUMPING IN SHOCKED MOLECULAR GAS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, R. E.; Geballe, T. R.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained K -band spectra at R ∼ 5000 and an angular resolution of 0.″3 of a section of the Herbig–Haro 7 (HH7) bow shock, using the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph at Gemini North. Present in the portion of the data cube corresponding to the brightest part of the bow shock are emission lines of H 2 with upper state energies ranging from ∼6000 K to the dissociation energy of H 2 , ∼50,000 K. Because of low signal-to-noise ratios, the highest excitation lines cannot be easily seen elsewhere in the observed region. However, excitation temperatures, measured throughout much of the observed region using lines from levels as high as 25,000 K, are a strong function of upper level energy, indicating that the very highest levels are populated throughout. The level populations in the brightest region are well fit by a two-temperature model, with 98.5% of the emitting gas at T = 1800 K and 1.5% at T = 5200 K. The bulk of the H 2 line emission in HH7, from the 1800 K gas, has previously been well-modeled by a continuous shock, but the 5200 K cozmponent is inconsistent with standalone standard continuous shock models. We discuss various possible origins for the hot component and suggest that this component is H 2 newly reformed on dust grains and then ejected from them, presumably following dissociation of some of the H 2 by the shock.

  17. The doping sites in Eu2+-doped AIBIIPO4 phosphors and their consequence on the photoluminescence excitation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, M.; Boutinaud, P.

    2018-02-01

    The energy corresponding to the excitation edge in Eu2+-doped phosphate phosphors of the type AIBIIPO4 (AI = monovalent cation, BII = divalent cation) is calculated from the knowledge of two crystal-structure-related factors he(X(i)) and Fc(X(i)) which are connected respectively to the crystal field splitting (CFS) and the centroid energy (Ec) of the excited 4f65d1 electron configuration of Eu2+. The calculation is carried out for each cation site X(i) available for Eu2+ in 25 different compositions of AIBIIPO4 including NaZnPO4-Eu2+ for which the luminescence is firstly reported. Our results indicate (1) that is it possible to identify the nature of the cation site that contributes to the excitation edge of Eu2+ in AIBIIPO4 within an accuracy of±1000 cm-1 and (2) that the method can be used as a tool for the predictive design of AIBIIPO4 - Eu2+ phosphors applicable in solid state LED-based lighting.

  18. Comparative analysis of the vibrational structure of the absorption spectra of acrolein in the excited ( S 1) electronic state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, L. A.; Tyulin, V. I.; Matveev, V. K.; Pentin, Yu. A.

    2012-04-01

    The assignments of absorption bands of the vibrational structure of the UV spectrum are compared with the assignments of bands obtained by the CRDS method in a supersonic jet from the time of laser radiation damping for the trans isomer of acrolein in the excited ( S 1) electronic state. The ν00 trans = 25861 cm-1 values and fundamental frequencies, including torsional vibration frequency, obtained by the two methods were found to coincide in the excited electronic state ( S 1) for this isomer. The assignments of several absorption bands of the vibrational structure of the spectrum obtained by the CRDS method were changed. Changes in the assignment of (0-v') transition bands of the torsional vibration of the trans isomer in the Deslandres table from the ν00 trans trans origin allowed the table to be extended to high quantum numbers v'. The torsional vibration frequencies up to v' = 5 were found to be close to the frequencies found by analyzing the vibrational structure of the UV spectrum and calculated quantum-mechanically. The coincidence of the barrier to internal rotation (the cis-trans transition) in the one-dimensional model with that calculated quantum-mechanically using the two-dimensional model corresponds to a planar structure of the acrolein molecule in the excited ( S 1) electronic state.

  19. Orbital momentum profiles and binding energy spectra for the complete valence shell of molecular fluorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y.; Brion, C.E. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Brunger, M.J.; Zhao, K.; Grisogono, A.M.; Braidwood, S.; Weigold, E. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Electronic Structure of Materials Centre; Chakravorty, S.J.; Davidson, E.R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Sgamellotti, A. [Univ di Perugia (Italy). Dipartimento di Chimica; von Niessen, W. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst fuer Physikalische

    1996-01-01

    The first electronic structural study of the complete valence shell binding energy spectrum of molecular fluorine, encompassing both the outer and inner valence regions, is reported. These binding energy spectra as well as the individual orbital momentum profiles have been measured using an energy dispersive multichannel electron momentum spectrometer at a total energy of 1500 eV, with an energy resolution of 1.5 eV and a momentum resolution of 0.1 a.u. The measured binding energy spectra in the energy range of 14-60 eV are compared with the results of ADC(4) many-body Green`s function and also direct-Configuration Interaction (CI) and MRSD-CI calculations. The experimental orbital electron momentum profiles are compared with SCF theoretical profiles calculated using the target Hartree-Fock approximation with a range of basis sets and with Density Functional Theory predictions in the target Kohn-Sham approximation with non-local potentials. The truncated (aug-cc-pv5z) Dunning basis sets were used for the Density Functional Theory calculations which also include some treatment of correlation via the exchange and correlation potentials. Comparisons are also made with the full ion-neutral overlap amplitude calculated with MRSD-CI wave functions. Large, saturated basis sets (199-GTO) were employed for both the high level SCF near Hartree-Fock limit and MRSD-CI calculations to investigate the effects of electron correlation and relaxation. 66 refs., 9 tabs., 9 figs.

  20. Cold excitation and determination of hydrogen sulfide by dielectric barrier discharge molecular emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongchen; Jiang, Jie; Li, Na

    2015-11-01

    A low-temperature microplasma generated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was used as a radiation source for the excitation of hydrogen sulfide and its determination by molecular emission spectrometry (MES). The excitation/emission chamber was enclosed to eliminate spectral interference from ambient air. The spectral emission lines of hydrogen sulfide were clearly discriminated from the background spectrum, and the emission line at 365.06 nm was selected for parameter optimization and quantitative analysis. The S(2-) ions in aqueous samples were reacted with acid to generate hydrogen sulfide and then determined. The experimental parameters affecting the determination of hydrogen sulfide and S(2-) were optimized. The limits of detection were 1.4 mg m(-3) for H2S and 11.2 mg L(-1) for S(2-). The repeatability of the method was satisfactory, as the RSD values were 2.3% for H2S and 1.8% for S(2-). The enclosed DBD-MES system was demonstrated to be a useful tool for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in gas samples and S(2-) in aqueous samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Design considerations for highly effective fluorescence excitation and detection optical systems for molecular diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Axel; Van Hille, Herbert; Kuk, Sola

    2018-02-01

    Modern instruments for molecular diagnostics are continuously optimized for diagnostic accuracy, versatility and throughput. The latest progress in LED technology together with tailored optics solutions allows developing highly efficient photonics engines perfectly adapted to the sample under test. Super-bright chip-on-board LED light sources are a key component for such instruments providing maximum luminous intensities in a multitude of narrow spectral bands. In particular the combination of white LEDs with other narrow band LEDs allows achieving optimum efficiency outperforming traditional Xenon light sources in terms of energy consumption, heat dissipation in the system, and switching time between spectral channels. Maximum sensitivity of the diagnostic system can only be achieved with an optimized optics system for the illumination and imaging of the sample. The illumination beam path must be designed for optimum homogeneity across the field while precisely limiting the angular distribution of the excitation light. This is a necessity for avoiding spill-over to the detection beam path and guaranteeing the efficiency of the spectral filtering. The imaging optics must combine high spatial resolution, high light collection efficiency and optimized suppression of excitation light for good signal-to-noise ratio. In order to achieve minimum cross-talk between individual wells in the sample, the optics design must also consider the generation of stray light and the formation of ghost images. We discuss what parameters and limitations have to be considered in an integrated system design approach covering the full path from the light source to the detector.

  2. Neutron spectra and cross sections for ice and clathrate generated from the synthetic spectrum and synthetic model for molecular solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petriw, S; Cantargi, F; Granada, R

    2006-01-01

    We present here a Synthetic Model for Molecular Solids, aimed at the description of the interaction of thermal neutrons with this kind of systems.Simple representations of the molecular dynamical modes are used, in order to produce a fair description of neutron scattering kernels and cross sections with a minimum set of input data. Using those spectra, we have generated thermal libraries for M C N P [es

  3. ExoMol molecular line lists - XXIII. Spectra of PO and PS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapat, Laxmi; Jagoda, Pawel; Lodi, Lorenzo; Gorman, Maire N.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-12-01

    Comprehensive line lists for phosphorus monoxide (31P16O) and phosphorus monosulphide (31P32S) in their X 2Π electronic ground state are presented. The line lists are based on new ab initio potential energy (PEC), spin-orbit (SOC) and dipole moment (DMC) curves computed using the MRCI+Q-r method with aug-cc-pwCV5Z and aug-cc-pV5Z basis sets. The nuclear motion equations (i.e. the rovibronic Schrödinger equations for each molecule) are solved using the program DUO. The PECs and SOCs are refined in least-squares fits to available experimental data. Partition functions, Q(T), are computed up to T = 5000 K, the range of validity of the line lists. These line lists are the most comprehensive available for either molecule. The characteristically sharp peak of the Q-branches from the spin-orbit split components gives useful diagnostics for both PO and PS in spectra at infrared wavelengths. These line lists should prove useful for analysing observations and setting up models of environments such as brown dwarfs, low-mass stars, O-rich circumstellar regions and potentially for exoplanetary retrievals. Since PS is yet to be detected in space, the role of the two lowest excited electronic states (a 4Π and B 2Π) are also considered. An approximate line list for the PS X-B electronic transition, which predicts a number of sharp vibrational bands in the near ultraviolet, is also presented. The line lists are available from the CDS (http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr) and ExoMol (www.exomol.com) data bases.

  4. Lowest excited states and optical absorption spectra of donor–acceptor copolymers for organic photovoltaics: a new picture emerging from tuned long-range corrected density functionals

    KAUST Repository

    Pandey, Laxman; Doiron, Curtis; Sears, John S.; Bré das, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Polymers with low optical gaps are of importance to the organic photovoltaics community due to their potential for harnessing a large portion of the solar energy spectrum. The combination along their backbones of electron-rich and electron-deficient fragments contributes to the presence of low-lying excited states that are expected to display significant charge-transfer character. While conventional hybrid functionals are known to provide unsatisfactory results for charge-transfer excitations at the time-dependent DFT level, long-range corrected (LRC) functionals have been reported to give improved descriptions in a number of systems. Here, we use such LRC functionals, considering both tuned and default range-separation parameters, to characterize the absorption spectra of low-optical-gap systems of interest. Our results indicate that tuned LRC functionals lead to simulated optical-absorption properties in good agreement with experimental data. Importantly, the lowest-lying excited states (excitons) are shown to present a much more localized nature than initially anticipated. © 2012 the Owner Societies.

  5. Asymptotic behaviour of optimal fraction-rational series of the perturbation theory at description of molecular rotational spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenin, A.V.

    1994-01-01

    A possibility is shown of substantial expansion of the choice of asymptotic behaviour of optimal fraction-rational series of the perturbation theory on description of molecular rotational spectra. The expansion permits to hope for substantial improvement of results of using the conception of effective rotational hamiltonian in a fraction-rational form on the description of highly perturbed vibrational states

  6. Breakup excitation function at backward angles from α-spectra in the 6Li + 144Sm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capurro, O.A.; Pacheco, A.J.; Arazi, A.; Figueira, J.M.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Negri, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Breakup cross sections were obtained for the 6 Li + 144 Sm system at energies above and below the Coulomb barrier from a detailed analysis of the data recorded at backward angles. These cross sections are compared with inelastic target excitations previously reported revealing a similar behavior as a function of the bombarding energy but a large absolute difference between them. Using kinematical considerations we have analyzed possible contributions from different breakup channels and we have extracted information on magnitudes such as the relative kinetic energies of the corresponding breakup fragments.

  7. Particle unstable excited states in /sup 9/Be influence of beta recoil and width on delayed particle spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Nyman, G H; Jonson, B; Kratz, K L; Larsson, P O; Mattsson, S; Ziegert, W

    1981-01-01

    The light nucleus /sup 9/Be has been studied through the emission of beta-delayed neutrons and alpha particles from /sup 9/Li. The activity is produced at the ISOLDE facility in fragmentation reactions induced either by 600 MeV proton or 910 MeV /sup 3/He beams from the CERN Synchro-cyclotron. After mass separation neutron spectra are recorded using /sup 3/He-filled proportional counters, while surface barrier detectors are used for the spectroscopy of alpha particles. Effects on the spectrum shape induced by recoil and polarization phenomena as well as large widths of the intermediate states are discussed. (14 refs).

  8. Microwave measurements of the spectra and molecular structure for phthalic anhydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Sun, Ming; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2014-05-01

    The microwave rotational spectrum for phthalic anhydride (PhA) has been measured in the 4-14 GHz microwave region using a pulsed-beam Fourier transform (PBFT) Flygare-Balle type microwave spectrometer. Initially, the molecular structure was calculated using Gaussian 09 suite with mp2/6-311++G** basis and the calculations were used in predicting spectra for the measured isotopologues. The experimental rotational transition frequencies were measured and used to calculate the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. The rotational constants for the normal isotopologue, four unique 13C substituted isotopologues and two 18O isotologues, were used in a least squares fit to determine nearly all structural parameters for this molecule. Since no substitutions were made at hydrogen sites, the calculated positions of the hydrogen atoms relative to the bonded carbon atoms were used in the structure determination. The rotational constants for the parent isotopologue were determined to be A = 1801.7622(9) MHz, B = 1191.71816(26) MHz, C = 717.44614(28) MHz. Small values for the centrifugal distortion constants were obtained; DJ = 0.0127 kHz, DJK = 0.0652 kHz, and DK = -0.099 kHz, indicating a fairly rigid structure. The structure of PhA is planar with a negative inertial defect of Δ = -0.154 amu Å2. Structural parameters from the mp2 and DFT calculations are in quite good agreement with measured parameters.

  9. Molecular structure, vibrational spectra and photochemistry of 5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Zavaglia, A.; Reva, I. D.; Frija, L.; Cristiano, M. L.; Fausto, R.

    2006-04-01

    In this work, 5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole was studied by low temperature matrix-isolation and solid-state infrared spectroscopy, DFT(B3LYP)/6-311++G(d,p) calculations and photochemical methods. In the low temperature neat solid phase and isolated in an argon matrix, the compound was found to exist in the 1-methyl-1,4-dihydro-5 H-tetrazole-5-thione tautomeric form. The infrared spectra of the compound were fully assigned and correlated with structural properties. In situ UV-irradiation ( λ>235 nm) of the matrix-isolated monomer is shown to induce different photochemical processes, all of them involving cleavage of the tetrazole ring: e.g. (1) molecular nitrogen expulsion, with production of 1-methyl-1 H-diazirene-3-thiol, which is produced in two different conformers; (2) ring cleavage leading to production of methyl isothiocyanate and azide; (3) simultaneous elimination of nitrogen and sulphur with production of N-methylcarbodiimide. Following these photoprocesses, subsequent reactions occur, leading to production of methyl diazene, carbon monosulphide and nitrogen hydride. Spectroscopic evidence of the production of the above-mentioned chemical species is provided.

  10. Preparation of actinide targets by molecular plating for coulomb excitation studies at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, J P; Ahmad, I

    1999-01-01

    Molecular plating is now routinely used to prepare sources and targets of actinide elements. Although the technique is simple and fairly reproducible, because of the radioactive nature of the targets, it is very useful to record various parameters in the preparation process. At Argonne, approx 200 mu g/cm sup 2 thick targets of Pu and Cm were required for Coulomb Excitation (COULEX) studies with the Argonne-Notre Dame boron germanate (BGO) gamma-ray facility and later with the GAMMASPHERE. These targets were plated on 50 mg/cm sup 2 Au backings and were covered with 150 mu g/cm sup 2 Au foil. Targets of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 0 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 2 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 4 Pu and sup 2 sup 4 sup 8 Cm were prepared by dissolving the material in isopropyl alcohol and electroplating the actinide ions by applying 600 V. The amount of these materials on the target was determined by alpha particle counting and gamma-ray counting. Details of the molecular plating and counting will be discussed.

  11. Spin excitations in 3D molecular magnets probed by neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bordallo, H N; Chapon, L C; Manson, J L; Cook, J C; Lee, S H; Copley, J R D; Yildirim, T; Kern, S

    2002-01-01

    The emerging field of molecular magnetism constitutes a new branch of materials science that deals with the magnetic properties of molecules, or assemblies of molecules, that contain magnetic centers. The growing interest in understanding the origin of the magnetic ordering in these materials is to obtain novel multiproperty molecular magnetic materials with high transition temperatures. Molecules based on the dicyanamide ion [N ident to C-N-C ident to N], abbreviated (dca), such as M(dca) sub 2 [M=Mn, Ni], have shown interesting bulk properties that prompted our inelastic neutron scattering (INS) studies. While the Mn sup 2 sup + ion is isotropic because of its L=0 configuration, the isostructural Ni analog has S=1 and demonstrates marked single-ion anisotropy. Mn(dca) sub 2 is a canted antiferromagnet below 16 K, while Ni(dca) sub 2 is a ferromagnet below 21 K. INS has been used to investigate the magnetic excitations in Mn(dca) sub 2 and Ni(dca) sub 2. For Mn(dca) sub 2 , a Heisenberg model gives good corr...

  12. The effect of nonlocal dielectric response on the surface-enhanced Raman and fluorescence spectra of molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yong; Pei, Huan; Li, Li; Zhu, Yanying

    2018-06-01

    We present a theoretical study on the influence of the nonlocal dielectric response on surface-enhanced resonant Raman scattering (SERRS) and fluorescence (SEF) spectra of a model molecule confined in the center of a Ag nanoparticle (NP) dimer. In the simulations, the nonlocal dielectric response caused by the electron–hole pair generation in Ag NPs was computed with the d-parameter theory, and the scattering spectra of a model molecule representing the commonly used fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G (R6G) were obtained by density-matrix calculations. The influence of the separation between Ag NP dimers on the damping rate and scattering spectra with and without the nonlocal response were systematically analyzed. The results show that the nonlocal dielectric response is very sensitive to the gap distance of the NP dimers, and it undergoes much faster decay with the increase of the separation than the radiative and energy transfer rates. The Raman and fluorescence peaks as simulated with the nonlocal dielectric response are relative weaker than that without the nonlocal effect for smaller NP separations because the extra decay rates of the nonlocal effect could reduce both the population of the excited state and the interband coherence between the ground and excited states. Our result also indicates that the nonlocal effect is more prominent on the SEF process than the SERRS process.

  13. Millimeter-wave and Submillimeter-wave Spectra of Aminoacetonitrile in the Three Lowest Vibrational Excited States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposti, Claudio Degli; Dore, Luca; Melosso, Mattia [Dipartimento di Chimica “Giacomo Ciamician”, Università di Bologna, via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Kobayashi, Kaori [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Fujita, Chiho; Ozeki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: ozeki@env.sci.toho-u.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi, 274-8510 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    It is important to study possible precursors of amino acids such as glycine to enable future searches in interstellar space. Aminoacetonitrile (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CN) is one of the most feasible molecules for this purpose. This molecule was already detected toward Sgr B2(N). Aminoacetonitrile has a few low-lying vibrational excited states, and transitions within these states may be found in space. In this study, the pure-rotational transitions in the three lowest vibrational states in the 80–450 GHz range have been assigned and analyzed. It was found to be very important to include Coriolis coupling between the two lowest vibrational fundamentals, while the third one was unperturbed. The partition function was evaluated considering these new results.

  14. Excitation power dependence of photoluminescence spectra of GaSb type-II quantum dots in GaAs grown by droplet epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawazu, T., E-mail: KAWAZU.Takuya@nims.go.jp; Noda, T.; Sakuma, Y. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Sakaki, H. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    We investigated the excitation power P dependence of photoluminescence (PL) spectra of GaSb type-II quantum dots (QDs) in GaAs grown by droplet epitaxy. We prepared two QD samples annealed at slightly different temperatures (380 {sup o}C and 400 {sup o}C) and carried out PL measurements. The 20 {sup o}C increase of the annealing temperature leads to (1) about 140 and 60 times stronger wetting layer (WL) luminescence at low and high P, (2) about 45% large energy shift of QD luminescence with P, and (3) the different P dependence of the PL intensity ratio between the QD and the WL. These differences of the PL characteristics are explained by the effects of the WL.

  15. Band-head spectra of low-energy single-particle excitations in some well-deformed, odd-mass heavy nuclei within a microscopic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Meng-Hock [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); Duc, Dao Duy [Ton Duc Thang University, Division of Nuclear Physics, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Ton Duc Thang University, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nhan Hao, T.V. [Duy Tan University, Center of Research and Development, Danang (Viet Nam); Hue University, Center for Theoretical and Computational Physics, College of Education, Hue City (Viet Nam); Long, Ha Thuy [Hanoi University of Sciences, Vietnam National University, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Quentin, P. [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); Ton Duc Thang University, Division of Nuclear Physics, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Bonneau, L. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR5797, Gradignan (France)

    2016-01-15

    In four well-deformed heavy odd nuclei, the energies of low-lying rotational band heads have been determined microscopically within a self-consistent Hartree-Fock-plus-BCS approach with blocking. A Skyrme nucleon-nucleon effective interaction has been used together with a seniority force to describe pairing correlations. Only such states which are phenomenologically deemed to be related to single-particle excitations have been considered. The polarization effects, including those associated with the genuine time-reversal symmetry breaking have been fully taken into account within our model assumptions. The calculated spectra are in reasonably good qualitative agreement with available data for the considered odd-neutron nuclei. This is not so much the case for the odd-proton nuclei. A potential explanation for such a difference in behavior is proposed. (orig.)

  16. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  17. Multi-phase Turbulence Density Power Spectra in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingel, N. M.; Lee, Min-Young; Burkhart, Blakesley; Stanimirović, Snežana

    2018-04-01

    We derive two-dimensional spatial power spectra of four distinct interstellar medium tracers, H I, 12CO(J = 1–0), 13CO(J = 1–0), and dust, in the Perseus molecular cloud, covering linear scales ranging from ∼0.1 pc to ∼90 pc. Among the four tracers, we find the steepest slopes of ‑3.23 ± 0.05 and ‑3.22 ± 0.05 for the uncorrected and opacity-corrected H I column density images. This result suggests that the H I in and around Perseus traces a non-gravitating, transonic medium on average, with a negligible effect from opacity. On the other hand, we measure the shallowest slope of ‑2.72 ± 0.12 for the 2MASS dust extinction data and interpret this as the signature of a self-gravitating, supersonic medium. Possible variations in the dust-to-gas ratio likely do not alter our conclusion. Finally, we derive slopes of ‑3.08 ± 0.08 and ‑2.88 ± 0.07 for the 12CO(1–0) and 13CO(1–0) integrated intensity images. Based on theoretical predictions for an optically thick medium, we interpret these slopes of roughly ‑3 as implying that both CO lines are susceptible to the opacity effect. While simple tests for the impact of CO formation and depletion indicate that the measured slopes of 12CO(1–0) and 13CO(1–0) are not likely affected by these chemical effects, our results generally suggest that chemically more complex and/or fully optically thick media may not be a reliable observational tracer for characterizing turbulence.

  18. Magnetic excitation spectra of strongly correlated quasi-one-dimensional systems: Heisenberg versus Hubbard-like behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, A.; Patel, N. D.; Fernandez-Baca, J.; Dagotto, E.; Alvarez, G.

    2016-11-01

    We study the effects of charge degrees of freedom on the spin excitation dynamics in quasi-one-dimensional magnetic materials. Using the density matrix renormalization group method, we calculate the dynamical spin structure factor of the Hubbard model at half electronic filling on a chain and on a ladder geometry, and compare the results with those obtained using the Heisenberg model, where charge degrees of freedom are considered frozen. For both chains and two-leg ladders, we find that the Hubbard model spectrum qualitatively resembles the Heisenberg spectrum—with low-energy peaks resembling spinonic excitations—already at intermediate on-site repulsion as small as U /t ˜2 -3 , although ratios of peak intensities at different momenta continue evolving with increasing U /t converging only slowly to the Heisenberg limit. We discuss the implications of these results for neutron scattering experiments and we propose criteria to establish the values of U /t of quasi-one-dimensional systems described by one-orbital Hubbard models from experimental information.

  19. A coherent modified Redfield theory for excitation energy transfer in molecular aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang-Fu, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Yuan-Chung, E-mail: yuanchung@ntu.edu.tw

    2015-02-02

    Highlights: • A CMRT method for coherent energy transfer in molecular aggregates was developed. • Applicability of the method was verified in two-site systems with various parameters. • CMRT accurately describes population dynamics in the FMO-complex. • The method is accurate in a large parameter space and computationally efficient. - Abstract: Excitation energy transfer (EET) is crucial in photosynthetic light harvesting, and quantum coherence has been recently proven to be a ubiquitous phenomenon in photosynthetic EET. In this work, we derive a coherent modified Redfield theory (CMRT) that generalizes the modified Redfield theory to treat coherence dynamics. We apply the CMRT method to simulate the EET in a dimer system and compare the results with those obtained from numerically exact path integral calculations. The comparison shows that CMRT provides excellent computational efficiency and accuracy within a large EET parameter space. Furthermore, we simulate the EET dynamics in the FMO complex at 77 K using CMRT. The results show pronounced non-Markovian effects and long-lasting coherences in the ultrafast EET, in excellent agreement with calculations using the hierarchy equation of motion approach. In summary, we have successfully developed a simple yet powerful framework for coherent EET dynamics in photosynthetic systems and organic materials.

  20. Computation of diatomic molecular spectra for selected transitions of aluminum monoxide, cyanide, diatomic carbon, and titanium monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parigger, Christian G., E-mail: cparigge@tennessee.edu [The University of Tennessee/University of Tennessee Space Institute, Center for Laser Applications, 411 B.H. Goethert Parkway, Tullahoma, TN 37388-9700 (United States); Woods, Alexander C.; Surmick, David M.; Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Witte, Michael J. [The University of Tennessee/University of Tennessee Space Institute, Center for Laser Applications, 411 B.H. Goethert Parkway, Tullahoma, TN 37388-9700 (United States); Hornkohl, James O. [Hornkohl Consulting, Tullahoma, TN 37388 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Laser ablation studies with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) typically emphasize atomic species yet fingerprints from molecular species can occur subsequently or concurrently. In this work, selected molecular transitions of aluminum monixide (AlO), diatomic carbon (C{sub 2}), cyanide (CN), and titanium monoxide (TiO) are accurately computed. Line strength tables are used to describe the radiative transitions of diatomic molecules primarily in the visible, optical region. Details are elaborated of the computational procedure that allows one to utilize diatomic spectra as a predictive and as a diagnostic tool. In order to create a computed spectrum, the procedure requires information regarding the temperature of the diatomic transitions along with other input such as the spectral resolution. When combined with a fitting algorithm to optimize such parameters, this procedure is used to infer information from an experimentally obtained spectrum. Furthermore, the programs and data files are provided for LIBS investigations that also reveal AlO, C{sub 2}, CN, and TiO diatomic spectra. - Highlights: • We present a program for fitting of molecular spectra. • This includes data base for AlO, C{sub 2}, CN, and TiO. • We discuss the details of the program including fitting. • We show computed examples and reference current work.

  1. Physical Meaning of Virtual Kohn-Sham Orbitals and Orbital Energies: An Ideal Basis for the Description of Molecular Excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, R; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2014-10-14

    In recent years, several benchmark studies on the performance of large sets of functionals in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations of excitation energies have been performed. The tested functionals do not approximate exact Kohn-Sham orbitals and orbital energies closely. We highlight the advantages of (close to) exact Kohn-Sham orbitals and orbital energies for a simple description, very often as just a single orbital-to-orbital transition, of molecular excitations. Benchmark calculations are performed for the statistical average of orbital potentials (SAOP) functional for the potential [J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 1344; 2001, 114, 652], which approximates the true Kohn-Sham potential much better than LDA, GGA, mGGA, and hybrid potentials do. An accurate Kohn-Sham potential does not only perform satisfactorily for calculated vertical excitation energies of both valence and Rydberg transitions but also exhibits appealing properties of the KS orbitals including occupied orbital energies close to ionization energies, virtual-occupied orbital energy gaps very close to excitation energies, realistic shapes of virtual orbitals, leading to straightforward interpretation of most excitations as single orbital transitions. We stress that such advantages are completely lost in time-dependent Hartree-Fock and partly in hybrid approaches. Many excitations and excitation energies calculated with local density, generalized gradient, and hybrid functionals are spurious. There is, with an accurate KS, or even the LDA or GGA potentials, nothing problematic about the "band gap" in molecules: the HOMO-LUMO gap is close to the first excitation energy (the optical gap).

  2. Energetics of the rearrangement of neutral and ionized perfluorocyclopropane to perfluoropropylene. Use of infrared multiphoton dissociation spectra to identify structural isomers of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomse, D.S.; Berman, D.W.; Beauchamp, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy is used to compare the structure of gas-phase C 3 F 6 + ions obtained by electron-impact ionization of two isomeric precursors: perfluoropropylene and perfluorocyclopropane. Photodissociation spectra are obtained by observing the extent of multiphoton dissociation as the CO 2 laser is tuned across the 925 to 1080 cm -1 wavelength range. Ions are formed, stored, and detected with the use of techniques of ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy. Infrared multiphoton excitation is effected by using low-power, continuous-wave laser radiation. The fingerprint spectrum of the molecular ion of perfluorocyclopropane is identical with that obtained from perfluoropropylene, indicating rearrangement of the former to the latter. Photodissociation kinetics indicate that the entire perfluorocyclopropane molecular ion population isomerizes to the more stable perfluoropropylene structure. Thermochemistry of C 3 F 6 and C 3 F 6 + isomers is discussed. Comparisons are made with the analogous C 3 H 6 system. Photoionization mass spectroscopy results yield ΔH/sub f/(c-C 3 F 6 ) = -233.8 kcal/mol. 4 figures

  3. Molecular complex of lumiflavin and 2-aminobenzoic acid: crystal structure, crystal spectra, and solution properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, H S; Ghisla, S; Hanson, L K; Ludwig, M L; Nordman, C E

    1981-08-04

    The molecular complex lumiflavin-2-aminobenzoic acid monohydrate (C13H12N4O2.C7H7NO2.H2O) crystallizes from from aqueous solution as red triclinic prisms. The space group is P1 with cell dimensions a = 9.660 A, b = 14.866 A, c = 7.045 A, alpha = 95.44 degrees , beta = 95.86 degrees, and gamma = 105.66 degrees . The crystal structure was solved by direct methods and refined by block-diagonal least-squares procedures to an R value of 0.050 on the basis of 1338 observed reflections. The structure is composed of stacks of alternating lumiflavin adn un-ionized (neutral) 2-aminobenzoic acid molecules. Two different modes of stacking interaction are observed. In one, 2-aminobenzoic acid overlaps all three of the isoalloxazine rings, at a mean distance of 3.36 A; in the other, 2-aminobenzoic acid interacts distance of 3.36 A; in the other, 2-aminobenzoic acid interacts with the pyrazine and dimethylbenzene moieties, at a distance of 3.42 A. Perpendicular to the stacking direction, the molecules form a continuous sheet. Each flavin is hydrogen bonded via O(2) and NH(3) to two symmetrically related aminobenzoates; the water of crystallization forms three hydrogen bonds, bridging two flavins, via O(4) and N(5), and one aminobenzoic acid. The red color of the crystals results from a charge-transfer transition involving stacked flavin and 2-aminobenzoic acid. The red color of the crystals results from a charge-transfer transition involving stacked flavin and 2-aminobenzoic acid molecules. Measurements of the polarized optical absorption spectra of crystals show that the transition moment direction for the long wavelength absorbance (beyond 530 nm) contains an out-of-plane component which can only arise from a charge-transfer interaction. Since the amino N does not make exceptionally close interactions with isoalloxazine atoms in either stacking mode (minimum interatomic distance 3.52 A), the charge transfer is presumed to involve pi orbitals of the 2-aminobenzoic acid donor.

  4. The workings of a molecular thermometer: the vibrational excitation of carbon tetrachloride by a solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Polly B; Matus, Kira J M; Stratt, Richard M

    2004-09-15

    An intriguing energy-transfer experiment was recently carried out in methanol/carbon tetrachloride solutions. It turned out to be possible to watch vibrational energy accumulating in three of carbon tetrachloride's modes following initial excitation of O-H and C-H stretches in methanol, in effect making those CCl(4) modes "molecular thermometers" reporting on methanol's relaxation. In this paper, we use the example of a CCl(4) molecule dissolved in liquid argon to examine, on a microscopic level, just how this kind of thermal activation occurs in liquid solutions. The fact that even the lowest CCl(4) mode has a relatively high frequency compared to the intermolecular vibrational band of the solvent means that the only solute-solvent dynamics relevant to the vibrational energy transfer will be extraordinarily local, so much so that it is only the force between the instantaneously most prominent Cl and solvent atoms that will significantly contribute to the vibrational friction. We use this observation, within the context of a classical instantaneous-pair Landau-Teller calculation, to show that energy flows into CCl(4) primarily via one component of the nominally degenerate, lowest frequency, E mode and does so fast enough to make CCl(4) an excellent choice for monitoring methanol relaxation. Remarkably, within this theory, the different symmetries and appearances of the different CCl(4) modes have little bearing on how well they take up energy from their surroundings--it is only how high their vibrational frequencies are relative to the solvent intermolecular vibrational band edge that substantially favors one mode over another.

  5. Photoelectron spectra of N2+: Rotational line profiles studied with HeI-excited angle-resolved spectroscopy and with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohrwall, G.; Baltzer, P.; Bozek, J.

