WorldWideScience

Sample records for excitatory amino acid

  1. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  2. Automated determination of excitatory amino acid neurotoxicity in cortical culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingman, J G; Hartley, D M; Choi, D W

    1990-01-01

    We used a commercially available robotic laboratory workstation to quantitatively study excitotoxic neuronal injury in cell culture. A Beckman Instruments Biomek 1000 was programmed to perform both timed exposures to excitatory amino acid agonists, and kinetic assay of the resultant efflux of lactic dehydrogenase from damaged neurons, using 96-well culture plates. Examination of homocysteate neurotoxicity utilizing this automated method produced results similar to those obtained earlier using manual techniques. The method described here may facilitate the characterization of neurotoxic agonist or antagonist activity.

  3. Ionotropic excitatory amino acid receptor ligands. Synthesis and pharmacology of a new amino acid AMPA antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, U; Sløk, F A; Stensbøl, T B

    2000-01-01

    We have previously described the potent and selective (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist, (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ACPA), and the AMPA receptor antagonist (RS)-2-amino-3-[3-(carboxymethoxy)-5-methyl-4......-isoxazolyl]propionic acid (AMOA). Using these AMPA receptor ligands as leads, a series of compounds have been developed as tools for further elucidation of the structural requirements for activation and blockade of AMPA receptors. The synthesized compounds have been tested for activity at ionotropic...... excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors using receptor binding and electrophysiological techniques, and for activity at metabotropic EAA receptors using second messenger assays. Compounds 1 and 4 were essentially inactive. (RS)-2-Amino-3-[3-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl]propionic acid (ACMP, 2...

  4. Motor effects of intracaudate injection of excitatory amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, E; Lajtha, A

    1989-05-01

    In a study of the role of excitatory amino acid receptors in movement disorders, the effect of the injection of glutamate (Glu), aspartate (Asp), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), quisqualate (Qu), or kainate (K) into the rat striatum was investigated. Rats were microinjected unilaterally through chronically implanted guide cannulas and their motor behavior was recorded. After 10-25 min L-Glu produced reversible periodic choreiform movements lasting 5-10 sec and contraversive rotation lasting 1-2 min. Both episodes were repeated every 2-3 min: the duration of motor effects was 60-80 min. L-Asp had an effect similar to that of L-Glu and in addition produced barrel rolling. The L-isomers of both Glu and Asp were active and the D-isomers were inactive. NMDA, Qu, and K were more potent than Glu or Asp. Each produced effects similar to that of Glu, and in addition NMDA and K produced wet-dog-shakes and masticatory movements. The motor behavior produced by Qu was identical to that of Glu, but it lasted longer. The motor effects of L-Glu were blocked by L-glutamic acid diethyl ester (GDEE) and by a larger sedative dose of 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5), but not by haloperidol, GABA, glycine (Gly), or a smaller nonsedative dose of AP5. The results suggest that the motor effects of L-Glu were produced by activation of the Qu-type (glutamatergic) receptors, not involving the dopamine and GABA systems. However, activation of the K-type receptors by L-Glu cannot be ruled out.

  5. Excitatory amino acid release and electrocortical brain activity after hypoxemia in near-term lambs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, S.H.G. van; Ruitenbeek, W.; Hopman, J.; Bor, M. van de

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Energy failure due to insufficient cerebral O(2)-supply leads to excess accumulation of calcium ions in presynaptic neurons, followed by excess release of excitatory amino acids (EAAs), which are potent neurotoxins, into the synaptic cleft. AIM: The aim of the present study was to

  6. The importance of the excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E. Bjørn-Yoshimoto, Walden; Underhill, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    localization can buffer nearby glutamate receptors and modulate excitatory neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. It is also the main neuronal cysteine uptake system acting as the rate-limiting factor for the synthesis of glutathione, a potent antioxidant, in EAAT3 expressing neurons, while on GABAergic......Abstract The neuronal excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) is fairly ubiquitously expressed in the brain, though it does not necessarily maintain the same function everywhere. It is important in maintaining low local concentrations of glutamate, where its predominant post-synaptic...

  7. A new structural class of subtype-selective inhibitor of cloned excitatory amino acid transporter, EAAT2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Hermit, M B; Nielsen, B

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the pharmacological effects of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) and the enantiomers of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-1,2, 5-thiadiazol-4-yl)propionic acid (TDPA) on cloned human excitatory amino acid transporter subtypes 1, 2 and 3 (EAAT1...

  8. Excitatory amino acid transporters: recent insights into molecular mechanisms, novel modes of modulation and new therapeutic possibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Fahlke, Christoph; Bjørn-Yoshimoto, Walden Emil

    2015-01-01

    The five excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT1–5) mediating the synaptic uptake of the major excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate are differently expressed throughout the CNS and at the synaptic level. Although EAATs are crucial for normal excitatory neurotransmission, explorations into the ...... of EAATs and their intricate transport process, the novel approaches to pharmacological modulation of the transporters that have emerged, and interesting new perspectives in EAAT as drug targets proposed in recent years....

  9. A new highly selective metabotropic excitatory amino acid agonist: 2-amino-4-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)butyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Sløk, F A; Skjaerbaek, N

    1996-01-01

    The homologous series of acidic amino acids, ranging from aspartic acid (1) to 2-aminosuberic acid (5), and the corresponding series of 3-isoxazolol bioisosteres of these amino acids, ranging from (RS)-2-amino-2-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (AMAA, 6) to (RS)-2-amino-6-(3-hydroxy-5......-methylisoxazol-4-yl)hexanoic acid (10), were tested as ligands for metabotropic excitatory amino acid receptors (mGlu1 alpha, mGlu2, mGlu4a, and mGlu6). Whereas AMAA (6) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propinoic acid (AMPA, 7) are potent and highly selective agonists at N-methyl...

  10. Glutathione in Cellular Redox Homeostasis: Association with the Excitatory Amino Acid Carrier 1 (EAAC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Aoyama

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are by-products of the cellular metabolism of oxygen consumption, produced mainly in the mitochondria. ROS are known to be highly reactive ions or free radicals containing oxygen that impair redox homeostasis and cellular functions, leading to cell death. Under physiological conditions, a variety of antioxidant systems scavenge ROS to maintain the intracellular redox homeostasis and normal cellular functions. This review focuses on the antioxidant system’s roles in maintaining redox homeostasis. Especially, glutathione (GSH is the most important thiol-containing molecule, as it functions as a redox buffer, antioxidant, and enzyme cofactor against oxidative stress. In the brain, dysfunction of GSH synthesis leading to GSH depletion exacerbates oxidative stress, which is linked to a pathogenesis of aging-related neurodegenerative diseases. Excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1 plays a pivotal role in neuronal GSH synthesis. The regulatory mechanism of EAAC1 is also discussed.

  11. Opioid Tolerance and Physical Dependence: Role of Spinal Neuropeptides, Excitatory Amino Acids and Their Messengers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khem Jhamandas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic opioid treatment results in the development of tolerance and physical dependence. The mechanisms underlying opioid tolerance and/or physical dependence are unclear. Recent studies suggest that opioid receptor or nociceptive, neural network-based adaptations contribute to this phenomenon. At the spinal level, the genesis of tolerance and physical dependence is associated with increased excitatory amino acid activity expressed through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the dorsal horn. However, recent evidence also implicates spinal neuropeptide transmitters such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and  substance P in the development of opioid tolerance. Long term spinal morphine treatment increases CGRP-like immunostaining in the dorsal horn, and coadministration of morphine with CGRP8-37, a competitive CGRP1 receptor antagonist, prevents this response as well as loss of the analgesic potency. CGRP8-37, like N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, has the potential to restore morphine potency in experimental animals who are already tolerant to the opioid agonist. Recent evidence suggests that the effects of excitatory amino acid and neuropeptide receptor activity may be expressed through the generation of messengers such as nitric oxide and prostanoids. Agents that inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids have the potential to inhibit and reverse spinal opioid tolerance, suggesting that this phenomenon may be expressed through the activity of these mediators. Nociceptive transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord also involves activity of a number of other mediators including morphine modulatory neuropeptides, neuropeptide FF  and neuropeptide SF. The role of these mediators and their relationship with other factors implicated in tolerance remain to be determined.

  12. [Ischemic Stroke, Excitatory Amino Acids Toxicity and the Adjustment of Acupuncture Intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-xiao; Lu, Sheng-feng; Zhu, Bing-mei; Fu, Shu-ping

    2016-04-01

    Excitatory amino acids toxicity is an onset causation of cerebral ischemia injury cascade reaction, and eventually leading to brain cell necrosis and apoptosis. Acupuncture is reported to be effective for ischemic stroke in clinical practice and animal experiments, but its mechanism is still under exploring. In this paper the authors introduce the research status of antiexcitatory amino acids toxicity effect of acupuncture in ischemic stroke animals by summarizing its effects on subunits of ionotropic glutamate receptor (NMDA/AMPA) and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and on astrocyte activities. Results indicated that acupuncture intervention may down-regulate the expression levels of cerebral multi-types (NR 1, NR 2 B) of glutamate NMDA receptors, up-regulate expression of glutamate transporter-1, NR 2 A, cannabinoid receptor (CBR) type 1 and 2, and suppress activities of cerebral astrocytes, reduce the content of extracellular glutamate to lower its toxicity and to improve stroke at last. The present paper may provide a reference for acupuncture research on ischemic brain injury.

  13. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pss; Yallapu, Murali M; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B; Kumar, Santosh

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described.

  14. Glutamatergic modulation of separation distress: profound emotional effects of excitatory amino acids in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normansell, Larry; Panksepp, Jaak

    2011-10-01

    Pre-clinical models of brain affective circuits provide relevant evidence for understanding the brain systems that figure heavily in psychiatric disorders. Social isolation and the resulting separation distress contribute to the onset of depression. In this work, the effects of excitatory amino acids (EAA) on isolation-induced distress vocalization (DV) were assessed in young domestic chicks. Both glutamate and quisqualate (QA) produced dose-dependent reductions in DVs, while N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and kainate (KA) increased DVs. Such a differential pattern of responsiveness may indicate the presence of reciprocal or interacting EAA systems in the brain control of separation distress. Administration of either the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) or the broad-spectrum antagonist gamma-d-glutamylglycine (DGG) greatly reduced DVs, as did the antagonist 2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (APB). APV did not attenuate the increase in vocalizations seen after NMDA or KA administration. DGG, however, was able to block the increase in calling produced by either of these agonists, suggesting a KA receptor mechanism. KA treatment inhibited the ability of other chicks, or auditory and somatosensory information, to suppress DVs. KA-treated animals exhibited a hyperemotional behavior pattern during which a variety of motivated behaviors were disrupted including reactions to novel objects, approaching the flock, and foraging. They could not sustain a coherent flock-like social cohesion, but exhibited strong fixed-action patterns of flight interspersed with hiding and crouching behaviors. The evident behavioral changes suggest that glutamatergic synapses directly influence sensory, motor and emotional processes in the brain and may be especially important in the integration of environmental stimuli with emotional central state processes of animals. Considering that unresolved social loss and grief have been deemed to be among the main precipitating causes

  15. Bioavailability Studies and in vitro Profiling of the Selective Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter Subtype 1 (EAAT1) Inhibitor UCPH‐102

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haym, Isabell; Huynh, Tri H. V.; Hansen, Stinne W.

    2016-01-01

    Although the selective excitatory amino acid transporter subtype 1 (EAAT1) inhibitor UCPH‐101 has become a standard pharmacological tool compound for in vitro and ex vivo studies in the EAAT research field, its inability to penetrate the blood–brain barrier makes it unsuitable for in vivo studies...... displayed substantially improved properties in this respect. In vitro profiling of UCPH‐102 (10 μm) at 51 central nervous system targets in radioligand binding assays strongly suggests that the compound is completely selective for EAAT1. Finally, in a rodent locomotor model, p.o. administration of UCPH‐102...

  16. Excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 in temporal lobe and hippocampus in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarac, Sinan; Afzal, Shoaib; Broholm, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is an invalidating disease and many patients are resistant to medical treatment. Increased glutamate concentration has been found in epileptogenic foci and may induce local over-excitation and cytotoxicity; one of the proposed mechanisms involves reduced...... extra-cellular clearance of glutamate by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT-1 to EAAT-5). EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 are mainly expressed on astroglial cells for the reuptake of glutamate from the extra-cellular space. We have studied the expression of EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 in the hippocampus and temporal lobe...

  17. Molecular pharmacology of 4-substituted glutamic acid analogues at ionotropic and metabotropic excitatory amino acid receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Nielsen, B; Stensbøl, T B

    1997-01-01

    The pharmacology of (2S,4R)-4-methylglutamic acid, (2S,4S)-4-methylglutamic acid and (S)- and (R)-4-methyleneglutamic acids (obtained in high chemical and enantiomeric purity from racemic 4-methyleneglutamic acid by chiral HPLC using a Crownpak CR(+) column), was examined in binding experiments...... for any of the receptor subtypes, the results demonstrate that each of these structurally related compounds has a distinct pharmacological profile....

  18. Marked Elevation of Excitatory Amino Acids in Cerebrospinal Fluid Obtained From Patients With Rotavirus-Associated Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Kawashima, Hisashi; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Nishimata, Shigeo; Takekuma, Koji; Hoshika, Akinori

    2015-07-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children; however, its pathogenesis and immunity are not completely understood. Even less well recognized is rotavirus-induced central nervous system (CNS) involvement, which has been associated with seizure, encephalopathy and death, among others. To elucidate the host response to rotavirus infection, we retrospectively examined neurotransmitter amino acids in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 19 children with CNS involvement associated with rotavirus infection. Subjects were classified into two groups: those with encephalopathy followed by prolonged seizure (encephalopathy group) and those who had experienced afebrile, brief cluster of seizures without encephalopathy (cluster group). The levels of glutamate, glycine, and taurine in the encephalopathy group were significantly higher than those in the cluster group. Increased levels of excitatory amino acids in the CSF may induce neurological disorders and be related to disorder severity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report regarding amino acids in the CSF obtained from patients with rotavirus-induced CNS involvement. Further study is necessary to elucidate the role of CSF amino acid levels in rotavirus-induced CNS involvement. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Up-Regulation of the Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 by Mammalian Target of Rapamycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Abousaab

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The excitatory amino-acid transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 clear glutamate from the synaptic cleft and thus terminate neuronal excitation. The carriers are subject to regulation by various kinases. The EAAT3 isoform is regulated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. The present study thus explored whether mTOR influences transport by EAAT1 and/or EAAT2. Methods: cRNA encoding wild type EAAT1 (SLC1A3 or EAAT2 (SLC1A2 was injected into Xenopus oocytes without or with additional injection of cRNA encoding mTOR. Dual electrode voltage clamp was performed in order to determine electrogenic glutamate transport (IEAAT. EAAT2 protein abundance was determined utilizing chemiluminescence. Results: Appreciable IEAAT was observed in EAAT1 or EAAT2 expressing but not in water injected oocytes. IEAAT was significantly increased by coexpression of mTOR. Coexpression of mTOR increased significantly the maximal IEAAT in EAAT1 or EAAT2 expressing oocytes, without significantly modifying affinity of the carriers. Moreover, coexpression of mTOR increased significantly EAAT2 protein abundance in the cell membrane. Conclusions: The kinase mTOR up-regulates the excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2.

  20. Imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory amino acids at spinal level is associated with maintenance of persistent pain-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lai-Hong; Hou, Jun-Feng; Liu, Ming-Gang; Li, Meng-Meng; Cui, Xiu-Yu; Lu, Zhuo-Min; Zhang, Fu-Kang; An, Yang-Yuan; Shi, Lin; Chen, Jun

    2009-05-01

    Although the postsynaptic events responsible for development of pathological pain have been intensively studied, the relative contribution of presynaptic neurotransmitters to the whole process remains less elucidated. In the present investigation, we sought to measure temporal changes in spinal release of both excitatory amino acids (EAAs, glutamate and aspartate) and inhibitory amino acids (IAAs, glycine, ?-aminobutyric acid and taurine) in response to peripheral inflammatory pain state. The results showed that following peripheral chemical insult induced by subcutaneous bee venom (BV) injection, there was an initial, parallel increase in spinal release of both EAAs and IAAs, however, the balance between them was gradually disrupted when pain persisted longer, with EAAs remaining at higher level but IAAs at a level below the baseline. Moreover, the EAAs-IAAs imbalance at the spinal level was dependent upon the ongoing activity from the peripheral injury site. Intrathecal blockade of ionotropic (NMDA and non-NMDA) and metabotropic (mGluRI, II, III) glutamate receptors, respectively, resulted in a differential inhibition of BV-induced different types of pain (persistent nociception vs. hyperalgesia, or thermal vs. mechanical hyperalgesia), implicating that spinal antagonism of any specific glutamate receptor subtype fails to block all types of pain-related behaviors. This result provides a new line of evidence emphasizing an importance of restoration of EAAs-IAAs balance at the spinal level to prevent persistence or chronicity of pain.

  1. Excitatory amino acid b-N-methylamino-L-alanine is a putative environmental neurotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR NEDELJKOV

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid b-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA has been associated with the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex in three distinct western Pacific populations. The putative neurotoxin is produced by cyanobacteria, which live symbiotically in the roots of cycad trees. L-BMAA was thought to be a threat only to those few populations whose diet and medicines rely heavily on cycad seeds. However, the recent discovery that cyanobacteria from diverse terrestrial, freshwater, and saltwater ecosystems around the world produce the toxin requires a reassessment of whether it poses a larger health threat. Therefore, it is proposed that monitoring L-BMAA levels in cyanobacteria-contaminated water supplies might be prudent.

  2. Pharmacological characterization of human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    We have expressed the human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 stably in HEK293 cells and characterized the transporters pharmacologically in a conventional [(3) H]-d-aspartate uptake assay and in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay, the FLIPR Membrane Potential (...

  3. Repeated injections of piracetam improve spatial learning and increase the stimulation of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis by excitatory amino acids in aged rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canonico, P. L.; Aronica, E.; Aleppo, G.; Casabona, G.; Copani, A.; Favit, A.; Nicoletti, F.; Scapagnini, U.

    1991-01-01

    Repeated injections of piracetam (400 mg/kg, i.p. once a day for 15 days) to 16-month old rats led to an improved performance on an 8-arm radial maze, used as a test for spatial learning. This effect was accompanied by a greater ability of excitatory amino acids (ibotenate and glutamate) to

  4. Pharmacology of morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide at opioid, excitatory amino acid, GABA and glycine binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, S.E.; Smith, M.T. (Department of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland (Australia)); Dood, P.R. (Clinical Research Centre, Royal Brisbane Hospital Foundation, Brisbane (Australia))

    1994-07-01

    Morphine in high doses and its major metabolite, morphine-3-glucuronide, cause CNS excitation following intrathecal and intracerebroventricular administration by an unknown mechanism. This study investigated whether morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide interact at major excitatory (glutamate), major inhibitory (GABA or glycine), or opioid binding sites. Homogenate binding assays were performed using specific radioligands. At opioid receptors, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine caused an equipotent sodium shift, consistent with morphine-3-glucuronide behaving as an agonist. This suggests that morphine-3-glucuronide-mediated excitation is not caused by an interaction at opioid receptors. Morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine caused a weak inhibition of the binding of [sup 3]H-MK801 (non-competitive antagonist) and [sup 125]I-ifenprodil (polyamine site antagonist), but at unphysiologically high concentrations. This suggests that CNS excitation would not result from an interaction of morphine-3-glucuronide and high-dose morphine with these sites on the NMDA receptor. Morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine inhibited the binding of [sup 3]H-muscimol (GABA receptor agonist), [sup 3]H-diazepam and [sup 3]H-flunitraxepam (benzodiazepine agonists) binding very weakly, suggesting the excitatory effects of morphine-3-glucuronide and high-dose morphine are not elicited through GABA[sub A] receptors. Morphine-3-glucuronide and high-dose morphine did not prevent re-uptake of glutamate into presynaptic nerve terminals. In addition, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine did not inhibit the binding of [sup 3]H-strychnine (glycine receptor antagonist) to synaptic membranes prepared from bovine spinal cord. It is concluded that excitation caused by high-dose morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide is not mediated by an interaction with postsynaptic amino acid receptors. (au) (30 refs.).

  5. Identification of a New Class of Selective Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter Subtype 1 (EAAT1) Inhibitors Followed by a Structure-Activity-Relationship Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stinne Wessel; Erichsen, Mette Norman; Fu, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Screening of a small compound library at the three excitatory amino acid transporter subtypes 1–3 (EAAT1–3) resulted in the identification of compound (Z)-4-chloro-3-(5-((3-(2-ethoxy-2-oxoethyl)-2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl)furan-2-yl)benzoic acid (1a) that exhibited a distinct preference...... available pharmacological tools in the EAAT field but also substantiates the notion that EAAT ligands not derived from α-amino acids hold considerable potential in terms of subtype-selective modulation of the transporters....

  6. Cerebroprotective activity of U-50488H: Relationship to interactions with excitatory amino acids and calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho Ochoa, M.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the anticonvulsant and cerebroprotective activity of U-50488H was evaluated using {sup 45}Ca{sup ++} uptake in rat Ficoll purified synaptosomes, ({sup 3}H)-2-deoxyglucose uptake in selected mouse brain regions, ({sup 3}H)kainic acid binding to mouse forebrain synaptic membranes and incidence of KA-induced lesions in the CA3 region of the mouse hippocampus. U-50488H causes reduction in K{sup +}-evoked {sup 45}Ca{sup ++} uptake. These effects are comparable to those of the calcium channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine and seem to be related to calcium dependent mechanisms. Changes in saturability, specificity and dissociation constant values of kainic acid receptor binding were demonstrated in the presence of U-50488H at concentrations similar to those used in {sup 45}Ca{sup ++} uptake studies and in the presence of calcium and chloride ions.

  7. Excitatory amino acid neurotoxicity and modulation of glutamate receptor expression in organotypic brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, J; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Jakobsen, B

    2000-01-01

    -induced excitotoxicity and KA-glutamate receptor subunit mRNA expression after long-term exposure to low, non-toxic doses of KA and NBQX. We conclude that organotypic brain slice cultures, combined with standardized procedures for quantitation of cell damage and receptor subunit changes is of great potential use......Using organotypic slice cultures of hippocampus and cortex-striatum from newborn to 7 day old rats, we are currently studying the excitotoxic effects of kainic acid (KA), AMPA and NMDA and the neuroprotective effects of glutamate receptor blockers, like NBQX. For detection and quantitation......-associated protein 2, and --e) general and specific neuronal and glial cell stains. The results show good correlation between the different markers, and are in accordance with results obtained in vivo. Examples presented in this review will focus on the use of PI uptake to monitor the excitotoxic effects of --a) KA...

  8. Mechanism of ceftriaxone induction of excitatory amino acid transporter-2 expression and glutamate uptake in primary human astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok-Geun; Su, Zhao-Zhong; Emdad, Luni; Gupta, Pankaj; Sarkar, Devanand; Borjabad, Alejandra; Volsky, David J; Fisher, Paul B

    2008-05-09

    Glutamate is an essential neurotransmitter regulating brain functions. Excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT)-2 is one of the major glutamate transporters primarily expressed in astroglial cells. Dysfunction of EAAT2 is implicated in acute and chronic neurological disorders, including stroke/ischemia, temporal lobe epilepsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, human immunodeficiency virus 1-associated dementia, and growth of malignant gliomas. Ceftriaxone, one of the beta-lactam antibiotics, is a stimulator of EAAT2 expression with neuroprotective effects in both in vitro and in vivo models based in part on its ability to inhibit neuronal cell death by glutamate excitotoxicity. Based on this consideration and its lack of toxicity, ceftriaxone has potential to manipulate glutamate transmission and ameliorate neurotoxicity. We investigated the mechanism by which ceftriaxone enhances EAAT2 expression in primary human fetal astrocytes (PHFA). Ceftriaxone elevated EAAT2 transcription in PHFA through the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling pathway. The antibiotic promoted nuclear translocation of p65 and activation of NF-kappaB. The specific NF-kappaB binding site at the -272 position of the EAAT2 promoter was responsible for ceftriaxone-mediated EAAT2 induction. In addition, ceftriaxone increased glutamate uptake, a primary function of EAAT2, and EAAT2 small interference RNA completely inhibited ceftriaxone-induced glutamate uptake activity in PHFA. Taken together, our data indicate that ceftriaxone is a potent modulator of glutamate transport in PHFA through NF-kappaB-mediated EAAT2 promoter activation. These findings suggest a mechanism for ceftriaxone modulation of glutamate transport and for its potential effects on ameliorating specific neurodegenerative diseases through modulation of extracellular glutamate.

  9. Mechanism of Transport Modulation by an Extracellular Loop in an Archaeal Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter (EAAT) Homolog*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Christopher; Mindell, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary transporters in the excitatory amino acid transporter family terminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission by catalyzing Na+-dependent removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Recent structural studies of the aspartate-specific archaeal homolog, GltPh, suggest that transport is achieved by a rigid body, piston-like movement of the transport domain, which houses the substrate-binding site, between the extracellular and cytoplasmic sides of the membrane. This transport domain is connected to an immobile scaffold by three loops, one of which, the 3–4 loop (3L4), undergoes substrate-sensitive conformational change. Proteolytic cleavage of the 3L4 was found to abolish transport activity indicating an essential function for this loop in the transport mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that despite the presence of fully cleaved 3L4, GltPh is still able to sample conformations relevant for transport. Optimized reconstitution conditions reveal that fully cleaved GltPh retains some transport activity. Analysis of the kinetics and temperature dependence of transport accompanied by direct measurements of substrate binding reveal that this decreased transport activity is not due to alteration of the substrate binding characteristics but is caused by the significantly reduced turnover rate. By measuring solute counterflow activity and cross-link formation rates, we demonstrate that cleaving 3L4 severely and specifically compromises one or more steps contributing to the movement of the substrate-loaded transport domain between the outward- and inward-facing conformational states, sparing the equivalent step(s) during the movement of the empty transport domain. These results reveal a hitherto unknown role for the 3L4 in modulating an essential step in the transport process. PMID:24155238

  10. Probing for improved potency and in vivo bioavailability of excitatory amino acid transporter subtype 1 inhibitors UCPH-101 and UCPH-102: Design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of substituted 7-biphenyl analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Mette Norman; Hansen, J; Artacho Ruiz, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Uptake of the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS, (S)-glutamate, is mediated by a family of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT). Previously we have explored the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a series of EAAT1 selective inhibitors, leading to the development of the poten...

  11. 4,4-Dimethyl- and diastereomeric 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-(2S)-glutamate analogues display distinct pharmacological profiles at ionotropic glutamate receptors and excitatory amino acid transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, Lennart; Pickering, Darryl S; Gefflaut, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    this approach has provided important insight into the structure-activity relationships (SAR) for ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs), as well as the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). In this work, three 4,4-disubstituted Glu analogues 1-3, which are hybrid structures......Subtype-selective ligands are of great interest to the scientific community, as they provide a tool for investigating the function of one receptor or transporter subtype when functioning in its native environment. Several 4-substituted (S)-glutamate (Glu) analogues were synthesized, and altogether...

  12. Excitatory amino acid receptor ligands: resolution, absolute stereochemistry, and enantiopharmacology of 2-amino-3-(4-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-5-yl)propionic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Ebert, B; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    1998-01-01

    (RS)-2-Amino-3-(4-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-5-yl)propionic acid (Bu-HIBO, 6) has previously been shown to be an agonist at (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors and an inhibitor of CaCl2-dependent [3H]-(S)-glutamic acid binding (J. Med. Chem. 1992, 35, 3512...... equipotent as inhibitors of CaCl2-dependent [3H]-(S)-glutamic acid binding, neither enantiomer showed significant affinity for the synaptosomal (S)-glutamic acid uptake system(s). AMPA receptor affinity (IC50 = 0.48 microM) and agonism (EC50 = 17 microM) were shown to reside exclusively in the S....... These observations together indicate that the potentiation of the AMPA receptor agonism of 7 by 8 is not mediated by metabotropic (S)-glutamate receptors but rather by the CaCl2-dependent (S)-glutamic acid binding system, which shows the characteristics of a transport mechanism. After intravenous administration...

  13. 3-pyrazolone analogues of the 3-isoxazolol metabotropic excitatory amino acid receptor agonist homo-AMPA. Synthesis and pharmacological testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, D.; Janin, Y.L.; Brehm, L.

    1999-01-01

    the terminal carboxyl group has been replaced by various bioisosteric groups, such as phosphonic acid or 3-isoxazolol groups, have been shown to interact selectively with different subtypes of mGlu receptors. In this paper we report the synthesis of the 3-pyrazolone bioisosteres of a-AA, compounds (RS)-2-amino...

  14. Effect of Gua Lou Gui Zhi decoction on focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury through regulating the expression of excitatory amino acids and their receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianwen; Li, Huang; Huang, Mingqing; Huang, Mei; Xu, Wei; Chu, Kedan; Chen, Lidian; Zhang, Yuqin

    2014-07-01

    Gua Lou Gui Zhi decotion (GLGZD) has been reported to be an effective treatment for post‑apoplectic limb spasm in the clinic. The present study aimed to investigate whether GLGZD had an affect on cerebral injuries induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats and its possible mechanism. High‑performance liquid chromatography was performed to analyze GLGZD. Furthermore, a model was established to assess the efficacy of GLGZD. Neurological defect scores and screen tests were analyzed. Brain ischemic infarct volume was measured using 2,3,5‑triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining and glutamic acid (Glu), aspartic acid (Asp) and glycine (Gly) levels in the cerebrospinal fluid were measured using the Hitachi automatic amino acid analyzer. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of the α‑amino‑3‑hydroxy‑5‑methyl‑4‑isoxazole‑propionic acid (AMPA) and N‑methyl‑D‑aspartic acid (NMDA) glutamate receptors, and to analyze histopathological change. GLGZD was found to improve neurological performance and reduce infarct volumes in MCAO rats. In addition, GLGZD was observed to enhance motor performance, which was assessed using the screen test. Furthermore, GLGZD was found to reduce Glu, Asp and Gly levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and downregulate the protein expression of the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors. Thus, it was demonstrated that GLGZD may exert neuroprotective effects through the modulation of excitatory amino acids, and AMPA and NMDA receptor expression.

  15. Comparison of effects of endogenous and exogenous excitatory amino acids on Retzius nerve cells of the leech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopicic, Srdjan; Nedeljkov, Vladimir; Cemerikic, Dusan; Dudvarski, Zoran; Pavlovic, Dragan; Cutura, Nedjo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine the effects of L-aspartate, L-glutamate, and beta-N-oxalylamino-L-alanine (Lathyrus toxin) on Retzius nerve cells of the leech Haemopis sanguisuga. The goal was to compare the electrophysiological effects of endogenous vs. exogenous amino acids, known as potent neurotoxins, through the mechanism ofexcitotoxicity. We used classical intracellular recordings on Retzius nerve cells in isolated ganglia of the leech, and plotted dose-response curves to compare potencies. Our results show that Lathyrus toxin is more than 200 times more potent in depolarizing the membrane potential on our model than L-aspartate and L-glutamate, which are approximately equipotent.

  16. Up-Regulation of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters EAAT3 and EAAT4 by Lithium Sensitive Glycogen Synthase Kinase GSK3ß

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Abousaab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cellular uptake of glutamate by the excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs decreases excitation and thus participates in the regulation of neuroexcitability. Kinases impacting on neuronal function include Lithium-sensitive glycogen synthase kinase GSK3ß. The present study thus explored whether the activities of EAAT3 and/or EAAT4 isoforms are sensitive to GSK3ß. Methods: cRNA encoding wild type EAAT3 (SLC1A1 or EAAT4 (SLC1A6 was injected into Xenopus oocytes without or with additional injection of cRNA encoding wild type GSK3ß or the inactive mutant K85AGSK3ß. Dual electrode voltage clamp was performed in order to determine glutamate-induced current (IEAAT. Results: Appreciable IEAAT was observed in EAAT3 or EAAT4 expressing but not in water injected oocytes. IEAAT was significantly increased by coexpression of GSK3ß but not by coexpression of K85AGSK3ß. Coexpression of GSK3ß increased significantly the maximal IEAAT in EAAT3 or EAAT4 expressing oocytes, without significantly modifying apparent affinity of the carriers. Lithium (1 mM exposure for 24 hours decreased IEAAT in EAAT3 and GSK3ß expressing oocytes to values similar to IEAAT in oocytes expressing EAAT3 alone. Lithium did not significantly modify IEAAT in oocytes expressing EAAT3 without GSK3ß. Conclusions: Lithium-sensitive GSK3ß is a powerful regulator of excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT3 and EAAT4.

  17. Piracetam ameliorated oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced injury in rat cortical neurons via inhibition of oxidative stress, excitatory amino acids release and P53/Bax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi; Hu, Min; Zha, Yun-hong; Li, Zi-cheng; Zhao, Bo; Yu, Ling-ling; Yu, Min; Qian, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that piracetam inhibited the decrease in amino acid content induced by chronic hypoperfusion, ameliorated the dysfunction of learning and memory in a hypoperfusion rat model, down-regulated P53, and BAX protein, facilitated the synaptic plasticity, and may be helpful in the treatment of vascular dementia. To explore the precise mechanism, the present study further evaluated effects of piracetam on Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal damage in rat primary cortical cells. The addition of piracetam to the cultured cells 12 h before OGD for 4 h significantly reduced neuronal damage as determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and lactate dehydrogenase release experiments. Piracetam also lowered the levels of malondialdehyde, nitrogen monoxidum, and xanthine oxidase which was increased in the OGD cells, and enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, which were decreased in the OGD cells. We also demonstrated that piracetam could decrease glutamate and aspartate release when cortical cells were subjected to OGD. Furthermore, Western blot study demonstrated that piracetam attenuated the increased expression of P53 and BAX protein in OGD cells. These observations demonstrated that piracetam reduced OGD-induced neuronal damage by inhibiting the oxidative stress and decreasing excitatory amino acids release and lowering P53/Bax protein expression in OGD cells.

  18. Evidence that luteinizing hormone suppression in response to inhibitory neuropeptides, beta-endorphin, interleukin-1 beta, and neuropeptide-K, may involve excitatory amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, J J; Kalra, S P; Kalra, P S

    1993-07-01

    A large body of recent evidence suggests that a number of inhibitory and excitatory neuropeptides and amino acids may participate in the episodic secretion of hypothalamic LHRH and pituitary LH in castrated rats. However, the precise functional relationships among these messenger molecules in the control of LH secretion remain to be ascertained. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that inhibition of LH release by an opioid [beta-endorphin (beta END)], cytokine [interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta)], or tachykinin [neuropeptide-K (NPK)] is a result of diminished excitatory amino acid (EAA) signaling. Adult male rats were castrated and received an intracerebroventricular cannula in the third ventricle for administration of beta END (10 micrograms/rat), NPK (2.5 nmol/rat), or IL-1 beta (100 ng/rat) 2 weeks postcastration. One day before the experiments, rats received an intraatrial cannula for frequent blood sampling and for iv injection of the glutamate receptor agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 5 mg/kg) at 30-min intervals. Blood samples for LH measurements were withdrawn immediately before and 10 min after each NMDA injection. The results show that intracerebroventricular beta END, IL-1 beta, or NPK inhibited LH release. Multiple injections of NMDA did not alter the existing pattern of LH secretion in castrated control rats. However, similar NMDA injections completely prevented the decrease in LH release by beta END, IL-1 beta, or NPK. Plasma LH levels in these rats remained within the range seen in untreated control rats throughout the 120-min duration of the experiment, and NMDA injections at 30-min intervals evoked pulses of LH that resembled those seen normally in castrated rats. The blockade of the inhibitory effects of the three peptides by NMDA and previous knowledge of hypothalamic sites of NMDA action suggest that EAA systems may represent a common pathway down-stream in the hypothalamic LHRH-regulating circuitry to mediate diminution of LH

  19. Evidence that nitric oxide may mediate the ovarian steroid-induced luteinizing hormone surge: involvement of excitatory amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, J J; Sahu, A; Kalra, P S; Kalra, S P

    1993-12-01

    The involvement of excitatory N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the hypothalamic control of pituitary LH secretion is well recognized. Recent evidence shows that nitric oxide (NO), a free radical gas, may act as neurotransmitter in the brain, and its efflux is stimulated by activation of NMDA receptors. Studies were undertaken to determine whether NO is involved in the hypothalamic release of LHRH and in the LH surge induced by progesterone (P) in estrogen-primed ovariectomized rats. Rats were ovariectomized and 2 weeks later received estradiol benzoate (30 micrograms sc) at 1000 h. Two days later, P was injected at 1000 h to potentiate the estradiol benzoate-induced LH surge in the afternoon. Serial blood samples were collected at hourly intervals from 1400-1800 h via an intraatrial cannula implanted the day before P injection. Additionally, at various times before onset of the LH surge at 1400 h, the rats were injected sc with one of three inhibitors of NO synthase, the enzyme that generates NO. Control, saline-injected rats showed unambiguous LH surges in the afternoon. However, either a single injection at 1000 h of NG-methyl-L-arginine (20 mg/kg) or three injections at 1000, 1200, and 1400 h of either Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (NAME, 40 mg/kg) or Nw-nitro-L-arginine (60 mg/kg) to inhibit NO efflux markedly suppressed the P-induced LH surge in the afternoon. To ascertain whether suppression of LH surge was due to blockade of hypothalamic LHRH release, a series of in vitro studies were performed in steroid-primed rats. First we examined the effects of sodium nitroprusside (NPS), a compound that spontaneously generates and releases NO. NPS increased basal and KCl-induced LHRH release in vitro from the medial basal hypothalamus-preoptic area and median eminence fragments. No direct effect of NO at the pituitary level was seen, since NPS did not alter basal or LHRH-induced LH in vitro release from hemipituitaries. In addition, we tested the effects of

  20. Amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  1. Interactive effects involving different classes of excitatory amino acid receptors and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1990-01-01

    Differentiating granule cells develop survival requirements in culture which can be met by treatment with high K+ or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and, according to our recent findings, also with low concentrations of kainic acid (KA, 50 microM). We have now attempted to elucidate the mechanism(s) ...

  2. Central phencyclidine (PCP) receptor binding is glutamate dependent: evidence for a PCP/excitatory amino acid receptor (EAAR) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, P.; Braunwalder, A.; Lehmann, J.; Williams, M.

    1986-03-01

    PCP and other dissociative anesthetica block the increase in neuronal firing rate evoked by the EAAR agonist, N-methyl-Daspartate. NMDA and other EAAs such as glutamate (glu) have not been previously shown to affect PCP ligand binding. In the present study, using once washed rat forebrain membranes, 10 ..mu..M-glu was found to increase the binding of (/sup 3/H)TCP, a PCP analog, to defined PCP recognition sites by 20%. Removal of glu and aspartate (asp) by extensive washing decreased TCP binding by 75-90%. In these membranes, 10 ..mu..M L-glu increased TCP binding 3-fold. This effect was stereospecific and evoked by other EAAs with the order of activity, L-glu > D-asp > L- asp > NMDA > D-glu > quisqualate. Kainate, GABA, NE, DA, 5-HT, 2-chloroadenosine, oxotremorine and histamine had no effect on TCP binding at concentrations up to 100 ..mu..M. The effects of L-glu were attenuated by the NMDA-type receptor antagonist, 2-amino-7--phosphonoheptanoate (AP7; 10 ..mu..M-1 mM). These findings indicate that EAAS facilitate TCP binding, possibly through NMDA-type receptors. The observed interaction between the PCP receptor and EAARs may reflect the existence of a macromolecular receptor complex similar to that demonstrated for the benzodiazepines and GABA.

  3. Excitatory amino acid receptor blockade within the caudal pressor area and rostral ventrolateral medulla alters cardiovascular responses to nucleus raphe obscurus stimulation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva N.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressor responses elicited by stimulation of the nucleus raphe obscurus (NRO depend on the integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM. Therefore, to test the participation of excitatory amino acid (EAA receptors in the cardiovascular responses evoked by NRO stimulation (1 ms, 100 Hz, 40-70 µA, for 10 s, the EAA antagonist kynurenic acid (Kyn was microinjected at different sites in the ventrolateral medullar surface (2.7 nmol/200 nl of male Wistar rats (270-320 g, N = 39 and NRO stimulation was repeated. The effects of NRO stimulation were: hypertension (deltaMAP = +43 ± 1 mmHg, P<0.01, bradycardia (deltaHR = -30 ± 7 bpm, P<0.01 and apnea. Bilateral microinjection of Kyn into the RVLM, which did not change baseline parameters, almost abolished the bradycardia induced by NRO stimulation (deltaHR = -61 ± 3 before vs -2 ± 3 bpm after Kyn, P<0.01, N = 7. Unilateral microinjection of Kyn into the CVLM did not change baseline parameters or reduce the pressor response to NRO stimulation (deltaMAP = +46 ± 5 before vs +48 ± 5 mmHg after Kyn, N = 6. Kyn bilaterally microinjected into the caudal pressor area reduced blood pressure and heart rate and almost abolished the pressor response to NRO stimulation (deltaMAP = +46 ± 4 mmHg before vs +4 ± 2 mmHg after Kyn, P<0.01, N = 7. These results indicate that EAA receptors on the medullary ventrolateral surface play a role in the modulation of the cardiovascular responses induced by NRO stimulation, and also suggest that the RVLM participates in the modulation of heart rate responses and that the caudal pressor area modulates the pressor response following NRO stimulation.

  4. Relationship between structure, conformational flexibility, and biological activity of agonists and antagonists at the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid subtype of excitatory amino acid receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, U; Brehm, L; Schaumburg, Kjeld

    1990-01-01

    spectroscopy and supported by computer simulations and molecular mechanics calculations. While the trans forms of 2,3-PDA and 2,4-PDA and cis-2,5-PDA show NMDA receptor agonist activities, cis-2,3-PDA and cis-2,4-PDA are NMDA antagonists. The compounds trans-2,5-PDA and cis-2,6-PDA did not interact with NMDA...... receptors. Each of the three cyclic acidic amino acids showing NMDA agonist activities was found to exist as an equilibrium mixture of two conformers in aqueous solution. In contrast, the NMDA antagonists cis-2,3-PDA and cis-2,4-PDA as well as the inactive compounds trans-2,5-PDA and cis-2,6-PDA were shown...

  5. Structure–Activity Relationship Study of Selective Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter Subtype 1 (EAAT1) Inhibitor 2-Amino-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-(naphthalen-1-yl)-5-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-chromene-3-carbonitrile (UCPH-101) and Absolute Configurational Assignment Using Infrared and Vibrational

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huynh, Tri H.V.; Shim, Irene; Bohr, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) play essential roles in regulating the synaptic concentration of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the mammalian central nervous system. To date, five subtypes have been identified, named EAAT1–5 in humans, and GLAST, GLT-1, EAAC1, EAAT4, and EAAT5...

  6. Selective stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptor subtypes and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture: effect of kainic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1990-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate. Here we report on the influence of another glutamate analogue, kainic acid, which, in contrast to N-methyl-D-aspartate, is believed to stimulate transmitter rec...

  7. Age-related changes in cerebellar and hypothalamic function accompany non-microglial immune gene expression, altered synapse organization, and excitatory amino acid neurotransmission deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasera, Stephen J; Arikkath, Jyothi; Boska, Michael D; Chaudoin, Tammy R; DeKorver, Nicholas W; Goulding, Evan H; Hoke, Traci A; Mojtahedzedah, Vahid; Reyelts, Crystal D; Sajja, Balasrinivasa; Schenk, A Katrin; Tecott, Laurence H; Volden, Tiffany A

    2016-09-20

    We describe age-related molecular and neuronal changes that disrupt mobility or energy balance based on brain region and genetic background. Compared to young mice, aged C57BL/6 mice exhibit marked locomotor (but not energy balance) impairments. In contrast, aged BALB mice exhibit marked energy balance (but not locomotor) impairments. Age-related changes in cerebellar or hypothalamic gene expression accompany these phenotypes. Aging evokes upregulation of immune pattern recognition receptors and cell adhesion molecules. However, these changes do not localize to microglia, the major CNS immunocyte. Consistent with a neuronal role, there is a marked age-related increase in excitatory synapses over the cerebellum and hypothalamus. Functional imaging of these regions is consistent with age-related synaptic impairments. These studies suggest that aging reactivates a developmental program employed during embryogenesis where immune molecules guide synapse formation and pruning. Renewed activity in this program may disrupt excitatory neurotransmission, causing significant behavioral deficits.

  8. Plasma amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  9. The hypothalamic peptides, beta-endorphin, neuropeptide K and interleukin-1 beta, and the opiate morphine, enhance the excitatory amino acid-induced LH release under the influence of gonadal steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, J J; Sahu, A; Kalra, S P; Kalra, P S

    1994-10-01

    Several hypothalamic neuropeptides and amino acids are known to inhibit or excite pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) release, but the precise interplay between these 2 classes of signals in episodic LH discharge is not known. In this study, we have evaluated the interaction between neuropeptides shown previously to inhibit LH release in castrated rats and the excitatory amino acid agonist, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), on LH release in intact male rats. Rats received a permanent intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) cannula and 9-12 days later an intrajugular cannula for frequent blood sampling. The next day, rats received i.c.v. either saline (SAL, 3 microliters, controls) or a neuropeptide: the opioid beta-endorphin (beta-END; 2.9 nmol), the tachykinin neuropeptide K (NPK, 2.5 nmol) or the cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta, 5.9 pmol) in SAL. The LH response to 2 consecutive i.v. injections of NMDA (5 mg/kg) at 30 min intervals was evaluated. In control rats, each NMDA injection evoked a significant release of LH at 10 min. Quite unexpectedly, the three peptides, instead of exerting an inhibitory effect, enhanced the LH response to NMDA. The peak plasma LH levels after each NMDA injection and the cumulative LH responses were significantly higher in peptide-treated than in control rats. This peculiar ability of the peptides that inhibit LH release in castrated rats, to potentiate the NMDA-induced LH release in the presence of gonadal steroids was further validated in female rats treated with an opiate receptor agonist, morphine (MOR) which is also known to suppress LH release in ovariectomized rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Reduced excitatory amino acid transporter 1 and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 expression in the cerebellum of fragile X mental retardation gene 1 premutation carriers with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretto, Dalyir I; Kumar, Madhur; Cao, Zhengyu; Cunningham, Christopher L; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Qi, Lihong; Berman, Robert; Noctor, Stephen C; Hagerman, Randi J; Pessah, Isaac N; Tassone, Flora

    2014-05-01

    A premutation (PM) expansion (55-200 CGG) in the fragile X mental retardation gene 1 causes elevated messenger RNA and reduced fragile X mental retardation gene 1 protein. Young PM carriers can develop characteristic physical features and mild cognitive disabilities. In addition, individuals with PM, particularly male carriers, are at high risk to develop fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) with aging. Human postmortem FXTAS brains show extensive white matter disease in the cerebellum and the presence of intranuclear inclusions throughout the brain, although their etiologic significance is unknown. In the current work, expression levels of the metabotropic glutamate (Glu) receptor 5 and the Glu transporter excitatory amino acid transporter 1, examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses, were found to be reduced in the postmortem cerebellum of PM carriers with FXTAS compared with age matched controls, with higher CGG repeat number having greater reductions in both proteins. These data suggests a dysregulation of Glu signaling in PM carriers, which would likely contribute to the development and severity of FXTAS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease. Amino acids are "building blocks" that join together to form ...

