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Sample records for excitation-induced muscle cell

  1. Causes of excitation-induced muscle cell damage in isometric contractions: mechanical stress or calcium overload?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsted, Anne; Gissel, Hanne; Madsen, Klavs

    2007-01-01

    Prolonged or unaccustomed exercise leads to muscle cell membrane damage, detectable as release of the intracellular enzyme lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH). This is correlated to excitation-induced influx of Ca2+, but it cannot be excluded that mechanical stress contributes to the damage. We here ...

  2. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  3. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Emerson Randolph

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies, such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some muscular dystrophies. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on their embryologic origins and the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  4. The Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The skeletal muscle satellite cell was first described and named based on its anatomic location between the myofiber plasma and basement membranes. In 1961, two independent studies by Alexander Mauro and Bernard Katz provided the first electron microscopic descriptions of satellite cells in frog and rat muscles. These cells were soon detected in other vertebrates and acquired candidacy as the source of myogenic cells needed for myofiber growth and repair throughout life. Cultures of isolated myofibers and, subsequently, transplantation of single myofibers demonstrated that satellite cells were myogenic progenitors. More recently, satellite cells were redefined as myogenic stem cells given their ability to self-renew in addition to producing differentiated progeny. Identification of distinctively expressed molecular markers, in particular Pax7, has facilitated detection of satellite cells using light microscopy. Notwithstanding the remarkable progress made since the discovery of satellite cells, researchers have looked for alternative cells with myogenic capacity that can potentially be used for whole body cell-based therapy of skeletal muscle. Yet, new studies show that inducible ablation of satellite cells in adult muscle impairs myofiber regeneration. Thus, on the 50th anniversary since its discovery, the satellite cell’s indispensable role in muscle repair has been reaffirmed. PMID:22147605

  5. Satellite cells: the architects of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Natasha C; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle is attributed to the resident muscle stem cell termed satellite cell. Satellite cells are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration as they ultimately provide the myogenic precursors that rebuild damaged muscle tissue. Satellite cells characteristically are a heterogeneous population of stem cells and committed progenitor cells. Delineation of cellular hierarchy and understanding how lineage fate choices are determined within the satellite cell population will be invaluable for the advancement of muscle regenerative therapies. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  7. Transplantation of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Monica N; Hall, John K; Cadwallader, Adam B; Pawlikowski, Bradley T; Doles, Jason D; Elston, Tiffany L; Olwin, Bradley B

    2017-01-01

    Transplanting adult stem cells provides a stringent test for self-renewal and the assessment of comparative engraftment in competitive transplant assays. Transplantation of satellite cells into mammalian skeletal muscle provided the first critical evidence that satellite cells function as adult muscle stem cells. Transplantation of a single satellite cell confirmed and extended this hypothesis, providing proof that the satellite cell is a bona fide adult skeletal muscle stem cell as reported by Sacco et al. (Nature 456(7221):502-506). Satellite cell transplantation has been further leveraged to identify culture conditions that maintain engraftment and to identify self-renewal deficits in satellite cells from aged mice. Conversion of iPSCs (induced pluripotent stem cells) to a satellite cell-like state, followed by transplantation, demonstrated that these cells possess adult muscle stem cell properties as reported by Darabi et al. (Stem Cell Rev Rep 7(4):948-957) and Mizuno et al. (FASEB J 24(7):2245-2253). Thus, transplantation strategies involving either satellite cells derived from adult muscles or derived from iPSCs may eventually be exploited as a therapy for treating patients with diseased or failing skeletal muscle. Here, we describe methods for isolating dispersed adult mouse satellite cells and satellite cells on intact myofibers for transplantation into recipient mice to study muscle stem cell function and behavior following engraftment .

  8. Mechanosensitivtiy of aged muscle stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, Heleen E.; Haroon, Mohammad; Le Grand, Fabien; Bakker, Astrid D.; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Jaspers, Richard T.

    2017-01-01

    During aging, skeletal muscle tissue progressively declines in mass, strength, and regenerative capacity. Decreased muscle stem cell (MuSC) number and impaired function might underlie the aging-related muscle wasting and impaired regenerative capacity. As yet, the search for factors that regulate

  9. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  10. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eSnijders

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodelling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodelling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodelling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  11. Hierarchical signaling transduction of the immune and muscle cell crosstalk in muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenjun; Hu, Ping

    2017-08-24

    The muscle regeneration is a complicated bioprocess that involved in many cell types, including necrotic muscle cells, satellite cells, mesenchymal cells, pericytes, immune cells, and other cell types present at the injury site. Immune cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses regulate the progress of muscle regeneration. In this review, we discussed the roles of different immune cells in muscle regeneration. The immune cells regulate muscle regeneration through cytokine production, cell-cell contacts, and general immune environment regulation. We also describe the current known mechanism of how immune cells regulating muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Muscle Cells Provide Instructions for Planarian Regeneration

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    Jessica N. Witchley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region.

  13. Muscle cells provide instructions for planarian regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witchley, Jessica N; Mayer, Mirjam; Wagner, Daniel E; Owen, Jared H; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-08-29

    Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs) that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Muscle cell cultures in Menkes' disease: copper accumulation in myotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, G. J.; Kroon, J. J.; Wijburg, F. A.; Sinjorgo, K. M.; Herzberg, N. H.; Bolhuis, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    We present 64Cu uptake studies in cultured muscle cells from a one-year-old patient with Menkes' disease. The cultured muscle cells from the patient showed a five-fold higher 64Cu uptake than control muscle cells. Copper uptake in muscle cells was of the same magnitude as that found in fibroblasts

  15. Skeletal Muscle Cell Induction from Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Yusaku Kodaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have the potential to differentiate into various types of cells including skeletal muscle cells. The approach of converting ESCs/iPSCs into skeletal muscle cells offers hope for patients afflicted with the skeletal muscle diseases such as the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Patient-derived iPSCs are an especially ideal cell source to obtain an unlimited number of myogenic cells that escape immune rejection after engraftment. Currently, there are several approaches to induce differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs to skeletal muscle. A key to the generation of skeletal muscle cells from ESCs/iPSCs is the mimicking of embryonic mesodermal induction followed by myogenic induction. Thus, current approaches of skeletal muscle cell induction of ESCs/iPSCs utilize techniques including overexpression of myogenic transcription factors such as MyoD or Pax3, using small molecules to induce mesodermal cells followed by myogenic progenitor cells, and utilizing epigenetic myogenic memory existing in muscle cell-derived iPSCs. This review summarizes the current methods used in myogenic differentiation and highlights areas of recent improvement.

  16. Satellite Cells and the Muscle Stem Cell Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hang; Price, Feodor

    2013-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle in mammals is a stable tissue under normal circumstances but has remarkable ability to repair after injury. Skeletal muscle regeneration is a highly orchestrated process involving the activation of various cellular and molecular responses. As skeletal muscle stem cells, satellite cells play an indispensible role in this process. The self-renewing proliferation of satellite cells not only maintains the stem cell population but also provides numerous myogenic cells, which proliferate, differentiate, fuse, and lead to new myofiber formation and reconstitution of a functional contractile apparatus. The complex behavior of satellite cells during skeletal muscle regeneration is tightly regulated through the dynamic interplay between intrinsic factors within satellite cells and extrinsic factors constituting the muscle stem cell niche/microenvironment. For the last half century, the advance of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics has greatly improved our understanding of skeletal muscle biology. Here, we review some recent advances, with focuses on functions of satellite cells and their niche during the process of skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:23303905

  17. Cultured human muscle cells and respiratory chain deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herzberg, N. H.; Bolhuis, P. A.; van den Bogert, C.; Barth, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    Cultured muscle cells are useful in the study of respiratory chain disorders. Muscle tissue is affected in most cases and muscle biopsies are often taken for diagnostic purposes. Small samples of the biopsies can provide large numbers of muscle cells. In contrast with most other cell types, the

  18. Mechanosensitiviy of aged muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, Heleen E; Haroon, Mohammad; Le Grand, Fabien; Bakker, Astrid D; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Jaspers, Richard T

    2017-11-02

    During aging, skeletal muscle tissue progressively declines in mass, strength, and regenerative capacity. Decreased muscle stem cell (MuSC) number and impaired function might underlie the aging-related muscle wasting and impaired regenerative capacity. As yet, the search for factors that regulate MuSC fate and function has revealed several biochemical factors within the MuSC niche that may be responsible for the decline in MuSC regenerative capacity. This decline cannot be explained by environmental factors solely, as the MuSC potential to regenerate muscle tissue is not reversed by changing the biochemical MuSC niche composition. Here we discuss the likeliness that during physical exercise, MuSCs within their niche are subjected to mechanical loads, in particular pressure and shear stress, as well as associated deformations. We postulate that these physical cues are involved in the activation and differentiation of MuSCs as these cells contain several transmembrane sensor proteins that have been shown to be mechanosensitive in other cell types, that is, endothelial cells and osteoprogenitors. We will specifically address age-related changes in mechanosensing in MuSCs and their niche. Insight in the physical cues applied to the MuSCs in vivo, and how these cues affect MuSC fate and function, helps to develop new therapeutic interventions to counterbalance age-related muscle loss. This requires an approach combining two- and three-dimensional live cell imaging of MuSCs within contracting muscle tissue, mathematical finite element modeling, and cell biology. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society.

  19. Skeletal muscle stem cells from animals I. Basic cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeletal muscle stem cells from food-producing animals have been of interest to agricultural life scientists seeking to develop a better understanding of the molecular regulation of lean tissue (skeletal muscle protein hypertrophy) and intramuscular fat (marbling) development. Enhanced understanding...

  20. Autophagic regulation of smooth muscle cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua K. Salabei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy regulates the metabolism, survival, and function of numerous cell types, including those comprising the cardiovascular system. In the vasculature, changes in autophagy have been documented in atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions and in hypertensive vessels. The biology of vascular smooth muscle cells appears particularly sensitive to changes in the autophagic program. Recent evidence indicates that stimuli or stressors evoked during the course of vascular disease can regulate autophagic activity, resulting in modulation of VSMC phenotype and viability. In particular, certain growth factors and cytokines, oxygen tension, and pharmacological drugs have been shown to trigger autophagy in smooth muscle cells. Importantly, each of these stimuli has a redox component, typically associated with changes in the abundance of reactive oxygen, nitrogen, or lipid species. Collective findings support the hypothesis that autophagy plays a critical role in vascular remodeling by regulating smooth muscle cell phenotype transitions and by influencing the cellular response to stress. In this graphical review, we summarize current knowledge on the role of autophagy in the biology of the smooth muscle cell in (pathophysiology.

  1. Isolation of satellite cells from single muscle fibers from young, aged, or dystrophic muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Foggia, Valentina; Robson, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains an identified resident stem cell population called the satellite cells. This cell is responsible for the majority of the postnatal growth and regenerative potential of skeletal muscle. Other cells do contribute to skeletal muscle regeneration and in cultures of minced whole muscle these cells are cultured along with the satellite cells and it is impossible to dissect out their contribution compared to the satellite cells. Therefore, a method to culture pure satellite cells has been developed to study the signaling pathways that control their proliferation and differentiation. In our studies into the role of the resident myogenic stem cells in regeneration, myopathic conditions, and aging, we have optimized the established techniques that already exist to isolate pure satellite cell cultures from single muscle fibers. We have successfully isolated satellite cells from young adults through to 24-month-old muscles and obtained populations of cells that we are studying for the signaling events that regulate their proliferative potential.

  2. Muscle Satellite Cell Heterogeneity and Self-Renewal

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    Norio eMotohashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult skeletal muscle possesses extraordinary regeneration capacities. After muscle injury or exercise, large numbers of newly formed muscle fibers are generated within a week as a result of expansion and differentiation of a self-renewing pool of muscle stem cells termed muscle satellite cells. Normally, satellite cells are mitotically quiescent and reside beneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Upon regeneration, satellite cells are activated, and give rise to daughter myogenic precursor cells. After several rounds of proliferation, these myogenic precursor cells contribute to the formation of new muscle fibers. During cell division, a minor population of myogenic precursor cells returns to quiescent satellite cells as a self-renewal process. Currently, accumulating evidence has revealed the essential roles of satellite cells in muscle regeneration and the regulatory mechanisms, while it still remains to be elucidated how satellite cell self-renewal is molecularly regulated and how satellite cells are important in aging and diseased muscle. The number of satellite cells is decreased due to the changing niche during ageing, resulting in attenuation of muscle regeneration capacity. Additionally, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients, the loss of satellite cell regenerative capacity and decreased satellite cell number due to continuous needs for satellite cells lead to progressive muscle weakness with chronic degeneration. Thus, it is necessary to replenish muscle satellite cells continuously. This review outlines recent findings regarding satellite cell heterogeneity, asymmetric division and molecular mechanisms in satellite cell self-renewal which is crucial for maintenance of satellite cells as a muscle stem cell pool throughout life. In addition, we discuss roles in the stem cell niche for satellite cell maintenance, as well as related cell therapies for approaching treatment of DMD.

  3. Muscle satellite cell heterogeneity and self-renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Norio; Asakura, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle possesses extraordinary regeneration capacities. After muscle injury or exercise, large numbers of newly formed muscle fibers are generated within a week as a result of expansion and differentiation of a self-renewing pool of muscle stem cells termed muscle satellite cells. Normally, satellite cells are mitotically quiescent and reside beneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Upon regeneration, satellite cells are activated, and give rise to daughter myogenic precursor cells. After several rounds of proliferation, these myogenic precursor cells contribute to the formation of new muscle fibers. During cell division, a minor population of myogenic precursor cells returns to quiescent satellite cells as a self-renewal process. Currently, accumulating evidence has revealed the essential roles of satellite cells in muscle regeneration and the regulatory mechanisms, while it still remains to be elucidated how satellite cell self-renewal is molecularly regulated and how satellite cells are important in aging and diseased muscle. The number of satellite cells is decreased due to the changing niche during ageing, resulting in attenuation of muscle regeneration capacity. Additionally, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, the loss of satellite cell regenerative capacity and decreased satellite cell number due to continuous needs for satellite cells lead to progressive muscle weakness with chronic degeneration. Thus, it is necessary to replenish muscle satellite cells continuously. This review outlines recent findings regarding satellite cell heterogeneity, asymmetric division and molecular mechanisms in satellite cell self-renewal which is crucial for maintenance of satellite cells as a muscle stem cell pool throughout life. In addition, we discuss roles in the stem cell niche for satellite cell maintenance, as well as related cell therapies for approaching treatment of DMD. PMID:25364710

  4. Rudimentary cilia in muscle cells of annelids and echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, S L; Rieger, R M

    1980-01-01

    Rudimentary cilia have been observed in muscle cells lining the tube feet of Ophioderma brevispinum (Ophiuroidea) and in muscle cells of the body wall and parapodial glands of Owena fusiformis (Polychaeta). A diplosomal basal body is associated with each cilium. Striated rootlets are absent. This is the first report on rudimentary cilia in muscle cells of an echinoderm and an annelid.

  5. Myogenic capacity of muscle progenitor cells from head and limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers, Mette A R; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M; Torensma, Ruurd; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2012-02-01

    The restoration of muscles in the soft palate of patients with cleft lip and/or palate is accompanied by fibrosis, which leads to speech and feeding problems. Treatment strategies that improve muscle regeneration have only been tested in limb muscles. Therefore, in the present study the myogenic potential of muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) isolated from head muscles was compared with that of limb muscles. Muscle progenitor cells were isolated from the head muscles and limb muscles of rats and cultured. The proliferation of MPCs was analysed by DNA quantification. The differentiation capacity was analysed by quantifying the numbers of fused cells, and by measuring the mRNA levels of differentiation markers. Muscle progenitor cells were stained to quantify the expression of paired box protein Pax 7 (Pax-7), myoblast determination protein 1 (MyoD), and myogenin. Proliferation was similar in the head MPCs and the limb MPCs. Differentiating head and limb MPCs showed a comparable number of fused cells and mRNA expression levels of myosin-1 (Myh1), myosin-3 (Myh3), and myosin-4 (Myh4). During proliferation and differentiation, the number of Pax-7(+), MyoD(+), and myogenin(+) cells in head and limb MPCs was equal. It was concluded that head and limb MPCs show similar myogenic capacities in vitro. Therefore, in vivo myogenic differences between those muscles might rely on the local microenvironment. Thus, regenerative strategies for limb muscles might also be used for head muscles. © 2012 Eur J Oral Sci.

  6. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

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    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  7. Catechins activate muscle stem cells by Myf5 induction and stimulate muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Byun, Mi Ran; Hwang, Jun-Ha; Park, Jung Il; Oh, Ho Taek; Kim, Hyo Kyeong; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2017-07-22

    Muscle weakness is one of the most common symptoms in aged individuals and increases risk of mortality. Thus, maintenance of muscle mass is important for inhibiting aging. In this study, we investigated the effect of catechins, polyphenol compounds in green tea, on muscle regeneration. We found that (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) activate satellite cells by induction of Myf5 transcription factors. For satellite cell activation, Akt kinase was significantly induced after ECG treatment and ECG-induced satellite cell activation was blocked in the presence of Akt inhibitor. ECG also promotes myogenic differentiation through the induction of myogenic markers, including Myogenin and Muscle creatine kinase (MCK), in satellite and C2C12 myoblast cells. Finally, EGCG administration to mice significantly increased muscle fiber size for regeneration. Taken together, the results suggest that catechins stimulate muscle stem cell activation and differentiation for muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells

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    Bo-jiang Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells.