    2004-01-01

    We have recorded angle-resolved He I photoelectron spectra of the three outer most valence states in N+2, with high enough resolution to observe rotational line profiles. For the two Sigma states, the X 2 Sigma +g and the B 2 Sigma +u, we found that the rotational branches corresponding to different changes in rotational quantum number can differ dramatically in beta value. The well-known difference in beta value for the nu=0 and nu =1 vibrations of the X 2 Sigma +g state was found to be due to different rotational branching ratios and also different beta values of the rotational branches. For the nu=0-2 vibrations of the A 2 Pi u state, the beta value difference between rotational branches is much less pronounced than in the X and B states. We have also recorded synchrotron-radiation-excited photoelectron spectra of the nu=0 vibrational peaks of the X 2 Sigma +g and B 2 Sigma +u states where rotational line profiles are resolved. The intensities of the rotational branches were studied as function of photon energy, the X state between 23 and 65 eV, and We have recorded angle-resolved He I photoelectron spectra of the three outermost valence states in N+2, with high enough resolution to observe rotational line profiles. For the two Sigma states, the X 2 Sigma +g and the B 2 Sigma +u, we found that the rotational branches corresponding to different changes in rotational quantum number can differ dramatically in beta value. The well-known difference in beta value for the nu=0 and nu=1 vibrations of the X 2 Sigma +g state was found to be due to different rotational branching ratios and also different beta values of the rotational branches. For the nu=0-2 vibrations of the A 2 Pi u state, the beta value difference between rotational branches is much less pronounced than in the X and B states. We have also recorded synchrotron-radiation-excited photoelectron spectra of the nu=0 vibrational peaks of the X 2 Sigma +g and B 2 Sigma +u states where rotational line profiles a

  6. Photoelectron spectra of N2 +: Rotational line profiles studied with He;I endash excited angle-resolved spectroscopy and with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehrwall, G.; Baltzer, P.; Bozek, J.

    1999-01-01

    We have recorded angle-resolved He I photoelectron spectra of the three outermost valence states in N 2 + , with high enough resolution to observe rotational line profiles. For the two Σ states, the X 2 Σ g + and the B 2 Σ u + , we found that the rotational branches corresponding to different changes in rotational quantum number can differ dramatically in β value. The well-known difference in β value for the ν=0 and ν=1 vibrations of the X 2 Σ g + state was found to be due to different rotational branching ratios and also different β values of the rotational branches. For the ν=0 endash 2 vibrations of the A 2 Π u state, the β value difference between rotational branches is much less pronounced than in the X and B states. We have also recorded synchrotron-radiation-excited photoelectron spectra of the ν=0 vibrational peaks of the X 2 Σ g + and B 2 Σ u + states where rotational line profiles are resolved. The intensities of the rotational branches were studied as function of photon energy, the X state between 23 and 65 eV, and the B state between 23 and 45 eV. The results for the X state have recently been presented in a Letter [G. Oehrwall, P. Baltzer, and J. Bozek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 546, 1998]. The rotational branching ratios of the two states have very different behaviors as functions of photon energy. The relative intensities of the rotational branches in the X state change significantly over the studied energy range. The 3σ g →kσ u shape resonance apparently gives rise to a non-Franck-Condon-like behavior for the rotational branching ratio of the X state. In the B state, the rotational branching ratios remain essentially constant over the studied energy range. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  7. Molecular Excitation Energies from Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Employing Random-Phase Approximation Hessians with Exact Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heßelmann, Andreas

    2015-04-14

    Molecular excitation energies have been calculated with time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) using random-phase approximation Hessians augmented with exact exchange contributions in various orders. It has been observed that this approach yields fairly accurate local valence excitations if combined with accurate asymptotically corrected exchange-correlation potentials used in the ground-state Kohn-Sham calculations. The inclusion of long-range particle-particle with hole-hole interactions in the kernel leads to errors of 0.14 eV only for the lowest excitations of a selection of three alkene, three carbonyl, and five azabenzene molecules, thus surpassing the accuracy of a number of common TDDFT and even some wave function correlation methods. In the case of long-range charge-transfer excitations, the method typically underestimates accurate reference excitation energies by 8% on average, which is better than with standard hybrid-GGA functionals but worse compared to range-separated functional approximations.

  8. Fluorescence-excitation and emission spectra from LH2 antenna complexes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila as a function of the sample preparation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Ralf; Timpmann, Kõu; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen; Freiberg, Arvi

    2013-10-10

    The high sensitivity of optical spectra of pigment-protein complexes to temperature and pressure is well known. In the present study, we have demonstrated the significant influence of the environments commonly used in bulk and single-molecule spectroscopic studies at low temperatures on the LH2 photosynthetic antenna complex from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. A transfer of this LH2 complex from a bulk-buffer solution into a spin-coated polymer film results in a 189 cm(-1) blue shift of the B850 excitonic absorption band at 5 K. Within the molecular exciton model, the origin of this shift could be disentangled into three parts, namely to an increase of the local site energies, a contraction of the exciton band, and a decrease of the displacement energy.

  9. Detection of Copper (II) and Cadmium (II) binding to dissolved organic matter from macrophyte decomposition by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra combined with parallel factor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Dong-hai; Guo, Xu-jing; Wen, Li; He, Lian-sheng; Wang, Jing-gang; Li, Jun-qi

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from macrophyte decomposition, and to study its complexation with Cu (II) and Cd (II). Both the protein-like and the humic-like components showed a marked quenching effect by Cu (II). Negligible quenching effects were found for Cd (II) by components 1, 5 and 6. The stability constants and the fraction of the binding fluorophores for humic-like components and Cu (II) can be influenced by macrophyte decomposition of various weight gradients in aquatic plants. Macrophyte decomposition within the scope of the appropriate aquatic phytomass can maximize the stability constant of DOM-metal complexes. A large amount of organic matter was introduced into the aquatic environment by macrophyte decomposition, suggesting that the potential risk of DOM as a carrier of heavy metal contamination in macrophytic lakes should not be ignored. - Highlights: • Macrophyte decomposition increases fluorescent DOM components in the upper sediment. • Protein-like components are quenched or enhanced by adding Cu (II) and Cd (II). • Macrophyte decomposition DOM can impact the affinity of Cu (II) and Cd (II). • The log K M and f values showed a marked change due to macrophyte decomposition. • Macrophyte decomposition can maximize the stability constant of DOM-Cu (II) complexes. - Macrophyte decomposition DOM can influence on the binding affinity of metal ions in macrophytic lakes

  10. New solar carbon abundance based on non-LTE CN molecular spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mount, G.H.; Linsky, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed non-LTE analysis of solar CN spectra strongly suggests a revised carbon abundance for the Sun. A value of log A/subc/=8.35plus-or-minus0.15 which is significantly lower than the presently accepted value of log A/subc/=8.55 is suggested. This revision may have important consequences in astrophysics

  11. Computation of Molecular Spectra on a Quantum Processor with an Error-Resilient Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Colless

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the full power of nascent quantum processors requires the efficient management of a limited number of quantum bits with finite coherent lifetimes. Hybrid algorithms, such as the variational quantum eigensolver (VQE, leverage classical resources to reduce the required number of quantum gates. Experimental demonstrations of VQE have resulted in calculation of Hamiltonian ground states, and a new theoretical approach based on a quantum subspace expansion (QSE has outlined a procedure for determining excited states that are central to dynamical processes. We use a superconducting-qubit-based processor to apply the QSE approach to the H_{2} molecule, extracting both ground and excited states without the need for auxiliary qubits or additional minimization. Further, we show that this extended protocol can mitigate the effects of incoherent errors, potentially enabling larger-scale quantum simulations without the need for complex error-correction techniques.

  12. Computation of Molecular Spectra on a Quantum Processor with an Error-Resilient Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colless, J. I.; Ramasesh, V. V.; Dahlen, D.; Blok, M. S.; Kimchi-Schwartz, M. E.; McClean, J. R.; Carter, J.; de Jong, W. A.; Siddiqi, I.

    2018-02-01

    Harnessing the full power of nascent quantum processors requires the efficient management of a limited number of quantum bits with finite coherent lifetimes. Hybrid algorithms, such as the variational quantum eigensolver (VQE), leverage classical resources to reduce the required number of quantum gates. Experimental demonstrations of VQE have resulted in calculation of Hamiltonian ground states, and a new theoretical approach based on a quantum subspace expansion (QSE) has outlined a procedure for determining excited states that are central to dynamical processes. We use a superconducting-qubit-based processor to apply the QSE approach to the H2 molecule, extracting both ground and excited states without the need for auxiliary qubits or additional minimization. Further, we show that this extended protocol can mitigate the effects of incoherent errors, potentially enabling larger-scale quantum simulations without the need for complex error-correction techniques.

  13. Dynamical coupling of plasmons and molecular excitations by hybrid quantum/classical calculations: time-domain approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakko, Arto; Rossi, Tuomas P; Nieminen, Risto M

    2014-01-01

    The presence of plasmonic material influences the optical properties of nearby molecules in untrivial ways due to the dynamical plasmon-molecule coupling. We combine quantum and classical calculation schemes to study this phenomenon in a hybrid system that consists of a Na 2 molecule located in the gap between two Au/Ag nanoparticles. The molecule is treated quantum-mechanically with time-dependent density-functional theory, and the nanoparticles with quasistatic classical electrodynamics. The nanoparticle dimer has a plasmon resonance in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the Na 2 molecule has an electron-hole excitation in the same energy range. Due to the dynamical interaction of the two subsystems the plasmon and the molecular excitations couple, creating a hybridized molecular-plasmon excited state. This state has unique properties that yield e.g. enhanced photoabsorption compared to the freestanding Na 2 molecule. The computational approach used enables decoupling of the mutual plasmon-molecule interaction, and our analysis verifies that it is not legitimate to neglect the backcoupling effect when describing the dynamical interaction between plasmonic material and nearby molecules. Time-resolved analysis shows nearly instantaneous formation of the coupled state, and provides an intuitive picture of the underlying physics. (paper)

  14. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces for Both the Ground (X̃1A′ and Excited (A∼1A′′ Electronic States of HSiBr and the Absorption and Emission Spectra of HSiBr/DSiBr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anyang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio potential energy surfaces for the ground (X̃1A′ and excited (A˜A′′1 electronic states of HSiBr were obtained by using the single and double excitation coupled-cluster theory with a noniterative perturbation treatment of triple excitations and the multireference configuration interaction with Davidson correction, respectively, employing an augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence quadruple zeta basis set. The calculated vibrational energy levels of HSiBr and DSiBr of the ground and excited electronic states are in excellent agreement with the available experimental band origins. In addition, the absorption and emission spectra of HSiBr and DSiBr were calculated using an efficient single Lanczos propagation method and are in good agreement with the available experimental observations.

  15. Complicated Fermi-type vibronic resonance: Untangling of the single-site quasi-line fluorescence excitation spectra of a methylated dibenzoporphin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabei, S.M.; Kuzmitsky, V.A.; Solovyov, K.N.

    2008-01-01

    The quasi-line low-temperature (4.2 K) fluorescence excitation spectra of 2,3,12,13-tetramethyldibenzo[g,q]porphin introduced into an n-octane matrix have been measured in the range of the S 2 0 electronic transition at selective fluorescence monitoring for the two main types of impurity centers (sites). A characteristic feature of these spectra is that a conglomerate of quasi-lines - a structured complex band - is observed instead of one 0-0 quasi-line of the S 2 0 transition. In this band, the intensity distributions for the two main sites considerably differ from each other. The occurrence of such conglomerates is interpreted as a result of nonadiabatic vibrational-electronic interaction between the vibronic S 2 and S 1 states (the complex vibronic analogue of the Fermi resonance). The frequencies and intensities of individual transitions determined from the deconvolution of complex conglomerates are used as the initial data for solving the inverse spectroscopic problem: the determination of the unperturbed electronic and vibrational levels of states involved in the resonance and the vibronic-interaction matrix elements between them. This problem is solved with a method developed previously. The experimental results and their analysis are compared to the analogous data obtained earlier for meso-tetraazaporphin and meso-tetrapropylporphin. The energy intervals between the S 2 and S 1 electronic levels (ΔE S 2 S 1 ) of the two main types of impurity centers formed by molecules of a given porphyrin in the crystal matrix are found to significantly differ from each other, the values of this difference (δΔE S 2 S 1 ) being considerably greater for tetramethyldibenzoporphin, δΔE S 2 S 1 =228cm -1 , than for the two other porphyrins. At the same time, the energies of the unperturbed vibrational states of the S 1 electronic level participating in the resonance are very close to each other for these two sites

  16. Dual fluorescence of excited state intra-molecular proton transfer of HBFO: mechanistic understanding, substituent and solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenjing; Chen, Xuebo

    2014-03-07

    A combined approach of the multiconfigurational perturbation theory with the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus methodology has been employed to calculate the minimum potential energy profiles and the rates of excited state intra-molecular proton transfer (ESIPT) for the WOLED material molecule of HBFO and its four meta- or para-substituted compounds in gas phase, acetonitrile and cyclohexane solvents. The kinetic control for these reactions is quantitatively determined and extensively studied on the basis of the accurate potential energy surfaces when the thermodynamic factor associated with the free energy change becomes negligible in the case of the existence of a significant barrier in the ESIPT process. These computational efforts contribute to a deep understanding of the ESIPT mechanism, dual emission characteristics, kinetic controlling factor, substituent and solvent effects for these material molecules. The white light emission is generated by the establishment of dynamic equilibrium between enol and keto forms in the charge transfer excited SCT((1)ππ*) state. The performance of white light emission is quantitatively demonstrated to be mainly sensitive to the molecular tailoring approach of the electronic properties of meta- or para- substituents by the modulation of the forward/backward ESIPT rate ratio. The quality of white light emission is slightly tunable through its surrounding solvent environment. These computational results will provide a useful strategy for the molecular design of OLED and WOLED materials.

  17. Remarkable solvent-dependent excited-state chirality : A molecular modulator of circularly polarized luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delden, Richard A.; Huck, N.P.M.; Piet, J.J.; Warman, J.M.; Meskers, S.C.J.; Dekkers, H.P J M; Feringa, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    The photochemical control of ground- and excited-state chirality of (M)-cis-(1) and (P)-trans(2)-2-nitro-7-(dimethylamino)-9-(2',3'-dihydro-1'H-naphtho[2,1-b]-thiopyran-1'-ylidene)-9H-thioxanthene is described. It is shown that while ground state chirality can be controlled photochemically by

  18. Remarkable solvent-dependent excited-state chirality : a molecular modulator of circularly polarized luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delden, van R.A.; Huck, H.P.M.; Piet, J.J.; Warman, J.M.; Meskers, S.C.J.; Dekkers, H.P.J.M.; Feringa, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    The photochemical control of ground- and excited-state chirality of (M)-cis-(1) and (P)-trans-(2)-2-nitro-7-(dimethylamino)-9-(2',3' -dihydro-1'H-naphtho[2,1-b]-thiopyran-1'-ylidene)-9H-thioxanthene is described. It is shown that while ground state chirality can be controlled photochemically by

  19. Photobleaching response of different sources of chromophoric dissolved organic matter exposed to natural solar radiation using absorption and excitation-emission matrix spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN:TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN:TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254), was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 0-9, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%-5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein

  20. Ab initio Molecular Orbital Studies of the Vibrational Spectra of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    2004-06-15

    Jun 15, 2004 ... molecular complexes containing the family of Lewis acids carbon dioxide ..... cating a successively weaker interaction along the series. For. SO2. ..... Schleyer, H.F. Schaefer III, P.R. Scheiner, W.L. Jorgensen, W. Thiel and.

  1. Vibronic Boson Sampling: Generalized Gaussian Boson Sampling for Molecular Vibronic Spectra at Finite Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Joonsuk; Yung, Man-Hong

    2017-08-07

    Molecular vibroic spectroscopy, where the transitions involve non-trivial Bosonic correlation due to the Duschinsky Rotation, is strongly believed to be in a similar complexity class as Boson Sampling. At finite temperature, the problem is represented as a Boson Sampling experiment with correlated Gaussian input states. This molecular problem with temperature effect is intimately related to the various versions of Boson Sampling sharing the similar computational complexity. Here we provide a full description to this relation in the context of Gaussian Boson Sampling. We find a hierarchical structure, which illustrates the relationship among various Boson Sampling schemes. Specifically, we show that every instance of Gaussian Boson Sampling with an initial correlation can be simulated by an instance of Gaussian Boson Sampling without initial correlation, with only a polynomial overhead. Since every Gaussian state is associated with a thermal state, our result implies that every sampling problem in molecular vibronic transitions, at any temperature, can be simulated by Gaussian Boson Sampling associated with a product of vacuum modes. We refer such a generalized Gaussian Boson Sampling motivated by the molecular sampling problem as Vibronic Boson Sampling.

  2. Application of the instanton method for analyzing tunneling splitting spectra of nonrigid molecular systems : II. Excited states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iroshnikov, GS; Sukhanov, LP

    For nonrigid molecules with two equivalent minima on their potential energy surface, expressions are obtained in terms of the instanton method for the calculation of the magnitude of the tunneling splitting of vibrational levels with the number n greater than or equal to 0 both in the harmonic

  3. Interplay of intra-atomic and interatomic effects: An investigation of the 2p core level spectra of atomic Fe and molecular FeCl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, T.; Wolff, T.; Zimmermann, P.; Godehusen, K.; Martins, M.

    2004-01-01

    The 2p photoabsorption and photoelectron spectra of atomic Fe and molecular FeCl 2 were studied by photoion and photoelectron spectroscopy using monochromatized synchrotron radiation and atomic or molecular beam technique. The atomic spectra were analyzed with configuration interaction calculations yielding excellent agreement between experiment and theory. For the analysis of the molecular photoelectron spectrum which shows pronounced interatomic effects, a charge transfer model was used, introducing an additional 3d 7 configuration. The resulting good agreement between the experimental and theoretical spectrum and the remarkable similarity of the molecular with the corresponding spectrum in the solid phase opens a way to a better understanding of the interplay of the interatomic and intra-atomic interactions in the 2p core level spectra of the 3d metal compounds

  4. Phosphorescent Molecularly Doped Light-Emitting Diodes with Blended Polymer Host and Wide Emission Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable green light emission and high efficiency organic devices with three polymer layers were fabricated using bis[2-(4′-tert-butylphenyl-1-phenyl-1H-benzoimidazole-N,C2′] iridium(III (acetylacetonate doped in blended host materials. The 1 wt% doping concentration showed maximum luminance of 7841 cd/cm2 at 25.6 V and maximum current efficiency of 9.95 cd/A at 17.2 V. The electroluminescence spectra of devices indicated two main peaks at 522 nm and 554 nm coming from phosphor dye and a full width at half maximum (FWHM of 116 nm. The characteristics of using blended host, doping iridium complex, emission spectrum, and power efficiency of organic devices were investigated.

  5. Crystal structure and vibrational spectra of piperazinium bis(4-hydroxybenzenesulphonate) molecular-ionic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, M. K.; Pietraszko, A.

    2008-02-01

    The piperazinium bis(4-hydroxybenzenesulphonate) crystallizes from water solution at room temperature in P2 1/ c space group of monoclinic system. The crystals are built up of doubly protonated piperazinium cations and ionized 4-hydroxybenzenesulphonate anions that interact through weak hydrogen bonds of O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O type. Mutual orientation of anions is determined by non-conventional hydrogen bonds of C-H⋯π type. Room temperature powder FT IR and FT Raman measurements were carried out. The vibrational spectra are in full agreement with the structure obtained from X-ray crystallography. The big single crystals of the title salt can be grown.

  6. A ROTATING MOLECULAR DISK TOWARD IRAS 18162-2048, THE EXCITING SOURCE OF HH 80-81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Lopez, M.; Curiel, S.; Girart, J. M.; Gomez, Y.; Ho, P. T. P.; Patel, N.

    2011-01-01

    We present several molecular line emission arcsecond and subarcsecond observations obtained with the Submillimeter Array in the direction of the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048, the exciting source of HH 80-81. The data clearly indicate the presence of a compact (radius ∼425-850 AU) SO 2 structure, enveloping the more compact (radius ∼ sun . The SO 2 spectral line data also allow us to constrain the structure temperature between 120 and 160 K and the volume density ∼> 2 x 10 9 cm -3 . We also find that such a rotating flattened system could be unstable due to gravitational disturbances. The data from C 17 O line emission show a dense core within this star-forming region. Additionally, the H 2 CO and SO emissions appear clumpy and trace the disk-like structure, a possible interaction between a molecular core and the outflows, and in part, the cavity walls excavated by the thermal radio jet.

  7. Molecular structure and vibrational spectra of 6-methylquinoline and 8-methylquinoline molecules by quantum mechanical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurt, M.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of 6-methylquinoline(6MQ) and 8-methylquinolines(8MQ) in the ground state have been calculated by using the Hartree-Fock and density functional methods (B3LYP and BLYP) with 6-31G (d) as the basis set. The optimized geometric bond lengths obtained by using B3LYP and bond angles obtained by BLYP were given corresponding experimental values of similar molecule. Comparison of the observed fundamental vibrational frequencies of these molecules and calculated results by density functional B3LYP, BLYP and Hartree-Fock methods indicates that B3LYP is superior to the scaled Hartree- Fock and BLYP approach for molecular vibrational problems

  8. Qualitative features of the rearrangement of molecular energy spectra from a “wall-crossing” perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, T., E-mail: iwai@amp.i.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Zhilinskii, B., E-mail: zhilin@univ-littoral.fr [Université du Littoral Côte d' Opale, 59140 Dunkerque (France)

    2013-11-15

    Qualitatively different systems of molecular energy bands are studied on example of a parametric family of effective Hamiltonians describing rotational structure of triply degenerate vibrational state of a cubic symmetry molecule. The modification of band structure under variation of control parameters is associated with a topological invariant “delta-Chern”. This invariant is evaluated by using a local Hamiltonian for the control parameter values assigned at the boundary between adjacent parameter domains which correspond to qualitatively different band structures.

  9. Microwave spectra, molecular structure, and aromatic character of 4a,8a-azaboranaphthalene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Daly, Adam M.; Kukolich, Stephen G. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Ashe, Arthur J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1055 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    The microwave spectra for seven unique isotopologues of 4a,8a-azaboranaphthalene [hereafter referred to as BN-naphthalene] were measured using a pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Spectra were obtained for the normal isotopologues with {sup 10}B, {sup 11}B, and all unique single {sup 13}C and the {sup 15}N isotopologue (with {sup 11}B), in natural abundance. The rotational, centrifugal distortion and quadrupole coupling constants determined for the {sup 11}B{sup 14}N isotopologue are A = 3042.712 75(43) MHz, B = 1202.706 57(35) MHz, C = 862.220 13(35) MHz, D{sub J} = 0.06(1) kHz, 1.5χ{sub aa} ({sup 14}N) = 2.5781(61) MHz, 0.25(χ{sub bb} − χ{sub cc}) ({sup 14}N) = − 0.1185(17) MHz, 1.5χ{sub aa} (11B) = − 3.9221(75) MHz, and 0.25(χ{sub bb} − χ{sub cc}) ({sup 11}B) = − 0.9069(24) MHz. The experimental inertial defect is Δ = − 0.159 amu Å{sup 2}, which is consistent with a planar structure for the molecule. The B—N bond length from the experimentally determined structure is 1.47 Å, which indicates π-bonding character between the B and N. The measured quadrupole coupling strengths provide important and useful information about the bonding, orbital occupancy, and aromatic character for this aromatic molecule. Extended Townes-Dailey analyses were used to determine the B and N electron sp{sup 2}-hybridized and p-orbital occupations. These results are compared with electron orbital occupations from the natural bond orbital option in theoretical calculations. From the analyses, it was determined that BN-naphthalene has aromatic character similar to that of other N-containing aromatics. The results are compared with similar results for B—N bonding in 1,2-dihydro-1,2-azaborine and BN-cyclohexene. Accurate and precise structural parameters were obtained from the microwave measurements on seven isotopologues and from high-level G09 calculations.

  10. Ultrafast Excited State Dynamics in Molecular Motors : Coupling of Motor Length to Medium Viscosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conyard, Jamie; Stacko, Peter; Chen, Jiawen; McDonagh, Sophie; Hall, Christopher R.; Laptenok, Sergey P.; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Meech, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Photochemically driven molecular motors convert the energy of incident radiation to intramolecular rotational motion. The motor molecules considered here execute four step unidirectional rotational motion. This comprises a pair of successive light induced isomerizations to a metastable state

  11. Collisional effects on molecular spectra laboratory experiments and models, consequences for applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Robert, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Gas phase molecular spectroscopy is a powerful tool for obtaining information on the geometry and internal structure of isolated molecules as well as on the interactions that they undergo. It enables the study of fundamental parameters and processes and is also used for the sounding of gas media through optical techniques. It has been facing always renewed challenges, due to the considerable improvement of experimental techniques and the increasing demand for accuracy and scope of remote sensing applications. In practice, the radiating molecule is usually not isolated but diluted in a mixture

  12. Theory vs. experiment for molecular clusters: Spectra of OCS trimers and tetramers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelisti, Luca [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, McCormick Road, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” University of Bologna, Via Selmi 2, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Perez, Cristobal; Seifert, Nathan A.; Pate, Brooks H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, McCormick Road, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Dehghany, M.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive North West, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); McKellar, A. R. W. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2015-03-14

    All singly substituted {sup 13}C, {sup 18}O, and {sup 34}S isotopomers of the previously known OCS trimer are observed in natural abundance in a broad-band spectrum measured with a chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The complete substitution structure thus obtained critically tests (and confirms) the common assumption that monomers tend to retain their free structure in a weakly bound cluster. A new OCS trimer isomer is also observed, and its structure is determined to be barrel-shaped but with the monomers all approximately aligned, in contrast to the original trimer which is barrel-shaped with two monomers aligned and one anti-aligned. An OCS tetramer spectrum is assigned for the first time, and the tetramer structure resembles an original trimer with an OCS monomer added at the end with two sulfur atoms. Infrared spectra observed in the region of the OCS ν{sub 1} fundamental (≈2060 cm{sup −1}) are assigned to the same OCS tetramer, and another infrared band is tentatively assigned to a different tetramer isomer. The experimental results are compared and contrasted with theoretical predictions from the literature and from new cluster calculations which use an accurate OCS pair potential and assume pairwise additivity.

  13. The effects of pseudo magnetic fields in molecular spectra and scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendrick, B.K.

    1996-01-01

    Pseudo magnetic fields appear in the Born-Oppenheimer method for molecules when conical intersections or electronic angular momenta are taken into account. These fields are not real magnetic fields but they have the same mathematical properties and can lead to real observable effects in the dynamics of molecules. A general vector potential (gauge theory) approach for including these field effects in the Born-Oppenheimer method is introduced and applied to H + O 2 scattering and the vibrational spectrum of Na 3 (X) for zero total angular momentum (J = 0). The scattering results for HO 2 show significant shifts in the resonance energies and lifetimes due to a magnetic solenoid type field originating from the C 2v conical intersection in HO 2 . Significant changes in the state-to-state transition probabilities are also observed. The non-degenerate A 1 and A 2 vibrational spectra of Na 3 (X) show significant shifts in the energy levels due to a magnetic solenoid type field originating from the D 3h conical intersection in Na 3 . These two examples show that the effects of pseudo magnetic fields can be significant and in many cases they must be included in order to obtain agreement between theory and experiment. The newly developed gauge theory techniques for treating pseudo magnetic fields are also relevant for including the effects of real magnetic fields

  14. Microwave spectra and molecular structures of (Z)-pent-2-en-4-ynenitrile and maleonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halter, R J; Fimmen, R L; McMahon, R J; Peebles, S A; Kuczkowski, R L; Stanton, J F

    2001-12-12

    Accurate equilibrium structures have been determined for (Z)-pent-2-en-4-ynenitrile (8) and maleonitrile (9) by combining microwave spectroscopy data and ab initio quantum chemistry calculations. The microwave spectra of 10 isotopomers of 8 and 5 isotopomers of 9 were obtained using a pulsed nozzle Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The ground-state rotational constants were adjusted for vibration-rotation interaction effects calculated from force fields obtained from ab initio calculations. The resultant equilibrium rotational constants were used to determine structures that are in very good agreement with those obtained from high-level ab initio calculations (CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ). The geometric parameters in 8 and 9 are very similar; they also do not differ significantly from the all-carbon analogue, (Z)-hex-3-ene-1,5-diyne (7), the parent molecule for the Bergman cyclization. A small deviation from linearity about the alkyne and cyano linkages is observed for 7-9 and several related species where accurate equilibrium parameters are available. The data on 7-9 should be of interest to radioastronomy and may provide insights on the formation and interstellar chemistry of unsaturated species such as the cyanopolyynes.

  15. Hydrostatic pressure and temperature effect on the Raman spectra of the molecular crystal 2-amine-1,3,4-thiadiazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Toledo, T. A.; da Costa, R. C.; Bento, R. R. F.; Pizani, P. S.

    2018-03-01

    The structural, thermal and vibrational properties of the molecular crystal 2-amine-1,3,4-thiadiazole (ATD) were investigated combining X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, Raman scattering (in solid and in solution) and thermal analysis as experimental techniques and first principle calculations based on density functional theory using PZ, BLYP in condensed-phase and B3LYP/cc-pVTZ in isolated molecule methods. The structural stability and phonon anharmonicity were also studied using Raman spectroscopy at different temperatures and hydrostatic pressures. A reasonable agreement was obtained between calculated and experimental results. The main difference between experimental and computed structural and vibrational spectra occurred in the intermolecular bond distance Nsbnd H⋯N and stretching modes of NH2. The vibrational spectra were interpreted and assigned based on group theory and functional group analysis assisted by theoretical results, which led to a more comprehensive knowledge about external and internal modes at different thermodynamic conditions. As temperature increases, it was observed the line-width increases and red-shifts, indicating a phonon anharmonicity without a temperature-induced phase transition in the range 10-413 K. However, ATD crystal undergoes a phase transition in the temperature range 413-475 K, as indicated by thermal analysis curve and Raman spectra. Furthermore, increasing pressure from ambient to 3.1 GPa, it was observed the splitting of the external Raman bands centered at 122 cm-1 (at 0.2 GPa), 112 cm-1 (1.1 GPa), 93 cm-1 (2.4 GPa) in two components as well as the appearance of new band near 50 cm-1 at 1.1 GPa, indicating a possible phase-transition. The blue-shift of the Raman bands was associated to anharmonicity of the interatomic potential caused by unit cell contraction.

  16. Comparison of various molecular forms of bovine trypsin: Correlation of infrared spectra with X-ray crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prestrelski, S.J. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine of the City Univ. of New York (USA)); Byler, D.M. (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Philadelphia, PA (USA)); Liebman, M.N. (AMOCO Technology Corporation, Naperville, IL (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is a valuable method for the study of protein conformation in solution primarily because of the sensitivity to conformation of the amide I band (1700-1620 cm{sup {minus}1}) which arises from the backbone C{double bond}O stretching vibration. Combined with resolution-enhancement techniques such as derivative spectroscopy and self-deconvolution, plus the application of iterative curve-fitting techniques, this method provides a wealth of information concerning protein secondary structure. Further extraction of conformational information from the amide I band is dependent upon discerning the correlations between specific conformation types and component bands in the amide I region. In this paper the authors report spectra-structure correlations derived from conformational perturbations in bovine trypsin which arise from autolytic processing, zymogen activation, and active-site inhibition. IR spectra were collected for the single-chain ({beta}-trypsin) and once-cleaved, double-chain ({alpha}-trypsin) forms as well as at various times during the course of autolysis and also for zymogen, trypsinogen, and {beta}-trypsin inhibited with diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Spectral differences among the various molecular forms were interpreted in light of previous biochemical studies of autolysis and the known three-dimensional structures of the zymogen, the active enzyme, and the DIP-inhibited form. The spectroscopic results from these proteins in D{sub 2}O imply that certain loop structures may absorb in the region of 1655 cm{sup {minus}1}. They estimate that this approach to data analysis and interpretation is sensitive to changes of 0.01 unit or less in the relative integrated intensities of component bands in spectra whose peaks are well resolved.

  17. Understanding the interface between silicon-based materials and water: Molecular-dynamics exploration of infrared spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Martinez-Gonzalez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-dynamics simulations for silicon, hydrogen- and hydroxyl-terminated silicon in contact with liquid water, at 220 and 300 K, display water-density ‘ordering’ along the laboratory z-axis, emphasising the hydrophobicity of the different systems and the position of this first adsorbed layer. Density of states (DOS of the oxygen and proton velocity correlation functions (VACFs and infrared (IR spectra of the first monolayer of adsorbed water, calculated via Fourier transformation, indicate similarities to more confined, ice-like dynamical behaviour (redolent of ice. It was observed that good qualitative agreement is obtained between the DOS for this first layer in all systems. The DOS for the lower-frequency zone indicates that for the interface studied (i.e., the first layer near the surface, the water molecules try to organise in a similar form, and that this form is intermediate between liquid water and ice. For IR spectra, scrutiny of the position of the highest-intensity peaks for the stretching and bending bands indicate that such water molecules in the first solvating layer are organised in an intermediate fashion between ice and liquid water.

  18. X-ray photoelectron spectra structure of actinide compounds stipulated by electrons of the inner valence molecular orbitals (IVMO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teterin, Yu. A.; Ivanov, K. E.

    1997-01-01

    Development of precise X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using X-ray radiation hν< 1.5 KeV allowed to carry out immediate investigations of fine spectra structure of both weakly bond and deep electrons. Based on the experiments and the obtained results it may be concluded: 1. Under favourable conditions the inner valence molecular orbitals (IVMO) may form in all actinide compounds. 2. The XPS spectra fine structure stipulated by IVMO electrons allows to judge upon the degree of participation of the filled AO electrons in the chemical bond, on the structure o considered atom close environment and the bond lengths in compounds. For amorphous compounds the obtaining of such data based on X-ray structure analysis is restricted. 3. The summary contribution of IVMO electrons to the absolute value of the chemical bonding is comparable with the corresponding value of OMO electrons contribution to the atomic bonding. This fact is very important and new in chemistry. (author)

  19. ExoMol molecular line lists - XXVII: spectra of C2H4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mant, Barry P.; Yachmenev, Andrey; Yurchenko, Jonathan Tennyson Sergei N.