  12. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  13. Effect of environmental factors on the biosynthesis of the neuro-excitatory amino acid β-ODAP (β-N-oxalyl-L-α,β-diaminopropionic acid) in callus tissue of Lathyrus sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Rabiul M; Kuo, Yu-Haey; Lambein, Fernand; Hussain, Muhammed

    2011-03-01

    Habituated callus tissues derived from leaf explants of Lathyrus sativus L. (grass pea) were cultured under different environmental conditions such as drought, salinity and deficiency or oversupply of micronutrients. The biosynthesis of the neuro-excitatory β-ODAP (β-N-oxalyl-L-α,β-diaminopropionic acid) was induced by feeding the precursor BIA, (β-isoxazolin-5-on-2-yl)-alanine, to those calli habituated under different stress conditions. Conversion of BIA into β-ODAP was reduced by Zn(2+) at different levels of Fe(2+) supplements while excess of Fe(2+) enhanced it at different Zn(2+) levels in the media. The biosynthesis of β-ODAP was increased by both oversupply and deficiency of Mn(2+) manganese while B(3+) as well as Co(2+) increased it significantly by oversupply. Al(3+) enhanced the conversion of BIA into β-ODAP significantly in a concentration-dependent way. Cu(2+) also reduced the formation of β-ODAP when increased in the media. Mo(6+) had no apparent effect. NaCl decreased the conversion of BIA into β-ODAP proportionately with the increase in salinity. β-ODAP was increased with increasing mannitol concentration till -0.23MPa while at this osmotic potential created with PEG-20,000 the formation of β-ODAP is completely inhibited in low toxin calli. These experiments demonstrate the importance of environmental factors, especially micronutrients and salinity, on the biosynthesis of β-ODAP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-03-10

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness.

  15. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  16. Amino Acids and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  17. Azetidinic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Bunch, Lennart; Chopin, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    A set of ten azetidinic amino acids, that can be envisioned as C-4 alkyl substituted analogues of trans-2-carboxyazetidine-3-acetic acid (t-CAA) and/or conformationally constrained analogues of (R)- or (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) have been synthesized in a diastereo- and enantiomerically pure form from...... of two diastereoisomers that were easily separated and converted in two steps into azetidinic amino acids. Azetidines 35-44 were characterized in binding studies on native ionotropic Glu receptors and in functional assays at cloned metabotropic receptors mGluR1, 2 and 4, representing group I, II and III...

  18. acetyl amino acids and dipeptides

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemistry. 2-(2'-Isopropyl-5'-methylphenoxy)acetic acid (1) was prepared by phenoxylation of thymol by using chloroacetic acid in alkaline conditions. Dipeptides Boc-Gly-Gly-OMe, Boc-Pro-Pro-. OMe and Boc-Ala-Leu-OMe were prepared from the corresponding amino acid methyl esters and Boc-amino acids using DCC ...

  19. Amino acids and gut function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W W; Qiao, S Y; Li, D F

    2009-05-01

    The intestine is not only critical for the absorption of nutrients, but also interacts with a complex external milieu. Most foreign antigens enter the body through the digestive tract. Dietary amino acids are major fuels for the small intestinal mucosa, as well as important substrates for syntheses of intestinal proteins, nitric oxide, polyamines, and other products with enormous biological importance. Recent studies support potential therapeutic roles for specific amino acids (including glutamine, glutamate, arginine, glycine, lysine, threonine, and sulfur-containing amino acids) in gut-related diseases. Results of these new lines of work indicate trophic and cytoprotective effects of amino acids on gut integrity, growth, and health in animals and humans.

  20. utilisation of synthetic amino acids

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    student

    Crystalline amino acids are used increasingly to meet the lysine, methionine and threonine requirements of poultry. Initially this was on economic grounds but their use is now being encouraged by concerns over N-pollution (Fisher, 2000). When modelling the amino acid requirements of broiler breeder hens, a question that ...

  1. Stereoselective chemoenzymatic synthesis of the four stereoisomers of l-2-(2-carboxycyclobutyl)glycine and pharmacological characterization at human excitatory amino acid transporter subtypes 1, 2, and 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faure, Sophie; Jensen, Anders A.; Maurat, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The four stereoisomers of l-2-(2-carboxycyclobutyl)glycine, l-CBG-I, l-CBG-II, l-CBG-III, and l-CBG-IV, were synthesized in good yield and high enantiomeric excess, from the corresponding cis and trans-2-oxalylcyclobutanecarboxylic acids 5 and 6 using the enzymes aspartate aminotransferase (AAT...

  2. Amino Acids from a Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie Elisla

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary- vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a coetary amino acid.

  3. Treatment of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amino acid metabolism disorders Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please fill ... It's been added to your dashboard . Amino acid metabolism disorders are rare health conditions that affect a ...

  4. Excitatory amino acid transmission in health and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bridges, Richard J; Balázs, R; Cotman, Carl W

    2006-01-01

    ... Structure of the Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors, 23 3 AMPA RECEPTORS, 36 Molecular Structure, Properties, and Regulation, 36 Distribution of AMPA Receptors, 41 AMPA Receptor Pharmacology, 46 Th...

  5. Excitatory amino acid transporters as potential drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, Lennart; Erichsen, Mette Navy; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    roles or functions in the CNS are yet to be fully understood due to the shortage of subtype-selective ligands. OBJECTIVE/METHODS: We examine the latest developments in this field by addressing EAAT expression pattern, localization and pharmacology. We present highlights of published work on inhibitors...

  6. Branched-Chain Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Ghiringhelli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Our study is focused on evaluation and use of the most effective and correct nutrients. In particular, our attention is directed to the role of certain amino acids in cachectic patients. During parenteral nutrition in humans, physician already associates in the PN-bags different formulations including amino acids, lipids and glucose solutions or essential amino acids solution alone or exclusively branched-chain amino acids (BCAA. Studies investigated the effects of dietary BCAA ingestion on different diseases and conditions such as obesity and metabolic disorders, liver disease, muscle atrophy, cancer, impaired immunity or injuries (surgery, trauma, burns, and sepsis. BCAAs have been shown to affect gene expression, protein metabolism, apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes, and insulin resistance. They have also been shown to inhibit the proliferation of liver cancer cells in vitro, and are essential for lymphocyte proliferation and dendritic cell maturation. Oral or parenteral administration of these three amino acids will allow us to evaluate the real efficacy of these compounds during a therapy to treat malnutrition in subjects unable to feed themselves.

  7. Synthesis of Trishomocubane Amino Acid Derivatives | Govender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acid fluoride is required for activation of the cage amino acid in SPPS. Esterification of the sterically hindered trishomocubane amino acid is also reported, indicating sufficient reactivity of the acid function for potential use in SPPS. Keywords: Trishomocubane amino acid, hydantoin, Fmoc protection, t-Boc protection, ...

  8. Combinatorics of aliphatic amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grützmann, Konrad; Böcker, Sebastian; Schuster, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This study combines biology and mathematics, showing that a relatively simple question from molecular biology can lead to complicated mathematics. The question is how to calculate the number of theoretically possible aliphatic amino acids as a function of the number of carbon atoms in the side chain. The presented calculation is based on earlier results from theoretical chemistry concerning alkyl compounds. Mathematical properties of this number series are highlighted. We discuss which of the theoretically possible structures really occur in living organisms, such as leucine and isoleucine with a chain length of four. This is done both for a strict definition of aliphatic amino acids only involving carbon and hydrogen atoms in their side chain and for a less strict definition allowing sulphur, nitrogen and oxygen atoms. While the main focus is on proteinogenic amino acids, we also give several examples of non-proteinogenic aliphatic amino acids, playing a role, for instance, in signalling. The results are in agreement with a general phenomenon found in biology: Usually, only a small number of molecules are chosen as building blocks to assemble an inconceivable number of different macromolecules as proteins. Thus, natural biological complexity arises from the multifarious combination of building blocks.

  9. Toward Sustainable Amino Acid Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Yoshihiro; Hara, Yoshihiko; Kojima, Hiroyuki

    Because the global amino acid production industry has been growing steadily and is expected to grow even more in the future, efficient production by fermentation is of great importance from economic and sustainability viewpoints. Many systems biology technologies, such as genome breeding, omics analysis, metabolic flux analysis, and metabolic simulation, have been employed for the improvement of amino acid-producing strains of bacteria. Synthetic biological approaches have recently been applied to strain development. It is also important to use sustainable carbon sources, such as glycerol or pyrolytic sugars from cellulosic biomass, instead of conventional carbon sources, such as glucose or sucrose, which can be used as food. Furthermore, reduction of sub-raw substrates has been shown to lead to reduction of environmental burdens and cost. Recently, a new fermentation system for glutamate production under acidic pH was developed to decrease the amount of one sub-raw material, ammonium, for maintenance of culture pH. At the same time, the utilization of fermentation coproducts, such as cells, ammonium sulfate, and fermentation broth, is a useful approach to decrease waste. In this chapter, further perspectives for future amino acid fermentation from one-carbon compounds are described.

  10. Amino acids in sheep production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoard, Susan A; Sales, Francisco A; Sciascia, Quentin L

    2016-01-01

    Increasing production efficiency with a high standard of animal welfare and respect for the environment is a goal of sheep farming systems. Substantial gains in productivity have been achieved through improved genetics, nutrition and management changes; however the survival and growth performance of multiple-born lambs still remains a problem. This is a significant production efficiency and animal well-being issue. There is a growing body of evidence that some amino acids have a role in regulating growth, reproduction and immunity through modulation of metabolic and cell signaling pathways. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of what is currently known about the role of amino acids in sheep production and the potential for supplementation strategies to influence on-farm survival and growth of lambs.

  11. AMINO ACIDS APPLICATION TO CREATE OF NANOSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    I. S. Chekman; N. A. Gorchakova; H. O. Sirova; O. O. Kazakova; T. I. Nagorna; V. F. Shatornaya

    2014-01-01

    Review is devoted to the amino acids that could be used for nanostructures creation. The investigation of corresponding properties of amino acids is essential for their role definition in creation of nanomedicines. However, amino acid studying as components of nanostructures is insufficient. Study of nanoparticles for medicines creation was initiated by the development of nanotechnology. Amino acids in complexes with the nanoparticles of organic and inorganic nature play an important role for...

  12. Symmetry Scheme for Amino Acid Codons

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishnan, J.

    2003-01-01

    Group theoretical concepts are invoked in a specific model to explain how only twenty amino acids occur in nature out of a possible sixty four. The methods we use enable us to justify the occurrence of the recently discovered twenty first amino acid selenocysteine, and also enables us to predict the possible existence of two more, as yet undiscovered amino acids.

  13. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  14. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Schultz, Peter G.

    2017-10-25

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  15. Amino acids as antioxidants for frying oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids, proteins and hydrolysates of proteins have been known to protect edible oils from oxidation. While amino acids and related materials have high potential as antioxidants for frying oil, effectiveness of each amino acid and mechanisms of their activities are not well understood yet. Propo...

  16. Carcass amino acid composition and utilization of dietary amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carcass amino acid composition and utilization of dietary amino acids by chickens. A.J. Saunders, J.P.H. Wessels, R.M. Gous. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics Loading ... Metrics powered by PLOS ...

  17. Bacterial synthesis of D-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radkov, Atanas D; Moe, Luke A

    2014-06-01

    Recent work has shed light on the abundance and diversity of D-amino acids in bacterial extracellular/periplasmic molecules, bacterial cell culture, and bacteria-rich environments. Within the extracellular/periplasmic space, D-amino acids are necessary components of peptidoglycan, and disruption of their synthesis leads to cell death. As such, enzymes responsible for D-amino acid synthesis are promising targets for antibacterial compounds. Further, bacteria are shown to incorporate a diverse collection of D-amino acids into their peptidoglycan, and differences in D-amino acid incorporation may occur in response to differences in growth conditions. Certain D-amino acids can accumulate to millimolar levels in cell culture, and their synthesis is proposed to foretell movement from exponential growth phase into stationary phase. While enzymes responsible for synthesis of D-amino acids necessary for peptidoglycan (D-alanine and D-glutamate) have been characterized from a number of different bacteria, the D-amino acid synthesis enzymes characterized to date cannot account for the diversity of D-amino acids identified in bacteria or bacteria-rich environments. Free D-amino acids are synthesized by racemization or epimerization at the α-carbon of the corresponding L-amino acid by amino acid racemase or amino acid epimerase enzymes. Additionally, D-amino acids can be synthesized by stereospecific amination of α-ketoacids. Below, we review the roles of D-amino acids in bacterial physiology and biotechnology, and we describe the known mechanisms by which they are synthesized by bacteria.

  18. Amino acid properties conserved in molecular evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold R Rudnicki

    Full Text Available That amino acid properties are responsible for the way protein molecules evolve is natural and is also reasonably well supported both by the structure of the genetic code and, to a large extent, by the experimental measures of the amino acid similarity. Nevertheless, there remains a significant gap between observed similarity matrices and their reconstructions from amino acid properties. Therefore, we introduce a simple theoretical model of amino acid similarity matrices, which allows splitting the matrix into two parts - one that depends only on mutabilities of amino acids and another that depends on pairwise similarities between them. Then the new synthetic amino acid properties are derived from the pairwise similarities and used to reconstruct similarity matrices covering a wide range of information entropies. Our model allows us to explain up to 94% of the variability in the BLOSUM family of the amino acids similarity matrices in terms of amino acid properties. The new properties derived from amino acid similarity matrices correlate highly with properties known to be important for molecular evolution such as hydrophobicity, size, shape and charge of amino acids. This result closes the gap in our understanding of the influence of amino acids on evolution at the molecular level. The methods were applied to the single family of similarity matrices used often in general sequence homology searches, but it is general and can be used also for more specific matrices. The new synthetic properties can be used in analyzes of protein sequences in various biological applications.

  19. Branched-Chain Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Keisuke; Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Yukawa, Hideaki

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), viz., L-isoleucine, L-leucine, and L-valine, are essential amino acids that cannot be synthesized in higher organisms and are important nutrition for humans as well as livestock. They are also valued as synthetic intermediates for pharmaceuticals. Therefore, the demand for BCAAs in the feed and pharmaceutical industries is increasing continuously. Traditional industrial fermentative production of BCAAs was performed using microorganisms isolated by random mutagenesis. A collection of these classical strains was also scientifically useful to clarify the details of the BCAA biosynthetic pathways, which are tightly regulated by feedback inhibition and transcriptional attenuation. Based on this understanding of the metabolism of BCAAs, it is now possible for us to pursue strains with higher BCAA productivity using rational design and advanced molecular biology techniques. Additionally, systems biology approaches using augmented omics information help us to optimize carbon flux toward BCAA production. Here, we describe the biosynthetic pathways of BCAAs and their regulation and then overview the microorganisms developed for BCAA production. Other chemicals, including isobutanol, i.e., a second-generation biofuel, can be synthesized by branching the BCAA biosynthetic pathways, which are also outlined.

  20. Amino and fatty acids in carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    Analyses of two carbonaceous meteorites have provided much of the latest evidence which seems to support Oparin's theory on the origin of life. The meteorites involved are the Murray meteorite, which fell in 1950, and the Murchison meteorite, which fell in 1969. The amino acids in the two meteorites are similar in composition. Eight of the twenty amino acids found belong to amino acids present in proteins. A number of monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic fatty acids were also found in the meteorites.

  1. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  2. Amino Acid Transport in a Polyaromatic Amino Acid Auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greasham, Randolph L.; Moat, Albert G.

    1973-01-01

    The initiation of growth of a polyaromatic auxotrophic mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was inhibited by several amino acids, whereas growth of the parent prototroph was unaffected. A comparative investigation of amino acid transport in the two strains employing 14C-labeled amino acids revealed that the transport of amino acids in S. cerevisiae was mediated by a general transport system responsible for the uptake of all neutral as well as basic amino acids. Both auxotrophic and prototrophic strains exhibited stereospecificity for l-amino acids and a Km ranging from 1.5 × 10−5 to 5.0 × 10−5 M. Optimal transport activity occurred at pH 5.7. Cycloheximide had no effect on amino acid uptake, indicating that protein synthesis was not a direct requirement for amino acid transport. Regulation of amino acid transport was subject to the concentration of amino acids in the free amino acid pool. Amino acid inhibition of the uptake of the aromatic amino acids by the aromatic auxotroph did not correlate directly with the effect of amino acids on the initiation of growth of the auxotroph but provides a partial explanation of this effect. PMID:4580574

  3. Amino acid composition of some Mexican foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales de León, Josefina; Camacho, M Elena; Bourges, Héctor

    2005-06-01

    Knowledge of the amino acid composition of foods is essential to calculate their chemical score, which is used to predict protein quality of foods and diets. Though amino acid composition of many foods is reasonably well established, better knowledge is needed on native foods consumed in different regions and countries. This paper presents the amino acid composition of different presentations of raw and processed foods produced and consumed in Mexico. The amino acid composition was determined using Beckman amino acid analyzers (models 116 and 6300). Tryptophan was determined using the Spies and Chambers method. Of the different foods analyzed, some comments are made on native or basic foods in Mexico: Spirulin, where lysine is the limiting amino acid, with a chemical score of 67%, is a good source of tryptophan (1.16g/16 gN); amaranth contains high levels of sulphur amino acids (4.09 to 5.34 g/16gN), with a protein content of 15 g/100g; and pulque, a Pre-Hispanic beverage that contains high levels of tryptophan (2.58 g/16 gN) and sulphur amino acids (2.72 g/16 gN). Finally, insects are good sources of sulphur amino acids and lysine.

  4. Pyrolysis of amino acids - Mechanistic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, M. A., Jr.; Medley, E. E.; Simmonds, P. G.

    1974-01-01

    Pyrolysis of several structurally different amino acids in a column at 500 C showed differences in the mechanisms and final products. The aliphatic protein amino acids decompose mainly by simple decarboxylation and condensation reactions, while the beta amino acids undergo deamination to unsaturated acids. Alpha amino acids with alpha alkyl substituents undergo an unusual intramolecular SN1 reaction with the formation of an intermediate alpha lactone which decomposes to yield a ketone. The alpha alkyl substituents appear to stabilize the developing negative charge formed by partial heterolytic cleavage of the alpha carbon - NH3 bond. The gamma and delta amino acids give 2-pyrrolidinone and 2-piperidone respectively, while the epsilon acids yield mixed products.

  5. Research Progress of Amino Acid Metabolism PET Imaging in Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIE Da-hong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid metabolism PET imaging plays a very important role in metabolism molecular imaging. Amino acid PET tracers include [1-11C]amino acid, labeling α-C amino acid, labeling side-chain amino acid, and N-substituted labeling amino acid. Uptake mechanism of these amino acids in tumor mainly involves in amino acid transport and amino acid metabolism PET imaging has an advantage of differential diagnosis of neuropsychiatric diseases, brain cancer, neuroendocrine tumor, and other tumors. The research progress of amino acid metabolism PET imaging in tumor were summarized.

  6. carcass amino acid composition and utilization of dietary amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the dissimilar diets fed. Highly significant correlation coefficients u,ere obtained br:tween body water content and the content of es- sential amino acids in the carcass. Carcass arnino acid analysis couid the'refore, under set conditions, be calculated from the body water content by using predetermined regression equations.

  7. Maternal Immune Activation Delays Excitatory-to-Inhibitory Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Switch in Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Irene; Focchi, Elisa; Rasile, Marco; Morini, Raffaella; Desiato, Genni; Tomasoni, Romana; Lizier, Michela; Ghirardini, Elsa; Fesce, Riccardo; Morone, Diego; Barajon, Isabella; Antonucci, Flavia; Pozzi, Davide; Matteoli, Michela

    2017-11-14

    The association between maternal infection and neurodevelopmental defects in progeny is well established, although the biological mechanisms and the pathogenic trajectories involved have not been defined. Pregnant dams were injected intraperitoneally at gestational day 9 with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid. Neuronal development was assessed by means of electrophysiological, optical, and biochemical analyses. Prenatal exposure to polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid causes an imbalanced expression of the Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter 1 and the K+-Cl- cotransporter 2 (KCC2). This results in delayed gamma-aminobutyric acid switch and higher susceptibility to seizures, which endures up to adulthood. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments reveal increased binding of the repressor factor RE1-silencing transcription (also known as neuron-restrictive silencer factor) to position 509 of the KCC2 promoter that leads to downregulation of KCC2 transcription in prenatally exposed offspring. Interleukin-1 receptor type I knockout mice, which display braked immune response and no brain cytokine elevation upon maternal immune activation, do not display KCC2/Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter 1 imbalance when implanted in a wild-type dam and prenatally exposed. Notably, pretreatment of pregnant dams with magnesium sulfate is sufficient to prevent the early inflammatory state and the delay in excitatory-to-inhibitory switch associated to maternal immune activation. We provide evidence that maternal immune activation hits a key neurodevelopmental process, the excitatory-to-inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid switch; defects in this switch have been unequivocally linked to diseases such as autism spectrum disorder or epilepsy. These data open the avenue for a safe pharmacological treatment that may prevent the neurodevelopmental defects caused by prenatal immune activation in a specific pregnancy time window. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Amino acid regulation of autophagosome formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are not only substrates for various metabolic pathways, but can also serve as signaling molecules controlling signal transduction pathways. One of these signaling pathways is mTOR-dependent and is activated by amino acids (leucine in particular) in synergy with insulin. Activation of

  9. THE AMINO ACID SEQUENCE OF HYPERTENSIN II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeggs, Leonard T.; Lentz, Kenneth E.; Kahn, Joseph R.; Shumway, Norman P.; Woods, Kenneth R.

    1956-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of horse hypertensin II has been determined by the use of chymotrypsin, the fluorodinitrobenzene method, and stepwise phenylisothiocyanate degradation. The results indicate that the amino acids of hypertensin II are arranged in the following order: asp-arg-val-tyr-iso-hist-pro-phe. PMID:13345964

  10. Amino acids transport in lactic streptococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Arnold Jacob Mathieu

    1987-01-01

    Lactic streptococci are extremely fastidious bacteria. For growth an exogenous source of amino acids and other nutrients is essential. The amino acid requirement in milk is fulfilled by the milk-protein casein, which is degraded by sequential hydrolysis, involving proteases and peptidases. ... Zie:

  11. The Apollo Program and Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Sidney W.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the determination of hydrolyzable amino acid precursors and a group of six amino acids in the returned lunar samples of the Apollo programs. Indicates that molecular evolution is arrested at the precursor stage on the Moon because of lack of water. (CC)

  12. Amino acids profile of four Nile fish

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    juba

    Amino acids contents of four commercial Nile fishes in Sudan. M. O. Mohammed* and D. I. Alim. Environment and Natural Resources Research Institute, the National Centre for Research, Khartoum, Sudan. Accepted 28 January, 2012. This study was intended to identify contents of amino acids (AAs) of four commercial Nile ...

  13. Crystalline amino acids and nitrogen emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Reductions in dietary protein level and supplementation with certain crystalline amino acids is a well-established method of formulating diets to achieve a more ideal amino acid pattern and to reduce nitrogen excretion. Up to 35% reduction in nitrogen excretion may be achieved by supplementing pig

  14. Plasma amino acids in Greenlanders and Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erling B; Jørgensen, Marit E; Siggaard, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    Basal metabolic rate is elevated among circumpolar populations. It has been our hypotheses that this is reflected in the levels of plasma amino acids, that amino acid concentration in plasma differs between Greenlanders and Danes, and that this difference is related to residence, ethnicity, diet......, and season. The purpose of the study was to measure plasma amino acids in Greenlanders and Danes and to analyze the influence of residence, ethnicity, diet, and season. Amino acids in plasma were measured in four groups of healthy subjects both during summer and winter: Group 1, Danes living in Denmark...... consuming European food; Group 2, Greenlanders living in Denmark consuming European food; Group 3, Greenlanders living in Greenland consuming European food; and Group 4, Greenlanders living in Greenland consuming mainly traditional Greenlandic food. Amino acids were determined by pre-column derivatization...

  15. Differential distribution of amino acids in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Sharma, Anket; Kaur, Ravdeep; Thukral, Ashwani Kumar; Bhardwaj, Renu; Ahmad, Parvaiz

    2017-05-01

    Plants are a rich source of amino acids and their individual abundance in plants is of great significance especially in terms of food. Therefore, it is of utmost necessity to create a database of the relative amino acid contents in plants as reported in literature. Since in most of the cases complete analysis of profiles of amino acids in plants was not reported, the units used and the methods applied and the plant parts used were different, amino acid contents were converted into relative units with respect to lysine for statistical analysis. The most abundant amino acids in plants are glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Pearson's correlation analysis among different amino acids showed that there were no negative correlations between the amino acids. Cluster analysis (CA) applied to relative amino acid contents of different families. Alismataceae, Cyperaceae, Capparaceae and Cactaceae families had close proximity with each other on the basis of their relative amino acid contents. First three components of principal component analysis (PCA) explained 79.5% of the total variance. Factor analysis (FA) explained four main underlying factors for amino acid analysis. Factor-1 accounted for 29.4% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on glycine, isoleucine, leucine, threonine and valine. Factor-2 explained 25.8% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on alanine, aspartic acid, serine and tyrosine. 14.2% of the total variance was explained by factor-3 and had maximum loadings on arginine and histidine. Factor-4 accounted 8.3% of the total variance and had maximum loading on the proline amino acid. The relative content of different amino acids presented in this paper is alanine (1.4), arginine (1.8), asparagine (0.7), aspartic acid (2.4), cysteine (0.5), glutamic acid (2.8), glutamine (0.6), glycine (1.0), histidine (0.5), isoleucine (0.9), leucine (1.7), lysine (1.0), methionine (0.4), phenylalanine (0.9), proline (1.1), serine (1.0), threonine (1

  16. Optical Sensors for Detection of Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettiwala, Aafrin M; Singh, Prabhat K

    2017-11-06

    Amino acids are crucially involved in a myriad of biological processes. Any aberrant changes in physiological level of amino acids often manifest in common metabolic disorders, serious neurological conditions and cardiovascular diseases. Thus, devising methods for detection of trace amounts of amino acids becomes highly elemental to their efficient clinical diagnosis. Recently, the domain of developing optical sensors for detection of amino acids has witnessed significant activity which is the focus of the current review article. We undertook a detailed search of the peer-reviewed literature that primarily deals with optical sensors for amino acids and focuses on the use of different type of materials as a sensing platform. Ninety-five papers have been included in the review, majority of which deals with optical sensors. We attempt to systematically classify these contributions based on applications of various chemical and biological scaffolds such as polymers, supramolecular assemblies, nanoparticles, DNA, heparin etc. for the sensing of amino acids. This review identifies that supramolecular assemblies and nanomaterial continue to be commonly used materials to devise sensors for amino acids followed by surfactant assemblies. The broad implications of amino acids in human health and diagnosis have stirred a lot of interest to develop optimized optical detection systems for amino acids in recent years, using different materials based on chemical and biological scaffolds. We have also attempted to highlight the merits and demerits of some of the noteworthy sensor systems to instigate further efforts for constructing amino acids sensor based on unconventional concepts. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activity of novel bicyclic acidic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Paola; De Amici, Marco; Joppolo Di Ventimiglia, Samuele

    2003-01-01

    Bicyclic acidic amino acids (+/-)-6 and (+/-)-7, which are conformationally constrained homologues of glutamic acid, were prepared via a strategy based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The new amino acids were tested toward ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes; both of them...

  18. Gemini surfactants from natural amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lourdes; Pinazo, Aurora; Pons, Ramon; Infante, Mrosa

    2014-03-01

    In this review, we report the most important contributions in the structure, synthesis, physicochemical (surface adsorption, aggregation and phase behaviour) and biological properties (toxicity, antimicrobial activity and biodegradation) of Gemini natural amino acid-based surfactants, and some potential applications, with an emphasis on the use of these surfactants as non-viral delivery system agents. Gemini surfactants derived from basic (Arg, Lys), neutral (Ser, Ala, Sar), acid (Asp) and sulphur containing amino acids (Cys) as polar head groups, and Geminis with amino acids/peptides in the spacer chain are reviewed. © 2013.

  19. An overview on D-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe

    2017-07-05

    More than half a century ago researchers thought that D-amino acids had a minor function compared to L-enantiomers in biological processes. Many evidences have shown that D-amino acids are present in high concentration in microorganisms, plants, mammals and humans and fulfil specific biological functions. In the brain of mammals, D-serine (D-Ser) acts as a co-agonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors, responsible for learning, memory and behaviour. D-Ser metabolism is relevant for disorders associated with an altered function of the NMDA receptor, such as schizophrenia, ischemia, epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders. On the other hand, D-aspartate (D-Asp) is one of the major regulators of adult neurogenesis and plays an important role in the development of endocrine function. D-Asp is present in the neuroendocrine and endocrine tissues and testes, and regulates the synthesis and secretion of hormones and spermatogenesis. Also food proteins contain D-amino acids that are naturally originated or processing-induced under conditions such as high temperatures, acid and alkali treatments and fermentation processes. The presence of D-amino acids in dairy products denotes thermal and alkaline treatments and microbial contamination. Two enzymes are involved in the metabolism of D-amino acids: amino acid racemase in the synthesis and D-amino acid oxidase in the degradation.

  20. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  1. Nutritional and amino acid analysis of raw, partially fermented and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results of the amino acid analysis showed that the partially fermented sample had the lowest quantities of all amino acids determined and had lysine as the limiting amino acid, whereas the raw and completely fermented samples had very similar amino acid profile with amino acid scores of 100, indicating that there are no ...

  2. Amino acids in human and animal nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karau, Andreas; Grayson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids are key components of human and animal nutrition, both as part of a protein-containing diet, and as supplemented individual products. In the last 10 years there has been a marked move away from the extraction of amino acids from natural products, which has been replaced by efficient fermentation processes using nonanimal carbon sources. Today several amino acids are produced in fermentation plants with capacities of more than 100,000 tonnes to serve the requirements of animal feed and human nutrition. The main fermentative amino acids for animal nutrition are L-lysine, L-threonine, and L-tryptophan. DL-Methionine continues to be manufactured for animal feed use principally by chemical synthesis, and a pharmaceutical grade is manufactured by enzymatic resolution. Amino acids play an important role in medical nutrition, particularly in parenteral nutrition, where there are high purity requirements for infusion grade products. Amino acids are also appearing more often in dietary supplements, initially for performance athletes, but increasingly for the general population. As the understanding of the effects of the individual amino acids on the human metabolism is deepened, more specialized product mixtures are being offered to improve athletic performance and for body-building.

  3. Amino Acid Stability in the Early Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. T.; Brinton, K. L.; Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    It is likely that a variety of amino acids existed in the early oceans of the Earth at the time of the origin and early evolution of life. "Primordial soup", hydrothermal vent, and meteorite based processes could have contributed to such an inventory. Several "protein" amino acids were likely present, however, based on prebiotic synthesis experiments and carbonaceous meteorite studies, non-protein amino acids, which are rare on Earth today, were likely the most abundant. An important uncertainty is the length of time these amino acids could have persisted before their destruction by abiotic and biotic processes. Prior to life, amino acid concentrations in the oceans were likely regulated by circulation through hydro-thermal vents. Today, the entire ocean circulates through vent systems every 10(exp 7) years. On the early Earth, this value was likely smaller due to higher heat flow and thus marine amino acid life-time would have been shorter. After life, amino acids in the oceans could have been assimilated by primitive organisms.

  4. Enantiomer-specific selection of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xueying; Tellez, Luis A; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-12-01

    Dietary intake of L-amino acids impacts on several physiological functions, including the control of gastrointestinal motility, pancreatic secretion, and appetite. However, the biological mechanisms regulating behavioral predilections for certain amino acid types remain poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that, in mice, the potency with which a given glucogenic amino acid increases glucose utilization reflects its rewarding properties. We have found that: (1) during long-, but not short-, term preference tests, L-alanine and L-serine were preferred over their D-enantiomer counterparts, while no such effect was observed for L-threonine vs. D-threonine; (2) these behavioral patterns were closely associated with the ability of L-amino acids to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios such that those, and only those, L-amino acids able to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios were preferred over their D-isomers; (3) these behavioral preferences were independent of gustatory influences, since taste-deficient Trpm5 knockout mice displayed ingestive responses very similar to those of their wild-type counterparts. We conclude that the ability to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios enhances the reward value of nutritionally relevant amino acids and suggest a mechanistic link between substrate utilization and amino acid preferences.

  5. Distribution of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most eagerly studied questions upon initial return of lunar samples was whether significant amounts of organic compounds, including amino acids, were present. Analyses during the 1970s produced only tentative and inconclusive identifications of indigenous amino acids. Those analyses were hampered by analytical difficulties including relative insensitivity to certain compounds, the inability to separate chiral enantiomers, and the lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements, which made it impossible to determine whether the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the results of contamination. Numerous advances have been made in instrumentation and methodology for amino acid characterization in extraterrestrial samples in the intervening years, yet the origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples has been revisited only once for a single lunar sample, (3) and remains unclear. Here, we present initial data from the analyses of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples. We discuss these abundances in the context of four potential amino acid sources: (1) terrestrial biological contamination; (2) contamination from lunar module (LM) exhaust; (3) derivation from solar windimplanted precursors; and (4) exogenous delivery from meteorites.

  6. Cytokines: muscle protein and amino acid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    raises TNF-α and IL-6 to moderate levels, has only identified IL-6 as a potent cytokine, decreasing systemic amino acid levels and muscle protein metabolism. The marked decrease in circulatory and muscle amino acid concentrations was observed with a concomitant reduction in both the rates of muscle...... of IL-6 on the regulation of muscle protein metabolism but indirectly via IL-6 reducing amino acid availability. SUMMARY: Recent studies suggest that the best described cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 are unlikely to be the major direct mediators of muscle protein loss in inflammatory diseases. However...

  7. Synthesis of Trishomocubane Amino Acid Derivatives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    The synthesis of four novel trishomocubane amino acid derivatives is described. The hydantoin precursor and bis-Boc protected hydantoin (>95% yield) were previously reported. A mild hydrolysis of the bis-Boc hydantoin with lithium hydroxide at room temperature quantitatively yielded the corresponding novel cage amino ...

  8. Discovery and History of Amino Acid Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi

    There has been a strong demand in Japan and East Asia for L-glutamic acid as a seasoning since monosodium glutamate was found to present umami taste in 1907. The discovery of glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum in 1956 enabled abundant and low-cost production of the amino acid, creating a large market. The discovery also prompted researchers to develop fermentative production processes for other L-amino acids, such as lysine. Currently, the amino acid fermentation industry is so huge that more than 5 million metric tons of amino acids are manufactured annually all over the world, and this number continues to grow. Research on amino acid fermentation fostered the notion and skills of metabolic engineering which has been applied for the production of other compounds from renewable resources. The discovery of glutamate fermentation has had revolutionary impacts on both the industry and science. In this chapter, the history and development of glutamate fermentation, including the very early stage of fermentation of other amino acids, are reviewed.

  9. Regulation of the proteome by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgoin-Voillard, Sandrine; Goron, Arthur; Seve, Michel; Moinard, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Besides their main contribution as substrates for protein synthesis, amino acids as signaling molecules could exert some regulatory functions on protein synthesis and/or proteolysis that have been emphasized in a number of recent studies. Several publications have highlighted supplemental roles of those amino acids in protein metabolism as well as in immunity, heat shock response, or apoptosis processes. In this way, via their regulatory properties, selected amino acids (such as leucine, glutamine, arginine, citrulline, or methionine) directly influence the proteome. In this review, we are proposing an overview of the regulation of the proteome by amino acids in mammals. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Amino Acid Biosynthesis Pathways in Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz A. Bromke

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids are not only building blocks for proteins but serve as precursors for the synthesis of many metabolites with multiple functions in growth and other biological processes of a living organism. The biosynthesis of amino acids is tightly connected with central carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. Recent publication of genome sequences for two diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum created an opportunity for extensive studies on the structure of these metabolic pathways. Based on sequence homology found in the analyzed diatomal genes, the biosynthesis of amino acids in diatoms seems to be similar to higher plants. However, one of the most striking differences between the pathways in plants and in diatomas is that the latter possess and utilize the urea cycle. It serves as an important anaplerotic pathway for carbon fixation into amino acids and other N-containing compounds, which are essential for diatom growth and contribute to their high productivity.

  11. Side Chain Cyclized Aromatic Amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van der Poorten, Olivier; Knuhtsen, Astrid; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Constraining the conformation of flexible peptides is a proven strategy to increase potency, selectivity, and metabolic stability. The focus has mostly been on constraining the backbone dihedral angles; however, the correct orientation of the amino acid side chains (χ-space) that constitute...... the peptide pharmacophore is equally important. Control of χ-space utilizes conformationally constrained amino acids that favor, disfavor, or exclude the gauche (-), the gauche (+), or the trans conformation. In this review we focus on cyclic aromatic amino acids in which the side chain is connected...... to the peptide backbone to provide control of χ(1)- and χ(2)-space. The manifold applications for cyclized analogues of the aromatic amino acids Phe, Tyr, Trp, and His within peptide medicinal chemistry are showcased herein with examples of enzyme inhibitors and ligands for G protein-coupled receptors....

  12. AMINO ACIDS APPLICATION TO CREATE OF NANOSTRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Chekman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Review is devoted to the amino acids that could be used for nanostructures creation. The investigation of corresponding properties of amino acids is essential for their role definition in creation of nanomedicines. However, amino acid studying as components of nanostructures is insufficient. Study of nanoparticles for medicines creation was initiated by the development of nanotechnology. Amino acids in complexes with the nanoparticles of organic and inorganic nature play an important role for medicines targeting in pathological process. They could reduce toxicity of the nanomaterials used in nanomedicine and are used for creation of biosensors, lab-on-chip and therefore they are a promising material for synthesis of new nanodrugs and diagnostic tools.

  13. Recombinant thiopeptides containing noncanonical amino acids

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Xiaozhou; Zambaldo, Claudio; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yuhan; Xuan, Weimin; Wang, Chen; Reed, Sean A.; Yang, Peng-Yu; Wang, Rongsheng E.; Javahishvili, Tsotne; Schultz, Peter G.; Young, Travis S.

    2016-01-01

    Thiopeptides are a subclass of ribosomally synthesized natural products with complex structures and potent antimicrobial activities. Here we describe a general strategy that allows the incorporation of noncanonical amino acids into thiopeptides by introducing orthogonal amber suppressor aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA pairs into a thiocillin-producing strain of Bacillus cereus. We show that thiocillin variants harboring a noncanonical amino acid with bioorthogonal chemical reactivity can be fu...

  14. Wafer Cakes of Improved Amino Acid Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roksolana Boidunyk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study of the amino acid composition of newly developed wafer cakes with adipose fillings combined with natural additives. The appropriateness of the using non-traditional raw materials (powder of willow herb, poppy oilcake, carob, as well as skimmed milk powder in order to increase the biological value of wafer cakes and improve their amino acid composition is proven.

  15. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiangyun; Xie, Jianming; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-10-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl) ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  16. Amino Acid Patterns around Disulfide Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, José R. F.; da Fonseca, Rute R.; Drury, Brett; Melo, André

    2010-01-01

    Disulfide bonds provide an inexhaustible source of information on molecular evolution and biological specificity. In this work, we described the amino acid composition around disulfide bonds in a set of disulfide-rich proteins using appropriate descriptors, based on ANOVA (for all twenty natural amino acids or classes of amino acids clustered according to their chemical similarities) and Scheffé (for the disulfide-rich proteins superfamilies) statistics. We found that weakly hydrophilic and aromatic amino acids are quite abundant in the regions around disulfide bonds, contrary to aliphatic and hydrophobic amino acids. The density distributions (as a function of the distance to the center of the disulfide bonds) for all defined entities presented an overall unimodal behavior: the densities are null at short distances, have maxima at intermediate distances and decrease for long distances. In the end, the amino acid environment around the disulfide bonds was found to be different for different superfamilies, allowing the clustering of proteins in a biologically relevant way, suggesting that this type of chemical information might be used as a tool to assess the relationship between very divergent sets of disulfide-rich proteins. PMID:21151463

  17. Amino acid patterns around disulfide bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, José R F; da Fonseca, Rute R; Drury, Brett; Melo, André

    2010-11-18

    Disulfide bonds provide an inexhaustible source of information on molecular evolution and biological specificity. In this work, we described the amino acid composition around disulfide bonds in a set of disulfide-rich proteins using appropriate descriptors, based on ANOVA (for all twenty natural amino acids or classes of amino acids clustered according to their chemical similarities) and Scheffé (for the disulfide-rich proteins superfamilies) statistics. We found that weakly hydrophilic and aromatic amino acids are quite abundant in the regions around disulfide bonds, contrary to aliphatic and hydrophobic amino acids. The density distributions (as a function of the distance to the center of the disulfide bonds) for all defined entities presented an overall unimodal behavior: the densities are null at short distances, have maxima at intermediate distances and decrease for long distances. In the end, the amino acid environment around the disulfide bonds was found to be different for different superfamilies, allowing the clustering of proteins in a biologically relevant way, suggesting that this type of chemical information might be used as a tool to assess the relationship between very divergent sets of disulfide-rich proteins.

  18. Hybrid gold single crystals incorporating amino acids

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Linfeng; Weber, Eva; Fitch, Andy N; Pokroy, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    Composite hybrid gold crystals are of profound interest in various research areas ranging from materials science to biology. Their importance is due to their unique properties and potential implementation, for example in sensing or in bio-nanomedicine. Here we report on the formation of hybrid organic-metal composites via the incorporation of selected amino acids histidine, aspartic acid, serine, glutamine, alanine, cysteine, and selenocystine into the crystal lattice of single crystals of gold. We used electron microscopy, chemical analysis and high-resolution synchrotron powder X ray diffraction to examine these composites. Crystal shape, as well as atomic concentrations of occluded amino acids and their impact on the crystal structure of gold, were determined. Concentration of the incorporated amino acid was highest for cysteine, followed by serine and aspartic acid. Our results indicate that the incorporation process probably occurs through a complex interaction of their individual functional groups with ...

  19. Composition of amino acids, fatty acids and dietary fibre monomers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is increasing demand for sources of energy and non-meat protein with balanced amino acid profiles worldwide. Nuts are rich in protein and essential amino acids, and have a high energy value due to their high fat content. Kernels from two wild fruits in Mozambique, Adansonia digitata and Sclerocarya birrea, were ...

  20. Amino acid neurotransmitter release from cerebrocortical synaptosomes of sheep with severe ryegrass staggers in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantle, P G

    1983-05-01

    Enhanced unstimulated release of the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters aspartic acid and glutamic acid was measured in cerebrocortical synaptosomes prepared from sheep showing severe symptoms of ryegrass staggers. A similar pattern of deviation from neurologically normal animals was seen whether the sheep had contracted the disorder naturally or whether they had been deliberately caused to develop the disorder by grazing specific pastures rich in endophyte infected ryegrass. Deranged neurotransmitter release may reasonably be involved in the chemical pathology of ryegrass staggers and the findings are in accord with the putative synonymy of lolitrem toxicosis and ryegrass staggers.

  1. Correlation between kinetics and RNA splicing of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors in neocortical neurons.

    OpenAIRE

    Lambolez, B; Ropert, N; Perrais, D.; Rossier, J.; Hestrin, S.

    1996-01-01

    In the cortex fast excitatory synaptic currents onto excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory nonpyramidal neurons are mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors exhibiting cell-type-specific differences in their kinetic properties. AMPA receptors consist of four subunits (GluR1-4), each existing as two splice variants, flip and flop, which critically affect the desensitization properties of receptors expressed in heterologous systems. Using singl...

  2. Amino acid uptake in rust fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The plant pathogenic rust fungi colonize leaf tissue and feed off their host plants without killing them. Certain economically important species of different genera such as Melampsora, Phakopsora, Puccinia, or Uromyces are extensively studied for resolving the mechanisms of the obligate biotrophy. As obligate parasites rust fungi only can complete their life cycle on living hosts where they grow through the leaf tissue by developing an extended network of intercellular hyphae from which intracellular haustoria are differentiated. Haustoria are involved in key functions of the obligate biotrophic lifestyle: suppressing host defense responses and acquiring nutrients. This review provides a survey of rust fungi nitrogen nutrition with special emphasis on amino acid uptake. A variety of sequences of amino acid transporter genes of rust fungi have been published; however, transport activity of only three in planta highly up-regulated amino acid permeases have been characterized. Functional and immunohistochemical investigations have shown the specificity and localization of these transporters. Sequence data of various genome projects allowed identification of numerous rust amino acid transporter genes. An in silico analysis reveals that these genes can be classified into different transporter families. In addition, genetic and molecular data of amino acid transporters have provided new insights in the corresponding metabolic pathways. PMID:25699068

  3. Amino acid uptake in rust fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eStruck

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The plant pathogenic rust fungi colonize leaf tissue and feed off their host plants without killing them. Certain economically important species of different genera such as Melampsora, Phakopsora, Puccinia or Uromyces are extensively studied for resolving the mechanisms of the obligate biotrophy. As obligate parasites rust fungi only can complete their life cycle on living hosts where they grow through the leaf tissue by developing an extended network of intercellular hyphae from which intracellular haustoria are differentiated. Haustoria are involved in key functions of the obligate biotrophic lifestyle: suppressing host defense responses and acquiring nutrients. This review provides a survey of rust fungi nitrogen nutrition with special emphasis on amino acid uptake. A variety of sequences of amino acid transporter genes of rust fungi have been published; however, transport activity of only three in planta highly up-regulated amino acid permeases have been characterized. Functional and immunohistochemical investigations have shown the specificity and localization of these transporters. Sequence data of various genome projects allowed identification of numerous rust amino acid tranporter genes. An in silico analysis reveals that these genes can be classified into different transporter families. In addition, genetic and molecular data of amino acid transporters have provided new insights in the corresponding metabolic pathways.