  9. Muscle side population cells from dystrophic or injured muscle adopt a fibro-adipogenic fate.

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    Penton, Christopher M; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Johnson, Eric K; McAllister, Cynthia; Montanaro, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Muscle side population (SP) cells are rare multipotent stem cells that can participate in myogenesis and muscle regeneration upon transplantation. While they have been primarily studied for the development of cell-based therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, little is known regarding their non-muscle lineage choices or whether the dystrophic muscle environment affects their ability to repair muscle. Unfortunately, the study of muscle SP cells has been challenged by their low abundance and the absence of specific SP cell markers. To address these issues, we developed culture conditions for the propagation and spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation of muscle SP cells. Using this approach, we show that SP cells from wild type muscle robustly differentiate into satellite cells and form myotubes without requiring co-culture with myogenic cells. Furthermore, this myogenic activity is associated with SP cells negative for immune (CD45) and vascular (CD31) markers but positive for Pax7, Sca1, and the mesenchymal progenitor marker PDGFRα. Additionally, our studies revealed that SP cells isolated from dystrophic or cardiotoxin-injured muscle fail to undergo myogenesis. Instead, these SP cells rapidly expand giving rise to fibroblast and adipocyte progenitors (FAPs) and to their differentiated progeny, fibroblasts and adipocytes. Our findings indicate that muscle damage affects the lineage choices of muscle SP cells, promoting their differentiation along fibro-adipogenic lineages while inhibiting myogenesis. These results have implications for a possible role of muscle SP cells in fibrosis and fat deposition in muscular dystrophy. In addition, our studies provide a useful in vitro system to analyze SP cell biology in both normal and pathological conditions.

  10. Pervasive satellite cell contribution to uninjured adult muscle fibers.

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    Pawlikowski, Bradley; Pulliam, Crystal; Betta, Nicole Dalla; Kardon, Gabrielle; Olwin, Bradley B

    2015-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle adapts to functional needs, maintaining consistent numbers of myonuclei and stem cells. Although resident muscle stem cells or satellite cells are required for muscle growth and repair, in uninjured muscle, these cells appear quiescent and metabolically inactive. To investigate the satellite cell contribution to myofibers in adult uninjured skeletal muscle, we labeled satellite cells by inducing a recombination of LSL-tdTomato in Pax7(CreER) mice and scoring tdTomato+ myofibers as an indicator of satellite cell fusion. Satellite cell fusion into myofibers plateaus postnatally between 8 and 12 weeks of age, reaching a steady state in hindlimb muscles, but in extra ocular or diaphragm muscles, satellite cell fusion is maintained at postnatal levels irrespective of the age assayed. Upon recombination and following a 2-week chase in 6-month-old mice, tdTomato-labeled satellite cells fused into myofibers as 20, 50, and 80 % of hindlimb, extra ocular, and diaphragm myofibers, respectively, were tdTomato+. Satellite cells contribute to uninjured myofibers either following a cell division or directly without an intervening cell division. The frequency of satellite cell fusion into the skeletal muscle fibers is greater than previously estimated, suggesting an important functional role for satellite cell fusion into adult myofibers and a requirement for active maintenance of satellite cell numbers in uninjured skeletal muscle.

  11. Cell fate determination in zebrafish embryonic and adult muscle development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tee, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in how the genetic basis of muscle precursor cells determines the outcome of the muscle cell fate, and thus leading to disruption in muscle formation and maintenance. We utilized the zebrafish carrying mutations in both Axin1 and Apc1, resulting in overactivation of the

  12. The effect of the muscle environment on the regenerative capacity of human skeletal muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jinhong; Bencze, Maximilien; Asfahani, Rowan; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Muscle stem cell transplantation is a possible treatment for muscular dystrophy. In addition to the intrinsic properties of the stem cells, the local and systemic environment plays an important role in determining the fate of the grafted cells. We therefore investigated the effect of modulating the host muscle environment in different ways (irradiation or cryoinjury or a combination of irradiation and cryoinjury) in two immunodeficient mouse strains (mdx nude and recombinase-activating gene (Rag)2-/γ chain-/C5-) on the regenerative capacity of two types of human skeletal muscle-derived stem cell (pericytes and CD133+ cells). Human skeletal muscle-derived pericytes or CD133+ cells were transplanted into muscles of either mdx nude or recombinase-activating gene (Rag)2-/γ chain-/C5- host mice. Host muscles were modulated prior to donor cell transplantation by either irradiation, or cryoinjury, or a combination of irradiation and cryoinjury. Muscles were analysed four weeks after transplantation, by staining transverse cryostat sections of grafted muscles with antibodies to human lamin A/C, human spectrin, laminin and Pax 7. The number of nuclei and muscle fibres of donor origin and the number of satellite cells of both host and donor origin were quantified. Within both host strains transplanted intra-muscularly with both donor cell types, there were significantly more nuclei and muscle fibres of donor origin in host muscles that had been modulated by cryoinjury, or irradiation+cryoinjury, than by irradiation alone. Irradiation has no additive effects in further enhancing the transplantation efficiency than cryodamage. Donor pericytes did not give rise to satellite cells. However, using CD133+ cells as donor cells, there were significantly more nuclei, muscle fibres, as well as satellite cells of donor origin in Rag2-/γ chain-/C5- mice than mdx nude mice, when the muscles were injured by either cryodamage or irradiation+cryodamage. Rag2-/γ chain-/C5- mice are a

  13. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor-I in skeletal muscle and muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, R A; Lang, C H

    2003-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) are potent regulators of muscle mass. Transgenic mice that over-express these proteins exhibit dramatically enlarged skeletal muscles. In contrast, malnutrition, critical illness, sepsis, and aging are all associated with a dramatic reduction in muscle mass and function. The circulating concentration of IGF-I and the expression of IGF-I in skeletal muscle are also reduced during catabolic states. Consequently, GH has been used clinically to increase lean body mass in patients with muscle wasting. Likewise, delivery of IGF-I specifically into muscle has been proposed as a genetic therapy for muscle disorders. A better understanding of the regulation of IGF-I expression in skeletal muscle and muscle cells is therefore of importance. Yet, our knowledge in this area has been limited by a lack of GH responsive muscle cells. In addition the IGF-I gene spans over 90 kb of genomic DNA and it exhibits a very complex regulatory pattern. This review will summarize our knowledge of the control of muscle mass by GH, IGF-I, anabolic steroids, exercise and other growth enhancing hormones. We will also highlight recent advances in the regulation of IGF-I and signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) by GH. A special emphasis will be placed on the interaction of IGF-I and proinflammatory cytokines in skeletal muscle and muscle cells.

  14. Adenosine formation in contracting primary rat skeletal muscle cells and endothelial cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study examined the capacity for adenosine formation, uptake and metabolism in contracting primary rat muscle cells and in microvascular endothelial cells in culture. 2. Strong and moderate electrical simulation of skeletal muscle cells led to a significantly greater increase...... in the extracellular adenosine concentration (421 +/- 91 and 235 +/- 30 nmol (g protein)-1, respectively; P muscle cells (161 +/- 20 nmol (g protein)-1). The ATP concentration was lower (18%; P muscle cells....... 3. Addition of microvascular endothelial cells to the cultured skeletal muscle cells enhanced the contraction-induced accumulation of extracellular adenosine (P cells in culture alone did not cause extracellular accumulation of adenosine. 4. Skeletal muscle cells were...

  15. Trichinella spiralis infected skeletal muscle cells arrest in G2/M and cease muscle gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, D P

    1993-05-01

    Infection by Trichinella spiralis causes a variety of changes in skeletal muscle cells including the hypertrophy of nuclei and decreased expression of muscle specific proteins. Potential cellular processes leading to these changes were investigated. In synchronized muscle infections, [3H]thymidine was incorporated into infected cell nuclei from 2-5 days post infection. Labeled nuclei were stably integrated into the infected cell up to 60 days post infection and appear to originate from differentiated skeletal muscle nuclei present at the time of infection. These nuclei were further shown to contain a mean DNA content of approximately 4N, indicating that the [3H]thymidine uptake reflects DNA synthesis and subsequent long-term suspension of the infected cell in the cell cycle at G2/M. Associated with these changes, muscle specific gene transcripts were reduced to < 1- < 0.1% in the infected cell compared to normal muscle. Transcript levels of the muscle transcriptional regulatory factors myogenin, MyoD1, and Id were reduced to < 10, < 1, and increased approximately 250%, respectively, in the infected cell compared to normal muscle, indicating transcriptional inactivation of muscle genes. DNA synthesis in the infected cell may represent the initiation event which leads to expression of this infected cell phenotype.

  16. Electric pulse stimulation of cultured murine muscle cells reproduces gene expression changes of trained mouse muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Burch

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adequate levels of physical activity are at the center of a healthy lifestyle. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate the beneficial effects of exercise remain enigmatic. This gap in knowledge is caused by the lack of an amenable experimental model system. Therefore, we optimized electric pulse stimulation of muscle cells to closely recapitulate the plastic changes in gene expression observed in a trained skeletal muscle. The exact experimental conditions were established using the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha as a marker for an endurance-trained muscle fiber. We subsequently compared the changes in the relative expression of metabolic and myofibrillar genes in the muscle cell system with those observed in mouse muscle in vivo following either an acute or repeated bouts of treadmill exercise. Importantly, in electrically stimulated C2C12 mouse muscle cells, the qualitative transcriptional adaptations were almost identical to those in trained muscle, but differ from the acute effects of exercise on muscle gene expression. In addition, significant alterations in the expression of myofibrillar proteins indicate that this stimulation could be used to modulate the fiber-type of muscle cells in culture. Our data thus describe an experimental cell culture model for the study of at least some of the transcriptional aspects of skeletal muscle adaptation to physical activity. This system will be useful for the study of the molecular mechanisms that regulate exercise adaptation in muscle.

  17. Traction in smooth muscle cells varies with cell spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cell shape regulate cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been suggested that the regulation of cell function by the cell shape is a result of the tension in the cytoskeleton and the distortion of the cell. Here we explore the association between cell-generated mechanical forces and the cell morphology. We hypothesized that the cell contractile force is associated with the degree of cell spreading, in particular with the cell length. We measured traction fields of single human airway smooth muscle cells plated on a polyacrylamide gel, in which fluorescent microbeads were embedded to serve as markers of gel deformation. The traction exerted by the cells at the cell-substrate interface was determined from the measured deformation of the gel. The traction was measured before and after treatment with the contractile agonist histamine, or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The relative increase in traction induced by histamine was negatively correlated with the baseline traction. On the contrary, the relative decrease in traction due to isoproterenol was independent of the baseline traction, but it was associated with cell shape: traction decreased more in elongated than in round cells. Maximum cell width, mean cell width, and projected area of the cell were the parameters most tightly coupled to both baseline and histamine-induced traction in this study. Wide and well-spread cells exerted larger traction than slim cells. These results suggest that cell contractility is controlled by cell spreading.

  18. Lkb1 deletion promotes ectopic lipid accumulation in muscle progenitor cells and mature muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tizhong; Zhang, Pengpeng; Bi, Pengpeng; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-05-01

    Excessive intramyocellular triglycerides (muscle lipids) are associated with reduced contractile function, insulin resistance, and Type 2 diabetes, but what governs lipid accumulation in muscle is unclear. Here we report a role of Lkb1 in regulating lipid metabolism in muscle stem cells and their descendent mature muscles. We used Myod(Cre) and Lkb1(flox/flox) mice to specifically delete Lkb1 in myogenic cells including stem and differentiated cells, and examined the lipid accumulation and gene expression of myoblasts cultured from muscle stem cells (satellite cells). Genetic deletion of Lkb1 in myogenic progenitors led to elevated expression of lipogenic genes and ectopic lipid accumulation in proliferating myoblasts. Interestingly, the Lkb1-deficient myoblasts differentiated into adipocyte-like cells upon adipogenic induction. However, these adipocyte-like cells maintained myogenic gene expression with reduced ability to form myotubes efficiently. Activation of AMPK by AICAR prevented ectopic lipid formation in the Lkb1-null myoblasts. Notably, Lkb1-deficient muscles accumulated excessive lipids in vivo in response to high-fat diet feeding. These results demonstrate that Lkb1 acts through AMPK to limit lipid deposition in muscle stem cells and their derivative mature muscles, and point to the possibility of controlling muscle lipid content using AMPK activating drugs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fetal muscle-derived cells can repair dystrophic muscles in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auda-Boucher, Gwenola; Rouaud, Thierry; Lafoux, Aude; Levitsky, Dmitri; Huchet-Cadiou, Corinne; Feron, Marie; Guevel, Laetitia; Talon, Sophie; Fontaine-Pérus, Josiane; Gardahaut, Marie-France

    2007-03-10

    We have previously reported that CD34(+) cells purified from mouse fetal muscles can differentiate into skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo when injected into muscle tissue of dystrophic mdx mice. In this study, we investigate the ability of such donor cells to restore dystrophin expression, and to improve the functional muscle capacity of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) of mdx mice. For this purpose green fluorescent-positive fetal GFP(+)/CD34(+) cells or desmin(+)/(-)LacZ/CD34(+) cells were transplanted into irradiated or non-irradiated mdx EDL muscle. Donor fetal muscle-derived cells predominantly fused with existing fibers. Indeed more than 50% of the myofibers of the host EDL contained donor nuclei delivering dystrophin along 80-90% of the length of their sarcolemma. The presence of significant amounts of dystrophin (about 60-70% of that found in a control wild-type mouse muscle) was confirmed by Western blot analyses. Dystrophin expression also outcompeted that of utrophin, as revealed by a spatial shift in the distribution of utrophin. At 1 month post-transplant, the recipient muscle appeared to have greater resistance to fatigue than control mdx EDL muscle during repeated maximal contractions.

  20. Quercetin inhibits adipogenesis of muscle progenitor cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Funakoshi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle satellite cells are committed myogenic progenitors capable of contributing to myogenesis to maintain adult muscle mass and function. Several experiments have demonstrated that muscle satellite cells can differentiate into adipocytes in vitro, supporting the mesenchymal differentiation potential of these cells. Moreover, muscle satellite cells may be a source of ectopic muscle adipocytes, explaining the lipid accumulation often observed in aged skeletal muscle (sarcopenia and in muscles of patients` with diabetes. Quercetin, a polyphenol, is one of the most abundant flavonoids distributed in edible plants, such as onions and apples, and possesses antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we examined whether quercetin inhibited the adipogenesis of muscle satellite cells in vitro with primary cells from rat limbs by culture in the presence of quercetin under adipogenic conditions. Morphological observations, Oil Red-O staining results, triglyceride content analysis, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that quercetin was capable of inhibiting the adipogenic induction of muscle satellite cells into adipocytes in a dose-dependent manner by suppressing the transcript levels of adipogenic markers, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and fatty acid binding protein 4. Our results suggested that quercetin inhibited the adipogenesis of muscle satellite cells in vitro by suppressing the transcription of adipogenic markers.

  1. Muscle satellite cells are a functionally heterogeneous population in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yusuke; Boldrin, Luisa; Knopp, Paul; Morgan, Jennifer E; Zammit, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscles of body and limb are derived from somites, but most head muscles originate from cranial mesoderm. The resident stem cells of muscle are satellite cells, which have the same embryonic origin as the muscle in which they reside. Here, we analysed satellite cells with a different ontology, comparing those of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of the limb with satellite cells from the masseter of the head. Satellite cell-derived myoblasts from MAS and EDL muscles had distinct gene expression profiles and masseter cells usually proliferated more and differentiated later than those from EDL. When transplanted, however, masseter-derived satellite cells regenerated limb muscles as efficiently as those from EDL. Clonal analysis showed that functional properties differed markedly between satellite cells: ranging from clones that proliferated extensively and gave rise to both differentiated and self-renewed progeny, to others that divided minimally before differentiating completely. Generally, masseter-derived clones were larger and took longer to differentiate than those from EDL. This distribution in cell properties was preserved in both EDL-derived and masseter-derived satellite cells from old mice, although clones were generally less proliferative. Satellite cells, therefore, are a functionally heterogeneous population, with many occupants of the niche exhibiting stem cell characteristics in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

  2. Satellite cells from dystrophic muscle retain regenerative capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Luisa; Zammit, Peter S; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited disorder that is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, with a failure of muscle maintenance/repair mediated by satellite cells (muscle stem cells). The function of skeletal muscle stem cells resident in dystrophic muscle may be perturbed by being in an increasing pathogenic environment, coupled with constant demands for repairing muscle. To investigate the contribution of satellite cell exhaustion to this process, we tested the functionality of satellite cells isolated from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that satellite cells derived from young mdx mice contributed efficiently to muscle regeneration within our in vivo mouse model. To then test the effects of long-term residence in a dystrophic environment, satellite cells were isolated from aged mdx muscle. Surprisingly, they were as functional as those derived from young or aged wild type donors. Removing satellite cells from a dystrophic milieu reveals that their regenerative capacity remains both intact and similar to satellite cells derived from healthy muscle, indicating that the host environment is critical for controlling satellite cell function. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Myosatellite cells in muscle of growing carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koumans, J.T.M.