    2018-05-01

    A new line list for ethylene, 12C21H4 is presented. The line list is based on high level ab initiopotential energy and dipole moment surfaces. The potential energy surface is refined by fitting to experimental energies. The line list covers the range up to 7000 cm-1(1.43 μm) with all ro-vibrational transitions (50 billion) with the lower state below 5000 cm-1included and thus should be applicable for temperatures up to 700 K. A technique for computing molecular opacities from vibrational band intensities is proposed and used to provide temperature dependent cross sections of ethylene for shorter wavelength and higher temperatures. When combined with realistic band profiles (such as the proposed three-band model), the vibrational intensity technique offers a cheap but reasonably accurate alternative to the full ro-vibrational calculations at high temperatures and should be reliable for representing molecular opacities. The C2H4 line list, which is called MaYTY, is rmade available in electronic form from the CDS (http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr) and ExoMol (www.exomol.com) databases.

  20. Molecular structure, vibrational spectra and DFT computational studies of melaminium N-acetylglycinate dihydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanak, H.; Pawlus, K.; Marchewka, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    Melaminium N-acetylglycinate dihydrate, an organic material has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, and FT-Raman spectroscopies for the protiated and deuteriated crystals. The title complex crystallizes in the triclinic system, and the space group is P-1 with a = 5.642(1) Å, b = 7.773(2) Å, c = 15.775(3) Å, α = 77.28(1)°, β = 84.00(1)°, γ = 73.43(1)° and Z = 2. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and intensity of the vibrational bands have been interpreted with the aid of structure optimization based on density functional method (B3LYP) with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The obtained vibrational wavenumbers and optimized geometric parameters were seen to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions of the title compound have been investigated using the natural bonding orbital analysis. It reveals that the O-H···O, N-H···N and N-H···O intermolecular interactions significantly influence crystal packing of this molecule. The non-linear optical properties are also addressed theoretically. The predicted NLO properties of the title compound are much greater than ones of urea. In addition, DFT calculations of the title compound, molecular electrostatic potential, thermodynamic properties, frontier orbitals and chemical reactivity descriptors were also performed at 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory.

  1. ExoMol molecular line lists - XXVI: spectra of SH and NS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Bond, Wesley; Gorman, Maire N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; McKemmish, Laura K.; Nunn, William; Shah, Rohan; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2018-07-01

    Line lists for the sulphur-containing molecules SH (the mercapto radical) and NS are computed as part of the ExoMol project. These line lists consider transitions within the X2Π ground state for 32SH, 33SH, 34SH,36SH and, 32SD, and 14N32S, 14N33S, 14N34S, 14N36S, and 15N32S. Ab initio potential energy (PEC) and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) curves are computed and then improved by fitting to experimentally observed transitions. Fully ab initio dipole moment curves (DMCs) computed at high level of theory are used to produce the final line lists. For SH, our fit gives a root-mean-square (rms) error of 0.03 cm-1 between the observed (vmax = 4, Jmax = 34.5) and calculated transitions wavenumbers; this is extrapolated such that all X2Π rotational-vibrational-electronic (rovibronic) bound states are considered. For 32SH the resulting line list contains about 81 000 transitions and 2300 rovibronic states, considering levels up to vmax = 14 and Jmax = 60.5. For NS the refinement used a combination of experimentally determined frequencies and energy levels and led to an rms-fitting error of 0.002 cm-1. Each NS-calculated line list includes around 2.8 million transitions and 31 000 rovibronic states with a vibrational range up to v = 53 and rotational range up to J = 235.5, which covers up to 23 000 cm-1. Both line lists should be complete for temperatures up to 5000 K. Example spectra simulated using this line list are shown and comparisons made to the existing data in the CDMS data base. The line lists are available from the CDS (http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr) and ExoMol (www.exomol.com) data bases.

  2. ExoMol molecular line lists - XXVI: spectra of SH and NS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Bond, Wesley; Gorman, Maire N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; McKemmish, Laura K.; Nunn, William; Shah, Rohan; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2018-04-01

    Line lists for the sulphur-containing molecules SH (the mercapto radical) and NS are computed as part of the ExoMol project. These line lists consider transitions within the X 2Π ground state for 32SH, 33SH, 34SH and 32SD, and 14N32S, 14N33S, 14N34S, 14N36S and 15N32S. Ab initio potential energy (PEC) and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) curves are computed and then improved by fitting to experimentally observed transitions. Fully ab initio dipole moment curves (DMCs) computed at high level of theory are used to produce the final line lists. For SH, our fit gives a root-mean-square (rms) error of 0.03 cm-1 between the observed (vmax = 4, Jmax = 34.5) and calculated transitions wavenumbers; this is extrapolated such that all X 2Π rotational-vibrational-electronic (rovibronic) bound states are considered. For 32SH the resulting line list contains about 81 000 transitions and 2 300 rovibronic states, considering levels up to vmax = 14 and Jmax = 60.5. For NS the refinement used a combination of experimentally determined frequencies and energy levels and led to an rms fitting error of 0.002 cm-1. Each NS calculated line list includes around 2.8 million transitions and 31 000 rovibronic states with a vibrational range up to v = 53 and rotational range to J = 235.5, which covers up to 23 000 cm-1. Both line lists should be complete for temperatures up to 5000 K. Example spectra simulated using this line list are shown and comparisons made to the existing data in the CDMS database. The line lists are available from the CDS (http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr) and ExoMol (www.exomol.com) data bases.

  3. Molecular Complex of Lumiflavin and 2-Aminobenzoic Acid : Crystal Structure, Crystal Spectra, and Solution Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Ghisla, Sandro; Hanson, Louise Karle; Ludwig, Martha L.; Nordman, Christer E.

    1981-01-01

    The molecular complex lumiflavin-2-aminobenzoic acid monohydrate (C13H12N402●C7H7N02●H2O)crystallizes from aqueous solution as red triclinic prisms. The space group is P1 with cell dimensions a = 9.660 A, b = 14.866 Å, c = 7.045 Å, α = 95.44°, β = 95.86°, and γ = 105.66°. The crystal structure was solved by direct methods and refined by block-diagonal least-squares procedures to an R value of 0.050 on the basis of 1338 observed reflections. The structure is composed of stacks of alternating l...

  4. Investigations of the valence-shell excitations of molecular ethane by high-energy electron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Qing; Xu, Long-Quan; Qi, De-Guang; Chen, Tao; Liu, Ya-Wei; Zhu, Lin-Fan

    2018-04-01

    The differential cross sections and generalized oscillator strengths for the low-lying excitations of the valence-shell 1eg orbital electron in ethane have been measured for the first time at a high incident electron energy of 1500 eV and a scattering angular range of 1.5°-10°. A weak feature, termed X here, with a band center of about 7.5 eV has been observed, which was also announced by the previous experimental and theoretical studies. The dynamic behaviors of the generalized oscillator strengths for the 3s (8.7 eV), 3s+3p (9.31 eV, 9.41 eV), and X (˜7.5 eV) transitions on the momentum transfer squared have been obtained. The integral cross sections of these transitions from their thresholds to 5000 eV have been obtained with the aid of the BE-scaling (B is the binding energy and E is the excitation energy) method. The optical oscillator strengths of the above transitions determined by extrapolating their generalized oscillator strengths to the limit of the squared momentum transfer K2 → 0 are in good agreement with the ones from the photoabsorption spectrum [J. W. Au et al., Chem. Phys. 173, 209 (1993)], which indicates that the present differential cross sections, generalized oscillator strengths, and integral cross sections can serve as benchmark data.

  5. The dance of molecules: new dynamical perspectives on highly excited molecular vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellman, Michael E; Tyng, Vivian

    2007-04-01

    At low energies, molecular vibrational motion is described by the normal modes model. This model breaks down at higher energy, with strong coupling between normal modes and onset of chaotic dynamics. New anharmonic modes are born in bifurcations, or branchings of the normal modes. Knowledge of these new modes is obtained through the window of frequency-domain spectroscopy, using techniques of nonlinear classical dynamics. It may soon be possible to "watch" molecular rearrangement reactions spectroscopically. Connections are being made with reaction rate theories, condensed phase systems, and motions of electrons in quantum dots.

  6. Study on structure, vibrational analysis and molecular characteristics of some halogen substituted azido-phenylethanones using FTIR spectra and DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, J.; Reddy, Byru Venkatram

    2018-03-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of organic compounds 4-fluoro-2-azido-1-phenylethanone (FAP), 4-chloro-2-azido-1-phenylethanone (CAP) and 4-bromo-2-azido-1-phenylethanone (BAP) have been recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1. The optimized molecular structure for global minimum energy of the titled molecules is determined by evaluating torsional potentials as a function of rotation angle about free rotation bonds among the substituent groups subjecting them to DFT employing B3LYP functional with 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. The vibrational frequencies along with infrared intensities are computed by SQM procedure. The rms error between observed and calculated frequencies is found to be 9.27, 8.17 and 7.95 cm-1 for FAP, CAP and BAP, respectively which shows good agreement between experimental and scaled values of calculated frequencies obtained by DFT. The vibrational assignments of all the fundamental bands of each molecule are made unambiguously using PED and eigen vectors obtained in the computations. The computed values of dipole moment, polarizability and hyperpolarizability indicate that the titled molecules exhibit NLO behaviour and hence may be considered for potential applicants for the development of NLO materials. HOMO and LUMO energies evaluated in the study demonstrate chemical stability of the molecules. NBO analysis is made to study the stability of the molecules arising from hyper conjugative interactions and charge delocalization. The molecular electrostatic surface potential (MESP) and thermodynamic parameters are also evaluated.

  7. Diagnosis of lubricating oil by evaluating cyanide and carbon molecular emission lines in laser induced breakdown spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnasharty, I. Y.; Kassem, A. K.; Sabsabi, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    To prevent engine failure it is essential to change lubricating oil regularly before it loses its protective properties. It is also necessary to monitor the physical and chemical conditions of the oil to reliably determine the optimum oil-change intervals. The present work focuses on studying evolution of the cyanide (CN) and carbon (C 2) molecular spectral emission lines in the laser induced breakdown spectra of lubricating oil as a function of its consumption. The intensities of these molecular bands have been taken as indicator of engine oil degradation at certain mileage. Furthermore, the percentage of decay of CN and C 2 integral intensity values at the corresponding mileage was calculated in order to relate it to the degree of consumption of the motor oil. Such percentage decay of the CN and C 2 integral intensities have been found to increase gradually with increasing mileage which is accompanied with increasing depletion of engine oil. The results of using LIBS technique in the present measurements proved that it is possible to have a direct, straightforward and easy method for prediction of lubricating oil degree of consumption. This may facilitate scheduling the proper time and/or mileage intervals for changing the oil to avoid any possibility of engine failure.

  8. Diagnosis of lubricating oil by evaluating cyanide and carbon molecular emission lines in laser induced breakdown spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elnasharty, I.Y.; Kassem, A.K. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University (Egypt); Sabsabi, M. [National Research Council, Industrial Material Institute, Quebec (Canada); Harith, M.A., E-mail: mharithm@niles.edu.eg [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University (Egypt)

    2011-08-15

    To prevent engine failure it is essential to change lubricating oil regularly before it loses its protective properties. It is also necessary to monitor the physical and chemical conditions of the oil to reliably determine the optimum oil-change intervals. The present work focuses on studying evolution of the cyanide (CN) and carbon (C{sub 2}) molecular spectral emission lines in the laser induced breakdown spectra of lubricating oil as a function of its consumption. The intensities of these molecular bands have been taken as indicator of engine oil degradation at certain mileage. Furthermore, the percentage of decay of CN and C{sub 2} integral intensity values at the corresponding mileage was calculated in order to relate it to the degree of consumption of the motor oil. Such percentage decay of the CN and C{sub 2} integral intensities have been found to increase gradually with increasing mileage which is accompanied with increasing depletion of engine oil. The results of using LIBS technique in the present measurements proved that it is possible to have a direct, straightforward and easy method for prediction of lubricating oil degree of consumption. This may facilitate scheduling the proper time and/or mileage intervals for changing the oil to avoid any possibility of engine failure.

  9. Diagnosis of lubricating oil by evaluating cyanide and carbon molecular emission lines in laser induced breakdown spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elnasharty, I.Y.; Kassem, A.K.; Sabsabi, M.; Harith, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    To prevent engine failure it is essential to change lubricating oil regularly before it loses its protective properties. It is also necessary to monitor the physical and chemical conditions of the oil to reliably determine the optimum oil-change intervals. The present work focuses on studying evolution of the cyanide (CN) and carbon (C 2 ) molecular spectral emission lines in the laser induced breakdown spectra of lubricating oil as a function of its consumption. The intensities of these molecular bands have been taken as indicator of engine oil degradation at certain mileage. Furthermore, the percentage of decay of CN and C 2 integral intensity values at the corresponding mileage was calculated in order to relate it to the degree of consumption of the motor oil. Such percentage decay of the CN and C 2 integral intensities have been found to increase gradually with increasing mileage which is accompanied with increasing depletion of engine oil. The results of using LIBS technique in the present measurements proved that it is possible to have a direct, straightforward and easy method for prediction of lubricating oil degree of consumption. This may facilitate scheduling the proper time and/or mileage intervals for changing the oil to avoid any possibility of engine failure.

  10. Theoretical Investigation on the Molecular Structure, Vibrational and NMR Spectra of N, N, 4-Tri chlorobenzenesulfonamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinar, M.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the structural properties of N,N,4-Tri chlorobenzenesulfonamide have been studied extensively using Density Functional Theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectrum was calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned based on the scaled theoretical wavenumbers. The 1 H and 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the compound were calculated using the Gauge-Invariant Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method. To investigate the basis set effects, calculations were performed at the 6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) levels. Finally, geometric parameters, vibrational bands and isotropic chemical shifts were compared with available experimental data of compound. The fully optimized geometry of the molecule was found to be consistent with the X-ray crystal structure. The observed and calculated frequencies and chemical shifts were found to be in very good agreement. The computed results appear that the basis set has slight effect on the molecular geometry of N,N,4-Tri chlorobenzenesulfonamide

  11. Perspective: Tipping the scales: Search for drifting constants from molecular spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Paul; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Ubachs, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Transitions in atoms and molecules provide an ideal test ground for constraining or detecting a possible variation of the fundamental constants of nature. In this perspective, we review molecular species that are of specific interest in the search for a drifting proton-to-electron mass ratio μ. In particular, we outline the procedures that are used to calculate the sensitivity coefficients for transitions in these molecules and discuss current searches. These methods have led to a rate of change in μ bounded to 6 × 10 −14 /yr from a laboratory experiment performed in the present epoch. On a cosmological time scale, the variation is limited to |Δμ/μ| −5 for look-back times of 10–12× 10 9 years and to |Δμ/μ| −7 for look-back times of 7× 10 9 years. The last result, obtained from high-redshift observation of methanol, translates into μ . /μ=(1.4±1.4)×10 −17 /yr if a linear rate of change is assumed

  12. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of human blastocysts andcytotrophoblasts by multi-color FISH and Spectra Imaging analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jung,Christine J.; Nguyen, Ha-Nam; Chu, Lisa W.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fisher,Susan J.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-02-08

    Numerical chromosome aberrations in gametes typically lead to failed fertilization, spontaneous abortion or a chromosomally abnormal fetus. By means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we now can screen human embryos in vitro for aneuploidy before transferring the embryos to the uterus. PGD allows us to select unaffected embryos for transfer and increases the implantation rate in in vitro fertilization programs. Molecular cytogenetic analyses using multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of blastomeres have become the major tool for preimplantation genetic screening of aneuploidy. However, current FISH technology can test for only a small number of chromosome abnormalities and hitherto failed to increase the pregnancy rates as expected. We are in the process of developing technologies to score all 24 chromosomes in single cells within a 3 day time limit, which we believe is vital to the clinical setting. Also, human placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) at the fetal-maternal interface acquire aneuploidies as they differentiate to an invasive phenotype. About 20-50% of invasive CTB cells from uncomplicated pregnancies were found aneuploidy, suggesting that the acquisition of aneuploidy is an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of CTBs. Since most invasive CTBs are interphase cells and possess extreme heterogeneity, we applied multi-color FISH and repeated hybridizations to investigate individual CTBs. In summary, this study demonstrates the strength of Spectral Imaging analysis and repeated hybridizations, which provides a basis for full karyotype analysis of single interphase cells.

  13. 2D IR spectra of cyanide in water investigated by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Won; Carr, Joshua K.; Göllner, Michael; Hamm, Peter; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the 2D infrared (IR) spectroscopy of CN− solvated in D2O is investigated. Depending on the force field parametrizations, most of which are based on multipolar interactions for the CN− molecule, the frequency-frequency correlation function and observables computed from it differ. Most notably, models based on multipoles for CN− and TIP3P for water yield quantitatively correct results when compared with experiments. Furthermore, the recent finding that T 1 times are sensitive to the van der Waals ranges on the CN− is confirmed in the present study. For the linear IR spectrum, the best model reproduces the full widths at half maximum almost quantitatively (13.0 cm−1 vs. 14.9 cm−1) if the rotational contribution to the linewidth is included. Without the rotational contribution, the lines are too narrow by about a factor of two, which agrees with Raman and IR experiments. The computed and experimental tilt angles (or nodal slopes) α as a function of the 2D IR waiting time compare favorably with the measured ones and the frequency fluctuation correlation function is invariably found to contain three time scales: a sub-ps, 1 ps, and one on the 10-ps time scale. These time scales are discussed in terms of the structural dynamics of the surrounding solvent and it is found that the longest time scale (≈10 ps) most likely corresponds to solvent exchange between the first and second solvation shell, in agreement with interpretations from nuclear magnetic resonance measurements.

  14. Monte Carlo wave-packet approach to trace nuclear dynamics in molecular excited states by XUV-pump-IR-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Qingli; Bello, Roger Y.; Martín, Fernando; Palacios, Alicia; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2018-04-01

    Recent research interests have been raised in uncovering and controlling ultrafast dynamics in excited neutral molecules. In this work we generalize the Monte Carlo wave packet (MCWP) approach to XUV-pump-IR-probe schemes to simulate the process of dissociative double ionization of H2 where singly excited states in H2 are involved. The XUV pulse is chosen to resonantly excite the initial ground state of H2 to the lowest excited electronic state of 1Σu + symmetry in H2 within the Franck-Condon region. The delayed intense IR pulse couples the excited states of 1Σu + symmetry with the nearby excited states of 1Σg + symmetry. It also induces the first ionization from H2 to H2 + and the second ionization from H2 + to H++H+. To reduce the computational costs in the MCWP approach, a sampling method is proposed to determine in time the dominant ionization events from H2 to H2+. By conducting a trajectory analysis, which is a unique possibility within the MCWP approach, the origins of the characteristic features in the nuclear kinetic energy release spectra are identified for delays ranging from 0 to 140 fs and the nuclear dynamics in the singly excited states in H2 is mapped out.

  15. Excitation of Molecular Hydrogen in the Orion Bar Photodissociation Region from a Deep Near-infrared IGRINS Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kyle F.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Oh, Heeyoung; Mace, Gregory N.; Kim, Hwihyun; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Pavel, Michael D.; Lee, Sungho; Pak, Soojong; Park, Chan; Sok Oh, Jae; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2017-04-01

    We present a deep near-infrared spectrum of the Orion Bar Photodissociation Region (PDR) taken with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) on the 2.7 m telescope at the McDonald Observatory. IGRINS has high spectral resolution (R˜ {{45,000}}) and instantaneous broad wavelength coverage (1.45-2.45 μm), enabling us to detect 87 emission lines from rovibrationally excited molecular hydrogen (H2) that arise from transitions out of 69 upper rovibration levels of the electronic ground state. These levels cover a large range of rotational and vibrational quantum numbers and excitation energies, making them excellent probes of the excitation mechanisms of H2 and physical conditions within the PDR. The Orion Bar PDR is thought to consist of cooler high density clumps or filaments (T=50{--}250 K, {n}H={10}5{--}{10}7 cm-3) embedded in a warmer lower density medium (T=250{--}1000 K, {n}H={10}4{--}{10}5 cm-3). We fit a grid of constant temperature and density Cloudy models, which recreate the observed H2 level populations well, to constrain the temperature to a range of 600-650 K and the density to {n}H=2.5× {10}3{--}{10}4 cm-3. The best-fit model gives T = 625 K and {n}H=5× {10}3 cm-3. This well-constrained warm temperature is consistent with kinetic temperatures found by other studies for the Orion Bar’s lower density medium. However, the range of densities well fit by the model grid is marginally lower than those reported by other studies. We could be observing lower density gas than the surrounding medium, or perhaps a density-sensitive parameter in our models is not properly estimated.

  16. HIGHLY EXCITED H{sub 2} IN HERBIG–HARO 7: FORMATION PUMPING IN SHOCKED MOLECULAR GAS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, R. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Geballe, T. R. [Gemini Observatory, Hilo, HI (United States); Burton, M. G. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Chrysostomou, A. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-10

    We have obtained K -band spectra at R ∼ 5000 and an angular resolution of 0.″3 of a section of the Herbig–Haro 7 (HH7) bow shock, using the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph at Gemini North. Present in the portion of the data cube corresponding to the brightest part of the bow shock are emission lines of H{sub 2} with upper state energies ranging from ∼6000 K to the dissociation energy of H{sub 2}, ∼50,000 K. Because of low signal-to-noise ratios, the highest excitation lines cannot be easily seen elsewhere in the observed region. However, excitation temperatures, measured throughout much of the observed region using lines from levels as high as 25,000 K, are a strong function of upper level energy, indicating that the very highest levels are populated throughout. The level populations in the brightest region are well fit by a two-temperature model, with 98.5% of the emitting gas at T = 1800 K and 1.5% at T = 5200 K. The bulk of the H{sub 2} line emission in HH7, from the 1800 K gas, has previously been well-modeled by a continuous shock, but the 5200 K cozmponent is inconsistent with standalone standard continuous shock models. We discuss various possible origins for the hot component and suggest that this component is H{sub 2} newly reformed on dust grains and then ejected from them, presumably following dissociation of some of the H{sub 2} by the shock.

  17. In situ detection of atomic and molecular iodine using Resonance and Off-Resonance Fluorescence by Lamp Excitation: ROFLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Gómez Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a new instrument for in situ detection of atmospheric iodine atoms and molecules based on atomic and molecular resonance and off-resonance ultraviolet fluorescence excited by lamp emission. The instrument combines the robustness, light weight, low power consumption and efficient excitation of radio-frequency discharge light sources with the high sensitivity of the photon counting technique. Calibration of I2 fluorescence is achieved via quantitative detection of the molecule by Incoherent Broad Band Cavity-enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy. Atomic iodine fluorescence signal is calibrated by controlled broad band photolysis of known I2 concentrations in the visible spectral range at atmospheric pressure. The instrument has been optimised in laboratory experiments to reach detection limits of 1.2 pptv for I atoms and 13 pptv for I2, for S/N = 1 and 10 min of integration time. The ROFLEX system has been deployed in a field campaign in northern Spain, representing the first concurrent observation of ambient mixing ratios of iodine atoms and molecules in the 1–350 pptv range.

  18. Ab initio R-matrix/Multi-channel Quantum Defect Theory applied to Molecular Core Excitation and Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiyama, M.; Kosugi, N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Ab initio R-matrix/MQDT approach, which is a combination of ab initio R-matrix techniques and the multi channel quantum defect theory (MQDT), has recently been developed by one of the present authors (MH) and Child, to successfully obtain the potential energy curves of Rydberg states converging to not only the lowest but also the higher ionized states. This approach is also applied to estimate the valence state interaction with Rydberg and continuum (ionization) channels. Very recently we have made an original ab initio polyatomic R-matrix/MQDT program package, GSCF4R based on Gaussian type basis functions for the bound and continuum states, to extensively study molecular excitation and ionization in the X-ray region as well as in the VUV region. We are going to report the results for core excitation and ionization of diatomic molecules such as NO and O 2 to show that the R-matrix/MQDT method is indispensable to describe the core-to-Rydberg states with the higher quantum number and the continuum states. These results lead us to the conclusion that the close-coupling approximation augmented with the correlation term within the R-matrix/MQDT formalism is powerful to calculate the Rydberg-valence mixing and the interchannel coupling between several core-ionized states

  19. Excitation and deexcitation of N2 molecular levels. Induced fluorescence by electrons and laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Fernandez-Mayoralas, A.

    1989-01-01

    The electron impact excitation followed by fluorescence induced by N 2 -laser absorption was used to study the lifetime of the lowest vibrational level of the B 3 π g electronic state of N 2 . The experimental result of this work is 13 + 1 μs. To measure the lifetime of B 3 π g (v=2,3,5,6,7,8) levels the delayed coincidence method by electron impact was use. The lifetime values were compared with recent experimental and theoretical results. The relative intensi-ties of 3 π g --- A 3 Σ Ω + system bands, in the range (6540-10500 A o ) was measured using a hollow cathode lamp as spectral source. The relative transition moments and its dependence versus the r-centroid was obtained. Total cross sections for electron scattering by N molecules in the range 600 - 5000 eV have been obtained from measurements of the attenuation of a linear electron beam. The results have been compared with available experimental cross sections and with theoretical calculations based on the first Born approximation. (Author)

  20. Molecular Basis of Ion Channels and Receptors Involved in Nerve Excitation, Synaptic Transmission and Muscle Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-20

    R\\I) (CHARLES A SANDE[RS. Past Chairman {I IElNE 1. KAPLAN . General ,unsel (c-\\ itimol RODNEY W NI(HOI.S. Chief Fiveut,,, Officer [k.x fliui...MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR 221 𔃼 -7 acca cr Y. x a ý . a; > -, -~ 2x 1 Ft. 4• ,1; S4" វ - ɜ:4+ 222 ANNALS NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES with other...Physiol. 263: C267-C286. 22. KAPLAN , J, H. 1993. Molecular biology of carrier proteins. Cell 72: 13-18. 23. SOEJIMA, M. & A. NOMA. 1984. Mode of

  1. Theoretical Investigation of the Effect of the Rare Gas Matrices on the Vibrational Spectra of Solvated Molecular Ions: Cu+CO

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bludský, Ota; Šilhan, Martin; Nachtigall, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 20 (2002), s. 9298-9305 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : vibrational spectra * solvated molecular ions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.998, year: 2002

  2. Explicit Hilbert-space representations of atomic and molecular photoabsorption spectra: Computational studies of Stieltjes-Tchebycheff functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, M.R.; Langhoff, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    Explicit Hilbert-space techniques are reported for construction of the discrete and continuum Schroedinger states required in atomic and molecular photoexcitation and/or photoionization studies. These developments extend and clarify previously described moment-theory methods for determinations of photoabsorption cross sections from discrete basis-set calculations to include explicit construction of underlying wave functions. The appropriate Stieltjes-Tchebycheff excitation and ionization functions of nth order are defined as Radau-type eigenstates of an appropriate operator in an n-term Cauchy-Lanczos basis. The energies of these states are the Radau quadrature points of the photoabsorption cross section, and their (reciprocal) norms provide the corresponding quadrature weights. Although finite-order Stieltjes-Tchebycheff functions are L 2 integrable, and do not have asymptotic spatial tails in the continuous spectrum, the Radau quadrature weights nevertheless provide information for normalization in the conventional Dirac delta-function sense. Since one Radau point can be placed anywhere in the spectrum, appropriately normalized convergent approximations to any of the discrete or continuum Schroedinger states are obtained from the development. Connections with matrix partitioning methods are established, demonstrating that nth-order Stieltjes-Tchebycheff functions are optical-potential solutions of the matrix Schroedinger equation in the full Cauchy-Lanczos basis

  3. Microscopic nature of inhomogeneous line broadening: Analysis of the excitation-line-narrowing spectra of Cf4+ in CeF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, G.K.; Huang, J.; Beitz, J.V.

    1993-01-01

    Optical transitions between 5f states of tetravalent californium ion doped (1 metal-atom %) into CeF 4 exhibit unusually large inhomogeneous broadening. The nature of the inhomogeneous broadening in this system has been studied by using fluorescence line narrowing and excitation line narrowing (ELN). It is shown that the energy distributions of different electronic states of Cf 4+ in this system are correlated. In the ELN experiments, reduced excitation linewidth was obtained when selectively monitoring fluorescence emission. A linear relation was observed between the excitation energies of crystal-field states of the 5 G 4' manifold and the fluorescence wavelength monitored across the inhomogeneous profile of a 5 G 6' -- 7 F 6' transition. Analysis of these results by means of a microscopic theory proposed by Laird and Skinner [J. Chem. Phys. 90, 3880 (1989)] has provided insights into the structural properties of this disordered system

  4. Excitation-transcription coupling in skeletal muscle: the molecular pathways of exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Muscle fibres have different properties with respect to force, contraction speed, endurance, oxidative/glycolytic capacity etc. Although adult muscle fibres are normally post-mitotic with little turnover of cells, the physiological properties of the pre-existing fibres can be changed in the adult animal upon changes in usage such as after exercise. The signal to change is mainly conveyed by alterations in the patterns of nerve-evoked electrical activity, and is to a large extent due to switches in the expression of genes. Thus, an excitation-transcription coupling must exist. It is suggested that changes in nerve-evoked muscle activity lead to a variety of activity correlates such as increases in free intracellular Ca2+ levels caused by influx across the cell membrane and/or release from the sarcoplasmatic reticulum, concentrations of metabolites such as lipids and ADP, hypoxia and mechanical stress. Such correlates are detected by sensors such as protein kinase C (PKC), calmodulin, AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ), and oxygen dependent prolyl hydroxylases that trigger intracellular signaling cascades. These complex cascades involve several transcription factors such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), myogenic differentiation factor (myoD), myogenin, PPARδ, and sine oculis homeobox 1/eyes absent 1 (Six1/Eya1). These factors might act indirectly by inducing gene products that act back on the cascade, or as ultimate transcription factors binding to and transactivating/repressing genes for the fast and slow isoforms of various contractile proteins and of metabolic enzymes. The determination of size and force is even more complex as this involves not only intracellular signaling within the muscle fibres, but also muscle stem cells called satellite cells. Intercellular signaling substances such as myostatin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) seem to act in a paracrine

  5. Quantum chemical density functional theory studies on the molecular structure and vibrational spectra of Gallic acid imprinted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardeshi, Sushma; Dhodapkar, Rita; Kumar, Anupama

    2013-12-01

    Gallic acid (GA) is known by its antioxidant, anticarcinogenic properties and scavenger activity against several types of harmful free radicals. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are used in separation of a pure compound from complex matrices. A stable template-monomer complex generates the MIPs with the highest affinity and selectivity for the template. The quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) was used on the template Gallic acid (GA), monomer acrylic acid (AA) and GA-AA complex to study the nature of interactions involved in the GA-AA complex. B3LYP/6-31+G(2d,2p) model chemistry was used to optimize their structures and frequency calculations. The effect of porogen acetonitrile (ACN) on complex formation was included by using polarizable continuum model (PCM). The results demonstrated the formation of a stable GA-AA complex through the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between carboxylic acid groups of GA and AA. The Mulliken atomic charge analysis and simulated vibrational spectra also supported the stable hydrogen bonding interaction between the carboxylic acid groups of GA and AA with minimal interference of porogen ACN. Further, simulations on GA-AA mole ratio revealed that 1:4 GA-AA was optimum for synthesis of MIP for GA.

  6. Molecular structure, vibrational spectra and quantum chemical MP2/DFT studies toward the rational design of hydroxyurea imprinted polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bhim Bali; Rai, Garima

    2013-03-01

    In this study, both experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of template (hydroxyurea, HU), monomer (N-(4,6-bisacryloyl amino-[1,3,5] triazine-2-yl-)-acryl amide, TAT), and HU-TAT complexes were compared and these were respectively found to be in good agreement. Binding energies of HU, when complexed with different monomers, were computed using second order Moller Plesset theory (MP2) at 6-311++G(d,p) level both in the gas as well as solution phases. HU is an antineoplastic agent extensively being used in the treatment of polycythaemia Vera and thrombocythemia. It is also used to reduce the frequency of painful attacks in sickle cell anemia. It has antiretroviral property in disease like AIDS. All spectral characterizations were made using Density Functional Theory (DFT) at B3LYP employing 6-31+g(2d, 2p) basis set. The theoretical values for 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts were found to be in accordance with the corresponding experimental values. Of all different monomers studied for the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) systems, the monomer TAT (2 mol) was typically found to have a best binding score requisite for complexation with HU (1 mol) at the ground state.

  7. N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency: Novel mutation associated with neonatal presentation and literature review of molecular and phenotypic spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiman H. Al Kaabi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The urea cycle is the main pathway for the disposal of excess nitrogen. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1, the first and rate-limiting enzyme of urea cycle, is activated by N-acetylglutamate (NAG, and thus N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS is an essential part of the urea cycle. Although NAGS deficiency is the rarest urea cycle disorder, it is the only one that can be specifically and effectively treated by a drug, N-carbamylglutamate, a stable structural analogous of NAG that activates CPS1. Here we report an infant with NAGS deficiency who presented with neonatal hyperammonemia. She was found to have a novel homozygous splice-site mutation, c.1097-2A>T, in the NAGS gene. We describe the clinical course of this infant, who had rapid response to N-carbamylglutamate treatment. In addition, we reviewed the clinical and molecular spectra of previously reported individuals with NAGS deficiency, which presents in most cases with neonatal hyperammonemia, and in some cases the presentation is later, with a broad spectrum of ages and manifestations. With this broad later-onset phenotypic spectrum, maintaining a high index of suspicion is needed for the early diagnosis of this treatable disease.

  8. FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra, density functional computations of the vibrational spectra and molecular conformational analysis of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-hydroquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, N.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Dereli, Ö.; Türkkan, E.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of finding conformer among six different possible conformers of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-hydroquinone (DTBHQ), its equilibrium geometry and harmonic wavenumbers were calculated by the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method. The infrared and Raman spectra of DTBHQ were recorded in the region 400-4000 cm -1 and 50-3500 cm -1, respectively. In addition, the IR spectra in CCl 4 at various concentrations of DTBHQ are also recorded. The computed vibrational wavenumbers were compared with the IR and Raman experimental data. Computational calculations at B3LYP level with two different basis sets 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) are also employed in the study of the possible conformer of DTBHQ. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated using VEDA 4 program. The general agreement between the observed and calculated frequencies was established.