  4. Amino acid "little Big Bang": representing amino acid substitution matrices as dot products of Euclidian vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Karel; Gibrat, Jean-François

    2010-01-04

    Sequence comparisons make use of a one-letter representation for amino acids, the necessary quantitative information being supplied by the substitution matrices. This paper deals with the problem of finding a representation that provides a comprehensive description of amino acid intrinsic properties consistent with the substitution matrices. We present a Euclidian vector representation of the amino acids, obtained by the singular value decomposition of the substitution matrices. The substitution matrix entries correspond to the dot product of amino acid vectors. We apply this vector encoding to the study of the relative importance of various amino acid physicochemical properties upon the substitution matrices. We also characterize and compare the PAM and BLOSUM series substitution matrices. This vector encoding introduces a Euclidian metric in the amino acid space, consistent with substitution matrices. Such a numerical description of the amino acid is useful when intrinsic properties of amino acids are necessary, for instance, building sequence profiles or finding consensus sequences, using machine learning algorithms such as Support Vector Machine and Neural Networks algorithms.

  5. Amino acid "little Big Bang": Representing amino acid substitution matrices as dot products of Euclidian vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmermann Karel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence comparisons make use of a one-letter representation for amino acids, the necessary quantitative information being supplied by the substitution matrices. This paper deals with the problem of finding a representation that provides a comprehensive description of amino acid intrinsic properties consistent with the substitution matrices. Results We present a Euclidian vector representation of the amino acids, obtained by the singular value decomposition of the substitution matrices. The substitution matrix entries correspond to the dot product of amino acid vectors. We apply this vector encoding to the study of the relative importance of various amino acid physicochemical properties upon the substitution matrices. We also characterize and compare the PAM and BLOSUM series substitution matrices. Conclusions This vector encoding introduces a Euclidian metric in the amino acid space, consistent with substitution matrices. Such a numerical description of the amino acid is useful when intrinsic properties of amino acids are necessary, for instance, building sequence profiles or finding consensus sequences, using machine learning algorithms such as Support Vector Machine and Neural Networks algorithms.

  6. Amino acid requirements of South African Mutton Merino lambs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1998-11-15

    Nov 15, 1998 ... An exception is the branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine .... By supplementing the amino acids in short supply, the amino acids ... titatively undersupplied in the duodenum, the infusion of a mixture of amino acids at different lev- ... Tackman et al., 1990) and is thought to have wider application to.

  7. Postprandial fate of amino acids: adaptation to molecular forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolles, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    During the postprandial phase dietary proteins are digested to peptides and amino acids and absorbed. Once absorbed the peptides are further hydrolyzed to amino acids and transported to the tissues. These amino acids are largely incorporated into body proteins. Not all amino acids are, however,

  8. Amino Acid Profile of Biodegraded Brewers Spent Grains (BSG ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The amino acids profiles of biodegraded brewers spent grains (BSG) were determined. The analysis revealed the presence of 17 amino acids including the major amino acids (cysteine, lysine and methionine) required in poultry nutrition. The concentrations of the amino acids however varied with the microbial species used ...

  9. Determinotion of Apparent and True Amino Acid Digestibility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Behrooz

    However, it is recognized that in the diet formulation for chickens the digestibility of amino acids is required rather than the gross amino acid content of the dietary ingredients. The purpose of this study was to determine the digestibility of the amino acids in artemia meal when using the amino acid content of ileal digesta vs.

  10. Amino acids in the sedimentary humic and fulvic acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.

    Humic and fulvic acids isolated from a few sediment samples from Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal were analysed for total hydrolysable amino acids concentration and their composition. The amono acids content of fulvic acids was higher than in the humic...

  11. Cometary Amino Acids from the STARDUST Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie Elsila

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81 P/WiId 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a cometary amino acid.

  12. Large neutral amino acids in daily practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Kirsten Kiær

    2010-01-01

    At the Kennedy Centre for Phenylketonuria, Denmark, large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) are being used to treat adult and adolescent patients who are nonadherent to dietary treatment for phenylketonuria (PKU). At the start of treatment, a patient must undergo dietary analysis and regular blood...... sampling to measure plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations. The aim of this analysis and treatment is that the patient receives 25-30% of the daily protein requirement from LNAA supplementation and the remaining 70-75% from natural, low-phenylalanine proteins (although some patients have difficulties...

  13. Amino acid nutrition of fishes: requirements and supplementation of diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketola, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is: (1) to make a concise review of the published dietary requirements of fishes for amino acids, (2) to describe recent findings at the Tunison Laboratory concerning amino acid nutrition of trout, (3) to review specific signs of deficiency of amino acids, and (4) to discuss use of the fish egg amino acid pattern as a guideline to formulating new feeds or studying amino acid requirements of fishes for which there is limited information on their quantitative requirements.

  14. Amino acid derived 1,4-dialkyl substituted imidazolones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, Frederik; Meldal, Morten Peter

    2010-01-01

    A general method for synthesis of 1,4-substituted imidazolones from amino acids on solid support or in solution has been developed. Amino acid derived 3-Boc-(1,3)-oxazinane (Box) protected amino aldehyde building blocks were coupled through urea bonds to the amino terminal of dipeptides or amino...

  15. Evaluation of methods to estimate the essential amino acids requirements of fish from the muscle amino acid profile

    OpenAIRE

    de Almeida Bicudo,Álvaro José; Possebon Cyrino,José Eurico

    2014-01-01

    Many methods to estimate amino acid requirement based on amino acid profile of fish have been proposed. This study evaluates the methodology proposed by Meyer & Fracalossi (2005) and by Tacon (1989) to estimate amino acids requirement of fish, which do exempt knowledge on previous nutritional requirement of reference amino acid. Data on amino acid requirement of pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus, were used to validate de accuracy of those methods. Meyer & Fracalossi's and Tacon's methodol...

  16. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  17. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. Acidic amino acids; bromamine-B; oxidation kinetics, acid medium. 1. Introduction. The chemistry of aromatic sulphonyl haloamines has evoked considerable interest, as they are sources of halonium cations, hypohalite species, and N-anions which act both as bases and nucleophiles. The prominent members of ...

  18. Amino acids analysis during lactic acid fermentation by single strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... of the three LAB strains to utilize amino acids for growth and lactic acid production were employed to ... Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which are used for the .... broth. These findings confirm that L. salivarius released alanine and glycine, which are non-essential for the growth of this bacterium. P. acidilactici ...

  19. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 113; Issue 4. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N-bromobenzenesulphonamide in acid medium: A mechanistic approach ... Department of Post-Graduate Studies in Chemistry, Central College, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560 001, India ...

  20. Dietary Supplements and Sports Performance: Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Melvin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is the third in a series of six articles to discuss the major classes of dietary supplements (vitamins; minerals; amino acids; herbs or botanicals; metabolites, constituents/extracts, or combinations. The major focus is on efficacy of such dietary supplements to enhance exercise or sport performance.

  1. SHORT COMMUNICATION DETERMINATION OF AMINO ACIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    ABSTRACT. Royal jelly (RJ) is popular among consumers around the world due to its perceived health benefits. The purpose of this study was to assess the levels of free and total amino acid profile as well as protein content in order to characterize Bulgarian RJ samples. A total of 17 fresh and commercial RJ samples from.

  2. Synthesis of Trishomocubane Amino Acid Derivatives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    Fmoc group is base-labile and a ninhydrin test indicated that some deprotection of a dry sample had occurred after three weeks of storage in a refrigerator. As indicated in the introduction, synthesizing trishomocubane amino acid derivatives (such as 8 and 9) suitable for peptide synthesis, is a worthwhile goal. However ...

  3. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320...

  4. Present Global Situation of Amino Acids in Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonouchi, Naoto; Ito, Hisao

    At present, amino acids are widely produced and utilized industrially. Initially, monosodium glutamate (MSG) was produced by extraction from a gluten hydrolysate. The amino acid industry started using the residual of the lysate. The discovery of the functions of amino acids has led to the expansion of their field of use. In addition to seasoning and other food use, amino acids are used in many fields such as animal nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. On the other hand, the invention of the glutamate fermentation process, followed by the development of fermentation methods for many other amino acids, is no less important. The supply of these amino acids at a low price is very essential for their industrial use. Most amino acids are now produced by fermentation. The consumption of many amino acids such as MSG or feed-use amino acids is still rapidly increasing.

  5. Amino acid quality indices of the leaves of Clerodendrum volubile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochuko Lucky Erukainure

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the amino acid profile and quality indices of Clerodendrum volubile (C. volubile leaves. Methods: Dried leaves of C. volubile were blended, defatted and subjected to amino acid analysis using the technicon sequential multi-sample amino acid analyzer. The amino acid quality indices which covers for chemical score, essential amino acid index, nutritional index, true digestibility, protein digestibility corrected amino acid score, and digestible indispensable amino acid score were evaluated using standard formulas. Results: Amino acid analysis revealed glutamic acid to have the highest concentration, with cysteine having the least. Aspartic acid had the highest chemical score, this was followed by glycine, histidine and arginine, respectively. The least scores were observed in serine and methionine. Glutamic acid had the highest value for true digestibility and protein digestibility corrected amino acid score, with the least observed in cysteine. Digestible indispensable amino acid score evaluation showed histidine to have the highest value for infants (birth to 6 months, threonine for children (6 months to 3 years, while isoleucine was observed to have the highest value for older children, adolescents and adults. The essential amino acid index value was less than 4, while nutritional index value was less than 0.5. Conclusions: These results indicated the leaves of C. volubile as a potential source of amino acids in the human diet as portrayed by its amino acids profile and qualities.

  6. Biosynthesis of natural products containing β-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Fumitaka; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    Covering: up to January, 2014. We focus here on β-amino acids as components of complex natural products because the presence of β-amino acids produces structural diversity in natural products and provides characteristic architectures beyond those of ordinary α-L-amino acids, thus generating significant and unique biological functions in nature. In this review, we first survey the known bioactive β-amino acid-containing natural products including nonribosomal peptides, macrolactam polyketides, and nucleoside-β-amino acid hybrids. Next, the biosynthetic enzymes that form β-amino acids from α-amino acids and the de novo synthesis of β-amino acids are summarized. Then, the mechanisms of β-amino acid incorporation into natural products are reviewed. Because it is anticipated that the rational swapping of the β-amino acid moieties with various side chains and stereochemistries by biosynthetic engineering should lead to the creation of novel architectures and bioactive compounds, the accumulation of knowledge regarding β-amino acid-containing natural product biosynthetic machinery could have a significant impact in this field. In addition, genome mining of characteristic β-amino acid biosynthetic genes and unique β-amino acid incorporation machinery could lead to the discovery of new β-amino acid-containing natural products.

  7. Nonconventional techniques for separation of biosynthetic amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloetzer, Lenuţa; Poştaru, Mădălina; Cheptea, Corina; Caşcaval, D; Galaction, Anca-Irina

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids can be obtained by biosynthesis, by protein hydrolysis or by extraction from natural sources. The most efficient methods are the first two, but the separation of amino acids from fermentation broths or protein hydrolysates is rather difficult. Amino acids dissociate in aqueous solutions, forming characteristic ionic species depending on the solution pH-value. These properties make amino acids to be hydrophilic at any pH-value. This paper presents a review of the separation studies of some amino acids by nonconventional methods, namely individual or selective reactive extraction. Separation of some amino acids from their mixture obtained either by fermentation or protein hydrolysis by reactive extraction with different extractants indicated the possibility of the amino acids selective separation as a function of the pH-value of aqueous solution correlated with the acidic or basic character of each amino acid.

  8. Recent advances in amino acid production by microbial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Amino acids have been utilized for the production of foods, animal feeds and pharmaceuticals. After the discovery of the glutamic acid-producing bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum by Japanese researchers, the production of amino acids, which are primary metabolites, has been achieved using various microbial cells as hosts. Recently, metabolic engineering studies on the rational design of amino acid-producing microbial cells have been successfully conducted. Moreover, the technology of systems biology has been applied to metabolic engineering for the creation of amino acid-producing microbial cells. Currently, new technologies including synthetic biology, single-cell analysis, and evolutionary engineering have been utilized to create amino acid-producing microbial cells. In addition, useful compounds from amino acids have been produced by microbial cells. Here, current researches into the metabolic engineering of microbial cells toward production of amino acids and amino acid-related compounds are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Amino acids analysis during lactic acid fermentation by single strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... Amino acids analysis during lactic acid fermentation by single strain cultures of lactobacilli and mixed culture starter made from them. KiBeom Lee1*, Ho-Jin Kim1 and Sang-Kyu Park2. 1Bio Center Technopark, 7-50 Songdo, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon 406-840, Republic of Korea. 2Nambu University, Chumdan ...

  10. Homeostatic responses to amino acid insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy G. Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief overview describing how two key signaling pathways, namely the integrated stress response and the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, work together to facilitate cellular adaptation to dietary amino acid insufficiency. A deeper understanding of these mechanisms is leading to identification of novel targets which aid in disease treatments, improve stress recovery and increase health span through slowed aging and enhanced metabolic fitness.

  11. Free amino acids and 5'-nucleotides in Finnish forest mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Hanna; Rotola-Pukkila, Minna; Aisala, Heikki; Hopia, Anu; Laaksonen, Timo

    2018-05-01

    Edible mushrooms are valued because of their umami taste and good nutritional values. Free amino acids, 5'-nucleotides and nucleosides were analyzed from four Nordic forest mushroom species (Lactarius camphoratus, Boletus edulis, Cantharellus cibarius, Craterellus tubaeformis) using high precision liquid chromatography analysis. To our knowledge, these taste components were studied for the first time from Craterellus tubaeformis and Lactarius camphoratus. The focus was on the umami amino acids and 5'-nucleotides. The free amino acid and 5'-nucleotide/nucleoside contents of studied species differed from each other. In all studied samples, umami amino acids were among five major free amino acids. The highest concentration of umami amino acids was on L. camphoratus whereas B. edulis had the highest content of sweet amino acids and C. cibarius had the highest content of bitter amino acids. The content of umami enhancing 5'-nucleotides were low in all studied species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Change in amino acids content during germination and seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    presence of histidine (His) and phenylalanine (Phe), but also to amide amino acids asparagine (Asn), glutamine (Gln) and Arg contents. In Cola sp., free amino acids varied significantly during these two processes indicating their high utilization.

  13. Alimentary proteins, amino acids and cholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachier, François; Lancha, Antonio H; Boutry, Claire; Tomé, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Numerous data from both epidemiological and experimental origins indicate that some alimentary proteins and amino acids in supplements can modify the blood LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and total cholesterol. After an initial approval of the health claim for soy protein consumption for the prevention of coronary heart disease, more recently it has been concluded from an overall analysis of literature that isolated soy protein with isoflavones only slightly decrease LDL and total cholesterol. Other plant extracts and also some proteins from animal origin have been reported to exert a lowering effect on blood cholesterol when compared with a reference protein (often casein). The underlying mechanisms are still little understood. Individual amino acids and mixture of amino acids have also been tested (mostly in animal studies) for their effects on cholesterol parameters and on cholesterol metabolism. Methionine, lysine, cystine, leucine, aspartate and glutamate have been tested individually and in combination in different models of either normo or hypercholesterolemic animals and found to be able to modify blood cholesterol and/or LDL cholesterol and/or HDL cholesterol. It is however not known if these results are relevant to human nutrition.

  14. Dietary amino acids budget for juvenile yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata)

    OpenAIRE

    Masumoto, Toshiro; Itoh, Yoshiaki; Ruchimat, Toni; Hosokawa, Hidetsuyo; Shimeno, Sadao

    1998-01-01

    Yellowtail weighing 31.7g was fed 4 levels of fish meal diet for 21 days. Based on the amino acid intake and gain data from the best growth exhibited crude protein content 52% fed fish, the amino acid budget was estimated. Average of each amino acid value showed that about 32% and 57% of intake amino acids were utilized for growth and for as an energy source and maintenance, respectively.

  15. Branched-chain amino acids for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Koretz, R L; Kjaergard, L L

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  16. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of (2S,4R)-2-amino-4-(3-(2,2-diphenylethylamino)-3-oxopropyl)pentanedioic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sagot, Emanuelle; Jensen, Anders A.; Pickering, Darryl S

    2008-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), the action of sodium dependent excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) is responsible for termination of glutamatergic neurotransmission by reuptake of ( S) -glutamate (Glu) from the synaptic cleft. Five EAAT subtypes have been identified, of whic...

  17. Determination and stability constants of Manganese (II) amino acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination and stability constants of Manganese (II) amino acid complexes. HN Aliyu, J Na'aliya. Abstract. The stepwise and the overall stability constants of the complexes formed by manganese (II) ion and twelve (12) amino acids have been determined. The dissociation constants, pKa, of the amino acids determined ...

  18. Origin, Microbiology, Nutrition, and Pharmacology of D-Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure of food proteins to certain processing conditions induces two major chemical changes: racemization of all L-amino acids (LAA) to D-amino acids (DAA) and concurrent formation of crosslinked amino acids such as lysinoalanine (LAL). The diet contains both processing-induced and naturally-form...

  19. A Convenient Synthesis of Amino Acid Methyl Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaowu Sha

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of amino acid methyl ester hydrochlorides were prepared in good toexcellent yields by the room temperature reaction of amino acids with methanol in thepresence of trimethylchlorosilane. This method is not only compatible with natural aminoacids, but also with other aromatic and aliphatic amino acids.

  20. Proximate and Amino Acid Composition of Celosia argentea Leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proximate, trace metals and amino acids composition of Celosia argentea were determined. The crude fat, fibre and protein contents were moderate with 1.10, 3.53 and 5.17% respectively while high in the ash content (22.43%). Results of the amino acid analysis revealed high contents of the essential amino acids with ...

  1. Soil amino acid composition across a boreal forest successional sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy R. Werdin-Pfisterer; Knut Kielland; Richard D. Boone

    2009-01-01

    Soil amino acids are important sources of organic nitrogen for plant nutrition, yet few studies have examined which amino acids are most prevalent in the soil. In this study, we examined the composition, concentration, and seasonal patterns of soil amino acids across a primary successional sequence encompassing a natural gradient of plant productivity and soil...

  2. Evaluation of Mineral and Amino Acid Composition of Leaves of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to determine the mineral and amino acid composition of the leave of Ocimum gratissimum. The mineral composition showed major minerals such as Na, K, Ca and Mg should essential and non-essential amino acids. The amino acids compared favorably with FAO reference protein. The leave were ...

  3. The relationship between amino acid and protein content of yellow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the content of these amino acids from the amount of crude protein in maize are given. The remaining amino acids can be estimated without loss of accuracy from their mean value expressed as g/16 9. N. Although the relationship between certain amino acids and crude protein differed between certain areas, it is unlikely that ...

  4. Metabolism of amino acid amides in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Croes, L.M.; Peeters, W.P.H.; Peters, P.J.H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of the natural amino acid L-valine, the unnatural amino acids D-valine, and D-, L-phenylglycine (D-, L-PG), and the unnatural amino acid amides D-, L-phenylglycine amide (D, L-PG-NH2) and L-valine amide (L-Val-NH2) was studied in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The organism possessed

  5. 40 Oil Characterization, Amino Acid and Vitamin A and C ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AL-AMAANI

    email: johntsadom@gmail.com. ABSTRACT. Oil characterization, amino acid and vitamin A and C composition of Cucurbita maxima seeds was carried out using standard analytical methods. The amino acid profile was determined using Techno sequential multi sample amino acid analyser and except phenylalanine which ...

  6. Pre-staining thin layer chromatography method for amino acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-13

    Dec 13, 2010 ... The modified thin layer chromatography can be used for the analysis of amino acids. When compared to the classical thin layer ... amino acid-producing microbes as well as amino acid fermentation processes. ... sodium hydroxide solution to a final concentration of 0.01M. The fermentation broth was directly.

  7. Nutritional and medicinal aspects of D-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel; Levin, Carol E

    2012-05-01

    This paper reviews and interprets a method for determining the nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives using a growth assay in mice fed a synthetic all-amino acid diet. A large number of experiments were carried out in which a molar equivalent of the test compound replaced a nutritionally essential amino acid such as L-lysine (L-Lys), L-methionine (L-Met), L-phenylalanine (L-Phe), and L-tryptophan (L-Trp) as well as the semi-essential amino acids L-cysteine (L-Cys) and L-tyrosine (L-Tyr). The results show wide-ranging variations in the biological utilization of test substances. The method is generally applicable to the determination of the biological utilization and safety of any amino acid derivative as a potential nutritional source of the corresponding L-amino acid. Because the organism is forced to use the D-amino acid or amino acid derivative as the sole source of the essential or semi-essential amino acid being replaced, and because a free amino acid diet allows better control of composition, the use of all-amino-acid diets for such determinations may be preferable to protein-based diets. Also covered are brief summaries of the widely scattered literature on dietary and pharmacological aspects of 27 individual D-amino acids, D-peptides, and isomeric amino acid derivatives and suggested research needs in each of these areas. The described results provide a valuable record and resource for further progress on the multifaceted aspects of D-amino acids in food and biological samples.

  8. Amino acid biogeo- and stereochemistry in coastal Chilean sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2006-01-01

    aspartate and its non-protein degradation product β-alanine confirmed this observation. Furthermore, estimates of THAA mineralization showed that sedimentary amino acid reactivity decreased with both increasing water depth as well as progressive degradation status of the organic matter that was incorporated...... in the cores. The contribution of peptidoglycan amino acids to THAA was estimated from the concentrations of D-aspartate, D-glutamic acid, D-serine, and D-alanine. Peptidoglycan amino acids accounted for >18% of THAA in all investigated samples. In surface sediments peptidoglycan amino acids accounted......The spatial distribution of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) and amino acid enantiomers (D- and L-forms) was investigated in sediments underlying two contrasting Chilean upwelling regions,: at ~23°S off Antofagasta and at ~36°S off Concepcion. The contribution of amino acids to total organic...

  9. Neighbor Preferences of Amino Acids and Context-Dependent Effects of Amino Acid Substitutions in Human, Mouse, and Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingchuan Fu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids show apparent propensities toward their neighbors. In addition to preferences of amino acids for their neighborhood context, amino acid substitutions are also considered to be context-dependent. However, context-dependence patterns of amino acid substitutions still remain poorly understood. Using relative entropy, we investigated the neighbor preferences of 20 amino acids and the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions with protein sequences in human, mouse, and dog. For 20 amino acids, the highest relative entropy was mostly observed at the nearest adjacent site of either N- or C-terminus except C and G. C showed the highest relative entropy at the third flanking site and periodic pattern was detected at G flanking sites. Furthermore, neighbor preference patterns of amino acids varied greatly in different secondary structures. We then comprehensively investigated the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions. Our results showed that nearly half of 380 substitution types were evidently context dependent, and the context-dependent patterns relied on protein secondary structures. Among 20 amino acids, P elicited the greatest effect on amino acid substitutions. The underlying mechanisms of context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions were possibly mutation bias at a DNA level and natural selection. Our findings may improve secondary structure prediction algorithms and protein design; moreover, this study provided useful information to develop empirical models of protein evolution that consider dependence between residues.

  10. Neighbor Preferences of Amino Acids and Context-Dependent Effects of Amino Acid Substitutions in Human, Mouse, and Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mingchuan; Huang, Zhuoran; Mao, Yuanhui; Tao, Shiheng

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids show apparent propensities toward their neighbors. In addition to preferences of amino acids for their neighborhood context, amino acid substitutions are also considered to be context-dependent. However, context-dependence patterns of amino acid substitutions still remain poorly understood. Using relative entropy, we investigated the neighbor preferences of 20 amino acids and the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions with protein sequences in human, mouse, and dog. For 20 amino acids, the highest relative entropy was mostly observed at the nearest adjacent site of either N- or C-terminus except C and G. C showed the highest relative entropy at the third flanking site and periodic pattern was detected at G flanking sites. Furthermore, neighbor preference patterns of amino acids varied greatly in different secondary structures. We then comprehensively investigated the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions. Our results showed that nearly half of 380 substitution types were evidently context dependent, and the context-dependent patterns relied on protein secondary structures. Among 20 amino acids, P elicited the greatest effect on amino acid substitutions. The underlying mechanisms of context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions were possibly mutation bias at a DNA level and natural selection. Our findings may improve secondary structure prediction algorithms and protein design; moreover, this study provided useful information to develop empirical models of protein evolution that consider dependence between residues. PMID:25210846

  11. Stability and assessment of amino acids in parenteral nutrition solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Nina; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2017-08-02

    Sterile amino acid solutions are applied in medical care as part of Total Parenteral Nutrition systems. Typical formulations consist of variable admixtures of essential and non-essential amino acids together with carbohydrates, electrolytes, vitamins, trace element solutions and lipid emulsions. The complexity of these formulations gives rise to stability and compatibility reflections. This review focuses on amino acid stability in pure amino acid solution and name methods of assessment. Incompatibilities of amino acids with the other ingredients are matter of concern in clinical practice and evaluated for relevance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Disorders of branched chain amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, I; Venditti, C P

    2016-11-07

    The three essential branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine and valine, share the first enzymatic steps in their metabolic pathways, including a reversible transamination followed by an irreversible oxidative decarboxylation to coenzyme-A derivatives. The respective oxidative pathways subsequently diverge and at the final steps yield acetyl- and/or propionyl-CoA that enter the Krebs cycle. Many disorders in these pathways are diagnosed through expanded newborn screening by tandem mass spectrometry. Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is the only disorder of the group that is associated with elevated body fluid levels of the BCAAs. Due to the irreversible oxidative decarboxylation step distal enzymatic blocks in the pathways do not result in the accumulation of amino acids, but rather to CoA-activated small carboxylic acids identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis of urine and are therefore classified as organic acidurias. Disorders in these pathways can present with a neonatal onset severe-, or chronic intermittent- or progressive forms. Metabolic instability and increased morbidity and mortality are shared between inborn errors in the BCAA pathways, while treatment options remain limited, comprised mainly of dietary management and in some cases solid organ transplantation.

  13. The Role of Microbial Amino Acid Metabolism in Host Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien P. J. G. Neis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Disruptions in gut microbiota composition and function are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The functional output of the gut microbiota, including short-chain fatty acids and amino acids, are thought to be important modulators underlying the development of these disorders. Gut bacteria can alter the bioavailability of amino acids by utilization of several amino acids originating from both alimentary and endogenous proteins. In turn, gut bacteria also provide amino acids to the host. This could have significant implications in the context of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus, conditions associated with elevated systemic concentrations of certain amino acids, in particular the aromatic and branched-chain amino acids. Moreover, several amino acids released by gut bacteria can serve as precursors for the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids, which also play a role in the development of obesity. In this review, we aim to compile the available evidence on the contribution of microbial amino acids to host amino acid homeostasis, and to assess the role of the gut microbiota as a determinant of amino acid and short-chain fatty acid perturbations in human obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Dissolved amino acids in oceanic basaltic basement fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huei-Ting; Amend, Jan P.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Bingham, Jon-Paul; Cowen, James P.

    2015-09-01

    The oceanic basaltic basement contains the largest aquifer on Earth and potentially plays an important role in the global carbon cycle as a net sink for dissolved organic carbon (DOC). However, few details of the organic matter cycling in the subsurface are known because great water depths and thick sediments typically hinder direct access to this environment. In an effort to examine the role of water-rock-microorganism interaction on organic matter cycling in the oceanic basaltic crust, basement fluid samples collected from three borehole observatories installed on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed for dissolved amino acids. Our data show that dissolved free amino acids (1-13 nM) and dissolved hydrolyzable amino acids (43-89 nM) are present in the basement. The amino acid concentrations in the ridge-flank basement fluids are at the low end of all submarine hydrothermal fluids reported in the literature and are similar to those in deep seawater. Amino acids in recharging deep seawater, in situ amino acid production, and diffusional input from overlying sediments are potential sources of amino acids in the basement fluids. Thermodynamic modeling shows that amino acid synthesis in the basement can be sustained by energy supplied from inorganic substrates via chemolithotrophic metabolisms. Furthermore, an analysis of amino acid concentrations and compositions in basement fluids support the notion that heterotrophic activity is ongoing. Similarly, the enrichment of acidic amino acids and depletion of hydrophobic ones relative to sedimentary particulate organic matter suggests that surface sorption and desorption also alters amino acids in the basaltic basement. In summary, although the oceanic basement aquifer is a net sink for deep seawater DOC, similar amino acid concentrations in basement aquifer and deep seawater suggest that DOC is preferentially removed in the basement over dissolved amino acids. Our data also suggest that organic carbon

  15. Antioxidative Categorization of Twenty Amino Acids Based on Experimental Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naijin Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In view of the great importance bestowed on amino acids as antioxidants in oxidation resistance, we attempted two common redox titration methods in this report, including micro-potassium permanganate titration and iodometric titration, to measure the antioxidative capacity of 20 amino acids, which are the construction units of proteins in living organisms. Based on the relative intensities of the antioxidative capacity, we further conducted a quantitative comparison and found out that the product of experimental values obtained from the two methods was proven to be a better indicator for evaluating the relative antioxidative capacity of amino acids. The experimental results were largely in accordance with structural analysis made on amino acids. On the whole, the 20 amino acids concerned could be divided into two categories according to their antioxidative capacity. Seven amino acids, including tryptophan, methionine, histidine, lysine, cysteine, arginine and tyrosine, were greater in total antioxidative capacity compared with the other 13 amino acids.

  16. Antioxidative Categorization of Twenty Amino Acids Based on Experimental Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Naijin; Chen, Guanqun; Liu, Hui

    2017-11-27

    In view of the great importance bestowed on amino acids as antioxidants in oxidation resistance, we attempted two common redox titration methods in this report, including micro-potassium permanganate titration and iodometric titration, to measure the antioxidative capacity of 20 amino acids, which are the construction units of proteins in living organisms. Based on the relative intensities of the antioxidative capacity, we further conducted a quantitative comparison and found out that the product of experimental values obtained from the two methods was proven to be a better indicator for evaluating the relative antioxidative capacity of amino acids. The experimental results were largely in accordance with structural analysis made on amino acids. On the whole, the 20 amino acids concerned could be divided into two categories according to their antioxidative capacity. Seven amino acids, including tryptophan, methionine, histidine, lysine, cysteine, arginine and tyrosine, were greater in total antioxidative capacity compared with the other 13 amino acids.

  17. Amino acids analysis during lactic acid fermentation by single strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L. salivarius alone showed relatively good assimilation of various amino acids that existed at only a little amounts in MRS media (Asn, Asp, Cit, Cys, Glu, His, Lys, Orn, Phe, Pro, Tyr, Arg, Ile, Leu, Met, Ser, Thr, Trp and Val), whereas Ala and Gly accumulated in L. salivarius cultures. P. acidilactici, in contrast, hydrolyzed the ...

  18. Fatty acids and amino acids contents in Scomber scombrus fillets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proximate composition, fats and amino acids of Atlantic Mackerel fillets (Scomber scombrus) from the South East of Tunisia in different seasons, were analyzed in order to assess nutritive characteristics of this species. Samples were collected monthly from Zarzis fishing port located in the South-East of Tunisia. Total fats and ...

  19. Fatty acid composition and amino acid profile of two freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proximate, fatty and amino acids composition of two commercially important freshwater fish species Clarias gariepinus and Tilapia zillii. purchased from local fishermen in two landing sites in Lagos State, Nigeria were determined. Live specimens of C. gariepinus were purchased while samples of T. zillii were stored in ...

  20. Photoinduced dynamics in protonated aromatic amino acid

    CERN Document Server

    Grégoire, Gilles; Barat, Michel; Fayeton, Jacqueline; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    UV photoinduced fragmentation of protonated aromatics amino acids have emerged the last few years, coming from a situation where nothing was known to what we think a good understanding of the optical properties. We will mainly focus this review on the tryptophan case. Three groups have mostly done spectroscopic studies and one has mainly been involved in dynamics studies of the excited states in the femtosecond/picosecond range and also in the fragmentation kinetics from nanosecond to millisecond. All these data, along with high level ab initio calculations, have shed light on the role of the different electronic states of the protonated molecules upon the fragmentation mechanisms.

  1. AMINO ACIDS: SENSING AND IMPLICATION INTO AGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh Lushchak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An ability to sense and respond to nutrient availability is an important requisite for life. Nutrient limitation is among main factors to influence the evolution of most cellular processes. Different pathways that sense intracellular and extracellular levels of carbohydtrates, amino acids, lipids, and intermediate metabolites are integrated and coordinated at the organismal level through neuronal and humoral signals. During food abundance, nutrient-sensing pathways engage anabolism and storage, whereas limitation triggers the mechanisms, such as the mobilization of internal stores including through autophagy. These processes are affected during aging and are themselves important regulators of longevity, stress resistance, and age-related complications.

  2. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, R-amino-n-butyric acid (beta-ABA), 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and alpha-AIB in Almahata Sitta are 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures.

  3. Evolutionary systems biology of amino acid biosynthetic cost in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Barton

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental

  4. Adsorption Behavior of Amino Acids on a Stainless Steel Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura; Mimura; Okamoto; Sakiyama; Nakanishi

    2000-09-01

    The adsorption behavior of various amino acids on a stainless steel surface was investigated at 30 degrees C and over a pH range of 3-10. Acidic and basic amino acids except histidine adsorbed remarkably at pH 3-4 and 7-10, respectively, and showed Langmuir-type adsorption isotherms. The effects of pH and ionic strength on the adsorption isotherms were investigated to analyze the interactions between amino acids and adsorption sites on the stainless steel. Hydrophobic amino acids and glycine showed only small adsorbed amounts at all pHs tested. For the acidic and basic amino acids, reversibility of the absorption and the influence of the ionic strength on the adsorption behavior were examined. The adsorption isotherms of the derivatives of aspartic acid were also measured in order to examine the contribution of the carboxylic groups of acidic amino acids to the adsorption. Furthermore, a Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic analysis and semiempirical molecular orbital calculation were carried out to analyze the ionization states and the configuration of the amino acids adsorbed on a stainless steel surface. These investigations suggest that the acidic and basic amino acids adsorb through two electrostatic interactions of two ionized groups in the amino acid with a stainless steel surface. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Sugar amino acids and related molecules: Some recent developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sugar amino acids constitute an important class of such polyfunctional scaffolds where the carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl termini provide an excellent opportunity to organic chemists to create structural diversities akin to Nature's molecular arsenal. In recent years, sugar amino acids have been used extensively in the area of ...

  6. Amino acids as modulators of endothelium-derived nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoki, Masao; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Edgell, Cora-Jean S; Maeda, Nobuyo; Smithies, Oliver; Mattson, David L

    2006-08-01

    To examine the mechanisms whereby amino acids modulate nitric oxide (NO) production and blood flow in the renal vasculature, chemiluminescence techniques were used to quantify NO in the renal venous effluent of the isolated, perfused rat kidney as different amino acids were added to the perfusate. The addition of 10(-4) or 10(-3) M cationic amino acids (l-ornithine, l-lysine, or l-homoarginine) or neutral amino acids (l-glutamine, l-leucine, or l-serine) to the perfusate decreased NO and increased renal vascular resistance. Perfusion with anionic amino acids (l-glutamate or l-aspartate) had no effect on either parameter. The effects of the cationic and neutral amino acids were reversed with 10(-3) M l-arginine and prevented by deendothelialization or NO synthase inhibition. The effects of the neutral amino acids but not the cationic amino acids were dependent on extracellular sodium. Cationic and neutral amino acids also decreased calcimycin-induced NO, as assessed by DAF-FM-T fluorescence, in cultured EA.hy926 endothelial cells. Inhibition of system y(+) or y(+)L by siRNA for the cationic amino acid transporter 1 or the CD98/4F2 heavy chain diminished the NO-depleting effects of these amino acids. Finally, transport studies in cultured cells demonstrated that cationic or neutral amino acids in the extracellular space stimulate efflux of l-arginine out of the cell. Thus the present experiments demonstrate that cationic and neutral amino acids can modulate NO production in endothelial cells by altering cellular l-arginine transport through y(+) and y(+)L transport mechanisms.

  7. Transfer of Asymmetry between Proteinogenic Amino Acids under Harsh Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Vives, Thomas; Snytnikov, Valeriy N.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2017-09-01

    The heating above 400 °C of serine, cysteine, selenocysteine and threonine leads to a complete decomposition of the amino acids and to the formation in low yields of alanine for the three formers and of 2-aminobutyric acid for the latter. At higher temperature, this amino acid is observed only when sublimable α-alkyl-α-amino acids are present, and with an enantiomeric excess dependent on several parameters. Enantiopure or enantioenriched Ser, Cys, Sel or Thr is not able to transmit its enantiomeric excess to the amino acid formed during its decomposition. The presence during the sublimation-decomposition of enantioenriched valine or isoleucine leads to the enantioenrichment of all sublimable amino acids independently of the presence of many decomposition products coming from the unstable derivative. All these studies give information on a potentially prebiotic key-reaction of abiotic transformations between α-amino acids and their evolution to homochirality.

  8. Formation of specific amino acid sequences during thermal polymerization of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, J; Brand, M C; Dose, K

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of the thermal polymerization (at 180 degrees C) of glutamic acid, tyrosine, and glycine has been studied. Glutamic acid is quickly and almost completely converted into pyroglutamic acid. The only dipeptide that is formed by dimerization of the remaining two amino acids is cyclic glycyl-tyrosine (a diketopiperazine). In a secondary reaction pyroglutamic acid interacts with cyclic glycyl-tyrosine and yields pyroglutamyl-glycyl-tyrosine and pyroglutamyl-tyrosyl-glycine. Other di- or tripeptides are not observed. The preferential appearance of the two pyroglutamyl-peptides has been reported earlier by Nakashima et al. (1977). The present data explain those results. Model experiments show that cyclic glycyl-tyrosine can also be cleaved by other acids or bases. In the presence of acetic acid at 118 degrees C N-acetyl-glycyl-tyrosine is the major product. Partial hydrolysis predominantly yields tyrosyl-glycine. These effects are explained by stereospecific interactions. The results on self-ordering of amino acids during peptide formation are discussed in respect of the origin of prebiotic enzymes and genetic information.

  9. Nectar amino acids enhance reproduction in male butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahenzli, Fabian; Erhardt, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    After over 30 years of research, it was recently shown that nectar amino acids increase female butterfly fecundity. However, little attention has been paid to the effect of nectar amino acids on male butterfly reproduction. Here, we show that larval food conditions (nitrogen-rich vs. nitrogen-poor host plants) and adult diet quality (nectar with or without amino acids) affected the amount of consumed nectar in Coenonympha pamphilus males. Furthermore, amino acids in the nectar diet of males increased progeny's larval hatching mass, irrespective of paternal larval reserves. Our study takes the whole reproductive cycle of male butterflies into account, and also considers the role of females in passing male nutrients to offspring, as males' realized reproduction was examined indirectly via nuptial gifts, by female performance. With this comprehensive approach, we demonstrate for the first time that nectar amino acids can improve male butterfly reproduction, supporting the old postulate that nectar amino acids generally enhance butterfly fitness.

  10. Quest for steroidomimetics: Amino acids derived steroidal and nonsteroidal architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagufta; Ahmad, Irshad; Panda, Gautam

    2017-06-16

    The chiral pool amino acids have been utilized for the construction of steroidal and non-steroidal architectures in the quest for steroidomimetics. Chirality derived from amino acid-based architectures provides new and easy to incorporate chiral chemical space, which is otherwise very difficult to introduce and comprised of several synthetic steps for asymmetric steroids. The different and exciting ligand-receptor interactions may arise from the use of each amino acid enantiomer that was introduced into the chiral steroidal backbone. The A and D rings of steroidal architectures can be mimicked by the phenyl group of the amino acid tyrosine. The Mitsunobu reaction, nucleophilic substitution and elimination, etc. were utilized for constructing diverse tri- and tetracyclic steroidal skeletons as well as benzofused seco-steroids from amino acids. These benzofused, amino acid-derived steroidal and nonsteroidal molecules had promising biological activity in hormonal related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Distribution and Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; McLain, H. L.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of organic compounds on the lunar surface has been a question of interest from the Apollo era to the present. Investigations of amino acids immediately after collection of lunar samples yielded inconclusive identifications, in part due to analytical limitations including insensitivity to certain compounds, an inability to separate enantiomers, and lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements. It was not possible to determine if the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the result of terrestrial contamination. Recently, we presented initial data from the analysis of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples and discussed those results in the context of four potential amino acid sources [5]. Here, we expand on our previous work, focusing on amino acid abundances and distributions in seven regolith samples and presenting the first compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios measured for amino acids in a lunar sample.

  12. Diversity of amino acids in a typical chernozem of Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frunze, N. I.

    2014-12-01

    The content and composition of the amino acids in typical chernozems were studied. The objects of the study included a reference soil under an old fallow and three variants under fodder crop rotations: not fertilized, with mineral fertilizers, and with organic fertilizers. The contents of 18 amino acids were determined in these soils. The amino acids were extracted by the method of acid hydrolysis and identified by the method of ion-exchange chromatography. The total content of most of the amino acids was maximal in the reference soil; it was much lower in the cultivated soils and decreased in the following sequence: organic background > mineral background > no fertilization. The diversity of amino acids was evaluated quantitatively using different parameters applied in ecology for estimating various aspects of the species composition of communities (Simpson, Margalef, Menhinick, and Shannon's indices). The diversity and contribution of different amino acids to the total pool of amino acids also varied significantly in the studied variants. The maximum diversity of amino acids and maximum evenness of their relative abundance indices were typical of the reference chernozem; these parameters were lower in the cultivated soils. It was concluded that the changes in the structure of the amino acids under the impact of agricultural loads are similar to those that are usually observed under stress conditions.

  13. the amino acid composition of selected south african feed ingredients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The amino acid composition of l4 different feed ingredients used in a local feed millwere determined on replicate samples drawn from the mill at intervals over a period of .... this tube, 6 mol dm -t - hydrochloric acid (3 cm.r) was added. The mixture was ... standardised to present results as g amino acid residuell00 g sample.

  14. Amino acid composition and protein quality of white melon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amino acid composition of the seed flour and its protein fractions were determined using standard analytical techniques in the laboratory. Protein quality of the seed flour was evaluated using the invitro techniques. Results showed that glutamic acid is the most abundant amino acid (128.2 156.4 mg/g protein) while leucine ...

  15. Non-protein amino acids in peptide design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    protein amino acids in peptide design ... illustrate the use -aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) in the construction of helices, D-amino acids in the design of helix termination segments and DPro-Xxx segments for nucleating of -hairpin structures. - and ...

  16. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  17. Genetic incorporation of recycled unnatural amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wooseok; Kim, Sanggil; Jo, Kyubong; Lee, Hyun Soo

    2016-02-01

    The genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) into proteins has been a useful tool for protein engineering. However, most UAAs are expensive, and the method requires a high concentration of UAAs, which has been a drawback of the technology, especially for large-scale applications. To address this problem, a method to recycle cultured UAAs was developed. The method is based on recycling a culture medium containing the UAA, in which some of essential nutrients were resupplemented after each culture cycle, and induction of protein expression was controlled with glucose. Under optimal conditions, five UAAs were recycled for up to seven rounds of expression without a decrease in expression level, cell density, or incorporation fidelity. This method can generally be applied to other UAAs; therefore, it is useful for reducing the cost of UAAs for genetic incorporation and helpful for expanding the use of the technology to industrial applications.

  18. Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations

    OpenAIRE

    Pennington, BO; Sears, D; Clegg, DO

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 42(6):495-500, 2014. We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" f...

  19. Amino acid composition in parenteral nutrition: what is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarandi, Shadi S.; Zhao, Vivian M.; Hebbar, Gautam; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Complete parenteral nutrition solutions contain mixed amino acid products providing all nine essential amino acids and a varying composition of nonessential amino acids. Relatively little rigorous comparative efficacy research on altered parenteral nutrition amino acid composition has been published in recent years. Recent findings Limited data from randomized, double-blind, adequately powered clinical trials to define optimal doses of total or individual amino acids in parenteral nutrition are available. An exception is the growing number of studies on the efficacy of glutamine supplementation of parenteral nutrition or given as a single parenteral agent. Parenteral glutamine appears to confer benefit in selected patients; however, additional data to define optimal glutamine dosing and the patient subgroups who may most benefit from this amino acid are needed. Although some promising studies have been published, little data are available in the current era of nutrition support on the clinical efficacy of altered doses of arginine, branched chain amino acids, cysteine, or taurine supplementation of parenteral nutrition. Summary Despite routine use of parenteral nutrition, surprisingly little clinical efficacy data are available to guide total or specific amino acid dosing in adult and pediatric patients requiring this therapy. This warrants increased attention by the research community and funding agencies to better define optimal amino acid administration strategies in patient subgroups requiring parenteral nutrition. PMID:21076291

  20. D-Amino Acids in the Nervous and Endocrine Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimitsu Kiriyama; Hiromi Nochi

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important components for peptides and proteins and act as signal transmitters. Only L-amino acids have been considered necessary in mammals, including humans. However, diverse D-amino acids, such as D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, and D-cysteine, are found in mammals. Physiological roles of these D-amino acids not only in the nervous system but also in the endocrine system are being gradually revealed. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are associated with learning and me...