    1992-01-01

    Myosatellite cells are small spindle shaped myogenic cells situated between the sarcolemma and the basal lamina that surrounds every muscle fibre. Based on information from mammals and birds, myosatellite cells are considered to play an important role in postlarval muscle growth in fish.

  4. Regulatory factors and cell populations involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, R.W. Ten; Grefte, S.; Hoff, J.W. von den

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is a complex process, which is not yet completely understood. Satellite cells, the skeletal muscle stem cells, become activated after trauma, proliferate, and migrate to the site of injury. Depending on the severity of the myotrauma, activated satellite cells form new

  5. Isolation and Culture of Satellite Cells from Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarò, Antonio; Carosio, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by a population of quiescent mononucleated myoblasts, localized between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers, known as satellite cells. Satellite cells play a pivotal role in muscle homeostasis and are the major source of myogenic precursors in mammalian muscle regeneration.This chapter describes protocols for isolation and culturing satellite cells isolated from mouse skeletal muscles. The classical procedure, which will be discussed extensively in this chapter, involves the enzymatic dissociation of skeletal muscles, while the alternative method involves isolation of satellite cells from isolated myofibers in which the satellite cells remain in their in situ position underneath the myofiber basal lamina.In particular, we discuss the technical aspect of satellite cell isolation, the methods necessary to enrich the satellite cell fraction and the culture conditions that optimize proliferation and myotube formation of mouse satellite cells.

  6. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Somik [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yin, Hongshan [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Third Affiliated Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050051, Hebei (China); Nam, Deokhwa [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Li, Yong [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Ma, Ke, E-mail: kma@houstonmethodist.org [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1{sup −/−} mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation.

  9. Autologous transplantation of muscle-derived CD133+ stem cells in Duchenne muscle patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Y; Belicchi, M; Marchesi, C; D'Antona, G; Cogiamanian, F; Pisati, F; Gavina, M; Giordano, R; Tonlorenzi, R; Fagiolari, G; Lamperti, C; Porretti, L; Lopa, R; Sampaolesi, M; Vicentini, L; Grimoldi, N; Tiberio, F; Songa, V; Baratta, P; Prelle, A; Forzenigo, L; Guglieri, M; Pansarasa, O; Rinaldi, C; Mouly, V; Butler-Browne, G S; Comi, G P; Biondetti, P; Moggio, M; Gaini, S M; Stocchetti, N; Priori, A; D'Angelo, M G; Turconi, A; Bottinelli, R; Cossu, G; Rebulla, P; Bresolin, N

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal X-linked recessive muscle disease due to defect on the gene encoding dystrophin. The lack of a functional dystrophin in muscles results in the fragility of the muscle fiber membrane with progressive muscle weakness and premature death. There is no cure for DMD and current treatment options focus primarily on respiratory assistance, comfort care, and delaying the loss of ambulation. Recent works support the idea that stem cells can contribute to muscle repair as well as to replenishment of the satellite cell pool. Here we tested the safety of autologous transplantation of muscle-derived CD133+ cells in eight boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in a 7-month, double-blind phase I clinical trial. Stem cell safety was tested by measuring muscle strength and evaluating muscle structures with MRI and histological analysis. Timed cardiac and pulmonary function tests were secondary outcome measures. No local or systemic side effects were observed in all treated DMD patients. Treated patients had an increased ratio of capillary per muscle fibers with a switch from slow to fast myosin-positive myofibers.

  10. Skeletal muscle aging: stem cell function and tissue homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Victor, Pedro Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Muscle aging, in particular, is characterized by the reduction of tissue mass and function, which are particularly prominent in geriatric individuals undergoing sarcopenia. The age-associated muscle wasting is also associated with a decline in regenerative ability and a reduction in resident muscle stem cell (satellite cell) number and function. Although sarcopenia is one of the major contributors to the general loss of physiological function, the mechanisms involved in age-related loss of mu...

  11. Skeletal muscle progenitor cells and the role of Pax genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Satellite cells, which lie under the basal lamina of muscle fibres, are marked by the expression of Pax7, and in many muscles of Pax3 also. A pure population of satellite cells, isolated from a Pax3(GFP/+) mouse line by flow cytometry, contribute very efficiently to skeletal muscle regeneration and also self-renew, thus demonstrating their role as muscle stem cells. Pax3/7 regulates the entry of these cells into the myogenic programme via the activation of the myogenic determination gene, MyoD. Pax7 is also essential for the survival of satellite cells. This dual role underlines the importance of ensuring that a tissue stem cell that has lost its myogenic instruction should not be left to run amok, with the potential risk of tissue deregulation and cancer. A somite-derived population of Pax3/Pax7 positive cells is responsible for muscle growth during development and gives rise to the satellite cells of postnatal muscles. In the absence of both Pax3 and Pax7, these cells die or assume other cell fates. Pax3/7 lies genetically upstream of both MyoD and Myf5, which determine the skeletal muscle fate of these cells. To cite this article: M. Buckingham, C. R. Biologies 330 (2007).

  12. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  13. Action of Obestatin in Skeletal Muscle Repair: Stem Cell Expansion, Muscle Growth, and Microenvironment Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-01-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration. PMID:25762009

  14. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin-4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2015-10-01

    Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin-4 (Ten-4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten-4-deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten-4-deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten-4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten-4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells. © 2015 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin‐4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So‐ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin‐4 (Ten‐4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten‐4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten‐4‐deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten‐4‐deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten‐4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten‐4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells. Stem Cells 2015;33:3017–3027 PMID:26013034

  16. In Situ Immunofluorescent Staining of Autophagy in Muscle Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Castagnetti, Francesco

    2017-06-13

    Increasing evidence points to autophagy as a crucial regulatory process to preserve tissue homeostasis. It is known that autophagy is involved in skeletal muscle development and regeneration, and the autophagic process has been described in several muscular pathologies and agerelated muscle disorders. A recently described block of the autophagic process that correlates with the functional exhaustion of satellite cells during muscle repair supports the notion that active autophagy is coupled with productive muscle regeneration. These data uncover the crucial role of autophagy in satellite cell activation during muscle regeneration in both normal and pathological conditions, such as muscular dystrophies. Here, we provide a protocol to monitor the autophagic process in the adult Muscle Stem Cell (MuSC) compartment during muscle regenerative conditions. This protocol describes the setup methodology to perform in situ immunofluorescence imaging of LC3, an autophagy marker, and MyoD, a myogenic lineage marker, in muscle tissue sections from control and injured mice. The methodology reported allows for monitoring the autophagic process in one specific cell compartment, the MuSC compartment, which plays a central role in orchestrating muscle regeneration.

  17. Skeletal muscle satellite cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Greg; Hartzell, Charles R.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite cells are postnatal myoblasts responsible for providing additional nuclei to growing or regenerating muscle cells. Satellite cells retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in vitro and therefore provide a useful model to study postnatal muscle development. Most culture systems used to study postnatal muscle development are limited by the two-dimensional (2-D) confines of the culture dish. Limiting proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in 2-D could potentially limit cell-cell contacts important for developing the level of organization in skeletal muscle obtained in vivo. Culturing satellite cells on microcarrier beads suspended in the High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) designed by NASA provides a low shear, three-dimensional (3-D) environment to study muscle development. Primary cultures established from anterior tibialis muscles of growing rats (approximately 200 gm) were used for all studies and were composed of greater than 75 % satellite cells. Different inoculation densities did not affect the proliferative potential of satellite cells in the HARV. Plating efficiency, proliferation, and glucose utilization were compared between 2-D flat culture and 3-D HARV culture. Plating efficiency (cells attached - cells plated x 100) was similar between the two culture systems. Proliferation was reduced in HARV cultures and this reduction was apparent for both satellite cells and non-satellite cells. Furthermore, reduction in proliferation within the HARV could not be attributed to reduced substrate availability since glucose levels in media from HARV and 2-D cell culture were similar. Morphologically, microcarrier beads within the HARVS were joined together by cells into three-dimensional aggregates composed of greater than 10 beads/aggregate. Aggregation of beads did not occur in the absence of cells. Myotubes were often seen on individual beads or spanning the surface of two beads. In summary, proliferation and differentiation of

  18. Isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of muscle stem cells

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    So-ichiro eFukada

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available keletal muscle has great regenerative capacity which is dependent on muscle stem cells, also known as satellite cells. A loss of satellite cells and/or their function impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and leads to a loss of skeletal muscle power; therefore, the molecular mechanisms for maintaining satellite cells in a quiescent and undifferentiated state are of great interest in skeletal muscle biology. Many studies have demonstrated proteins expressed by satellite cells, including Pax7, M-cadherin, Cxcr4, syndecan3/4, and c-met. To further characterize satellite cells, we established a method to directly isolate satellite cells using a monoclonal antibody, SM/C-2.6. Using SM/C-2.6 and microarrays, we measured the genes expressed in quiescent satellite cells and demonstrated that Hesr3 may complement Hesr1 in generating quiescent satellite cells. Although Hesr1- or Hesr3-single knockout mice show a normal skeletal muscle phenotype, including satellite cells, Hesr1/Hesr3-double knockout mice show a gradual decrease in the number of satellite cells and increase in regenerative defects dependent on satellite cell numbers. We also observed that a mouse’s genetic background affects the regenerative capacity of its skeletal muscle and have established a line of DBA/2-background mdx mice that has a much more severe phenotype than the frequently used C57BL/10-mdx mice. The phenotype of DBA/2-mdx mice also seems to depend on the function of satellite cells. In this review, we summarize the methodology of direct isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of satellite cells based on our results. The relationship between the regenerative capacity of satellite cells and progression of muscular disorders is also summarized. In the last part, we discuss application of the accumulating scientific information on satellite cells to treatment of patients with muscular disorders.

  19. Fetal stem cells and skeletal muscle regeneration: a therapeutic approach

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    Michela ePozzobon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available More than 40% of the body mass is represented by muscle tissue, which possesses the innate ability to regenerate after damage through the activation of muscle specific stem cell, namely satellite cells. Muscle diseases, in particular chronic degenerative state of skeletal muscle such as dystrophies, lead to a perturbation of the regenerative process, which causes the premature exhaustion of satellite cell reservoir due to continue cycles of degeneration/regeneration. Nowadays, the research is focused on different therapeutic approaches, ranging from gene and cell to pharmacological therapy, but still there is not a definitive cure in particular for genetic muscle disease. Taking this in mind, in this article we will give special consideration to muscle diseases and the use of fetal derived stem cells as new approach for therapy. Cells of fetal origin, from cord blood to placenta and amniotic fluid, can be easily obtained without ethical concern, expanded and differentiated in culture, and possess immunemodulatory properties. The in vivo approach in animal models can be helpful to study the mechanism underneath the operating principle of the stem cell reservoir, namely the niche, which holds great potential to understand the onset of muscle pathologies.

  20. Transformation of jaw muscle satellite cells to cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughters, Randall S; Keirstead, Susan A; Slack, Jonathan M W

    In the embryo a population of progenitor cells known as the second heart field forms not just parts of the heart but also the jaw muscles of the head. Here we show that it is possible to take skeletal muscle satellite cells from jaw muscles of the adult mouse and to direct their differentiation to become heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes). This is done by exposing the cells to extracellular factors similar to those which heart progenitors would experience during normal embryonic development. By contrast, cardiac differentiation does not occur at all from satellite cells isolated from trunk and limb muscles, which originate from the somites of the embryo. The cardiomyocytes arising from jaw muscle satellite cells express a range of specific marker proteins, beat spontaneously, display long action potentials with appropriate responses to nifedipine, norepinephrine and carbachol, and show synchronized calcium transients. Our results show the existence of a persistent cardiac developmental competence in satellite cells of the adult jaw muscles, associated with their origin from the second heart field of the embryo, and suggest a possible method of obtaining cardiomyocytes from individual patients without the need for a heart biopsy. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Eccentric exercise facilitates mesenchymal stem cell appearance in skeletal muscle.

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    M Carmen Valero

    Full Text Available Eccentric, or lengthening, contractions result in injury and subsequently stimulate the activation and proliferation of satellite stem cells which are important for skeletal muscle regeneration. The discovery of alternative myogenic progenitors in skeletal muscle raises the question as to whether stem cells other than satellite cells accumulate in muscle in response to exercise and contribute to post-exercise repair and/or growth. In this study, stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1 positive, non-hematopoetic (CD45⁻ cells were evaluated in wild type (WT and α7 integrin transgenic (α7Tg mouse muscle, which is resistant to injury yet liable to strain, 24 hr following a single bout of eccentric exercise. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ stem cells were increased 2-fold in WT muscle post-exercise. The α7 integrin regulated the presence of Sca-1⁺ cells, with expansion occurring in α7Tg muscle and minimal cells present in muscle lacking the α7 integrin. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ cells isolated from α7Tg muscle following exercise were characterized as mesenchymal-like stem cells (mMSCs, predominantly pericytes. In vitro multiaxial strain upregulated mMSC stem cells markers in the presence of laminin, but not gelatin, identifying a potential mechanistic basis for the accumulation of these cells in muscle following exercise. Transplantation of DiI-labeled mMSCs into WT muscle increased Pax7⁺ cells and facilitated formation of eMHC⁺DiI⁻ fibers. This study provides the first demonstration that mMSCs rapidly appear in skeletal muscle in an α7 integrin dependent manner post-exercise, revealing an early event that may be necessary for effective repair and/or growth following exercise. The results from this study also support a role for the α7 integrin and/or mMSCs in molecular- and cellular-based therapeutic strategies that can effectively combat disuse muscle atrophy.

  2. Selective Expansion of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells from Bulk Muscle Cells in Soft Three‐Dimensional Fibrin Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pei; Zhou, Yalu; Wu, Furen; Hong, Yuanfan; Wang, Xin; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Mosenson, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) exhibit robust myogenic potential in vivo, thus providing a promising curative treatment for muscle disorders. Ex vivo expansion of adult MuSCs is highly desired to achieve a therapeutic cell dose because of their scarcity in limited muscle biopsies. Sorting of pure MuSCs is generally required for all the current culture systems. Here we developed a soft three‐dimensional (3D) salmon fibrin gel culture system that can selectively expand mouse MuSCs from bulk skeletal muscle preparations without cell sorting and faithfully maintain their regenerative capacity in culture. Our study established a novel platform for convenient ex vivo expansion of MuSCs, thus greatly advancing stem cell‐based therapies for various muscle disorders. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1412–1423 PMID:28244269

  3. Molecular aging and rejuvenation of human muscle stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Morgan E; Suetta, Charlotte; Conboy, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Very little remains known about the regulation of human organ stem cells (in general, and during the aging process), and most previous data were collected in short-lived rodents. We examined whether stem cell aging in rodents could be extrapolated to genetically and environmentally variable humans....... Our findings establish key evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of human stem cell aging. We find that satellite cells are maintained in aged human skeletal muscle, but fail to activate in response to muscle attrition, due to diminished activation of Notch compounded by elevated transforming growth...... factor beta (TGF-beta)/phospho Smad3 (pSmad3). Furthermore, this work reveals that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/phosphate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) signalling declines in human muscle with age, and is important for activating Notch in human muscle stem cells. This molecular...