  9. The molecular, electronic structures and vibrational spectra of metal-free, N,N'-dideuterio and magnesium tetra-2,3-pyridino-porphyrazines: Density functional calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongqiang; Zhang, Xianxi; Zhang, Yuexing; Li, Renjie; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2006-10-01

    A theoretical investigation of the fully optimized geometries and electronic structures of the metal-free (TPdPzH(2)), N,N'-dideuterio (TPdPzD(2)), and magnesium (TPdPzMg) tetra-2,3-pyridino-porphyrazine has been conducted based on density functional theory. The optimized geometries at density functional theory level for these compounds are reported here for the first time. A comparison between the different molecules for the geometry, molecular orbital, and atomic charge is made. The substituent effect of the N atoms on the molecular structures of these compounds is discussed. The IR and Raman spectra for these three compounds have also been calculated at density functional B3LYP level using the 6-31G(d) basis set. Detailed assignments of the NH, NM, and pyridine ring vibrational bands in the IR and Raman spectra have been made based on assistance of animated pictures. The simulated IR spectra of TPdPzH(2) are compared with the experimental absorption spectra, and very good consistency has been found. The isotope effect on the IR and Raman spectra is also discussed.

  10. Molecular-dynamics study of the dynamical excitations in commensurate monolayer films of nitrogen molecules on graphite: A test of the corrugation in the nitrogen-graphite potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    1995-01-01

    The dynamical excitations in a commensurate monolayer solid of N2 molecules adsorbed on graphite have been studied using molecular-dynamics simulations. Velocity and rotational correlation functions as well as coherent intermediate scattering functions and dynamical structure factors have been ca...

  11. CINE: Comet INfrared Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-08-01

    CINE calculates infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. One of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets is the fluorescence by the solar radiation followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state. This command-line tool calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Fluorescence coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  12. Terahertz spectra revealing the collective excitation mode in charge-density-wave single crystal LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiumei; Jin, Zuanming; Lin, Xian; Ma, Guohong [Department of Physics, Shanghai University (China); Cheng, Zhenxiang [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Balakrishnan, Geetha [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    A low-energy collective excitation mode in charge-ordered multiferroic LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is reported via terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Upon cooling from 300 to 40 K, the central resonance frequency showed a pronounced hardening from 0.85 to 1.15 THz. In analogy to the well-known low-energy optical properties of LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, this emerging resonance was attributed to the charge-density-wave (CDW) collective excitations. By using the Drude-Lorentz model fitting, the CDW collective mode becomes increasingly damped with the increasing temperature. Furthermore, the kinks of the CDW collective mode at the magnetic transition temperature are analyzed, which indicate the coupling of spin order with electric polarization. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Photobleaching Response of Different Sources of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Exposed to Natural Solar Radiation Using Absorption and Excitation?Emission Matrix Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L.; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrea...

  14. Conformation of the azo bond and its influence on the molecular and crystal structures, IR and Raman spectra, and electron properties of 6-methyl-3,5-dinitro-2-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]pyridine - Quantum chemical DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, J.; Bryndal, I.; Lorenc, J.; Hermanowicz, K.; Janczak, J.; Hanuza, J.

    2018-02-01

    The crystal and molecular structures of 6-methyl-3,5-dinitro-2-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]pyridine have been determined by X-ray diffraction and quantum chemical DFT calculations. The crystal is monoclinic, space group Cc (No. 9) with Z = 4 with the unit cell parameters: a = 12.083(7), b = 12.881(6), c = 8.134(3) Å and β = 97.09(5)°. The azo-bridge appears in the trans conformation in which C2-N2-N2‧-C1‧ torsion angle takes a value - 178.6(3)°, whereas the dihedral angle between the planes of the phenyl and pyridine rings is 3.5(2)°. The IR and Raman spectra measured in the temperature range 80-350 K and quantum chemical calculations with the use of B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) approach confirmed the trans configuration of the azo-bridge as the most stable energetically and allowed determination of the energy other virtual structures. The observed effects were used in the discussion of vibrational dynamics of the studied compound. The energy gap between cis and trans conformers equals to 1.054 eV (0.03873 Hartree). The electron absorption and emission spectra have been measured and analyzed on the basis of DFT calculations. The life time of the excited state is 12 μs and the Stokes shift is close to 5470 cm- 1.

  15. Relative Stability of the La and Lb Excited States in Adenine and Guanine: Direct Evidence from TD-DFT Calculations of MCD Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Fabrizio; Improta, Roberto; Fahleson, Tobias; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-06-05

    The relative position of La and Lb ππ* electronic states in purine nucleobases is a much debated topic, since it can strongly affect our understanding of their photoexcited dynamics. To assess this point, we calculated the absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of adenine, guanine, and their nucleosides in gas-phase and aqueous solution, exploiting recent developments in MCD computational technology within time-dependent density functional theory. MCD spectroscopy allows us to resolve the intense S0→ La transition from the weak S0→ Lb transition. The spectra obtained in water solution, by using B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP functionals and describing solvent effect by cluster models and by the polarizable continuum model (PCM), are in very good agreement with the experimental counterparts, thus providing direct and unambiguous evidence that the energy ordering predicted by TD-DFT, La < Lb, is the correct one.

  16. Encapsulation of 3-hydroxyflavone and fisetin in β-cyclodextrins: Excited state proton transfer fluorescence and molecular mechanics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anwesha; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    2006-06-01

    Excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) and dual emission properties (emission profile, anisotropy and decay kinetics) of 3-hydroxyflavone (a synthetic, model flavonol) and fisetin (3,7,3',4'-OH-flavone, a therapeutically active plant flavonol) have been exploited to study their encapsulation in nano-cavities comprising of natural and chemically modified β-cyclodextrins. In the presence of β-CDs, both the flavonols show significantly enhanced relative yields (along with changes in other emission parameters) of the tautomer emission. In addition, for fisetin, large blue shifts are observed for the normal emission (which has significant charge transfer character). From these we infer that the flavonols are encaged in predominantly hydrophobic micro-environments, where external hydrogen bonding perturbations (interfering with the intrinsic ESIPT), and dipolar relaxation effects, are minimized. This is further explained from results of molecular mechanics calculations which indicate selectivity in orientation of the encapsulated flavonols. Moreover, chemical modification of the β-CDs is found to profoundly influence the binding affinities of the guest flavonols.

  17. On the excitation spectra of Cr{sup 3+}/Cr{sup 2+} and V{sup 3+} co-doped ZnAl{sub 2}S{sub 4} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, S., E-mail: anggell@gmail.com [Institute of Applied Physics, Academiei Str 5, Chis,inău MD-2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Anorganische Chemie III, Universitätsstrasse 150, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Brik, M.G. [College of Sciences, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14 C, Tartu 50411 (Estonia); Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Armii Krajowej 13/15, PL-42200 Czestochowa (Poland); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Aleja Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Ma, C.-G. [College of Sciences, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Sushkevich, K. [State University of Moldova, Mateevici Str 60, Chis,inău MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Kulyuk, L. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academiei Str 5, Chis,inău MD-2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The excitation spectra of the ZnAl{sub 2}S{sub 4} spinel crystals codoped with chromium and vanadium are investigated in order to explain some features of the Cr{sup 3+} ions optical spectra and the inconsistency of the experimental absorption/emission bands position with the Tanabe–Sugano diagram, as well as the “missing” band in the absorption spectrum of V{sup 3+} ion although this band should be present as it is due to a spin allowed transition. The unusual high Racah parameters of the C/B ratio for Cr{sup 3+} ions have been induced to recalculate the Tanabe–Sugano diagram for the d{sup 3} electron configuration and the ratio C/B=8 in order to use it for the experimental results interpretation. The presence of Cr{sup 2+} ions in the low spin electron configurations in the octahedral coordination was confirmed; the temperature dependence of the Cr{sup 2+} emission at about 1.9 eV was studied and the Huang–Rhys factors were estimated for different temperatures. Despite the fact that the V{sup 3+}C/B ratio has a different value compared to the case of Cr{sup 3+} ions, the electron–phonon interaction is similar for both ions, with the Huang–Rhys parameter equal to 10 in both cases. Further research into optimizing the ZnAl{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Cr, V system to get an efficient enhancement of the vanadium emission on account on re-absorbing the chromium emission is suggested. - Highlights: • The spectroscopic properties of Cr and V codoped α-ZnAI{sub 2}S{sub 4} have been investigated. • The crystal field calculations have been performed. • The Huang–Rhys factors have been estimated for different temperatures. • The theoretical calculations have been correlated with the excitation spectra.

  18. Efficient "on-the-fly" calculation of Raman spectra from ab-initio molecular dynamics: Application to hydrophobic/hydrophilic solutes in bulk water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partovi-Azar, Pouya; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-11-05

    We present a novel computational method to accurately calculate Raman spectra from first principles. Together with an extension of the second-generation Car-Parrinello method of Kühne et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2007, 98, 066401) to propagate maximally localized Wannier functions together with the nuclei, a speed-up of one order of magnitude can be observed. This scheme thus allows to routinely calculate finite-temperature Raman spectra "on-the-fly" by means of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. To demonstrate the predictive power of this approach we investigate the effect of hydrophobic and hydrophilic solutes in water solution on the infrared and Raman spectra. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs step quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinling; Cheng, Shuying; Lai, Yunfeng; Zheng, Qiao; Chen, Yonghai

    2014-03-19

    : Spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) at inter-band excitation have been experimentally investigated in InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs step quantum wells (QWs) at room temperature. The Rashba- and Dresselhaus-induced CPGE spectra are quite similar with each other during the spectral region corresponding to the transition of the excitonic state 1H1E (the first valence subband of heavy hole to the first conduction subband of electrons). The ratio of Rashba- and Dresselhaus-induced CPGE current for the transition 1H1E is estimated to be 8.8±0.1, much larger than that obtained in symmetric QWs (4.95). Compared to symmetric QWs, the reduced well width enhances the Dresselhaus-type spin splitting, but the Rashba-type spin splitting increases more rapidly in the step QWs. Since the degree of the segregation effect of indium atoms and the intensity of build-in field in the step QWs are comparable to those in symmetric QWs, as proved by reflectance difference and photoreflectance spectra, respectively, the larger Rashba-type spin splitting is mainly induced by the additional interface introduced by step structures.

  20. LIF excitation spectra for S 0 → S 1 transition of deuterated anthranilic acid COOD, ND 2 in supersonic-jet expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolek, Przemysław; Leśniewski, Sebastian; Andrzejak, Marcin; Góra, Maciej; Cias, Pawel; Weģrzynowicz, Adam; Najbar, Jan

    2010-12-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation spectrum for the S 0 → S 1 transition of anthranilic acid molecules deuterated in the substituent groups (COOD, ND 2) was investigated. Analysis of the LIF spectrum allowed for the assignment of the six most prominent fundamental in-plane modes of frequencies up to ca. 850 cm. The experimental results show good correlation with the frequency changes upon deuteration computed with CIS (CI-Singles) and TD-DFT for the S 1 state. Deuteration induced red-shifts of the identified fundamental bands are used for examination of the alternative assignments proposed in earlier studies. Potential energy distributions (PED) and overlaps of the in-plane normal modes with frequencies below 850 cm indicate that the correspondence of the respective vibrations of the deuterated and non-deuterated molecule is very good. A blue-shift of the 00 transition due to the isotopic substitution, is equal to 47 cm. This relatively large value is caused primarily by a significant decrease of the N-H stretching frequency associated with the increase of strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bond upon the electronic excitation. The deuteration shift of the 00 band was interpreted in terms of the differences of the zero point energy (ZPE) between the S 0 and S 1 electronic states, computed with DFT and TD-DFT methods, respectively.

  1. Vibrational spectra (FT-IR, FT-Raman), frontier molecular orbital, first hyperpolarizability, NBO analysis and thermodynamics properties of Piroxicam by HF and DFT methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, S.; Gunasekaran, S.; Srinivasan, S.

    2015-03-01

    The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-Hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(2-pyridinyl)-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide-1,1-dioxide (Piroxicam) have been recorded in the region 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1 respectively. The molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies and bonding features of piroxicam in the ground state have been calculated by Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) methods using 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies are scaled and they are compared with experimental obtained by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of the title compound has been made on the basis of the calculated potential energy distribution (PED). The electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) are also performed. The linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyper polarizability (β) values of the title compound have been computed. The molecular stability arising from hyper conjugative interaction, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis.

  2. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Radtke, M.; Vincze, L.; Rackwitz, V.; Reuter, D.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  3. Fluorescence and excitation spectra of Bk3+, Cf3+, and Es3+ ions in single crystals of LaCl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessler, J.P.; Caird, J.A.; Carnall, W.T.; Crosswhite, H.M.; Sjoblom, R.K.; Wagner, F. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Dye laser techniques have been used to study the energy level structure of the heavier actinides in single crystals of lanthanum chloride. In the case of einsteinium, fluorescence was detected and measured from the following manifolds: J = 5 at 0.984 μm -1 , J = 4 at 1.572 μm -1 , J = 6 at 2.930 μm -1 . This fluorescence was observed to the five lowest manifolds: J = 8, 5, 7, 2, 6. For californium, fluorescence has been detected from the manifolds: J = 11/2 at 1.190 μm -1 , J = 7/2 at 1.389 μm -1 , J = 5/2 at 1.977 μm -1 . This fluorescence was observed to the three lowest manifolds: J = 15/2, 9/2, 11/2. The fluorescence manifolds of berkelium are J = 6 at 1.540 μm -1 , and J = 4 at 1.953 μm -1 . The three lowest manifolds, J = 6, 5, and 4, have been observed in fluorescence. Absorption spectra data have yielded crystal-field splitting measurements in the higher manifolds of Es + . The location of the manifolds in general confirmed earlier approximate free-ion level structure calculations based on assumed regularities in the energy level parameters derived from spectra of the actinide ions through Cf + . 2 figures

  4. Intramolecular deactivation processes of electronically excited Lanthanide(III) complexes with organic acids of low molecular weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek, Katja; Eidner, Sascha; Kuke, Stefanie; Kumke, Michael U.

    2018-02-01

    The luminescence of Lanthanide(III) complexes with different model ligands was studied under direct as well as sensitized excitation conditions. The research was performed in the context of studies dealing with deep-underground storages for high-level nuclear waste. Here, Lanthanide(III) ions served as natural analogues for Actinide(III) ions and the low-molecular weight organic ligands are present in clay minerals and furthermore, they were employed as proxies for building blocks of humic substances, which are important complexing molecules in the natural environment, e.g., in the far field of a repository site. Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy was applied for a detailed characterization of Eu(III), Tb(III), Sm(III) and Dy(III) complexes in aqueous solutions. Based on the observed luminescence the ligands were tentatively divided into two groups (A, B). The luminescence of Lanthanide(III) complexes of group A was mainly influenced by an energy transfer to OH-vibrations. Lanthanide(III) complexes of group B showed ligand-related luminescence quenching, which was further investigated. To gain more information on the underlying quenching processes of group A and B ligands, measurements at different temperatures (77 K ≤ T ≤ 353 K) were performed and activation energies were determined based on an Arrhenius analysis. Moreover, the influence of the ionic strength between 0 M ≤ I ≤ 4 M on the Lanthanide(III) luminescence was monitored for different complexes, in order to evaluate the influence of specific conditions encountered in host rocks foreseen as potential repository sites.

  5. Excited-state relaxation of some aminoquinolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and fluorescence rate constants ( k f of 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzoxazolylquinoline (I, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylquinoline (II, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -methoxybenzothiazolyl-quinoline (III, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylbenzoquinoline (IV at different temperatures have been measured. The shortwavelength shift of fluorescence spectra of compounds studied (23–49 nm in ethanol as the temperature decreases (the solvent viscosity increases points out that the excited-state relaxation process takes place. The rate of this process depends essentially on the solvent viscosity, but not the solvent polarity. The essential increasing of fluorescence rate constant k f (up to about 7 times as the solvent viscosity increases proves the existence of excited-state structural relaxation consisting in the mutual internal rotation of molecular fragments of aminoquinolines studied, followed by the solvent orientational relaxation.

  6. Strategies to enhance the excitation energy-transfer efficiency in a light-harvesting system using the intra-molecular charge transfer character of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukihira, Nao [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Sugai, Yuko [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Fujiwara, Masazumi [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Kosumi, Daisuke [Institute of Pulsed Power Science; Kumamoto University; Kumamoto; Japan; Iha, Masahiko [South Product Co. Ltd.; Uruma-shi; Japan; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko [Department of Chemistry; Graduate School of Science; Osaka City University; Osaka 558-8585; Japan; Katsumura, Shigeo [Department of Chemistry; Graduate School of Science; Osaka City University; Osaka 558-8585; Japan; Gardiner, Alastair T. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre; University of Glasgow; 126 University Place; Glasgow, G12 8QQ; UK; Cogdell, Richard J. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre; University of Glasgow; 126 University Place; Glasgow, G12 8QQ; UK; Hashimoto, Hideki [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan

    2017-01-01

    Fucoxanthin is a carotenoid that is mainly found in light-harvesting complexes from brown algae and diatoms. Due to the presence of a carbonyl group attached to polyene chains in polar environments, excitation produces an excited intra-molecular charge transfer. This intra-molecular charge transfer state plays a key role in the highly efficient (~95%) energy-transfer from fucoxanthin to chlorophyllain the light-harvesting complexes from brown algae. In purple bacterial light-harvesting systems the efficiency of excitation energy-transfer from carotenoids to bacteriochlorophylls depends on the extent of conjugation of the carotenoids. In this study we were successful, for the first time, in incorporating fucoxanthin into a light-harvesting complex 1 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium,Rhodospirillum rubrumG9+ (a carotenoidless strain). Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy was applied to this reconstituted light-harvesting complex in order to determine the efficiency of excitation energy-transfer from fucoxanthin to bacteriochlorophyllawhen they are bound to the light-harvesting 1 apo-proteins.

  7. Electron-impact excitation and recombination of molecular cations in edge fusion plasma: application to H2+and BeD+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Nicolina; Iacob, Felix; Mezei, Zsolt; Motapon, Ousmanou; Niyonzima, Sebastien; Schneider, Ioan

    2017-10-01

    Dissociative recombination, ro-vibrational excitation and dissociative excitation of molecular cations with electrons are major elementary process in the kinetics and in the energy balance of astrophysically-relevant ionized media (supernovae, interstellar molecular clouds, planetary ionospheres, early Universe), in edge fusion and in many other cold media of technological interest. For the fusion plasma edge, extensive cross sections and rate coefficients have been produced for reactions induced on HD+, H2+ and BeD+ using the Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory (MQDT). Our calculations resulted in good agreement with the CRYRING (Stockholm) and TSR (Heidelberg) magnetic storage ring results, and our approach is permanently improved in order to face the new generation of electrostatic storage rings, as CSR (Heidelberg) and DESIREE (Stockholm). Member of APS Reciprocal Society: European Physics Society.

  8. Temperature dependence of spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinling; Cheng, Shuying; Lai, Yunfeng; Zheng, Qiao; Zhu, Laipan; Chen, Yonghai; Ren, Jun

    2015-10-19

    Spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) at inter-band excitation have been experimentally investigated in InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells at a temperature range of 80 to 290 K. It is found that, the sign of Rashba-type current reverses at low temperatures, while that of Dresselhaus-type remains unchanged. The temperature dependence of ratio of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling parameters, increasing from -6.7 to 17.9, is obtained, and the possible reasons are discussed. We also develop a model to extract the Rashba-type effective electric field at different temperatures. It is demonstrated that excitonic effect will significantly influence the Rashba-type CPGE, while it has little effect on Dresselhaus-type CPGE.

  9. Autoionization spectra of He excited by fast (MeV) H/sup +/, He/sup +/, and Li/sup n//sup +/ (N = 1,2,3) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, D.; Arcuni, P.; Bruch, P.; Stoeffler, W.

    1983-01-01

    Autoionization spectra of He following excitation by 1 to 3 MeV H/sup +/, He/sup +/, and Li/sup n//sup +/ (n = 1,2,3) have been measured as a function of observation angle. The (2p/sup 2/)/sup 1/D and (2s2p)/sup 1/P resonances have been examined and a strong dependence on projectile velocities, charge state and observation angle was found. The measurements were performed in a crossed-beam scattering chamber. The target-gas pressure was in the order of 10/sup -4/ Torr. The secondary electrons have been energy analyzed by a 45/sup 0/ parallel-plate analyzer. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  10. A “Swingable” straight-chain affinity molecule immobilized on a semi-conductor electrode for photo-excited current-based molecular sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsuji, Yoshiyuki; Wakabayashi, Ryo; Sakakura, Tatsuya; Haruyama, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    The molecular affinities of biomolecules have found applications in the areas of clinical diagnostics, drug discovery, as well as allied fields of study. An affinity sensor is a unique in situ assay tool, which is valuable and convenient in practical situations. In this study, we designed a photo-excitable molecular interface with an affinity domain and fabricated with a “swingable” straight-chain affinity molecule immobilized on a semi-conductor electrode (SCE). The straight-chain affinity molecule possessed a photo-excitable dye at one end and was bound to the SCE surface at the other by the EC tag method, which was developed previously. A straight-chain molecule is too long to transfer electrons from the photo-excited dye to the conduction band of the SCE. However, the straight-chain molecule was designed with a “swing” structure, which made the transfer of electrons possible. The central region of the chain molecule has an affinity to the activated estrogen receptor (ER). When the activated ER bound to the affinity region, the molecular lost its swingable function, the electron transfer from the photo-excited dye to the SCE was consequently suppressed. Based on the unique swingable molecular interface, the affinity sensor can be used to determine the in situ concentration of endocrine disrupter ESTROGEN (17β-estradiol) at concentrations ranging from 2 to 10 nM with very good reproducibility. The superior assay reproducibility is responsible for the success of the EC tag method, which is a quantitative method for immobilizing molecules on SCE.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of riboflavin on nanostructured Ag surfaces: The role of excitation wavelength, plasmon resonance and molecular resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šubr, Martin; Kuzminova, Anna; Kylián, Ondřej; Procházka, Marek

    2018-05-01

    Optimization of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensors for (bio)analytical applications has received much attention in recent years. For optimum sensitivity, both the nanostructure fabrication process and the choice of the excitation wavelength used with respect to the specific analyte studied are of crucial importance. In this contribution, detailed SERS intensity profiles were measured using gradient nanostructures with the localized surface-plasmon resonance (LSPR) condition varying across the sample length and using riboflavin as the model biomolecule. Three different excitation wavelengths (633 nm, 515 nm and 488 nm) corresponding to non-resonance, pre-resonance and resonance excitation with respect to the studied molecule, respectively, were tested. Results were interpreted in terms of a superposition of the enhancement provided by the electromagnetic mechanism and intrinsic properties of the SERS probe molecule. The first effect was dictated mainly by the degree of spectral overlap between the LSPR band, the excitation wavelength along with the scattering cross-section of the nanostructures, while the latter was influenced by the position of the molecular resonance with respect to the excitation wavelength. Our experimental findings contribute to a better understanding of the SERS enhancement mechanism.

  12. LIME - a flexible, non-LTE line excitation and radiation transfer method for millimeter and far-infrared wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Christian; Hogerheijde, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    We present a new code for solving the molecular and atomic excitation and radiation transfer problem in a molecular gas and predicting emergent spectra. This code works in arbitrary three dimensional geometry using unstructured Delaunay latices for the transport of photons. Various physical model...

  13. Excited-state kinetics of the carotenoid S//1 state in LHC II and two-photon excitation spectra of lutein and beta-carotene in solution Efficient Car S//1 yields Chl electronic energy transfer via hot S//1 states?

    CERN Document Server

    Walla, P J; Linden, Patricia A; Ohta, Kaoru

    2002-01-01

    The excited-state dynamics of the carotenoids (Car) in light- harvesting complex II (LHC II) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were studied by transient absorption measurements. The decay of the Car S //1 population ranges from similar to 200 fs to over 7 ps, depending on the excitation and detection wavelengths. In contrast, a 200 fs Car S//1 yields Chlorophyll (Chl) energy transfer component was the dominant time constant for our earlier two-photon fluorescence up- conversion measurements (Walla, P.J. ; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 4799-4806). We also present the two-photon excitation (TPE) spectra of lutein and beta-carotene in solution and compare them with the TPE spectrum of LHC II. The TPE-spectrum of LHC II has an onset much further to the blue and a width that is narrower than expected from comparison to the S//1 fluorescence of lutein and beta-carotene in solution. Different environments may affect the shape of the S//1 spectrum significantly. To explain the blue shift of the TPE spectrum and the d...

  14. Electronic spectra and structures of some biologically important xanthines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, M. K.; Mishra, P. C.

    1994-08-01

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of aqueous solutions of xanthine, caffeine, theophylline and theobromine have been studied at different pH. The observed spectra have been interpreted in terms of neutral and ionic forms of the molecules with the help of molecular orbital calculations. At neutral and acidic pH, the spectra can be assigned to the corresponding most stable neutral forms, with the exception that the fluorescence of xanthine at acidic pH appears to originate from the lowest singlet excited state of a cation of the molecule. At alkaline pH, xanthine and theophylline exist mainly as their monoanions. In xanthine and theophylline at alkaline pH, fluorescence originates from the lowest singlet excited state of the corresponding anion. However, in caffeine and theobromine, even at alkaline pH, fluorescence belongs to the neutral species. On the whole, the properties of xanthine are quite different from those of the methyl xanthines.

  15. [Fluorescence spectra analysis of the scrophularia soup].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li-hua; Song, Feng; Han, Juan; Su, Jing; Qu, Fei-fei; Song, Yi-zhan; Hu, Bo-lin; Tian, Jian-guo

    2008-08-01

    The cold-water and boiled-water soaked scrophularia soups have been prepared. The emission and excitation spectra of each scrophularia soup under different conditions have been measured at room temperature. The pH values of the different scrophularia soups have been also detected. There are obvious differences between the cold-water soaked scrophularia soup and the boiled-water soaked scrophularia. For both soups the emission wavelength increases with the wavelength of the excitation, but the peaks of the emission spectra for cold-water and boiled-water soaked scrophularia soup are different, which are 441 and 532 nm, respectively. Excitation spectrum has double peaks in the cold-water soaked scrophularia soup while only one peak with longer wavelength in the boiled-water soaked one. The pH value changes from 5.5 to 4.1. According to the organic admixture fluorescence mechanism we analyzed the reasons of the experimental results. Through heating, the interaction in different fluorescence molecular and the energy transfer process in the same fluorescence molecular become more active, and the conjugate structures and the generation of hydrogen bonds, increase. The fluorescence measurement is of value for the scrophularia pharmacology analysis and provides an analytical method for the quality identification of scrophularia soup.

  16. Molecular dynamics study of structure and vibrational spectra at zwitterionoic lipid/aqueous KCl, NaCl, and CaCl2 solution interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Shirai, Shinnosuke; Okumura, Tomoaki; Morita, Akihiro

    2018-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of KCl, NaCl, and CaCl2 solution/dipalmytoylphosphatidylcholine lipid interfaces were performed to analyze heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (HD-VSFG) spectra in relation to the interfacial water structure. The present MD simulation well reproduces the experimental spectra and elucidates a specific cation effect on the interfacial structure. The K+, Na+, and Ca2+ cation species penetrate in the lipid layer more than the anions in this order, due to the electrostatic interaction with negative polar groups of lipid, and the electric double layer between the cations and anions cancels the intrinsic orientation of water at the water/lipid interface. These mechanisms explain the HD-VSFG spectrum of the water/lipid interface and its spectral perturbation by adding the ions. The lipid monolayer reverses the order of surface preference of the cations at the solution/lipid interface from that at the solution/air interface.

  17. Comparison of the performance of different DFT methods in the calculations of the molecular structure and vibration spectra of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Gao, Hongwei

    2012-04-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter which plays an important role in treating acute or clinical stress. The comparative performance of different density functional theory (DFT) methods at various basis sets in predicting the molecular structure and vibration spectra of serotonin was reported. The calculation results of different methods including mPW1PW91, HCTH, SVWN, PBEPBE, B3PW91 and B3LYP with various basis sets including LANL2DZ, SDD, LANL2MB, 6-31G, 6-311++G and 6-311+G* were compared with the experimental data. It is remarkable that the SVWN/6-311++G and SVWN/6-311+G* levels afford the best quality to predict the structure of serotonin. The results also indicate that PBEPBE/LANL2DZ level show better performance in the vibration spectra prediction of serotonin than other DFT methods.

  18. Lipid Dynamics Studied by Calculation of 31P Solid-State NMR Spectra Using Ensembles from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Krogh; Vestergaard, Mikkel; Thøgersen, Lea

    2014-01-01

    , for example, order parameters. Therefore, valuable insight into the dynamics of biomolecules may be achieved by the present method. We have applied this method to study the dynamics of lipid bilayers containing the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin, and we show that the calculated 31P spectra obtained...

  19. Prediction of EPR Spectra of Lyotropic Liquid Crystals using a Combination of Molecular Dynamics Simulations and the Model-Free Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Christopher; Oganesyan, Vasily S

    2017-09-21

    We report the first application of fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to the prediction of the motional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of lyotropic liquid crystals in different aggregation states doped with a paramagnetic spin probe. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, given that EPR spectra are highly sensitive to the motions and order of the spin probes doped within lyotropic aggregates, simulation of EPR line shapes from the results of MD modelling provides an ultimate test bed for the force fields currently employed to model such systems. Second, the EPR line shapes are simulated using the motional parameters extracted from MD trajectories using the Model-Free (MF) approach. Thus a combined MD-EPR methodology allowed us to test directly the validity of the application of the MF approach to systems with multi-component molecular motions. All-atom MD simulations using the General AMBER Force Field (GAFF) have been performed on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC) liquid crystals. The resulting MD trajectories were used to predict and interpret the EPR spectra of pre-micellar, micellar, rod and lamellar aggregates. The predicted EPR spectra demonstrate good agreement with most of experimental line shapes thus confirming the validity of both the force fields employed and the MF approach for the studied systems. At the same time simulation results confirm that GAFF tends to overestimate the packing and the order of the carbonyl chains of the surfactant molecules. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. What Lurks in ULIRGs?—Probing the Chemistry and Excitation of Molecular Gas in the Nuclei of Arp 220 and NGC 6240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar, Swarnima; Scoville, Nick [California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We have imaged the dense star-forming regions of Arp 220 and NGC 6240 in the 3 mm band transitions of CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, and CS at 0.″5–0.″8 resolution using CARMA. Our data set images all these lines at similar resolutions and high sensitivity, and can be used to derive line ratios of faint high excitation lines. In both the nuclei of Arp 220, the HCN/HNC ratios suggest chemistry of X-ray Dominated Regions (XDRs)—a likely signature of an active galactic nucleus. In NGC 6240, there is no evidence of XDR type chemistry, but there the bulk of the molecular gas is concentrated between the nuclei rather than on them. We calculated molecular H{sub 2} densities from excitation analysis of each of the molecular species. It appears that the abundances of HNC and HCO{sup +} in Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies may be significantly different from those in galactic molecular clouds. The derived H{sub 2} volume densities are ∼5 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup −3} in the Arp 220 nuclei and ∼10{sup 4} cm{sup −3} in NGC 6240.

  1. Vibronic effects and destruction of exciton coherence in optical spectra of J-aggregates: A variational polaron transformation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloemsma, E.A.; Silvis, M.H.; Stradomska, A.; Knoester, J., E-mail: j.knoester@rug.nl

    2016-12-20

    Using a symmetry adapted polaron transformation of the Holstein Hamiltonian, we study the interplay of electronic excitation-vibration couplings, resonance excitation transfer interactions, and temperature in the linear absorption spectra of molecular J-aggregates. Semi-analytical expressions for the spectra are derived and compared with results obtained from direct numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian in the two-particle basis set representation. At zero temperature, we show that our polaron transformation reproduces both the collective (exciton) and single-molecule (vibrational) optical response associated with the appropriate standard perturbation limits. Specifically, for the molecular dimer excellent agreement with the spectra from the two-particle approach for the entire range of model parameters is obtained. This is in marked contrast to commonly used polaron transformations. Upon increasing the temperature, the spectra show a transition from the collective to the individual molecular features, which results from the thermal destruction of the exciton coherence.

  2. DFT Calculation of IR Absorption Spectra for PCE-nH2O, TCE-nH2O, DCE-nH2O, VC-nH2O for Small and Water-Dominated Molecular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-31

    VC-nH2O for Small and Water-Dominated Molecular Clusters October 31, 2017 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. L. Huang S.g...Calculation of IR Absorption Spectra for PCE-nH2O, TCE-nH2O, DCE-nH2O, VC-nH2O for Small and Water-Dominated Molecular Clusters L. Huang,1 S.G...nH2O molecular clusters using density function theory (DFT). DFT can provide interpretation of absorption spectra with respect to molecular

  3. Vibrational Spectra of β″-Type BEDT-TTF Salts: Relationship between Conducting Property, Time-Averaged Site Charge and Inter-Molecular Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamamoto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the conducting behavior and the degree of charge fluctuation in the β″-type BEDT-TTF salts is reviewed from the standpoints of vibrational spectroscopy and crystal structure. A group of β″-type ET salts demonstrates the best model compounds for achieving the above relationship because the two-dimensional structure is simple and great diversity in conducting behavior is realized under ambient pressure. After describing the requirement for the model compound, the methodology for analyzing the results of the vibrational spectra is presented. Vibrational spectroscopy provides the time-averaged molecular charge, the charge distribution in the two-dimensional layer, and the inter-molecular interactions, etc. The experimental results applied to 2/3-filled and 3/4-filled β″-type ET salts are reported. These experimental results suggest that the conducting property, the difference in the time-averaged molecular charges between the ionic and neutral-like sites, the alternation in the inter-molecular distances and the energy levels in the charge distributions are relevant to one another. The difference in the time-averaged molecular charges, ∆ρ, is a useful criterion for indicating conducting behavior. All superconductors presented in this review are characterized as small but finite ∆ρ.

  4. Effects of the molecular rotational dynamics on dielectric and far-infra-red spectra of anisotropic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordio, P.L.; Segre, U.