  1. Amino acids in the cultivation of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Andrew; Keusgen, Michael; von Hagen, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Amino acids are crucial for the cultivation of mammalian cells. This importance of amino acids was realized soon after the development of the first cell lines, and a solution of a mixture of amino acids has been supplied to cultured cells ever since. The importance of amino acids is further pronounced in chemically defined mammalian cell culture media, making the consideration of their biological and chemical properties necessary. Amino acids concentrations have been traditionally adjusted to their cellular consumption rates. However, since changes in the metabolic equilibrium of amino acids can be caused by changes in extracellular concentrations, metabolomics in conjunction with flux balance analysis is being used in the development of culture media. The study of amino acid transporters is also gaining importance since they control the intracellular concentrations of these molecules and are influenced by conditions in cell culture media. A better understanding of the solubility, stability, dissolution kinetics, and interactions of these molecules is needed for an exploitation of these properties in the development of dry powdered chemically defined media for mammalian cells. Due to the complexity of these mixtures however, this has proven to be challenging. Studying amino acids in mammalian cell culture media will help provide a better understanding of how mammalian cells in culture interact with their environment. It would also provide insight into the chemical behavior of these molecules in solutions of complex mixtures, which is important in the understanding of the contribution of individual amino acids to protein structure.

  2. Amino acid fermentation at the origin of the genetic code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vladar Harold P

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is evidence that the genetic code was established prior to the existence of proteins, when metabolism was powered by ribozymes. Also, early proto-organisms had to rely on simple anaerobic bioenergetic processes. In this work I propose that amino acid fermentation powered metabolism in the RNA world, and that this was facilitated by proto-adapters, the precursors of the tRNAs. Amino acids were used as carbon sources rather than as catalytic or structural elements. In modern bacteria, amino acid fermentation is known as the Stickland reaction. This pathway involves two amino acids: the first undergoes oxidative deamination, and the second acts as an electron acceptor through reductive deamination. This redox reaction results in two keto acids that are employed to synthesise ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation. The Stickland reaction is the basic bioenergetic pathway of some bacteria of the genus Clostridium. Two other facts support Stickland fermentation in the RNA world. First, several Stickland amino acid pairs are synthesised in abiotic amino acid synthesis. This suggests that amino acids that could be used as an energy substrate were freely available. Second, anticodons that have complementary sequences often correspond to amino acids that form Stickland pairs. The main hypothesis of this paper is that pairs of complementary proto-adapters were assigned to Stickland amino acids pairs. There are signatures of this hypothesis in the genetic code. Furthermore, it is argued that the proto-adapters formed double strands that brought amino acid pairs into proximity to facilitate their mutual redox reaction, structurally constraining the anticodon pairs that are assigned to these amino acid pairs. Significance tests which randomise the code are performed to study the extent of the variability of the energetic (ATP yield. Random assignments can lead to a substantial yield of ATP and maintain enough variability, thus selection can

  3. Amino acid fermentation at the origin of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vladar, Harold P

    2012-02-10

    There is evidence that the genetic code was established prior to the existence of proteins, when metabolism was powered by ribozymes. Also, early proto-organisms had to rely on simple anaerobic bioenergetic processes. In this work I propose that amino acid fermentation powered metabolism in the RNA world, and that this was facilitated by proto-adapters, the precursors of the tRNAs. Amino acids were used as carbon sources rather than as catalytic or structural elements. In modern bacteria, amino acid fermentation is known as the Stickland reaction. This pathway involves two amino acids: the first undergoes oxidative deamination, and the second acts as an electron acceptor through reductive deamination. This redox reaction results in two keto acids that are employed to synthesise ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation. The Stickland reaction is the basic bioenergetic pathway of some bacteria of the genus Clostridium. Two other facts support Stickland fermentation in the RNA world. First, several Stickland amino acid pairs are synthesised in abiotic amino acid synthesis. This suggests that amino acids that could be used as an energy substrate were freely available. Second, anticodons that have complementary sequences often correspond to amino acids that form Stickland pairs. The main hypothesis of this paper is that pairs of complementary proto-adapters were assigned to Stickland amino acids pairs. There are signatures of this hypothesis in the genetic code. Furthermore, it is argued that the proto-adapters formed double strands that brought amino acid pairs into proximity to facilitate their mutual redox reaction, structurally constraining the anticodon pairs that are assigned to these amino acid pairs. Significance tests which randomise the code are performed to study the extent of the variability of the energetic (ATP) yield. Random assignments can lead to a substantial yield of ATP and maintain enough variability, thus selection can act and refine the assignments

  4. Amino acid fermentation at the origin of the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that the genetic code was established prior to the existence of proteins, when metabolism was powered by ribozymes. Also, early proto-organisms had to rely on simple anaerobic bioenergetic processes. In this work I propose that amino acid fermentation powered metabolism in the RNA world, and that this was facilitated by proto-adapters, the precursors of the tRNAs. Amino acids were used as carbon sources rather than as catalytic or structural elements. In modern bacteria, amino acid fermentation is known as the Stickland reaction. This pathway involves two amino acids: the first undergoes oxidative deamination, and the second acts as an electron acceptor through reductive deamination. This redox reaction results in two keto acids that are employed to synthesise ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation. The Stickland reaction is the basic bioenergetic pathway of some bacteria of the genus Clostridium. Two other facts support Stickland fermentation in the RNA world. First, several Stickland amino acid pairs are synthesised in abiotic amino acid synthesis. This suggests that amino acids that could be used as an energy substrate were freely available. Second, anticodons that have complementary sequences often correspond to amino acids that form Stickland pairs. The main hypothesis of this paper is that pairs of complementary proto-adapters were assigned to Stickland amino acids pairs. There are signatures of this hypothesis in the genetic code. Furthermore, it is argued that the proto-adapters formed double strands that brought amino acid pairs into proximity to facilitate their mutual redox reaction, structurally constraining the anticodon pairs that are assigned to these amino acid pairs. Significance tests which randomise the code are performed to study the extent of the variability of the energetic (ATP) yield. Random assignments can lead to a substantial yield of ATP and maintain enough variability, thus selection can act and refine the assignments

  5. PCI-GC-MS-MS approach for identification of non-amino organic acid and amino acid profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hemi; Yang, Lin; Ji, Fenfen; Cai, Zongwei

    2017-03-15

    Alkyl chloroformate have been wildly used for the fast derivatization of metabolites with amino and/or carboxyl groups, coupling of powerful separation and detection systems, such as GC-MS, which allows the comprehensive analysis of non-amino organic acids and amino acids. The reagents involving n-alkyl chloroformate and n-alcohol are generally employed for providing symmetric labeling terminal alkyl chain with the same length. Here, we developed an asymmetric labeling strategy and positive chemical ionization gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (PCI-GC-MS-MS) approach for determination of non-amino organic acids and amino acids, as well as the short chain fatty acids. Carboxylic and amino groups could be selectively labelled by propyl and ethyl groups, respectively. The specific neutral loss of C3H8O (60Da), C3H5O2 (74Da) and C4H8O2 (88Da) were useful in the selective identification for qualitative analysis of organic acids and amino acid derivatives. PCI-GC-MS-MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was applied for semi-quantification of typical non-amino organic acids and amino acids. This method exhibited a wide range of linear range, good regression coefficient (R2) and repeatability. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of targeted metabolites showed excellent intra- and inter-day precision (GC-MS-MS, coupled with alkyl chloroformate derivatization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Utilization of acidic α-amino acids as acyl donors: an effective stereo-controllable synthesis of aryl-keto α-amino acids and their derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Murai, Yuta; Yoshida, Takuma; Okamoto, Masashi; Tachrim, Zetryana Puteri; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Hashimoto, Makoto

    2014-05-16

    Aryl-keto-containing α-amino acids are of great importance in organic chemistry and biochemistry. They are valuable intermediates for the construction of hydroxyl α-amino acids, nonproteinogenic α-amino acids, as well as other biofunctional components. Friedel-Crafts acylation is an effective method to prepare aryl-keto derivatives. In this review, we summarize the preparation of aryl-keto containing α-amino acids by Friedel-Crafts acylation using acidic α-amino acids as acyl-donors and Lewis acids or Brönsted acids as catalysts.

  7. Amino Acid Availability Modulates Vacuolar H+-ATPase Assembly*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stransky, Laura A.; Forgac, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) is an ATP-dependent proton pump composed of a peripheral ATPase domain (V1) and a membrane-integral proton-translocating domain (V0) and is involved in many normal and disease processes. An important mechanism of regulating V-ATPase activity is reversible assembly of the V1 and V0 domains. Increased assembly in mammalian cells occurs under various conditions and has been shown to involve PI3K. The V-ATPase is necessary for amino acid-induced activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is important in controlling cell growth in response to nutrient availability and growth signals. The V-ATPase undergoes amino acid-dependent interactions with the Ragulator complex, which is involved in recruitment of mTORC1 to the lysosomal membrane during amino acid sensing. We hypothesized that changes in the V-ATPase/Ragulator interaction might involve amino acid-dependent changes in V-ATPase assembly. To test this, we measured V-ATPase assembly by cell fractionation in HEK293T cells treated with and without amino acids. V-ATPase assembly increases upon amino acid starvation, and this effect is reversed upon readdition of amino acids. Lysosomes from amino acid-starved cells possess greater V-ATPase-dependent proton transport, indicating that assembled pumps are catalytically active. Amino acid-dependent changes in both V-ATPase assembly and activity are independent of PI3K and mTORC1 activity, indicating the involvement of signaling pathways distinct from those implicated previously in controlling assembly. By contrast, lysosomal neutralization blocks the amino acid-dependent change in assembly and reactivation of mTORC1 after amino acid starvation. These results identify an important new stimulus for controlling V-ATPase assembly. PMID:26378229

  8. Adsorption of amino acids by fullerenes and fullerene nanowhiskers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Hideo; Hirata, Chika; Fujii, Kazuko; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of some amino acids and an oligopeptide by fullerene (C60) and fullerene nanowhiskers (FNWs). C60 and FNWs hardly adsorbed amino acids. Most of the amino acids used have a hydrophobic side chain. Ala and Val, with an alkyl chain, were not adsorbed by the C60 or FNWs. Trp, Phe and Pro, with a cyclic structure, were not adsorbed by them either. The aromatic group of C60 did not interact with the side chain. The carboxyl or amino group, with the frame structure of an amino acid, has a positive or negative charge in solution. It is likely that the C60 and FNWs would not prefer the charged carboxyl or amino group. Tri-Ala was adsorbed slightly by the C60 and FNWs. The carboxyl or amino group is not close to the center of the methyl group of Tri-Ala. One of the methyl groups in Tri-Ala would interact with the aromatic structure of the C60 and FNWs. We compared our results with the theoretical interaction of 20 bio-amino acids with C60. The theoretical simulations showed the bonding distance between C60 and an amino acid and the dissociation energy. The dissociation energy was shown to increase in the order, Val < Phe < Pro < Asp < Ala < Trp < Tyr < Arg < Leu. However, the simulation was not consistent with our experimental results. The adsorption of albumin (a protein) by C60 showed the effect on the side chains of Try and Trp. The structure of albumin was changed a little by C60. In our study Try and Tyr were hardly adsorbed by C60 and FNWs. These amino acids did not show a different adsorption behavior compared with other amino acids. The adsorptive behavior of mono-amino acids might be different from that of polypeptides.

  9. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using various amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Fujimoto, Yuhei; Maekawa, Tetsuya

    2015-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (4-7nm) were synthesized from tetraauric acid using various amino acids as reducing and capping agents. The gold nanoparticles were produced from the incubation of a AuCl4(-) solution with an amino acid at 80°C for 20min. Among the twenty amino acids tested, several amino acids produced gold nanoparticles. The color of the nanoparticle solutions varied with the amino acids used for the reduction. We adopted l-histidine as a reducing agent and investigated the effects of the synthesis conditions on the gold nanoparticles. The His and AuCl4(-) concentrations affected the size of the gold nanoparticles and their aggregates. The pH of the reaction solution also affected the reaction yields and the shape of the gold nanoparticles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intraoperative Use of Epsilon Amino Caproic Acid and Tranexamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intraoperative Use of Epsilon Amino Caproic Acid and Tranexamic Acid in Surgeries Performed Under Cardiopulmonary Bypass: a Comparative Study To Assess Their Impact On Reopening Due To Postoperative Bleeding.

  11. Effect of xenon on excitatory and inhibitory transmission in rat spinal ventral horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Honda, Hiroyuki; Baba, Hiroshi; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2012-05-01

    The minimum alveolar concentration is determined in the spinal cord rather than in the brain. Xenon inhibits glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn neurons. However, its actions in the ventral horn neurons have not been investigated. The effects of 50 or 75% xenon on excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission were examined in the spinal lamina IX neurons of neonatal rats by using a whole cell patch clamp technique. Fifty percent xenon inhibited the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-4-propionic acid-induced currents (amplitudes = 72 ± 9% and integrated area = 73 ± 13% of the control values), and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor-mediated electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (amplitudes = 69 ± 13% of the control values). Seventy-five percent xenon similarly inhibited α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-4-propionic acid-induced currents. However, xenon had no effect on the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced currents or N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents. Xenon decreased the amplitude, but not the frequency, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. There were no discernible effects on the currents induced by γ-aminobutyric acid or glycine or on miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Xenon inhibits α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor-mediated glutamatergic excitatory transmission in the spinal lamina IX neurons via a postsynaptic mechanism. In contrast, there are no substantial effects on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated or inhibitory synaptic transmission. The suppressive effects on excitatory synaptic transmission in the ventral horn neurons partly account for the mechanism behind xenon's ability to produce immobility in response to noxious stimuli and to determine the minimum alveolar concentration.

  12. A plasma membrane association module in yeast amino acid transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Bianchi, Frans; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Meutiawati, Febrina; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid permeases (AAPs) in the plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the uptake of amino acids and involved in regulation of their cellular levels. Here, we report on a strong and complex module for PM association found in the C-terminal tail of AAPs. Using in

  13. Generation of deviation parameters for amino acid singlets, doublets ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deviation parameters (DP) for amino acid singlets, doublets and triplets were computed with respect to secondary structural elements of proteins based on the dictionary of secondary structure prediction (DSSP)-generated secondary structure for 408 selected non-homologous proteins. To the amino acid triplets which are ...

  14. CO2 sorption by supported amino acid ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention concerns the absorption and desorption behaviour of carbon dioxide (CO2) using ionic liquids derived from amino acids adsorbed on porous carrier materials.......The present invention concerns the absorption and desorption behaviour of carbon dioxide (CO2) using ionic liquids derived from amino acids adsorbed on porous carrier materials....

  15. Site-selective covalent reactions on proteinogenic amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Wing Ho; Zhang, Yu; Kang, Wei; Wong, Clarence T T; Sun, Hongyan; Xia, Jiang

    2017-07-05

    To achieve precise control of the signaling events or to achieve unmistakable synthesis of biomolecules, nature has evolved organic reactions involving proteinogenic amino acids with unparalleled site selectivity. For example, dedicated enzymes accurately dictate the site of post-translational modifications in signaling proteins, and ribosomes precisely link the C-terminal carboxylic acid of one unprotected amino acid with the N-terminal amino group of the other amino acid through spatially confined proximity. For many years, chemists have been striving to achieve site selectivity on biomolecules by mimicking nature. Driven by the development of chemoselective protein conjugation reactions, enzymology and protein-protein interactions, the past decade has witnessed a boom in site-selective protein conjugation reactions. (In this review, a site-selective protein conjugation reaction is defined as an organic reaction that targets a single amino acid instead of a kind of amino acids in a protein or a proteome under physiological conditions, for example, a single cysteine residue among all of the cysteines.) In this review, we summarize the recent advancements of bioconjugation reactions that demonstrate this feature of precise site selectivity, focusing on the reactions of the proteinogenic amino acids (excluding those at non-coded or non-proteinogenic amino acids that are introduced to proteins through genetic manipulations). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Meteoritic Amino Acids: Diversity in Compositions Reflects Parent Body Histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, Jamie E; Aponte, José C; Blackmond, Donna G; Burton, Aaron S; Dworkin, Jason P; Glavin, Daniel P

    2016-06-22

    The analysis of amino acids in meteorites dates back over 50 years; however, it is only in recent years that research has expanded beyond investigations of a narrow set of meteorite groups (exemplified by the Murchison meteorite) into meteorites of other types and classes. These new studies have shown a wide diversity in the abundance and distribution of amino acids across carbonaceous chondrite groups, highlighting the role of parent body processes and composition in the creation, preservation, or alteration of amino acids. Although most chiral amino acids are racemic in meteorites, the enantiomeric distribution of some amino acids, particularly of the nonprotein amino acid isovaline, has also been shown to vary both within certain meteorites and across carbonaceous meteorite groups. Large l-enantiomeric excesses of some extraterrestrial protein amino acids (up to ∼60%) have also been observed in rare cases and point to nonbiological enantiomeric enrichment processes prior to the emergence of life. In this Outlook, we review these recent meteoritic analyses, focusing on variations in abundance, structural distributions, and enantiomeric distributions of amino acids and discussing possible explanations for these observations and the potential for future work.

  17. Effect of fortifying amaranth diets with amino acids, casein and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two feeding trials with broilers (1-31 days of age) were carried out to determine the effect of fortifying grain amaranth based diets with lysine, methionine, casein and ethylene diamine tetra acetate (EDTA) on broiler performance, amino acid availability, plasma amino acid concentrations and nitrogen and mineral retention.

  18. Change in amino acids content during germination and seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-08-30

    Aug 30, 2010 ... Proteins, amino acids and sugars in mature seeds (I), germinated seeds (II) and seedlings (III) of six accessions of. Cola acuminata ...... Inherited disorders of GABA metabolism. J. Inherit. Metab. Dis. 16(4): 704-715. Lea PJ, Joy KW (1983). Amino acid interconversion in germinating seeds. In: Nozzolillo, Lea ...

  19. Serum amino acid abnormalities in pediatric patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamad A. El Sawy

    2011-08-10

    Aug 10, 2011 ... Levels of plasma and intracellular amino acids are signifi- cant early indicators of protein metabolism and nutritional sta- tus assessment [1,3]. Many of the characteristic alterations in the plasma amino acid profile that are observed in chronic end-stage renal disease are already present in mild renal insuf-.

  20. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  1. The intercorrelation of the amino acid quality between raw, steeped ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Levels of amino acids were determined in the grains of guinea corn, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench. The steeped sample was best in His, Arg, Thr, Ser, Pro, Gly, Ala, Met, Cys, Val, Phe and Tyr contents whereas germinated sample was best in Lys, Asp, Glu, Leu and Ile. The total amino acid contents were: steeped [57.71 ...

  2. Generation of deviation parameters for amino acid singlets, doublets ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a new method, secondary structure prediction by deviation parameter (SSPDP) for predicting the secondary structure of proteins from amino acid sequence. Deviation parameters (DP) for amino acid singlets, doublets and triplets were computed with respect to secondary structural elements of proteins based on ...

  3. Determination of Proximate Composition and Amino Acid Profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proximate composition and amino acid profile of the seed of 30 Nigerian sesame genotypes were determined based on the standard methods of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) and the Sequential Multi- sample amino acid Analyzer (TSM). Proximate analysis showed that sesame seed contained ...

  4. Chemical and essential amino acid composition of South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-05-05

    May 5, 1997 ... Since there is no information regarding the essential amino acid requirements of these ani- mals, further research is required. To determine the amino acid composition of the carcass, at least half the carcass has to be milled, thoroughly mixed and a representative sample taken for analysis (MacRae er al.,.

  5. Impact of dietary crude protein and nonessential amino acids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nebonid

    The authors gratefully acknowledge the Degussa AG and its technical service manager in Iran, Ali. Afsar, for conducting the amino acid analyses of our feedstuffs and providing crystalline amino acids. References. Abdullah, R. & Falconer, L.R., 1977. Responses of thyroid activity to feed restriction in the goat. Aust. J. Boil.

  6. Genetic analysis of amino acid content in wheat grain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-22

    Aug 22, 2014 ... Therefore, it is important to enhance the level of nutrition in food by increasing the protein content of wheat, especially improving the amino acid composition of protein. Contents of wheat grain amino acids are quantitative traits, controlled by many genes, and their genetic basis was. ∗For correspondence.

  7. Nitrogen and amino acid metabolism in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, S.

    1981-01-01

    For the process of milk production, the dairy cow requires nutrients of which energy supplying nutrients and protein or amino acid supplying nutrients are the most important. Amino acid supplying nutrients have to be absorbed from the small intestine and the research reported in this thesis mainly

  8. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  9. Meteoritic Amino Acids: Diversity in Compositions Reflects Parent Body Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Aponte, Jose C.; Blackmond, Donna G.; Burton, Aaron S.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of amino acids in meteorites dates back over 50 years; however, it is only in recent years that research has expanded beyond investigations of a narrow set of meteorite groups (exemplied by the Murchison meteorite) into meteorites of other types and classes. These new studies have shown a wide diversity in the abundance and distribution of amino acids across carbonaceous chondrite groups, highlighting the role of parent body processes and composition in the creation, preservation, or alteration of amino acids. Although most chiral amino acids are racemic in meteorites, the enantiomeric distribution of some amino acids, particularly of the nonprotein amino acid isovaline, has also been shown to vary both within certain meteorites and across carbonaceous meteorite groups. Large -enantiomeric excesses of some extraterrestrial protein amino acids (up to 60) have also been observed in rare cases and point to nonbiological enantiomeric enrichment processes prior to the emergence of life. In this Outlook, we review these recent meteoritic analyses, focusing on variations in abundance, structural distributions, and enantiomeric distributions of amino acids and discussing possible explanations for these observations and the potential for future work.

  10. Insulin-dependent signaling: regulation by amino acids and energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that amino acids stimulate a signal-transduction pathway that is also used by insulin. Moreover, for insulin to exert its anabolic and anticatabolic effects on protein, there is an absolute requirement for amino acids. This signaling pathway becomes inhibited by

  11. Effect of supplementing grain amaranth diets with amino acids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    James Bond

    Effect of fortifying amaranth diets with amino acids, casein and ethylene diamine tetra acetate on broiler performance, amino acid availability and mineral utilisation. L.W. Kabuage1#, P.N. Mbugua1, B.N. Mitaru1, T.A. Ngatia2 and K. Schafer3. 1Department of Animal Production, 2Department of Veterinary Pathology, ...

  12. Protein and Amino Acid Composition of Water Melon ( Citrullus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The protein and amino acids composition of seeds and pulp of watermelon, Citrullus lanatus were analyzed using Kjeldahl method and ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) respectively. The protein contents (% dry matter) of seeds and pulp were found to be 24.23 and 1.05% respectively. The results of amino acids ...

  13. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves II, H. James

    2015-01-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or “chemistry space.” Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set. PMID:25802223

  14. Amino acid, Antioxidant and Ion Profiles of Carpolobia lutea Leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amino acid analysis was by cation-exchange chromatography using automated amino acid analyser. Antioxidant potential was obtained by spectrophotometric assay using 2, 2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl DPPH while elemental and ionic analyses were carried out by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and potentiometric ...

  15. Separation of amino acid enantiomers by micelle-enhanced ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de T.J.M.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Zuilhof, H.; Rodenburg, L.M.; Overdevest, P.E.M.; Padt, van der A.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.

    2000-01-01

    A Micelle-enhanced ultrafiltration (MEUF) separation process was investigated that can potentially be used for large-scale enantioseparations. Copper(II)-amino acid derivatives dissolved in nonionic surfactant micelles were used as chiral selectors for the separation of dilute racemic amino acids

  16. Physiological and biochemical studies of bacterial amino acid amide metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, Hubertus Franciscus Maria

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids represent a class of versatile chiral building blocks for a whole range of fine chemicals, used in the pharmaceutical and agro-chemical industry. Considerable experience currently is available with a wide variety of chemo-enzymatic processes for the synthesis of amino acids, which is

  17. Mechanisms controlling renal hemodynamics and electrolyte excretion during amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, L.L.; Mizelle, H.L.; Montani, J.P.; Hall, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the mechanisms by which increased plasma amino acids elevate renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Since transport of amino acids and Na is linked in the proximal tubule, the authors hypothesized that increased amino acids might stimulate proximal tubular Na reabsorption (PR/sub Na/) and thus increase RBF and GFR by a macula densa feedback mechanism. A solution of four amino acids (Ala, Ser, Gly, Pro) was infused intravenously into anesthetized dogs with normal kidneys (NK) and with kidneys in which the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism was blunted by lowering renal artery pressure (LPK) or blocked by making the kidneys nonfiltering (NFK). In NK, RBF and GFR increased by 35 +/- 4% and 30 +/- 7% after 90 min of amino acid infusion, while PR/sub Na/ (estimated from lithium clearance) and O2 consumption increased by 31 +/- 5% and 29 +/- 5% and distal Na delivery remained relatively constant. Autoregulation of RBF and GFR in response to step deceases in renal artery pressure was impaired during amino acids in NK. The hemodynamic responses to amino acids were abolished in LPK and NFK. Infusion of the nonmetabolized -aminoisobutyric acid into NK produced changes in renal hemodynamics that were similar to the responses observed with the four metabolizable amino acids. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevation of plasma amino acids increases RBF and GFR by a mechanism that requires an intact macula densa feedback. Metabolism of the amino acids does not appear to be necessary for these changes to occur.

  18. Incretin effect after oral amino Acid ingestion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Ola; Pacini, Giovanni; Tura, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ) was administered orally or iv at a rate resulting in matching total amino acid concentrations to 12 male volunteers with age 22.5 ± 1.4 years and a body mass index 22.4 ± 1.4 kg/m(2), who had no history of diabetes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Main outcome measures were area under the 120-minute curve for insulin, C......CONTEXT: The incretin effect is the augmented insulin secretion by oral vs iv glucose at matching glucose levels. We previously demonstrated an augmented insulin secretion when fat is given orally rather than iv, suggesting an incretin effect also after fat. However, whether an incretin effect......: Oral amino acid mixture ingestion elicits a stronger insulin secretory response than iv amino acid at matching amino acid levels and this is associated with increased GIP level, suggesting that an incretin effect exists also after oral amino acids, possibly mediated by GIP....

  19. ANALYSIS OF AMINO ACIDS BY HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurat E Noor Baig

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are considered as the key precursors for the formation of hormones and low molecular weight nitrogenous substances with biological importance. Since the analysis of amino acids has been carried out for both qualitative and quantitative purposes with an aim to study their levels in the plasma concentration, the quantitative determination, in particular, also helps in the diagnosis of different diseases associated with their deficiency. This review article deals with the determination of amino acids by chromatographic methods which include ion-exchange chromatography (IEC, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC and ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC. The review will also give an idea for the preparation of samples, derivatization methods for the analysis of amino acids (direct and indirect methods and separation of amino acids by high performance liquid chromatographic technique.

  20. Supernovae, Neutrinos and the Chirality of Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshitaka Kajino

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for creating an enantioenrichment in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one handedness by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is defined. The chiral selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. It also requires an asymmetric distribution of neutrinos emitted from the supernova. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth’s proteinaceous amino acids.

  1. Amino Acids Are an Ineffective Fertilizer for Dunaliella spp. Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphree, Colin A; Dums, Jacob T; Jain, Siddharth K; Zhao, Chengsong; Young, Danielle Y; Khoshnoodi, Nicole; Tikunov, Andrey; Macdonald, Jeffrey; Pilot, Guillaume; Sederoff, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Autotrophic microalgae are a promising bioproducts platform. However, the fundamental requirements these organisms have for nitrogen fertilizer severely limit the impact and scale of their cultivation. As an alternative to inorganic fertilizers, we investigated the possibility of using amino acids from deconstructed biomass as a nitrogen source in the genus Dunaliella. We found that only four amino acids (glutamine, histidine, cysteine, and tryptophan) rescue Dunaliella spp. growth in nitrogen depleted media, and that supplementation of these amino acids altered the metabolic profile of Dunaliella cells. Our investigations revealed that histidine is transported across the cell membrane, and that glutamine and cysteine are not transported. Rather, glutamine, cysteine, and tryptophan are degraded in solution by a set of oxidative chemical reactions, releasing ammonium that in turn supports growth. Utilization of biomass-derived amino acids is therefore not a suitable option unless additional amino acid nitrogen uptake is enabled through genetic modifications of these algae.

  2. Amino Acids Are an Ineffective Fertilizer for Dunaliella spp. Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin A. Murphree

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic microalgae are a promising bioproducts platform. However, the fundamental requirements these organisms have for nitrogen fertilizer severely limit the impact and scale of their cultivation. As an alternative to inorganic fertilizers, we investigated the possibility of using amino acids from deconstructed biomass as a nitrogen source in the genus Dunaliella. We found that only four amino acids (glutamine, histidine, cysteine, and tryptophan rescue Dunaliella spp. growth in nitrogen depleted media, and that supplementation of these amino acids altered the metabolic profile of Dunaliella cells. Our investigations revealed that histidine is transported across the cell membrane, and that glutamine and cysteine are not transported. Rather, glutamine, cysteine, and tryptophan are degraded in solution by a set of oxidative chemical reactions, releasing ammonium that in turn supports growth. Utilization of biomass-derived amino acids is therefore not a suitable option unless additional amino acid nitrogen uptake is enabled through genetic modifications of these algae.

  3. Analysis of Free Amino Acids in Mammalian Brain Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenofontov, A L; Boyko, A I; Mkrtchyan, G V; Tashlitsky, V N; Timofeeva, A V; Graf, A V; Bunik, V I; Baratova, L A

    2017-10-01

    An optimized method for analysis of free amino acids using a modified lithium-citrate buffer system with a Hitachi L-8800 amino acid analyzer is described. It demonstrates clear advantages over the sodium-citrate buffer system commonly used for the analysis of protein hydrolysates. A sample pretreatment technique for amino acid analysis of brain extracts is also discussed. The focus has been placed on the possibility of quantitative determination of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) with simultaneous analysis of all other amino acids in brain extracts. The method was validated and calibration coefficient (KGSH) was determined. Examples of chromatographic separation of free amino acids in extracts derived from different parts of the brain are presented.

  4. Stardust, Supernovae and the Chirality of the Amino Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2011-03-09

    A mechanism for creating enantiomerism in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one chirality by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is described. The selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth's amino acids.

  5. Regulation of intestinal protein metabolism by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Julien; Goichon, Alexis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2013-09-01

    Gut homeostasis plays a major role in health and may be regulated by quantitative and qualitative food intake. In the intestinal mucosa, an intense renewal of proteins occurs, at approximately 50% per day in humans. In some pathophysiological conditions, protein turnover is altered and may contribute to intestinal or systemic diseases. Amino acids are key effectors of gut protein turnover, both as constituents of proteins and as regulatory molecules limiting intestinal injury and maintaining intestinal functions. Many studies have focused on two amino acids: glutamine, known as the preferential substrate of rapidly dividing cells, and arginine, another conditionally essential amino acid. The effects of glutamine and arginine on protein synthesis appear to be model and condition dependent, as are the involved signaling pathways. The regulation of gut protein degradation by amino acids has been minimally documented until now. This review will examine recent data, helping to better understand how amino acids regulate intestinal protein metabolism, and will explore perspectives for future studies.

  6. Amino acids: metabolism, functions, and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery that amino acids (AA) are not only cell signaling molecules but are also regulators of gene expression and the protein phosphorylation cascade. Additionally, AA are key precursors for syntheses of hormones and low-molecular weight nitrogenous substances with each having enormous biological importance. Physiological concentrations of AA and their metabolites (e.g., nitric oxide, polyamines, glutathione, taurine, thyroid hormones, and serotonin) are required for the functions. However, elevated levels of AA and their products (e.g., ammonia, homocysteine, and asymmetric dimethylarginine) are pathogenic factors for neurological disorders, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular disease. Thus, an optimal balance among AA in the diet and circulation is crucial for whole body homeostasis. There is growing recognition that besides their role as building blocks of proteins and polypeptides, some AA regulate key metabolic pathways that are necessary for maintenance, growth, reproduction, and immunity. They are called functional AA, which include arginine, cysteine, glutamine, leucine, proline, and tryptophan. Dietary supplementation with one or a mixture of these AA may be beneficial for (1) ameliorating health problems at various stages of the life cycle (e.g., fetal growth restriction, neonatal morbidity and mortality, weaning-associated intestinal dysfunction and wasting syndrome, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome, and infertility); (2) optimizing efficiency of metabolic transformations to enhance muscle growth, milk production, egg and meat quality and athletic performance, while preventing excess fat deposition and reducing adiposity. Thus, AA have important functions in both nutrition and health.

  7. Electronic coupling through natural amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T., E-mail: michael.crowley@nrel.gov, E-mail: gregg.beckham@nrel.gov; Crowley, Michael F., E-mail: michael.crowley@nrel.gov, E-mail: gregg.beckham@nrel.gov [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, National Bioenergy Center, 15013 Denver West Pkwy, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Myriad scientific domains concern themselves with biological electron transfer (ET) events that span across vast scales of rate and efficiency through a remarkably fine-tuned integration of amino acid (AA) sequences, electronic structure, dynamics, and environment interactions. Within this intricate scheme, many questions persist as to how proteins modulate electron-tunneling properties. To help elucidate these principles, we develop a model set of peptides representing the common α-helix and β-strand motifs including all natural AAs within implicit protein-environment solvation. Using an effective Hamiltonian strategy with density functional theory, we characterize the electronic coupling through these peptides, furthermore considering side-chain dynamics. For both motifs, predictions consistently show that backbone-mediated electronic coupling is distinctly sensitive to AA type (aliphatic, polar, aromatic, negatively charged and positively charged), and to side-chain orientation. The unique properties of these residues may be employed to design activated, deactivated, or switch-like superexchange pathways. Electronic structure calculations and Green’s function analyses indicate that localized shifts in the electron density along the peptide play a role in modulating these pathways, and further substantiate the experimentally observed behavior of proline residues as superbridges. The distinct sensitivities of tunneling pathways to sequence and conformation revealed in this electronic coupling database help improve our fundamental understanding of the broad diversity of ET reactivity and provide guiding principles for peptide design.

  8. Protein engineering with unnatural amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, William H; Otting, Gottfried; Jackson, Colin J

    2013-08-01

    Protein engineering has become an extensively used tool in many fields, allowing us to probe protein function, characterize proteins using a range of biophysical techniques, chemically modify proteins and improve protein function for medical and industrial applications. It is now possible to site-specifically incorporate unnatural, or non-canonical, amino acids (uAAs) into proteins, which has had a major impact on protein engineering. In this review, we discuss the recent technical developments in the field and how uAA-protein engineering is becoming an increasingly valuable molecular tool, with the unique chemical functionalities of some uAAs allowing a range of otherwise impossible experiments to be performed. Finally, the impediments that have resulted in a relatively small number of recent studies in which uAA-protein engineering has been used to improve protein function are discussed, alongside some of the recent technical developments that may serve to overcome these obstacles. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional amino acids in nutrition and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoyao

    2013-09-01

    The recent years have witnessed growing interest in biochemistry, physiology and nutrition of amino acids (AA) in growth, health and disease of humans and other animals. This results from the discoveries of AA in cell signaling involving protein kinases, G protein-coupled receptors, and gaseous molecules (i.e., NO, CO and H2S). In addition, nutritional studies have shown that dietary supplementation with several AA (e.g., arginine, glutamine, glutamate, leucine, and proline) modulates gene expression, enhances growth of the small intestine and skeletal muscle, or reduces excessive body fat. These seminal findings led to the new concept of functional AA, which are defined as those AA that participate in and regulate key metabolic pathways to improve health, survival, growth, development, lactation, and reproduction of the organisms. Functional AA hold great promise in prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases (e.g., obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disorders), intrauterine growth restriction, infertility, intestinal and neurological dysfunction, and infectious disease (including viral infections).

  10. Chemistry, nutrition, and microbiology of D-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, M

    1999-09-01

    Exposure of food proteins to certain processing conditions induces two major chemical changes: racemization of all L-amino acids to D-isomers and concurrent formation of cross-linked amino acids such as lysinoalanine. Racemization of L-amino acids residues to their D-isomers in food and other proteins is pH-, time-, and temperature-dependent. Although racemization rates of the 18 different L-amino acid residues in a protein vary, the relative rates in different proteins are similar. The diet contains both processing-induced and naturally formed D-amino acids. The latter include those found in microorganisms, plants, and marine invertebrates. Racemization impairs digestibility and nutritional quality. The nutritional utilization of different D-amino acids varies widely in animals and humans. In addition, some D-amino acids may be both beneficial and deleterious. Thus, although D-phenylalanine in an all-amino-acid diet is utilized as a nutritional source of L-phenylalanine, high concentrations of D-tyrosine in such diets inhibit the growth of mice. Both D-serine and lysinoalanine induce histological changes in the rat kidney. The wide variation in the utilization of D-amino acids is illustrated by the fact that whereas D-methionine is largely utilized as a nutritional source of the L-isomer, D-lysine is totally devoid of any nutritional value. Similarly, although L-cysteine has a sparing effect on L-methionine when fed to mice, D-cysteine does not. Because D-amino acids are consumed by animals and humans as part of their normal diets, a need exists to develop a better understanding of their roles in nutrition, food safety, microbiology, physiology, and medicine. To contribute to this effort, this multidiscipline-oriented overview surveys our present knowledge of the chemistry, nutrition, safety, microbiology, and pharmacology of D-amino acids. Also covered are the origin and distribution of D-amino acids in the food chain and in body fluids and tissues and

  11. Hydration of amino acids: FTIR spectra and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuszko, Aneta; Adamczak, Beata; Czub, Jacek; Gojło, Emilia; Stangret, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    The hydration of selected amino acids, alanine, glycine, proline, valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine, has been studied in aqueous solutions by means of FTIR spectra of HDO isotopically diluted in H2O. The difference spectra procedure and the chemometric method have been applied to remove the contribution of bulk water and thus to separate the spectra of solute-affected HDO. To support interpretation of obtained spectral results, molecular dynamics simulations of amino acids were performed. The structural-energetic characteristic of these solute-affected water molecules shows that, on average, water affected by amino acids forms stronger and shorter H-bonds than those in pure water. Differences in the influence of amino acids on water structure have been noticed. The effect of the hydrophobic side chain of an amino acid on the solvent interactions seems to be enhanced because of the specific cooperative coupling of water strong H-bond chain, connecting the carboxyl and amino groups, with the clathrate-like H-bond network surrounding the hydrocarbon side chain. The parameter derived from the spectral data, which corresponds to the contributions of the population of weak hydrogen bonds of water molecules which have been substituted by the stronger ones in the hydration sphere of amino acids, correlated well with the amino acid hydrophobicity indexes.

  12. Effects of alkali or acid treatment on the isomerization of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Taketo; Mutaguchi, Yuta; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-10-01

    The effect of alkali treatment on the isomerization of amino acids was investigated. The 100×D/(D+L) values of amino acids from peptide increased with increase in the number of constituent amino acid residues. Furthermore, the N-terminal amino acid of a dipeptide was isomerized to a greater extent than the C-terminal residue. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The putative Cationic Amino acid Transporter 9 is targeted to vesicles and may be involved in plant amino acid homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiyu eYang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids are major primary metabolites. Their uptake, translocation, compartmentation and re-mobilization require a diverse set of cellular transporters. Here, the broadly expressed gene product of CATIONIC AMINO ACID TRANSPORTER 9 (CAT9 was identified as mainly localized to vesicular membranes that are involved in vacuolar trafficking, including those of the trans-Golgi network. In order to probe whether and how these compartments are involved in amino acid homeostasis, a loss-of-function cat9-1 mutant and ectopic over-expressor plants were isolated. Under restricted nitrogen supply in soil, cat9-1 showed a chlorotic phenotype, which was reversed in the over-expressors. The total soluble amino acid pools were affected in the mutants, but this was only significant under poor nitrogen supply. Upon nitrogen starvation, the major soluble amino acid leaf pools decreased. This decrease was lower in cat9-1 and augmented in the over-expressor. Over-expression generally affected total soluble amino acid concentrations and finally improved the survival upon severe nitrogen starvation. The results potentially identify a novel function of vesicular amino acid transport mediated by CAT9 in the cellular nitrogen-dependent amino acid homeostasis.

  14. Essential amino acids are primarily responsible for the amino acid stimulation of muscle protein anabolism in healthy elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Elena; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Mittendorfer, Bettina; Wolfe, Robert R

    2003-08-01

    Nutritional supplementation may be used to treat muscle loss with aging (sarcopenia). However, if physical activity does not increase, the elderly tend to compensate for the increased energy delivered by the supplements with reduced food intake, which results in a calorie substitution rather than supplementation. Thus, an effective supplement should stimulate muscle anabolism more efficiently than food or common protein supplements. We have shown that balanced amino acids stimulate muscle protein anabolism in the elderly, but it is unknown whether all amino acids are necessary to achieve this effect. We assessed whether nonessential amino acids are required in a nutritional supplement to stimulate muscle protein anabolism in the elderly. We compared the response of muscle protein metabolism to either 18 g essential amino acids (EAA group: n = 6, age 69 +/- 2 y; +/- SD) or 40 g balanced amino acids (18 g essential amino acids + 22 g nonessential amino acids, BAA group; n = 8, age 71 +/- 2 y) given orally in small boluses every 10 min for 3 h to healthy elderly volunteers. Muscle protein metabolism was measured in the basal state and during amino acid administration via L-[ring-(2)H(5)]phenylalanine infusion, femoral arterial and venous catheterization, and muscle biopsies. Phenylalanine net balance (in nmol x min(-1). 100 mL leg volume(-1)) increased from the basal state (P anabolism in the elderly.

  15. Biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids in Nocardia sp. 239 : effects of amino acid analogues on growth and regulatory enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L. de; Grobben, G.; Vrijbloed, J.W.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1990-01-01

    Further steps required for overproduction of aromatic amino acids by a mutant strain of Nocardia sp. 239 (Noc 87-13), unable to grow on L-phenylalanine as a sole carbon and energy source, were investigated. A number of analogues of the aromatic amino acids displayed severe inhibitory effects on the

  16. Enantioseparation of amino acids by micelle-enhanced ultrafiltration : experimental and theoretical studies of copper (II) amino acid interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de T.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    A micelle-enhanced ultrafiltration system, which can potentially be used for large scale separations, has been used to investigate the resolution of amino acid enantiomers. For this purpose amino acid derivatives were synthesized, which in combination with copper(II) ions were used as

  17. Evaluation of methods to estimate the essential amino acids requirements of fish from the muscle amino acid profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro José de Almeida Bicudo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many methods to estimate amino acid requirement based on amino acid profile of fish have been proposed. This study evaluates the methodology proposed by Meyer & Fracalossi (2005 and by Tacon (1989 to estimate amino acids requirement of fish, which do exempt knowledge on previous nutritional requirement of reference amino acid. Data on amino acid requirement of pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus, were used to validate de accuracy of those methods. Meyer & Fracalossi's and Tacon's methodology estimated the lysine requirement of pacu, respectively, at 13 and 23% above requirement determined using dose-response method. The values estimated by both methods lie within the range of requirements determined for other omnivorous fish species, the Meyer & Fracalossi (2005 method showing better accuracy.

  18. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  19. Abiotic racemization kinetics of amino acids in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Andrew; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Enantiomeric ratios of amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic racemize abiotically. Based on a heating experiment, we report Arrhenius parameters...... for aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3 °C suggests racemization rate constants of on the order of 10-5 yr-1 without evident differences...... between different amino acids or depths. These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of D:L amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial...

  20. Amino acid catabolism by Lactobacillus helveticus in cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kananen, Soila Kaarina

    manufacture were studied. Amino acid catabolism related enzyme activities were studied in vitro from eight out of 39 Lb. helveticus strains selected based on different pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiles. Amino acids can be initially converted into a-keto acids by transamination reaction. Lb helveticus......Amino acid catabolism is the final step in the conversion of caseins to flavour compounds and a part of a complex combination of biochemical pathways in cheese flavour formation. Lactobacillus helveticus is a thermophilic lactic acid bacterium that is used in cheese manufacture as a primary starter...... culture or as an adjunct culture. It has shown high proteolytic activities in conversion of caseins to peptides and further to amino acids and flavour compounds. Better understanding of the enzyme activity properties and the influence of different properties on final cheese flavour is favourable...

  1. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Hoshino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1 system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source and keto acids (oxylic acid sources. In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin.

  2. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Daneault

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS spectroscopic techniques.

  3. Amino acid sequence of toxin III from Anemonia sulcata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bĕress, L; Wunderer, G; Wachter, E

    1977-08-01

    Toxin III, the smallest toxin component of the poison of the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata, is a polypeptide with 27 amino acids. Its structure is stabilized by three disulfide bridges. The amino acid sequence was determined by solid-phase Edman degradation of the aminoethylated derivative. The peptide was coupled to the carrier, porous glass, by thiourea bridges between the alpha-amino group of arginine-1 and the epsilon-amino group of lysine-26 and the isothiocyanate groups of the carrier. Another fraction of the polypeptide was bound by an acid-amide condensation of the C-terminal valine-27 with the aminopropyl group of the carrier. The sequence of toxin III has no regions homologous to the 47-residue toxin II. Comparison with the known partial sequence of toxin I, which contains 46 amino acids (Wunderer, G. & Eulitz, M., in preparation) also fails to reveal homologies.

  4. Fortifying Horticultural Crops with Essential Amino Acids: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoping; Xu, Mengyun; Wang, Wenyi; Galili, Gad

    2017-06-19

    To feed the world's growing population, increasing the yield of crops is not the only important factor, improving crop quality is also important, and it presents a significant challenge. Among the important crops, horticultural crops (particularly fruits and vegetables) provide numerous health compounds, such as vitamins, antioxidants, and amino acids. Essential amino acids are those that cannot be produced by the organism and, therefore, must be obtained from diet, particularly from meat, eggs, and milk, as well as a variety of plants. Extensive efforts have been devoted to increasing the levels of essential amino acids in plants. Yet, these efforts have been met with very little success due to the limited genetic resources for plant breeding and because high essential amino acid content is generally accompanied by limited plant growth. With a deep understanding of the biosynthetic pathways of essential amino acids and their interactions with the regulatory networks in plants, it should be possible to use genetic engineering to improve the essential amino acid content of horticultural plants, rendering these plants more nutritionally favorable crops. In the present report, we describe the recent advances in the enhancement of essential amino acids in horticultural plants and possible future directions towards their bio-fortification.