  4. Chlamydia pneumoniae induces aponecrosis in human aortic smooth muscle cells

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    Walch Michael

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intracellular bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae is suspected to play a role in formation and progression of atherosclerosis. Many studies investigated cell death initiation versus inhibition by Chlamydia pneumoniae in established cell lines but nothing is known in primary human aortic smooth muscle cells, a cell type among others known to be involved in the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque. Type of cell death was analyzed by various methods in primary aortic smooth muscle cells after infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae to investigate a possible pathogenic link in atherosclerosis. Results Chlamydiae were found to be localized up to 72 h post infection in aortic smooth muscle cells either as single bacteria or inside of large inclusions. Quantification of host cell death by lactate dehydrogenase release assay revealed strictly dose and time dependent lysis for all tested isolates of Chlamydia pneumoniae. Phosphatidylserine exposure was detected by flow cytometry in Chlamydia pneumoniae infected cells. Ultrastructure of Chlamydia pneumoniae infected human aortic smooth muscle cells showed extensive membrane- and organelle damage, chromatin condensation but no nuclear fragmentation. DNA fragmentation as well as cell membrane permeability was analyzed by TUNEL and NHS-biotin staining and occurred exclusively in cells carrying Chlamydia pneumoniae spots but not in smooth muscle cells with inclusions. These morphological features of cell death were not accompanied by an activation of caspase-3 as revealed by analysis of enzyme activity but involved mitochondrial membrane depolarization as shown by TMRE uptake and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Conclusion This study provides evidence that Chlamydia pneumoniae induce a spot like infection in human aortic smooth muscle cells, which results in a chimeric cell death with both apoptotic and necrotic characteristics. This aponecrotic cell death may assist chronic

  5. Rejuvenation of the aged muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; Gilbert, Penney M.; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P.; Corbel, Stephane Y.; Llewellyn, Michael E.; Delp, Scott L.; Blau, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    The aged suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging due in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of aged MuSCs are intrinsically defective relative to young MuSCs, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation due to a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and that have elevated p38α/β MAPK activity. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the aged MuSC population to transient inhibition of p38α/β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional aged MuSC population, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration, serial transplantation, and strengthening damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy in aged individuals. PMID:24531378

  6. Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Gilbert, Penney M; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P; Corbel, Stephane Y; Llewellyn, Michael E; Delp, Scott L; Blau, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    The elderly often suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging owing in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of MuSCs from aged mice are intrinsically defective relative to MuSCs from young mice, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation. This deficiency is correlated with a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and is due to elevated activity of the p38α and p38β mitogen-activated kinase pathway. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the MuSC population from aged mice to transient inhibition of p38α and p38β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional MuSC population from aged mice, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration and serial transplantation as well as strengthening of damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy for the elderly.

  7. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles

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    Xiaoti Xu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2–4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50–70 fiber-associated, or 1,000–5,000 FACS-enriched CD56+/CD29+ human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications.

  8. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

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    Simon Hauerslev

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  9. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  10. Human muscle satellite cells as targets of Chikungunya virus infection.

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    Simona Ozden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya (CHIK virus is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes in humans an acute infection characterised by fever, polyarthralgia, head-ache, and myalgia. Since 2005, the emergence of CHIK virus was associated with an unprecedented magnitude outbreak of CHIK disease in the Indian Ocean. Clinically, this outbreak was characterized by invalidating poly-arthralgia, with myalgia being reported in 97.7% of cases. Since the cellular targets of CHIK virus in humans are unknown, we studied the pathogenic events and targets of CHIK infection in skeletal muscle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistology on muscle biopsies from two CHIK virus-infected patients with myositic syndrome showed that viral antigens were found exclusively inside skeletal muscle progenitor cells (designed as satelllite cells, and not in muscle fibers. To evaluate the ability of CHIK virus to replicate in human satellite cells, we assessed virus infection on primary human muscle cells; viral growth was observed in CHIK virus-infected satellite cells with a cytopathic effect, whereas myotubes were essentially refractory to infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report provides new insights into CHIK virus pathogenesis, since it is the first to identify a cellular target of CHIK virus in humans and to report a selective infection of muscle satellite cells by a viral agent in humans.

  11. CDK inhibitors for muscle stem cell differentiation and self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Amrudha; Asakura, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Regeneration of muscle is undertaken by muscle stem cell populations named satellite cells which are normally quiescent or at the G0 phase of the cell cycle. However, upon signals from damaged muscle, satellite cells lose their quiescence, and enter the G1 cell cycle phase to expand the population of satellite cell progenies termed myogenic precursor cells (MPCs). Eventually, MPCs stop their cell cycle and undergo terminal differentiation to form skeletal muscle fibers. Some MPCs retract to quiescent satellite cells as a self-renewal process. Therefore, cell cycle regulation, consisting of satellite cell activation, proliferation, differentiation and self-renewal, is the key event of muscle regeneration. In this review, we summarize up-to-date progress on research about cell cycle regulation of myogenic progenitor cells and muscle stem cells during embryonic myogenesis and adult muscle regeneration, aging, exercise and muscle diseases including muscular dystrophy and muscle fiber atrophy, especially focusing on cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs).

  12. Can Cytoprotective Cobalt Protoporphyrin Protect Skeletal Muscle and Muscle-derived Stem Cells From Ischemic Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Heather-Marie P; Welikson, Robert E; Luo, Jun; Kean, Thomas J; Cao, Baohong; Dennis, James E; Allen, Margaret D

    2015-09-01

    Extremity trauma is the most common injury seen in combat hospitals as well as in civilian trauma centers. Major skeletal muscle injuries that are complicated by ischemia often result in substantial muscle loss, residual disability, or even amputation, yet few treatment options are available. A therapy that would increase skeletal muscle tolerance to hypoxic damage could reduce acute myocyte loss and enhance preservation of muscle mass in these situations. In these experiments, we investigated (1) whether cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), a pharmacologic inducer of cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), would upregulate HO-1 expression and activity in skeletal muscle, tested in muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs); and (2) whether CoPP exposure would protect MDSCs from cell death during in vitro hypoxia/reoxygenation. Then, using an in vivo mouse model of hindlimb ischemia/reperfusion injury, we examined (3) whether CoPP pharmacotherapy would reduce skeletal muscle damage when delivered after injury; and (4) whether it would alter the host inflammatory response to injury. MDSCs were exposed in vitro to a single dose of 25 μΜ CoPP and harvested over 24 to 96 hours, assessing HO-1 protein expression by Western blot densitometry and HO-1 enzyme activity by cGMP levels. To generate hypoxia/reoxygenation stress, MDSCs were treated in vitro with phosphate-buffered saline (vehicle), CoPP, or CoPP plus an HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), and then subjected to 5 hours of hypoxia (muscles was determined by uptake of intraperitoneally delivered Evans blue dye (EBD), quantified by image analysis. On serial sections, inflammation was gauged by the mean myeloperoxidase staining intensity per unit area over the entirety of each muscle. In MDSCs, a single exposure to CoPP increased HO-1 protein expression and enzyme activity, both of which were sustained for 96 hours. CoPP treatment of MDSCs reduced apoptotic cell populations by 55% after in vitro hypoxia

  13. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal in circular muscle of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Qvortrup, Klaus

    1993-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) may be important regulatory cells in gut muscle layers. This study examined ICC within the circular muscle of human small intestine.......Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) may be important regulatory cells in gut muscle layers. This study examined ICC within the circular muscle of human small intestine....

  14. Functional Overload Enhances Satellite Cell Properties in Skeletal Muscle

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    Shin Fujimaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle represents a plentiful and accessible source of adult stem cells. Skeletal-muscle-derived stem cells, termed satellite cells, play essential roles in postnatal growth, maintenance, repair, and regeneration of skeletal muscle. Although it is well known that the number of satellite cells increases following physical exercise, functional alterations in satellite cells such as proliferative capacity and differentiation efficiency following exercise and their molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we found that functional overload, which is widely used to model resistance exercise, causes skeletal muscle hypertrophy and converts satellite cells from quiescent state to activated state. Our analysis showed that functional overload induces the expression of MyoD in satellite cells and enhances the proliferative capacity and differentiation potential of these cells. The changes in satellite cell properties coincided with the inactivation of Notch signaling and the activation of Wnt signaling and likely involve modulation by transcription factors of the Sox family. These results indicate the effects of resistance exercise on the regulation of satellite cells and provide insight into the molecular mechanism of satellite cell activation following physical exercise.

  15. Interstitial cells of Cajal in human small intestine. Ultrastructural identification and organization between the main smooth muscle layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johannes; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, small intestine, gut motility, pacemaker cells, smooth muscle......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, small intestine, gut motility, pacemaker cells, smooth muscle...

  16. Influence of exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on human skeletal muscle satellite cell content and muscle fiber growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Riis, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are involved in remodeling and hypertrophy processes of skeletal muscle. However, little knowledge exists on extrinsic factors that influence the content of SCs in skeletal muscle. In a comparative human study, we investigated the muscle fiber type...... CSA increased exclusively with Whey-Conc (P hypertrophy correlated with whole muscle hypertrophy exclusively following Conc training (P ...-specific association between emergence of satellite cells (SCs), muscle growth, and remodeling in response to 12 wk unilateral resistance training performed as eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc) resistance training ± whey protein (Whey, 19.5 g protein + 19.5 g glucose) or placebo (Placebo, 39 g glucose...

  17. Muscle Stem Cells: A Model System for Adult Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelison, Ddw; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells, originally termed satellite cells for their position adjacent to differentiated muscle fibers, are absolutely required for the process of skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last decade, satellite cells have become one of the most studied adult stem cell systems and have emerged as a standard model not only in the field of stem cell-driven tissue regeneration but also in stem cell dysfunction and aging. Here, we provide background in the field and discuss recent advances in our understanding of muscle stem cell function and dysfunction, particularly in the case of aging, and the potential involvement of muscle stem cells in genetic diseases such as the muscular dystrophies.

  18. In vitro co-culture of epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells on aligned nanofibrous scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppan, Purushothaman; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2017-12-01

    Esophagus is a complex, hollow organ consisting of epithelial cells in the inner mucosal layer and smooth muscle cells in the outer muscle layer. In the present study, we have evaluated the in vitro co-culture of epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells on the aligned nanofibrous scaffold made of PHBV, PHBV-gelatin, PCL and PCL-gelatin developed through electrospinning using rotating drum collector. Epithelial cells were labeled with cell tracker green while the smooth muscle cells were labeled with cell tracker red. Labeled cells were seeded on the aligned nanofibers matrices and tracked using laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results demonstrate that both epithelial and smooth muscle cells attach, extend, and proliferate over these nanofibrous matrices. Confocal z-sectioning shows that epithelial and smooth muscle cells tend to separate into two distinct layers on a single nanofiber system mimicking the in vivo anatomy. Cell viability assay showed that both types of cells are viable and also interact with each other. The functional gene expression of respective cell types demonstrates that both epithelial and smooth muscle cells are phenotypically as well as functionally active when they were co-cultured. Thus the study highlighted that aligned nanofibrous scaffolds could be potential alternative graft for esophageal tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Interaction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Under Low Shear Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    The blood vessel wall consists of three cellular layers, an outer adventitial, a middle medial and an inner intimal layer. When the blood vessel forms in the embryo it begins as a tube composed of a single cell type called endothelial cells. Over time, other cells are recruited from the surrounding tissue to form additional layers on the outer surface of the endothelial tube. The cells that are recruited are called mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells are responsible for the production of connective tissue that holds the blood vessel together and for developing into vascular smooth muscle cells that are responsible for regulating the diameter of the vessel (1) and therefore, blood flow. In a fully developed blood vessel, the endothelial cells make- up the majority of cells in the intimal layer while the mesenchymal cells make-up the majority of cells in the medial and adventitial layers. Within the medial layer of a mature vessel, cells are organized into multiple circular layers of alternating bands of connective tissue and cells. The cell layer is composed of a mixture of mesenchymal cells that have not developed into smooth muscle cells and fully developed smooth muscle cells (2). The assembly and organization of complex tissues is directed in part by a signaling system composed of proteins on the cell surface called adhesion molecules. Adhesion molecules enable cells to recognize each other as well as the composition of the connective tissue in which they reside (3). It was hypothesized that the different cell types that compose the vascular wall possess different adhesion molecules that enable them to recognize each other and through this recognition system, form the complex layered organization of the vascular wall. In other words, the layered organization is an intrinsic property of the cells. If this hypothesis is correct then the different cells that make up the vessel wall, when mixed together, should organize themselves into a layered structure

  20. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma with Calf Muscle Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bourdeanu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL usually occurs in the lymph nodes, approximately 30–40% of the time it can have an extranodal site of involvement and it can arise in nearly every body site such as intestine, bone, breast, liver, skin, lung, and central nervous system. Muscle involvement of DLBCL is especially uncommon, comprising 0.5% of extranodal NHL. We report a case of a 72-year-old man with extranodal DLBCL of a unique manifestation in the calf muscle, involving predominantly the gastrocnemius muscle. The patient achieved complete response and remained free of local recurrence or metastasis following diagnosis.

  1. Molecular aging and rejuvenation of human muscle stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Morgan E; Suetta, Charlotte; Conboy, Michael J.; Aagaard, Per; Mackey, Abigail; Kjaer, Michael; Conboy, Irina

    2009-01-01

    Very little remains known about the regulation of human organ stem cells (in general, and during the aging process), and most previous data were collected in short-lived rodents. We examined whether stem cell aging in rodents could be extrapolated to genetically and environmentally variable humans. Our findings establish key evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of human stem cell aging. We find that satellite cells are maintained in aged human skeletal muscle, but fail to activate in response ...

  2. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cell Activation Following Cutaneous Burn in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    cultures of SJL/J and BALB/C skeletal muscle. Exp Cell Res 1994;211(1):99–107. [37] Yablonka-Reuveni Z, Rivera AJ. Temporal expression of regulatory...precursor cells. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 2004;287(6):C1753–62. [41] Yasuhara S, Perez ME, Kanakubo E, Yasuhara Y, Shin YS, Kaneki M, Fujita T, Martyn JA...Yasuhara S, Kanakubo E, Perez ME, Kaneki M, Fujita T, Okamoto T, Martyn JA. The 1999 Moyer award, Burn injury induces skeletal muscle apoptosis and

  3. Ureter smooth muscle cell orientation in rat is predominantly longitudinal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronck, Bart; Merken, Jort J; Reesink, Koen D; Kroon, Wilco; Delhaas, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    In ureter peristalsis, the orientation of the contracting smooth muscle cells is essential, yet current descriptions of orientation and composition of the smooth muscle layer in human as well as in rat ureter are inconsistent. The present study aims to improve quantification of smooth muscle orientation in rat ureters as a basis for mechanistic understanding of peristalsis. A crucial step in our approach is to use two-photon laser scanning microscopy and image analysis providing objective, quantitative data on smooth muscle cell orientation in intact ureters, avoiding the usual sectioning artifacts. In 36 rat ureter segments, originating from a proximal, middle or distal site and from a left or right ureter, we found close to the adventitia a well-defined longitudinal smooth muscle orientation. Towards the lamina propria, the orientation gradually became slightly more disperse, yet the main orientation remained longitudinal. We conclude that smooth muscle cell orientation in rat ureter is predominantly longitudinal, though the orientation gradually becomes more disperse towards the proprial side. These findings do not support identification of separate layers. The observed longitudinal orientation suggests that smooth muscle contraction would rather cause local shortening of the ureter, than cause luminal constriction. However, the net-like connective tissue of the ureter wall may translate local longitudinal shortening into co-local luminal constriction, facilitating peristalsis. Our quantitative, minimally invasive approach is a crucial step towards more mechanistic insight into ureter peristalsis, and may also be used to study smooth muscle cell orientation in other tube-like structures like gut and blood vessels.

  4. Airway smooth muscle cells : regulators of airway inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuyderduyn, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Airways from asthmatic subjects are more responsive to bronchoconstrictive stimuli than airways from healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells mediate contraction of the airways by responding to the bronchoconstrictive stimuli, which was thought to be the primary role of ASM cells. In this

  5. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory...... factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth...... control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we...

  6. Increased Stiffness in Aged Skeletal Muscle Impairs Muscle Progenitor Cell Proliferative Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Lacraz

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle aging is associated with a decreased regenerative potential due to the loss of function of endogenous stem cells or myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs. Aged skeletal muscle is characterized by the deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM, which in turn influences the biomechanical properties of myofibers by increasing their stiffness. Since the stiffness of the MPC microenvironment directly impacts MPC function, we hypothesized that the increase in muscle stiffness that occurs with aging impairs the behavior of MPCs, ultimately leading to a decrease in regenerative potential.We showed that freshly isolated individual myofibers from aged mouse muscles contain fewer MPCs overall than myofibers from adult muscles, with fewer quiescent MPCs and more proliferative and differentiating MPCs. We observed alterations in cultured MPC behavior in aged animals, where the proliferation and differentiation of MPCs were lower and higher, respectively. These alterations were not linked to the intrinsic properties of aged myofibers, as shown by the similar values for the cumulative population-doubling values and fusion indexes. However, atomic force microscopy (AFM indentation experiments revealed a nearly 4-fold increase in the stiffness of the MPC microenvironment. We further showed that the increase in stiffness is associated with alterations to muscle ECM, including the accumulation of collagen, which was correlated with higher hydroxyproline and advanced glycation end-product content. Lastly, we recapitulated the impaired MPC behavior observed in aging using a hydrogel substrate that mimics the stiffness of myofibers.These findings provide novel evidence that the low regenerative potential of aged skeletal muscle is independent of intrinsic MPC properties but is related to the increase in the stiffness of the MPC microenvironment.