    1981-01-01

    Dielectric and far-infra-red spectra of uniaxial liquid-crystal phase are analysed in terms of correlation functions calculated by a memory function formalism. SAIL (strong anisotropic interaction limit) conditions are always found to apply, resulting in diffusional regime at low working frequencies. Dipole friction has been also included in the calculations to consider many-particle interactions, its effect being analogous to the introduction of slowly relaxing local structures. (author)

  5. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging as a means to discriminate various tissues types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Joshua; Favreau, Peter F.; Lopez, Carmen; Lall, Malvika; Weber, David S.; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2017-02-01

    Little is currently known about the fluorescence excitation spectra of disparate tissues and how these spectra change with pathological state. Current imaging diagnostic techniques have limited capacity to investigate fluorescence excitation spectral characteristics. This study utilized excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging to perform a comprehensive assessment of fluorescence spectral signatures of various tissues. Immediately following tissue harvest, a custom inverted microscope (TE-2000, Nikon Instruments) with Xe arc lamp and thin film tunable filter array (VersaChrome, Semrock, Inc.) were used to acquire hyperspectral image data from each sample. Scans utilized excitation wavelengths from 340 nm to 550 nm in 5 nm increments. Hyperspectral images were analyzed with custom Matlab scripts including linear spectral unmixing (LSU), principal component analysis (PCA), and Gaussian mixture modeling (GMM). Spectra were examined for potential characteristic features such as consistent intensity peaks at specific wavelengths or intensity ratios among significant wavelengths. The resultant spectral features were conserved among tissues of similar molecular composition. Additionally, excitation spectra appear to be a mixture of pure endmembers with commonalities across tissues of varied molecular composition, potentially identifiable through GMM. These results suggest the presence of common autofluorescent molecules in most tissues and that excitationscanning hyperspectral imaging may serve as an approach for characterizing tissue composition as well as pathologic state. Future work will test the feasibility of excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging as a contrast mode for discriminating normal and pathological tissues.

  6. The past and the future of Alzheimer’s disease CSF biomarkers – a journey towards validated biochemical tests covering the whole spectra of molecular events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaj eBlennow

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a short review on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, from early developments to high-precision validated assays on fully automated lab analyzers. We also discuss developments on novel biomarkers, such as synaptic proteins and Aβ oligomers. Our vision for the future is that assaying a set of biomarkers in a single CSF tube can monitor the whole spectra of AD molecular pathogenic events. CSF biomarkers will have a central position not only for clinical diagnosis, but also for the understanding of the sequence of molecular events in the pathogenic process underlying AD and as tools to monitor the effects of novel drug candidates targeting these different mechanisms.

  7. The Born-Oppenheimer molecular simulations of infrared spectra of crystalline poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate with analysis of weak Csbnd H⋯Odbnd C hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brela, Mateusz Z.; Boczar, Marek; Wójcik, Marek J.; Sato, Harumi; Nakajima, Takahito; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2017-06-01

    In this letter we present results of study of weak Csbnd H⋯Odbnd C hydrogen bonds of crystalline poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) by using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. The polymeric structure and IR spectra of PHB result from the presence of the weak hydrogen bonds. We applied the post-molecular dynamics analysis to consider a Cdbnd O motion as indirectly involved in the hydrogen bonds. Quantization of the nuclear motion of the oxygens was done to perform detailed analysis of the strength and properties of the Cdbnd O bands involved in the weak hydrogen bonds. We have also shown the dynamic character of the weak hydrogen bond interactions.

  8. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of molecules and molecular fragments. Annual progress report, March 1992 - February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In this report, the author will review the progress made in his studies of ion rotational distributions resulting from resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of excited electronic states and from single-photon ionization of ground electronic states of jet-cooled molecules by coherent VUV and XUV radiation. To do so he will select a few examples from his studies which serve to highlight his progress and to identify the background and significance of the specific spectral features and systems he has chosen to study

  9. Physical Meaning of Virtual Kohn-Sham Orbitals and Orbital Energies: An Ideal Basis for the Description of Molecular Excitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, R.; Gritsenko, O.V.; Baerends, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several benchmark studies on the performance of large sets of functionals in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations of excitation energies have been performed. The tested functionals do not approximate exact Kohn-Sham orbitals and orbital energies closely. We

  10. Electron spectra resulting from autoionization in low-energy Li+ + He collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, A.; Wakiya, K.; Takayanagi, T.; Suzuki, H.; Koike, F.

    1979-09-01

    Spectra of electrons ejected from doubly excited states of helium have been extensively measured at several observation angles fro impact with lithium ions at energies lower than 5 KeV. ''Molecular-autoionization'' spectra have been found at forward observation angles, and analyzed in terms of the Gerber-Niehaus theory with modification. The spectral shapes of atomic-autoionization peaks have been discussed in relation to both the Barker-Berry effect and the Doppler effect. Excitation cross sections of autoionizing states have been determined by a new method that uses simultaneous impact of ions and electrons. (author)

  11. Imprints of the Molecular Electronic Structure in the Photoelectron Spectra of Strong-Field Ionized Asymmetric Triatomic Model Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Matthias; Yue, Lun; Gräfe, Stefanie

    2018-06-01

    We examine the circular dichroism in the angular distribution of photoelectrons of triatomic model systems ionized by strong-field ionization. Following our recent work on this effect [Paul, Yue, and Gräfe, J. Mod. Opt. 64, 1104 (2017), 10.1080/09500340.2017.1299883], we demonstrate how the symmetry and electronic structure of the system is imprinted into the photoelectron momentum distribution. We use classical trajectories to reveal the origin of the threefolded pattern in the photoelectron momentum distribution, and show how an asymmetric nuclear configuration of the triatomic system effects the photoelectron spectra.

  12. Two-dimensional 1H and 31P NMR spectra and restrained molecular dynamics structure of an oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplex refined via a hybrid relaxation matrix procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, R.; Jones, C.R.; Gorenstein, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Assignment of the 1H and 31P resonances of a decamer DNA duplex, d(CGCTTAAGCG)2 was determined by two-dimensional COSY, NOESY and 1H-31P Pure Absorption phase Constant time (PAC) heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy. The solution structure of the decamer was calculated by an iterative hybrid relaxation matrix method combined with NOESY-distance restrained molecular dynamics. The distances from the 2D NOESY spectra were calculated from the relaxation rate matrix which were evaluated from a hybrid NOESY volume matrix comprising elements from the experiment and those calculated from an initial structure. The hybrid matrix-derived distances were then used in a restrained molecular dynamics procedure to obtain a new structure that better approximates the NOESY spectra. The resulting partially refined structure was then used to calculate an improved theoretical NOESY volume matrix which is once again merged with the experimental matrix until refinement is complete. JH3'-P coupling constants for each of the phosphates of the decamer were obtained from 1H-31P J-resolved selective proton flip 2D spectra. By using a modified Karplus relationship the C4'-C3'-O3'-P torsional angles were obtained. Comparison of the 31P chemical shifts and JH3'-P coupling constants of this sequence has allowed a greater insight into the various factors responsible for 31P chemical shift variations in oligonucleotides. It also provides an important probe of the sequence-dependent structural variation of the deoxyribose phosphate backbone of DNA in solution. These correlations are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in local helical structure perturb the deoxyribose phosphate backbone. The variation of the 31P chemical shift, and the degree of this variation from one base step to the next is proposed as a potential probe of local helical conformation within the DNA double helix

  13. Tunable submillimeter sources applied to the excited state rotational spectroscopy and kinetics of CH3F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumberg, W.A.M.; Fetterman, H.R.; Peck, D.D.; Goldsmith, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Tunable submillimeter radiation, generated and detected using optically pumped lasers and Schottky diode mixers, has been used in an infrared-submillimeter double resonance investigation of CH 3 F. This technique permits the direct observation of the molecular rotational spectra and kinetics of excited vibrational states and is particularly important for those molecules which are candidates for optically pumped submillimeter lasers

  14. Molecular reorganization of selected quinoline derivatives in the ground and excited states—Investigations via static DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaziak, Kacper; Panek, Jarosław J.; Jezierska, Aneta

    2015-07-01

    Quinoline derivatives are interesting objects to study internal reorganizations due to the observed excited-state-induced intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Here, we report on computations for selected 12 quinoline derivatives possessing three kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Density functional theory was employed for the current investigations. The metric and electronic structure simulations were performed for the ground state and first excited singlet and triplet states. The computed potential energy profiles do not show a spontaneous proton transfer in the ground state, whereas excited states exhibit this phenomenon. Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory was applied to study the nature of hydrogen bonding, whereas Harmonic Oscillator Model of aromaticity index (HOMA) provided data of aromaticity evolution as a derivative of the bridge proton position. The AIM-based topological analysis confirmed the presence of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In addition, using the theory, we were able to provide a quantitative illustration of bonding transformation: from covalent to the hydrogen. On the basis of HOMA analysis, we showed that the aromaticity of both rings is dependent on the location of the bridge proton. Further, the computed results were compared with experimental data available. Finally, ESIPT occurrence was compared for the three investigated kinds of hydrogen bridges, and competition between two bridges in one molecule was studied.

  15. Molecular reorganization of selected quinoline derivatives in the ground and excited states—Investigations via static DFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Błaziak, Kacper; Panek, Jarosław J.; Jezierska, Aneta

    2015-01-01

    Quinoline derivatives are interesting objects to study internal reorganizations due to the observed excited-state-induced intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Here, we report on computations for selected 12 quinoline derivatives possessing three kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Density functional theory was employed for the current investigations. The metric and electronic structure simulations were performed for the ground state and first excited singlet and triplet states. The computed potential energy profiles do not show a spontaneous proton transfer in the ground state, whereas excited states exhibit this phenomenon. Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory was applied to study the nature of hydrogen bonding, whereas Harmonic Oscillator Model of aromaticity index (HOMA) provided data of aromaticity evolution as a derivative of the bridge proton position. The AIM-based topological analysis confirmed the presence of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In addition, using the theory, we were able to provide a quantitative illustration of bonding transformation: from covalent to the hydrogen. On the basis of HOMA analysis, we showed that the aromaticity of both rings is dependent on the location of the bridge proton. Further, the computed results were compared with experimental data available. Finally, ESIPT occurrence was compared for the three investigated kinds of hydrogen bridges, and competition between two bridges in one molecule was studied

  16. Theoretical investigation of molecular structure and vibrational spectra of 4,5-bis-(2-isopropyl-5- methylphenoxy) phthalonitrile molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avci, D.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of 4,5-bis-(2-isopropyl-5- methylphenoxy) phthalonitrile in the ground state have been calculated using the Hartree- Fock (HF) and density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-31G(d) basis set. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by using HF and DFT (B3LYP) show the best agreement with the experimental data. Comparison of the observed fundamental vibrational frequencies of 4,5-bis-(2-isopropyl-5-methylphenoxy) phthalonitrile with calculated results by density functional B3LYP and Hartree-Fock methods indicate that B3LYP is superior to the scaled Hartree-Fock approach for molecular vibrational problems

  17. Excited states 2

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that deals with molecules in the excited states. The book describes the geometries of molecules in the excited electronic states. One paper describes the geometries of a diatomic molecule and of polyatomic molecules; it also discusses the determination of the many excited state geometries of molecules with two, three, or four atoms by techniques similar to diatomic spectroscopy. Another paper introduces an ordered theory related to excitons in pure and mixed molecular crystals. This paper also presents some experimental data such as those invo

  18. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  19. Simultaneous analysis of rotational and vibrational-rotational spectra of DF and HF to obtain irreducible molecular constants for HF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiai, Koui; Uehara, Hiromichi

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Available rotational and vibrational-rotational spectral lines of DF and HF are analyzed simultaneously using a non-Born-Oppenheimer effective Hamiltonian. Research highlights: → Simultaneous analysis of DF and HF spectral data. → Application of a non-Born-Oppenheimer effective Hamiltonian. → Twenty irreducible molecular constants for HF have been determined. - Abstract: Analytic expressions of corrections for the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation to Dunham's Y ij with optimal parameters, i.e., determinable clusters of expansion coefficients, are applied to a data analysis of the rotational and vibrational-rotational transitions of HF reported in the literature. All the available spectral lines of the two isotopologues, DF and HF, are simultaneously fitted to a single set of molecular parameters of HF within experimental errors. Fitting of a data set of 595 spectral transitions for DF and HF has generated only 20 minimal independent parameter values, i.e., 'irreducible' molecular constants of HF, that are sufficient to precisely generate 82 Y ij coefficients and 144 band constants in total: 41 Y ij and 72 band constants each for DF and HF.

  20. Collective excitation spectra of transitional even nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quentin, P.; Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay; Deloncle, I.; Libert, J.; Sauvage, J.

    1990-01-01

    This talk is dealing with the nuclear low energy collective motion as described in the context of microscopic versions of the Bohr Hamiltonian. Two different ways of building microscopically Bohr collective Hamiltonians will be sketched; one within the framework of the Generator Coordinate Method, the other using the Adiabatic Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock-Boholyubov approximation. A sample of recent results will be presented which pertains to the description of transitional even nuclei and to the newly revisited phenomenon of superdeformation at low spin

  1. Arrangement of Fibril Side Chains Studied by Molecular Dynamics and Simulated Infrared and Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kessler, Jiří; Kiederling, T. A.; Bouř, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 24 (2014), s. 6937-6945 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:MŠMT(CZ) LM2010005; AV ČR(CZ) M200550902; MŠMT(CZ) ED3.2.00/08.0144 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : insulin amyloid superstructures * DFT * VCD * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2014

  2. L-lysine-L-tartaric acid: New molecular complex with nonlinear optical properties. Structure, vibrational spectra and phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debrus, S.; Marchewka, M.K.; Baran, J.; Drozd, M.; Czopnik, R.; Pietraszko, A.; Ratajczak, H.

    2005-01-01

    The first X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopic analysis of a novel complex between L-lysine and L-tartaric acid is reported. The structure was solved in two temperatures (320 and 260 K) showing incommensurate phase between them. Room-temperature powder infrared and Raman measurements for the L-lysine-L-tartaric acid molecular complex (1:1) were carried out. DSC measurements on powder samples indicate two phase transitions points at about 295, 300 and 293, 300 K, for heating and cooling, respectively, with noticeable temperature interval between them. Second harmonic generation efficiency d eff =0.35 d eff (KDP)

  3. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy as a tool to detect molecular vibrations in ground and excited electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang [Department of Chemistry, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Rao, B. Jayachander [Departamento de Química and Centro de Química, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2016-05-14

    We give a detailed theoretical analysis of the simplest variant of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, where a picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond Raman probe pulse are applied resonantly to a chromophore in thermal equilibrium in the ground electronic state. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of the detection of dephasing-free Raman-like lines revealing vibrational modes not only in the electronic ground state but also in the excited electronic state of the chromophore. The analytical results obtained with simplifying assumptions for the shape of the laser pulses are substantiated by numerical simulations with realistic laser pulses, employing the equation-of-motion phase-matching approach.

  4. Core Level Spectra of Organic Molecules Adsorbed on Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash Ravikumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We perform first principle calculations based on density functional theory to investigate the effect of the adsorption of core-excited organic molecules on graphene. We simulate Near Edge X-ray absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS and X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS at the N and C edges for two moieties: pyridine and the pyridine radical on graphene, which exemplify two different adsorption characters. The modifications of molecular and graphene energy levels due to their interplay with the core-level excitation are discussed. We find that upon physisorption of pyridine, the binding energies of graphene close to the adsorption site reduce mildly, and the NEXAFS spectra of the molecule and graphene resemble those of gas phase pyridine and pristine graphene, respectively. However, the chemisorption of the pyridine radical is found to significantly alter these core excited spectra. The C 1s binding energy of the C atom of graphene participating in chemisorption increases by ∼1 eV, and the C atoms of graphene alternate to the adsorption site show a reduction in the binding energy. Analogously, these C atoms also show strong modifications in the NEXAFS spectra. The NEXAFS spectrum of the chemisorbed molecule is also modified as a result of hybridization with and screening by graphene. We eventually explore the electronic properties and magnetism of the system as a core-level excitation is adiabatically switched on.

  5. [The effect of electromagnetic waves of very high frequency of molecular spectra of radiation and absorption of nitric oxide on the functional activity of platelets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichuk, V F; Maĭborodin, A V; Volin, M V; Krenitskiĭ, A P; Tupikin, V D

    2001-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of electromagnetic EMI MMD-fluctuation on the frequencies of molecular spectra of radiation, and nitric oxide absorption under in vitro conditions on the functional activity of platelets in patients with unstable angina pectoris, with the help of a specially created generator. At amplitude-modulated and continuous modes of EMI MMD-irradiation of platelet-rich plasma for 5, 15 and 30 min the platelet functional activity decreases, which was shown up in reduction of their activation and fall of aggregative ability. The degree, to which platelet functional activity was inhibited, depended on the mode of irradiation and on duration of EMI MMD effect. The most obvious changes in platelet activation and in their readiness to aggregative response were observed at a continuous mode of irradiation within a 15 min interval.

  6. Excitation and charge transfer in He/sup +/ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-06-01

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He/sup +/ + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes.

  7. Excitation and charge transfer in He+ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-01-01

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He + + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes

  8. Crystal and molecular structure of N-(4-nitrophenyl)-β-alanine—Its vibrational spectra and theoretical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, M. K.; Drozd, M.; Janczak, J.

    2011-08-01

    The N-(4-nitrophenyl)-β-alanine in crystalline form directly by the addition of 4-nitroaniline to the acrylic acid in aqueous solution has been obtained. The title β-alanine derivative crystallizes in the P2 1/ c space group of monoclinic system with four molecules per unit cell. The X-ray geometry of β-alanine derivative molecule has been compared with those obtained by molecular orbital calculations corresponding to the gas phase. In the crystal the molecules related by an inversion center interact via symmetrically equivalent O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds with O⋯O distance of 2.656(2) Å forming a dimeric structure. The dimers of β-alanine derivative weakly interact via N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the H atom of β-amine groups and one of O atom of nitro groups. The room temperature powder vibrational (infrared and Raman) measurements are in accordance with the X-ray analysis. In aqueous solution of 4-nitroaniline and acrylic acid, the double C dbnd C bond of vinyl group of acrylic acid breaks as result of 4-nitroaniline addition.

  9. Cryogenic exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  10. A theoretical study of the molecular structures and vibrational spectra of the N 2O⋯(HF) 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Nathália B.; Ramos, Mozart N.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical calculations using both the MP2 and B3LYP levels of calculation with a 6-311++G(3df,3pd) basis set have been performed to determine stable structures and molecular properties for the H-bonded complexes involving nitrous oxide (N 2O) and two HF molecules. Five complex have been characterized as minima since no imaginary frequency was found. Three complex are predicted to be relatively more stable with binding energies varying from 14 kJ mol -1 to 23 kJ mol -1 after BSSE and ZPE corrections. Our calculations have revealed that the second complexation with HF preferably occurs with the first complexed HF molecule, i.e., forming the X⋯H sbnd F⋯H sbnd F skeleton with X = O or N instead the F sbnd H⋯N sbnd N sbnd O⋯H sbnd F one. As expected, the H sbnd F chemical bonds are increased after complexation due to intermolecular charge transfer from "n" isolated pair of the X atom (X = N, O or F) to the σ ∗ anti-bonding orbital of HF. For the strongly bounded complex, the doubly complexed HF molecule acts as a bridge between the two end molecules while transferring electrons from N 2O to HF. Both possess the same amount of residual charge but with opposite signs. The H sbnd F stretching frequency of the monoprotic acid is shifted downward after complexation whereas its IR intensity is much enhanced. This increase has been adequately interpreted in terms of equilibrium hydrogen charge and charge-flux associated to the H sbnd F stretching using the CCFOM model for infrared intensities. This procedure has also allowed to analyze the new vibrational modes arising upon H-bond formation, especially those associated with the out-of-plane and in-plane HF bending modes, which are pure rotations in the HF isolated molecule.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Collisional excitation of sulfur dioxide, SO2, in cold molecular c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernicharo, J.; Spielfiedel, A.; Balanca, C.; Dayou, F.; Senent, M.-L.; Feautrier, N.; Faure, A.; Cressiot-Vincent, L.; Wiesenfeld, L.; Pardo, J. R.

    We present collisional rate coefficients for SO2 with ortho an molecular hydrogen for the physical conditions prevailing in dark molecular clouds. Rate coefficients for the first 31 rotational levels of this species (energies up to 55K) and for temperatures between 5 and 30K are provided. We have found that these rate coefficients are about ten times more than those previously computed for SO2 with helium. We calculated the expected emission of the centimeter wavelength lines of SO2. We find that the transition connecting the metastable 202 level with the 111 one is in absorption against the cosmic background for a wide range of densities. The 404-313 line is found to be inverted for densities below a few 104cm-3. We observed the 111-202 transition with the 100m Green Bank Telescope towards some dark clouds. The line is observed, as expected, in absorption and provides an abundance of SO2 in these objects of a few 10-10^. The potential use of millimeter lines of SO2 as tracers of the physical conditions of dark clouds is discussed. (3 data files).

  12. Detecting Molecular Features of Spectra Mainly Associated with Structural and Non-Structural Carbohydrates in Co-Products from BioEthanol Production Using DRIFT with Uni- and Multivariate Molecular Spectral Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiqiang; Damiran, Daalkhaijav; Azarfar, Arash; Niu, Zhiyuan

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use DRIFT spectroscopy with uni- and multivariate molecular spectral analyses as a novel approach to detect molecular features of spectra mainly associated with carbohydrate in the co-products (wheat DDGS, corn DDGS, blend DDGS) from bioethanol processing in comparison with original feedstock (wheat (Triticum), corn (Zea mays)). The carbohydrates related molecular spectral bands included: A_Cell (structural carbohydrates, peaks area region and baseline: ca. 1485–1188 cm−1), A_1240 (structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 1240 cm−1 with region and baseline: ca. 1292–1198 cm−1), A_CHO (total carbohydrates, peaks region and baseline: ca. 1187–950 cm−1), A_928 (non-structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 928 cm−1 with region and baseline: ca. 952–910 cm−1), A_860 (non-structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 860 cm−1 with region and baseline: ca. 880–827 cm−1), H_1415 (structural carbohydrate, peak height centered at ca. 1415 cm−1 with baseline: ca. 1485–1188 cm−1), H_1370 (structural carbohydrate, peak height at ca. 1370 cm−1 with a baseline: ca. 1485–1188 cm−1). The study shows that the grains had lower spectral intensity (KM Unit) of the cellulosic compounds of A_1240 (8.5 vs. 36.6, P carbohydrate of A_928 (17.3 vs. 2.0) and A_860 (20.7 vs. 7.6) than their co-products from bioethanol processing. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in the peak area intensities of A_Cell (structural CHO) at 1292–1198 cm−1 and A_CHO (total CHO) at 1187–950 cm−1 with average molecular infrared intensity KM unit of 226.8 and 508.1, respectively. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in the peak height intensities of H_1415 and H_1370 (structural CHOs) with average intensities 1.35 and 1.15, respectively. The multivariate molecular spectral analyses were able to discriminate and classify between the corn and corn DDGS molecular spectra, but not wheat and wheat DDGS. This

  13. High-resolution spectroscopy in superfluid helium droplets. Investigation of vibrational fine structures in electronic spectra of phthalocyanine and porphyrin derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riechers, Ricarda Eva Friederike Elisabeth

    2011-03-22

    Since a considerably large variety of substituted compounds is commercially available and the electronic excitation spectra fit well into the spectral range covered by the continuous wave dye laser used for this study several porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives substituted with different types and numbers of alkyl and aryl groups were chosen as molecular probes. Recording fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra revealed exclusively sharp transitions for all species. A change of the molecule's electrostatic moments, primarily and most effectively, a change of the molecular dipole moment regarding both magnitude and orientation, was identified as the main contribution for line broadening effects. Apart from the sharp lines presented in their fluorescence excitation spectra, the phthalocyanine derivatives investigated for this study, namely chloro-aluminium-phthalocyanine (AlClPc) and tetra-tertbutyl-phthalocyanine (TTBPc), exhibited more than one emission spectrum.

  14. High-resolution spectroscopy in superfluid helium droplets. Investigation of vibrational fine structures in electronic spectra of phthalocyanine and porphyrin derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riechers, Ricarda Eva Friederike Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Since a considerably large variety of substituted compounds is commercially available and the electronic excitation spectra fit well into the spectral range covered by the continuous wave dye laser used for this study several porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives substituted with different types and numbers of alkyl and aryl groups were chosen as molecular probes. Recording fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra revealed exclusively sharp transitions for all species. A change of the molecule's electrostatic moments, primarily and most effectively, a change of the molecular dipole moment regarding both magnitude and orientation, was identified as the main contribution for line broadening effects. Apart from the sharp lines presented in their fluorescence excitation spectra, the phthalocyanine derivatives investigated for this study, namely chloro-aluminium-phthalocyanine (AlClPc) and tetra-tertbutyl-phthalocyanine (TTBPc), exhibited more than one emission spectrum.

  15. Atomic and molecular data for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    An Advisory Group Meeting devoted solely to review the atomic and molecular data needed for radiotherapy was held in Vienna from 13 to 16 June 1988. The following items as related to the atoms and molecules of human tissues were reviewed: Cross sections differential in energy loss for electrons and other charged particles. Secondary electron spectra, or differential ionization cross sections. Total cross sections for ionization and excitation. Subexcitation electrons. Cross sections for charged-particle collisions in condensed matter. Stopping power for low-energy electrons and ions. Initial yields of atomic and molecular ions and their excited states and electron degradation spectra. Rapid conversion of these initial ions and their excited states through thermal collisions with other atoms and molecules. Track-structure quantities. Other relevant data. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Coulomb excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, F.K.; Stelson, P.H.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of Coulomb excitation and a brief review of pertinent treatments of the Coulomb excitation process that are useful for the analysis of experiments are given. Examples demonstrating the scope of nuclear structure information obtainable from gamma spectroscopy are presented. Direct Elambda excitation of 232 Th is discussed in terms of the one phonon octupole vibrational spectrum. B(MI) reduced transition probabilities resulting from Coulomb excitation of odd-A deformed nuclei with heavy ions are presented as a test of the rotational model. The use of gamma ray coincidence and particle-gamma coincidence as tools for investigating Coulomb excitation is discussed. (U.S.)

  17. Excited state Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Anthralin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Andersen, Kristine B.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results in an unus......Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results......, associated with an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process....

  18. BETA SPECTRA. I. Negatrons spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Malonda, A.; Garcia-Torano, E.

    1978-01-01

    Using the Fermi theory of beta decay, the beta spectra for 62 negatrons emitters have been computed introducing a correction factor for unique forbidden transitions. These spectra are plotted vs. energy, once normal i sed, and tabulated with the related Fermi functions. The average and median energies are calculated. (Author)

  19. Fourier transform spectra of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, V.; Ardelean, I.; Armăşelu, Anca; Apostol, D.

    2010-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are nanometer-sized crystals with unique photochemical and photophysical properties that are not available from either isolated molecules or bulk solids. These nanocrystals absorb light over a very broad spectral range as compared to molecular fluorophores which have very narrow excitation spectra. High-quality QDs are proper to be use in different biological and medical applications (as fluorescent labels, the cancer treatment and the drug delivery). In this article, we discuss Fourier transform visible spectroscopy of commercial quantum dots. We reveal that QDs produced by Evident Technologies when are enlightened by laser or luminescent diode light provides a spectral shift of their fluorescence spectra correlated to exciting emission wavelengths, as shown by the ARCspectroNIR Fourier Transform Spectrometer. In the final part of this paper we show an important biological application of CdSe/ZnS core-shell ODs as microbial labeling both for pure cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechocystis PCC 6803) and for mixed cultures of phototrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms.

  20. Structures, energetics, vibrational spectra of NH4+ (H2O)(n=4,6) clusters: Ab initio calculations and first principles molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, S; Singh, Jiten N; Park, Mina; Kumar, Rajesh; Kim, Kwang S

    2008-06-28

    Important structural isomers of NH(4) (+)(H(2)O)(n=4,6) have been studied by using density functional theory, Moller-Plesset second order perturbation theory, and coupled-cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. The zero-point energy (ZPE) correction to the complete basis set limit of the CCSD(T) binding energies and free energies is necessary to identify the low energy structures for NH(4) (+)(H(2)O)(n=4,6) because otherwise wrong structures could be assigned for the most probable structures. For NH(4) (+)(H(2)O)(6), the cage-type structure, which is more stable than the previously reported open structure before the ZPE correction, turns out to be less stable after the ZPE correction. In first principles Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations around 100 K, the combined power spectrum of three lowest energy isomers of NH(4) (+)(H(2)O)(4) and two lowest energy isomers of NH(4) (+)(H(2)O)(6) explains each experimental IR spectrum.

  1. The molecular structure and vibrational spectra of N-(2,2-diphenylacetyl)- N'-(naphthalen-1yl)-thiourea by Hartree-Fock and density functional methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hakan; Mansuroglu, Demet Sezgin; VanDerveer, Don; Binzet, Gun

    2009-04-01

    N-(2,2-Diphenylacetyl)- N'-(naphthalen-1yl)-thiourea (PANT) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The crystal and molecular structure of the title compound has been determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. It crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1, Z = 2 with a = 10.284(2) Å, b = 10.790(2) Å, c = 11.305(2) Å, α = 64.92(3)°, β = 89.88(3)°, γ = 62.99(3)°, V = 983.7(3) Å 3 and Dcalc = 1.339 Mg/m 3. The molecular structure, vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of PANT were calculated by the Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods (BLYP and B3LYP) using the 6-31G* basis set. The calculated geometric parameters were compared to the corresponding X-ray structure of the title compound. We obtained 22 stable conformers for the title compound; however Conformer 1 is approximately 9.53 kcal/mol more stable than Conformer 22. The comparison of the theoretical and experimental geometry of the title compound shows that the X-ray parameters fairly well reproduce the geometry of Conformer 17. The harmonic vibrations computed for this compound by the B3LYP/6-31G* method are in good agreement with the observed IR spectral data. Theoretical vibrational spectra of the title compound were interpreted by means of PEDs using the VEDA 4 program. A general better performance of the investigated methods was calculated by PAVF 1.0 program.

  2. Environmental Research Division: fundamental molecular physics and chemistry. Annual report, January-December 1983. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) photoionization of radicals or excited states; (2) molecular spectroscopy by resonant multiphoton ionization; (3) studies conducted with the synchrotron radiation facility at the National Bureau of Standards; (4) theoretical studies on molecular photoabsorption; (5) analysis of photoabsorption spectra of open-shell atoms; (6) the electron energy-loss spectra of molecules; and (7) cross sections and stopping powers. Items have been individually abstracted for the data base

  3. Environmental Research Division: fundamental molecular physics and chemistry. Annual report, January-December 1983. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-03-01

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) photoionization of radicals or excited states; (2) molecular spectroscopy by resonant multiphoton ionization; (3) studies conducted with the synchrotron radiation facility at the National Bureau of Standards; (4) theoretical studies on molecular photoabsorption; (5) analysis of photoabsorption spectra of open-shell atoms; (6) the electron energy-loss spectra of molecules; and (7) cross sections and stopping powers. Items have been individually abstracted for the data base. (ACR)

  4. Exciton Scattering approach for conjugated macromolecules: from electronic spectra to electron-phonon coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretiak, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    The exciton scattering (ES) technique is a multiscale approach developed for efficient calculations of excited-state electronic structure and optical spectra in low-dimensional conjugated macromolecules. Within the ES method, the electronic excitations in the molecular structure are attributed to standing waves representing quantum quasi-particles (excitons), which reside on the graph. The exciton propagation on the linear segments is characterized by the exciton dispersion, whereas the exciton scattering on the branching centers is determined by the energy-dependent scattering matrices. Using these ES energetic parameters, the excitation energies are then found by solving a set of generalized ``particle in a box'' problems on the graph that represents the molecule. All parameters can be extracted from quantum-chemical computations of small molecular fragments and tabulated in the ES library for further applications. Subsequently, spectroscopic modeling for any macrostructure within considered molecular family could be performed with negligible numerical effort. The exciton scattering properties of molecular vertices can be further described by tight-binding or equivalently lattice models. The on-site energies and hopping constants are obtained from the exciton dispersion and scattering matrices. Such tight-binding model approach is particularly useful to describe the exciton-phonon coupling, energetic disorder and incoherent energy transfer in large branched conjugated molecules. Overall the ES applications accurately reproduce the optical spectra compared to the reference quantum chemistry results, and make possible to predict spectra of complex macromolecules, where conventional electronic structure calculations are unfeasible.

  5. Vibrational spectra, molecular structure, natural bond orbital, first order hyperpolarizability, thermodynamic analysis and normal coordinate analysis of Salicylaldehyde p-methylphenylthiosemicarbazone by density functional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porchelvi, E. Elamurugu; Muthu, S.

    2015-01-01

    The thiosemicarbazone compound, Salicylaldehyde p-methylphenylthiosemicarbazone (abbreviated as SMPTSC) was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman and UV. Density functional (DFT) calculations have been carried out for the title compound by performing DFT level of theory using B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) basis set. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies were calculated and compared with the experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with aid of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology. The electronic dipole moment (μD) and the first hyperpolarizability (βtot) values of the investigated molecule were computed using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The stability and charge delocalization of the molecule was studied by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Thearomaticities of the phenyl rings were studied using the standard harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA) index. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges is also calculated. The molecule orbital contributions are studied by density of energy states (DOSs).

  6. Ab initio molecular orbital studies of the vibrational spectra of the van der Waals complexes of boron trifluoride with the noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Thomas A

    2005-05-01

    The molecular structures, interaction energies, charge transfer properties and vibrational spectra of the van der Waals complexes formed between boron trifluoride and the noble gases neon, argon, krypton and xenon have been computed using second and fourth order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory LANL2DZ basis set. The complexes are all symmetric tops, with the noble gas atom acting as a sigma electron donor along the C3 axis of the BF3 molecule. The interaction energies are all vanishingly small, and the amount of charge transferred in each case is of the order of 0.01e. The directions of the wavenumber shifts of the symmetric bending (nu2) and antisymmetric stretching (nu3) modes of the BF3 fragment confirm those determined experimentally, and the shifts are shown to correlate well with the polarizability of the noble gas atom and the inverse sixth power of the intermonomer separation. The nu2 mode is substantially more sensitive to complexation than the nu3 vibration.