  5. Distribution of soluble amino acids in maize endosperm mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toro Alejandro Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available For human nutrition the main source of vegetable proteins are cereal and legume seeds. The content of total soluble amino acids in mature endosperm of wild-type, opaque and floury maize (Zea mays L. mutants were determined by HPLC. The total absolute concentration of soluble amino acids among the mutants varied depending on the mutant. The o11 and o13 mutants exhibited the highest average content, whereas o10, fl3 and fl1 exhibited the lowest average content. In general, the mutants exhibited similar concentrations of total soluble amino acids when compared to the wild-type lines, with the clear exception of mutants o11 and fl1, with the o11 mutant exhibiting a higher concentration of total soluble amino acids when compared to its wild-type counterpart W22 and the fl1 mutant a lower concentration when compared to its wild-type counterpart Oh43. For methionine, the mutants o2 and o11 and wild-type Oh43 exhibited the highest concentrations of this amino acid. Significant differences were not observed between mutants for other amino acids such as lysine and threonine. The high lysine concentrations obtained originally for these mutants may be due to the amino acids incorporated into storage proteins, but not those present in the soluble form.

  6. Fortifying Horticultural Crops with Essential Amino Acids: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoping Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To feed the world′s growing population, increasing the yield of crops is not the only important factor, improving crop quality is also important, and it presents a significant challenge. Among the important crops, horticultural crops (particularly fruits and vegetables provide numerous health compounds, such as vitamins, antioxidants, and amino acids. Essential amino acids are those that cannot be produced by the organism and, therefore, must be obtained from diet, particularly from meat, eggs, and milk, as well as a variety of plants. Extensive efforts have been devoted to increasing the levels of essential amino acids in plants. Yet, these efforts have been met with very little success due to the limited genetic resources for plant breeding and because high essential amino acid content is generally accompanied by limited plant growth. With a deep understanding of the biosynthetic pathways of essential amino acids and their interactions with the regulatory networks in plants, it should be possible to use genetic engineering to improve the essential amino acid content of horticultural plants, rendering these plants more nutritionally favorable crops. In the present report, we describe the recent advances in the enhancement of essential amino acids in horticultural plants and possible future directions towards their bio-fortification.

  7. Cyanobacteria as efficient producers of mycosporine-like amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shikha; Prajapat, Ganshyam; Abrar, Mustari; Ledwani, Lalita; Singh, Anoop; Agrawal, Akhil

    2017-09-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids are the most common group of transparent ultraviolet radiation absorbing intracellular secondary metabolites. These molecules absorb light in the range of ultraviolet-A and -B with a maximum absorbance between 310 and 362 nm. Cyanobacteria might have faced the most deleterious ultraviolet radiation, which leads to an evolution of ultraviolet protecting mycosporine-like amino acids for efficient selection in the environment. In the last 30 years, scientists have investigated various cyanobacteria for novel mycosporine-like amino acids, applying different induction techniques. This review organizes all the cyanobacterial groups that produce various mycosporine-like amino acids. We found out that cyanobacteria belonging to orders Synechococcales, Chroococcales, Oscillatoriales, and Nostocales are frequently studied for the presence of mycosporine-like amino acids, while orders Gloeobacterales, Spirulinales, Pleurocapsales, and Chroococcidiopsidales are still need to be investigated. Nostoc and Anabaena strains are major studied genus for the mycosporine-like amino acids production. Hence, this review will give further insight to the readers about potential mycosporine-like amino acid producing cyanobacterial groups in future investigations. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Aromatic amino acids in high selectivity bismuth(III) recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, Sumanta Kumar; Dey, Debarati; Sen, Souvik; Sen, Kamalika

    2013-04-21

    The three aromatic amino acids, tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine, play different physiological roles in life processes. Metal ions capable of binding these amino acids may aid in the reduction of effective concentration of these amino acids in any physiological system. Here we have studied the efficacy of some heavy metals for their complexation with these three amino acids. Bismuth has been found to bind selectively with these aromatic amino acids and this was confirmed using spectrofluorimetric, spectrophotometric and cyclic voltammetric studies. The series of heavy metals has been chosen because each of these metals remains associated with the others at very low concentration levels and Bi(III) is the least toxic amongst the other elements. So, selective recognition for Bi(III) would also mean no response for the other heavy elements if contaminants are present even at low concentration levels. The affinity towards these amino acids has been found to be in the order tryptophan < phenylalanine < tyrosine. The association constants of these amino acids have been calculated using Benesi-Hildebrand equations and the corresponding free energy change has also been calculated. The values of the association constants obtained from BH equations using absorbance values corroborate with the Stern-Volmer constants obtained from fluorimetric studies. The evidence for complexation is also supported by the results of cyclic voltammetry.

  9. New Functions and Potential Applications of Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneyama, Hisayuki; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Tonouchi, Naoto

    Currently, several types of amino acids are being produced and used worldwide. Nevertheless, several new functions of amino acids have been recently discovered that could result in other applications. For example, oral stimulation by glutamate triggers the cephalic phase response to prepare for food digestion. Further, the stomach and intestines have specific glutamate-recognizing systems in their epithelial mucosa. Regarding clinical applications, addition of monosodium glutamate to the medicinal diet has been shown to markedly enhance gastric secretion in a vagus-dependent manner. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are the major components of muscles, and ingestion of BCAAs has been found to be effective for decreasing muscle pain. BCAAs are expected to be a solution for the serious issue of aging. Further, ingestion of specific amino acids could be beneficial. Glycine can be ingested for good night's sleep: glycine ingestion before bedtime significantly improved subjective sleep quality. Ingestion of alanine and glutamine effectively accelerates alcohol metabolism, and ingestion of cystine and theanine effectively prevents colds. Finally, amino acids could be used in a novel clinical diagnostic method: the balance of amino acids in the blood could be an indicator of the risk of diseases such as cancer. These newly discovered functions of amino acids are expected to contribute to the resolution of various issues.

  10. Rewiring protein synthesis: From natural to synthetic amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yongqiang; Evans, Christopher R; Ling, Jiqiang

    2017-11-01

    The protein synthesis machinery uses 22 natural amino acids as building blocks that faithfully decode the genetic information. Such fidelity is controlled at multiple steps and can be compromised in nature and in the laboratory to rewire protein synthesis with natural and synthetic amino acids. This review summarizes the major quality control mechanisms during protein synthesis, including aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, elongation factors, and the ribosome. We will discuss evolution and engineering of such components that allow incorporation of natural and synthetic amino acids at positions that deviate from the standard genetic code. The protein synthesis machinery is highly selective, yet not fixed, for the correct amino acids that match the mRNA codons. Ambiguous translation of a codon with multiple amino acids or complete reassignment of a codon with a synthetic amino acid diversifies the proteome. Expanding the genetic code with synthetic amino acids through rewiring protein synthesis has broad applications in synthetic biology and chemical biology. Biochemical, structural, and genetic studies of the translational quality control mechanisms are not only crucial to understand the physiological role of translational fidelity and evolution of the genetic code, but also enable us to better design biological parts to expand the proteomes of synthetic organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biochemistry of Synthetic Biology - Recent Developments" Guest Editor: Dr. Ilka Heinemann and Dr. Patrick O'Donoghue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and chirality of amino acids under interstellar conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Chaitanya; Goesmann, Fred; Meinert, Cornelia; Evans, Amanda C; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids are the fundamental building blocks of proteins, the biomolecules that provide cellular structure and function in all living organisms. A majority of amino acids utilized within living systems possess pre-specified orientation geometry (chirality); however the original source for this specific orientation remains uncertain. In order to trace the chemical evolution of life, an appreciation of the synthetic and evolutional origins of the first chiral amino acids must first be gained. Given that the amino acids in our universe are likely to have been synthesized in molecular clouds in interstellar space, it is necessary to understand where and how the first synthesis might have occurred. The asymmetry of the original amino acid synthesis was probably the result of exposure to chiral photons in the form of circularly polarized light (CPL), which has been detected in interstellar molecular clouds. This chirality transfer event, from photons to amino acids, has been successfully recreated experimentally and is likely a combination of both asymmetric synthesis and enantioselective photolysis. A series of innovative studies have reported successful simulation of these environments and afforded production of chiral amino acids under realistic circumstellar and interstellar conditions: irradiation of interstellar ice analogues (CO, CO2, NH3, CH3OH, and H2O) with circularly polarized ultraviolet photons at low temperatures does result in enantiomer enriched amino acid structures (up to 1.3% ee). This topical review summarizes current knowledge and recent discoveries about the simulated interstellar environments within which amino acids were probably formed. A synopsis of the COSAC experiment onboard the ESA cometary mission ROSETTA concludes this review: the ROSETTA mission will soft-land on the nucleus of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014, anticipating the first in situ detection of asymmetric organic molecules in cometary ices.

  12. Pathogenesis of CNS involvement in disorders of amino and organic acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölker, S; Sauer, S W; Hoffmann, G F; Müller, I; Morath, M A; Okun, J G

    2008-04-01

    Inherited disorders of amino and organic acid metabolism have a high cumulative frequency, and despite heterogeneous aetiology and varying clinical presentation, the manifestation of neurological disease is common. It has been demonstrated for some of these diseases that accumulating pathological metabolites are directly involved in the manifestation of neurological disease. Various pathomechanisms have been suggested in different in vitro and in vivo models including an impairment of brain energy metabolism, an imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, altered transport across the blood-brain barrier and between glial cells and neurons, impairment of myelination and disturbed neuronal efflux of metabolic water. This review summarizes recent knowledge on pathomechanisms involved in phenylketonuria, glutaric aciduria type I, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency and aspartoacylase deficiency with examples, highlighting general as well as disease-specific concepts and their putative impact on treatment.

  13. [Free amino acids of various lacteal formulas used in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periago, J L; Faus, O; Martínez Valverde, A; Bueno Sánchez, A; Faus, M J; Gil, A

    1984-11-15

    A comparative study has been made upon free amino-acids in human milk, cow's milk and some infant formulas commercialized in Spain. The contents of free amino-acids in human milk is significantly increased when compared to those of raw of UHT sterilized cow's milk and to those of infant formulas. The concentrations of alanine are significantly lower in cow's milk and in infant formulas compared to human milk. The same occurs with branched chain amino-acids, glutamic acid, serine, threonine and taurine. On the contrary, the levels of free cysteine are significantly higher in cow's milk and in infant formulas. The concentrations of free amino-acids determined in different infant formulas on sale in Spain are rather similar between each others, being the cuantitative pattern very different from that determined in human milk.

  14. The origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5-651.1 ppb in 6 M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D- and L-β-amino-n-butyric acid (β-ABA), DL-α-amino-n-butyric acid, γ-amino-n-butyric acid, β-alanine, and ε-amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic β-ABA were present in some samples. We also examined seven samples from Apollo 15, 16, and 17 that had been previously allocated to a non-curation laboratory, as well as two samples of terrestrial dunite from studies of lunar module engine exhaust that had been stored in the same laboratory. The amino acid content of these samples suggested that contamination had occurred during non-curatorial storage. We measured the compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios of glycine, β-alanine, and L-alanine in Apollo regolith sample 70011 and found values of -21‰ to -33‰. These values are consistent with those seen in terrestrial biology and, together with the enantiomeric compositions of the proteinogenic amino acids, suggest that terrestrial biological contamination is a primary source of the

  15. A common periodic table of codons and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, J C; Benyó, B; Sansom, C; Szlávecz, A; Fördös, G; Micsik, T; Benyó, Z

    2003-06-27

    A periodic table of codons has been designed where the codons are in regular locations. The table has four fields (16 places in each) one with each of the four nucleotides (A, U, G, C) in the central codon position. Thus, AAA (lysine), UUU (phenylalanine), GGG (glycine), and CCC (proline) were placed into the corners of the fields as the main codons (and amino acids) of the fields. They were connected to each other by six axes. The resulting nucleic acid periodic table showed perfect axial symmetry for codons. The corresponding amino acid table also displaced periodicity regarding the biochemical properties (charge and hydropathy) of the 20 amino acids and the position of the stop signals. The table emphasizes the importance of the central nucleotide in the codons and predicts that purines control the charge while pyrimidines determine the polarity of the amino acids. This prediction was experimentally tested.

  16. Reactivity of amino acid anions with nitrogen and oxygen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Li, Ya-Ke; He, Sheng-Gui; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2018-02-14

    For many decades, astronomers have searched for biological molecules, including amino acids, in the interstellar medium; this endeavor is important for investigating the hypothesis of the origin of life from space. The space environment is complex and atomic species, such as nitrogen and oxygen atoms, are widely distributed. In this work, the reactions of eight typical deprotonated amino acids (glycine, alanine, cysteine, proline, aspartic acid, histidine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) with ground state nitrogen and oxygen atoms are studied by experiment and theory. These amino acid anions do not react with nitrogen atoms. However, the reactions of these ions with oxygen atoms show an intriguing variety of ionic products and the reaction rate constants are of the order of 10 -10 cm 3 s -1 . Density functional calculations provide detailed mechanisms of the reactions, and demonstrate that spin conversion is essential for some processes. Our study provides important data and insights for understanding the kinetic and dynamic behavior of amino acids in space environments.

  17. EFFECT OF TETRACYCLINES ON THE INTRACELLULAR AMINO ACIDS OF MOLDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREEMAN, B A; CIRCO, R

    1963-07-01

    Freeman, Bob A. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.) and Richard Circo. Effect of tetracyclines on the intracellular amino acids of molds. J. Bacteriol. 86:38-44. 1963.-The tetracycline antibiotics were shown to alter the amino acid metabolism of molds whose growth is not markedly affected. Eight molds were grown in the presence of these antiobiotics; four exhibited a general reduction in the concentration of the intracellular amino acids, except for glutamic acid and alanine. In most of these four cultures, the tetracyclines also caused the complete disappearance of arginine, lysine, proline, phenylalanine, and tyrosine from the intracellular amino acid pool. The significance of these observations and the usefulness of the method in the study of the mechanisms of antibiotic action are discussed.

  18. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Alexandrina, E-mail: alexandrina.nan@itim-cj.ro; Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  19. Digestible indispensable amino acid score and digestible amino acids in eight cereal grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Pahm, Sarah K; Liu, Yanhong; Stein, Hans H

    2014-05-01

    To determine values for the digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS), it is recommended that ileal amino acid (AA) digestibility values obtained in growing pigs are used to characterise protein quality in different foods. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the standardised ileal digestibility (SID) of AA in eight cereal grains (yellow dent maize, Nutridense maize, dehulled barley, dehulled oats, polished white rice, rye, sorghum and wheat) fed to pigs, where SID values in pigs can be used to calculate approximate DIAAS values in humans. In the present experiment, twenty-four barrows with a T-cannula inserted in the distal ileum were allotted to eight diets and fed for three periods to give a total of nine replicate pigs per diet. Each period lasted 14 d, and ileal digesta samples were collected on days 13 and 14. Among the SID values obtained for all cereal grains, values for total indispensable AA were greatest (Poats, but greater (P< 0·05) than in the other cereal grains, and the concentrations of SID indispensable AA in Nutridense maize were greater (P< 0·05) than in yellow dent maize and sorghum, but less (P< 0·05) than in the other cereal grains, except rye. In conclusion, results indicate that to meet dietary requirements for AA in humans, diets based on yellow dent maize or sorghum require more AA supplementation than diets based on other cereal grains.

  20. Transport of amino acids and GABA analogues via the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter, hPAT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mie; Larsen, Birger Brodin; Frølund, Bente

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate transepithelial amino acid transport as a function of Caco-2 cell culture time. Furthermore, the objective was to investigate apical uptake characteristics of hPAT1-mediated transport under various experimental conditions. Apical amino acid uptake......, which has been shown to function as a carboxylic acid bioisostere for substrates of the GABA receptor and transport systems....

  1. Method Development for Efficient Incorporation of Unnatural Amino Acids

    KAUST Repository

    Harris, Paul D.

    2014-04-01

    The synthesis of proteins bearing unnatural amino acids has the potential to enhance and elucidate many processes in biochemistry and molecular biology. There are two primary methods for site specific unnatural amino acid incorporation, both of which use the cell’s native protein translating machinery: in vitro chemical acylation of suppressor tRNAs and the use of orthogonal amino acyl tRNA synthetases. Total chemical synthesis is theoretically possible, but current methods severely limit the maximum size of the product protein. In vivo orthogonal synthetase methods suffer from the high cost of the unnatural amino acid. In this thesis I sought to address this limitation by increasing cell density, first in shake flasks and then in a bioreactor in order to increase the yield of protein per amount of unnatural amino acid used. In a parallel project, I used the in vitro chemical acylation system to incorporate several unnatural amino acids, key among them the fluorophore BODIPYFL, with the aim of producing site specifically fluorescently labeled protein for single molecule FRET studies. I demonstrated successful incorporation of these amino acids into the trial protein GFP, although incorporation was not demonstrated in the final target, FEN1. This also served to confirm the effectiveness of a new procedure developed for chemical acylation.

  2. [Studies on interaction of acid-treated nanotube titanic acid and amino acids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huqin; Chen, Xuemei; Jin, Zhensheng; Liao, Guangxi; Wu, Xiaoming; Du, Jianqiang; Cao, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Nanotube titanic acid (NTA) has distinct optical and electrical character, and has photocatalysis character. In accordance with these qualities, NTA was treated with acid so as to enhance its surface activity. Surface structures and surface groups of acid-treated NTA were characterized and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The interaction between acid-treated NTA and amino acids was investigated. Analysis results showed that the lengths of acid-treated NTA became obviously shorter. The diameters of nanotube bundles did not change obviously with acid-treating. Meanwhile, the surface of acid-treated NTA was cross-linked with carboxyl or esterfunction. In addition, acid-treated NTA can catch amino acid residues easily, and then form close combination.

  3. Searching for Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in a Contaminated Meteorite: Amino Acid Analyses of the Canakkale L6 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Ornek, C. Y.; Esenoglu, H. H.; Unsalan, O.; Ozturk, B.

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids can serve as important markers of cosmochemistry, as their abundances and isomeric and isotopic compositions have been found to vary predictably with changes in parent body chemistry and alteration processes. Amino acids are also of astrobiological interest because they are essential for life on Earth. Analyses of a range of meteorites, including all groups of carbonaceous chondrites, along with H, R, and LL chondrites, ureilites, and a martian shergottite, have revealed that amino acids of plausible extraterrestrial origin can be formed in and persist after a wide range of parent body conditions. However, amino acid analyses of L6 chondrites to date have not provided evidence for indigenous amino acids. In the present study, we performed amino acid analysis on larger samples of a different L6 chondite, Canakkale, to determine whether or not trace levels of indigenous amino acids could be found. The Canakkale meteor was an observed fall in late July, 1964, near Canakkale, Turkey. The meteorite samples (1.36 and 1.09 g) analyzed in this study were allocated by C. Y. Ornek, along with a soil sample (1.5 g) collected near the Canakkale recovery site.

  4. Hydroxy, carboxylic and amino acid functionalized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    precipitation method and modified with different coating agents such as ascorbic acid, hexanoic acid, salicylic acid, L-arginine and L-cysteine. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by various techniques such as FT IR, XRD, VSM, ...

  5. Pre-staining thin layer chromatography method for amino acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The modified thin layer chromatography can be used for the analysis of amino acids. When compared to the classical thin layer chromatography, the improved method was more rapid and inexpensive and the results obtained were clean and reproducible. However, it is suitable for the high throughput screening of amino ...

  6. Sugar amino acids and related molecules: Some recent developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    where the carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl termini provide an excellent opportunity to organic chemists to create structural diversities akin to Nature's molecular arsenal. In recent years, sugar amino acids have been used extensively in the area of peptidomimetic studies. Advances made in the area of combinatorial chemistry ...

  7. Utilization of milk amino acids for body gain in suckling mink (Mustela vison) kits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tauson, Anne-Helene; Fink, Rikke; Hansen, Niels E

    2005-01-01

    The efficiency of utilization of milk amino acids for body gain in suckling mink kits from small (n = 3), medium (n = 6) and large litters (n = 9) was investigated by using 36 mink dams and their litters for measurements during lactation weeks 1 through 4. Measurements on each dam and litter were......% of total amino acids. Branched chained amino acids made up slightly more than 20% and sulphur containing amino acids less than 5% of total milk amino acids. In kit bodies the sum of glutamate, aspartate and leucine made up about 32% of amino acids, branched chain amino acids about 16% and sulphur...... containing amino acids about 4%. The amino acid composition of both milk and bodies changed as lactation progressed with decreasing proportions of essential amino acids. The ratio between body and milk amino acids was constantly over 1 only for lysine, suggesting that it was the most limiting amino acid...

  8. Amino acid secondary transporters: toward a common transport mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikhard, Eva S; Ziegler, Christine M

    2012-01-01

    Solute carriers (SLC) that transport amino acids are key players in health and diseases in humans. Their prokaryotic relatives are often involved in essential physiological processes in microorganisms, e.g. in homeostasis and acidic/osmotic stress response. High-resolution X-ray structures of the sequence-unrelated amino acid transporters unraveled a striking structural similarity between carriers, which were formerly assigned to different families. The highly conserved fold is characterized by two inverted structural repeats of five transmembrane helices each and indicates common mechanistic transport concepts if not an evolutionary link among a large number of amino acid transporters. Therefore, these transporters are classified now into the structural amino acid-polyamine-organocation superfamily (APCS). The APCS includes among others the mammalian SLC6 transporters and the heterodimeric SLC7/SLC3 transporters. However, it has to be noted that the APCS is not limited entirely to amino acid transporters but contains also transporters for, e.g. amino acid derivatives and sugars. For instance, the betaine-choline-carnitine transporter family of bacterial activity-regulated Na(+)- and H(+)-coupled symporters for glycine betaine and choline is also part of this second largest structural superfamily. The APCS fold provides different possibilities to transport the same amino acid. Arginine can be transported by an H(+)-coupled symport or by antiport mechanism in exchange against agmatine for example. The convergence of the mechanistic concept of transport under comparable physiological conditions allows speculating if structurally unexplored amino acid transporters, e.g. the members of the SLC36 and SLC38 family, belong to the APCS, too. In the kidney, which is an organ that depends critically on the regulated amino acid transport, these different SLC transporters have to work together to account for proper function. Here, we will summarize the basic concepts of Na

  9. Amino acid neurotransmitter release and learning: a study of visual imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, R M; McCabe, B J; Kendrick, K M; Horn, G

    2004-01-01

    The intermediate and medial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) is an area of the domestic chick forebrain that stores information acquired through the learning process of imprinting. The effects of visual imprinting on the release of the amino acids aspartate, arginine, citrulline, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, glycine and taurine from the left and right IMHVs in vitro were measured at 3.5, 10 and 24 h after training. Chicks were exposed to an imprinting stimulus for 1 h, their preferences measured 10 min afterward and a preference score calculated as a measure of the strength of learning. Potassium stimulation was used to evoke amino acid release from the IMHVs of trained and untrained chicks in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+. Ca2+-dependent, K+-evoked release of glutamate was significantly (34.4%) higher in trained than in untrained chicks. This effect was not influenced by time after training or by side (left or right IMHV). Training influenced the evoked release of GABA and taurine from the left IMHV at both 3.5 and 10 h. The training effects at the two times were statistically homogeneous so data (imprinting stimulus glutamatergic excitatory transmission in IMHV is enhanced, and remains enhanced for at least 24 h. In contrast, the learning-related elevations in taurine and GABA release are not sustained over this period. The change in GABA release may reflect a transient increase in inhibitory transmission in the left IMHV. Copyright 2004 IBRO

  10. Effects of amino acid neurotransmitters on spontaneous muscular activity of the rumen amphistome, Gastrothylax crumenifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, P K; Kumar, D; Tandan, S K

    2009-12-01

    Amino acid neurotransmitters play an important role in regulating neuromuscular activity of helminth parasites. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of different amino acid neurotransmitters [L-glutamate, glycine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)] on spontaneous muscular activity of isometrically mounted Gastrothylax crumenifer. L-Glutamate caused a significant increase in the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions of rumen fluke at 10(-7)-10(-4) m and at 10(-5)-10(-4) m concentrations, respectively. Glycine application (10(-7)-10(-3) m) produced a significant decrease in the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous muscular contractions in a concentration-dependent manner, as compared to control amplitude (0.53 +/- 0.02 g) and frequency (51 +/- 4.65/5 min). Similarly, GABA produced a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in amplitude, baseline tension and frequency of spontaneous muscular contractions of G. crumenifer. To further substantiate the GABA effect, GABAA receptor antagonists, picrotoxin and bicuculline were applied. Picrotoxin (10(-5)-10(-3) m) caused a significant (P < 0.05) increase in amplitude, baseline tension and frequency of the rumen fluke as compared to control; whereas bicuculline did not elicit any observable effect in these attributes in isometrically mounted rumen flukes. These observations suggested that L-glutamate has an excitatory, whereas GABA and glycine have an inhibitory, effect on the spontaneous muscular activity of G. crumenifer.

  11. Extending enzyme molecular recognition with an expanded amino acid alphabet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windle, Claire L; Simmons, Katie J; Ault, James R; Trinh, Chi H; Nelson, Adam; Pearson, Arwen R; Berry, Alan

    2017-03-07

    Natural enzymes are constructed from the 20 proteogenic amino acids, which may then require posttranslational modification or the recruitment of coenzymes or metal ions to achieve catalytic function. Here, we demonstrate that expansion of the alphabet of amino acids can also enable the properties of enzymes to be extended. A chemical mutagenesis strategy allowed a wide range of noncanonical amino acids to be systematically incorporated throughout an active site to alter enzymic substrate specificity. Specifically, 13 different noncanonical side chains were incorporated at 12 different positions within the active site of N-acetylneuraminic acid lyase (NAL), and the resulting chemically modified enzymes were screened for activity with a range of aldehyde substrates. A modified enzyme containing a 2,3-dihydroxypropyl cysteine at position 190 was identified that had significantly increased activity for the aldol reaction of erythrose with pyruvate compared with the wild-type enzyme. Kinetic investigation of a saturation library of the canonical amino acids at the same position showed that this increased activity was not achievable with any of the 20 proteogenic amino acids. Structural and modeling studies revealed that the unique shape and functionality of the noncanonical side chain enabled the active site to be remodeled to enable more efficient stabilization of the transition state of the reaction. The ability to exploit an expanded amino acid alphabet can thus heighten the ambitions of protein engineers wishing to develop enzymes with new catalytic properties.

  12. The Amino Acid Composition of the Sutter's Mill Carbonaceous Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Yin, Q. Z.; Cooper, G.; Jenniskens, P.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the Murchison meteorite which had a complex distribution of amino acids with a total C2 to Cs amino acid abundance of approx.14,000 parts-per-billion (ppb) [2], the Sutters Mill meteorite was found to be highly depleted in amino acids. Much lower abundances (approx.30 to 180 ppb) of glycine, beta-alanine, L-alanine and L-serine were detected in SM2 above procedural blank levels indicating that this meteorite sample experienced only minimal terrestrial amino acid contamination after its fall to Earth. Carbon isotope measurements will be necessary to establish the origin of glycine and beta-alanine in SM2. Other non-protein amino acids that are rare on Earth, yet commonly found in other CM meteorites such as aaminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB) and isovaline, were not identified in SM2. However, traces of beta-AIB (approx.1 ppb) were detected in SM2 and could be" extraterrestrial in origin. The low abundances of amino acids in the Sutter's Mill meteorite is consistent with mineralogical evidence that at least some parts of the Sutter's Mill meteorite parent body experienced extensive aqueous and/or thermal alteration.

  13. Updates on industrial production of amino acids using Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendisch, Volker F; Jorge, João M P; Pérez-García, Fernando; Sgobba, Elvira

    2016-06-01

    L-Amino acids find various applications in biotechnology. L-Glutamic acid and its salts are used as flavor enhancers. Other L-amino acids are used as food or feed additives, in parenteral nutrition or as building blocks for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. L-amino acids are synthesized from precursors of central carbon metabolism. Based on the knowledge of the biochemical pathways microbial fermentation processes of food, feed and pharma amino acids have been developed. Production strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum, which has been used safely for more than 50 years in food biotechnology, and Escherichia coli are constantly improved using metabolic engineering approaches. Research towards new processes is ongoing. Fermentative production of L-amino acids in the million-ton-scale has shaped modern biotechnology and its markets continue to grow steadily. This review focusses on recent achievements in strain development for amino acid production including the use of CRISPRi/dCas9, genome-reduced strains, biosensors and synthetic pathways to enable utilization of alternative carbon sources.

  14. Profile of Fatty Acids, Amino Acids, Carotenoid Total, and α-Tocopherol from Flying Fish Eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aulia Azka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Flying fish are found in waters of eastern Indonesia, which until now is still limited information about nutritional content. The purpose of this research was determine the composition of fatty acids, amino acids, total carotenoids, α-tocopherol flying fish eggs (Hyrundicthys sp.. The composition of fatty acid was measured by gas chromatography (GC, while amino acids, total carotenoids, α-tocopherol was measured by High performanced Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. Egg contained 22 fatty acids such as saturated fatty acid 29.71%, monounsaturated fatty acid 7.86%, and polysaturated fatty acid 13.64%. The result showed that eggs flying fish contained 17 amino acids, such as essential amino acid 14.96% and non-essential amino acids 20.27%. Eggs contained a total carotenoid of 245.37 ppm. α-tocopherol content of flying fish eggs by 1.06 ppm.

  15. Proximate and Amino Acid Composition of Celosia argentea Leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    amino acids with the WHO recommended values, the vegetable is adequate in these acids. ... Vegetables are sources of vitamins, ascorbic acid, niacin, riboflavin and thiamine and minerals, calcium and iron, as well as supplementary protein and calories. (FAO, 1988). ... pupa and cultivars with deep green narrow leaves.

  16. Effect of amino acids on bioleaching of chalcopyrite ore by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diptajeet

    2012-01-26

    Jan 26, 2012 ... Amino acids seem to play a major role during bioleaching of chalcopyrite ore by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Efficiency of microbial leaching of chalcopyrite by T. ferrooxidans was investigated in the presence of L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-histidine and L-serine. The bioleaching of copper ion. (Cu2+) ...

  17. Effect of amino acids on bioleaching of chalcopyrite ore by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amino acids seem to play a major role during bioleaching of chalcopyrite ore by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Efficiency of microbial leaching of chalcopyrite by T. ferrooxidans was investigated in the presence of L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-histidine and L-serine. The bioleaching of copper ion (Cu2+) from the low grade ...

  18. Amino acid assisted dehalogenation of carbon tetrachloride by green rust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao; Strobel, Bjarne W.; Hansen, Hans Chr. Bruun

    2017-01-01

    of CF formation with only ~ 10% of CF recovery while sarcosine (SAR) showed insignificant effects. For two non-amino acid buffers, TRIS had little effect while HEPES resulted in a 40 times lower rate constant compared to experiments where no buffer was added. The FeII complexing properties of the amino...... acids and buffers caused variable extents of GRCl dissolution which was linearly correlated with CF suppression and dehalogenation rate. We hypothesize that the CF suppression seen for amino acids is caused by stabilization of carbene intermediates via the carbonyl group. Different effects on CF...... that reduce the formation of toxic by-products such as chloroform (CF). In this study, carbon tetrachloride (CT) dehalogenation by the chloride form of GR (GRCl) was tested in presence of glycine (GLY) and other selected amino acids. GLY, alanine (ALA) or serine (SER) all resulted in remarkable suppression...

  19. Free amino acids: an innovative treatment for ocular surface disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusciano, Dario; Roszkowska, Anna Maria; Gagliano, Caterina; Pezzino, Salvatore

    2016-09-15

    Amino acids are the basic constituents of living organisms, and have both a structural and an active dynamic role in tissue and cell physiology. Human tears contain 23 amino acids, the relative proportion of which may change with the different physiological states of the eye surface. In this review, we present a collection of data from the published literature that indicate an active role of amino acids in the maintenance of eye surface homeostasis. Moreover, another series of published clinical data indicate that supplementation of amino acids, either as food supplements or as a topical treatment in enriched eye drops, is beneficial to the eye surface, and may improve its healing in cases of eye surface disease due to different causes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Azide- and alkyne-derivatised α-amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Karl Henrik; Pedersen, D.S.

    2012-01-01

    for their synthesis. In this review we have compiled available methods for synthesising optically active azide- and alkyne-derivatised α-amino acids that can be prepared from readily available α-amino acids. We highlight a number of commonly overlooked problems associated with existing methods and direct attention......With the emergence of the copper-catalysed Huisgen cycloaddition the use of azide- and alkyne-derivatised α-amino acids has found widespread use within most chemistry disciplines. Despite a growing interest in these building blocks researchers are struggling to identify the best way...... to unexplored possibilities. Azide- and alkyne-derivatised α-amino acids are finding widespread use within most chemistry disciplines. However, it is far from clear what the best way for the synthesis of these useful building blocks is. Herein we show the available methods for synthesis of optically active...

  1. Astrobionibbler: In Situ Microfluidic Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, A. C.; Fisher, A. M.; Takano, N.; Fors-Francis, K.; Sherrit, S.; Grunthaner, F.

    2016-10-01

    A fluidic-chip based instrument for subcritical water extraction (SCWE) of amino acids and other organics from powder samples has been developed. A variety of soil analog extractions have been performed to better understand SCWE capabilities.

  2. Molecular Evolution Directs Protein Translation Using Unnatural Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Vanessa E; Gaucher, Eric A

    2015-12-02

    Unnatural amino acids have in recent years established their importance in a wide range of fields, from pharmaceuticals to polymer science. Unnatural amino acids can increase the number of chemical groups within proteins and thus expand or enhance biological function. Our ability to utilize these important building blocks, however, has been limited by the inherent difficulty in incorporating these molecules into proteins. To address this challenge, researchers have examined how the canonical twenty amino acids are incorporated, regulated, and modified in nature. This review focuses on achievements and techniques used to engineer the ribosomal protein-translation machinery, including the introduction of orthogonal translation components, how directed evolution enhances the incorporation of unnatural amino acids, and the potential utility of ancient biomolecules for this process. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Placental Amino Acids Transport in Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avagliano, Laura; Garò, Chiara; Marconi, Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    The placenta represents a key organ for fetal growth as it acts as an interface between mother and fetus, regulating the fetal-maternal exchange of nutrients, gases, and waste products. During pregnancy, amino acids represent one of the major nutrients for fetal life, and both maternal and fetal concentrations are significantly different in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction when compared to uncomplicated pregnancies. The transport of amino acids across the placenta is a complex process that includes the influx of neutral, anionic, and cationic amino acids across the microvilluos plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast, the passage through the cytoplasm of the trophoblasts, and the transfer outside the trophoblasts across the basal membrane into the fetal circulation. In this paper, we review the transport mechanisms of amino acids across the placenta in normal pregnancies and in pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction. PMID:22997583

  4. Genetic analysis of amino acid content in wheat grain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) were conducted to analyse inheritance of 17 amino acid contents by using the genetic model including seed, cytoplasmic, maternal and environment interaction effects on quantitative traits of seeds in cereal crops. The results showed that ...

  5. Direct N-alkylation of unprotected amino acids with alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tao; Feringa, Ben L.; Barta, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    N-alkyl amino acids find widespread application as highly valuable, renewable building blocks. However, traditional synthesis methodologies to obtain these suffer from serious limitations, providing a major challenge to develop sustainable alternatives. We report the first powerful catalytic strategy for the direct N-alkylation of unprotected α-amino acids with alcohols. This method is highly selective, produces water as the only side product leading to a simple purification procedure, and a variety of α-amino acids are mono- or di-N-alkylated, in most cases with excellent retention of optical purity. The hydrophobicity of the products is tunable, and even simple peptides are selectively alkylated. An iron-catalyzed route to mono-N-alkyl amino acids using renewable fatty alcohols is also described that represents an ideal green transformation for obtaining fully bio-based surfactants. PMID:29226249

  6. Chemical Approaches to Studying Labile Amino Acid Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmelstein, Alan M; Moreno, Javier; Fiedler, Dorothea

    2017-04-01

    Phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is the archetypal posttranslational modification of proteins. While phosphorylation of these residues has become standard textbook knowledge, phosphorylation of other amino acid side chains is underappreciated and minimally characterized by comparison. This disparity is rooted in the relative instability of these chemically distinct amino acid side chain moieties, namely phosphoramidates, acyl phosphates, thiophosphates, and phosphoanhydrides. In the case of the O-phosphorylated amino acids, synthetic constructs were critical to assessing their stability and developing tools for their study. As the chemical biology community has become more aware of these alternative phosphorylation sites, methodology has been developed for the synthesis of well-characterized standards and close mimics of these phosphorylated amino acids as well. In this article, we review the synthetic chemistry that is a prerequisite to progress in this field.

  7. Direct N-alkylation of unprotected amino acids with alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tao; Feringa, Ben L; Barta, Katalin

    2017-12-01

    N-alkyl amino acids find widespread application as highly valuable, renewable building blocks. However, traditional synthesis methodologies to obtain these suffer from serious limitations, providing a major challenge to develop sustainable alternatives. We report the first powerful catalytic strategy for the direct N-alkylation of unprotected α-amino acids with alcohols. This method is highly selective, produces water as the only side product leading to a simple purification procedure, and a variety of α-amino acids are mono- or di-N-alkylated, in most cases with excellent retention of optical purity. The hydrophobicity of the products is tunable, and even simple peptides are selectively alkylated. An iron-catalyzed route to mono-N-alkyl amino acids using renewable fatty alcohols is also described that represents an ideal green transformation for obtaining fully bio-based surfactants.

  8. Amino acids interacting with defected carbon nanotubes: ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Darvish Ganji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of a number of amino acids on a defected single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT is investigated by using the density-functional theory (DFT calculations. The adsorption energies and equilibrium distances are calculated for various configurations such as amino acid attaching to defect sites heptagon, pentagon and hexagon in defective tube and also for several molecular orientations with respect to the nanotube surface. The results showed that amino acids prefer to be physisorbed on the outer surface of the defected nanotube with different interaction strength following the hierarchy histidine > glycine > phenylalanine > cysteine. Comparing these findings with those obtained for perfect SWCNTs reveals that the adsorption energy of the amino acids increase for adsorption onto defected CNTs. The adsorption nature has also been evaluated by means of electronics structures analysis within the Mulliken population and DOS spectra for the interacting entities.

  9. Enzymatic stereoselective synthesis of B-amino acids

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chhiba, V

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available , antimicrobials, and as nonstandard amino acids in therapeutic peptides or peptidomimetics. Access to these compounds can be achieved through diverse synthetic routes with enantioselective steps catalyzed in different ways, including by means of nitrile hydrolysis...

  10. Direct N-alkylation of unprotected amino acids with alcohols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Tao; Feringa, Ben L; Barta, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    N-alkyl amino acids find widespread application as highly valuable, renewable building blocks. However, traditional synthesis methodologies to obtain these suffer from serious limitations, providing a major challenge to develop sustainable alternatives. We report the first powerful catalytic

  11. Amino acids production focusing on fermentation technologies – A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Este, Martina; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    Amino acids are attractive and promising biochemicals with market capacity requirements constantly increasing. Their applicability ranges from animal feed additives, flavour enhancers and ingredients in cosmetic to specialty nutrients in pharmaceutical and medical fields. This review gives...... an overview of the processes applied for amino acids production and points out the main advantages and disadvantages of each. Due to the advances made in the genetic engineering techniques, the biotechnological processes, and in particular the fermentation with the aid of strains such as Corynebacterium...... glutamicum or Escherichia coli, play a significant role in the industrial production of amino acids. Despite the numerous advantages of the fermentative amino acids production, the process still needs significant improvements leading to increased productivity and reduction of the production costs. Although...

  12. Comparison of amino acids interaction with gold nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Fatemeh; Amanlou, Massoud; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2014-04-01

    The study of nanomaterial/biomolecule interface is an important emerging field in bionanoscience, and additionally in many biological processes such as hard-tissue growth and cell-surface adhesion. To have a deeper understanding of the amino acids/gold nanoparticle assemblies, the adsorption of these amino acids on the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) has been investigated via molecular dynamics simulation. In these simulations, all the constituent atoms of the nanoparticles were considered to be dynamic. The geometries of amino acids, when adsorbed on the nanoparticle, were studied and their flexibilities were compared with one another. The interaction of each of 20 amino acids was considered with 3 and 8 nm gold GNPs.

  13. Inhibitors of amino acids biosynthesis as antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębowska, Kamila; Gabriel, Iwona

    2015-02-01

    Fungal microorganisms, including the human pathogenic yeast and filamentous fungi, are able to synthesize all proteinogenic amino acids, including nine that are essential for humans. A number of enzymes catalyzing particular steps of human-essential amino acid biosynthesis are fungi specific. Numerous studies have shown that auxotrophic mutants of human pathogenic fungi impaired in biosynthesis of particular amino acids exhibit growth defect or at least reduced virulence under in vivo conditions. Several chemical compounds inhibiting activity of one of these enzymes exhibit good antifungal in vitro activity in minimal growth media, which is not always confirmed under in vivo conditions. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge on pathways of amino acids biosynthesis in fungi, with a special emphasis put on enzymes catalyzing particular steps of these pathways as potential targets for antifungal chemotherapy.

  14. The amino acid sequence of snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) ribonuclease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, Jacob; Broos, Jaap; Meulenberg, Janneke; Schüller, Cornelis

    1985-01-01

    Snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue. Turtle ribonuclease binds much more weakly to the affinity chromatography matrix used than mammalian ribonucleases. The amino acid sequence was determined from overlapping peptides obtained from three different

  15. Genetics Home Reference: aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amino acid decarboxylase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... involuntary body processes such as the regulation of blood pressure and body temperature. Resulting signs and symptoms can ...

  16. Amino Acid Permeases and Virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Felipe Cruz Martho

    Full Text Available Fungal opportunistic pathogens colonize various environments, from plants and wood to human and animal tissue. Regarding human pathogens, one great challenge during contrasting niche occupation is the adaptation to different conditions, such as temperature, osmolarity, salinity, pressure, oxidative stress and nutritional availability, which may constitute sources of stress that need to be tolerated and overcome. As an opportunistic pathogen, C. neoformans faces exactly these situations during the transition from the environment to the human host, encountering nutritional constraints. Our previous and current research on amino acid biosynthetic pathways indicates that amino acid permeases are regulated by the presence of the amino acids, nitrogen and temperature. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have twenty-four and twenty-seven genes encoding amino acid permeases, respectively; conversely, they are scarce in number in Basidiomycetes (C. neoformans, Coprinopsis cinerea and Ustilago maydis, where nine to ten permease genes can be found depending on the species. In this study, we have demonstrated that two amino acid permeases are essential for virulence in C. neoformans. Our data showed that C. neoformans uses two global and redundant amino acid permeases, Aap4 and Aap5 to respond correctly to thermal and oxidative stress. Double deletion of these permeases causes growth arrest in C. neoformans at 37°C and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The inability to uptake amino acid at a higher temperature and under oxidative stress also led to virulence attenuation in vivo. Our data showed that thermosensitivity caused by the lack of permeases Aap4 and Aap5 can be remedied by alkaline conditions (higher pH and salinity. Permeases Aap4 and Aap5 are also required during fluconazole stress and they are the target of the plant secondary metabolite eugenol, a potent antifungal inhibitor that targets amino acid permeases. In summary, our work

  17. Facile synthesis of α-hydroxy carboxylic acids from the corresponding α-amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Padrah, Shahrokh; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    An effective and improved procedure is developed for the synthesis of α-hydroxy carboxylic acids by treatment of the corresponding protonated α-amino acid with tert-butyl nitrite in 1,4-dioxane-water. The amino moiety must be protonated and located α to a carboxylic acid function in order...... to undergo initial diazotization and successive hydroxylation, since neither β-amino acids nor acid derivatives such as esters and amides undergo hydroxylations. The method is successfully applied for the synthesis of 18 proteinogenic amino acids....

  18. Sublimation of natural amino acids and induction of asymmetry by meteoritic amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    It is believed that the homochirality of building blocks of life like amino acids (AAs) and sugars is a prerequisite requirement for the origin and evolution of life. Among different mechanisms that might have triggered the initial disparity in the enantiomeric ratio on the primitive Earth, the key roles were assigned to: (i) local chiral symmetry breaking and (ii) the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (eg the carbonaceous meteorites containing non-racemic AAs). Recently it has been revealed that sublimation, a subject almost completely neglected for a long time, gives a pathway to enantioenrichment of natural AAs (1,2 and references herein). Sublimation is however one of the key physical processes that occur on comets. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure AA, a partial sublimation gives an important enrichment of the sublimate (1,2). The resulted disparity in the ratio between enantiomers of a partial sublimate is determined by the crystalline nature of the starting mixture: we observed a drastic difference in the behavior of (i) mixtures based on true racemic compounds and (ii) mechanical mixtures of two enantiopure solid phases. On the other hand, combination of crystallization and sublimation can lead to segregation of enantioenriched fractions starting from racemic composition of sublimable aliphatic AAs (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) in mixtures with non-volatile enantiopure ones (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) (3). The resulted sense of chirality correlates with the handedness of the non-volatile AAs: the observed changes in enantiomeric ratios clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. It is noteworthy that just these 5 (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) out of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to local symmetry breaking. On the other hand, recent data on the enantiomeric composition of the Tagish Lake, a C2-type carbonaceous meteorite, revealed a large L

  19. Specific plasma amino acid disturbances associated with metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Siomkajło, Marta; Rybka, Jacek; Mierzchała-Pasierb, Magdalena; Gamian, Andrzej; Stankiewicz-Olczyk, Joanna; Bolanowski, Marek; Daroszewski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of the present study was to examine the association between branched chain and aromatic amino acid profiles (BCAA and AAA respectively) and the metabolic syndrome (MS), and to evaluate the clinical utility of these associations in the diagnostic process. Methods Two hundred and sixty three healthy men with MS [MS(+): n = 165] and without MS [MS(−): n = 98] were enrolled in the observational study. Anthropometrical, biochemical, and amino acid measurements were pe...