  7. Chiral Orientation of Skeletal Muscle Cells Requires Rigid Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninghao Zhu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reconstitution of tissue morphology with inherent left–right (LR asymmetry is essential for tissue/organ functions. For skeletal muscle, the largest tissue in mammalian organisms, successful myogenesis requires the regulation of the LR asymmetry to form the appropriate muscle alignment. However, the key factor for reproducing the LR asymmetry of skeletal tissues in a controllable, engineering context remains largely unknown. Recent reports indicate that cell chirality may underlie the LR development in tissue morphogenesis. Here, we report that a rigid substrate is required for the chirality of skeletal muscle cells. By using alternating micropatterned cell-adherent and cell-repellent stripes on a rigid substrate, we found that C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblasts exhibited a unidirectional tilted orientation with respect to the stripe boundary. Importantly, such chiral orientation was reduced when soft substrates were used instead. In addition, we demonstrated the key role of actin stress fibers in the formation of the chiral orientation. This study reveals that a rigid substrate is required for the chiral pattern of myoblasts, paving the way for reconstructing damaged muscle tissue with inherent LR asymmetry in the future.

  8. Improved Cell Culture Method for Growing Contracting Skeletal Muscle Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquette, Michele L.; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved method for culturing immature muscle cells (myoblasts) into a mature skeletal muscle overcomes some of the notable limitations of prior culture methods. The development of the method is a major advance in tissue engineering in that, for the first time, a cell-based model spontaneously fuses and differentiates into masses of highly aligned, contracting myotubes. This method enables (1) the construction of improved two-dimensional (monolayer) skeletal muscle test beds; (2) development of contracting three-dimensional tissue models; and (3) improved transplantable tissues for biomedical and regenerative medicine applications. With adaptation, this method also offers potential application for production of other tissue types (i.e., bone and cardiac) from corresponding precursor cells.

  9. Glucose deprivation attenuates sortilin levels in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Miyako; Yoneyama, Yosuke; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Ishiuchi, Yuri; Ishii, Takayuki; Sato, Hitoshi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Nedachi, Taku; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2017-03-31

    In skeletal muscle, sortilin plays a predominant role in the sorting of glucose transporter 4 (Glut4), thereby controlling glucose uptake. Moreover, our previous study suggested that the sortilin expression levels are also implicated in myogenesis. Despite the importance of sortilin in skeletal muscle, however, the regulation of sortilin expression has not been completely understood. In the present study, we analyzed if the sortilin expression is regulated by glucose in C2C12 myocytes and rat skeletal muscles in vivo. Sortilin protein expression was elevated upon C2C12 cell differentiation and was further enhanced in the presence of a high concentration of glucose. The gene expression and protein degradation of sortilin were not affected by glucose. On the other hand, rapamycin partially reduced sortilin induction by a high concentration of glucose, which suggested that sortilin translation could be regulated by glucose, at least in part. We also examined if the sortilin regulation by glucose was also observed in skeletal muscles that were obtained from fed or fasted rats. Sortilin expression in both gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle was significantly decreased by 17-18h of starvation. On the other hand, pathological levels of high blood glucose did not alter the sortilin expression in rat skeletal muscle. Overall, the present study suggests that sortilin protein levels are reduced under hypoglycemic conditions by post-transcriptional control in skeletal muscles.

  10. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  11. Overexpression of Striated Muscle Activator of Rho Signaling (STARS) Increases C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Marita A; Della Gatta, Paul A; Ahmad Mir, Bilal; Kowalski, Greg M; Kloehn, Joachim; McConville, Malcom J; Russell, Aaron P; Lamon, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration depend on the activation of satellite cells, which leads to myocyte proliferation, differentiation and fusion with existing muscle fibers. Skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation are tightly coordinated by a continuum of molecular signaling pathways. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) is an actin binding protein that regulates the transcription of genes involved in muscle cell growth, structure and function via the stimulation of actin polymerization and activation of serum-response factor (SRF) signaling. STARS mediates cell proliferation in smooth and cardiac muscle models; however, whether STARS overexpression enhances cell proliferation and differentiation has not been investigated in skeletal muscle cells. We demonstrate for the first time that STARS overexpression enhances differentiation but not proliferation in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. Increased differentiation was associated with an increase in the gene levels of the myogenic differentiation markers Ckm, Ckmt2 and Myh4, the differentiation factor Igf2 and the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) Myf5 and Myf6. Exposing C2C12 cells to CCG-1423, a pharmacological inhibitor of SRF preventing the nuclear translocation of its co-factor MRTF-A, had no effect on myotube differentiation rate, suggesting that STARS regulates differentiation via a MRTF-A independent mechanism. These findings position STARS as an important regulator of skeletal muscle growth and regeneration.

  12. Study of muscle cell dedifferentiation after skeletal muscle injury of mice with a Cre-Lox system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Dedifferentiation of muscle cells in the tissue of mammals has yet to be observed. One of the challenges facing the study of skeletal muscle cell dedifferentiation is the availability of a reliable model that can confidentially distinguish differentiated cell populations of myotubes and non-fused mononuclear cells, including stem cells that can coexist within the population of cells being studied.In the current study, we created a Cre/Lox-β-galactosidase system, which can specifically tag differentiated multinuclear myotubes and myotube-generated mononuclear cells based on the activation of the marker gene, β-galactosidase. By using this system in an adult mouse model, we found that β-galactosidase positive mononuclear cells were generated from β-galactosidase positive multinuclear myofibers upon muscle injury. We also demonstrated that these mononuclear cells can develop into a variety of different muscle cell lineages, i.e., myoblasts, satellite cells, and muscle derived stem cells.These novel findings demonstrated, for the first time, that cellular dedifferentiation of skeletal muscle cells actually occurs in mammalian skeletal muscle following traumatic injury in vivo.

  13. Muscle Stem Cell Fate Is Controlled by the Cell-Polarity Protein Scrib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ono

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cells are resident skeletal muscle stem cells that supply myonuclei for homeostasis, hypertrophy, and repair in adult muscle. Scrib is one of the major cell-polarity proteins, acting as a potent tumor suppressor in epithelial cells. Here, we show that Scrib also controls satellite-cell-fate decisions in adult mice. Scrib is undetectable in quiescent cells but becomes expressed during activation. Scrib is asymmetrically distributed in dividing daughter cells, with robust accumulation in cells committed to myogenic differentiation. Low Scrib expression is associated with the proliferative state and preventing self-renewal, whereas high Scrib levels reduce satellite cell proliferation. Satellite-cell-specific knockout of Scrib in mice causes a drastic and insurmountable defect in muscle regeneration. Thus, Scrib is a regulator of tissue stem cells, controlling population expansion and self-renewal with Scrib expression dynamics directing satellite cell fate.

  14. Cell-Surface Protein Profiling Identifies Distinctive Markers of Progenitor Cells in Human Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Uezumi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle contains two distinct stem/progenitor populations. One is the satellite cell, which acts as a muscle stem cell, and the other is the mesenchymal progenitor, which contributes to muscle pathogeneses such as fat infiltration and fibrosis. Detailed and accurate characterization of these progenitors in humans remains elusive. Here, we performed comprehensive cell-surface protein profiling of the two progenitor populations residing in human skeletal muscle and identified three previously unrecognized markers: CD82 and CD318 for satellite cells and CD201 for mesenchymal progenitors. These markers distinguish myogenic and mesenchymal progenitors, and enable efficient isolation of the two types of progenitors. Functional study revealed that CD82 ensures expansion and preservation of myogenic progenitors by suppressing excessive differentiation, and CD201 signaling favors adipogenesis of mesenchymal progenitors. Thus, cell-surface proteins identified here are not only useful markers but also functionally important molecules, and provide valuable insight into human muscle biology and diseases.

  15. Implantation of muscle satellite cells overexpressing myogenin improves denervated muscle atrophy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H; Lv, Y; Shen, X Q; Xu, J H; Lu, H; Fu, L C; Duan, T

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) overexpressing myogenin (MyoG) on denervated muscle atrophy. Rat MSCs were isolated and transfected with the MyoG-EGFP plasmid vector GV143. MyoG-transfected MSCs (MTMs) were transplanted into rat gastrocnemius muscles at 1 week after surgical denervation. Controls included injections of untransfected MSCs or the vehicle only. Muscles were harvested and analyzed at 2, 4, and 24 weeks post-transplantation. Immunofluorescence confirmed MyoG overexpression in MTMs. The muscle wet weight ratio was significantly reduced at 2 weeks after MTM injection (67.17±6.79) compared with muscles injected with MSCs (58.83±5.31) or the vehicle (53.00±7.67; t=2.37, P=0.04 and t=3.39, P=0.007, respectively). The muscle fiber cross-sectional area was also larger at 2 weeks after MTM injection (2.63×10³±0.39×10³) compared with MSC injection (1.99×10³±0.58×10³) or the vehicle only (1.57×10³±0.47×10³; t=2.24, P=0.049 and t=4.22, P=0.002, respectively). At 4 and 24 weeks post-injection, the muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area were similar across all three experimental groups. Immunohistochemistry showed that the MTM group had larger MyoG-positive fibers. The MTM group (3.18±1.13) also had higher expression of MyoG mRNA than other groups (1.41±0.65 and 1.03±0.19) at 2 weeks after injection (t=2.72, P=0.04). Transplanted MTMs delayed short-term atrophy of denervated muscles. This approach can be optimized as a novel stand-alone therapy or as a bridge to surgical re-innervation of damaged muscles.

  16. Implantation of muscle satellite cells overexpressing myogenin improves denervated muscle atrophy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of muscle satellite cells (MSCs overexpressing myogenin (MyoG on denervated muscle atrophy. Rat MSCs were isolated and transfected with the MyoG-EGFP plasmid vector GV143. MyoG-transfected MSCs (MTMs were transplanted into rat gastrocnemius muscles at 1 week after surgical denervation. Controls included injections of untransfected MSCs or the vehicle only. Muscles were harvested and analyzed at 2, 4, and 24 weeks post-transplantation. Immunofluorescence confirmed MyoG overexpression in MTMs. The muscle wet weight ratio was significantly reduced at 2 weeks after MTM injection (67.17±6.79 compared with muscles injected with MSCs (58.83±5.31 or the vehicle (53.00±7.67; t=2.37, P=0.04 and t=3.39, P=0.007, respectively. The muscle fiber cross-sectional area was also larger at 2 weeks after MTM injection (2.63×103±0.39×103 compared with MSC injection (1.99×103±0.58×103 or the vehicle only (1.57×103±0.47×103; t=2.24, P=0.049 and t=4.22, P=0.002, respectively. At 4 and 24 weeks post-injection, the muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area were similar across all three experimental groups. Immunohistochemistry showed that the MTM group had larger MyoG-positive fibers. The MTM group (3.18±1.13 also had higher expression of MyoG mRNA than other groups (1.41±0.65 and 1.03±0.19 at 2 weeks after injection (t=2.72, P=0.04. Transplanted MTMs delayed short-term atrophy of denervated muscles. This approach can be optimized as a novel stand-alone therapy or as a bridge to surgical re-innervation of damaged muscles.

  17. Muscle biopsy and cell cultures: potential diagnostic tools in hereditary skeletal muscle channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Meola

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary muscle channelopathies are caused by dominant mutations in the genes encoding for subunits of muscle voltage- gated ion channels. Point mutations on the human skeletal muscle Na+ channel (Nav1.4 give rise to hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, potassium aggravated myotonia, paramyotonia congenita and hypokalemic periodic paralysis type 2. Point mutations on the human skeletal muscle Ca2+ channel give rise to hypokalemic periodic paralysis and malignant hyperthermia. Point mutations in the human skeletal chloride channel ClC-1 give rise to myotonia congenita. Point mutations in the inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir2.1 give rise to a syndrome characterized by periodic paralysis, severe cardiac arrhythmias and skeletal alterations (Andersen’s syndrome. Involvement of the same ion channel can thus give rise to different phenotypes. In addition, the same mutation can lead to different phenotypes or similar phenotypes can be caused by different mutations on the same or on different channel subtypes. Bearing in mind, the complexity of this field, the growing number of potential channelopathies (such as the myotonic dystrophies, and the time and cost of the genetic procedures, before a biomolecular approach is addressed, it is mandatory to apply strict diagnostic protocols to screen the patients. In this study we propose a protocol to be applied in the diagnosis of the hereditary muscle channelopathies and we demonstrate that muscle biopsy studies and muscle cell cultures may significantly contribute towards the correct diagnosis of the channel involved. DNAbased diagnosis is now a reality for many of the channelopathies. This has obvious genetic counselling, prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  18. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.

  19. Bmp signaling at the tips of skeletal muscles regulates the number of fetal muscle progenitors and satellite cells during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Noulet, Fanny; Edom-Vovard, Frédérique; Tozer, Samuel; Le Grand, Fabien; Duprez, Delphine

    2010-04-20

    Muscle progenitors, labeled by the transcription factor Pax7, are responsible for muscle growth during development. The signals that regulate the muscle progenitor number during myogenesis are unknown. We show, through in vivo analysis, that Bmp signaling is involved in regulating fetal skeletal muscle growth. Ectopic activation of Bmp signaling in chick limbs increases the number of fetal muscle progenitors and fibers, while blocking Bmp signaling reduces their numbers, ultimately leading to small muscles. The Bmp effect that we observed during fetal myogenesis is diametrically opposed to that previously observed during embryonic myogenesis and that deduced from in vitro work. We also show that Bmp signaling regulates the number of satellite cells during development. Finally, we demonstrate that Bmp signaling is active in a subpopulation of fetal progenitors and satellite cells at the extremities of muscles. Overall, our results show that Bmp signaling plays differential roles in embryonic and fetal myogenesis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Suppression of vascular smooth muscle cells' proliferation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to determine the effects of valsartan on the proliferation and migration of isolated rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the expression of phospho-p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) promoted by angiotensin II (Ang II). VSMCs from the rat thoracic aorta were cultured by ...

  1. Muscle cell membrane damage by very low serum sodium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nathan

    2009-11-12

    Nov 12, 2009 ... and following PVP (photoselective vaporization of prostate) for benign prostate hypertrophy [7] had led to hyponatermia induced rhabdomyolysis. Though underlying pathophysiology for hyponatremia induced rhabdomyolysis is still obscure, the proposed mechanism is the malfunction of muscle cell ...

  2. Association of smooth muscle cell tissue factor with caveolae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, AB; Smit, JW; Bom, VJJ; Blom, NR; Ruiters, MHJ; Halie, MR; vanderMeer, J

    1996-01-01

    There is still no satisfactory explanation for the low catalytic activity of tissue factor (TF)/factor VII(a) complexes towards coagulation factor X, as found on the apical surface side of cell layers. It has been hypothesized that TF exists in a latent form. Layers of cultured human smooth muscle

  3. ACL injury reduces satellite cell abundance and promotes fibrogenic cell expansion within skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher S; Johnson, Darren L; Ireland, Mary Lloyd; Noehren, Brian

    2017-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are associated with significant loss of strength in knee extensor muscles that persists despite physical therapy. The underlying mechanisms responsible for this protracted muscle weakness are poorly understood; however, we recently showed significant myofiber atrophy and altered muscle phenotype following ACL injury. We sought to further explore perturbations in skeletal muscle morphology and progenitor cell activity following an ACL injury. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the injured and non-injured vastus lateralis of young adults (n = 10) following ACL injury, and histochemical/immunohistochemical analyses were undertaken to determine collagen content, abundance of connective tissue fibroblasts, fibrogenic/adipogenic progenitor (FAP) cells, satellite cells, in addition to indices of muscle fiber denervation and myonuclear apoptosis. The injured limb showed elevated collagen content (p injury. The injured limb also displayed reduced satellite cell abundance, increased fiber denervation and DNA damage associated with apoptosis (p muscle itself after the ligament injury. Injury of the ACL induces a myriad of negative outcomes within knee extensor muscles, which likely compromise the restorative capacity and plasticity of skeletal muscle, impeding rehabilitative efforts. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1876-1885, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tong Luo; Huan Chen; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation. Methods and Results A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well a...

  5. Differential Gene Expression Profiling of Dystrophic Dog Muscle after MuStem Cell Transplantation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robriquet, Florence; Lardenois, Aurélie; Babarit, Candice; Larcher, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Leroux, Isabelle; Zuber, Céline; Ledevin, Mireille; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Fromes, Yves; Cherel, Yan; Guevel, Laetitia; Rouger, Karl

    2015-01-01

    ...). We have recently shown that systemic delivery of MuStem cells, skeletal muscle-resident stem cells isolated in healthy dog, generates the remodelling of muscle tissue and gives rise to striking...

  6. Thapsigargin induces apoptosis in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, C; Vallejo, S; Cercas, E; Llergo, J L; Lafuente, N; Matesanz, N; Rodríguez-Mañas, L; Sánchez-Ferrer, C F

    2000-11-01

    Vascular remodeling is a key feature of many pathologic states, including atherosclerosis, or hypertension. Vascular smooth muscle cells participate in determining the vessel structure by several mechanisms such as cell migration, cell growth, or cell death (necrosis or apoptosis). Here we report that thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), is able to induce apoptosis in human vascular smooth muscle cells (HVSMCs). Apoptosis was assessed by three different methods: differential chromatin binding dye staining. cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). When HVSMCs were treated for 1 h with thapsigargin (100 nM-10 microM), there was a concentration-dependent increase in both parameters 24 h after the thapsigargin pulse. When a time-course experiment was performed, both parameters were significantly enhanced from 3 to 6 h after the exposure to thapsigargin. We conclude that thapsigargin promotes apoptosis in HVSMCs, providing a useful tool for the study of programmed cell death in human vascular smooth muscle.