  7. Fission fragment excited laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  8. Sub-threshold excited Cl Kβ (K-V) x-ray fluorescence from CF3Cl molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Cowan, P.L.; Lindle, D.W.; LaVilla, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    With the availability of tunable synchrotron radiation sources, unoccupied molecular orbits (below vacuum level) can be selectively populated producing highly excited neutral molecules. X-ray fluorescence spectra from molecules were obtained with excitation below the ionization threshold and were observed to have significant intensity changes, absolute and relative energy position shifts and line width changes as compared to fluorescence spectra excited above the threshold. As an example, the Cl Kβ (K-V) emission spectra from CF 3 Cl vapor are presented. The energy shifts and intensity changes are explained in terms of perturbation effects due to the presence of an electron in an unoccupied molecular orbital. The narrow line widths obtained in the spectra excited below threshold are explained in terms of the ''effective'' hole production region in a core state limited by the broadening of the unoccupied level. The change in line widths as a function of below-threshold excitation energy is proposed as a novel technique to study the localized properties and reorganization effects of a hole in a core level. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  9. Cine: Line excitation by infrared fluorescence in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-03-01

    CINE is a Python module for calculating infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. Excitation by solar radiation of vibrational bands followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state is one of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets. This code calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Line transitions are queried from the latest version of the HITRAN spectroscopic repository using the astroquery affiliated package of astropy. Molecular data are obtained from the LAMDA database. These coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  10. Exciter switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  11. Gamma rays from the de-excitation of 12C*(15.11MeV) and 12C*(4.44MeV) as probes of energetic particle spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crannell, C.J.; Ramaty, R.; Crannell, H.

    1977-01-01

    The flux of 15.11 MeV γ rays relative to the flux 4.44 MeV γ rays has been calculated from measured cross sections for excitation of the corresponding states of 12 C and from experimental determinations of the branching ratios for direct de-excitation of these states to the ground state. Because of the difference in threshold energies for excitation of these two levels, the relative intensities in the two lines are particularly sensitive to the spectral distribution of energetic particles which excite the corresponding nuclear levels. For both solar and cosmic emission, the observability of the 15.11 MeV line is expected to be enhanced by low source-background continuum in this ener

  12. Molecular structures and excited states of CpM(CO)(2) (Cp = eta(5)-C(5)H(5); M = Rh, Ir) and [Cl(2)Rh(CO)(2)](-). Theoretical evidence for a competitive charge transfer mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenming; Boyd, Russell J; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2002-03-20

    Molecular structures and excited states of CpM(CO)(2) (Cp = eta(5)-C(5)H(5); M = Rh, Ir) and [Cl(2)Rh(CO)(2)](-) complexes have been investigated using the B3LYP and the symmetry-adapted cluster (SAC)/SAC-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) theoretical methods. All the dicarbonyl complexes have singlet ground electronic states with large singlet-triplet separations. Thermal dissociations of CO from the parent dicarbonyls are energetically unfavorable. CO thermal dissociation is an activation process for [Cl(2)Rh(CO)(2)](-) while it is a repulsive potential for CpM(CO)(2). The natures of the main excited states of CpM(CO)(2) and [Cl(2)Rh(CO)(2)](-) are found to be quite different. For [Cl(2)Rh(CO)(2)](-), all the strong transitions are identified to be metal to ligand CO charge transfer (MLCT) excitations. A significant feature of the excited states of CpM(CO)(2) is that both MLCT excitation and a ligand Cp to metal and CO charge transfer excitation are strongly mixed in the higher energy states with the latter having the largest oscillator strength. A competitive charge transfer excited state has therefore been identified theoretically for CpRh(CO)(2) and CpIr(CO)(2). The wavelength dependence of the quantum efficiencies for the photoreactions of CpM(CO)(2) reported by Lees et al. can be explained by the existence of two different types of excited states. The origin of the low quantum efficiencies for the C-H/S-H bond activations of CpM(CO)(2) can be attributed to the smaller proportion of the MLCT excitation in the higher energy states.

  13. The Naples High- and Low-Excitability rats: selective breeding, behavioral profile, morphometry, and molecular biology of the mesocortical dopamine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggiano, Davide; Vallone, Daniela; Welzl, Hans; Sadile, Adolfo G

    2002-09-01

    The Naples High- (NHE) and Low-Excitability (NLE) rat lines have been selected since 1976 on the basis of behavioral arousal to novelty (Làt-maze). Selective breeding has been conducted under continuous genetic pressure, with no brother-sister mating. The behavioral analyses presented here deal with (1) activity in environments of different complexity, i.e., holeboard and Làt maze; (2) maze learning in hexagonal tunnel, Olton, and Morris water mazes and; (3) two-way active avoidance and conditioned taste aversion tests. Morphometric analyses deal with central dopaminergic systems at their origin and target sites, as well as the density of dopamine transporter immunoreactivity. Molecular biology analyses are also presented, dealing with recent experiments on the prefrontal cortex (PFc), cloning and identifying differentially expressed genes using subtractive libraries and RNAase protection. The divergence between NLE and NHE rats varies as a function of the complexity level of the environment, with an impaired working and reference memory in both lines compared to random bred (NRB) controls. Moreover, data from the PFc of NHE rats show a hyperdopaminergic innervation, with overexpression of mRNA species involved in basal metabolism, and down-regulation of dopamine D1 receptors. Altogether, the evidence gathered so far supports a hyperfunctioning mesocorticolimbic system that makes NHE rats a useful tool for the study of hyperactivity and attention deficit, learning and memory disabilities, and drug abuse.

  14. Theoretical and experimental study of the relaxation of excited states of the DCM laser dye. Intra-molecular electron transfer and photo-isomerization. Solvent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marguet, Sylvie

    1992-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of a styrenic laser dye, the 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-[p-(dimethylamino) styryl]-4H-pyrane or DCM for the characterization of the first electronic states and of the influence of the solvent on efficiencies of different relaxation processes of the first excited state S1 of the DCM. Due to the presence of a combination of a donor group and acceptor group, this compound has interesting properties of intra-molecular charge transfer and of photo-isomerization which highly depend on solvent polarity. Two approaches have been adopted to study these complementary processes: an experimental approach (determination of rate constants of the different deactivation ways of the S1 state by measuring fluorescence quantum efficiencies, photo-isomerization quantum efficiencies, and fluorescence lifetimes of DCM in about twenty solvent of increasing polarity), and a computational approach (a CS-INDO-MRI type quantum chemistry calculation to obtain potential energy curves, charge distributions, and dipolar moments of DCM first electronic states) [fr

  15. Three-dimensional cell organization leads to almost immediate HRE activity as demonstrated by molecular imaging of MG-63 spheroids using two-photon excitation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indovina, Paola; Collini, Maddalena; Chirico, Giuseppe; Santini, Maria Teresa

    2007-02-20

    Hypoxia through HRE (hypoxia-responsive element) activity in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells grown in monolayer and as very small, three-dimensional tumor spheroids was investigated using molecular imaging techniques. MG-63 cells were stably transfected with a vector constructed with multiple copies of the HRE sequence of the human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene and with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) coding sequence. During hypoxia when HIF-1alpha (hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha) is stabilized, the binding of HIF-1 to the HRE sequences of the vector allows the transcription of EGFP and the appearance of fluorescence. Transfected monolayer cells were characterized by flow cytometric analysis in response to various hypoxic conditions and HIF-1alpha expression in these cells was assessed by Western blotting. Two-photon excitation (TPE) microscopy was then used to examine both MG-63-transfected monolayer cells and spheroids at 2 and 5 days of growth in normoxic conditions. Monolayer cells reveal almost no fluorescence, whereas even very small spheroids (HRE activation. This activation of the HRE sequences, which control a wide variety of genes, suggests that monolayer cells and spheroids of the MG-63 cell line have different genes activated and thus diverse functional activities.

  16. Two-dimensional 1H and 31P NMR spectra and restrained molecular dynamics structure of an extrahelical adenosine tridecamer oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonowicz, E.; Roongta, V.; Jones, C.R.; Gorenstein, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Assignment of the 1H and 31P NMR spectra of an extrahelical adenosine tridecamer oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplex, d(CGCAGAATTCGCG)2, has been made by two-dimensional 1H-1H and heteronuclear 31P-1H correlated spectroscopy. The downfield 31P resonance previously noted by Patel et al. (1982) has been assigned by both 17O labeling of the phosphate as well as a pure absorption phase constant-time heteronuclear 31P-1H correlated spectrum and has been associated with the phosphate on the 3' side of the extrahelical adenosine. JH3'-P coupling constants for each of the phosphates of the tridecamer were obtained from the 1H-31P J-resolved selective proton-flip 2D spectrum. By use of a modified Karplus relationship the C4-C3'-O3-P torsional angles (epsilon) were obtained. There exists a good linear correlation between 31P chemical shifts and the epsilon torsional angle. The 31P chemical shifts and epsilon torsional angles follow the general observation that the more internal the phosphate is located within the oligonucleotide sequence, the more upfield the 31P resonance occurs. Because the extrahelical adenosine significantly distorts the deoxyribose phosphate backbone conformation even several bases distant from the extrahelical adenosine, 31P chemical shifts show complex site- and sequence-specific variations. Modeling and NOESY distance-restrained energy minimization and restrained molecular dynamics suggest that the extrahelical adenosine stacks into the duplex. However, a minor conformation is also observed in the 1H NMR, which could be associated with a structure in which the extrahelical adenosine loops out into solution

  17. Wall effect in deactivation of excited molecular oxygen {sup 1}{delta}g; Reiki sanso bunshi {sup 1}{delta}g no shikkatsu ni oyobosu hyomen hanno no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Yamashita, I. [Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1993-10-25

    This paper discusses effects of surface reaction on deactivation of excited molecular oxygen in {sup 1}{Delta}g condition. Gaseous oxygen containing excited oxygen generated by microwave discharge at a concentration of less than 1% is flown into several kinds of tubes to be measured such as quartz tubes (with an inner diameter of about 10 mm), and the light emitting intensity of the excited oxygen was measured upstream and downstream of the tubes to be measured (with in-tube pressure of 1 Torr or 2 Torr) to derive its concentration change. The surface reaction on the tube wall was regarded as a primary reaction, and the concentration change of the excited oxygen in flows in the round tube (attributable to the surface reaction) was analyzed. With respect to effects of tube wall materials on deactivation of the excited molecular oxygen, the surface deactivation probability in the case of using low-activity materials has decreased in the order of Pyrex, PVC, quartz, PFA and PTFE. The surface deactivation probability in the case of using a metallic material, SUS316L, was about 1000 times larger than that in the quartz. 14 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Predicting the Shifts of Absorption Maxima of Azulene Derivatives Using Molecular Modeling and ZINDO CI Calculations of UV-Vis Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalinghug, Wyona C.; Chang, Maharlika; Solis, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    The deep blue color of azulene is drastically changed by the addition of substituents such as CH[subscript 3], F, or CHO. Computational semiempirical methods using ZINDO CI are used to model azulene and azulene derivatives and to calculate their UV-vis spectra. The calculated spectra are used to show the trends in absorption band shifts upon…

  19. The [NeIV] Lines in High Excitation Gaseous Nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, L H

    1970-04-01

    The "forbidden" lines of three times ionized neon are among the most precious indicators of electron temperature and excitation. They are also predicted to be among the strongest lines observed in the far ultraviolet spectra of high excitation nebulae.

  20. Exciton scattering approach for optical spectra calculations in branched conjugated macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hao; Wu, Chao; Malinin, Sergey V.; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.

    2016-01-01

    The exciton scattering (ES) technique is a multiscale approach based on the concept of a particle in a box and developed for efficient calculations of excited-state electronic structure and optical spectra in low-dimensional conjugated macromolecules. Within the ES method, electronic excitations in molecular structure are attributed to standing waves representing quantum quasi-particles (excitons), which reside on the graph whose edges and nodes stand for the molecular linear segments and vertices, respectively. Exciton propagation on the linear segments is characterized by the exciton dispersion, whereas exciton scattering at the branching centers is determined by the energy-dependent scattering matrices. Using these ES energetic parameters, the excitation energies are then found by solving a set of generalized “particle in a box” problems on the graph that represents the molecule. Similarly, unique energy-dependent ES dipolar parameters permit calculations of the corresponding oscillator strengths, thus, completing optical spectra modeling. Both the energetic and dipolar parameters can be extracted from quantum-chemical computations in small molecular fragments and tabulated in the ES library for further applications. Subsequently, spectroscopic modeling for any macrostructure within a considered molecular family could be performed with negligible numerical effort. We demonstrate the ES method application to molecular families of branched conjugated phenylacetylenes and ladder poly-para-phenylenes, as well as structures with electron donor and acceptor chemical substituents. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used as a reference model for electronic structure. The ES calculations accurately reproduce the optical spectra compared to the reference quantum chemistry results, and make possible to predict spectra of complex macromolecules, where conventional electronic structure calculations are unfeasible.

  1. Exciton scattering approach for optical spectra calculations in branched conjugated macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Wu, Chao; Malinin, Sergey V.; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.

    2016-12-01

    The exciton scattering (ES) technique is a multiscale approach based on the concept of a particle in a box and developed for efficient calculations of excited-state electronic structure and optical spectra in low-dimensional conjugated macromolecules. Within the ES method, electronic excitations in molecular structure are attributed to standing waves representing quantum quasi-particles (excitons), which reside on the graph whose edges and nodes stand for the molecular linear segments and vertices, respectively. Exciton propagation on the linear segments is characterized by the exciton dispersion, whereas exciton scattering at the branching centers is determined by the energy-dependent scattering matrices. Using these ES energetic parameters, the excitation energies are then found by solving a set of generalized "particle in a box" problems on the graph that represents the molecule. Similarly, unique energy-dependent ES dipolar parameters permit calculations of the corresponding oscillator strengths, thus, completing optical spectra modeling. Both the energetic and dipolar parameters can be extracted from quantum-chemical computations in small molecular fragments and tabulated in the ES library for further applications. Subsequently, spectroscopic modeling for any macrostructure within a considered molecular family could be performed with negligible numerical effort. We demonstrate the ES method application to molecular families of branched conjugated phenylacetylenes and ladder poly-para-phenylenes, as well as structures with electron donor and acceptor chemical substituents. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used as a reference model for electronic structure. The ES calculations accurately reproduce the optical spectra compared to the reference quantum chemistry results, and make possible to predict spectra of complex macromolecules, where conventional electronic structure calculations are unfeasible.

  2. Exciton scattering approach for optical spectra calculations in branched conjugated macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hao [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Wu, Chao [Electronic Structure Lab, Center of Microscopic Theory and Simulation, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xian Jiaotong University, Xian 710054 (China); Malinin, Sergey V. [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, 5101 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Tretiak, Sergei, E-mail: serg@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chernyak, Vladimir Y., E-mail: chernyak@chem.wayne.edu [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, 5101 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The exciton scattering (ES) technique is a multiscale approach based on the concept of a particle in a box and developed for efficient calculations of excited-state electronic structure and optical spectra in low-dimensional conjugated macromolecules. Within the ES method, electronic excitations in molecular structure are attributed to standing waves representing quantum quasi-particles (excitons), which reside on the graph whose edges and nodes stand for the molecular linear segments and vertices, respectively. Exciton propagation on the linear segments is characterized by the exciton dispersion, whereas exciton scattering at the branching centers is determined by the energy-dependent scattering matrices. Using these ES energetic parameters, the excitation energies are then found by solving a set of generalized “particle in a box” problems on the graph that represents the molecule. Similarly, unique energy-dependent ES dipolar parameters permit calculations of the corresponding oscillator strengths, thus, completing optical spectra modeling. Both the energetic and dipolar parameters can be extracted from quantum-chemical computations in small molecular fragments and tabulated in the ES library for further applications. Subsequently, spectroscopic modeling for any macrostructure within a considered molecular family could be performed with negligible numerical effort. We demonstrate the ES method application to molecular families of branched conjugated phenylacetylenes and ladder poly-para-phenylenes, as well as structures with electron donor and acceptor chemical substituents. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used as a reference model for electronic structure. The ES calculations accurately reproduce the optical spectra compared to the reference quantum chemistry results, and make possible to predict spectra of complex macromolecules, where conventional electronic structure calculations are unfeasible.

  3. Voiced Excitations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holzricher, John

    2004-01-01

    To more easily obtain a voiced excitation function for speech characterization, measurements of skin motion, tracheal tube, and vocal fold, motions were made and compared to EM sensor-glottal derived...

  4. Exciting Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  5. Auger spectra of alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rye, R.R.; Jennison, D.R.; Houston, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The gas-phase Auger line shapes of the linear alkanes C 1 through C 6 and of neopentane are presented and analyzed. The general shape of the spectra are characteristic of carbon in a tetrahedral environment with the major feature in all cases occurring at approx.249 eV. The relatively large spectral changes found between methane and ethane results from the direct interaction of the terminal methyl groups in ethane, and the spectra of the higher alkanes are shown to be a composite of contributions from terminal methyl and interior methylene group carbon atoms. Theoretical analysis based on a one-electron approximation is shown to be capable of making a molecular orbital assignment by comparing calculated vertical transitions to features in the Auger spectra of ethane and propane, and, in the case of ethane, of differentiating between the 2 E/sub g/ and 2 A/sub 1g/ assignment of the ground state of (C 2 H 6 ) + . A one-electron based molecular orbital treatment, however, is shown to partially break down in propane and neopentane. Analysis of neopentane and the observed absence of any noticeable major peak energy shift with increasing molecular size (as predicted by the one-electron treatment) suggests that some Auger final states occur in which both valence holes are localized on the same subunit of the molecule

  6. Influence of molecular geometry, exchange-correlation functional, and solvent effects in the modeling of vertical excitation energies in phthalocyanines using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and polarized continuum model TDDFT methods: can modern computational chemistry methods explain experimental controversies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemykin, Victor N; Hadt, Ryan G; Belosludov, Rodion V; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2007-12-20

    A time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach coupled with 14 different exchange-correlation functionals was used for the prediction of vertical excitation energies in zinc phthalocyanine (PcZn). In general, the TDDFT approach provides a more accurate description of both visible and ultraviolet regions of the UV-vis and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of PcZn in comparison to the more popular semiempirical ZINDO/S and PM3 methods. It was found that the calculated vertical excitation energies of PcZn correlate with the amount of Hartree-Fock exchange involved in the exchange-correlation functional. The correlation was explained on the basis of the calculated difference in energy between occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals. The influence of PcZn geometry, optimized using different exchange-correlation functionals, on the calculated vertical excitation energies in PcZn was found to be relatively small. The influence of solvents on the calculated vertical excitation energies in PcZn was considered for the first time using a polarized continuum model TDDFT (PCM-TDDFT) method and was found to be relatively small in excellent agreement with the experimental data. For all tested TDDFT and PCM-TDDFT cases, an assignment of the Q-band as an almost pure a1u (HOMO)-->eg (LUMO) transition, initially suggested by Gouterman, was confirmed. Pure exchange-correlation functionals indicate the presence of six 1Eu states in the B-band region of the UV-vis spectrum of PcZn, while hybrid exchange-correlation functionals predict only five 1Eu states for the same energy envelope. The first two symmetry-forbidden n-->pi* transitions were predicted in the Q0-2 region and in the low-energy tail of the B-band, while the first two symmetry-allowed n-->pi* transitions were found within the B-band energy envelope when pure exchange-correlation functionals were used for TDDFT calculations. The presence of a symmetry-forbidden but vibronically allowed n

  7. Testing the excitation/inhibition imbalance hypothesis in a mouse model of the autism spectrum disorder: in vivo neurospectroscopy and molecular evidence for regional phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Joana; Violante, Inês R; Sereno, José; Leitão, Ricardo A; Cai, Ying; Abrunhosa, Antero; Silva, Ana Paula; Silva, Alcino J; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Excitation/inhibition (E/I) imbalance remains a widely discussed hypothesis in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The presence of such an imbalance may potentially define a therapeutic target for the treatment of cognitive disabilities related to this pathology. Consequently, the study of monogenic disorders related to autism, such as neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), represents a promising approach to isolate mechanisms underlying ASD-related cognitive disabilities. However, the NF1 mouse model showed increased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission, whereas the human disease showed reduced cortical GABA levels. It is therefore important to clarify whether the E/I imbalance hypothesis holds true. We hypothesize that E/I may depend on distinct pre- and postsynaptic push-pull mechanisms that might be are region-dependent. In current study, we assessed two critical components of E/I regulation: the concentration of neurotransmitters and levels of GABA(A) receptors. Measurements were performed across the hippocampi, striatum, and prefrontal cortices by combined in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and molecular approaches in this ASD-related animal model, the Nf1 +/- mouse. Cortical and striatal GABA/glutamate ratios were increased. At the postsynaptic level, very high receptor GABA(A) receptor expression was found in hippocampus, disproportionately to the small reduction in GABA levels. Gabaergic tone (either by receptor levels change or GABA/glutamate ratios) seemed therefore to be enhanced in all regions, although by a different mechanism. Our data provides support for the hypothesis of E/I imbalance in NF1 while showing that pre- and postsynaptic changes are region-specific. All these findings are consistent with our previous physiological evidence of increased inhibitory tone. Such heterogeneity suggests that therapeutic approaches to address neurochemical imbalance in ASD may need to focus on targets where convergent physiological mechanisms can be

  8. Ethanol modulation of mammalian BK channels in excitable tissues: molecular targets and their possible contribution to alcohol-induced altered behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M. Dopico

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In most tissues, the function of calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK channels is modified in response to ethanol concentrations reached in human blood during alcohol intoxication. In general, modification of BK current from ethanol-naïve preparations in response to brief ethanol exposure results from changes in channel open probability without modification of unitary conductance or change in BK protein levels in the membrane. Protracted and/or repeated ethanol exposure, however, may evoke changes in BK expression. The final ethanol effect on BK open probability leading to either BK current potentiation or BK current reduction is determined by an orchestration of molecular factors, including levels of activating ligand (cytosolic calcium, BK subunit composition and posttranslational modifications, and the channel’s lipid microenvironment. These factors seem to allosterically regulate a direct interaction between ethanol and a recognition pocket of discrete dimensions recently mapped to the channel-forming (slo1 subunit. Type of ethanol exposure also plays a role in the final BK response to the drug: in several central nervous system regions (e.g., striatum, primary sensory neurons, and supraoptic nucleus, acute exposure to ethanol reduces neuronal excitability by enhancing BK activity. In contrast, protracted or repetitive ethanol administration may alter BK subunit composition and membrane expression, rendering the BK complex insensitive to further ethanol exposure. In neurohypophysial axon terminals, ethanol potentiation of BK channel activity leads to a reduction in neuropeptide release. In vascular smooth muscle, however, ethanol inhibition of BK current leads to cell contraction and vascular constriction.

  9. Temperature dependence of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. I. Simulation predictions of resonance Raman and pump-probe transient absorption spectra of cavity and non-cavity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zho, Chen-Chen; Farr, Erik P.; Glover, William J.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2017-08-01

    We use one-electron non-adiabatic mixed quantum/classical simulations to explore the temperature dependence of both the ground-state structure and the excited-state relaxation dynamics of the hydrated electron. We compare the results for both the traditional cavity picture and a more recent non-cavity model of the hydrated electron and make definite predictions for distinguishing between the different possible structural models in future experiments. We find that the traditional cavity model shows no temperature-dependent change in structure at constant density, leading to a predicted resonance Raman spectrum that is essentially temperature-independent. In contrast, the non-cavity model predicts a blue-shift in the hydrated electron's resonance Raman O-H stretch with increasing temperature. The lack of a temperature-dependent ground-state structural change of the cavity model also leads to a prediction of little change with temperature of both the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time of the hydrated electron following photoexcitation. This is in sharp contrast to the predictions of the non-cavity model, where both the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time are expected to decrease significantly with increasing temperature. These simulation-based predictions should be directly testable by the results of future time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. Finally, the temperature-dependent differences in predicted excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time of the two models also lead to different predicted pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy of the hydrated electron as a function of temperature. We perform such experiments and describe them in Paper II [E. P. Farr et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074504 (2017)], and find changes in the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time with temperature that match well with the predictions of the non-cavity model. In particular, the experiments

  10. Excited states rotational effects on the behavior of excited molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 7 is a collection of papers that discusses the excited states of molecules. The first paper reviews the rotational involvement in intra-molecular in vibrational redistribution. This paper analyzes the vibrational Hamiltonian as to its efficacy in detecting the manifestations of intra-molecular state-mixing in time-resolved and time-averaged spectroscopic measurements. The next paper examines the temporal behavior of intra-molecular vibration-rotation energy transfer (IVRET) and the effects of IVRET on collision, reaction, and the decomposition processes. This paper also

  11. Excited fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudjema, F.; Djouadi, A.; Kneur, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The production of excited fermions with mass above 100 GeV is considered. f→Vf (1) decay widths are calculated where V=γ, Z or W. Excited fermion pair production in e + e - annihilation and in γγ collisions, and single production in e + e - annihilation, eγ and γγ collisions is also discussed. Cross sections are calculated for all these cases. The discovery potential of the NLC at 500 GeV is compared with that of other colliders. (K.A.) 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. HERSCHEL-PACS OBSERVATIONS OF FAR-IR CO LINE EMISSION IN NGC 1068: HIGHLY EXCITED MOLECULAR GAS IN THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Sturm, E.; Gracia-Carpio, J.; Davies, R.; Poglitsch, A.; Contursi, A.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L.; De Jong, J. A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Fischer, J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Remote Sensing Division, 4555 Overlook Ave SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Sternberg, A.; Mark, D. [Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel); Gonzalez-Alfonso, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Alcala de Henares, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Veilleux, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Verma, A., E-mail: shd@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-10

    We report the detection of far-IR CO rotational emission from the prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. Using Herschel-PACS, we have detected 11 transitions in the J{sub upper} = 14-30 (E{sub upper}/k{sub B} = 580-2565 K) range, all of which are consistent with arising from within the central 10'' (700 pc). The detected transitions are modeled as arising from two different components: a moderate-excitation (ME) component close to the galaxy systemic velocity and a high-excitation (HE) component that is blueshifted by {approx}80 km s{sup -1}. We employ a large velocity gradient model and derive n{sub H2} {approx} 10{sup 5.6} cm{sup -3}, T{sub kin} {approx} 170 K, and M{sub H2} {approx} 10{sup 6.7} M{sub Sun} for the ME component and n{sub H2} {approx} 10{sup 6.4} cm{sup -3}, T{sub kin} {approx} 570 K, and M{sub H2} {approx} 10{sup 5.6} M{sub Sun} for the HE component, although for both components the uncertainties in the density and mass are {+-}(0.6-0.9) dex. Both components arise from denser and possibly warmer gas than traced by low-J CO transitions, and the ME component likely makes a significant contribution to the mass budget in the nuclear region. We compare the CO line profiles with those of other molecular tracers observed at higher spatial and spectral resolution and find that the ME transitions are consistent with these lines arising in the {approx}200 pc diameter ring of material traced by H{sub 2} 1-0 S(1) observations. The blueshift of the HE lines may also be consistent with the bluest regions of this H{sub 2} ring, but a better kinematic match is found with a clump of infalling gas {approx}40 pc north of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). We consider potential heating mechanisms and conclude that X-ray- or shock heating of both components is viable, while far-UV heating is unlikely. We discuss the prospects of placing the HE component near the AGN and conclude that while the moderate thermal pressure precludes an association with the

  13. Characterization of ESIPT reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence and complexation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomin, Vladimir I.; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2016-01-01

    Proton transfer processes and especially excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) are of interest not only in physical studies but in a wide range of biological and chemical researches, since they play an important role in different fundamental reactions. Moreover, occurrence of ESIPT very often causes two-bands emission spectra corresponding to the normal and photoproduct (tautomer) forms of molecular structure. It allows carrying out unique measurement of microcharacteristics in chemical and biological researches by using substances with ESIPT as molecular probes, because its dual emission is very sensitive to parameters of microenvironment. Dual fluorescence signal is very convenient for two wavelength ratiometric measurements as they are more sensitive to variations of sample characteristics. Recently new approach for revealing type of excited state reaction which is based on analysis of dynamic changes of relative intensities in instant spectra of fluorescence ESIPT solutes was suggested and tested for neat solutions. Now we generalize this method on solutions in which ESIPT solute may participate also in creating fluorescent complexes. We demonstrate that relative intensities of instant spectra of fluorescence registered with high time resolution allow to get valuable information referring to type of excited state reaction in which dye may undergo complexation reactions with ions in solvent. In addition we show how it is possible in such case to determine characteristics of complexation as, for example, stability constant and efficiency of complexation.

  14. Continuum emission of excited sodium dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Poyato, J.M.L.; Alonso, J.I.; Rico, F.R.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been made of the behaviour of excited molecular sodium using high-power Ar + laser radiation. A continuum emission was observed in the red wavelength region. This emission was thought to be caused by the formation of excited triatomic molecules. Energy transfer was observed from excited molecules to atoms. (orig.)

  15. Selective Coherent Excitation of Charged Density Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsvetkov, A.A.; Sagar, D.M.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Marel, D. van der

    2003-01-01

    Real time femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study collective and single particle excitations in the charge density wave state of the quasi-1D metal, blue bronze. Along with the previously observed collective amplitudon excitation, the spectra show several additional coherent features.

  16. Ultraviolet spectra of planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.; Seaton, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Features observed in infrared spectra suggest that certain very low excitation (VLE) nebulae have low C/O abundance ratios (Cohen and Barlow 1980; Aitken and Roche 1982). Fluxes in the multiplets [O II] lambda 2470 and C II] lambda 2326 have been measured for the VLE nebula He He 2-131 = HD 138403 using IUE high-dispersion spectra. An analysis similar to that of Harrington et al. (1980) for IC 418 gives C/O = 0.3 for He 2-131, compared with C/O = 1.3 for IC 418 and 0.6 for the Sun. (author)

  17. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gredel, R.; Van Dishoeck, E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles. 70 references

  18. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredel, Roland; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Black, John H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles.

  19. Electron spectroscopy of collisional excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straten, P. van der.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis measurements are described in which coincidences are detected between scattered projectiles and emitted electrons. This yields information on two-electron excitation processes. In order to show what can be learnt from coincidence experiments a detailed theoretical analysis is given. The transition amplitudes, which contain all the information, are introduced (ch.2). In ch.3 the experimental set-up is shown. The results for the Li + -He system are shown in ch. 7 and are compared with predictions based on the Molecular-Orbitalmodel which however does not account for two-excitation mechanisms. With the transition amplitudes also the wave function of the excited atom has been completely determined. In ch.8 the shape of the electron cloud, induced by the collision, is derived from the amplitudes. The relation between the oscillatory motion of this cloud after the collision and the correlation between the two electrons of the excited atom is discussed. In ch. 6 it is shown that the broad structures in the non-coincident energy spectra of the Li + -He system are erroneously interpretated as a result of electron emission from the (Li-He) + -quasimolecule. A model is presented which explains, based on the results obtained from the coincidence measurements, these broad structures. In ch. 4 the Post-Collision Interaction process is treated. It is shown that for high-energy collisions, in contrast with general assumptions, PCI is important. In ch. 5 the importance of PCI-processes in photoionization of atoms, followed by Auger decay, are studied. From the formulas derived in ch. 4 simple analytical results are obtained. These are applied to recent experiments and good agreement is achieved. 140 refs.; 55 figs.; 9 tabs

  20. Molecular structure and vibrational spectra of MHal3 (M = Sc, Y, La, Lu; Hal = F, Cl, Br, I): ab initio calculations by the CISD+Q method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomonik, V.G.; Marochko, O.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    Structure and vibrational spectra of MHal 3 molecules (M = Sc, Y, La, Lu; Hal = F, Cl, Br, I) are studied by the CISD+Q method. It is ascertained that equilibrium configuration of nuclei in all the molecules, except LaF 3 , is plane (D 3h symmetry), while that of LaF 3 molecule - pyramidal (C 3c symmetry). Results of the calculations are compared with previously published experimental data. Band reference in IR spectra of ScBr 3 , YF 3 and YCl 3 molecules has been corrected [ru

  1. Photo-driven electron transfer from the highly reducing excited state of naphthalene diimide radical anion to a CO 2 reduction catalyst within a molecular triad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jose F. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; La Porte, Nathan T. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; Mauck, Catherine M. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; Wasielewski, Michael R. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA

    2017-01-01

    The naphthalene-1,4:5,8-bis(dicarboximide) radical anion (NDI-˙), which is easily produced by mild chemical or electrochemical reduction (-0.5 Vvs.SCE), can be photoexcited at wavelengths as long as 785 nm, and has an excited state (NDI-˙*) oxidation potential of -2.1 Vvs.SCE, making it a very attractive choice for artificial photosynthetic systems that require powerful photoreductants, such as CO2 reduction catalysts. However, once an electron is transferred from NDI-˙* to an acceptor directly bound to it, a combination of strong electronic coupling and favorable free energy change frequently make the back electron transfer rapid. To mitigate this effect, we have designed a molecular triad system comprising an NDI-˙ chromophoric donor, a 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DPA) intermediate acceptor, and a Re(dmb)(CO)3carbon dioxide reduction catalyst, where dmb is 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine, as the terminal acceptor. Photoexcitation of NDI-˙ to NDI-˙* is followed by ultrafast reduction of DPA to DPA-˙, which then rapidly reduces the metal complex. The overall time constant for the forward electron transfer to reduce the metal complex is τ = 20.8 ps, while the time constant for back-electron transfer is six orders of magnitude longer, τ = 43.4 μs. Achieving long-lived, highly reduced states of these metal complexes is a necessary condition for their use as catalysts. The extremely long lifetime of the reduced metal complex is attributed to careful tuning of the redox potentials of the chromophore and intermediate acceptor. The NDI-˙–DPA fragment presents many attractive features for incorporation into other photoinduced electron transfer assemblies directed at the long-lived photosensitization of difficult-to-reduce catalytic centers.