  20. Co2 chemosorption by functionalized amino acid derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The absorption and desorption behaviour of carbon dioxide (CO2) using a composition comprising an ionic compound comprising a cation [A+] and an anion [B-] is described, wherein the anion [B-] is a mono-amine functionalized amino acid.......The absorption and desorption behaviour of carbon dioxide (CO2) using a composition comprising an ionic compound comprising a cation [A+] and an anion [B-] is described, wherein the anion [B-] is a mono-amine functionalized amino acid....

  1. Mass Spectrometric Determination of Gas Phase Structures of Amino Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Rožman, Marko; Srzić, Dunja

    2005-01-01

    In the past two decades mass spectrometry became an important tool in the structural investigations of biomolecules (amino acids). Although, the primary focus of mass spectrometry is on compound identification and sequence information (primary structure), some mass spectrometry based methods as ion chromatography, hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and kinetic method are able to determine secondary gas phase structure of the amino acids. For example, it is possible to distinguish the zwitterionic a...

  2. Amino acid fermentation at the origin of the genetic code

    OpenAIRE

    de Vladar, Harold P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract There is evidence that the genetic code was established prior to the existence of proteins, when metabolism was powered by ribozymes. Also, early proto-organisms had to rely on simple anaerobic bioenergetic processes. In this work I propose that amino acid fermentation powered metabolism in the RNA world, and that this was facilitated by proto-adapters, the precursors of the tRNAs. Amino acids were used as carbon sources rather than as catalytic or structural elements. In modern bact...

  3. The biotransformation of aromatic amino acids by Phoma macrostoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagunova, Yevgeniya; Sorensen, John L

    2010-01-01

    A search for natural products produced in fermentation cultures of a strain of Phoma macrostoma led to the identification of tyrosol as the major metabolite produced by this organism. The addition of the amino acid tyrosine to growing fermentation cultures of P. macrostoma resulted in an increase in the production of tyrosol. It was subsequently determined that this strain of P. macrostoma was also capable of the biotransformation of other amino acids into similar alcohols.

  4. Amino Acids Are an Ineffective Fertilizer for Dunaliella spp. Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Colin A. Murphree; Dums, Jacob T.; Jain, Siddharth K.; Chengsong Zhao; Young, Danielle Y.; Nicole Khoshnoodi; Andrey Tikunov; Jeffrey Macdonald; Guillaume Pilot; Heike Sederoff

    2017-01-01

    Autotrophic microalgae are a promising bioproducts platform. However, the fundamental requirements these organisms have for nitrogen fertilizer severely limit the impact and scale of their cultivation. As an alternative to inorganic fertilizers, we investigated the possibility of using amino acids from deconstructed biomass as a nitrogen source in the genus Dunaliella. We found that only four amino acids (glutamine, histidine, cysteine, and tryptophan) rescue Dunaliella spp. growth in nitroge...

  5. The complete amino acid sequence of human serum transferrin.

    OpenAIRE

    MacGillivray, R. T.; Mendez, E. (Elena); Sinha, S. K.; Sutton, M.R.; Lineback-Zins, J; Brew, K

    1982-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of human serum transferrin has been determined by aligning the structures of the 10 CNBr fragments. The order of these fragments in the polypeptide chain is deduced from the structures of peptides overlapping methionine residues and other evidence. Human transferrin contains 678 amino acid residues and--including the two asparagine-linked glycans--has an overall molecular weight of 79,550. The polypeptide chain contains two homologous domains consisting of res...

  6. Systems metabolic engineering strategies for the production of amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Systems metabolic engineering is a multidisciplinary area that integrates systems biology, synthetic biology and evolutionary engineering. It is an efficient approach for strain improvement and process optimization, and has been successfully applied in the microbial production of various chemicals including amino acids. In this review, systems metabolic engineering strategies including pathway-focused approaches, systems biology-based approaches, evolutionary approaches and their applications in two major amino acid producing microorganisms: Corynebacterium glutamicum and Escherichia coli, are summarized.

  7. Stereoselective synthesis of unsaturated α-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Roberto; Jeanne-Julien, Louis; René, Adeline; Martinez, Jean; Cavelier, Florine

    2015-06-01

    Stereoselective synthesis of unsaturated α-amino acids was performed by asymmetric alkylation. Two methods were investigated and their enantiomeric excess measured and compared. The first route consisted of an enantioselective approach induced by the Corey-Lygo catalyst under chiral phase transfer conditions while the second one involved the hydroxypinanone chiral auxiliary, both implicating Schiff bases as substrate. In all cases, the use of a prochiral Schiff base gave higher enantiomeric excess and yield in the final desired amino acid.

  8. Systems metabolic engineering strategies for the production of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Zhang, Quanwei; Xu, Qingyang; Zhang, Chenglin; Li, Yanjun; Fan, Xiaoguang; Xie, Xixian; Chen, Ning

    2017-06-01

    Systems metabolic engineering is a multidisciplinary area that integrates systems biology, synthetic biology and evolutionary engineering. It is an efficient approach for strain improvement and process optimization, and has been successfully applied in the microbial production of various chemicals including amino acids. In this review, systems metabolic engineering strategies including pathway-focused approaches, systems biology-based approaches, evolutionary approaches and their applications in two major amino acid producing microorganisms: Corynebacterium glutamicum and Escherichia coli, are summarized.

  9. Did evolution select a nonrandom "alphabet" of amino acids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Gayle K; Freeland, Stephen J

    2011-04-01

    The last universal common ancestor of contemporary biology (LUCA) used a precise set of 20 amino acids as a standard alphabet with which to build genetically encoded protein polymers. Considerable evidence indicates that some of these amino acids were present through nonbiological syntheses prior to the origin of life, while the rest evolved as inventions of early metabolism. However, the same evidence indicates that many alternatives were also available, which highlights the question: what factors led biological evolution on our planet to define its standard alphabet? One possibility is that natural selection favored a set of amino acids that exhibits clear, nonrandom properties-a set of especially useful building blocks. However, previous analysis that tested whether the standard alphabet comprises amino acids with unusually high variance in size, charge, and hydrophobicity (properties that govern what protein structures and functions can be constructed) failed to clearly distinguish evolution's choice from a sample of randomly chosen alternatives. Here, we demonstrate unambiguous support for a refined hypothesis: that an optimal set of amino acids would spread evenly across a broad range of values for each fundamental property. Specifically, we show that the standard set of 20 amino acids represents the possible spectra of size, charge, and hydrophobicity more broadly and more evenly than can be explained by chance alone.

  10. Potential role of amino acids in pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Shamaila; Shaukat, Faiza; Gul, Anjuman; Arooj, Mahwish; Malik, Arif

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a syndrome of inconclusive etiopathogenesis with a prevalence of about 1% in general population. Underlying factors include genetic predisposition and defected neurodevelopment in early stages of life. The role of amino acids has been indicated in some reports. However, very few workers have detailed the effect of each amino acid in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Thus, in the present review, we aimed to provide an insight into the potential role of amino acids levels during schizophrenia. Any single amino acid defect cannot lead to the development of the disease. Higher concentration of glycine, serine, glutamate, homocysteine, and arginine are reported by many scientists in blood samples of patients of schizophrenia. Levels of rest of the amino acids show inconsistent results. Involvement of glutamate in pathophysiology of schizophrenia was hypothesized as early as the 1980s. It was demonstrated that dissociative anesthetics which are N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists can produce all negative, psychotic, cognitive, and physiological features of schizophrenia in healthy controls. This led to the development of hypothesis of NMDA receptor hypofunctioning in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Later on, it was also found that agents enhancing functioning of NMDA receptor at glycine modulatory site, improved symptoms in patients of schizophrenia receiving antipsychotic medications. Thus, the relationship of perturb amino acid levels with the biological basis and pathophysiology of schizophrenia is an important area to be further explored for effective management of schizophrenic patients.

  11. Amino acids in the rhizosphere: from plants to microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Luke A

    2013-09-01

    Often referred to as the "building blocks of proteins", the 20 canonical proteinogenic amino acids are ubiquitous in biological systems as the functional units in proteins. Sometimes overlooked are their varying additional roles that include serving as metabolic intermediaries, playing structural roles in bioactive natural products, acting as cosubstrates in enzymatic transformations, and as key regulators of cellular physiology. Amino acids can also serve as biological sources of both carbon and nitrogen and are found in the rhizosphere as a result of lysis or cellular efflux from plants and microbes and proteolysis of existing peptides. While both plants and microbes apparently prefer to take up nitrogen in its inorganic form, their ability to take up and use amino acids may confer a selective advantage in certain environments where organic nitrogen is abundant. Further, certain amino acids (e.g., glutamate and proline) and their betaines (e.g., glycine betaine) serve as compatible solutes necessary for osmoregulation in plants and microbes and can undergo rapid cellular flux. This ability is of particular importance in an ecological niche such as the rhizosphere, which is prone to significant variations in solute concentrations. Amino acids are also shown to alter key phenotypes related to plant root growth and microbial colonization, symbiotic interactions, and pathogenesis in the rhizosphere. This review will focus on the sources, transport mechanisms, and potential roles of the 20 canonical proteinogenic amino acids in the rhizosphere.

  12. Transport Function of Rice Amino Acid Permeases (AAPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Margaret R; Reinders, Anke; Ward, John M

    2015-07-01

    The transport function of four rice (Oryza sativa) amino acid permeases (AAPs), OsAAP1 (Os07g04180), OsAAP3 (Os06g36180), OsAAP7 (Os05g34980) and OsAAP16 (Os12g08090), was analyzed by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes and electrophysiology. OsAAP1, OsAAP7 and OsAAP16 functioned, similarly to Arabidopsis AAPs, as general amino acid permeases. OsAAP3 had a distinct substrate specificity compared with other rice or Arabidopsis AAPs. OsAAP3 transported the basic amino acids lysine and arginine well but selected against aromatic amino acids. The transport of basic amino acids was further analyzed for OsAAP1 and OsAAP3, and the results support the transport of both neutral and positively charged forms of basic amino acids by the rice AAPs. Cellular localization using the tandem enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter pHusion showed that OsAAP1 and OsAAP3 localized to the plasma membrane after transient expression in onion epidermal cells or stable expression in Arabidopsis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Amino acids production focusing on fermentation technologies - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Este, Martina; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Angelidaki, Irini

    Amino acids are attractive and promising biochemicals with market capacity requirements constantly increasing. Their applicability ranges from animal feed additives, flavour enhancers and ingredients in cosmetic to specialty nutrients in pharmaceutical and medical fields. This review gives an overview of the processes applied for amino acids production and points out the main advantages and disadvantages of each. Due to the advances made in the genetic engineering techniques, the biotechnological processes, and in particular the fermentation with the aid of strains such as Corynebacterium glutamicum or Escherichia coli, play a significant role in the industrial production of amino acids. Despite the numerous advantages of the fermentative amino acids production, the process still needs significant improvements leading to increased productivity and reduction of the production costs. Although the production processes of amino acids have been extensively investigated in previous studies, a comprehensive overview of the developments in bioprocess technology has not been reported yet. This review states the importance of the fermentation process for industrial amino acids production, underlining the strengths and the weaknesses of the process. Moreover, the potential of innovative approaches utilizing macro and microalgae or bacteria are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. D-Amino Acids in the Nervous and Endocrine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriyama, Yoshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important components for peptides and proteins and act as signal transmitters. Only L-amino acids have been considered necessary in mammals, including humans. However, diverse D-amino acids, such as D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, and D-cysteine, are found in mammals. Physiological roles of these D-amino acids not only in the nervous system but also in the endocrine system are being gradually revealed. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are associated with learning and memory. D-Serine, D-aspartate, and D-alanine can all bind to NMDA receptors. H2S generated from D-cysteine reduces disulfide bonds in receptors and potentiates their activity. Aberrant receptor activity is related to diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, D-amino acids are detected in parts of the endocrine system, such as the pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, and testis. D-Aspartate is being investigated for the regulation of hormone release from various endocrine organs. Here we focused on recent findings regarding the synthesis and physiological functions of D-amino acids in the nervous and endocrine systems. PMID:28053803

  15. Computational protein design quantifies structural constraints on amino acid covariation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Ollikainen

    Full Text Available Amino acid covariation, where the identities of amino acids at different sequence positions are correlated, is a hallmark of naturally occurring proteins. This covariation can arise from multiple factors, including selective pressures for maintaining protein structure, requirements imposed by a specific function, or from phylogenetic sampling bias. Here we employed flexible backbone computational protein design to quantify the extent to which protein structure has constrained amino acid covariation for 40 diverse protein domains. We find significant similarities between the amino acid covariation in alignments of natural protein sequences and sequences optimized for their structures by computational protein design methods. These results indicate that the structural constraints imposed by protein architecture play a dominant role in shaping amino acid covariation and that computational protein design methods can capture these effects. We also find that the similarity between natural and designed covariation is sensitive to the magnitude and mechanism of backbone flexibility used in computational protein design. Our results thus highlight the necessity of including backbone flexibility to correctly model precise details of correlated amino acid changes and give insights into the pressures underlying these correlations.

  16. D-Amino Acids in the Nervous and Endocrine Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimitsu Kiriyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids are important components for peptides and proteins and act as signal transmitters. Only L-amino acids have been considered necessary in mammals, including humans. However, diverse D-amino acids, such as D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, and D-cysteine, are found in mammals. Physiological roles of these D-amino acids not only in the nervous system but also in the endocrine system are being gradually revealed. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors are associated with learning and memory. D-Serine, D-aspartate, and D-alanine can all bind to NMDA receptors. H2S generated from D-cysteine reduces disulfide bonds in receptors and potentiates their activity. Aberrant receptor activity is related to diseases of the central nervous system (CNS, such as Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, D-amino acids are detected in parts of the endocrine system, such as the pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, and testis. D-Aspartate is being investigated for the regulation of hormone release from various endocrine organs. Here we focused on recent findings regarding the synthesis and physiological functions of D-amino acids in the nervous and endocrine systems.

  17. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Ureilites Including Almahata Sitta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Callahan, M. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Ureilites are a class of meteorites that lack chondrules (achondrites) but have relatively high carbon abundances, averaging approx.3 wt %. Using highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS), it was recently determined that there are amino acids in. fragment 94 of the Almahata Sitta ureilite[l]. Based on the presence of amino acids that are rare in the Earth's biosphere, as well as the near-racemic enantiomeric ratios of marry of the more common amino acids, it was concluded that most of the detected amino acids were indigenous to the meteorite. Although the composition of the Almahata Sitta ureilite appears to be unlike other recovered ureilites, the discovery of amino acids in this meteorite raises the question of whether other ureilites rnav also contain amino acids. Herein we present the results of LC-FDlTo.F-MS analyses of: a sand sample from the Almahata Sitta strewn held, Almahata Sitta fragments 425 (an ordinary H5 chondrite) and 427 (ureilite), as well as an Antarctic ureilite (Allan lulls, ALHA 77257).

  18. Transperitoneal absorption of glucose and amino acids for nutritional support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile, B E; Borzatta, M

    1987-03-01

    To evaluate the peritoneal membrane as an absorptive surface for nutritional support, 14 New Zealand rabbits with peritoneal catheters were rapidly infused with 75 mL/kg of a 5% glucose and 2.5% mixed amino acid solution. Plasma and peritoneal fluid glucose, amino acid, and electrolyte concentrations and osmolarities were measured serially for six hours following infusion, and nutrient absorptions were calculated. Plasma osmolarity rose minimally, peritoneal fluid osmolarity declined rapidly, and there was a small increase in peritoneal fluid volume. Peritoneal fluid concentrations of glucose and amino acids fell precipitously during the initial two hours, while plasma concentrations rose in reciprocal fashion. Two thirds of the glucose and 83% of the amino acid loads were absorbed at six hours, with most of the absorption occurring within the first two hours. Amino acid absorption was independent of molecular weight and configuration. While glucose and amino acids were rapidly absorbed in adequate amounts, an intraperitoneal nutrition support system will require fat to provide total energy needs.

  19. Cytokinin producing bacteria stimulate amino acid deposition by wheat roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudoyarova, Guzel R; Melentiev, Alexander I; Martynenko, Elena V; Timergalina, Leila N; Arkhipova, Tatiana N; Shendel, Galina V; Kuz'mina, Ludmila Yu; Dodd, Ian C; Veselov, Stanislav Yu

    2014-10-01

    Phytohormone production is one mechanism by which rhizobacteria can stimulate plant growth, but it is not clear whether the bacteria gain from this mechanism. The hypothesis that microbial-derived cytokinin phytohormones stimulate root exudation of amino acids was tested. The rhizosphere of wheat plants was drenched with the synthetic cytokinin trans-zeatin or inoculated with Bacillus subtilis IB-22 (which produces zeatin type cytokinins) or B. subtilis IB-21 (which failed to accumulate cytokinins). Growing plants in a split root system allowed spatial separation of zeatin application or rhizobacterial inoculation to one compartment and analyses of amino acid release from roots (rhizodeposition) into the other compartment (without either microbial inoculation or treatment with exogenous hormone). Supplying B. subtilis IB-22 or zeatin to either the whole root system or half of the roots increased concentrations of amino acids in the soil solution although the magnitude of the increase was greater when whole roots were treated. There was some similarity in amino acid concentrations induced by either bacterial or zeatin treatment. Thus B. subtilis IB-22 increased amino acid rhizodeposition, likely due to its ability to produce cytokinins. Furthermore, B. subtilis strain IB-21, which failed to accumulate cytokinins in culture media, did not significantly affect amino acid concentrations in the wheat rhizosphere. The ability of rhizobacteria to produce cytokinins and thereby stimulate rhizodeposition may be important in enhancing rhizobacterial colonization of the rhizoplane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Amino acid modifiers in guayule rubber compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tire producers are increasingly interested in biobased materials, including rubber but also as compounding chemicals. An alternative natural rubber for tire use is produced by guayule, a woody desert shrub native to North America. Alternative compounding chemicals include naturally-occurring amino a...

  1. Glycolic acid peels versus amino fruit acid peels for acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilknur, Turna; Demirtaşoğlu, Melda; Biçak, Mehtap Unlü; Ozkan, Sebnem

    2010-10-01

    Chemical exfoliation resulting in the reduction of keratotic plugs serves as a second-line treatment used as an adjunct to anti-acne agents. This study was designed to compare the therapeutic effects of glycolic acid (GA) peels and amino fruit acid (AFA) peels in patients with acne vulgaris. In this single-blind, randomized, right-left comparison study, 24 patients received 12 serial peels (GA and AFA, at concentrations from the lowest to the highest) on the two halves of the face at 2-week intervals for 6 months. In addition, cutaneous tolerability assessments during the applications and the patient preference test between both peeling methods at the end of the study were performed. There was a statistically significant decrease in the number of non-inflamed lesions with GA following the first month and with AFA following the second month (p applications were compared with each other, there was not a statistically significant difference in terms of non-inflamed and inflamed lesions (p > 0.05). During the application, it was observed that AFA peels caused fewer problems than GA peels did. AFA concentrations were increased more rapidly and more sessions were performed at the highest concentration of AFA. Based on the results of this study, we can state that both GA and AFA peels are efficacious for comedonal acne. And, compared to a GA peel, an AFA peel is less irritating and better tolerated.

  2. AANT: the Amino Acid-Nucleotide Interaction Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michael M; Khrapov, Maksim A; Cox, J Colin; Yao, Jianchao; Tong, Lingnan; Ellington, Andrew D

    2004-01-01

    We have created an Amino Acid-Nucleotide Interaction Database (AANT; http://aant.icmb.utexas. edu/) that categorizes all amino acid-nucleotide interactions from experimentally determined protein-nucleic acid structures, and provides users with a graphic interface for visualizing these interactions in aggregate. AANT accomplishes this by extracting individual amino acid-nucleotide interactions from structures in the Protein Data Bank, combining and superimposing these interactions into multiple structure files (e.g. 20 amino acids x 5 nucleotides) and grouping structurally similar interactions into more readily identifiable clusters. Using the Chime web browser plug-in, users can view 3D representations of the superimpositions and clusters. The unique collection and representation of data on amino acid-nucleotide interactions facilitates understanding the specificity of protein-nucleic acid interactions at a more fundamental level, and allows comparison of otherwise extremely disparate sets of structures. Moreover, by modularly representing the fundamental interactions that govern binding specificity it may prove possible to better engineer nucleic acid binding proteins.

  3. Arrangement of Proteinogenic α-Amino Acids on a Cyclic Peptide Comprising Alternate Biphenyl-Cored ζ-Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Shohei; Chiba, Masayuki; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2017-05-18

    Aiming at precisely arranging several proteinogenic α-amino acids on a folded scaffold, we have developed a cyclic hexapeptide comprising an alternate sequence of biphenyl-cored ζ-amino acids and proteinogenic α-amino acids such as l-leucine. The amino acids were connected by typical peptide synthesis, and the resultant linear hexapeptide was intramolecularly cyclized to form a target cyclic peptide. Theoretical analyses and NMR spectroscopy suggested that the cyclic peptide was folded into an unsymmetrical conformation, and the structure was likely to be flexible in CHCl 3 . The optical properties including UV/Vis absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) were also evaluated. Furthermore, the cyclic peptide became soluble in water by introducing three carboxylate groups at the periphery of the cyclic skeleton. This α/ζ-alternating cyclic peptide is therefore expected to serve as a unique scaffold for arranging several functionalities. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Hydroxy, carboxylic and amino acid functionalized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by simple co-precipitation method and modified with different coating agents such as ascorbic acid, hexanoic acid, salicylic acid, L-arginine and L-cysteine. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by various techniques such as FT IR, XRD,.

  5. Characterization of 2-aminoisobutyric acid transport in Neurospora crassa: a general amino acid permease-specific substrate.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie-Villa, S; DeBusk, R M; DeBusk, A G

    1981-01-01

    We report the characterization of an amino acid 2-aminoisobutyric acid was transported solely by the general amino acid permease and not by the neutral amino acid permease. Furthermore, this substrate was not metabolized after transport. The potential for a system-specific nonmetabolizable substrate as a tool in the analysis of amino acid transport and its regulation is discussed.

  6. Non-protein amino acids and neurodegeneration: the enemy within.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Kenneth J

    2014-03-01

    Animals, in common with plants and microorganisms, synthesise proteins from a pool of 20 protein amino acids (plus selenocysteine and pyrolysine) (Hendrickson et al., 2004). This represents a small proportion (~2%) of the total number of amino acids known to exist in nature (Bell, 2003). Many 'non-protein' amino acids are synthesised by plants, and in some cases constitute part of their chemical armoury against pathogens, predators or other species competing for the same resources (Fowden et al., 1967). Microorganisms can also use selectively toxic amino acids to gain advantage over competing organisms (Nunn et al., 2010). Since non-protein amino acids (and imino acids) are present in legumes, fruits, seeds and nuts, they are ubiquitous in the diets of human populations around the world. Toxicity to humans is unlikely to have been the selective force for their evolution, but they have the clear potential to adversely affect human health. In this review we explore the links between exposure to non-protein amino acids and neurodegenerative disorders in humans. Environmental factors play a major role in these complex disorders which are predominantly sporadic (Coppede et al., 2006). The discovery of new genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases, many of which code for aggregation-prone proteins, continues at a spectacular pace but little progress is being made in identifying the environmental factors that impact on these disorders. We make the case that insidious entry of non-protein amino acids into the human food chain and their incorporation into protein might be contributing significantly to neurodegenerative damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  8. Detection of amino acid neurotransmitters by surface enhanced Raman scattering and hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Khetani, Altaf; Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Smith, Brett; Anis, Hanan; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-03-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detecting the neurotransmitters such as glutamate (GLU) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). These amino acid neurotransmitters that respectively mediate fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, are important for neuroendocrine control, and upsets in their synthesis are also linked to epilepsy. Our SERS-based detection scheme enabled the detection of low amounts of GLU (10-7 M) and GABA (10-4 M). It may complement existing techniques for characterizing such kinds of neurotransmitters that include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrography (MS). This is mainly because SERS has other advantages such as ease of sample preparation, molecular specificity and sensitivity, thus making it potentially applicable to characterization of experimental brain extracts or clinical diagnostic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and saliva. Using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) further enhanced the Raman signal relative to that in a standard cuvette providing sensitive detection of GLU and GABA in micro-litre volume of aqueous solutions.

  9. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Novel Amino Acid-(N'-Benzoyl Hydrazide and Amino Acid-(N'-Nicotinoyl Hydrazide Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherine N. Khattab

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The coupling reaction of benzoic acid and nicotinic acid hydrazides with N- protected L-amino acids including valine, leucine, phenylalanine, glutamic acid and tyrosine is reported. The target compounds, N-Boc-amino acid-(N`-benzoyl- and N- Boc-amino acid-(N`-nicotinoyl hydrazides 5a-5e and 6a-6e were prepared in very high yields and purity using N-[(dimethylamino-1H-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-b]pyridin-1-yl- methylene]-N-methyl-methanaminium hexafluorophosphate N-oxide (HATU as coupling reagent. The antimicrobial activity of the Cu and Cd complexes of the designed compounds was tested. The products were deprotected affording the corresponding amino acid-(N`-benzoyl hydrazide hydrochloride salts (7a-7e and amino acid-(N`- nicotinoyl hydrazide hydrochloride salts (8a-8e. These compounds and their Cu and Cd complexes were also tested for their antimicrobial activity. Several compounds showed comparable activity to that of ampicillin against S. aureus and E. coli.

  10. Variation in amino acid and lipid composition of latent fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxton, Ruth S; Baron, Mark G; Butler, David; Kent, Terry; Sears, Vaughn G

    2010-06-15

    The enhancement of latent fingerprints, both at the crime scene and in the laboratory using an array of chemical, physical and optical techniques, permits their use for identification. Despite the plethora of techniques available, there are occasions when latent fingerprints are not successfully enhanced. An understanding of latent fingerprint chemistry and behaviour will aid the improvement of current techniques and the development of novel ones. In this study the amino acid and fatty acid content of 'real' latent fingerprints collected on a non-porous surface was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Squalene was also quantified in addition. Hexadecanoic acid, octadecanoic acid and cis-9-octadecenoic acid were the most abundant fatty acids in all samples. There was, however, wide variation in the relative amounts of each fatty acid in each sample. It was clearly demonstrated that touching sebum-rich areas of the face immediately prior to fingerprint deposition resulted in a significant increase in the amount of fatty acids and squalene deposited in the resulting 'groomed' fingerprints. Serine was the most abundant amino acid identified followed by glycine, alanine and aspartic acid. The significant quantitative differences between the 'natural' and 'groomed' fingerprint samples seen for fatty acids were not observed in the case of the amino acids. This study demonstrates the variation in latent fingerprint composition between individuals and the impact of the sampling protocol on the quantitative analysis of fingerprints. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A molecular rotor based ratiometric sensor for basic amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettiwala, Aafrin M; Singh, Prabhat K

    2018-01-05

    The inevitable importance of basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, in human health and metabolism demands construction of efficient sensor systems for them. However, there are only limited reports on the 'ratiometric' detection of basic amino acids which is further restricted by the use of chemically complex sensor molecules, which impedes their prospect for practical applications. Herein, we report a ratiometric sensor system build on simple mechanism of disassociation of novel emissive Thioflavin-T H-aggregates from heparin surface, when subjected to interaction with basic amino acids. The strong and selective electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interaction of basic amino acids with heparin leads to large alteration in photophysical attributes of heparin bound Thioflavin-T, which forms a highly sensitive sensor platform for detection of basic amino acids in aqueous solution. These selective interactions between basic amino acids and heparin allow our sensor system to discriminate arginine and lysine from other amino acids. This unique mechanism of dissociation of Thioflavin-T aggregates from heparin surface provides ratiometric response on both fluorimetric and colorimetric outputs for detection of arginine and lysine, and thus it holds a significant advantage over other developed sensor systems which are restricted to single wavelength detection. Apart from the sensitivity and selectivity, our system also provides the advantage of simplicity, dual mode of sensing, and more importantly, it employs an inexpensive commercially available probe molecule, which is a significant advantage over other developed sensor systems that uses tedious synthesis protocol for the employed probe in the detection scheme, an impediment for practical applications. Additionally, our sensor system also shows response in complex biological media of serum samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A molecular rotor based ratiometric sensor for basic amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettiwala, Aafrin M.; Singh, Prabhat K.

    2018-01-01

    The inevitable importance of basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, in human health and metabolism demands construction of efficient sensor systems for them. However, there are only limited reports on the 'ratiometric' detection of basic amino acids which is further restricted by the use of chemically complex sensor molecules, which impedes their prospect for practical applications. Herein, we report a ratiometric sensor system build on simple mechanism of disassociation of novel emissive Thioflavin-T H-aggregates from heparin surface, when subjected to interaction with basic amino acids. The strong and selective electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interaction of basic amino acids with heparin leads to large alteration in photophysical attributes of heparin bound Thioflavin-T, which forms a highly sensitive sensor platform for detection of basic amino acids in aqueous solution. These selective interactions between basic amino acids and heparin allow our sensor system to discriminate arginine and lysine from other amino acids. This unique mechanism of dissociation of Thioflavin-T aggregates from heparin surface provides ratiometric response on both fluorimetric and colorimetric outputs for detection of arginine and lysine, and thus it holds a significant advantage over other developed sensor systems which are restricted to single wavelength detection. Apart from the sensitivity and selectivity, our system also provides the advantage of simplicity, dual mode of sensing, and more importantly, it employs an inexpensive commercially available probe molecule, which is a significant advantage over other developed sensor systems that uses tedious synthesis protocol for the employed probe in the detection scheme, an impediment for practical applications. Additionally, our sensor system also shows response in complex biological media of serum samples.

  13. Amino acid quantification in bulk soybeans by transmission Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulmerich, Matthew V; Gelber, Matthew K; Azam, Hossain M; Harrison, Sandra K; McKinney, John; Thompson, Dennis; Owen, Bridget; Kull, Linda S; Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-12-03

    Soybeans are a commodity crop of significant economic and nutritional interest. As an important source of protein, buyers of soybeans are interested in not only the total protein content but also in the specific amino acids that comprise the total protein content. Raman spectroscopy has the chemical specificity to measure the twenty common amino acids as pure substances. An unsolved challenge, however, is to quantify varying levels of amino acids mixed together and bound in soybeans at relatively low concentrations. Here we report the use of transmission Raman spectroscopy as a secondary analytical approach to nondestructively measure specific amino acids in intact soybeans. With the employment of a transmission-based Raman instrument, built specifically for nondestructive measurements from bulk soybeans, spectra were collected from twenty-four samples to develop a calibration model using a partial least-squares approach with a random-subset cross validation. The calibration model was validated on an independent set of twenty-five samples for oil, protein, and amino acid predictions. After Raman measurements, the samples were reduced to a fine powder and conventional wet chemistry methods were used for quantifying reference values of protein, oil, and 18 amino acids. We found that the greater the concentrations (% by weight component of interest), the better the calibration model and prediction capabilities. Of the 18 amino acids analyzed, 13 had R(2) values greater than 0.75 with a standard error of prediction c.a. 3-4% by weight. Serine, histidine, cystine, tryptophan, and methionine showed poor predictions (R(2) soybeans.

  14. Amino acid composition of cottage cheese and whey with bifidobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Rodionova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breaking condition intestinal flora, the simplest way to create sensitive parts of the body microbiocenosis caused by various factors. Reasons for people microecology imbalances – antibiotics, preservatives, stress. The result is an imbalance – the number of gastrointestinal disorders, immune deficiency disorders metabolic processes in the body. Therapeutic effect of probiotic microorganisms is the result of exogenous and endometabolitov synthesis the character of the protein. Acid activity information probiotic microorganisms and the distribution of amino acids between the products and intermediates in biopotential evaluation process foods produced with probiotic microflora by fermentation. Test results from the amino acid composition of whey and quark are obtained by fermenting raw milk probiotics bifidobacterias. It was found that during the fermentation of the quark consortium, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum Y enriched curd 4 of leucine and glutamine. Rate of transfer amino acids in serum to 2–6% of essential amino acids is irrelevant 3–7%. The highest value observed transient threonine, isoleucyl, lysine, valine, alanine, glycine, proline, serine. The mean value of the prototype amino acid protein curd and whey protein biological value was 71.89 and 74.58. Preservation of active forms of probiotic microorganisms after heating the bunch to 53–55 °C, lg concentration of not less than 7 (in 1 g in cottage cheese and serum. The received data are actual for formation of an information data bank, necessary for the development of prescription-component solutions of eubiotic products.

  15. Valuable biomolecules from nine North Atlantic red macroalgae: Amino acids, fatty acids, carotenoids, minerals and metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Bruhn, Annette; Eybye, Karin Loft

    2016-01-01

    , glutamic acid, and arginine, respectively. The amino acid score of the nine algae varied from 44% to 92%, the most commonly first limiting amino acid being histidine. Lutein, β-carotene, and zeaxanthin were the identified carotenoids. Contents of all macro and trace minerals, with the exception...

  16. Absolute quantitation of proteins by acid hydrolysis combined with amino acid detection by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirgorodskaya, Olga A; Körner, Roman; Kozmin, Yuri P; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is among the most accurate methods for absolute quantification of proteins and peptides. Here, we combine acid hydrolysis with the addition of isotopically labeled standard amino acids and analysis by mass spectrometry for accurate and sensitive protein quantitation. Quantitation of less than 10 fmol of protein standards with errors below 10% has been demonstrated using this method.

  17. Absolute quantitation of proteins by Acid hydrolysis combined with amino Acid detection by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirgorodskaya, Olga A; Körner, Roman; Kozmin, Yuri P

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is among the most accurate methods for absolute quantification of proteins and peptides. Here, we combine acid hydrolysis with the addition of isotopically labeled standard amino acids and analysis by mass spectrometry for accurate and sensitive protein quantitation....... Quantitation of less than 10 fmol of protein standards with errors below 10% has been demonstrated using this method (1)....

  18. Proximate composition and amino acid profile of rice husk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Native rice husk (NRH) was fermented with Pleurotus ostreatus for 7, 14 and 21 days to improve the nutritional values. The proximate composition and amino acid profiles were determined. The results showed that crude fibre (CF), nitrogen free extract (NFE), acid detergent fibre (ADF), and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) were ...

  19. Fatty and amino acids composition of selected wild edible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For thousands of years, mushrooms have long been used for their health promoting properties. The aim of this study was to determine the fatty acids and amino acids contents in priority wild mushrooms: Termitomyces microcarpus, Termitomyces sp. (Bunyanaka), Termitomyces globulus, Termitomyces eurrhizus and ...

  20. Promiscuous Seven Transmembrane Receptors Sensing L-α-amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2014-01-01

    A number of nutrient sensing seven trans-membrane (7TM) receptors have been identified and characterized over the past few years. While the sensing mechanisms to carbohydrates and free fatty acids are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing has recently come to the limelight. T....... The present review describes the current status of promiscuous L-α-amino acid sensors, the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), the GPRC6A receptor, the T1R1/T1R3 receptor and also their molecular pharmacology, expression pattern and physiological significance....

  1. Amino acid pool composition of the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Cynthia E; Gathman, Allen C; Lilly, Walt W

    2007-11-01

    The leaf-litter fungus Coprinus cinereus maintains a pool of free amino acid in its mycelium. When the organism is grown under conditions of high nitrogen availability with 13.2 mmol.L-1 L-asparagine as the nitrogen source, the primary constituents of this pool are glutamine, alanine, and glutamic acid. Together these 3 amino acids comprise approximately 70% of the pool. Nitrogen deprivation reduces the size of the free amino acid pool by 75%, and neither a high concentration of ammonium nor a protein nitrogen source support a similar pool size as L-asparagine. Nitrogen deprivation also reduces the concentration of glutamine to the pool while increasing glutamate. Concomitant with this shift is a marked increase in mycelial ammonium.

  2. Fungal Peptaibiotics: Assessing Potential Meteoritic Amino Acid Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bruckner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which are relatively rare in the terrestrial biosphere, has long been used as an indication of the indigeneity of meteoritic amino acids, however, the discovery of alpha-AIB in peptides producers by a widespread group of filamentous fungi indicates the possibility of a terrestrial biotic source for the alpha-AIB observed in some meteorites. The alpha-AIB-containing peptides produced by these fungi are dubbed peptaibiotics. We measured the molecular distribution and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids found in the total hydrolysates of four biologically synthesized peptaibiotics. We compared these aneasurenetts with those from the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Murchison and from three Antarctic CR2 carbonaceous chondrites in order to understand the peptaibiotics as a potential source of meteoritic contamination.

  3. Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cement for orthopedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cements were synthesized, formulated, and evaluated for orthopedic application. The formulation of different amino acid containing glass-ionomer bone cements was optimized, and conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements were compared. Properties of interest included handling characteristics, physical and chemical properties, and mechanical strength of the bone cement. The study was based on the synthesis of different vinyl containing amino acids, different polyelectrolytes containing these amino acid residues, and different resin-modified polyelectrolytes, as well as formulation and evaluation of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements using these polyelectrolytes. Systematic preparation of polyelectrolytes and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cements were essential features of this work, since we anticipated that the mechanical properties of the glass-ionomer bone cements could be strongly affected by the nature of the polyelectrolytes and formulation. Mechanical properties were evaluated in a screw driven mechanical testing machine, and structure-property relationships were determined by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation of the fracture surface of the specimens. How the structure of polyelectrolytes, such as different amino acid residues, molecular weight, different modifying resin, and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cement, affected the mechanical properties was also studied.

  4. Profile of Fatty Acids, Amino Acids, Carotenoid Total, and α-Tocopherol from Flying Fish Eggs

    OpenAIRE

    Aulia Azka; Nurjanah Nurjanah; Agoes Mardiono Jacoeb

    2015-01-01

    Flying fish are found in waters of eastern Indonesia, which until now is still limited informationabout nutritional content. The purpose of this research was determine the composition offatty acids, amino acids, total carotenoids, α-tocopherol flying fish eggs (Hyrundicthys sp.).The composition of fatty acid was measured by gas chromatography (GC), while amino acids,total carotenoids, α-tocopherol was measured by High performanced Liquid Chromatography(HPLC). Egg contained 22 fatty acids such...

  5. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    L-alanine, and L-valine in aqueous magnesium chlo- ride solutions (0⋅1–0⋅8 mol kg–1), at 288⋅15 and. 308⋅15 K. These results are expected to highlight the role of amino acids in presence of aqueous mag- nesium chloride solutions and the influence of tem- perature on them. 2.1 Experimental. 2.1 Materials. The amino ...

  6. Degradation of amino acids to short-chain fatty acids in humans. An in vitro study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H S; Holtug, K; Mortensen, P B

    1988-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) originate mainly in the colon through bacterial fermentation of polysaccharides. To test the hypothesis that SCFA may originate from polypeptides as well, the production of these acids from albumin and specific amino acids was examined in a faecal incubation system....... Albumin was converted to all C2-C5-fatty acids, whereas amino acids generally were converted to specific SCFA, most often through the combination of a deamination and decarboxylation of the amino acids, although more complex processes also took place. This study indicates that a part of the intestinal...

  7. Pyrrolidone-carboxylic acid magnesium salt (PCA-Mg2+) protects against seizures induced by excitatory amino acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canonico, P. L.; Aronica, E.; Bruno, V.; Catania, M. V.; Aleppo, G.; Galavotti, F.; Nicoletti, F.

    1990-01-01

    Single administration of PCA-Mg2+ (200 mg/kg, s.c.) increased the latency and shortened the duration of seizures produced by systemic injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in mice. Mortality was reduced in mice pretreated with PCA-Mg2+. Single or repeated (twice a day for 5 days) injections of

  8. Do dietary amino acid profiles affect performance of larval gilthead seabream?

    OpenAIRE

    Aragão, C.; Conceição, L. E. C.; Lacuisse, M.; Yúfera, M.; Dinis, Maria Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Live preys commonly used in fish larval rearing seem to be imbalanced in terms of amino acids. Manipulation of their amino acid composition is di fficult, but the use of microencapsulated diets allows this manipulation. This study analysed the effect of amino acid supplementation, in order to compensate for dietary amino acid imbalances, on growth and survival of gilthead seabream ( Sparus aurata ) larvae.

  9. Composition of antioxidants and amino acids in Stevia leaf infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periche, Angela; Koutsidis, Georgios; Escriche, Isabel

    2014-03-01

    Stevia, a non-caloric natural sweetener with beneficial properties and considerable antioxidants and amino acids, is increasingly consumed as an infusion. This work evaluates the influence of the conditions (temperature: 50, 70 or 90 °C and time: 1, 5, 20 or 40 min) applied to obtain Stevia infusions, on antioxidants (total phenols, flavonoids and antioxidant activity) and amino acids. The total concentration of the eleven amino acids found was 11.70 mg/g in dried leaves and from 6.84 to 9.11 mg/g per gram of Stevia in infusions. However, infusions showed higher levels of certain amino acids (alanine, asparagine, leucine and proline), and greater values of the three antioxidant parameters in comparison with dry leaves. Temperature had more influence (minimum values at 50 °C and maximum at 90 °C) than time in the case of antioxidants. At 90 °C there were no important increases in the extraction of antioxidant compounds after 5 min; each gram of Stevia had 117 mg trolox (total antioxidant activity), 90 mg gallic acid (total phenols) and 56 mg catechin equivalents (flavonoids). Varying the temperature and time conditions no notable differences were observed in the concentrations of the majority of amino acids. However, the infusion treatment at 90 °C for 5 min was the best, as it gave the highest yield of 8 of the 11 amino acids. Therefore, with respect to the compounds analyzed in this study, the best way to obtain Stevia leaf infusions is the same as the domestic process, almost boiling water for a short time.

  10. Examination of Vitamin and Amino Acid Profiles of Gmelina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examination of Vitamin and Amino Acid Profiles of Gmelina ( Gmelina Arborea ) Fruit and Fruit Pulp. ... (1.28-2.30 g/100g protein), histidine (1.07-1.61 g/100g protein), arginine (2.72-3.50 g/100g protein), aspartic acid (3.65-7.80 g/100g protein), serine (2.05-3.10 g/100g protein), glutamic acid (10.16-13.63 g/100g protein), ...

  11. Branched chain amino acids requirements and metabolism in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assadi Soumeh, Elham

    2015-01-01

    by increasing SID Leu:Lys in the diet were plasma Phe, α-ketoisovaleric acid, creatine, Ile, 3-methyl-oxovaleric acid, Trp and urinary Ile, glutamate, choline, cytosine, 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-[S-(R,R)]-butanoic acid, acetyl-DL-valine, L-2-aminoadipic acid, 2-methylbutyrylglycine, Tyr, and L-ascorbic acid. Among...... the identified metabolites, those that could be linked to the animal growth performance were plasma glycocholic acid and taurocholic acid which were concluded as biomarkers of the optimum dietary Ile level. Plasma creatine, urinary 2-aminoadipic acid, ascorbic acid, and choline were identified as biomarkers......There is an interest to reduce the dietary crude protein (CP) level to promote the gut health of piglets, eliminate the environmental nitrogen load from intensive pig farming, and to reduce diet costs. This is possible by estimating individual amino acid (AA) requirements and by optimizing the diet...

  12. A contribution to the structure-activity relationship in glutamate receptor ligands: 2. Characterization of 2-amino-4-oxo-5-pentanoic acid as NMDA receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S; Van Assche, I; Soroka, M; Haemers, A; Ben Ari, Y; Cherubini, E

    1993-01-01

    Pharmacological properties of 2-amino-4-oxo-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AOPA) on excitatory amino acids mediated responses have been tested in CA1 rat hippocampal neurones, using intracellular recordings and current and voltage clamp techniques. These properties were compared with those of the well-known NMDA antagonist, D(-)2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5). AOPA completely abolished the response to NMDA but had no effects on the responses to AMPA, quisqualate and kainate. In voltage clamp experiments AOPA antagonized NMDA-induced currents and produced a parallel shift of the NMDA concentration-response curve. Schild analysis gave a Kd value of 26 microM. AP-5 also produced a similar shift in this curve with a Kd of 6.9 mu.

  13. Production of amino acids - Genetic and metabolic engineering approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Ho; Wendisch, Volker F

    2017-12-01

    The biotechnological production of amino acids occurs at the million-ton scale and annually about 6milliontons of l-glutamate and l-lysine are produced by Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum strains. l-glutamate and l-lysine production from starch hydrolysates and molasses is very efficient and access to alternative carbon sources and new products has been enabled by metabolic engineering. This review focusses on genetic and metabolic engineering of amino acid producing strains. In particular, rational approaches involving modulation of transcriptional regulators, regulons, and attenuators will be discussed. To address current limitations of metabolic engineering, this article gives insights on recent systems metabolic engineering approaches based on functional tools and method such as genome reduction, amino acid sensors based on transcriptional regulators and riboswitches, CRISPR interference, small regulatory RNAs, DNA scaffolding, and optogenetic control, and discusses future prospects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multistep enzyme catalyzed reactions for unnatural amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arrigo, Paola; Tessaro, Davide

    2012-01-01

    The use of unnatural amino acids, particularly synthetic α-amino acids, for modern drug discovery research requires the availability of enantiomerically pure isomers. Starting from a racemate, one single enantiomer can be obtained using a deracemization process. The two more common strategies of deracemization are those obtained by stereoinversion and by dynamic kinetic resolution. Both techniques will be here described using as a substrate the D,L-3-(2-naphthyl)-alanine, a non-natural amino acid: the first one employing a multi-enzymatic redox system, the second one combining an hydrolytic enzyme together with a base-catalyzed substrate racemization. In both cases, the final product, L-3-(2-naphthyl)alanine, is recovered with good yield and excellent enantiomeric excess.

  15. Energetics of amino acid synthesis in hydrothermal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, J. P.; Shock, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations showed that the autotrophic synthesis of all 20 protein-forming amino acids was energetically favored in hot (100 degrees C), moderately reduced, submarine hydrothermal solutions relative to the synthesis in cold (18 degrees C), oxidized, surface seawater. The net synthesis reactions of 11 amino acids were exergonic in the hydrothermal solution, but all were endergonic in surface seawater. The synthesis of the requisite amino acids of nine thermophilic and hyperthermophilic proteins in a 100 degreesC hydrothermal solution yielded between 600 and 8000 kilojoules per mole of protein, which is energy that is available to drive the intracellular synthesis of enzymes and other biopolymers in hyperthermophiles thriving in these ecosystems.