  7. Rejuvenating Muscle Stem Cell Function: Restoring Quiescence and Overcoming Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2016-04-01

    Elderly humans gradually lose strength and the capacity to repair skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle repair requires functional skeletal muscle satellite (or stem) cells (SMSCs) and progenitor cells. Diminished stem cell numbers and increased dysfunction correlate with the observed gradual loss of strength during aging. Recent reports attribute the loss of stem cell numbers and function to either increased entry into a presenescent state or the loss of self-renewal capacity due to an inability to maintain quiescence resulting in stem cell exhaustion. Earlier work has shown that exposure to factors from blood of young animals and other treatments could restore SMSC function. However, cells in the presenescent state are refractory to the beneficial effects of being transplanted into a young environment. Entry into the presenescent state results from loss of autophagy, leading to increased ROS and epigenetic modification at the CDKN2A locus due to decreased H2Aub, upregulating cell senescence biomarker p16ink4a. However, the presenescent SMSCs can be rejuvenated by agents that stimulate autophagy, such as the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Autophagy plays a critical role in SMSC homeostasis. These results have implications for the development of senolytic therapies that attempt to destroy p16ink4a expressing cells, since such therapies would also destroy a reservoir of potentially rescuable regenerative stem cells. Other work suggests that in humans, loss of SMSC self-renewal capacity is primarily due to decreased expression of sprouty1. DNA hypomethylation at the SPRY1 gene locus downregulates sprouty1, causing inability to maintain quiescence and eventual exhaustion of the stem cell population. A unifying hypothesis posits that in aging humans, first loss of quiescence occurs, depleting the stem cell population, but that remaining SMSCs are increasingly subject to presenescence in the very old.

  8. Intracerebral transplants of primary muscle cells: a potential 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, S.; Schultz, E.; Wolff, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    After the transplantation of rat primary muscle cells into the caudate or cortex of recipient rats, the muscle cells were able to persist for at least 6 months. Muscle cells transfected with expression plasmids prior to transplantation were able to express reporter genes in the brains for at least 2 months. These results suggest that muscle cells might be a useful 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain.

  9. Biosynthesis of titin in cultured skeletal muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, W.B.; Kim, I.S.; Struve, A.; Fulton, A.B. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Although significant progress has been made regarding the structure and function of titin, little data exist on the biosynthesis of this large protein in developing muscle. Using pulse-labeling with ({sup 35}S)methionine and immunoprecipitation with an anti-titin mAb, we have examined the biosynthesis of titin in synchronized cultures of skeletal muscle cells derived from day 12 chicken embryos. We find that: (a) titin synthesis increases greater than 4-fold during the first week in culture and during this same time period, synthesis of muscle-specific myosin heavy chain increases greater than 12-fold; (b) newly synthesized titin has a t1/2 of approximately 70 h; (c) titin is resistant to extraction with Triton X-100 both during and immediately after its synthesis. These observations suggest that newly synthesized titin molecules are stable proteins that rapidly associate with the cytoskeleton of developing myotubes.

  10. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  11. Potassium currents in cultured human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, W; Karwande, S V; Hoidal, J R; Farrukh, I S

    1996-04-01

    In this study, using whole cell and single-channel configurations of the patch-clamp technique, we characterized K+ currents (IK) in cultured human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. The net whole cell outward membrane current (IKo) was activated at potentials positive to -60 mV. One component of IKo, IK(dr), was inhibited by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and high concentrations of tetraethylammonium (TEA) but was Ca2+ and charybdotoxin (CTX) insensitive. The other component of IKo, IK(Ca), was voltage and Ca2+ dependent and was inhibited by CTX and low concentrations of TEA. Activation of IKo in single-channel recordings was voltage dependent and demonstrated a high-conductance channel (245 +/- 2 pS) that was Ca2+ and CTX sensitive [IK(Ca)] and a low-conductance channel (109 +/- 2 pS) that was inhibited by 4-AP [IK(dr)] but was insensitive to low concentrations of TEA or to an increase in intracellular [Ca2+]. In isolated pulmonary arterial rings, TEA and 4-AP caused an additive increase in arterial tension. To our knowledge these data provide the first characterization of the IK in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and indicate that IK(Ca) and IK(dr) play an important role in maintaining pulmonary vascular tone. The data confirm previous observations in pulmonary smooth muscle cells of animal models.

  12. File list: Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. File list: His.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. Matrigel, but not collagen I, maintains the differentiation capacity of muscle derived cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefte, S.; Vullinghs, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are key cells for post-natal muscle growth and regeneration and they play a central role in the search for therapies to treat muscle injuries. In this study the proliferation and differentiation capacity of muscle progenitor cells was studied in 2D and 3D cultures with collagen type

  8. Receptor Expression in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    One on the most persistent problems with long-term space flight is atrophy of skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is unique as a tissue in the body in that its ability to undergo atrophy or hypertrophy is controlled exclusively by cues from the extracellular environment. The mechanism of communication between muscle cells and their environment is through a group of membrane-bound and soluble receptors, each of which carries out unique, but often interrelated, functions. The primary receptors include acetyl choline receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, insulin receptors, growth hormone (i.e., somatotropin) receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptors, and steroid receptors. This project has been initiated to develop an integrated approach toward muscle atrophy and hypertrophy that takes into account information on the populations of the entire group of receptors (and their respective hormone concentrations), and it is hypothesized that this information can form the basis for a predictive computer model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. The conceptual basis for this project is illustrated in the figure below. The individual receptors are shown as membrane-bound, with the exception of the glucocorticoid receptor which is a soluble intracellular receptor. Each of these receptors has an extracellular signalling component (e.g., innervation, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, etc.), and following the interaction of the extracellular component with the receptor itself, an intracellular signal is generated. Each of these intracellular signals is unique in its own way; however, they are often interrelated.

  9. Noninvasive PET Imaging and Tracking of Engineered Human Muscle Precursor Cells for Skeletal Muscle Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralampieva, Deana; Betzel, Thomas; Dinulovic, Ivana; Salemi, Souzan; Stoelting, Meline; Krämer, Stefanie D; Schibli, Roger; Sulser, Tullio; Handschin, Christoph; Eberli, Daniel; Ametamey, Simon M

    2016-09-01

    Transplantation of human muscle precursor cells (hMPCs) is envisioned for the treatment of various muscle diseases. However, a feasible noninvasive tool to monitor cell survival, migration, and integration into the host tissue is still missing. In this study, we designed an adenoviral delivery system to genetically modify hMPCs to express a signaling-deficient form of human dopamine D2 receptor (hD2R). The gene expression levels of the receptor were evaluated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and infection efficiency was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy. The viability, proliferation, and differentiation capacity of the transduced cells, as well as their myogenic phenotype, were determined by flow cytometry analysis and fluorescent microscopy. (18)F-fallypride and (18)F-fluoromisonidazole, two well-established PET radioligands, were assessed for their potential to image engineered hMPCs in a mouse model and their uptakes were evaluated at different time points after cell inoculation in vivo. Biodistribution studies, autoradiography, and PET experiments were performed to determine the extent of signal specificity. To address feasibility for tracking hMPCs in an in vivo model, the safety of the adenoviral gene delivery was evaluated. Finally, the harvested tissues were histologically examined to determine whether survival of the transplanted cells was sustained at different time points. Adenoviral gene delivery was shown to be safe, with no detrimental effects on the primary human cells. The viability, proliferation, and differentiation capacity of the transduced cells were confirmed, and flow cytometry analysis and fluorescent microscopy showed that their myogenic phenotype was sustained. (18)F-fallypride and (18)F-fluoromisonidazole were successfully synthesized. Specific binding of (18)F-fallypride to hD2R hMPCs was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the (18)F-fluoromisonidazole signal was high at the early stages. Finally

  10. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  11. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Yan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou (China); Li, Yuan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou (China); Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Kaufmann, Andreas M. [Clinic for Gynecology CCM/CBF, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Albers, Andreas E., E-mail: andreas.albers@charite.de [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  12. Light- and electron microscopical studies of interstitial cells of Cajal and muscle cells at the submucosal border of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Peters, S; Thuneberg, L

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) at the submucosal border of the colonic circular muscle are pacemaker cells. We studied smooth muscle cells and ICC at the submucosal surface of the circular muscle layer of the normal human colon....

  13. Application of cell co-culture system to study fat and muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Hwang, Inho

    2014-09-01

    Animal cell culture is a highly complex process, in which cells are grown under specific conditions. The growth and development of these cells is a highly unnatural process in vitro condition. Cells are removed from animal tissues and artificially cultured in various culture vessels. Vitamins, minerals, and serum growth factors are supplied to maintain cell viability. Obtaining result homogeneity of in vitro and in vivo experiments is rare, because their structure and function are different. Living tissues have highly ordered complex architecture and are three-dimensional (3D) in structure. The interaction between adjacent cell types is quite distinct from the in vitro cell culture, which is usually two-dimensional (2D). Co-culture systems are studied to analyze the interactions between the two different cell types. The muscle and fat co-culture system is useful in addressing several questions related to muscle modeling, muscle degeneration, apoptosis, and muscle regeneration. Co-culture of C2C12 and 3T3-L1 cells could be a useful diagnostic tool to understand the muscle and fat formation in animals. Even though, co-culture systems have certain limitations, they provide a more realistic 3D view and information than the individual cell culture system. It is suggested that co-culture systems are useful in evaluating the intercellular communication and composition of two different cell types.

  14. Lysyl Oxidase Propeptide Inhibits Smooth Muscle Cell Signaling and Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Paola A.; Vora, Siddharth; Sume, Siddika Selva; Yang, Dan; St. Hilaire, Cynthia; Guo, Ying; Palamakumbura, Amitha H.; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Ravid, Katya; Trackman, Philip C.

    2008-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase is required for the normal biosynthesis and maturation of collagen and elastin. It is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells, and its increased expression has been previously found in atherosclerosis and in models of balloon angioplasty. The lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) has more recently been found to have biological activity as a tumor suppressor, and it inhibits Erk1/2 Map kinase activation. We reasoned that LOX-PP may have functions in normal non-transformed cells. We, therefore, investigated its effects on smooth muscle cells, focusing on important biological processes mediated by Erk1/2-dependent signaling pathways including proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, we investigated whether evidence for accumulation of LOX-PP could be found in vivo in a femoral artery injury model. Recombinant LOX-PP was expressed and purified, and was found to inhibit primary rat aorta smooth muscle cell proliferation and DNA synthesis by more than 50%. TNF-α-stimulated MMP-9 expression and Erk1/2 activation were both significantly inhibited by LOX-PP. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out with affinity purified anti-LOX-PP antibody showed that LOX-PP epitopes were expressed at elevated levels in vascular lesions of injured arteries. These novel data suggest that LOX-PP may provide a feedback control mechanism that serves to inhibit properties associated with the development of vascular pathology. PMID:18060869

  15. The contribution of Islet1-expressing splanchnic mesoderm cells to distinct branchiomeric muscles reveals significant heterogeneity in head muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Elisha; Monovich, Amir; Tirosh-Finkel, Libbat; Harrelson, Zachary; Rousso, Tal; Rinon, Ariel; Harel, Itamar; Evans, Sylvia M; Tzahor, Eldad

    2008-02-01

    During embryogenesis, paraxial mesoderm cells contribute skeletal muscle progenitors, whereas cardiac progenitors originate in the lateral splanchnic mesoderm (SpM). Here we focus on a subset of the SpM that contributes to the anterior or secondary heart field (AHF/SHF), and lies adjacent to the cranial paraxial mesoderm (CPM), the precursors for the head musculature. Molecular analyses in chick embryos delineated the boundaries between the CPM, undifferentiated SpM progenitors of the AHF/SHF, and differentiating cardiac cells. We then revealed the regionalization of branchial arch mesoderm: CPM cells contribute to the proximal region of the myogenic core, which gives rise to the mandibular adductor muscle. SpM cells contribute to the myogenic cells in the distal region of the branchial arch that later form the intermandibular muscle. Gene expression analyses of these branchiomeric muscles in chick uncovered a distinct molecular signature for both CPM- and SpM-derived muscles. Islet1 (Isl1) is expressed in the SpM/AHF and branchial arch in both chick and mouse embryos. Lineage studies using Isl1-Cre mice revealed the significant contribution of Isl1(+) cells to ventral/distal branchiomeric (stylohyoid, mylohyoid and digastric) and laryngeal muscles. By contrast, the Isl1 lineage contributes to mastication muscles (masseter, pterygoid and temporalis) to a lesser extent, with virtually no contribution to intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles or extraocular muscles. In addition, in vivo activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in chick embryos resulted in marked inhibition of Isl1, whereas inhibition of this pathway increased Isl1 expression. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, the contribution of Isl1(+) SpM cells to a subset of branchiomeric skeletal muscles.

  16. Expansion of revertant fibers in dystrophic mdx muscles reflects activity of muscle precursor cells and serves as an index of muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Toshifumi; Lu, Qi-Long; Morgan, Jennifer E; Davies, Kay E; Fisher, Rosie; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Partridge, Terence A

    2006-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse myopathies reflect a lack of dystrophin in muscles. However, both contain sporadic clusters of revertant fibers (RFs) that express dystrophin. RF clusters expand in size with age in mdx mice. To test the hypothesis that the expansion of clusters is achieved through the process of muscle degeneration and regeneration, we analyzed muscles of mdx mice in which degeneration and regeneration were inhibited by the expression of micro-dystrophins or utrophin transgenes. Postnatal RF expansion was diminished in direct correlation to the protective effect of the transgene expression. Similarly, expansion of RFs was inhibited when muscle regeneration was blocked by irradiation. However, in irradiated muscles, irradiation-tolerant quiescent muscle precursor cells reactivated by notexin effectively restored RF expansion. Our observations demonstrate that revertant events occur initially within a subset of muscle precursor cells. The proliferation of these cells, as part of the regeneration process, leads to the expansion of RF clusters within degenerating muscles. This expansion of revertant clusters depicts the cumulative history of regeneration, thus providing a useful index for functional evaluation of therapies that counteract muscle degeneration.

  17. Possible Local Stem Cells Activation by Microcurrent Application in Experimentally Injured Soleus Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Zickri, Maha Baligh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe injuries in skeletal muscle result in muscle weakness that delays recovery and contribute to progressive decline in muscle function. Microcurrent therapy (MCT) is a novel treatment method used in soft tissue injury and tissue regeneration therapy. The regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle tissue resides in satellite cells, the quiescent adult stem cells. Aim: The present work aimed at investigating the relation between microcurrent therapy and local stem cells in regener...

  18. [Transdisciplinary Approach for Sarcopenia. The effects of exercise on skeletal muscle hypertrophy and satellite cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Shin; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle has a high degree of plasticity. The mass of skeletal muscle maintains owing to muscle protein synthesis and the regeneration by satellite cells. Skeletal muscle atrophy with aging (sarcopenia) is developed by decline of muscle protein synthesis and dysfunction of satellite cells. It is urgently necessary for today's highly aged society to elucidate the mechanism of sarcopenia and to establish prevention measure. This review shows that the positive effects of "exercise" on muscle protein synthesis and satellite cell function including their main molecular mechanism.

  19. Response of turkey muscle satellite cells to thermal challenge. I. transcriptome effects in proliferating cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Kent M.; Kristelle M Mendoza; Abrahante, Juan E.; Barnes, Natalie E.; Velleman, Sandra G.; Strasburg, Gale M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Climate change poses a multi-dimensional threat to food and agricultural systems as a result of increased risk to animal growth, development, health, and food product quality. This study was designed to characterize transcriptional changes induced in turkey muscle satellite cells cultured under cold or hot thermal challenge to better define molecular mechanisms by which thermal stress alters breast muscle ultrastructure. Results Satellite cells isolated from the pectoralis major mu...

  20. Retained Myogenic Potency of Human Satellite Cells from Torn Rotator Cuff Muscles Despite Fatty Infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Masashi; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Kanzaki, Makoto; Hatakeyama, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Yukinori; Minowa, Takashi; Takemura, Taro; Ando, Akira; Sekiguchi, Takuya; Yabe, Yutaka; Itoi, Eiji

    2018-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are a common shoulder problem in the elderly that can lead to both muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration due to less physical load. Satellite cells, quiescent cells under the basal lamina of skeletal muscle fibers, play a major role in muscle regeneration. However, the myogenic potency of human satellite cells in muscles with fatty infiltration is unclear due to the difficulty in isolating from small samples, and the mechanism of the progression of fatty infiltration has not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to analyze the population of myogenic and adipogenic cells in disused supraspinatus (SSP) and intact subscapularis (SSC) muscles of the RCTs from the same patients using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The microstructure of the muscle with fatty infiltration was observed as a whole mount condition under multi-photon microscopy. Myogenic differentiation potential and gene expression were evaluated in satellite cells. The results showed that the SSP muscle with greater fatty infiltration surrounded by collagen fibers compared with the SSC muscle under multi-photon microscopy. A positive correlation was observed between the ratio of muscle volume to fat volume and the ratio of myogenic precursor to adipogenic precursor. Although no difference was observed in the myogenic potential between the two groups in cell culture, satellite cells in the disused SSP muscle showed higher intrinsic myogenic gene expression than those in the intact SSC muscle. Our results indicate that satellite cells from the disused SSP retain sufficient potential of muscle growth despite the fatty infiltration.