  2. Nuclear wobbling-phonon excitations with alignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, I.

    2003-01-01

    Wobbling-phonon excitations, which are recently observed in 71 163 Lu 92 , are studied. The presence of alignments in nuclei makes it easier for wobbling excitations to appear at lower angular momenta of the yrast spectra. A family of rotational bands with wobbling excitations, which have nearly the same nuclear intrinsic structure, have been pinned down by observing specific electromagnetic decay properties between them. The triaxiality parameter γ = +20 deg. is obtained for the nuclear shape from measured E2 transition probabilities

  3. Ab initio and DFT studies of the structure and vibrational spectra of anhydrous caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Santosh K.; Singh, Vipin B.

    2013-11-01

    Vibrational spectra and molecular structure of anhydrous caffeine have been systematically investigated by second order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Vibrational assignments have been made and many previous ambiguous assignments in IR and Raman spectra are amended. The calculated DFT frequencies and intensities at B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level, were found to be in better agreement with the experimental values. It was found that DFT with B3LYP functional predicts harmonic vibrational wave numbers more close to experimentally observed value when it was performed on MP2 optimized geometry rather than DFT geometry. The calculated TD-DFT vertical excitation electronic energies of the valence excited states of anhydrous caffeine are found to be in consonance to the experimental absorption peaks.

  4. Double photoionisation spectra of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Eland, John

    2017-01-01

    This book contains spectra of the doubly charged positive ions (dications) of some 75 molecules, including the major constituents of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and prototypes of major chemical groups. It is intended to be a new resource for research in all areas of molecular spectroscopy involving high energy environments, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial. All the spectra have been produced by photoionisation using laboratory lamps or synchrotron radiation and have been measured using the magnetic bottle time-of-flight technique by coincidence detection of correlated electron pairs. Full references to published work on the same species are given, though for several molecules these are the first published spectra. Double ionisation energies are listed and discussed in relation to the molecular electronic structure of the molecules. A full introduction to the field of molecular double ionisation is included and the mechanisms by which double photoionisation can occur are examined in detail. A p...

  5. Molecular conformational analysis, vibrational spectra and normal coordinate analysis of trans-1,2-bis(3,5-dimethoxy phenyl)-ethene based on density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Lynnette; Sajan, D; Chaitanya, K; Isac, Jayakumary

    2014-03-25

    The conformational behavior and structural stability of trans-1,2-bis(3,5-dimethoxy phenyl)-ethene (TDBE) were investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) method with the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set combination. The vibrational wavenumbers of TDBE were computed at DFT level and complete vibrational assignments were made on the basis of normal coordinate analysis calculations (NCA). The DFT force field transformed to natural internal coordinates was corrected by a well-established set of scale factors that were found to be transferable to the title compound. The infrared and Raman spectra were also predicted from the calculated intensities. The observed Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Fourier transform (FT) Raman vibrational wavenumbers were analyzed and compared with the theoretically predicted vibrational spectra. Comparison of the simulated spectra with the experimental spectra provides important information about the ability of the computational method to describe the vibrational modes. Information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecules has been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with electrostatic potential surfaces (ESP). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Theory of X-ray absorption and emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukoyama, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical studies on X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy are discussed. Simple expressions for X-ray emission rate and X-ray absorption cross section are presented in the dipole approximation. Various atomic models to obtain realistic wave functions and theoretical calculations for X-ray absorption cross sections and X-ray emission rates are described. In the case of molecules and solids, molecular orbital methods for electronic structures and molecular wave functions are discussed. The emphasis is on the procedures to obtain the excited-state and continuum wave functions for molecules and to calculate the multi-center dipole matrix elements. The examples of the calculated X-ray absorption and emission spectra are shown and compared with the experimental results

  7. Raman Spectra from Pesticides on the Surface of Fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, P X; Zhou Xiaofang; Cheng, Andrew Y S; Fang Yan

    2006-01-01

    Raman spectra of several vegetables and fruits were studied by micro-Raman spectrometer (514.5 nm) and Near-infrared Fourier Transform Raman spectrometer (FTRaman). It is shown that at 514.5 nm excitation, most of the spectra are from that of carotene with some very strong fluorescence in some cases. While at 1064 nm wavelength excitation, the spectra from the different samples demonstrate different characteristic Raman spectra without fluorescence. We discuss the spectroscopic difference by the two excitation wavelengths, and the application of Raman spectra for detection of pesticides left on the surface of vegetables and fruits. Raman spectra of fruits and pesticides were successfully recorded, and using the FT-Raman spectra the pesticides left on the surface of the fruits can be detected conveniently

  8. Excited baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested

  9. Excited baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  10. Cu 4s → 4p atomic like excitations in the Ne matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Yasuyo; Tatewaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi

    2013-06-07

    The lowest three or four excited states (the triplet or quartet states) of the Cu atom in a neon (Ne) matrix have been studied experimentally, and have been presumed to have the electronic configuration of Cu 4p(1). The origins of the triplet and the quartet are not yet fully clear, although many models have been proposed. It has been argued, for example, that the existence of different trapping sites would give rise to two partly overlapping triplets, leading to spectra having three or four lines or more. Below, the electronic structures of the ground state and lowest excited states of the Cu atom in the neon matrix are clarified by means of ab initio molecular orbital calculations, using the cluster model. It was found that a rather large vacancy (hollow) with residual Ne atoms is vital for explaining the observed spectra having three or more lines; the Cu atom occupies the center of the substitutional site of a face-centered cubic (fcc)-like cluster comprising 66 Ne atoms, in which the first shell composed of 12 Ne atoms is empty. The presence of the residual Ne atoms in the first shell gives rise to more than three excited states, explaining the experimental spectra. Electron-electron interaction (including the crystal field) and spin-orbit interaction are both important in explaining the experimental spectra.

  11. The Raman and SERS spectra of indigo and indigo-Ag2 complex: DFT calculation and comparison with experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Marilena; Lofrumento, Cristiana; Becucci, Maurizio; Castellucci, Emilio M

    2018-01-05

    Using time-dependent density functional theory in conjunction with B3LYP functional and LANL2DZ/6-31+g(d,p) basis sets, static and pre-resonance Raman spectra of the indigo-Ag 2 complex have been calculated. Structure optimization, excitation energies and pre-resonance Raman spectra of the indigo molecule have been obtained at the same level of theory. The available experimental Raman spectra at 1064, 785 and 514nm and the SERS spectra at 785 and 514nm have been well reproduced by the calculation. Experimental SERS spectra are confronted with the calculated pre-resonance Raman spectra obtained for the indigo-Ag 2 complex. The Raman activities calculated under the infinite lifetime approximation show a strong dependence upon the proximity to the energy and the oscillator strength of the excitation electronic transition. The comparison of the integrated EFs for indigo and indigo-Ag 2 calculated Raman spectra, gave some hints as to the enhancement mechanisms acting for the different excitation wavelengths. Whereas for excitation at a wavelength corresponding to 785nm, the enhancement mechanism for the Raman spectrum of the metal complex seems the chemical one, the strong increment (ten times) of the integrated EF of the Raman spectra of the complex in the case of 514nm excitation, suggests the onset of other enhancement mechanisms. Assuming that intra-cluster transitions with high oscillator strength can be thought of as to mimic surface plasmons excitations, we suggest the onset of the electromagnetic mechanisms (EM) as the origin of the Raman spectrum enhancement. Nevertheless, other enhancement effects cannot be ruled out, as a new molecular transition gains strength in the proximity of the excitation wavelength, as a consequence of the symmetry lowering of the molecule in the complex. A large variation across vibrational modes, by a factor of at least 10 4 , was found for the EFs. This large variation in the EFs can indicate that B-term Herzberg-Teller scattering

  12. Anharmonicity Effects in IR Spectra of [Re(X)(CO)(3)(alpha-diimine)] (alpha-diimine=2,2 '-bipyridine or pyridylimidazo[1,5-a]pyridine; X = Cl or NCS) Complexes in Ground and Excited Electronic States

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvapilová, Hana; Vlček, Antonín; Barone, V.; Biczysko, M.; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 40 (2015), s. 10137-10146 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD14129 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : RESOLVED INFRARED - SPECTROSCOPY * TRANSITION-METAL-COMPLEXES * LARGE MOLECULAR-SYSTEMS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.883, year: 2015

  13. Probing symmetry and symmetry breaking in resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.; Guo, J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Conventional non-resonant soft X-ray emission brings about information about electronic structure through its symmetry and polarization selectivity, the character of which is governed by simple dipole rules. For centro-symmetric molecules with the emitting atom at the inversion center these rules lead to selective emission through the required parity change. For the more common classes of molecules which have lower symmetry or for systems with degenerate core orbitals (delocalized over identical sites), it is merely the local symmetry selectivity that provides a probe of the local atomic orbital contribution to the molecular orbital. For instance, in X-ray spectra of first row species the intensities essentially map the p-density at each particular atomic site, and, in a molecular orbital picture, the contribution of the local p-type atomic orbitals in the LCAO description of the molecular orbitals. The situation is different for resonant X-ray fluorescence spectra. Here strict parity and symmetry selectivity gives rise to a strong frequency dependence for all molecules with an element of symmetry. In addition to symmetry selectivity the strong frequency dependence of resonant X-ray emission is caused by the interplay between the shape of a narrow X-ray excitation energy function and the lifetime and vibrational broadenings of the resonantly excited core states. This interplay leads to various observable effects, such as linear dispersion, resonance narrowing and emission line (Stokes) doubling. Also from the point of view of polarization selectivity, the resonantly excited X-ray spectra are much more informative than the corresponding non-resonant spectra. Examples are presented for nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide molecules.

  14. Molecular Structure, Vibrational Spectra, Quantum Chemical Calculations and Photochemistry of Picolinamide and Isonicotinamide Isolated in Cryogenic Inert Matrixes and in the Neat Low-Temperature Solid Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Borba, Ana; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea; Fausto, R.

    2007-01-01

    Picolinamide (PA) and isonicotinamide (INA), two structural isomers of pyridinecarboxamide, have been investigated by matrix isolation and low-temperature solid-state infrared spectroscopy, combined with UV (λ > 235 nm) photoexcitation and density functional theory and ab initio (MP2) theoretical studies. In consonance with the theoretical data, both PA and INA were found to exist in a single conformation in cryogenic rare gas matrixes. Comparison between the experimental spectra of the matri...

  15. Room temperature excitation spectroscopy of single quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Blum

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a single molecule detection scheme to investigate excitation spectra of single emitters at room temperature. We demonstrate the potential of single emitter photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy by recording excitation spectra of single CdSe nanocrystals over a wide spectral range of 100 nm. The spectra exhibit emission intermittency, characteristic of single emitters. We observe large variations in the spectra close to the band edge, which represent the individual heterogeneity of the observed quantum dots. We also find specific excitation wavelengths for which the single quantum dots analyzed show an increased propensity for a transition to a long-lived dark state. We expect that the additional capability of recording excitation spectra at room temperature from single emitters will enable insights into the photophysics of emitters that so far have remained inaccessible.

  16. The Electronic Structure and Spectra of Triphenylamines Functionalized by Phenylethynyl Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.; Minaev, B. F.; Grigoras, M.

    2018-01-01

    We study the features of the electronic structure and the IR, UV, and visible spectra of a series of triphenylamines substituted with phenylethynyl groups. The analysis is performed at the level of the density functional theory (DFT) and its nonstationary version in comparison with the experimental data of IR and electron spectroscopy. It is shown that, in the excited state, there is a change in the alternation of single, double, and triple bonds in accordance with the character of bonding and antibonding in the lowest vacant molecular orbital. The gradual introduction of additional phenylethynyl groups does not cause frequency shifts in the IR spectra of the molecules under study, but significantly affects the intensity of the corresponding IR bands. A similar effect is also observed in the electronic-absorption spectra of these compounds. This can be used for optical tuning of triphenylamines as promising materials for organic light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  17. CALCULATION OF THE PROTON-TRANSFER RATE USING DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION AND MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS - INCLUSION OF THE PROTON EXCITED-STATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1995-01-01

    The methodology for treatment of proton transfer processes by density matrix evolution (DME) with inclusion of many excited states is presented. The DME method (Berendsen, H. J. C.; Mavri, J. J. Phys. Chem. 1993, 97, 13464) that simulates the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in a classical

  18. Role of Solvent, pH, and Molecular Size in Excited-State Deactivation of Key Eumelanin Building Blocks: Implications for Melanin Pigment Photostability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauden, M.; Pezzella, A.; Panzella, L.

    2008-01-01

      Ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to investigate the excited state dynamics of the basic eumelanin building block 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid  (DHICA) its acetylated, methylated and carboxylic ester derivatives as well as two oligomers, a dimer and a trim...

  19. Convergent modulation of singlet and triplet excited states of phosphine-oxide hosts through the management of molecular structure and functional-group linkages for low-voltage-driven electrophosphorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chunmiao; Zhang, Zhensong; Xu, Hui; Xie, Guohua; Li, Jing; Zhao, Yi; Deng, Zhaopeng; Liu, Shiyong; Yan, Pengfei

    2013-01-02

    The controllable tuning of the excited states in a series of phosphine-oxide hosts (DPExPOCzn) was realized through introducing carbazolyl and diphenylphosphine-oxide (DPPO) moieties to adjust the frontier molecular orbitals, molecular rigidity, and the location of the triplet excited states by suppressing the intramolecular interplay of the combined multi-insulating and meso linkage. On increasing the number of substituents, simultaneous lowering of the first singlet energy levels (S(1)) and raising of the first triplet energy levels (T(1), about 3.0 eV) were achieved. The former change was mainly due to the contribution of the carbazolyl group to the HOMOs and the extended conjugation. The latter change was due to an enhanced molecular rigidity and the shift of the T(1) states from the diphenylether group to the carbazolyl moieties. This kind of convergent modulation of excited states not only facilitates the exothermic energy transfer to the dopants in phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs), but also realizes the fine-tuning of electrical properties to achieve the balanced carrier injection and transportation in the emitting layers. As the result, the favorable performance of blue-light-emitting PHOLEDs was demonstrated, including much-lower driving voltages of 2.6 V for onset and 3.0 V at 100 cd m(-2), as well as a remarkably improved E.Q.E. of 12.6%. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR spectra, density functional computations of the vibrational assignments (for monomer and dimer) and molecular geometry of anticancer drug 7-amino-2-methylchromone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, G.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2014-04-01

    Vibrational assignments for the 7-amino-2-methylchromone (abbreviated as 7A2MC) molecule using a combination of experimental vibrational spectroscopic measurements and ab initio computational methods are reported. The optimized geometry, intermolecular hydrogen bonding, first order hyperpolarizability and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of 7A2MC have been investigated with the help of B3LYP density functional theory method. The calculated molecular geometry parameters, the theoretically computed vibrational frequencies for monomer and dimer and relative peak intensities were compared with experimental data. DFT calculations using the B3LYP method and 6-31 + G(d,p) basis set were found to yield results that are very comparable to experimental IR and Raman spectra. Detailed vibrational assignments were performed with DFT calculations and the potential energy distribution (PED) obtained from the Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) program. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) study revealed the characteristics of the electronic delocalization of the molecular structure. 13C and 1H NMR spectra have been recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Furthermore, All the possible calculated values are analyzed using correlation coefficients linear fitting equation and are shown strong correlation with the experimental data.

  1. Comparative molecular-orbital and atomic-orbital study of electron transfer and excitation in He++Na(3s) collisions at energies of 0.05 to 20 keV/amu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, W.; Kimura, M.; Lane, N.F.

    1990-01-01

    Electron transfer and excitation in 0.05- to 20-keV/amu He + +Na(3s) collisions is studied theoretically within the close-coupling method with two-electron molecular- and atomic-orbital expansion basis sets. Results agree with the trend of other information on this system. Remaining discrepancies that are larger than those in similar contemporary studies of one-electron systems are discussed with reference to the convergence of this two-electron study. Results for the integral alignment parameter A 20 are also presented as a guideline for future experimental study

  2. The vibrational spectra of some tetrachlorides in rare gas matrices with particular reference to the molecular shapes of ThCl4 and UCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthers, S.A.; Beattie, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    Infrared spectra of tin, lead, hafnium, thorium, and uranium tetrachlorides isolated in inert gas matrices are reported. The results obtained for the tin, lead, and hafnium compounds follow the expected isotope patterns for a tetrahedral molecule except for the observation of additional weak features to high frequency of the all- 35 Cl isotopomers. By contrast for thorium tetrachloride the observed spectrum is not characteristic of a Tsub(d) molecule but can be fitted to a species with Csub(2v) symmetry. Similar results (although less detailed) were obtained for uranium tetrachloride. (author)

  3. Vibrational spectra of ordered perovskites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corsmit, A.F.; Hoefdraad, H.E.; Blasse, G.

    1972-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of the molecular M6+O6 (M = Mo, Te, W) group in ordered perovskites of the type Ba2M2+M6+O6 are reported. These groups have symmetry Oh, whereas their site symmetry is also Oh. An assignment of the internal vibrations is presented.

  4. Nonlinear excitations in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrard, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the workshop entitled ''Nonlinear Excitations in Biomolecules'' is to attempt to bridge the gap between the physicists and biologists communities which is mainly due to language and cultural barriers. The progress of nonlinear science in the last few decades which have shown that the combination of nonlinearity, which characterize most biological phenomena, and cooperative effects in a system having a large number of degrees of freedom, can give rise to coherent excitations with remarkable properties. New concepts, such as solitons nd nonlinear energy localisation have become familiar to physicists and applied mathematicians. It is thus tempting to make an analogy between these coherent excitations and the exceptional stability of some biological processes, such as for instance DNA transcription, which require the coordination of many events in the ever changing environment of a cell. Physicists are now invoking nonlinear excitations to describe and explain many bio-molecular processes while biologists often doubt that the seemingly infinite variety of phenomena that they are attempting to classify can be reduced to such simple concepts. A large part of the meeting is devoted to tutorial lectures rather than to latest research results. The book provides a pedagogical introduction to the two topics forming the backbone of the meeting: the theory of nonlinear excitations and solitons, and their application in biology; and the structure and function of biomolecules, as well as energy and charge transport in biophysics. In order to emphasize the link between physics and biology, the volume is not divided along these two topics but according to biological subjects. Each chapter starts with a short introduction attempting to help the reader to find his way among the contributions and point out the connection between them. 23 lectures over the 32 presented have been selected and refers to quantum properties of macro-molecules. (J.S.)

  5. Benchmarking singlet and triplet excitation energies of molecular semiconductors for singlet fission: Tuning the amount of HF exchange and adjusting local correlation to obtain accurate functionals for singlet-triplet gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Charlotte; Engels, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Vertical and adiabatic singlet and triplet excitation energies of molecular p-type semiconductors calculated with various DFT functionals and wave-function based approaches are benchmarked against MS-CASPT2/cc-pVTZ reference values. A special focus lies on the singlet-triplet gaps that are very important in the process of singlet fission. Singlet fission has the potential to boost device efficiencies of organic solar cells, but the scope of existing singlet-fission compounds is still limited. A computational prescreening of candidate molecules could enlarge it; yet it requires efficient methods accurately predicting singlet and triplet excitation energies. Different DFT formulations (Tamm-Dancoff approximation, linear response time-dependent DFT, Δ-SCF) and spin scaling schemes along with several ab initio methods (CC2, ADC(2)/MP2, CIS(D), CIS) are evaluated. While wave-function based methods yield rather reliable singlet-triplet gaps, many DFT functionals are shown to systematically underestimate triplet excitation energies. To gain insight, the impact of exact exchange and correlation is in detail addressed.

  6. An experimental and theoretical study of molecular structure and vibrational spectra of 2-methylphenyl boronic acid by density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Sudhir M.; Hiremath, C. S.; Khemalapure, S. S.; Patil, N. R.

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports the experimental and theoretical study on the structure and vibrations of 2-Methylphenyl boronic acid (2MPBA). The different spectroscopic techniques such as FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman (4000-50 cm-1) of the title molecule in the solid phase were recorded. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized using density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set calculations. The vibrational wavenumbers were also corrected with scale factor to take better results for the calculated data. Vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes obtained from VEDA 4 program. The calculated wavenumbers showed the best agreement with the experimental results. Whereas, it is observed that, the theoretical frequencies are more than the experimental one for O-H stretching vibration modes of the title molecule.

  7. Vibrational spectra, molecular structure, NBO, HOMO-LUMO and first order hyperpoalarizability analysis of 1,4-bis(4-formylphenyl)anthraquinone by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renjith, R.; Mary, Y. Sheena; Varghese, Hema Tresa; Panicker, C. Yohannan; Thiemann, Thies; Van Alsenoy, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Anthraquinone derivatives are most important class of a system that absorb in the visible region. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic analyses were carried out on 1,4-bis(4-formylphenyl)anthraquinone. The interpretation of the spectra was aided by DFT calculations of the molecule. The vibrational wavenumbers were examined theoretically using the Gaussian09 set of quantum chemistry codes, and the normal modes were assigned by potential energy distribution (PED) calculations. A computation of the first hyperpolarizability of the compound indicates that this class of substituted anthraquinones may be a good candidate as a NLO material. Optimized geometrical parameters of the compound are in agreement with similar reported structures. The HOMO and LUMO analysis is used to determine the charge transfer within the molecule. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis.

  8. Hydrogen bonding interaction of small acetaldehyde clusters studied with core-electron excitation spectroscopy in the oxygen K-edge region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabayashi, K.; Chohda, M.; Yamanaka, T.; Tsutsumi, Y.; Takahashi, O.; Yoshida, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2010-06-01

    In order to examine inner-shell electron excitation spectra of molecular clusters with strong multipole interactions, excitation spectra and time-of-flight (TOF) fragment-mass spectra of small acetaldehyde (AA) clusters have been studied under the beam conditions. The TOF spectra at the oxygen K-edge region showed an intense growth of the protonated clusters, MnH+ (M=CH3CHO) in the cluster beams. "cluster-specific" excitation spectra could be generated by monitoring partial-ion-yields of the protonated clusters. The most intense band of O1s→π*CO was found to shift to a higher energy by 0.15 eV relative to the monomer band upon clusterization. X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) were also calculated for the representative dimer configurations using a computer modelling program based on the density functional theory. The XAS prediction for the most stable (non-planar) configuration was found to give a close comparison with the cluster-band shift observed. The band shift was interpreted as being due to the HOMO-LUMO interaction within the complex where a contribution of vibrationally blue-shifting hydrogen bonding could be identified.

  9. Molecular-beam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N 2 from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl → NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2 2 P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included

  10. Molecular structure, vibrational spectra, MEP, HOMO-LUMO and NBO analysis of Hf(SeO3)(SeO4)(H2O)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankova, Rumyana; Genieva, Svetlana; Halachev, Nenko; Dimitrova, Ginka

    2016-02-01

    Hf(SeO3)(SeO4)(H2O)4 was obtained with the hydrothermal synthesis. The geometry optimization of this molecule was done by Density Functional Theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-31G(d) basis set and LANL2DZ for Hf. The experimental infrared spectrum was compared with calculated and complete vibrational assignment was provided. The bond orders and the electronic properties of the molecule were calculated. The natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) was performed in order to study the intramolecular bonding interactions among bonds and delocalization of unpaired electrons. The calculated highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) with frontier orbital gap were presented. The electrostatic potential was calculated in order to investigate the reaction properties of the molecule. The thermodynamic properties of the studied compound at different temperatures were calculated.

  11. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics modeling of photoelectron spectra: the carbon 1s core-electron binding energies of ethanol-water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löytynoja, T; Niskanen, J; Jänkälä, K; Vahtras, O; Rinkevicius, Z; Ågren, H

    2014-11-20

    Using ethanol-water solutions as illustration, we demonstrate the capability of the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) paradigm to simulate core photoelectron spectroscopy: the binding energies and the chemical shifts. An integrated approach with QM/MM binding energy calculations coupled to preceding molecular dynamics sampling is adopted to generate binding energies averaged over the solute-solvent configurations available at a particular temperature and pressure and thus allowing for a statistical assessment with confidence levels for the final binding energies. The results are analyzed in terms of the contributions in the molecular mechanics model-electrostatic, polarization, and van der Waals-with atom or bond granulation of the corresponding MM charge and polarizability force-fields. The role of extramolecular charge transfer screening of the core-hole and explicit hydrogen bonding is studied by extending the QM core to cover the first solvation shell. The results are compared to those obtained from pure electrostatic and polarizable continuum models. Particularly, the dependence of the carbon 1s binding energies with respect to the ethanol concentration is studied. Our results indicate that QM/MM can be used as an all-encompassing model to study photoelectron binding energies and chemical shifts in solvent environments.

  12. Simultaneous measurements of global vibrational spectra and dephasing times of molecular vibrational modes by broadband time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Jun; Yu Ling-Yao; Liu Xing; Wan Hui; Lin Zi-Yang; Niu Han-Ben

    2011-01-01

    In broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy with supercontinuum (SC), the simultaneously detectable spectral coverage is limited by the spectral continuity and the simultaneity of various spectral components of SC in an enough bandwidth. By numerical simulations, the optimal experimental conditions for improving the SC are obtained. The broadband time-resolved CARS spectrography based on the SC with required temporal and spectral distributions is realised. The global molecular vibrational spectrum with well suppressed nonresonant background noise can be obtained in a single measurement. At the same time, the measurements of dephasing times of various molecular vibrational modes can be conveniently achieved from intensities of a sequence of time-resolved CARS signals. It will be more helpful to provide a complete picture of molecular vibrations, and to exhibit a potential to understand not only both the solvent dynamics and the solute-solvent interactions, but also the mechanisms of chemical reactions in the fields of biology, chemistry and material science. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  13. Excited levels of Pa-233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vara Cuadrado, J. M.

    1969-01-01

    A study of Pa-233 excited levels from the alpha decay of Np-237 and from beta decay of Th-233 has been performed. The alpha decay spectrum was measured with a semiconductor spectrometer of 18 keV effective resolution (FWHM). Over 13 new lines were identified. The gamma ray spectra of Np-237 and Th-233 were obtained with a Ge-Li detector low and medium range energy lines, and with Si-Li detector for the low energy region. A continuous purification method of Np-237 from its comparatively short-lived daughter Pa-233 was applied. A high number of new lines were identified in both spectra. The gamma-gamma coincidence spectra were obtained with INa(T 1 ) detectors. (Author) 54 refs

  14. Investigation of pollutant gases with molecular absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izairi, N; Ajredini, F.; Shehabi, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contains the molecular absorption spectroscopic investigation on environmental pollution by many pollutants. For this purpose a laser absorption spectroscopy at 630 nm wavelength has been applied to excite the molecular spectra in order to identify the presence of main gas pollutants. The following was the experimental procedure. Preliminary the presence of pollutants was identified. The gas champions were taken in live environment, in Tetovo streets where cars moved, and in some points in Tetovo suburbia, during different periods of the day. A special civet, part of the apparatus, has been filled by environmental air, and latter, put into the apparatus. A laser beam pulse passes throughout absorbing gas medium in the civet to excite the gas, and the absorbing spectra were automatically registered. The molecular band spectra registration has been performed by an FT-IR Spectrometer (Spectrum BX FT-IR Perkin Elmer). For this purpose the measurements were focused in spectral region of 2075 cm -1 to 2384 cm -1 for CO 2 and CO bands investigation. The importance of such measurements is to investigate the spectral properties of absorption spectra and molecular structure, and for monitoring the environmental pollution. (Author)

  15. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  16. Assignment of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of metalloporphyrins by means of time-dependent density-functional calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Norman; Fink, Rainer; Hieringer, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The C 1s and N 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of three prototype tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules are discussed in the framework of a combined experimental and theoretical study. We employ time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) to compute the NEXAFS spectra of the open- and closed-shell metalloporphyrins CoTPP and ZnTPP as well as the free-base 2HTPP in realistic nonplanar conformations. Using Becke's well-known half-and-half hybrid functional, the computed core excitation spectra are mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in the low-energy region below the appropriate ionization threshold. To make these calculations feasible, we apply a new, simple scheme based on TDDFT using a modified single-particle input spectrum. This scheme is very easy to implement in standard codes and allows one to compute core excitation spectra at a similar cost as ordinary UV/vis spectra even for larger molecules. We employ these calculations for a detailed assignment of the NEXAFS spectra including subtle shifts in certain peaks of the N 1s spectra, which depend on the central coordination of the TPP ligand. We furthermore assign the observed NEXAFS resonances to the individual molecular subunits of the investigated TPP molecules.

  17. Two Dimensional Multiwavelength Fluorescence Spectra of Dipicolinic Acid and Calcium Dipicolinate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarasanandarajah, Sivananthan

    2004-01-01

    .... In this paper we report in some detail on the room temperature fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of DPA and its calcium ion complex and comparison of the excitation-emission spectrum...

  18. High excitation ISM and gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, E; Martinez-Hernandez, NL; Rodriguez-Fernandez, NJ; Tielens, [No Value

    An overview is given of ISO results on regions of high excitation ISM and gas, i.e. H II regions, the Galactic Centre and Supernova Remnants. IR emission due to fine-structure lines, molecular hydrogen, silicates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dust are summarised, their diagnostic

  19. High Excitation Gas and ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, E.; Martin-Hernandez, N. L.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview is given of ISO results on regions of high excitation ISM and gas, i.e. HII regions, the Galactic Centre and Supernovae Remnants. IR emission due to fine-structure lines, molecular hydrogen, silicates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dust are summarized, their diagnostic capabilities illustrated and their implications highlighted.

  20. Molecular structure and infrared spectra of the monomeric 3-(methoxy)-1,2-benzisothiazole 1,1-dioxide (methyl pseudosaccharyl ether)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka; Almeida, Rui; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea; Cristiano, Maria de Lurdes S.; Fausto, Rui

    2008-03-01

    The computational description of saccharin (1,2-benzisothiazol-3(2 H)-one-1,1-dioxide) and its derivatives is difficult due to the presence of hypervalent S dbnd O bonds in their structures. Therefore, in this investigation, the HF, DFT/B3LYP and MP2 methods were used to predict the geometry and the infrared spectrum of the saccharyl derivative 3-(methoxy)-1,2-benzisothiazole 1,1-dioxide (MBID). Their relative predictive capabilities were then evaluated by comparing the obtained results with experimentally available data, namely the newly obtained IR spectra of MBID isolated in low-temperature inert matrices. For each method, different basis sets [6-31++G(d,p), 6-31++G(3df,3pd), 6-311++G(d,p), 6-311++G(2df,2pd), 6-311++G(3df,3pd), aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ] were considered. The best overall agreement has been achieved at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) and B3LYP/6-31++G(3df,3pd) levels of theory, showing the adequacy of the B3LYP functional to describe the investigated properties in this type of compounds and stressing the relevance of including high-order polarization functions in the basis set. The chosen level of theory [B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd)] was applied to analyze the vibrational spectra and the geometry of the title molecule. In agreement with the experiment, the C sbnd O sbnd C linkage in MBID is predicted by these calculations to exhibit considerably short (1.320 Å) and long (1.442 Å) (N dbnd )C sbnd O and (H 3)C sbnd O bonds, respectively, and a hybridization of the central oxygen atom close to sp 2 (the C sbnd O sbnd C angle is predicted to be ca. 117°). This C sbnd O sbnd C bonding pattern fits the well-known high reactivity of MBID upon thermal rearrangement, which has been shown to result in easy selective [1,3']-isomerization of the compound.

  1. Electromagnetic radiation of ultrarelativistic particles at scattering in excited medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyshevskij, V.S.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between relativistic particles and a gaseous or condensed medium with a high density of nondegenerate excited quantum states involves the coherent conversion of atomic or molecular excitations into electromagnetic radiation

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation and TDDFT study of the structures and UV-vis absorption spectra of MCT-β-CD and its inclusion complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huijuan; Wang, Yujiao; Xie, Xiaomei; Chen, Feifei; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the inclusion ratios and inclusion constants of MCT-β-CD/PERM and MCT-β-CD/CYPERM inclusion complexes were measured by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The inclusion ratios are both 1:1, and the inclusion constants are 60 and 342.5 for MCT-β-CD/PERM and MCT-β-CD/CYPERM, respectively. The stabilities of inclusion complexes were investigated by MD simulation. MD shows that VDW energy plays a vital role in the stability of inclusion complex, and the destruction of inclusion complex is due to the increasing temperature. The UV-vis absorption spectra of MCT-β-CD and its inclusion complexes were studied by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method employing BLYP-D3, B3LYP-D3 and M06-2X-D3 functionals. BLYP-D3 well reproduces the UV-vis absorption spectrum and reveals that the absorption bands of MCT-β-CD mainly arise from n→π(∗) and n→σ(∗) transition, and those of inclusion complexes mainly arise from intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). ICT results in the shift of main absorption bands of MCT-β-CD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of weakly excited final states by shakedown spectroscopy of laser-excited potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.; Heinaesmaeki, S.; Aksela, S.; Aksela, H.; Sankari, R.; Rander, T.; Lindblad, A.; Bergersen, H.; Oehrwall, G.; Svensson, S.; Kukk, E.

    2006-01-01

    3p shakedown spectra of laser excited potassium atoms as well as direct 3p photoemission of ground state potassium have been studied. These two excitation schemes lead to the same final states and thereby provide a good basis for a detailed study of the 3p 5 (4s3d) 1 configurations of singly ionized potassium and the photoemission processes leading to these configurations. The comparison of direct photoemission from the ground state and conjugate shakedown spectra from 4p 1/2 laser excited potassium made it possible to experimentally determine the character of final states that are only weakly excited in the direct photoemission but have a much higher relative intensity in the shakedown spectrum. Based on considerations of angular momentum and parity conservation the excitation scheme of the final states can be understood

  4. Stimulated emission depletion following two photon excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, R. J.; Armoogum, D. A.; Bain, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The technique of stimulated emission depletion of fluorescence (STED) from a two photon excited molecular population is demonstrated in the S, excited state of fluorescein in ethylene glycol and methanol. Two photon excitation (pump) is achieved using the partial output of a regeneratively amplified Ti:Sapphire laser in conjunction with an optical parametric amplifier whose tuneable output provides a synchronous depletion (dump) pulse. Time resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy measu...