  16. Relation between chemotaxis and consumption of amino acids in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiling; M. Pollard, Abiola; Höfler, Carolin; Poschet, Gernot; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chemotaxis enables bacteria to navigate chemical gradients in their environment, accumulating toward high concentrations of attractants and avoiding high concentrations of repellents. Although finding nutrients is likely to be an important function of bacterial chemotaxis, not all characterized attractants are nutrients. Moreover, even for potential nutrients, the exact relation between the metabolic value of chemicals and their efficiency as chemoattractants has not been systematically explored. Here we compare the chemotactic response of amino acids with their use by bacteria for two well‐established models of chemotactic behavior, E scherichia coli and B acillus subtilis. We demonstrate that in E . coli chemotaxis toward amino acids indeed strongly correlates with their utilization. However, no such correlation is observed for B . subtilis, suggesting that in this case, the amino acids are not followed because of their nutritional value but rather as environmental cues. PMID:25807888

  17. tRNAs: cellular barcodes for amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Rajat; Chen, Shawn; Dare, Kiley

    2010-01-01

    The role of tRNA in translating the genetic code has received considerable attention over the last 50 years, and we now know in great detail how particular amino acids are specifically selected and brought to the ribosome in response to the corresponding mRNA codon. Over the same period, it has...... also become increasingly clear that the ribosome is not the only destination to which tRNAs deliver amino acids, with processes ranging from lipid modification to antibiotic biosynthesis all using aminoacyl-tRNAs as substrates. Here we review examples of alternative functions for tRNA beyond...... translation, which together suggest that the role of tRNA is to deliver amino acids for a variety of processes that includes, but is not limited to, protein synthesis....

  18. Lectin from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia scop.). Complete amino acid sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchalakos, R N; Bates, O J; Bradshaw, R A; Hapner, K D

    1984-04-10

    The complete amino acid sequence of a lectin from sainfoin ( Onobrychis viciifolia Scop . var. Eski ) has been determined by sequential Edman analyses of the intact protein and peptides derived from digests with trypsin and thermolysin. Peptides were purified by pH fractionation, by gel filtration, and by cation-exchange and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Seven segments of continuous sequence, accounting for the entire protein, were aligned through sequence comparison with several homologous leguminous lectins to give the final structure. Sainfoin lectin monomer, a glycoprotein which contains a single polypeptide chain of 236 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 26 509, has amino- and carboxyl-terminal residues of alanine and threonine, respectively. A single residue of cysteine, located at position 33, is the only sulfur-containing amino acid present. Asparagine-118 is the single oligosaccharide attachment site. At least two apparent allelomorphic forms of the protein, having valine or isoleucine at position 49 in equal amounts, were detected. The amino acid sequence of sainfoin lectin exhibits circular permutation relative to that of the homologous protein concanavalin A.

  19. Plant amino acid-derived vitamins: biosynthesis and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret, Javier A; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-04-01

    Vitamins are essential organic compounds for humans, having lost the ability to de novo synthesize them. Hence, they represent dietary requirements, which are covered by plants as the main dietary source of most vitamins (through food or livestock's feed). Most vitamins synthesized by plants present amino acids as precursors (B1, B2, B3, B5, B7, B9 and E) and are therefore linked to plant nitrogen metabolism. Amino acids play different roles in their biosynthesis and metabolism, either incorporated into the backbone of the vitamin or as amino, sulfur or one-carbon group donors. There is a high natural variation in vitamin contents in crops and its exploitation through breeding, metabolic engineering and agronomic practices can enhance their nutritional quality. While the underlying biochemical roles of vitamins as cosubstrates or cofactors are usually common for most eukaryotes, the impact of vitamins B and E in metabolism and physiology can be quite different on plants and animals. Here, we first aim at giving an overview of the biosynthesis of amino acid-derived vitamins in plants, with a particular focus on how this knowledge can be exploited to increase vitamin contents in crops. Second, we will focus on the functions of these vitamins in both plants and animals (and humans in particular), to unravel common and specific roles for vitamins in evolutionary distant organisms, in which these amino acid-derived vitamins play, however, an essential role.

  20. Biotechnology applications of amino acids in protein purification and formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, T; Tsumoto, K; Kita, Y; Chang, B; Ejima, D

    2007-11-01

    Amino acids are widely used in biotechnology applications. Since amino acids are natural compounds, they can be safely used in pharmaceutical applications, e.g., as a solvent additive for protein purification and as an excipient for protein formulations. At high concentrations, certain amino acids are found to raise intra-cellular osmotic pressure and adjust to the high salt concentrations of the surrounding medium. They are called "compatible solutes", since they do not affect macromolecular function. Not only are they needed to increase the osmotic pressure, they are known to increase the stability of the proteins. Sucrose, glycerol and certain amino acids were used to enhance the stability of unstable proteins after isolation from natural environments. The mechanism of the action of these protein-stabilizing amino acids is relatively well understood. On the contrary, arginine was accidentally discovered as a useful reagent for assisting in the refolding of recombinant proteins. This effect of arginine was ascribed to its ability to suppress aggregation of the proteins during refolding, thereby increasing refolding efficiency. By the same mechanism, arginine now finds much wider applications than previously anticipated in the research and development of proteins, in particular in pharmaceutical applications. For example, arginine solubilizes proteins from loose inclusion bodies, resulting in efficient production of active proteins. Arginine suppresses protein-protein interactions in solution and also non-specific adsorption to gel permeation chromatography columns. Arginine facilitates elution of bound proteins from various column resins, including Protein-A or dye affinity columns and hydrophobic interaction columns. This review covers various biotechnology applications of amino acids, in particular arginine.

  1. Amino Acid Catabolism in Multiple Sclerosis Affects Immune Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrotto, Laura; Correale, Jorge

    2017-03-01

    Amino acid catabolism has been implicated in immunoregulatory mechanisms present in several diseases, including autoimmune disorders. Our aims were to assess expression and activity of enzymes involved in Trp and Arg catabolism, as well as to investigate amino acid catabolism effects on the immune system of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. To this end, 40 MS patients, 30 healthy control subjects, and 30 patients with other inflammatory neurological diseases were studied. Expression and activity of enzymes involved in Trp and Arg catabolism (IDO1, IDO2, Trp 2,3-dioxygenase [TDO], arginase [ARG] 1, ARG2, inducible NO synthetase) were evaluated in PBMCs. Expression of general control nonrepressed 2 serine/threonine kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (both molecules involved in sensing amino acid levels) was assessed in response to different stimuli modulating amino acid catabolism, as were cytokine secretion levels and regulatory T cell numbers. The results demonstrate that expression and activity of IDO1 and ARG1 were significantly reduced in MS patients compared with healthy control subjects and other inflammatory neurological diseases. PBMCs from MS patients stimulated with a TLR-9 agonist showed reduced expression of general control nonrepressed 2 serine/threonine kinase and increased expression of mammalian target of rapamycin, suggesting reduced amino acid catabolism in MS patients. Functionally, this reduction resulted in a decrease in regulatory T cells, with an increase in myelin basic protein-specific T cell proliferation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, induction of IDO1 using CTLA-4 or a TLR-3 ligand dampened proinflammatory responses. Overall, these results highlight the importance of amino acid catabolism in the modulation of the immunological responses in MS patients. Molecules involved in these pathways warrant further exploration as potential new therapeutic targets in MS. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of

  2. OPTICAL SECOND-HARMONIC GENERATION IN CRYSTALLINE AMINO ACIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RIECKHOFF, K E; PETICOLAS, W L

    1965-02-05

    Optically active amino acids contain many highly efficient optical second-harmonic generators. When light from a ruby laser at 6943 A falls on the crystalline amino acids with sufficient intensity, the second harmonic of the light at 3471 A can be observed. Although the symmetry requirements for optical second-harmonic generation are always met by isomerically pure optically active substances, there is considerable variation in efficiency for the generation of the second harmonic, ranging from almost zero to greater than that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate, the most efficient known.

  3. A Topological Description of Hubs in Amino Acid Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Gaci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We represent proteins by amino acid interaction networks. This is a graph whose vertices are the proteins amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them. Once we have compared this type of graphs to the general model of scale-free networks, we analyze the existence of nodes which highly interact, the hubs. We describe these nodes taking into account their position in the primary structure to study their apparition frequency in the folded proteins. Finally, we observe that their interaction level is a consequence of the general rules which govern the folding process.

  4. Subcritical water extraction of amino acids from Mars analog soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, Aaron C; Fisher, Anita M; Fors-Francis, Kisa; Sherrit, Stewart

    2018-01-18

    For decades, the Martian regolith has stymied robotic mission efforts to catalog the organic molecules present. Perchlorate salts, found widely throughout Mars, are the main culprit as they breakdown and react with organics liberated from the regolith during pyrolysis, the primary extraction technique attempted to date on Mars. This work further develops subcritical water extraction (SCWE) as a technique for extraction of amino acids on future missions. The effect of SCWE temperature (185, 200, and 215°C) and duration of extraction (10-120 min) on the total amount and distribution of amino acids recovered was explored for three Mars analog soils (JSC Mars-1A simulant, an Atacama desert soil, and an Antarctic Dry Valleys soil) and bovine serum albumin (as a control solution of known amino acid content). Total amounts of amino acids extracted increased with both time and temperature; however, the distribution shifted notably due to the destruction of the amino acids with charged or polar side chains at the higher temperatures. The pure bovine serum albumin solution and JSC Mars 1A also showed lower yields than the Atacama and Antarctic extractions suggesting that SCWE may be less effective at hydrolyzing large or aggregated proteins. Changing solvent from water to a dilute (10 mM) HCl solution allowed total extraction efficiencies comparable to the higher temperature/time combinations while using the lowest temperature/time (185°C/20 min). The dilute HCl extractions also did not lead to the shift in amino acid distribution observed at the higher temperatures. Additionally, adding sodium perchlorate salt to the extraction did not interfere with recoveries. Native magnetite in the JSC Mars-1A may have been responsible for destruction of glycine, as evidenced by its uncharacteristic decrease as the temperature/time of extraction increased. This work shows that SCWE can extract high yields of native amino acids out of Mars analog soils with minimal disruption of the

  5. Regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids, especially glutamine (GLN) have been known for many years to stimulate the growth of small intestinal mucosa. Polyamines are also required for optimal mucosal growth, and the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, blocks growth. Certain amino acids, primarily asparagine (ASN) and GLN stimulate ODC activity in a solution of physiological salts. More importantly, their presence is also required before growth factors and hormones such as epidermal growth factor and insulin are able to increase ODC activity. ODC activity is inhibited by antizyme-1 (AZ) whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines, thus, providing a negative feedback regulation of the enzyme. In the absence of amino acids mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is inhibited, whereas, mTORC2 is stimulated leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis but increasing the synthesis of AZ via a cap-independent mechanism. These data, therefore, explain why ASN or GLN is essential for the activation of ODC. Interestingly, in a number of papers, AZ has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, or increase autophagy. Each of these activities results in decreased cellular growth. AZ binds to and accelerates the degradation of ODC and other proteins shown to regulate proliferation and cell death, such as Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, and Smad1. The correlation between the stimulation of ODC activity and the absence of AZ as influenced by amino acids is high. Not only do amino acids such as ASN and GLN stimulate ODC while inhibiting AZ synthesis, but also amino acids such as lysine, valine, and ornithine, which inhibit ODC activity, increase the synthesis of AZ. The question remaining to be answered is whether AZ inhibits growth directly or whether it acts by decreasing the availability of polyamines to the dividing cells. In either case, evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of AZ synthesis is the

  6. Analysis of Protein Amino Acids in Tobacco Using Microwave Digestion of Plant Material

    OpenAIRE

    Moldoveanu SC

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a technique using microwave digestion and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), which makes possible the analysis of protein amino acids in tobacco. The technique involves first the measurement of free amino acids, a hydrolysis using microwave digestion, and a measurement of total resulting amino acids. The content of protein amino acids is determined from the difference of total and free amino acids. The digestion is performed with aqueous 6 N HCl (with 1% phenol...

  7. Effect of the ratio between essential and nonessential amino acids in the diet on utilization of nitrogen and amino acids by growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenis, N.P.; Diepen, van H.T.M.; Bikker, P.; Jongbloed, A.W.; Meulen, van der J.

    1999-01-01

    In 36 growing pigs (30 to 60 kg), N balance and amino acid (AA) composition of weight gain were measured to evaluate the interactive effect of the ratio between N from essential amino acids (EAA(N)) to nonessential amino acids (NEAA(N)) and total N level (T(N)) in the diet on N retention and

  8. Mutation-induced quisqualic acid and ibotenic acid affinity at the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4: ligand selectivity results from a synergy of several amino acid residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    resides. In this study, we have identified four non-conserved amino acid residues that are essential for differentiating mGluR1 from mGluR4. Our approach has been to increase the affinity of the classic mGluR1 agonists, quisqualic acid and ibotenic acid, at mGluR4 by making various point mutations......The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are key modulators of excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The eight mGluR subtypes are seven trans-membrane-spanning proteins that possess a large extracellular amino-terminal domain in which the endogenous ligand binding pocket...... that mimicked mGluR1 residues. Based on ligand docking to homology models, the non-conserved residues, Lys-74, Glu-287, Ser-313, and Lys-317, were chosen for the mutational studies and all of the mutations proved capable of partially or completely restoring the affinities of the ligands. In particular...

  9. Amino Acids as Metabolic Substrates during Cardiac Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Kenneth J.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; McGuinness, Owen P.; Wasserman, David H.; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The heart is well known as a metabolic omnivore in that it is capable of consuming fatty acids, glucose, ketone bodies, pyruvate, lactate, amino acids and even its own constituent proteins, in order of decreasing preference. The energy from these substrates supports not only mechanical contraction, but also the various transmembrane pumps and transporters required for ionic homeostasis, electrical activity, metabolism and catabolism. Cardiac ischemia – for example, due to compromise of the coronary vasculature or end-stage heart failure – will alter both electrical and metabolic activity. While the effects of myocardial ischemia on electrical propagation and stability have been studied in depth, the effects of ischemia on metabolic substrate preference has not been fully appreciated: oxygen deprivation during ischemia will significantly alter the relative ability of the heart to utilize each of these substrates. Although changes in cardiac metabolism are understood to be an underlying component in almost all cardiac myopathies, the potential contribution of amino acids in maintaining cardiac electrical conductance and stability during ischemia is underappreciated. Despite clear evidence that amino acids exert cardioprotective effects in ischemia and other cardiac disorders, their role in the metabolism of the ischemic heart has yet to be fully elucidated. This review synthesizes the current literature of the metabolic contribution of amino acids during ischemia by analyzing relevant historical and recent research. PMID:23354395

  10. Interaction between the guanidinium cation and aromatic amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sanz, Ana A; Cabaleiro-Lago, Enrique M; Rodríguez-Otero, Jesús

    2014-11-07

    The interaction of the guanidinium cation with phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan has been studied using a variety of computational methods. Benchmark values for the interaction have been estimated using the CCSD(T) method extrapolated to the complete basis set limit, indicating that the complexation energy amounts to -123.0, -124.4 and -134.2 kJ mol(-1) for Phe, Tyr and Trp, respectively. Most stable minima correspond to neutral folded amino acids, with the cation interacting simultaneously with the carboxyl oxygen, the amino nitrogen and the aromatic ring. However, complexes with the amino acids as zwitterions are as stable as neutral ones. The final relative stability of the different structures results from a complex balance among different contributions to the complexation energy. Extended neutral structures are favored by larger electrostatic and smaller repulsion contributions, as well as by smaller deformation costs for bringing the amino acid to its final geometry into the complex. Zwitterions show large electrostatic and induction contributions that cancel out the huge deformation cost needed to transfer the proton to the amino group. The presence of the cation···π contact in folded minima introduces larger contributions from induction and dispersion (also as a consequence of the bulky guanidinium cation) that are able to overcome other effects, making folded minima the most stable together with zwitterionic ones.

  11. Chiral Recognition of Amino Acids by Magnetoelectrodeposited Cu Film Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Mogi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiral behavior of magnetoelectrodeposited (MED Cu film electrodes was investigated for the electrochemical reactions of amino acids. The Cu films were electrodeposited under a magnetic field of 5 T perpendicular to the electrode surface. Such MED Cu films were employed as an electrode, and cyclic voltammograms were measured for the electrochemical reactions of several kinds of amino acids. Chiral behavior was clearly observed as oxidation current difference between the enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The MED film electrodes with the thickness of 50~500 nm exhibited such chiral behavior, and their surface morphologies had network structures, which could be induced by the micro-MHD effect.

  12. Distribution of D-amino acids in vinegars and involvement of lactic acid bacteria in the production of D-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutaguchi, Yuta; Ohmori, Taketo; Akano, Hirofumi; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Levels of free D-amino acids were compared in 11 vinegars produced from different sources or through different manufacturing processes. To analyze the D- and L-amino acids, the enantiomers were initially converted into diastereomers using pre-column derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde plus N-acethyl-L-cysteine or N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-L-cysteine. This was followed by separation of the resultant fluorescent isoindol derivatives on an octadecylsilyl stationary phase using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. The analyses showed that the total D-amino acid level in lactic fermented tomato vinegar was very high. Furthermore, analysis of the amino acids in tomato juice samples collected after alcoholic, lactic and acetic fermentation during the production of lactic fermented tomato vinegar showed clearly that lactic fermentation is responsible for the D-amino acids production; marked increases in D-amino acids were seen during lactic fermentation, but not during alcoholic or acetic fermentation. This suggests lactic acid bacteria have a greater ability to produce D-amino acids than yeast or acetic acid bacteria.

  13. Effect of various amino acids on shoot regeneration of sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    from meristematic explants cultured on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with B5 vitamins containing 13.6 ìM 2-4, dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.05% (w/v) casein hydrolysate, 10% (v/v) coconut water and 3% glucose. Five levels (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 mM) of five different amino acids (glutamine, asparagine, ...

  14. Adsorption of L-amino Acids on Sea Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaia Dimas A. M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of adsorption of L-alanine, L-tyrosine, L-glutamic acid, and L-lysine on sea sand was carried out. Only L-lysine showed adsorption on sea sand, probably due to the presence of the positively charged R group. Our results raise some doubts as to whether sand was important for the pre-concentration of amino acids prior to peptide condensation on the Pre-Biotic Earth.

  15. On the evolution of the standard amino-acid alphabet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Freeland, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Although one standard amino-acid 'alphabet' is used by most organisms on Earth, the evolutionary cause(s) and significance of this alphabet remain elusive. Fresh insights into the origin of the alphabet are now emerging from disciplines as diverse as astrobiology, biochemical engineering and bioinformatics. PMID:16515719

  16. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of amino acids from grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Ceferino; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Ana; Palma, Miguel; Barroso, Carmelo G

    2015-01-01

    Recent cultivar techniques on vineyards can have a marked influence on the final nitrogen content of grapes, specifically individual amino acid contents. Furthermore, individual amino acid contents in grapes are related to the final aromatic composition of wines. A new ultrasound-assisted method for the extraction of amino acids from grapes has been developed. Several extraction variables, including solvent (water/ethanol mixtures), solvent pH (2-7), temperature (10-70°C), ultrasonic power (20-70%) and ultrasonic frequency (0.2-1.0s(-)(1)), were optimized to guarantee full recovery of the amino acids from grapes. An experimental design was employed to optimize the extraction parameters. The surface response methodology was used to evaluate the effects of the extraction variables. The analytical properties of the new method were established, including limit of detection (average value 1.4mmolkg(-)(1)), limit of quantification (average value 2.6mmolkg(-)(1)), repeatability (average RSD=12.9%) and reproducibility (average RSD=15.7%). Finally, the new method was applied to three cultivars of white grape throughout the ripening period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Synthesis and Evaluation of Arctigenin Amino Acid Ester Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, En-Bo; Yang, Li-Min; Jia, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Wei-Yuan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Wei; Song, Xing-Zhuo; Zheng, Man-Ling

    2016-10-01

    The use of arctigenin (ARG), a traditional medicine with many pharmacological activities, has been restricted due to its poor solubility in water. Five amino acid derivatives of ARG have been synthesized using glycine, o-alanine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine, which have t-butyloxy carbonyl (BOC) as a protective group. In this study, we examined the effects of removing these protective groups. The results showed that the amino acid derivatives have better solubility and nitrite-clearing ability than ARG. Among the compounds tested, the amino acid derivatives without protective group were the best. Based on these results, ARG and its two amino acid derivatives without protective group (ARG8, ARG10) were selected to evaluate their anti-tumor activity in vivo at a dosage of 40 mg/kg. The results indicated that ARG8 and ARG10 both exhibit more anti-tumor activity than ARG in H22 tumor-bearing mice. The tumor inhibition rates of ARG8 and ARG10 were 69.27 and 43.58%, which was much higher than ARG. Furthermore, the mice treated with these compounds exhibited less damage to the liver, kidney and immune organs compared with the positive group. Furthermore, ARG8 and ARG10 improved the serum cytokine levels significantly compared to ARG. In brief, this study provides a method to improve the water solubility of drugs, and we also provide a reference basis for new drug development.

  18. 2. Essential amino acid composition of the whole empty body

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1998-11-15

    Nov 15, 1998 ... Kwantiflsering van faktore wat die bruto doeltreffendheid van energie-omsetting van voer by skape be'invloed. D.Sc. (Agric.)-tesis, Universiteit van Pretoria. HOGAN, I.P., 1974. Quantitative aspects of nitrogen utilization in ruminants. Symposium: Protein and Amino. Acid Nutrition in the High Producing Cow.

  19. (aquo)cobaloxime by imidazoles and amino acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    A trans influence study in propyl (aquo)cobaloxime by imidazoles and amino acids. J V MADHURI and S SATYANARAYANA* ... (aquo)cobaloxime with a series of ligands to unravel the differences in Co–C and Co–N bond ..... Though histamine is slightly more basic than histidine, histidine forms a more stable complex than.

  20. Effect of sunlight shielding on leaf structure and amino acids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zino

    2013-09-04

    Sep 4, 2013 ... Light sensitive albino tea cultivar 'Jinguang' (Camellia sinensis) which grows albinism leaf in yellow colour, results to high level of amino acids but low levels of photosynthetic pigments including chlorophylls, neoxanthin, violaxanthin, phytoxanthin and β-carotene when it is exposed to high sunlight.

  1. Balancing the duodenal amino acid supply in ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DAAS: Duodenal Amino Acid Supply. Table 3 Least-cost feed formulations to balance the DAAS (for milk production) to protein ol milk dry mat- ter at the 15 % level. Unfermented ingredients (g/100 e). Fermented ingredients. G/rc0 e). Blood. Carcass PBPM. Imported. Brewers. Fish frsh. Groundnut srain. Gluten. Protein.

  2. Therapeutic Potential of Amino Acids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yulan; Wang, Xiuying; Hu, Chien-An Andy

    2017-08-23

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is a chronic relapsing inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, and is difficult to treat. The pathophysiology of IBD is multifactorial and not completely understood, but genetic components, dysregulated immune responses, oxidative stress, and inflammatory mediators are known to be involved. Animal models of IBD can be chemically induced, and are used to study etiology and to evaluate potential treatments of IBD. Currently available IBD treatments can decrease the duration of active disease but because of their adverse effects, the search for novel therapeutic strategies that can restore intestinal homeostasis continues. This review summarizes and discusses what is currently known of the effects of amino acids on the reduction of inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell death in the gut when IBD is present. Recent studies in animal models have identified dietary amino acids that improve IBD, but amino acid supplementation may not be adequate to replace conventional therapy. The animal models used in dietary amino acid research in IBD are described.

  3. Gas-Phase IR Spectroscopy of Deprotonated Amino Acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, J.; Steill, J. D.; Redlich, B.

    2009-01-01

    Gas-phase infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra have been recorded for the conjugate bases of a series of amino acids (Asp, Cys, Glu, Phe, Set, Trp, Tyr). The spectra are dominated by strong symmetric and antisymmetric carboxylate stretching modes around 1300 and 1600 cm(-1),

  4. Chiroptical Properties of Amino Acids: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Adrian-Scotto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids are involved in many scientific theories elucidating possible origins of life on Earth. One of the challenges when discussing the evolutionary origin of biopolymers such as proteins and oligonucleotides in living organisms is the phenomenon that these polymers implement monomers of exclusively one handedness, a feature called biomolecular homochirality. Many attempts have been made to understand this process of racemic symmetry breaking. Assuming an extraterrestrial origin of the molecular building blocks of living organisms, their susceptibility to asymmetric photolysis by the absorption of circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation in interstellar space was proposed. In order to predict whether the interaction of circularly polarized light with various racemic amino acids can induce an enantiomeric excess, we investigated the electronic and chiroptical properties of the amino acids valine and isovaline by a molecular modelling approach based on quantum chemistry (Density Functional Theory. The average spectra of both L-valine and L-isovaline have been produced on the basis of Boltzmann population analysis using computed spectra for the various conformations of each amino acid.

  5. Amyloid Aggregates Arise from Amino Acid Condensations under Prebiotic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Jason; Friedmann, Michael P; Riek, Roland

    2016-09-12

    Current theories on the origin of life reveal significant gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms that allowed simple chemical precursors to coalesce into the complex polymers that are needed to sustain life. The volcanic gas carbonyl sulfide (COS) is known to catalyze the condensation of amino acids under aqueous conditions, but the reported di-, tri-, and tetra-peptides are too short to support a regular tertiary structure. Here, we demonstrate that alanine and valine, two of the proteinogenic amino acids believed to have been among the most abundant on a prebiotic earth, can polymerize into peptides and subsequently assemble into ordered amyloid fibers comprising a cross-β-sheet quaternary structure following COS-activated continuous polymerization of as little as 1 mm amino acid. Furthermore, this spontaneous assembly is not limited to pure amino acids, since mixtures of glycine, alanine, aspartate, and valine yield similar structures. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Serum amino acid abnormalities in pediatric patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamad A. El Sawy

    2011-08-10

    Aug 10, 2011 ... The Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics www.ejmhg.eg.net ... failure and this may be, at least in part, nutritional in origin. [6]. Also increased ... Family history of chronic renal failure was negative in our all our studied ..... (2002) [8] who examined the relationship of plasma sulfur amino acids to car-.

  7. Detecting relationships between amylose content and amino acid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    paired traits conditioned on WBR were mainly controlled by the endosperm dominance or additive interaction effects. [Shi C. H., Zhu Q. Q., Wang ..... between AC and amino acid contents of rice conditioned on. PC or WBR could be ..... Statistical analysis method plays a key role in classical quan- titative genetics. With the ...

  8. Analysis of Peptides and Conjugates by Amino Acid Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    HCl at 110 °C for 20-24 h and the resulting amino acids analyzed by ion-exchange chromatography with post-column ninhydrin derivatization. Depending on the hydrolysis conditions, tryptophan is destroyed, and cysteine also, unless derivatized, and the amides, glutamine and asparagine, are deamidated...

  9. Amino acid profiles of sufu, a Chinese fermented soybean food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, B.; Rombouts, F.M.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Sufu is a Chinese soybean cheese-like product obtained by solid-state fungal fermentation and ripening of tofu. The resulting "pehtze" is salted, followed by maturation in brine. Total (TAA) and free amino acid (FAA) profiles were determined during consecutive stages of sufu manufacture, i.e., tofu,

  10. Determination of Amino Acids in Medicinal Plants from Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To analyze the amino acid contents of some plants used in traditional medicine in Southern Sonora, Mexico by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Methods: The plant samples (Jutuki, Zizyphus obtusifolia A.Gray; Jito, Forchammeria watsonii Rose; Barchata, Lycium berlandieri Dunal; Citabaro, ...

  11. Preliminary analyses and amino acid profile of wild sunflower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tithonia diversifolia (wild sunflower) leaves were harvested, sundried and milled to obtain Tithonia diversifolia leaf meal (TDLM). Samples of the TDLM were analysed for proximate composition, amino acid profile and certain antinutrients. Analysis revealed a composition of 20.6% CP, 18.9% CF, 4.0% EE, 42.5% CHO and ...

  12. Comparative analysis of naturally occurring L-amino acid osmolytes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Adaptation to high salinity and low or high temperature is essential for bacteria to survive. Accumulation of exogenous osmolytes is one of the ways that helps bacteria to survive under such extracellular stress. We have analysed the capability of various L-amino acids and their D-isomers to act as osmolytes and thus enable ...

  13. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 117; Issue 3. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions of MgCl2.6H2O at 288.15, and 308.15 K. Amalendu Pal Suresh Kumar. Volume 117 Issue 3 May 2005 pp 267-273 ...

  14. Amino acid nutrition beyond methionine and lysine for milk protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids are involved in many important physiological processes affecting the production, health, and reproduction of high-producing dairy cows. Most research and recommendations for lactating dairy cows has focused on methionine and lysine for increasing milk protein yield. This is because these...

  15. Hidden Markov model to predict the amino acid profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handamari, Endang Wahyu

    2017-12-01

    Sequence alignment is the basic method in sequence analysis, which is the process of composing or aligning two or more primary sequences so that the sequence similarity is apparent. One of the uses of this method is to predict the structure or function of an unknown protein by using a known protein information structure or function if the protein has the same sequence in database. Protein are macromolecules that make up more than half of the cell. Proteins are a chain of 20 amino acid combinations. Each type of protein has a unique number and sequence of amino acids. The method that can be applied for sequence alignment is the Genetic Algorithm, the other method is related to the Hidden Markov Model (HMM). The Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is a developmental form of the Markov Chain, which can be applied in cases that can not be directly observed. As Observed State (O) for sequence alignment is the sequence of amino acids in three categories: deletion, insertion and match. As for the Hidden State is the amino acid residue, which can determine the family protein corresponds to observation O.

  16. Comparative evaluation of protein and amino acid composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The seeds of melon (Citrullus vulgaris) and water melon (Citrullus lanatus) from Nasarawa town in Nasarawa State and Shagari town in Sokoto State, Nigeria were respectively analyzed for their crude protein and amino acids contents. The crude protein compositions of the melon and water melon seeds were found to be ...

  17. Amino acids as taste stimuli for tsetse flies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Goes van Naters, W.M; den Otter, C.J

    This paper reports the responses of taste cells on the legs of the blood-feeding tsetse fly Glossina fuscipes fuscipes Newstead 1910 (Diptera: Glossinidae) to twenty protein amino acids and to their mixture as it is present in human;sweat. It is investigated whether the mixture is sensed differently

  18. Amino acid metabolic signaling influences Aedes aegypti midgut microbiome variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Short

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito midgut microbiota has been shown to influence vector competence for multiple human pathogens. The microbiota is highly variable in the field, and the sources of this variability are not well understood, which limits our ability to understand or predict its effects on pathogen transmission. In this work, we report significant variation in female adult midgut bacterial load between strains of A. aegypti which vary in their susceptibility to dengue virus. Composition of the midgut microbiome was similar overall between the strains, with 81-92% of reads coming from the same five bacterial families, though we did detect differences in the presence of some bacterial families including Flavobacteriaceae and Entobacteriaceae. We conducted transcriptomic analysis on the two mosquito strains that showed the greatest difference in bacterial load, and found that they differ in transcript abundance of many genes implicated in amino acid metabolism, in particular the branched chain amino acid degradation pathway. We then silenced this pathway by targeting multiple genes using RNA interference, which resulted in strain-specific bacterial proliferation, thereby eliminating the difference in midgut bacterial load between the strains. This suggests that the branched chain amino acid (BCAA degradation pathway controls midgut bacterial load, though the mechanism underlying this remains unclear. Overall, our results indicate that amino acid metabolism can act to influence the midgut microbiota. Moreover, they suggest that genetic or physiological variation in BCAA degradation pathway activity may in part explain midgut microbiota variation in the field.

  19. Engineering Dehydrated Amino Acid Residues in the Antimicrobial Peptide Nisin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Rollema, Harry S.; Yap, Wyanda M.G.J.; Boot, Hein J.; Siezen, Roland J.; Vos, Willem M. de

    1992-01-01

    The small antimicrobial peptide nisin, produced by Lactococcus lactis, contains the uncommon amino acid residues dehydroalanine and dehydrobutyrine and five thio ether bridges. Since these structures are posttranslationally formed from Ser, Thr, and Cys residues, it is feasible to study their role

  20. Serum amino acid abnormalities in pediatric patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study aim at investigating the status of plasma amino acids in pediatric patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) on regular hemodialysis (HD) with and without history of thromboembolic manifestations. Methods: The study included 21 hemodialysis patients subdivided into two groups (those with no history of ...

  1. Formation mechanism of coamorphous drug−amino acid mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Cornett, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Two coamorphous drug−amino acid systems, indomethacin−tryptophan (Ind−Trp) and furosemide−tryptophan Fur−Trp), were analyzed toward their ease of amorphization and mechanism of coamorphization during ball milling. The two mixtures were compared to the corresponding amorphization of the pure drug...

  2. Amino acid profile of two non-conventional leafy vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The leaves of Sesamum indicum and Balanites aegyptiaca are popularly consumed in Adamawa State of Nigeria largely by the rural communities. They were analyzed to determine proximate nutrient content, amino acid composition and antinutritional factors. Data obtained for proximate composition showed protein ...

  3. Amino acid requirements of South African Mutton Merino lambs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1998-11-15

    Nov 15, 1998 ... Stem & Hoover (1979) mentioned that many factors, such as composition of diet, frequency of feeding, dietary intake, rumen dilution rates and availability of nitrogen and energy, affect rumen microbial protein synthesis. Therefore, the amino acid composition of the digesta leaving the rumen, do not reflect ...

  4. Biochemical Properties of Human D-Amino Acid Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Murtas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available D-amino acid oxidase catalyzes the oxidative deamination of D-amino acids. In the brain, the NMDA receptor coagonist D-serine has been proposed as its physiological substrate. In order to shed light on the mechanisms regulating D-serine concentration at the cellular level, we biochemically characterized human DAAO (hDAAO in greater depth. In addition to clarify the physical-chemical properties of the enzyme, we demonstrated that divalent ions and nucleotides do not affect flavoenzyme function. Moreover, the definition of hDAAO substrate specificity demonstrated that D-cysteine is the best substrate, which made it possible to propose it as a putative physiological substrate in selected tissues. Indeed, the flavoenzyme shows a preference for hydrophobic amino acids, some of which are molecules relevant in neurotransmission, i.e., D-kynurenine, D-DOPA, and D-tryptophan. hDAAO shows a very low affinity for the flavin cofactor. The apoprotein form exists in solution in equilibrium between two alternative conformations: the one at higher affinity for FAD is favored in the presence of an active site ligand. This may represent a mechanism to finely modulate hDAAO activity by substrate/inhibitor presence. Taken together, the peculiar properties of hDAAO seem to have evolved in order to use this flavoenzyme in different tissues to meet different physiological needs related to D-amino acids.

  5. Eliminating amino acid interference during spectrophotometric NH4+ analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, G.H.; Leeuwen, van A.G.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Amino acids can interfere with NH4+ in spectrophotometric NH4+ determination hampering accurate quantification of the fate of NH4+ and dissolved organic N in soils. Serious interference has been reported for soils rich in organic matter, and for soils that have been fumigated, oven-dried or

  6. Swarming modulatory effects of some amino acids on Proteus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Swarming motility, a multicellular behaviour characterized by periodic concentric growth on solid media has severally been reported as a constraint in the clinical ... The effects of 20 amino acids on swarming, extracellular protease activity, cellular RNA level and total protein concentration in 20 clinical Proteus strains from ...

  7. Hydrolysis conditions for the analysis for sulphur amino acids in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of methods of analysis for sulphur amino acids in feeds was undertaken with a view to finding methods suitable for the routine analysis of feedstuffs. In the case of cyst(e)ine, it was found that the results ob- tained from simple oxidation and hydrolysis with a mixture of dimethylsulphoxide (OMSO) and hydrochloric ...

  8. Detecting relationships between amylose content and amino acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The relationship between the genetic effects of endosperm, cytoplasm and maternal plant on amylose content (AC) and amino acid contents of indica rice was studied using unconditional and conditional analysis methods. The results indicated that the protein content (PC) and brown rice weight (WBR) could significantly ...

  9. CSF Amino Acids, Pterins and Mechanism of the Ketogenic Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, Spain, studied the relationship between the etiology of refractory childhood epilepsy, CSF neurotransmitters, pterins, and amino acids, and response to a ketogenic diet in 60 patients with refractory epilepsy, 83% focal and 52% idiopathic.

  10. Determination of amino acids and protein content in fresh and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Royal jelly (RJ) is popular among consumers around the world due to its perceived health benefits. The purpose of this study was to assess the levels of free and total amino acid profile as well as protein content in order to characterize Bulgarian RJ samples. A total of 17 fresh and commercial RJ samples from different ...

  11. Determination of free amino acids of porcine serum responsible for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of free amino acids of porcine serum responsible for the meat quality by 1 H NMR and HPLC analyses. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... The pH24h correlated well with the water holding capacity (WHC) of porcine meat, whereas a strongly negative correlation was observed between pH24h and serum ...

  12. Synthesis and accumulation of free amino acids during somatic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is an analogous process to zygotic embryogenesis (ZE); both complex processes are influenced by a significant number of genetic and environmental factors. Amino acids are considered important regulators of morphogenesis in several plant species, therefore the aim of this study was to ...

  13. Amino acids as regulators and components of nonproteinogenic pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.

    2003-01-01

    Amino acids are not only important precursors for the synthesis of proteins and other N-containing compounds, but also participate in the regulation of major metabolic pathways. Glutamate and aspartate, for example, are components of the malate/aspartate shuttle and their concentrations control the

  14. Maillard reaction induces changes in saccharides and amino acids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate changes in saccharides and amino acids induced by Maillard reaction (MR) during stir-baking of areca nuts (AN). Methods: The pH of aqueous extracts of AN and charred AN (CAN) were measured by a pH meter, and their absorbances at 420 nm were read in an ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) ...

  15. Child stunting is associated with low circulating essential amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stunting affects about one-quarter of children under five worldwide. The pathogenesis of stunting is poorly understood. Nutritional interventions have had only modest effects in reducing stunting. We hypothesized that insufficiency in essential amino acids may be limiting the linear growth of childr...

  16. Induction of DNA damage by oxidised amino acids and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luxford, Catherine; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of amino acids, peptides and proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 generates hydroperoxides in a dose-dependent manner. These hydroperoxides are stable in the absence of exogenous catalysts (e.g. heat, light, redox-active transition metal ions), but decompose rapidly in the presence...

  17. Nitrogen retention response to the abomasal infusion of amino acids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nitrogen (N) retention response to the abomasal infusion of amino acids in South African Mutton Merino ram lambs fed a standard finishing diet was investigated. The basal diet consisted of (g/kg air dry weight): 300 lucerne, 80 wheat straw, 561.5 maize meal, 35 molasses meal, 10 urea, 5 salt, 7.5 ammonium chloride, ...

  18. Effect of sunlight shielding on leaf structure and amino acids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Light sensitive albino tea cultivar 'Jinguang' (Camellia sinensis) which grows albinism leaf in yellow colour, results to high level of amino acids but low levels of photosynthetic pigments including chlorophylls, neoxanthin, violaxanthin, phytoxanthin and β-carotene when it is exposed to high sunlight illumination in the ...

  19. Balancing the duodenal amino acid supply in ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    x lm. " DAAS: Duodenal Amino Acid Supply. Table 3 Least-cost feed formulations to balance the DAAS (for milk production) to protein ol milk dry mat- ter at the 15 % level. Unfermented ingredients (g/100 e). Fermented ingredients. G/rc0 e). Blood. Carcass PBPM. Imported. Brewers. Fish frsh. Groundnut srain. Gluten. Protein.

  20. Determination of Proximate Composition and Amino Acid Profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johnny

    livestock nutrition. Keywords: Sesamum indicum; Proximate composition; Amino acid profile; Nutrient value. Correspondence: ubi.benjamin@yahoo.com. Introduction. Sesame ... presence of oxygen in the air to CO2 at a temperature of 600 0C (dry ashing). The % ash content was ..... Effect of Heat Treatment and Defatting.

  1. Syntrophic degradation of amino acids by thermophilic methanogenic consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plugge, C.

    2001-01-01

    Waste water usually contains large amounts of different organic compounds. A variety of microbial processes are involved in the anaerobic methanogenic treatment of waste water, such as hydrolysis of lipids, polysaccharides and proteins, fermentation of sugars and amino acids, acetogenic

  2. Amino Acid Enantiomeric Ratios in Biogeochemistry: Complications and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, G. D.; Sun, H. J.; Tsapin, A. I.

    2003-12-01

    Amino acid enantiomeric ratios have been used for many years as an indicator of the process of racemization, and thus as a method to determine the age of biological samples such as bones, shells, and teeth. Dating biological samples by this method relies on an accurate knowledge of the environmental temperatures the sample has experienced, and the racemization kinetic parameters in the sample matrix. In some environments, where an independent dating method such as radiocarbon is available, the observed amino acid D/L ratios are found to be either higher or lower than those expected due to racemization alone. The observed D/L ratios in these cases can be clues to biogeochemical processes operating in addition to, or in place of, chemical racemization. In Siberian permafrost (Brinton et al. 2002, Astrobiology 2, 77) we have found D/L ratios lower than expected, which we have interpreted as evidence for low-level D-amino acid metabolism and recycling in microorganisms previously thought to be metabolically dormant. In microbially-colonized Antarctic Dry Valley sandstones (McDonald and Sun 2002, Eos Trans. AGU 83, Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract B11A-0720) we have found D/L ratios higher than can be accounted for by racemization alone, most likely due to the accumulation of D-amino-acid-containing peptidoglycan material from multiple bacterial generations. D/L profiles in polar ices and in ice-covered lakes (Tsapin et al. 2002, Astrobiology 2, 632) can be used to indicate the sources and histories of water or ice samples. Multiple biological and biogeochemical processes may complicate the interpretation of amino acid enantiomeric excesses in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples; however, amino acid racemization remains a useful tool in biogeochemistry and astrobiology. With a good knowledge of the environmental history of samples, amino acid D/L profiles can be used as a window into processes such as molecular repair and biomass turnover that are difficult to

  3. Amino acid requirements in children and the elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Raja R; Kurpad, Anura V

    2012-08-01

    The factorial approach is used to measure the dietary indispensable amino acid (IAA) requirements in children, although recent measurements based on the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method have begun to generate more direct evidence. Difficulties with the factorial method are that it depends on accurate estimates of the maintenance protein requirement, as well as of protein deposition during growth. Also, a value for the efficiency of utilizing dietary protein for deposition has to be selected, based on published Nitrogen (N) balance studies. In the recent 2007 WHO/FAO/UNU report, the amino acid requirement pattern for infants was taken to be similar to the amino acid composition of breast milk. For pre-school and older children, the factorial method gave values for the scoring pattern of protein that were fairly close to the earlier 1985 WHO/FAO/UNU report for children, since growth progressively became a smaller component of the factorial calculation as age progressed. However, given that there are several assumptions in the derivation of factorial estimates, direct experimental measurements of the amino acid requirement are desirable. The IAAO method, as it is non-invasive, as made it possible to measure the IAA requirements in children. Over the last decade, some of the IAA requirements have been determined by using the IAAO method in healthy school age children; however, the data on IAA requirements in developing country populations are still being conducted. In the elderly, there are not enough data to make a separate recommendation for IAA requirements from that of adults.

  4. Study amino acid activity lacto-, bifidobacteria during fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Glagoleva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper evaluated the role of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, as a source of amino acids, are the building blocks of a number of biologically active substances produced by the indigenous microflora of the human body and involved in various metabolic processes of the host organism. Research Consortium bifidobacteria amino activity consisting of Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum Y-4 or Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus carried Lactobacillus after fermentation of milk with initial acidity titrated 19 °T at 38-40 °C for 12-16 hours until the titratable acidity 85-100 °T, dense gel formation and accumulation of biomass of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli to a concentration of not less than 109 cfu/g. The mass proportion of protein was determined by the Kjeldahl method, the amino acid composition – by ion exchange chromatography using the liquid chromatography Shimadzu LC-20 Prominence. As a result of fermentation was investigated systems installed increasing mass fraction of protein in the product, indicating that the accumulation of bacterial proteins – for bifidobacteria consortium - in an amount of 1%, in an amount of lactobacilli to – 0.2%. Fermentation Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum Y-4 installed next row preferential synthesis of amino acids: alanine, glutamic acid, methionine, glycine, histidine, serine, threonine, tyrosine, valine, proline. Fermentation Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus installed advantageous synthesis of methionine, alanine, glutamic acid, arginine, serine, histidine, threonine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, tryptophan. The data needed to assess the nutritional status of correction, when introduced into the diet of probiotic products with this consortium of bifidobacteria or lactobacilli Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus in the organization of children, gerontology, and

  5. Formation of taste-active amino acids, amino acid derivatives and peptides in food fermentations - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cindy J; Schieber, Andreas; Gänzle, Michael G

    2016-11-01

    Fermented foods are valued for their rich and complex odour and taste. The metabolic activity of food-fermenting microorganisms determines food quality and generates odour and taste compounds. This communication reviews the formation of taste-active amino acids, amino acid derivatives and peptides in food fermentations. Pathways of the generation of taste compounds are presented for soy sauce, cheese, fermented meats, and bread. Proteolysis or autolysis during food fermentations generates taste-active amino acids and peptides; peptides derived from proteolysis particularly impart umami taste (e.g. α-glutamyl peptides) or bitter taste (e.g. hydrophobic peptides containing proline). Taste active peptide derivatives include pyroglutamyl peptides, γ-glutamyl peptides, and succinyl- or lactoyl amino acids. The influence of fermentation microbiota on proteolysis, and peptide hydrolysis, and the metabolism of glutamate and arginine is well understood, however, the understanding of microbial metabolic activities related to the formation of taste-active peptide derivatives is incomplete. Improved knowledge of the interactions between taste-active compounds will enable the development of novel fermentation strategies to develop tastier, less bitter, and low-salt food products, and may provide novel and "clean label" ingredients to improve the taste of other food products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES...) The chemical substance generically identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6... part apply to this section except as modified by this paragraph. (1) Recordkeeping. Recordkeeping...

  7. Regulation of adipose branched chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated blood branched chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. One possibility is that under these conditions there is a reduced cellular utilization and/or lower complete oxidation of BCAAs. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a...