  1. Potential gene regulatory role for cyclin D3 in muscle cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclin D3 is important for muscle development and regeneration, and is involved in post-mitotic arrest of muscle cells. Cyclin D3 also has cell-cycle-independent functions such as regulation of specific genes in other tissues. Ectopic expression of cyclin D3 in myoblasts, where it is normally undetectable, promotes muscle ...

  2. Cell length measurements in longitudinal smooth muscle strips of the pig urinary bladder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Asselt (Els); R. Schot (Rachel); R. van Mastrigt (Ron)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the length of smooth muscle cells in muscle bundles of pig urinary bladder wall was determined after dissection in Tyrode buffers with different calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]). Previous studies have shown that the length of isolated smooth muscle cells decreases with an

  3. Trichinella spp.: differential expression of acid phosphatase and myofibrillar proteins in infected muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, D P; Bohnet, S; Prieur, D J

    1991-04-01

    Major alterations are induced in muscle cells infected by either Trichinella spiralis or Trichinella pseudospiralis. To investigate the response of muscle to these infections we have analyzed the expression of acid phosphatase (ACP, EC 3.1.3.2), adult skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain, and muscle tropomyosin proteins in infected mouse skeletal muscle cells. Using T. spiralis-infected cells, we provide strong evidence that the tartrate-sensitive ACP of these cells was synthesized by the infected cell and localized in lysosomes. Isoenzyme analysis indicated that the ACP activity was of host muscle cell origin and the specific activity of this ACP was 2.5 times greater than that in associated inflammatory cells. Increased ACP activity was also demonstrated in muscle cells infected by T. pseudospiralis. In synchronized muscle infections, increased ACP activity was detected at 5 days post-muscle infection for both parasites. ACP activity was further increased in infected muscle cells at later times tested. This increased infected cell ACP activity represents the earliest positive enzyme marker yet described indicating expression of the infected cell phenotype. In contrast, myofibrillar proteins were not detected in muscle cells chronically infected by T. spiralis but were detected in muscle cells infected by T. pseudospiralis. Decrease in myofibrillar protein levels was detected by 10 days post-muscle infection by T. spiralis. The data presented demonstrate significant differences and similarities in the phenotypes of muscle cells infected by these two parasites and establish criteria that could facilitate identification of parasite factors that may be involved in these phenomena.

  4. Pax7-Positive Cells/Satellite Cells in Human Extraocular Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Mona; Tjust, Anton E; Pedrosa Domellöf, Fatima

    2015-09-01

    We quantified and investigated the distribution of Pax7-positive cells/satellite cells (SCs) in the human extraocular muscles (EOMs). An immunofluorescence multiple-marker method simultaneously combining two SC markers (Pax7, NCAM), detection of the basement membrane (laminin) and cell nuclei (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole [DAPI]), was used on the anterior, middle, and posterior portions of EOMs from five healthy donors. Pax7-positive cell and SC content, myonuclear content, myofiber cross-sectional area, and myonuclear domain were analyzed in single cross-sections. Between 3915 and 13,536 myofibers per muscle cross-section and myofibers from the entire EOM cross-section were analyzed for quantification of Pax7-positive cells per myofiber (Pax7/F). The number of Pax7/F in the human EOMs varies along the length of the muscle with twice as high Pax7/F in the anterior part of the EOMs, but within the range of what has been previously reported for normal adult limb muscles. Furthermore, there are Pax7-positive cells in positions other than the classical SC position and the myonuclear domain size of adult EOMs is noticeably smaller than that previously reported for other adult skeletal muscles. Previous data on differences in Pax7-positive cell/SC abundance between EOMs and limb muscles must be reconsidered and the characteristics of different Pax7-positive cell populations further investigated. Higher numbers of Pax7-positive cells in the anterior portion of the EOMs may have a bearing for strabismus surgery involving sectioning of the muscle fibers.

  5. Transcriptome analysis of cattle muscle identifies potential markers for skeletal muscle growth rate and major cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bing; Greenwood, Paul L; Cafe, Linda M; Zhou, Guanghong; Zhang, Wangang; Dalrymple, Brian P

    2015-03-13

    This study aimed to identify markers for muscle growth rate and the different cellular contributors to cattle muscle and to link the muscle growth rate markers to specific cell types. The expression of two groups of genes in the longissimus muscle (LM) of 48 Brahman steers of similar age, significantly enriched for "cell cycle" and "ECM (extracellular matrix) organization" Gene Ontology (GO) terms was correlated with average daily gain/kg liveweight (ADG/kg) of the animals. However, expression of the same genes was only partly related to growth rate across a time course of postnatal LM development in two cattle genotypes, Piedmontese x Hereford (high muscling) and Wagyu x Hereford (high marbling). The deposition of intramuscular fat (IMF) altered the relationship between the expression of these genes and growth rate. K-means clustering across the development time course with a large set of genes (5,596) with similar expression profiles to the ECM genes was undertaken. The locations in the clusters of published markers of different cell types in muscle were identified and used to link clusters of genes to the cell type most likely to be expressing them. Overall correspondence between published cell type expression of markers and predicted major cell types of expression in cattle LM was high. However, some exceptions were identified: expression of SOX8 previously attributed to muscle satellite cells was correlated with angiogenesis. Analysis of the clusters and cell types suggested that the "cell cycle" and "ECM" signals were from the fibro/adipogenic lineage. Significant contributions to these signals from the muscle satellite cells, angiogenic cells and adipocytes themselves were not as strongly supported. Based on the clusters and cell type markers, sets of five genes predicted to be representative of fibro/adipogenic precursors (FAPs) and endothelial cells, and/or ECM remodelling and angiogenesis were identified. Gene sets and gene markers for the analysis of

  6. Tetranectin is a novel marker for myogenesis during embryonic development, muscle regeneration, and muscle cell differentiation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Iba, K; Durkin, M E

    1998-01-01

    Tetranectin, a plasminogen-binding protein with a C-type lectin domain, is found in both serum and the extracellular matrix. In the present study we report that tetranectin is closely associated with myogenesis during embryonic development, skeletal muscle regeneration, and muscle cell......, and both cytoplasmic and cell surface tetranectin immunostaining become apparent. Finally, we demonstrate that while tetranectin mRNA is translated to a similar degree in developing limbs and lung, the protein does not seem to be tissue associated in the lung as it is in the limbs. This indicates...... is observed in normal adult muscle. However, during skeletal muscle regeneration induced by the intramuscular injection of the myotoxic anesthetic Marcaine, myoblasts, myotubes, and the stumps of damaged myofibers exhibit intense tetranectin immunostaining. Tetranectin is also present in regenerating muscle...

  7. Embryonic stem cells improve skeletal muscle recovery after extreme atrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; De Oliveira Silvestre, João Guilherme; Guilherme, João Paulo Limongi França; Baptista, Igor Luchini; Ramos, Gracielle Vieira; Da Silva, Willian José; Miyabara, Elen Haruka; Moriscot, Anselmo Sigari

    2015-03-01

    We injected embryonic stem cells into mouse tibialis anterior muscles subjected to botulinum toxin injections as a model for reversible neurogenic atrophy. Muscles were exposed to botulinum toxin for 4 weeks and allowed to recover for up to 6 weeks. At the onset of recovery, a single muscle injection of embryonic stem cells was administered. The myofiber cross-sectional area, single twitch force, peak tetanic force, time-to-peak force, and half-relaxation time were determined. Although the stem cell injection did not affect the myofiber cross-sectional area gain in recovering muscles, most functional parameters improved significantly compared with those of recovering muscles that did not receive the stem cell injection. Muscle function recovery was accelerated by embryonic stem cell delivery in this durable neurogenic atrophy model. We conclude that stem cells should be considered a potential therapeutic tool for recovery after extreme skeletal muscle atrophy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Response of turkey muscle satellite cells to thermal challenge. I. transcriptome effects in proliferating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kent M; Mendoza, Kristelle M; Abrahante, Juan E; Barnes, Natalie E; Velleman, Sandra G; Strasburg, Gale M

    2017-05-06

    Climate change poses a multi-dimensional threat to food and agricultural systems as a result of increased risk to animal growth, development, health, and food product quality. This study was designed to characterize transcriptional changes induced in turkey muscle satellite cells cultured under cold or hot thermal challenge to better define molecular mechanisms by which thermal stress alters breast muscle ultrastructure. Satellite cells isolated from the pectoralis major muscle of 7-weeks-old male turkeys from two breeding lines (16 weeks body weight-selected and it's randombred control) were proliferated in culture at 33 °C, 38 °C or 43 °C for 72 h. Total RNA was isolated and 12 libraries subjected to RNAseq analysis. Statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed among treatments and between turkey lines with a greater number of genes altered by cold treatment than by hot and fewer differences observed between lines than between temperatures. Pathway analysis found that cold treatment resulted in an overrepresentation of genes involved in cell signaling/signal transduction and cell communication/cell signaling as compared to control (38 °C). Heat-treated muscle satellite cells showed greater tendency towards expression of genes related to muscle system development and differentiation. This study demonstrates significant transcriptome effects on turkey skeletal muscle satellite cells exposed to thermal challenge. Additional effects on gene expression could be attributed to genetic selection for 16 weeks body weight (muscle mass). New targets are identified for further research on the differential control of satellite cell proliferation in poultry.

  9. Electrical stimulation as a biomimicry tool for regulating muscle cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadian, Samad; Ostrovidov, Serge; Hosseini, Vahid; Kaji, Hirokazu; Ramalingam, Murugan; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need to understand muscle cell behaviors and to engineer muscle tissues to replace defective tissues in the body. Despite a long history of the clinical use of electric fields for muscle tissues in vivo, electrical stimulation (ES) has recently gained significant attention as a powerful tool for regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro. ES aims to mimic the electrical environment of electroactive muscle cells (e.g., cardiac or skeletal muscle cells) by helping to regulate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. As a result, it can be used to enhance the alignment and differentiation of skeletal or cardiac muscle cells and to aid in engineering of functional muscle tissues. Additionally, ES can be used to control and monitor force generation and electrophysiological activity of muscle tissues for bio-actuation and drug-screening applications in a simple, high-throughput, and reproducible manner. In this review paper, we briefly describe the importance of ES in regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro, as well as the major challenges and prospective potential associated with ES in the context of muscle tissue engineering.

  10. Uremia modulates the phenotype of aortic smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Marie; Pedersen, Annemarie Aarup; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Chronic kidney disease leads to uremia and markedly accelerates atherosclerosis. Phenotypic modulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the arterial media plays a key role in accelerating atherogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether uremia per se modulates...... the phenotype of aortic SMCs in vivo. METHODS: Moderate uremia was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) and wildtype C57Bl/6 mice. Plasma analysis, gene expression, histology, and myography were used to determine uremia-mediated changes in the arterial wall. RESULTS: Induction...... in the aortic media. In the aortic arch, mRNA and miRNA expression patterns were consistent with a uremia-mediated phenotypic modulation of SMCs; e.g. downregulation of myocardin, α-smooth muscle actin, and transgelin; and upregulation of miR146a. Notably, these expression patterns were observed after acute (2...

  11. Skeletal muscle perfusion and stem cell delivery in muscle disorders using intra-femoral artery canulation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Nadine; Hunt, Samuel D; Wu, Jianbo; Darabi, Radbod

    2015-11-15

    Muscular dystrophies are among major inherited muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle damage and fibrosis with no definitive cure. Recently, gene or cell based therapies have been developed to restore the missing gene expression or replace the damaged tissues. In order to test the efficiency of these therapies in mice models of muscular dystrophies, the arterial route of delivery is very advantageous as it provides uniform muscle exposure to the therapeutic agents or cells. Although there are few reports of arterial delivery of the therapeutic agents or cells in mice, there is no in-depth description and evaluation of its efficacy in perfusion of downstream muscles. This study is aimed to develop a practical method for intra-femoral artery perfusion in mice and to evaluate perfusion efficiency using near-infrared-fluorescence (NIRF) imaging as well as histology following stem cell delivery. Our results provide a practical guide to perform this delicate method in mice. By using a sensitive fluorescent dye, different muscle groups of the hindlimb have been evaluated for proper perfusion. As the final step, we have validated the efficiency of arterial cell delivery into muscles using human iPS-derived myogenic cells in an immunodeficient mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (NSG-mdx(4cv)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial redox signaling enables repair of injured skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Adam; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Defour, Aurelia; Hogarth, Marshall; Sreetama, Sen Chandra; Reed, Aaron; Scheffer, Luana; Chandel, Navdeep S; Jaiswal, Jyoti K

    2017-09-05

    Strain and physical trauma to mechanically active cells, such as skeletal muscle myofibers, injures their plasma membranes, and mitochondrial function is required for their repair. We found that mitochondrial function was also needed for plasma membrane repair in myoblasts as well as nonmuscle cells, which depended on mitochondrial uptake of calcium through the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Calcium uptake transiently increased the mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which locally activated the guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) RhoA, triggering F-actin accumulation at the site of injury and facilitating membrane repair. Blocking mitochondrial calcium uptake or ROS production prevented injury-triggered RhoA activation, actin polymerization, and plasma membrane repair. This repair mechanism was shared between myoblasts, nonmuscle cells, and mature skeletal myofibers. Quenching mitochondrial ROS in myofibers during eccentric exercise ex vivo caused increased damage to myofibers, resulting in a greater loss of muscle force. These results suggest a physiological role for mitochondria in plasma membrane repair in injured cells, a role that highlights a beneficial effect of ROS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  13. Urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator stimulate human vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnberg, M.J.; Nieuwenbroek, N.M.E.; Slomp, J.; Quax, P.H.A.; Verheijen, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the plasminogen activation system in the migration of human vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. After wounding of confluent human smooth muscle cell cultures by stripping cells from their extracellular matrix, cells start to migrate from

  14. Bone marrow derived cells in adult skeletal muscle tissue in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Str?mberg, Anna; Jansson, Monika; Fischer, Helene; Rullman, Eric; H?gglund, Hans; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background During the past decade, several animal studies have demonstrated that in addition to local cells, cells from the bone marrow (BM) possess the ability to contribute to regeneration of injured skeletal muscle tissue. In addition, in mice, regular physical activity has been displayed to be a sufficient stimulus for BM-derived cell contribution to the muscle, indicating that this is part of the ongoing physiological remodeling of skeletal muscle. However, whether BM-derived cells parti...

  15. Migratory appendicular muscles precursor cells in the common ancestor to all vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Eri; Kusakabe, Rie; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Hyodo, Susumu; Robert-Moreno, Alexandre; Onimaru, Koh; Sharpe, James; Kuratani, Shigeru; Tanaka, Mikiko

    2017-11-01

    In amniote embryos, skeletal muscles in the trunk are derived from epithelial dermomyotomes, the ventral margin of which extends ventrally to form body wall muscles. At limb levels, ventral dermomyotomes also generate limb-muscle precursors, an Lbx1-positive cell population that originates from the dermomyotome and migrates distally into the limb bud. In elasmobranchs, however, muscles in the paired fins were believed to be formed by direct somitic extension, a developmental pattern used by the amniote body wall muscles. Here we re-examined the development of pectoral fin muscles in catsharks, Scyliorhinus, and found that chondrichthyan fin muscles are indeed formed from Lbx-positive muscle precursors. Furthermore, these precursors originate from the ventral edge of the dermomyotome, the rest of which extends towards the ventral midline to form body wall muscles. Therefore, the Lbx1-positive, de-epithelialized appendicular muscle precursors appear to have been established in the body plan before the divergence of Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes.