  5. Automatic analysis of charged particle spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seres, Z.; Kiss, A.

    1975-11-01

    A computer program system is developed for off-line automatic analysis of a series of charged particle spectra measured by solid-state detectors and collected on magnetic tapes. The procedure results in complete angular distributions for the excited levels of the final nucleus up to about 15 MeV. (orig.) [de

  6. Power density and temperature dependent multi-excited states in InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzaïene, L.; Sfaxi, L.; Baira, M.; Maaref, H.; Bru-Chevallier, C.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled InAs/GaAs (001) quantum dots (QDs) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using ultra low-growth rate. A typical dot diameter of around 28 ± 2 nm and a typical height of 5 ± 1 nm are observed based on atomic force microscopy image. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra, their power and temperature dependences have been studied for ground (GS) and three excited states (1–3ES) in InAs QDs. By changing the excitation power density, we can significantly influence the distribution of excitons within the QD ensemble. The PL peak energy positions of GS and ES emissions bands depend on an excitation light power. With increasing excitation power, the GS emission energy was red-shifted, while the 1–3ES emission energies were blue-shifted. It is found that the full width at half maximum of the PL spectra has unusual relationship with increasing temperature from 9 to 300 K. The temperature dependence of QD PL spectra shown the existence of two stages of PL thermal quenching and two distinct activation energies corresponding to the temperature ranges I (9–100 K) and II (100–300 K).

  7. Electronic excitation and Auger spectroscopy of hexamethyldissilane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, G.G.B. de; Azevedo e Souza, A.C. de; Martins, R.J.; Lucas, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, it is presented an spectroscopic study of Si 2 (CH 3 ) 6 which presents interesting characteristics in the Si - Si bond. Electron energy loss technique was used in the energy range of 500 - 200 eV for the electron beam. Electronic excitation spectra were obtained for the energy loss range from 5 to 30 eV, and also Auger spectra. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  8. Induced absorption spectra of the infrared fundamental band of molecular deuterium at 77 K: S1( J)+S0( J) transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, P.G.; Prasad, R.D.G.; Reddy, S.P.

    1984-01-01

    The collision-induced spectra of the fundamental band of normal D 2 in the high frequency region 3200--3700 cm -1 were recorded for gas densities in the range 80--140 amagat at 77 K with a 2 m absorption cell. The contribution to the intensity of the band in this region comes from the high frequency wings of quadrupolar transitions S 1 ( J) and Q 1 ( J)+S 0 ( J) with J = 0 and 1, and from the group of transitions S 1 (2) and Q 1 ( J)+S 0 (2) with J = 0, 1, and 2 as well as from the relatively weaker double rotational transitions of the type S 1 ( J)+S 0 ( J); the latter transitions arise from the intermolecular interaction between the anisotropic component of the polarizability of one of the colliding pairs of molecules and the quadrupole field of the other. The experimental profiles were analyzed by assuming appropriate line shape functions and using the theoretical matrix elements of the quadrupole moment, isotropic polarizability, and anisotropy of polarizability of the D 2 molecule. From this analysis the characteristic half-width parameters delta/sub q/2 and delta/sub q/4 of the quadrupolar transitions and the binary and ternary absorption coefficients of the S 1 ( J)+S 0 ( J) transitions have been obtained. The experimental value of the binary absorption coefficient of S 1 (0)+S 0 (0) is (2.2 +- 0.1) x 10 -9 cm -1 amagat -2 and the corresponding theoretical value is 1.53 x 10 -9 cm -1 amagat -2

  9. HERSCHEL/SPIRE SUBMILLIMETER SPECTRA OF LOCAL ACTIVE GALAXIES {sup ,}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Spinoglio, Luigi; Busquet, Gemma [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Wilson, Christine D.; Schirm, Maximilien R. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Rangwala, Naseem [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Isaak, Kate G. [ESA Astrophysics Missions Division, ESTEC, P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Baes, Maarten [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Barlow, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Boselli, Alessandro [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM), Universite d' Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Cooray, Asantha [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Cormier, Diane, E-mail: miguel.pereira@ifsi-roma.inaf.it [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-05-01

    We present the submillimeter spectra from 450 to 1550 GHz of 11 nearby active galaxies observed with the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE/FTS) on board Herschel. We detect CO transitions from J{sub up} = 4 to 12, as well as the two [C I] fine structure lines at 492 and 809 GHz and the [N II]1461 GHz line. We used radiative transfer models to analyze the observed CO spectral line energy distributions. The FTS CO data were complemented with ground-based observations of the low-J CO lines. We found that the warm molecular gas traced by the mid-J CO transitions has similar physical conditions (n{sub H{sub 2}}{approx} 10{sup 3.2}-10{sup 3.9} cm{sup -3} and T{sub kin} {approx} 300-800 K) in most of our galaxies. Furthermore, we found that this warm gas is likely producing the mid-IR rotational H{sub 2} emission. We could not determine the specific heating mechanism of the warm gas, however, it is possibly related to the star formation activity in these galaxies. Our modeling of the [C I] emission suggests that it is produced in cold (T{sub kin} < 30 K) and dense (n{sub H{sub 2}}>10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) molecular gas. Transitions of other molecules are often detected in our SPIRE/FTS spectra. The HF J = 1-0 transition at 1232 GHz is detected in absorption in UGC 05101 and in emission in NGC 7130. In the latter, near-infrared pumping, chemical pumping, or collisional excitation with electrons are plausible excitation mechanisms likely related to the active galactic nucleus of this galaxy. In some galaxies, few H{sub 2}O emission lines are present. Additionally, three OH{sup +} lines at 909, 971, and 1033 GHz are identified in NGC 7130.

  10. Failure of single electron descriptions of molecular orbital collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Inner-shell excitation occurring in low and moderate (keV range) energy collisions between light atomic and ionic systems is frequently describable in terms of molecular promotion mechanisms, which were extensively explored both theoretically and experimentally. The bulk of such studies have concentrated on processes understandable through the use of single- and independent-electron models. Nonetheless, it is possible to find cases of inner-shell excitation in relatively simple collision systems which involve nearly simultaneous multiple-electron transitions and transitions induced by inherently two-electron interactions. Evidence for these many- and nonindependent-electron phenomena in inner-shell excitation processes and the importance of considering such effects in the interpretation of collisionally induced excitation spectra is discussed. 13 references

  11. Dealing with chemical reaction pathways and electronic excitations in molecular systems via renormalized and active-space coupled-cluster methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piecuch, Piotr; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse J. [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Włoch, Marta [Department of Chemistry, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Gour, Jeffrey R. [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA and Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    Coupled-cluster (CC) theory has become the de facto standard for high-accuracy molecular calculations, but the widely used CC and equation-of-motion (EOM) CC approaches, such as CCSD(T) and EOMCCSD, have difficulties with capturing stronger electron correlations that characterize multi-reference molecular problems. This presentation demonstrates that many of these difficulties can be addressed by exploiting the completely renormalized (CR) CC and EOMCC approaches, such as CR-CC(2,3), CR-EOMCCSD(T), and CR-EOMCC(2,3), and their local correlation counterparts applicable to systems with hundreds of atoms, and the active-space CC/EOMCC approaches, such as CCSDt and EOMCCSDt, and their extensions to valence systems via the electron-attached and ionized formalisms.

  12. Analysis of discrete and continuous laser induced fluorescence spectra of the A 1Σsub(u)+-X 1Σsub(g)+ band system of Sr2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.; Moeller, R.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectra of the gaseous Sr 2 excimer molecule have been measured. The spectra contain discrete molecular fluorescence series, regularly modulated continuous fluorescence and an unstructured continuum. Analysis of the molecular line spectra yields for the first time Dunham coefficients for the X 1 Σsub(g) + ground state and the A 1 Σsub(u) + excited state. Using the intensity distribution of the modulated continuum which is associated with bound-free transitions the repulsive potential of the ground state up to 3000 cm -1 above the dissociation limit has been determined. The unstructured continuum can be analyzed as due to two types of continuous fluorescence. The dissociation energy of Sr 2 has been determined to Dsub(e)(X) = 965 +- 45 cm -1 . (Auth.)

  13. Analysis of discrete and continuous laser induced fluorescence spectra of the A 1μ+sub(u) - X 1μ+sub(g) band system of SR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.; Moeller, R.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectra of the gaseous Sr 2 excimer molecule have been measured. The spectra contain discrete molecular fluorescence series, regularly modulated continuous fluorescence and an unstructured continuum. Analysis of the molecular line spectra yields for the first time Dunham coefficients for the X 1 μ + sub(g) ground state and the A 1 μ + sub(u) excited state. Using the intensity distribution of the modulated continuum which is associated with bound-free transitions the repulsive potential of the ground state up to 3000 cm - 1 above the dissociation limit has been determined. The unstructured continuum can be analyzed as due to two types of continuous fluorescence. The dissociation energy of Sr 2 has been determined to Dsub(e) (X) = 965 +- 45 cm - 1 . (Author)

  14. Photoelectron and UV absorption spectroscopy for determination of electronic configurations of negative molecular ions: Chlorophenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseplin, E.E.; Tseplina, S.N.; Tuimedov, G.M.; Khvostenko, O.G.

    2009-01-01

    The photoelectron and UV absorption spectra of p-, m-, and o-chlorophenols in the gas phase have been obtained. On the basis of DFT B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) calculations, the photoelectron bands have been assigned to occupied molecular orbitals. From the TDDFT B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) calculation results, the UV absorption bands have been assigned to excited singlet states of the molecules under investigation. For each excited state a dominant transition was found. It has been shown that the energies of these singlet transitions correlate with the energy differences between the ground-state molecular orbitals participating in them. Using the UV spectra interpretation, the electronic states of molecular anions detected earlier for the same compounds by means of the resonant electron capture mass-spectrometry have been determined.

  15. Beta spectra. II-Positron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau, A.; Garcia-Torano, E.

    1981-01-01

    Using the Fermi theory of beta decay, the beta spectra for 30 positron emitters have been computed, introducing a correction factor for unique forbidden transitions. The spectra are ploted vs. energy, once normalised, and tabulated with the related Fermi functions. The average and median energies are calculated. (author)

  16. Adsorption properties of the molecule resveratrol on CNT(8,0-10) nanotube: Geometry optimization, molecular structure, spectroscopic (NMR, UV/Vis, excited state), FMO, MEP and HOMO-LUMO investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Masoome; Shahab, Siyamak; Khaleghian, Mehrnoosh; Hajikolaee, Fatemeh Haji; Balakhanava, Iryna; Alnajjar, Radwan

    2018-05-01

    In the present work the adsorption properties of the molecule Resveratrol (RSV) (trans-3,5,4‧-Trihydroxystilbene) on CNT(8,0-10) nanotube was investigated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) in the gaseous phase for the first time. The non-bonded interaction effects of compounds RSV and CNT(8,0-10) nanotube on the electronic properties, chemical shift tensors and natural charge were determined and discussed. The electronic spectra of the RSV and the complex CNT(8,0-10)/RSV in the gaseous phase were calculated by Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) for investigation of the maximum wavelength value of the RSV before and after the non-bonded interaction with the CNT(8,0-10) nanotube and molecular orbitals involved in the formation of absorption spectrum of the complex RSV at maximum wavelength.

  17. Combination spectra in long-period variable stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, C.E.R.

    1975-01-01

    The electrical discharge theory of the variation in excitation observed in the atmosphere of the long period variable stars offers an explanation for the combination spectra exhibited by many of these stars, which is shown to be in accord with several of the most outstanding changes in their spectra and magnitude. (author)

  18. Database-Driven Analyses of Astronomical Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cami, Jan

    2012-03-01

    Spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools to study the physical properties and chemical composition of very diverse astrophysical environments. In principle, each nuclide has a unique set of spectral features; thus, establishing the presence of a specific material at astronomical distances requires no more than finding a laboratory spectrum of the right material that perfectly matches the astronomical observations. Once the presence of a substance is established, a careful analysis of the observational characteristics (wavelengths or frequencies, intensities, and line profiles) allows one to determine many physical parameters of the environment in which the substance resides, such as temperature, density, velocity, and so on. Because of this great diagnostic potential, ground-based and space-borne astronomical observatories often include instruments to carry out spectroscopic analyses of various celestial objects and events. Of particular interest is molecular spectroscopy at infrared wavelengths. From the spectroscopic point of view, molecules differ from atoms in their ability to vibrate and rotate, and quantum physics inevitably causes those motions to be quantized. The energies required to excite vibrations or rotations are such that vibrational transitions generally occur at infrared wavelengths, whereas pure rotational transitions typically occur at sub-mm wavelengths. Molecular vibration and rotation are coupled though, and thus at infrared wavelengths, one commonly observes a multitude of ro-vibrational transitions (see Figure 13.1). At lower spectral resolution, all transitions blend into one broad ro-vibrational molecular band. The isotope. Molecular spectroscopy thus allows us to see a difference of one neutron in an atomic nucleus that is located at astronomical distances! Since the detection of the first interstellar molecules (the CH [21] and CN [14] radicals), more than 150 species have been detected in space, ranging in size from diatomic

  19. Vibrational spectroscopy of the electronically excited state. 4. Nanosecond and picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of carotenoid excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallinger, R.F.; Farquharson, S.; Woodruff, W.H.; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra are reported for the S 0 and T 1 states of the carotenoids β-carotene, zeaxanthin, echinenone, canthaxanthin, dihydroxylycopene, astaxanthin, decapreno(C 50 )-β-carotene, β-apo-8'-carotenal, and ethyl β-apo-8'-carotenoate. The results reveal qualitatively similar ground-state spectra and similar frequency shifts in all observed resonance Raman modes between S 0 and T 1 , regardless of carotenoid structure. Examinations of the relationship of the putative C--C and C==C frequencies in S 0 and T 1 reveals anomalous shifts to lower frequency in the ''single-bond'' mode upon electronic excitation. These shifts may be due to molecular distortions in the excited state which force changes in molecular motions comprising the observed modes. However, another possibility requiring no distortion is that the interaction (off-diagonal) force constants connecting the C--C and C==C modes change sign upon electronic excitation. This latter phenomenon may provide a unitary explanation for the ''anomalous'' frequency shifts in the C--C and C==C modes, both in the T 1 states of carotenoids and in the S 1 states of simpler polyenes, without postulating large, unpredicted structural changes upon excitation or general errors in existing vibrational or theoretical analyses. Resonance Raman and absorbance studies with 35-ps time resolution suggest that S 1 lifetime (of the 1 B/sub u/ and/or the 1 A/sub g/* states) of β-carotene in benzene is less than 1 ps

  20. Particle evaporation spectra with inclusion of thermal shape fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Bowman, D.R.

    1987-04-01

    The origin of the substantial sub-Coulomb component observed in proton and 4 He evaporation spectra at high excitation energy is attributed to the thermal excitation of shape degrees of freedom. A critique of the Hauser-Feshbach theory as used in evaporation codes is presented. A new formalism including the thermal excitation of collective modes as well as quantal penetration in the framework of a transition state approach is derived. 5 figs

  1. Symmetry characterization of electrons and lattice excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schober H.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Symmetry concerns all aspects of a physical system from the electronic orbitals to structural and magnetic excitations. In this article we will try to elaborate the fundamental connection between symmetry and excitations. As excitations are manyfold in physical systems it is impossible to treat them exhaustively. We thus concentrate on the two topics of Bloch electrons and phonons. These two examples are complementary in the sense that Bloch electrons describe single particles in an external periodic potential while phonons exemplify a decoupled system of interacting particles. The way we develop the argument gives as by-product a short account of molecular orbitals and molecular vibrations.

  2. Strange diquarks and orbital excitations of hyperons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.; Ralchenko, Yu.V.; Vasilets, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    Using the model of the QCD string with spin-orbital interaction the masses of strange diquarks are determined. The spectra of orbital excitations of the Λ and Σ hyperons are calculated and discussed. Also the decay modes for Λ's and Σ's are considered

  3. Molecular ions in comet tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Wehinger, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    Band intensities of the molecular ions CH + , CO + , N 2 + , and H 2 O + have been determined on an absolute scale from tail spectra of comet Kohoutek (1973f) and comet Bradfield (1974b). Photoionization and photodissociation rates have been computed for CH, CO, and N 2 . Also emission rate excitation g-factors for (1) photoionization plus excitation and (2) resonance fluorescence have been computed for the observed ions. It is shown that resonance fluorescence is the dominant excitation mechanism for observed comet tail ions at rapprox. =1 AU. Band system luminosities and molecular ion abundances within a projected nuclear distance rho 4 km have been determined for CH + , CO + , N 2 + , and H 2 O + in comet Kohoutek, and for H 2 O + in comet Bradfield. Estimates are also given for column densities of all observed ions at rhoapprox. =10 4 km on the tailward side of the coma. The observed H 2 O + column densities were found to be roughly the same in comet Kohoutek and comet Bradfield et equal heliocentric distances, while CO + was found to be approximately 100 times more abundant than H 2 O + , N 2 + , and CH + at rhoapprox. =10 4 km in comet Kohoutek. Finally, the relative abundances of the observed ions and of the presumed parent neutral species are briefly discussed

  4. Resonant-enhanced spectroscopy of molecular rotations with a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natterer, Fabian Donat; Patthey, François; Brune, Harald

    2014-07-22

    We use rotational excitation spectroscopy with a scanning tunneling microscope to investigate the rotational properties of molecular hydrogen and its isotopes physisorbed on the surfaces of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), grown on Ni(111), Ru(0001), and Rh(111). The rotational excitation energies are in good agreement with ΔJ = 2 transitions of freely spinning p-H2 and o-D2 molecules. The variations of the spectral line shapes for H2 among the different surfaces can be traced back to a molecular resonance-mediated tunneling mechanism. Our data for H2/h-BN/Rh(111) suggest a local intrinsic gating on this surface due to lateral static dipoles. Spectra on a mixed monolayer of H2, HD, and D2 display all three J = 0 → 2 rotational transitions, irrespective of tip position, thus pointing to a multimolecule excitation, or molecular mobility in the physisorbed close-packed layer.

  5. Vibronic-structure tracking: A shortcut for vibrationally resolved UV/Vis-spectra calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Dennis; König, Carolin; Neugebauer, Johannes, E-mail: j.neugebauer@uni-muenster.de [Theoretische Organische Chemie, Organisch-Chemisches Institut and Center for Multiscale Theory and Computation, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Corrensstraße 40, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2014-10-28

    The vibrational coarse structure and the band shapes of electronic absorption spectra are often dominated by just a few molecular vibrations. By contrast, the simulation of the vibronic structure even in the simplest theoretical models usually requires the calculation of the entire set of normal modes of vibration. Here, we exploit the idea of the mode-tracking protocol [M. Reiher and J. Neugebauer, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 1634 (2003)] in order to directly target and selectively calculate those normal modes which have the largest effect on the vibronic band shape for a certain electronic excitation. This is achieved by defining a criterion for the importance of a normal mode to the vibrational progressions in the absorption band within the so-called “independent mode, displaced harmonic oscillator” (IMDHO) model. We use this approach for a vibronic-structure investigation for several small test molecules as well as for a comparison of the vibronic absorption spectra of a truncated chlorophyll a model and the full chlorophyll a molecule. We show that the method allows to go beyond the often-used strategy to simulate absorption spectra based on broadened vertical excitation peaks with just a minimum of computational effort, which in case of chlorophyll a corresponds to about 10% of the cost for a full simulation within the IMDHO approach.

  6. Magnetic excitations in ferromagnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furdyna, J.K.; Liu, X.; Zhou, Y.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic excitations in a series of GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor films were studied by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Using the FMR approach, multi-mode spin wave resonance spectra have been observed, whose analysis provides information on magnetic anisotropy (including surface anisotropy), distribution of magnetization precession within the GaMnAs film, dynamic surface spin pinning (derived from surface anisotropy), and the value of exchange stiffness constant D. These studies illustrate a combination of magnetism and semiconductor physics that is unique to magnetic semiconductors

  7. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  8. Electronic spectral study of interaction of electron donor – acceptor dyes in the ground and excited state with a metal ion. Effect of molecular structure of the dye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardar, Sanjib Kr; Mandal, Prasun K.; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of manganese (II) ion with electron donor (D)–acceptor (A) dyes having symmetric D–A–D configuration of chromophores (ketocyanine dye) and the corresponding parent merocyanines (D–A configuration) in acetonitrile has been compared by monitoring the electronic absorption, and steady state and time resolved fluorescence characteristics of the dyes. Absorption spectral studies point to the formation of a 1:1 metal ion–dye (S 0 -state) complex. Equilibrium constant (K 0 ) and other thermodynamic parameters for complex formation have been determined for all the systems. Symmetric ketocyanine dyes (D–A–D) form stronger complex than the corresponding dye with D–A configuration. Quenching of fluorescence is caused due to complex formation with the cation. However, for very low concentration of salts, where complex formation is insignificant, an enhancement of fluorescence intensity takes place due to addition of salt. The absorption band of the dye undergoes a slight blue shift in the same concentration range of the metal ion. Fluorescence life time of the excited state also increases with an increase in salt concentration in that concentration range. Results have been explained in terms of formation of a weak association complex where one or more cations replace equivalent solvent molecules in the cybotatic region around the dye. The binding constant of the association complex involving cation and the dye (S 1 -state) has been determined. While the value of the binding constant is higher for a symmetric D–A–D dye relative to that for the corresponding dye with D–A configuration, the extent of fluorescence enhancement for the latter is larger. Values of decay constant for the different photophysical processes have been calculated. Formation of association complex in the S 1 -state is characterised by a slower nonradiative decay of S 1 -state of the dyes. -- Highlights: • A ketocyanine dye forms 1:1 complex with metal ions. • Slight

  9. Review of high excitation energy structures in heavy ion collisions: target excitations and three body processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frascaria, N.

    1987-09-01

    A review of experimental results on high excitation energy structures in heavy ion inelastic scattering is presented. The contribution to the spectra of the pick-up break-up mechanism is discussed in the light of the data obtained with light heavy ion projectiles. Recent results obtained with 40 Ar beams at various energies will show that target excitations contribute strongly to the measured cross section

  10. Herschel-spire Fourier transform spectrometer observations of excited CO and [C I] in the antennae (NGC 4038/39): Warm and cold molecular gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Wilson, Christine D.; Parkin, Tara J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Kamenetzky, Julia; Glenn, Jason; Rangwala, Naseem [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Spinoglio, Luigi; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Baes, Maarten; De Looze, Ilse [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Barlow, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Clements, Dave L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Karczewski, Oskar Ł. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Madden, Suzanne C.; Rémy-Ruyer, Aurélie; Wu, Ronin, E-mail: schirmmr@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: wilson@physics.mcmaster.ca [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-02-01

    We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) observations of the Antennae (NGC 4038/39), a well-studied, nearby (22 Mpc), ongoing merger between two gas-rich spiral galaxies. The SPIRE-FTS is a low spatial ( FWHM ∼ 19''-43'') and spectral (∼1.2 GHz) resolution mapping spectrometer covering a large spectral range (194-671 μm, 450-1545 GHz). We detect five CO transitions (J = 4-3 to J = 8-7), both [C I] transitions, and the [N II] 205 μm transition across the entire system, which we supplement with ground-based observations of the CO J = 1-0, J = 2-1, and J = 3-2 transitions and Herschel Photodetecting Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations of [C II] and [O I] 63 μm. Using the CO and [C I] transitions, we perform both a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of [C I] and a non-LTE radiative transfer analysis of CO and [C I] using the radiative transfer code RADEX along with a Bayesian likelihood analysis. We find that there are two components to the molecular gas: a cold (T {sub kin} ∼ 10-30 K) and a warm (T {sub kin} ≳ 100 K) component. By comparing the warm gas mass to previously observed values, we determine a CO abundance in the warm gas of x {sub CO} ∼ 5 × 10{sup –5}. If the CO abundance is the same in the warm and cold gas phases, this abundance corresponds to a CO J = 1-0 luminosity-to-mass conversion factor of α{sub CO} ∼ 7 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} (K km s{sup –1}){sup –1} in the cold component, similar to the value for normal spiral galaxies. We estimate the cooling from H{sub 2}, [C II], CO, and [O I] 63 μm to be ∼0.01 L {sub ☉}/M {sub ☉}. We compare photon-dominated region models to the ratio of the flux of various CO transitions, along with the ratio of the CO flux to the far-infrared flux in NGC 4038, NGC 4039, and the overlap region. We find that the densities recovered from our non-LTE analysis are consistent with a

  11. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of elementary excitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, Lucas Johannes Peter (Luuk)

    2010-01-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is an X-ray in, X-ray out technique that enables one to study the dispersion of excitations in solids. In this thesis, we investigated how various elementary excitations of transition metal oxides show up in RIXS spectra.

  12. Can Excited State Electronic Coherence Be Tuned via Molecular Structural Modification? A First-Principles Quantum Electronic Dynamics Study of Pyrazolate-Bridged Pt(II) Dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingerfelt, David B.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Radler, Joseph J.; Brown-Xu, Samantha E.; Kim, Pyosang; Castellano, Felix N.; Chen, Lin X.; Li, Xiaosong

    2017-02-24

    Materials and molecular systems exhibiting long-lived electronic coherence can facilitate coherent transport, opening the door to efficient charge and energy transport beyond traditional methods. Recently, signatures of a possible coherent, recurrent electronic motion were identified in femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy experiments on a binuclear platinum complex, where a persistent periodic beating in the transient absorption signal’s anisotropy was observed. In this study, we investigate the excitonic dynamics that underlie the suspected electronic coherence for a series of binuclear platinum complexes exhibiting a range of interplatinum distances. Results suggest that the long-lived coherence can only result when competitive electronic couplings are in balance. At longer Pt-Pt distances, the electronic couplings between the two halves of the binuclear system weaken, and exciton localization and recombination is favored on short time scales. For short Pt-Pt distances, electronic couplings between the states in the coherent superposition are stronger than the coupling with other excitonic states, leading to long-lived coherence.

  13. "Anomalous" excitation in hydrogen-bonded molecular crystals - a Raman scattering study of specifically deuterated acetanilide (C 6D 5-CONH-CD 3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvajol, J. L.; De Nunzio, G.; Almairac, R.; Moret, J.; Barthés, M.; Bataillon, Place E.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of experimental and theoretical works about crystalline Acetanilide has been the "anomalous" temperature-dependent ir absorption and Raman peaks at about 1650 cm -1 and the multiband structure in the N-H stretch region. A lively discussion about the assignment of these "anomalous" bands has arisen and is still in progress. The present Raman experiments should be placed in this context as an attempt to identify the molecular degrees of freedom which originate the "anomalous" bands. In this aim Raman experiments have been performed on specifically deuterated Acetanilide [C 6D 5-CONH-CD 3] single crystal in the low-frequency (phonon) and C=O stretching regions. On cooling a distinct band at about 1495 cm -1 increases in intensity. We assign this peak to the equivalent of the 1650 cm -1 band in Acetanilide. The temperature dependence of this Raman line was studied. The results are discussed in the light of the models proposed to explain the anomalous behaviour of the 1650 cm -1 Raman line in Acetanilide.

  14. Synthesis, structural, spectroscopic, anti-cancer and molecular docking studies on novel 2-[(Anthracene-9-ylmethylene)amino]-2-methylpropane-1,3-diol using XRD, FTIR, NMR, UV-Vis spectra and DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavitha, P.; Prashanth, J.; Ramu, G.; Ramesh, G.; Mamatha, K.; Venkatram Reddy, Byru

    2017-11-01

    The novel titled compound 2-[(Anthracene-9-ylmethylene)amino]-2-methylpropane-1,3-diol (AMD) has been synthesized by slow evaporation technique from mixed solvent system of methanol with anthracene-9-carbaldehyde and 2-amino-2-methylpropane-1,3-diol. The synthesized molecule AMD was characterized experimentally by single crystal XRD, FTIR, NMR and UV-Vis spectra and density functional theory (DFT) computations. The structure of the crystal has been determined as orthorhombic system with space group P 21 21 21 and the cell parameters are obtained using XRD data. The optimized ground state geometry of the molecule is determined by evaluating torsional potentials as a function of angle of free rotation around Csbnd C bonds of functional groups by DFT method employing B3LYP functional with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. All the fundamental vibrations of the molecule are assigned unambiguously using potential energy distribution (PED) obtained in the DFT computations. The rms error between the observed and scaled frequencies is 6.20 cm-1. The values of dipole moment, polarizability and hyperpolarizability are evaluated to study the NLO behavior of the molecule. The HOMO-LUMO energies and thermodynamic parameters are also determined. The molecular electrostatic surface potential (MESP) is mapped to obtain the charge density distribution. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule are calculated by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results. UV-visible spectrum of the compound is also recorded in the region 200-800 nm to know the type of electronic transitions involved. The anti-cancer activity of AMD is determined against human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 and correlated the results with study of molecular docking against pharmacological protein IDO-1 receptor.

  15. Examples how to use atomic and molecular databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Izumi

    2012-01-01

    As examples how to use atomic and molecular databases, atomic spectra database (ASD) and molecular chemical kinetics database of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), collision cross sections of National Institute of Fusion Science (NIFS), Open-Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) and chemical reaction rate coefficients of GRI-Mech were presented. Sorting method differed in each database and several options were prepared. Atomic wavelengths/transition probabilities and electron collision ionization, excitation and recombination cross sections/rate coefficients were simply searched with just specifying atom or ion using a general internet search engine (GENIE) of IAEA. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Inhomogeneous free-electron distribution in InN nanowires: Photoluminescence excitation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Molina-Sánchez, A.; Garro, N.; García-Cristóbal, A.; Cantarero, A.; Iikawa, F.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2010-09-01

    Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra have been measured for a set of self-assembled InN nanowires (NWs) and a high-crystalline quality InN layer grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The PLE experimental lineshapes have been reproduced by a self-consistent calculation of the absorption in a cylindrical InN NW. The differences in the PLE spectra can be accounted for the inhomogeneous electron distribution within the NWs caused by a bulk donor concentration (ND+) and a two-dimensional density of ionized surface states (Nss+) . For NW radii larger than 30 nm, ND+ and Nss+ modify the absorption edge and the lineshape, respectively, and can be determined from the comparison with the experimental data.

  17. Temperature dependence of the magnetic excitation spectrum of Dy2Fe14B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenhaupt, M.; Fabi, P.; Sosnowska, I.; Frick, B.; Eccleston, R.

    1995-01-01

    We present inelastic magnetic neutron scattering spectra of polycrystalline Dy 2 Fe 14 B measured between 2 and 650 K employing different time-of-flight spectrometers. At the lowest temperatures we can identify in the magnetic excitation spectra the following features: (i) a dominant line at Δ=12 meV with a shoulder at 11.1 meV, and (ii) two weak lines at 3.8 and 5.5 meV. The temperature dependence of the average position Δ of the dominant line follows roughly the temperature dependence of the spontaneous magnetization of Y 2 Fe 14 B indicating that the energy of this mode is substantially fixed by the molecular fields of the surrounding Fe moments. Slight deviations, however, indicate that the Dy level spacing is not equidistant due to crystal field effects. ((orig.))

  18. Investigation of the vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence of gaseous xenon under optical excitation in an extended wavelength region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodmann, R.; Zimmerer, G.; Hamburg Univ.; Hahn, U.

    1976-02-01

    The fluorescence of Xe at a pressure of 10 Torr has been excited by monochromatic light in the wavelength region from 1,040 A to 1,500 A. Besides the well known first and second continuum additional emission bands appear at 1,192 A and 1,300 A. They are ascribed to an atomic transition 5d(3/2) 1 → 1 S 0 and a molecular transition O + sub(u)(6s'(1/2) + 1 S 0 ) → O + sub(g)( 1 S 0 + 1 S 0 ). The excitation spectra of the first and second continuum yield high fluorescence efficiency if higher Rydberg states are excited. Excitation of the first resonance line of Xe results in a low fluorescence intensity. Obviously the formation of highly excited molecules Xe** and intramolecular relaxation play an important role for the population of the vibrationally relaxed excited states (O + sub(u), 1sub(u)) of the Xe* 2 molecule. (orig.) [de

  19. Characterization of excited electronic states of naphthalene by resonance Raman and hyper-Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonang, C.C.; Cameron, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The first resonance Raman and hyper-Raman scattering from naphthalene are reported. Fourth harmonic of a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser is used to resonantly excite the 1 B 1u + transition, producing Raman spectra that confirm the dominance of the vibronically active ν 28 (b 3g ) mode and the Franck--Condon active a g modes, ν 5 and ν 3 . A synchronously pumped stilbene dye laser and its second harmonic are employed as the excitation sources for hyper-Raman and Raman scattering from the overlapping 1 B 2 u + and 1 A g - states. The Raman spectra indicate that the equilibrium geometry of naphthalene is distorted primarily along ν 5 , ν 8 , and ν 7 normal coordinates upon excitation to 1 B 2 u + . The hyper-Raman spectrum shows that ν 25 (b 2u ) is the mode principally responsible for vibronic coupling between the 1 A g - and 1 B 2u + states. The results demonstrate the advantageous features of resonance hyper-Raman scattering for the case of overlapping one- and two-photon allowed transitions. Calculations based on simple molecular orbital configurations are shown to qualitatively agree with the experimental results

  20. Electronically excited states of chloroethylenes: Experiment and DFT calculations in comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostenko, O.G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) calculations of chloroethylenes molecules were performed. • Calculations were correlated with experiment on the molecules ground and excited states. • The general pattern of electron structure of chloroethylenes was obtained. • Necessity of this data for chloroethylenes negative ions study was noted. - Abstract: B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) calculations of ground and electronically excited states of ethylene, chloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethylene-cis, 1,2-dichloroethylene-trans trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene molecules have been performed. Molecular orbitals images and orbital correlation diagram are given. The calculation results for chloroethylenes electronically excited states were compared with experimental data from the energy-loss spectra obtained and generally considered previously by C.F. Koerting, K.N. Walzl and A. Kupperman. Several new additional triplet and singlet transitions were pointed out in these spectra considering the calculation results. The finding of the additional transitions was supported by the UV absorption spectrum of trichloroethylene recorded in big cuvette (10 cm), where the first three triplet and two low-intensive forbidden singlet transitions were registered. The first triplet of this compound was recorded to be at the same energy as was found with the energy-loss spectroscopy