  8. Amino-containing magnetic nanoemulsions: elaboration and nucleic acid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veyret, Raphael [Unite Mixte CNRS-bioMerieux-2714, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon (France); Delair, Thierry [Unite Mixte CNRS-bioMerieux-2714, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon (France); Pichot, Christian [Unite Mixte CNRS-bioMerieux-2714, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon (France); Elaissari, Abdelhamid [Unite Mixte CNRS-bioMerieux-2714, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon (France)]. E-mail: hamid.elaissari@ens-lyon.fr

    2005-08-15

    Amino-containing magnetic colloids were prepared from highly magnetic oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions. The functionalization was performed by controlling the adsorption of polyethyleneimine onto negatively charged magnetic emulsions. The cationic magnetic nanodroplets were characterized in terms of chemical composition, particle size, size distribution, zeta potential and colloidal stability as a function of storage time. These amino-containing magnetic emulsions were assessed as a new tool for nucleic acid extraction and amplification. The adsorption of nucleic acids was mostly controlled by attractive electrostatic interactions. The adsorption efficiency of a model RNA was found to be encouraging and the captured nucleic acid molecules were directly enzymatically amplified in the presence of the magnetic particles without any elution step.

  9. Biogeochemistry of Dissolved Free Amino Acids in Marine Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    N C~l co LO~ - LLJC:0 C)D OD D -74- TABLE 3-3 Composition ot Insoluble Bacterial Proteina Amino Composition (mole %’) ACtd ChromobacteriumD...I \\I , ***ZJ0 ŕI~ 1 3 Il\\ "󈧘 3I o N ~3Q NO 2>0 I /301 / 40 I/ 50 I,, mMCO 4 8 2 16 4 I I I I I I I I I 0 400 800 1200 1600 2000 M ES = -95- Figure...amino acids appears to be very similar. This ques - tion, however, is important to the following discussion of sinks for DFAA in sediments. Therefore

  10. Proximate composition, amino acid and fatty acid composition of fish maws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Zeng, Ling; Xu, Youhou; Sun, Yulin; Chen, Ziming; Fan, Sigang

    2016-01-01

    Fish maws are commonly recommended and consumed in Asia over many centuries because it is believed to have some traditional medical properties. This study highlights and provides new information on the proximate composition, amino acid and fatty acid composition of fish maws of Cynoscion acoupa, Congresox talabonoides and Sciades proops. The results indicated that fish maws were excellent protein sources and low in fat content. The proteins in fish maws were rich in functional amino acids (FAAs) and the ratio of FAAs and total amino acids in fish maws ranged from 0.68 to 0.69. Among species, croaker C. acoupa contained the most polyunsaturated fatty acids, arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapntemacnioc acid, showing the lowest value of index of atherogenicity and index of thrombogenicity, showing the highest value of hypocholesterolemic/hypercholesterolemic ratio, which is the most desirable.

  11. Enhanced Resolution of Chiral Amino Acids with Capillary Electrophoresis for Biosignature Detection in Extraterrestrial Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Jessica S; Mora, Maria F; Willis, Peter A

    2017-01-17

    Amino acids are fundamental building blocks of terrestrial life as well as ubiquitous byproducts of abiotic reactions. In order to distinguish between amino acids formed by abiotic versus biotic processes it is possible to use chemical distributions to identify patterns unique to life. This article describes two capillary electrophoresis methods capable of resolving 17 amino acids found in high abundance in both biotic and abiotic samples (seven enantiomer pairs d/l-Ala, -Asp, -Glu, -His, -Leu, -Ser, -Val and the three achiral amino acids Gly, β-Ala, and GABA). To resolve the 13 neutral amino acids one method utilizes a background electrolyte containing γ-cyclodextrin and sodium taurocholate micelles. The acidic amino acid enantiomers were resolved with γ-cyclodextrin alone. These methods allow detection limits down to 5 nM for the neutral amino acids and 500 nM for acidic amino acids and were used to analyze samples collected from Mono Lake with minimal sample preparation.

  12. Specific plasma amino acid disturbances associated with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomkajło, Marta; Rybka, Jacek; Mierzchała-Pasierb, Magdalena; Gamian, Andrzej; Stankiewicz-Olczyk, Joanna; Bolanowski, Marek; Daroszewski, Jacek

    2017-12-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to examine the association between branched chain and aromatic amino acid profiles (BCAA and AAA respectively) and the metabolic syndrome (MS), and to evaluate the clinical utility of these associations in the diagnostic process. Two hundred and sixty three healthy men with MS [MS(+): n = 165] and without MS [MS(-): n = 98] were enrolled in the observational study. Anthropometrical, biochemical, and amino acid measurements were performed. The ability of the BCAA and AAA to discriminate subjects with MS and insulin resistance was tested. Based on logistic discrimination, a multivariate early MS diagnostic model was built, and its discrimination properties were evaluated. Two functionally independent amino acid clusters were identified. BCAA and phenylalanine differed significantly between MS(+) and MS(-) participants (P = 0.003). These factors were also found to be indicators of MS(+) individuals (AUC: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.5757-0.7469), and correlated with cardiometabolic factors. No statistically significant differences in amino acid concentrations between those with and without insulin resistance were noted, and none of the amino groups were indicators of insulin resistance. The proposed MS multivariate diagnostic model consisted of phenylalanine, insulin, leptin, and adiponectin, and had good discrimination properties [AUC 0.79; 95% CI: 0.7239-0.8646]. MS is associated with selective BCAA and AAA profile disturbances, which could be part of cardiometabolic disease pathogenesis and derive neither directly from insulin sensitivity impairment, nor obesity or muscle mass. The MS diagnostic model developed and described herein should be validated in future studies.

  13. Protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guoyao.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated chick extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscles and, in some experiments, rat skeletal muscles were used to study a number of aspects of protein and amino acid metabolism. (1) Chick EDC muscles synthesize and release large amounts of alanine and glutamine, which indirectly obtain their amino groups from branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). (2) Acetoacetate or DL-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (4 mM) decrease (P < 0.01) alanine synthesis and BCAA transamination in EDC muscles from 24-h fasted chicks by decreasing (P < 0.01) intracellular concentrations of pyruvate due to inhibition of glycolysis. (3) Glutamine is extensively degraded in skeletal muscles from both chicks and rats, thus challenging the traditional view that glutamine oxidation is negligible in skeletal muscle. The cytosolic glutamine aminotransferases L and K in the rat and the mitochondrial phosphate-activated glutaminase in the chick play important roles in the conversion of glutamine to {alpha}-ketoglutarate for further oxidation. (4) Although methionine has been reported to be extensively transaminated in rat skeletal muscle preparations in the absence of other amino acids, transamination of methionine is absent or negligible in chick and rat skeletal muscles in the presence of physiological concentrations of amino acids. (5) Glutamine at 1.0-15 mM increases (P < 0.01) protein synthesis ({sup 3}H-phenylalanine incorporation), and at 10.0-15.0 mM decreases (P < 0.05) protein degradation ({sup 3}H-phenylalanine release from prelabelled protein in vivo) in EDC muscles from fed chicks as compared to muscles incubated in the absence of glutamine. (6) Acetoacetate or DL-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (4 mM) has a small but significant inhibitory effect (P < 0.05) on the rate of protein synthesis, but has no effect (P > 0.05) on the rate of protein degradation in EDC muscles from fed chicks.

  14. Probing the Specificity Determinants of Amino Acid Recognition by Arginase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishova, E.; Di Costanzo, L; Emig, F; Ash, D; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma, erectile dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the molecular basis of inhibitor affinity, we have employed site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray crystallography to probe the molecular recognition of the amino acid moiety (i.e., the ?-amino and ?-carboxylate groups) of substrate l-arginine and inhibitors in the active site of arginase I. Specifically, we focus on (1) a water-mediated hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and T135, (2) a direct hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and N130, and (3) a direct charged hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-amino group and D183. Amino acid substitutions for T135, N130, and D183 generally compromise substrate affinity as reflected by increased KM values but have less pronounced effects on catalytic function as reflected by minimal variations of kcat. As with substrate KM values, inhibitor Kd values increase for binding to enzyme mutants and suggest that the relative contribution of intermolecular interactions to amino acid affinity in the arginase active site is water-mediated hydrogen bond < direct hydrogen bond < direct charged hydrogen bond. Structural comparisons of arginase with the related binuclear manganese metalloenzymes agmatinase and proclavaminic acid amidinohydrolase suggest that the evolution of substrate recognition in the arginase fold occurs by mutation of residues contained in specificity loops flanking the mouth of the active site (especially loops 4 and 5), thereby allowing diverse guanidinium substrates to be accommodated for catalysis.

  15. Determination of amino acids in grape-derived products: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejón, R M; Troncoso, A M; Morales, M L

    2010-06-15

    The amino acids present in foods and beverages affect the quality of these products and they play an important role in enology. Amino acids are consumed by yeasts as a source of nitrogen during alcoholic fermentation and are precursors of aroma compounds. In this review various chromatographic methodologies for the determination of amino acids are described, and specific applications for the analysis of amino acid content are discussed. Amino acids usually need to be derivatized to make them more detectable. Several derivatizing reagents have been employed for the determination of amino acids in enological applications, and each has its advantages and disadvantages.

  16. Amino acids attached to 2'-amino-LNA: Synthesis of DNA mixmer oligonucleotides with increased duplex stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Marie Willaing; Wengel, Jesper; Wamberg, Michael Chr.

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of 2'-amino-LNA (locked nucleic acid) opens up exciting possibilities for modification of nucleic acids by conjugation to the 2'-nitrogen. Incorporation of unmodified and N-functionalized 2'-amino-LNA nucleotides improve duplex stability compared to unmodified DNA. 2'-Amino......-LNA nucleosides derivatized with amino acids have been synthesized and incorporated into DNA oligonucleotides. Following oligonucleotide synthesis, peptides have been added using solid phase peptide coupling chem. Modification of oligonucleotides with pos. charged residues greatly improves thermal stability....

  17. Amino acids and hexosamines as indicators of organic matter degradation state in North Sea sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauwe, B.; Middelburg, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Sediment cores from six stations in the eastern North Sea were analyzed for protein amino acids, the nonprotein amino acids beta-alanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid and the hexosamines galactosamine and glucosamine, and bulk parameters (organic carbon, nitrogen, total hydrolyzable amino acids and

  18. LC/ESI-MS analysis of underivatized amino acids and mass spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, Yoshinori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    We report the method of LC/ESI-MS analysis of underivatized amino acids with corresponding mass spectrum and fragmentation patterns. Diagnostic product ions determined by mass spectrometry can support the qualitative identification and quantitative estimation of individual amino acids. Therefore, the optimization of chromatographic separation using the ion-pairing reagent (i.e., Nonafluoropentanoic acid, NFPA) is useful for the evaluation of target amino acid and for further compound-specific nitrogen isotope studies of amino acids.

  19. Detecting Electron Transport of Amino Acids by Using Conductance Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Qiong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The single molecular conductance of amino acids was measured by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM break junction. Conductance measurement of alanine gives out two conductance values at 10−1.85 G0 (1095 nS and 10−3.7 G0 (15.5 nS, while similar conductance values are also observed for aspartic acid and glutamic acid, which have one more carboxylic acid group compared with alanine. This may show that the backbone of NH2–C–COOH is the primary means of electron transport in the molecular junction of aspartic acid and glutamic acid. However, NH2–C–COOH is not the primary means of electron transport in the methionine junction, which may be caused by the strong interaction of the Au–SMe (methyl sulfide bond for the methionine junction. The current work reveals the important role of the anchoring group in the electron transport in different amino acids junctions.

  20. The multifaceted role of amino acids in chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasdeit, Henry; Fox, Stefan; Dalai, Punam

    We present an overview of recent ideas about α-amino acids on the Hadean / early Archean Earth and Noachian Mars. Pertinent simulation experiments are discussed. Electrical dis-charges in early Earth's bulk, probably non-reducing atmosphere [1, 2] and in volcanic ash-gas clouds [3] are likely to have synthesized amino acids abiotically. In principle, this may have been followed by the synthesis of peptides. Different kinds of laboratory simulations have, however, revealed severe difficulties with the condensation process under presumed prebiotic conditions. It therefore appears that peptides on the early Earth were mainly di-, tri-and tetramers and slightly longer only in the case of glycine homopeptides. But even such short peptides may have shown primitive catalytic activity after complexation of metal ions to form proto-metalloenzymes. L-enantiomeric excesses (L-ee) of meteoritic amino acids were possibly involved in the origin of biohomochirality [4, 5]. This idea also faces some problems, mainly dilution of the amino acids on Earth and a resulting low overall L-ee. However, as yet unknown reactions might exist that are highly enantioselective even under such unfavorable conditions, perhaps by a combination of autocatalysis and inhibition (compare the Soai reaction). Primor-dial volcanic islands are prebiotically interesting locations. At their hot coasts, solid sea salt probably embedded amino acids [6]. Our laboratory experiments showed that further heating of the salt crusts, simulating the vicinity of lava streams, produced pyrroles among other prod-ucts. Pyrroles are building blocks of biomolecules such as bilins, chlorophylls and heme. Thus, an abiotic route from amino acids to the first photoreceptor and electron-transfer molecules might have existed. There is no reason to assume that the chemical evolutionary processes described above were singular events restricted to Earth and Mars. In fact, they might take place even today on terrestrial exoplanets

  1. Determination of underivatized amino acid delta(13)C by liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for nutritional studies: the effect of dietary non-essential amino acid profile on the isotopic signature of individual amino acids in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, James; Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; Focken, Ulfert

    2008-06-01

    This study provides data for the effect of dietary non-essential amino acid composition on the delta(13)C values of individual amino acids in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS). In this experiment, trout were reared either on a control diet or on three experimental diets, differing in the composition of non-essential/conditionally essential amino acids, for a period of 6 weeks. The control diet was a commercial trout starter feed with fish meal as the main protein source. The experimental diets contained no protein, only synthetic amino acids. Diet 1 resembled the composition of fish meal in both essential and non-essential amino acids, Diet 2 had all essential amino acids, but cysteine, glycine, proline and tyrosine were replaced by the corresponding amounts of their precursors, and in Diet 3 all non-essential amino acids were replaced by glutamate. LC/IRMS was used for the determination of delta(13)C values of individual amino acids from diets and tissues without derivatization. Diet affected the delta(13)C of individual amino acids in fish. For fish on Diets 1-3 amino acid delta(13)C values showed a similar trend: phenylalanine showed very little change from diet to body tissue. Arginine, lysine, tyrosine and proline showed strong depletion from diet to body tissue and glycine, alanine, aspartate and serine all showed variable but strong enrichment in (13)C. Improvements are necessary before all amino acid delta(13)C values can be determined; however, this study demonstrates that measuring amino acid isotopic signatures by LC/IRMS is a promising new technique for nutritional physiologists.

  2. Asymmetric synthesis of propargylamines as amino acid surrogates in peptidomimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wünsch

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The amide moiety of peptides can be replaced for example by a triazole moiety, which is considered to be bioisosteric. Therefore, the carbonyl moiety of an amino acid has to be replaced by an alkyne in order to provide a precursor of such peptidomimetics. As most amino acids have a chiral center at Cα, such amide bond surrogates need a chiral moiety. Here the asymmetric synthesis of a set of 24 N-sulfinyl propargylamines is presented. The condensation of various aldehydes with Ellman’s chiral sulfinamide provides chiral N-sulfinylimines, which were reacted with (trimethylsilylethynyllithium to afford diastereomerically pure N-sulfinyl propargylamines. Diverse functional groups present in the propargylic position resemble the side chain present at the Cα of amino acids. Whereas propargylamines with (cycloalkyl substituents can be prepared in a direct manner, residues with polar functional groups require suitable protective groups. The presence of particular functional groups in the side chain in some cases leads to remarkable side reactions of the alkyne moiety. Thus, electron-withdrawing substituents in the Cα-position facilitate a base induced rearrangement to α,β-unsaturated imines, while azide-substituted propargylamines form triazoles under surprisingly mild conditions. A panel of propargylamines bearing fluoro or chloro substituents, polar functional groups, or basic and acidic functional groups is accessible for the use as precursors of peptidomimetics.

  3. The amino acid composition of cotyledons, testa, embryo and protein fractions of bean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Kosson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of cotyledons, embryo and testa to the whole seed, was analyzed in the bean cultivar, Wiejska. The total nitrogen content and amino acid composition of morphological parts of the seed were determined. The average amino acid composition of globulins and albumins and the content of free amino acids in seeds of six Polish cultivars were estimated as well. It was found that the embryo contained the highest quantity of total nitrogen and the lowest of protein nitrogen. The exogenous amino acid content in the embryo was higher than in cotyledons and testa. Both albumins and globulins were shown to contain 42% exogenous amino acids. The content of methionine - the first limiting amino acid of bean proteins - did not exceed 0.30% of the total amino acid content in albumins and globulins. Free glutamic and aspartic acids made up more than 60% of the total free amino acids.

  4. Alternate mechanism for amino acid entry into Neurospora crassa: extracellular deamination and subsequent keto acid transport.

    OpenAIRE

    DeBusk, R M; Brown, D T; DeBusk, A G; Penderghast, R D

    1981-01-01

    The growth of the pm nbg mutant strain of Neurospora crassa was inhibited by the amino acid analog para-fluorophenylalanine despite the fact that none of the three constitutive amino acid permeases is functional in this strain. This observation led to the detection of both a deaminase which was released into the growth medium in response to para-fluorophenylalanine and a keto acid transport system which allowed entry of the resulting keto acid into the cell. The transported keto acid was reco...

  5. Enhanced detection of amino acids in hydrophilic interaction chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with carboxylic acids as mobile phase additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Dengyang; Hu, Xunxiu; Liu, Dantong; Du, Wencheng; Wang, Haibo; Guo, Mengzhe; Tang, Daoquan

    2017-06-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry technique has been widely used in the analysis of biological targets such as amino acids, peptides, and proteins. In this work, eight common single carboxylic acids or diacids, which contain different pKa have been investigated as the additives to the analysis of amino acids. As the results, carboxylic acid additive can improve the signal intensity of acidity amino acids such as Asp and Glu and the chromatographic separation of basic amino acids such as Arg, His, and Lys. In particular, the diacids have better performance than single acids. The proposed mechanism is that the diacid has hydrogen bond interaction with amino acids to reduce their polarity/amphiprotic characteristics. Besides, oxalic acid has been found having better enhancement than phthalic acid by overall consideration. Therefore, we successfully quantified the 15 amino acids in Sepia bulk pharmaceutical chemical by using oxalic acid as the additive.

  6. Adsorption characteristics of amino acids on to calcium oxalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junbin; Lin, Rihui; Long, Han; Liang, Yuwei; Chen, Yangyang

    2015-09-15

    Adsorption of amino acids on to calcium oxalate found in urinary calculus has been studied and the adsorption characteristics were analyzed. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models were used to fit the kinetics data. The pseudo-second-order model best described the dynamic behavior of the adsorption process. The uptake of glutamic acid and aspartic acid were found to decrease as solution pH increasing from 4 to 8. The experimental data obtained at different pH conditions were analyzed and fitted by Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Temkin and Sips isotherm models using linear and nonlinear regression analysis. Error analysis (correlation coefficient, residual root mean square error and chi-square test) showed that the Langmuir I isotherm model and the non-linear form of Sips isotherm model should be primarily adopted for fitting the equilibrium data. The maximum adsorption capacity of glutamic acid and aspartic acid onto calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are 0.059 and 0.066μmol/g at pH 4, respectively. These studies have the vital significance for research aimed at exploring the role of urinary amino acids effect the formation process of calcium oxalate crystals found in urinary calculus and for potential application in the design of synthetic peptides used for urinary calculi therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The amino acid sequence of the spinach basic cupredoxin plantacyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, K; Eckerskorn, C; Mehrabian, Z; Nalbandyan, R M

    1996-11-01

    We describe the amino acid sequence of plantacyanin isolated from spinach leaves. This small basic copper-binding plant cupredoxin contains 91 amino acids (accession no. S70746) and its theoretical average mass of 9788.2 Da was confirmed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. When compared to the sequences of other plant cupredoxins, the most similar homologs were cucumber basic blue protein and stellacyanin from Laquer tree with 44-58% identical residues. Other known plant cupredoxins were significantly less similar which may allow to divide the plant cupredoxins into two subgroups, the single-domain cupredoxins (plantacyanin, cucumber basic blue protein and stellacyanin) and the two-domain, hydroxyproline-containing cupredoxins (cucumber peeling cupredoxin, basic blue protein from Arabidopsis thaliana and horseradish umecyanin).

  8. Recent advances in amino acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsot, Véréna; Carpéné, Marie-Anne; Bouajila, Jalloul; Gavard, Pierre; Feurer, Bernard; Couderc, François

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the most important articles that have been published on amino acid analysis using CE during the period from June 2009 to May 2011 and follows the format of the previous articles of Smith (Electrophoresis 1999, 20, 3078-3083), Prata et al. (Electrophoresis 2001, 22, 4129-4138) and Poinsot et al. (Electrophoresis 2003, 24, 4047-4062; Electrophoresis 2006, 27, 176-194; Electrophoresis 2008, 29, 207-223; Electrophoresis 2010, 31, 105-121). We present new developments in amino acid analysis with CE, which are reported describing the use of lasers or light emitting diodes for fluorescence detection, conductimetry electrochemiluminescence detectors, mass spectrometry applications, and lab-on-a-chip applications using CE. In addition, we describe articles concerning clinical studies and neurochemical applications of these techniques. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Amino acid sequence of the Amur tiger prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changde; Pang, Wanyong; Zhao, Deming

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in human and animal associated with conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathologic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Various data indicate that the polymorphisms within the open reading frame (ORF) of PrP are associated with the susceptibility and control the species barrier in prion diseases. In the present study, partial Prnp from 25 Amur tigers (tPrnp) were cloned and screened for polymorphisms. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (T423C, A501G, C511A, A610G) were found; the C511A and A610G nucleotide substitutions resulted in the amino acid changes Lysine171Glutamine and Alanine204Threoine, respectively. The tPrnp amino acid sequence is similar to house cat (Felis catus ) and sheep, but differs significantly from other two cat Prnp sequences that were previously deposited in GenBank.

  10. Engineering the translation apparatus to incorporate nonnatural amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yang

    2010-06-01

    Incorporation of nonnatural amino acids into proteins has exerted great effects on many fields. In recent years, the engineering of translation apparatus facilitates the boom of this field. The modifications on tRNAs, tRNA synthetases, ribosomes, elongation factors and release factors efficiently broaden the repertoire of amino acids and largely increase the efficiency of incorporation. In addition, deep understanding of the translation mechanism helps us generate certain kinds of RNAs which can act as alternative translation components to catalyze the aminoacylation step or inhibitors to attenuate the activity of a certain component. Here I review the strategies to evolve or engineer the components of translation apparatus as well as the methods to control their activity to meet our needs.

  11. Informational Way to Protein Alphabet: Entropic Classification of Amino Acids

    CERN Document Server

    Gorban, A N; Popova, T

    2007-01-01

    What are proteins made from, as the working parts of the living cells protein machines? To answer this question, we need a technology to disassemble proteins onto elementary func-tional details and to prepare lumped description of such details. This lumped description might have a multiple material realization (in amino acids). Our hypothesis is that informational approach to this problem is possible. We propose a way of hierarchical classification that makes the primary structure of protein maximally non-random. The first steps of the suggested research program are realized: the method and the analysis of optimal informational protein binary alphabet. The general method is used to answer several specific questions, for example: (i) Is there a syntactic difference between Globular and Membrane proteins? (ii) Are proteins random sequences of amino acids (a long discussion)? For these questions, the answers are as follows: (i) There exists significant syntactic difference between Globular and Membrane proteins,...

  12. Free amino acids in fibromyalgia syndrome: relationship with clinical picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Valeria; Mura, Massimiliano; Cacace, Enrico; Era, Benedetta; Peri, Marcella; Sanna, Giuseppina; Fais, Antonella

    2017-04-01

    The objectives of our study were to evaluate free amino acid (FAA) concentrations in the serum of patients affected by fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and to determine the relationships between FAA levels and FMS clinical parameters. Thus, serum amino acid concentrations were quantified (HPLC analysis) in 23 females with fibromyalgia (according to the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria) and 20 healthy females. The results showed significantly higher serum concentrations of aspartate, cysteine, glutamate, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, ornithine, phenylalanine, sarcosine, serine, taurine, tyrosine and valine in FMS patients vs. healthy controls. Patients with higher Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores showed increased levels of alanine, glutamine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, proline and valine. In conclusion, our results indicate an imbalance in some FAAs in FMS patients. Increased Glu is particularly interesting, as it could explain the deficit in monoaminergic transmission involved in pain.

  13. Modification in amino acids of Dead Sea Scroll Parchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, H; Ajie, H

    1992-12-01

    Fragments of Dead Sea Scroll Parchments were extracted for collagen and subjected to amino acid analysis. In modern parchment samples, 90% or more of the protein could be extracted in hot aqueous solution as collagen. In the ancient specimens, 70% or less was extractable. The hot-solution insoluble material was analyzed for collagen. In the soluble extract, the quantity of tyrosine, histidine, and methionine was reduced. Dityrosine was detected. The need to extend such studies is discussed.

  14. Mitochondrial transporters for ornithine and related amino acids: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monné, Magnus; Miniero, Daniela Valeria; Daddabbo, Lucia; Palmieri, Luigi; Porcelli, Vito; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2015-09-01

    Among the members of the mitochondrial carrier family, there are transporters that catalyze the translocation of ornithine and related substrates, such as arginine, homoarginine, lysine, histidine, and citrulline, across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mitochondrial carriers ORC1, ORC2, and SLC25A29 from Homo sapiens, BAC1 and BAC2 from Arabidopsis thaliana, and Ort1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been biochemically characterized by transport assays in liposomes. All of them transport ornithine and amino acids with side chains terminating at least with one amine. There are, however, marked differences in their substrate specificities including their affinity for ornithine (KM values in the mM to μM range). These differences are most likely reflected by minor differences in the substrate binding sites of these carriers. The physiological role of the above-mentioned mitochondrial carriers is to link several metabolic pathways that take place partly in the cytosol and partly in the mitochondrial matrix and to provide basic amino acids for mitochondrial translation. In the liver, human ORC1 catalyzes the citrulline/ornithine exchange across the mitochondrial inner membrane, which is required for the urea cycle. Human ORC1, ORC2, and SLC25A29 are likely to be involved in the biosynthesis and transport of arginine, which can be used as a precursor for the synthesis of NO, agmatine, polyamines, creatine, glutamine, glutamate, and proline, as well as in the degradation of basic amino acids. BAC1 and BAC2 are implicated in some processes similar to those of their human counterparts and in nitrogen and amino acid metabolism linked to stress conditions and the development of plants. Ort1p is involved in the biosynthesis of arginine and polyamines in yeast.

  15. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo

    2017-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. Objectives: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. Search methods: We identified trials through...... included randomised clinical trials, irrespective of the bias control, language, or publication status. Data collection and analysis: The authors independently extracted data based on published reports and collected data from the primary investigators. We changed our primary outcomes in this update...

  16. AMINO ACID COMPOSITION AND ELECTROPHORETIC PROPERTIES OF HYPERTENSIN I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeggs, Leonard T.; Marsh, Walton H.; Kahn, Joseph R.; Shumway, Norman P.

    1955-01-01

    A preparation of hypertensin I was purified by countercurrent distribution and was shown to migrate as a single component in starch blocks at pH 9.3 and 4.2. It had an isoelectric point of 7.7. Quantitative analysis by ion exchange column chromatography showed eight amino acids in approximately unimolar proportion: aspartic, proline, valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, and arginine. There were in addition two moles of histidine. PMID:13263485

  17. Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, Edgar P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-08-12

    The title of our project is “Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants”. Its goals are two-fold: to determine the molecular functions of glutamate receptor-like (GLR) proteins, and to elucidate their biological roles (physiological or developmental) in plants. Here is our final technical report. We were highly successful in two of the three aims, modestly successful in the third.

  18. Primordial transport of sugars and amino acids via Schiff bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillwell, William; Rau, Aruna

    1981-09-01

    Experimental support is given for a model concerning the origin of a primordial transport system. The model is based on the facilitated diffusion of amino acids stimulated by aliphatic aldehyde carriers and sugars stimulated by aliphatic amine carriers. The lipid-soluble diffusing species is the Schiff base. The possible role of this simple transport system in the origin of an early protocell is discussed.

  19. Intestinal adaptation and amino acid transport following massive enterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H T; Miller, J H; Iannoli, P; Sax, H C

    1997-11-01

    Morphological and physiological adaptation in residual small intestine occurs after massive enterectomy and is influenced significantly by different growth factors and hormones. The mechanism of adaptation occurs through hypertrophy and hyperplasia as well as nutrient transporter changes. These transporters are classified into different classes dependent on its biological properties. The adaptation process evolves over time and different nutrient absorption profiles occur at different postoperative stages. There is an initial decrease in amino acid transport after resection followed by a return to approximately normal levels. Glucose also follows a similar pattern of changes but returns to normal later than amino acids. The time course of these changes are different for different animals with rat adaptation being much faster than rabbit. Growth hormone (GH) induces increased amino acid transport during this adaptation period, however, appears not to affect small intestine hypertrophy or hyperplasia. The increase in transport occurs via an increase in transport numbers rather than affinity. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) also increases amino acid transport in postoperative animals. Its advantage is it is orally stable when given with a protease inhibitor. EGF also reverses the down-regulating effects of the somatostatin analogue Octreotide (SMS) post resection. EGF in combination with GH has additive effects. However, the effects of the growth factors are site specific. GH and EGF combination therapy significantly increased alanine and arginine transport in distal small bowel after 70 % enterectomy but not in the proximal small bowel. The same combination increases leucine and glutamine transport in the proximal small intestine only. Understanding the specific changes that occur with these therapies may improve quality of life for patients and also reduce that need for total parenteral nutrition.

  20. The potential of amino acids in alkaliphilic bioleaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthen, Robert; Karimzadeh, Lotfallah; Gruendig, Marion; Franke, Karsten; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Reactive Transport; Heim, J. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

    2017-06-01

    Bioleaching has become a major production process for copper contributing currently to around 15 % of the world wide copper production. However, non-sulfidic and/or complex ores are still not efficiently minable by conventional methods. In this study, we investigated the effect of copper complexing molecules such as amino acids on Cu{sup 2+} and S{sup 2-} solubilization from covellite.

  1. Statistical analysis of unstructured amino acid residues in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, M Yu; Garbuzynskiy, S O; Galzitskaya, O V

    2010-02-01

    We have performed a statistical analysis of unstructured amino acid residues in protein structures available in the databank of protein structures. Data on the occurrence of disordered regions at the ends and in the middle part of protein chains have been obtained: in the regions near the ends (at distance less than 30 residues from the N- or C-terminus), there are 66% of unstructured residues (38% are near the N-terminus and 28% are near the C-terminus), although these terminal regions include only 23% of the amino acid residues. The frequencies of occurrence of unstructured residues have been calculated for each of 20 types in different positions in the protein chain. It has been shown that relative frequencies of occurrence of unstructured residues of 20 types at the termini of protein chains differ from the ones in the middle part of the protein chain; amino acid residues of the same type have different probabilities to be unstructured in the terminal regions and in the middle part of the protein chain. The obtained frequencies of occurrence of unstructured residues in the middle part of the protein chain have been used as a scale for predicting disordered regions from amino acid sequence using the method (FoldUnfold) previously developed by us. This scale of frequencies of occurrence of unstructured residues correlates with the contact scale (previously developed by us and used for the same purpose) at a level of 95%. Testing the new scale on a database of 427 unstructured proteins and 559 completely structured proteins has shown that this scale can be successfully used for the prediction of disordered regions in protein chains.

  2. Plasma-Enhanced Copolymerization of Amino Acid and Synthetic Monomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    dielectrics to successfully deposit a wide range of monomers covering many traditional polymers , ranging from styrene, acrylonitrile, and benzene to...gas-phase monomer. It has been demonstrated that sublimation PECVD is compatible with a range of materials, from organometallics to amino acids...previous studies have evaluated this polymer and its deposition characteristics.9,41,42 This fact allowed the focus of this deposition to be centered on

  3. The effects of borate minerals on the synthesis of nucleic acid bases, amino acids and biogenic carboxylic acids from formamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladino, Raffaele; Barontini, Maurizio; Cossetti, Cristina; Di Mauro, Ernesto; Crestini, Claudia

    2011-08-01

    The thermal condensation of formamide in the presence of mineral borates is reported. The products afforded are precursors of nucleic acids, amino acids derivatives and carboxylic acids. The efficiency and the selectivity of the reaction was studied in relation to the elemental composition of the 18 minerals analyzed. The possibility of synthesizing at the same time building blocks of both genetic and metabolic apparatuses, along with the production of amino acids, highlights the interest of the formamide/borate system in prebiotic chemistry.

  4. First In-Situ Analysis of Amino Acids in the Murchison Meteorite with C60-TOFSIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, T.; Lyon, I. C.

    2015-07-01

    We found amino acids with a similar abundance pattern as previously reported by others. These amino acids show a spatial correlation with Mg indicating a possible involvement of Mg (or the corresponding mineral) in the processing of organic matter.

  5. Age-related changes of muscle and plasma amino acids in healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarqvist, Folke; Angsten, Gertrud; Meurling, Staffan; Andersson, Kerstin; Wernerman, Jan

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the study was to explore if changes in muscle and plasma amino acid concentrations developed during growth and differed from levels seen in adults. The gradient and concentrations of free amino acids in muscle and plasma were investigated in relation to age in metabolic healthy children. Plasma and specimens from the abdominal muscle were obtained during elective surgery. The children were grouped into three groups (group 1: amino acids analysed increased with age, namely taurine, aspartate, threonine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, histidine, as well as the total sums of branched chain amino acids (BCAA), basic amino acids (BAA) and total sum of amino acids (P amino acids correlated with age (P < 0.05). These results indicate that there is an age dependency of the amino acid pattern in skeletal muscle and plasma during growth.

  6. In vivo unnatural amino acid expression in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Travis [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA

    2014-02-11

    The invention provides orthogonal translation systems for the production of polypeptides comprising unnatural amino acids in methyltrophic yeast such as Pichia pastoris. Methods for producing polypeptides comprising unnatural amino acids in methyltrophic yeast such as Pichia pastoris are also provided.

  7. In vivo unnatural amino acid expression in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G.

    2017-08-15

    The invention provides orthogonal translation systems for the production of polypeptides comprising unnatural amino acids in methylotrophic yeast such as Pichia pastoris. Methods for producing polypeptides comprising unnatural amino acids in methylotrophic yeast such as Pichia pastoris are also provided.

  8. Functional amino acids in fish nutrition, health and welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Synne M; Waagbø, Rune; Espe, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Protein is the most expensive part of fish diets and supplies amino acids (AA) for energy, growth, protein synthesis and as substrates for key metabolic pathways. Functional AA is a term used to describe AA that are involved in cellular processes apart from protein synthesis. A deficiency, or imbalance, in functional AA may impair body metabolism and homeostasis. Recent years have seen an increased interest in AA to increase disease resistance, immune response, reproduction, behavior and more. This has led to a boost of commercially available functional fish feeds that aim to optimize fish performance and quality of the product. This review aim to collect recent findings of functional AA and of how they may improve fish health and welfare. It will focus on functional properties of some of the most studied AA, namely arginine, glutamine, glutamate, tryptophan, sulfur amino acids (methionine, cysteine and taurine), histidine and branched chain amino acids. Where information is not available in fish, we will point towards functions known in animals and humans, with possible translational functions to fish.

  9. Mining amino acid association patterns in class B GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Tannu; Pardasani, Kamal Raj

    2015-01-01

    Class B GPCR family is a small group of receptors which are activated by peptides of intermediate length that range from 30 to 40 amino acid residues including hormones, neuropeptides and autocrine factors that mediate diverse physiological functions. They are involved in physiological processes like glucose homeostasis (glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1), calcium homeostasis and bone turnover (parathyroid hormone and calcitonin), and control of the stress axis (corticotropin-releasing factor). Most of the GPCR structures and their functions are still unknown. Thus, the study of amino acid association patterns can be useful in prediction of their structure and functions. In view of above, in this paper, an attempt has been made to explore amino acid association patterns in class B GPCRs and their relationships with secondary structures and physiochemical properties. The fuzzy association rule mining is employed to take care of uncertainty due to variation in length of sequences. The association rules have been generated with the help of patterns discovered in the sequences.

  10. Functional amino acids in the development of the pig placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W; Johnson, Gregory A; Herring, Cassandra; Seo, Heewon; Dai, Zhaolai; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Zhenlong; Wang, Xiaolong

    2017-09-01

    The mammalian placenta is essential for supplying nutrients (e.g., amino acids and water) and oxygen from the mother to fetus and for removing fetal metabolites (e.g., ammonia and CO2 ) from fetus to mother. Thus, placental growth and development are determinants of fetal survival, growth, and development. Indeed, low birth weight is closely associated with reduced placental growth. Providing gestating gilts or sows with dietary supplementation of arginine and glutamine, increases placental growth (including vascular growth), improves embryonic/fetal growth and survival, and reduces the large variation in birth weight among litters. These two amino acids serve as building blocks for tissue protein as well as substrates for the production of polyamines and nitric oxide, which stimulate DNA and protein synthesis and angiogenesis and vascular growth in the placenta. These recent findings not only greatly advance the field of mammalian amino acid metabolism and nutrition, but also provide practical, mechanism-based methods to enhance reproductive efficiency in swine. These results may also help improve embryonic/fetal survival and growth in other livestock species (e.g., sheep and cattle) and in humans. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Amino-acid sequence of toxin III of Naja haje.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeyan, C; Miranda, F; Rochat, H

    1975-10-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of toxin III of Naja haje (72 residues) has been established mainly by use of a protein sequenator (identification of 70 residues). The two C-terminal residues have been determined by digestion with carboxypeptidases A and B. Addition of succinylated protein or peptide greatly improved the performance of the sequenator for the Edman degradation of peptides: on one peptide (39 residues) degradation went to step 34 with a protein program and on two peptides (10 and 13 residues) degradation reached the last amino acid with a peptide program (use of dimethylbenzylamine). Amino acid analysis of tryptic peptides obtained by digestion of the C-terminal cyanogen bromide peptide are in full agreement with the sequence established by automatic degradation. The sequence of toxin III of Naja haje is unique and is very similar to that of Naja nivea alpha (although there are 9 differences), of Naja melanoleuca b (11 differences) and also to that of Naja naja A (18 differences).

  12. Revisiting amino acid substitution matrices for identifying distantly related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazunori; Tomii, Kentaro

    2014-02-01

    Although many amino acid substitution matrices have been developed, it has not been well understood which is the best for similarity searches, especially for remote homology detection. Therefore, we collected information related to existing matrices, condensed it and derived a novel matrix that can detect more remote homology than ever. Using principal component analysis with existing matrices and benchmarks, we developed a novel matrix, which we designate as MIQS. The detection performance of MIQS is validated and compared with that of existing general purpose matrices using SSEARCH with optimized gap penalties for each matrix. Results show that MIQS is able to detect more remote homology than the existing matrices on an independent dataset. In addition, the performance of our developed matrix was superior to that of CS-BLAST, which was a novel similarity search method with no amino acid matrix. We also evaluated the alignment quality of matrices and methods, which revealed that MIQS shows higher alignment sensitivity than that with the existing matrix series and CS-BLAST. Fundamentally, these results are expected to constitute good proof of the availability and/or importance of amino acid matrices in sequence analysis. Moreover, with our developed matrix, sophisticated similarity search methods such as sequence-profile and profile-profile comparison methods can be improved further. Newly developed matrices and datasets used for this study are available at http://csas.cbrc.jp/Ssearch/.

  13. Branched chain amino acid profile in early chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional status in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients is a predictor of prognosis during the first period of dialysis. Serum albumin is the most commonly used nutritional marker. Another index is plasma amino acid profile. Of these, the plasma levels of branched chain amino acids (BCAA, especially valine and leucine, correlate well with nutritional status. Plasma BCAAs were evaluated along with albumin and C-reactive protein in 15 patients of early stages of CKD and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. A significant decrease in plasma valine, leucine and albumin levels was observed in CKD patients when compared with the controls (P <0.05. No significant difference in C-reactive protein (CRP levels was observed between the two groups. Malnutrition seen in our CKD patients in the form of hypoalbuminemia and decreased concentrations of BCAA points to the need to evaluate the nutritional status in the early stages itself. Simple measures in the form of amino acid supplementation should be instituted early to decrease the morbidity and mortality before start of dialysis in these patients.

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Amino Acid Side Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of nat...... of naturally-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain alkylamine side chains....

  15. Regional differences in glutathione accumulation pathways in the rat cornea: Mapping of amino acid transporters involved in glutathione synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandarajah, Vithushiya; Li, Bo; Umapathy, Ankita; Donaldson, Paul J; Lim, Julie C

    2017-08-01

    In this study we have sought to complete the identification and localisation of uptake pathways involved in accumulating precursor amino acids involved in GSH synthesis in the rat cornea. To do this, we performed reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) to identify the Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAAT 1-5) responsible for glutamate uptake, and glycine transporters (GLYT 1-2) at the transcript level. Western blotting was used to verify protein expression, while immunolabelling of sagittal sections was used to localise transporters to the different layers of the cornea. Immunolabelling of en face sections was used to examine the subcellular distribution of proteins in the corneal endothelium. Our findings revealed EAAT 1-5 and GLYT 1-2 to be expressed at the transcript and protein level in the rat cornea. Immunohistochemistry revealed all amino acid transporters to be localised to the epithelium. In the majority of cases, labelling was restricted to the epithelium, and labelling absent from the stroma or endothelium. However, EAAT 4 and GLYT 2 labelling was detected in the stroma with EAAT 4 labelling also present in the endothelium. Overall, the identification of amino acid transporters strongly supports the existence of an intracellular GSH synthesis pathway in the rat corneal epithelium. This suggests that regional differences in GSH accumulation pathways exist, with direct uptake of GSH and intracellular synthesis of GSH restricted to the endothelial and epithelial cell layers, respectively. This information is important in the design of targeted strategies to enhance GSH levels in specific layers of the cornea to prevent against oxidative damage, corneal swelling and loss of corneal transparency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-12-17

    Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

  17. Simultaneous extraction and derivatization of amino acids and free fatty acids in meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggio, Antonella; Belsito, Emilia Lucia; De Marco, Rosaria; Liguori, Angelo; Siciliano, Carlo; Spinella, Mariagiovanna

    2012-06-08

    In meat products the contents of free amino acids and free fatty acids are two important parameters used to establish their quality. These compounds play a very important role in defining the sensorial characteristics and acceptability of meat products. An innovative procedure for the measurement of free amino acid and fatty acid contents in meat and meat derivatives was developed. A single experiment can be performed in order to determine simultaneously the free amino acid and free fatty acid profiles. The analytes of interest are rapidly extracted from the meat matrix and derivatized by using methyl chloroformate. This reagent allows the transformation of the two groups of analytes into the corresponding N-methyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters and fatty acid methyl esters that can easily be extracted and sampled for their further identification and quantitation. The measurement of the obtained amino acid and fatty acid derivatives is performed by GC/MS analysis and their concentrations are calculated by using two appropriate internal standards. The main advantage of the proposed protocol is the determination at the same time of two important classes of analytes that are of great importance in food analysis and characterization. Moreover, minimal sample manipulation and preparation, and reduced total extraction times are required to obtain the response with respect to conventional procedures, in which instead the analysis of both the two classes of compounds must be performed separately. The helpfulness of the protocol was tested in the analysis of a cured meat product that is typical of the South of Italy. The optimized protocol successfully allowed the determination of thirteen free amino acids and six free fatty acids, namely those most abundant in the lipid content of the cured meat product under evaluation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Amphetamine modulates excitatory neurotransmission through endocytosis of the glutamate transporter EAAT3 in dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Suzanne M; Wheeler, David S; Li, Minghua; Watts, Spencer D; Ingram, Susan L; Amara, Susan G

    2014-07-16

    Amphetamines modify the brain and alter behavior through mechanisms generally attributed to their ability to regulate extracellular dopamine concentrations. However, the actions of amphetamine are also linked to adaptations in glutamatergic signaling. We report here that when amphetamine enters dopamine neurons through the dopamine transporter, it stimulates endocytosis of an excitatory amino acid transporter, EAAT3, in dopamine neurons. Consistent with this decrease in surface EAAT3, amphetamine potentiates excitatory synaptic responses in dopamine neurons. We also show that the process of internalization is dynamin- and Rho-mediated and requires a unique sequence in the cytosolic C terminus of EAAT3. Introduction of a peptide based on this motif into dopamine neurons blocks the effects of amphetamine on EAAT3 internalization and its action on excitatory responses. These data indicate that the internalization of EAAT3 triggered by amphetamine increases glutamatergic signaling and thus contributes to the effects of amphetamine on neurotransmission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of D-alanine and D-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other D-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of D-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than D-alanine and D-aspartic acid. These D-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria.

  20. Plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations in cats eating commercially prepared diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Cailin R; Larsen, Jennifer A; Kass, Philip H; Fascetti, Andrea J

    2009-11-01

    To establish comprehensive reference ranges for plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations in healthy adult cats eating commercial diets and to evaluate the relationships of age, sex, body weight, body condition score (BCS), dietary protein concentration, and dietary ingredients with plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations. 120 healthy adult cats. Blood samples and a complete health and diet history were obtained for each cat, and reference intervals for plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations were determined. Results were analyzed for associations of age, breed, sex, body weight, BCS, use of heparin, sample hemolysis and lipemia, dietary protein concentrations, and dietary ingredients with amino acid concentrations. 95% reference intervals were determined for plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations. A significant difference in amino acid concentrations on the basis of sex was apparent for multiple amino acids. There was no clear relationship between age, BCS, body weight, and dietary protein concentration and amino acid concentrations. Differences in amino acid concentrations were detected for various dietary ingredients, but the relationships were difficult to interpret. This study provided data on plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations for a large population of adult cats eating commercial diets. Plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations were not affected by age, BCS, or body weight but were affected by sex and neuter status. Dietary protein concentration and dietary ingredients were not directly associated with plasma amino acid or whole blood taurine concentrations.