  16. Pharyngeal Satellite Cells Undergo Myogenesis Under Basal Conditions and Are Required for Pharyngeal Muscle Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Matthew E; Phillips, Brittany L; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Vest, Katherine E; Vera, Yandery; Pavlath, Grace K

    2015-12-01

    The pharyngeal muscles of the nasal, oral, and laryngeal pharynxes are required for swallowing. Pharyngeal muscles are preferentially affected in some muscular dystrophies yet spared in others. Muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, may be critical factors in the development of pharyngeal muscle disorders; however, very little is known about pharyngeal satellite cells (PSC) and their role in pharyngeal muscles. We show that PSC are distinct from the commonly studied hindlimb satellite cells both transcriptionally and biologically. Under basal conditions PSC proliferate, progress through myogenesis, and fuse with pharyngeal myofibers. Furthermore, PSC exhibit biologic differences dependent on anatomic location in the pharynx. Importantly, PSC are required to maintain myofiber size and myonuclear number in pharyngeal myofibers. Together, these results demonstrate that PSC are critical for pharyngeal muscle maintenance and suggest that satellite cell impairment could contribute to pharyngeal muscle pathology associated with various muscular dystrophies and aging. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  17. Expression profiles of muscle disease-associated genes and their isoforms during differentiation of cultured human skeletal muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Hussein Saba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The formation of contractile myofibrils requires the stepwise onset of expression of muscle specific proteins. It is likely that elucidation of the expression patterns of muscle-specific sarcomeric proteins is important to understand muscle disorders originating from defects in contractile sarcomeric proteins. Methods We investigated the expression profile of a panel of sarcomeric components with a focus on proteins associated with a group of congenital disorders. The analyses were performed in cultured human skeletal muscle cells during myoblast proliferation and myotube development. Results Our culture technique resulted in the development of striated myotubes and the expression of adult isoforms of the sarcomeric proteins, such as fast TnI, fast TnT, adult fast and slow MyHC isoforms and predominantly skeletal muscle rather than cardiac actin. Many proteins involved in muscle diseases, such as beta tropomyosin, slow TnI, slow MyBPC and cardiac TnI were readily detected in the initial stages of muscle cell differentiation, suggesting the possibility of an early role for these proteins as constituent of the developing contractile apparatus during myofibrillogenesis. This suggests that in disease conditions the mechanisms of pathogenesis for each of the mutated sarcomeric proteins might be reflected by altered expression patterns, and disturbed assembly of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar structures and muscle development. Conclusions In conclusion, we here confirm that cell cultures of human skeletal muscle are an appropriate tool to study developmental stages of myofibrillogenesis. The expression of several disease-associated proteins indicates that they might be a useful model system for studying the pathogenesis of muscle diseases caused by defects in specific sarcomeric constituents.

  18. Tendon-muscle crosstalk controls muscle bellies morphogenesis, which is mediated by cell death and retinoic acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Guzman, Maria; Montero, Juan A; Santesteban, Elena; Gañan, Yolanda; Macias, Domingo; Hurle, Juan M

    2007-02-01

    Vertebrate muscle morphogenesis is a complex developmental process, which remains quite yet unexplored at cellular and molecular level. In this work, we have found that sculpturing programmed cell death is a key morphogenetic process responsible for the formation of individual foot muscles in the developing avian limb. Muscle fibers are produced in excess in the precursor dorsal and ventral muscle masses of the limb bud and myofibers lacking junctions with digital tendons are eliminated via apoptosis. Microsurgical experiments to isolate the developing muscles from their specific tendons are consistent with a role for tendons in regulating survival of myogenic cells. Analysis of the expression of Raldh2 and local treatments with retinoic acid indicate that this signaling pathway mediates apoptosis in myogenic cells, appearing also involved in tendon maturation. Retinoic acid inhibition experiments led to defects in muscle belly segmentation and myotendinous junction formation. It is proposed that heterogeneous local distribution of retinoids controlled through Raldh2 and Cyp26A1 is responsible for matching the fleshy and the tendinous components of each muscle belly.

  19. Muscle cell membranes from early degeneration muscle cell fibers in Solenopsis are leaky to lanthanum: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.G.; Davis, W.L.

    1985-06-01

    Lanthanum infusion techniques, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis were utilized to compare the permeability of muscle cell membranes from normal and degenerating muscle fibers of Solenopsis spp. In normal fibers, the electron-dense tracer was limited to components of the sarcotubular system. However, the insemination-induced degeneration of muscle fibers was characterized by the presence of an electron-dense precipitate within the myofibrils and mitochondria as well as in the extramyofibrillar spaces. The electron-dense material was subsequently identified by elemental analysis to be lanthanum. Such data indicate that one of the earliest stages of muscle degeneration involves an alteration in cell membrane permeability.

  20. Satellite-like cells contribute to pax7-dependent skeletal muscle repair in adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberoglu, Michael A; Gallagher, Thomas L; Morrow, Zachary T; Talbot, Jared C; Hromowyk, Kimberly J; Tenente, Inês M; Langenau, David M; Amacher, Sharon L

    2017-04-15

    Satellite cells, also known as muscle stem cells, are responsible for skeletal muscle growth and repair in mammals. Pax7 and Pax3 transcription factors are established satellite cell markers required for muscle development and regeneration, and there is great interest in identifying additional factors that regulate satellite cell proliferation, differentiation, and/or skeletal muscle regeneration. Due to the powerful regenerative capacity of many zebrafish tissues, even in adults, we are exploring the regenerative potential of adult zebrafish skeletal muscle. Here, we show that adult zebrafish skeletal muscle contains cells similar to mammalian satellite cells. Adult zebrafish satellite-like cells have dense heterochromatin, express Pax7 and Pax3, proliferate in response to injury, and show peak myogenic responses 4-5 days post-injury (dpi). Furthermore, using a pax7a-driven GFP reporter, we present evidence implicating satellite-like cells as a possible source of new muscle. In lieu of central nucleation, which distinguishes regenerating myofibers in mammals, we describe several characteristics that robustly identify newly-forming myofibers from surrounding fibers in injured adult zebrafish muscle. These characteristics include partially overlapping expression in satellite-like cells and regenerating myofibers of two RNA-binding proteins Rbfox2 and Rbfoxl1, known to regulate embryonic muscle development and function. Finally, by analyzing pax7a; pax7b double mutant zebrafish, we show that Pax7 is required for adult skeletal muscle repair, as it is in the mouse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamics of Traction Force Reinforcement in Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Kramer, Corinne; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Mechanical forces influence cell function in various ways. For instance, the force-induced contraction or relaxation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is critical to regulating the properties of blood vessels. Here, we study the dynamics of cellular traction forces in SMCs using micro-scale magnetic nanowires together with flexible PDMS micropost arrays. We use dual magnetic tweezers to apply a sinusoidal magnetic torque on nickel nanowires which are internalized by the SMCs. The spatial and temporal responses of the SMCs cultured on the tips of the microposts are recorded by the deflected posts. We observe a global reinforcement of the cells' traction forces upon applying a localized torque via the nanowires. Interestingly, we also find that the contractile response depends on the frequency of the applied stimulation, with a greater percentage of the SMCs showing enhanced reinforcement at lower frequencies.

  2. Self-organization of muscle cell structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosberg, Anna; Kuo, Po-Ling; Guo, Chin-Lin; Geisse, Nicholas A; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Adams, William J; Sheehy, Sean P; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2011-02-01

    The organization of muscle is the product of functional adaptation over several length scales spanning from the sarcomere to the muscle bundle. One possible strategy for solving this multiscale coupling problem is to physically constrain the muscle cells in microenvironments that potentiate the organization of their intracellular space. We hypothesized that boundary conditions in the extracellular space potentiate the organization of cytoskeletal scaffolds for directed sarcomeregenesis. We developed a quantitative model of how the cytoskeleton of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes organizes with respect to geometric cues in the extracellular matrix. Numerical results and in vitro assays to control myocyte shape indicated that distinct cytoskeletal architectures arise from two temporally-ordered, organizational processes: the interaction between actin fibers, premyofibrils and focal adhesions, as well as cooperative alignment and parallel bundling of nascent myofibrils. Our results suggest that a hierarchy of mechanisms regulate the self-organization of the contractile cytoskeleton and that a positive feedback loop is responsible for initiating the break in symmetry, potentiated by extracellular boundary conditions, is required to polarize the contractile cytoskeleton.

  3. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  4. Biophysical induction of vascular smooth muscle cell podosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Young Kim

    Full Text Available Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration and matrix degradation occurs with intimal hyperplasia associated with atherosclerosis, vascular injury, and restenosis. One proposed mechanism by which VSMCs degrade matrix is through the use of podosomes, transient actin-based structures that are thought to play a role in extracellular matrix degradation by creating localized sites of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP secretion. To date, podosomes in VSMCs have largely been studied by stimulating cells with phorbol esters, such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu, however little is known about the physiological cues that drive podosome formation. We present the first evidence that physiological, physical stimuli mimicking cues present within the microenvironment of diseased arteries can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. Both microtopographical cues and imposed pressure mimicking stage II hypertension induce podosome formation in A7R5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Moreover, wounding using a scratch assay induces podosomes at the leading edge of VSMCs. Notably the effect of each of these biophysical stimuli on podosome stimulation can be inhibited using a Src inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that physical cues can induce podosome formation in VSMCs.

  5. Plasticity of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Maddahi, Aida

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is most often followed by a delayed phase of cerebral ischemia which is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The causes underlying this delayed phase are still unsettled, but are believed to include cerebral vasospasm, cortical spreading depression......, inflammatory reactions, and microthrombosis. Additionally, a large body of evidence indicates that vascular plasticity plays an important role in SAH pathophysiology, and this review aims to summarize our current knowledge on the phenotypic changes of vascular smooth muscle cells of the cerebral vasculature...

  6. Response of Turkey Muscle Satellite Cells to Thermal Challenge. II. Transcriptome Effects in Differentiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent M. Reed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure of poultry to extreme temperatures during the critical period of post-hatch growth can seriously affect muscle development and thus compromise subsequent meat quality. This study was designed to characterize transcriptional changes induced in turkey muscle satellite cells by thermal challenge during differentiation. Our goal is to better define how thermal stress alters breast muscle ultrastructure and subsequent development.Results: Skeletal muscle satellite cells previously isolated from the Pectoralis major muscle of 7-wk-old male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo from two breeding lines: the F-line (16 wk body weight-selected and RBC2 (randombred control line were used in this study. Cultured cells were induced to differentiate at 38°C (control or thermal challenge temperatures of 33 or 43°C. After 48 h of differentiation, cells were harvested and total RNA was isolated for RNAseq analysis. Analysis of 39.9 Gb of sequence found 89% mapped to the turkey genome (UMD5.0, annotation 101 with average expression of 18,917 genes per library. In the cultured satellite cells, slow/cardiac muscle isoforms are generally present in greater abundance than fast skeletal isoforms. Statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed among treatments and between turkey lines, with a greater number of genes affected in the F-line cells following cold treatment whereas more differentially expressed (DE genes were observed in the RBC2 cells following heat treatment. Many of the most significant pathways involved signaling, consistent with ongoing cellular differentiation. Regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis appears to be significantly affected by temperature treatment, particularly cold treatment.Conclusions: Satellite cell differentiation is directly influenced by temperature at the level of gene transcription with greater effects attributed to selection for fast growth. At lower temperature, muscle-associated genes in the

  7. File list: InP.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Oth.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: InP.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: DNS.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Oth.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: His.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: ALL.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: NoD.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: InP.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Oth.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Unc.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Unc.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: His.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: His.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: His.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: NoD.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. Dynamics of Acute Local Inflammatory Response after Autologous Transplantation of Muscle-Derived Cells into the Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Burdzinska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of myoblasts transplanted into the skeletal muscle die within the first week after injection. Inflammatory response to the intramuscular cell transfer was studied in allogeneic but not in autologous model. The aim of this study was to evaluate immune reaction to autotransplantation of myogenic cells and to assess its dynamics within the first week after injection. Muscle-derived cells or medium alone was injected into the intact skeletal muscles in autologous model. Tissue samples were collected 1, 3, and 7 days after the procedure. Our analysis revealed the peak increase of the gene expression of all evaluated cytokines (Il-1α, Il-1β, Il-6, Tgf-β, and Tnf-α at day 1. The mRNA level of analyzed cytokines normalized in subsequent time points. The increase of Il-β gene expression was further confirmed at the protein level. Analysis of the tissue sections revealed rapid infiltration of injected cell clusters with neutrophils and macrophages. The inflammatory infiltration was almost completely resolved at day 7. The survived cells were able to participate in the muscle regeneration process. Presented results demonstrate that autotransplanted muscle-derived cells induce classical early immune reaction in the site of injection which may contribute to cellular graft elimination.

  20. An α-smooth muscle actin (acta2/αsma zebrafish transgenic line marking vascular mural cells and visceral smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Whitesell

    Full Text Available Mural cells of the vascular system include vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and pericytes whose role is to stabilize and/or provide contractility to blood vessels. One of the earliest markers of mural cell development in vertebrates is α smooth muscle actin (acta2; αsma, which is expressed by pericytes and SMCs. In vivo models of vascular mural cell development in zebrafish are currently lacking, therefore we developed two transgenic zebrafish lines driving expression of GFP or mCherry in acta2-expressing cells. These transgenic fish were used to trace the live development of mural cells in embryonic and larval transgenic zebrafish. acta2:EGFP transgenic animals show expression that largely mirrors native acta2 expression, with early pan-muscle expression starting at 24 hpf in the heart muscle, followed by skeletal and visceral muscle. At 3.5 dpf, expression in the bulbus arteriosus and ventral aorta marks the first expression in vascular smooth muscle. Over the next 10 days of development, the number of acta2:EGFP positive cells and the number of types of blood vessels associated with mural cells increases. Interestingly, the mural cells are not motile and remain in the same position once they express the acta2:EGFP transgene. Taken together, our data suggests that zebrafish mural cells develop relatively late, and have little mobility once they associate with vessels.

  1. Whole Genome Analysis of Muscle Founder Cells Implicates the Chromatin Regulator Sin3A in Muscle Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobi, Krista C.; Halfon, Marc S.; Baylies, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Skeletal muscles are formed in numerous shapes and sizes, and this diversity impacts function and disease susceptibility. To understand how muscle diversity is generated, we performed gene expression profiling of two muscle subsets from Drosophila embryos. By comparing the transcriptional profiles of these subsets, we identified a core group of founder cell-enriched genes. We screened mutants for muscle defects and identified novel functions for Sin3A and 10 other transcription and chromatin regulators in the Drosophila embryonic somatic musculature. Sin3A is required for the morphogenesis of a musclesubset, and Sin3A mutants display muscle loss and misattachment. Additionally, misexpression of identity gene transcription factors in Sin3A heterozygous embryos leads to direct transformations of one muscle into another, while overexpression of Sin3A results in the reverse transformation. Our data implicate Sin3A as a keybuffer controlling muscle responsiveness to transcription factors in the formation of muscle identity, thereby generating tissue diversity. PMID:25088419

  2. Characterization of muscle morphology and satellite cells, and expression of muscle-related genes in skeletal muscle of juvenile and adult Megalobrama amblycephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kecheng; Wang, Huanling; Wang, Huijuan; Gul, Yasmeen; Yang, Min; Zeng, Cong; Wang, Weimin

    2014-09-01

    Hyperplasia and hypertrophy are two distinct processes of skeletal muscle growth regulated by four myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs, contains MyoD, Myf5, Mrf4 and myogenin (MyoG)) and myostatin (MSTN). In this study, characterization of muscle morphology and satellite cells in juvenile (1-year-old) and adult (2-year-old) Megalobrama amblycephala was described. Compared with 1-year-old M. amblycephala, the diameter scope of epaxial, horizontal septum and hypaxial muscle fibers including red and white muscle in 2-year-old fish exhibited broader with dramatic reduction in frequency distribution of 50 μm diameter. Intermyofibrillar (IM) nuclei were also found except numerous subsarcolemmal (SS) nuclei in 2-year-old fish, whereas only SS nuclei were observed in 1-year-old fish. Immunofluorescence results showed that more satellite cells existed in red muscle than white muscle in 1-year-old fish, rather than 2-year-old fish. Moreover, we observed predominant increase in the mRNA levels of MyoD, Myf5, Mrf4, and MSTN during muscle development of fish in 2-year-old fish except MyoG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hyo Eun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do-Sun, E-mail: dslmd@kumc.or.kr [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  4. Association of interleukin-6 signalling with the muscle stem cell response following muscle-lengthening contractions in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryon R McKay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The regulation of muscle stem cells in humans in response to muscle injury remains largely undefined. Recently, interleukin-6 (IL-6 has been implicated in muscle stem cell (satellite cell-mediated muscle hypertrophy in animals; however, the role of IL-6 in the satellite cell (SC response following muscle-lengthening contractions in humans has not been studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eight subjects (age 22+/-1 y; 79+/-8 kg performed 300 maximal unilateral lengthening contractions (3.14 rad.s(-1 of the knee extensors. Blood and muscle samples were collected before and at 4, 24, 72, and 120 hours post intervention. IL-6, IL-6 receptor, IL-6R(alpha, cyclin D1, suppressor of cytokine signling-3 (SOCS3 mRNA were measured using quantitative RT-PCR and serum IL-6 protein was measured using an ELISA kit. JAK2 and STAT3 phosphorylated and total protein was measured using western blotting techniques. Immunohistochemical analysis of muscle cross-sections was performed for the quantification of SCs (Pax7(+ cells as well as the expression of phosphorylated STAT3, IL-6, IL-6R(alpha, and PCNA across all time-points. The SC response, as defined by an amplification of Pax7(+ cells, was rapid, increasing by 24 h and peaking 72 h following the intervention. Muscle IL-6 mRNA increased following the intervention, which correlated strongly (R(2 = 0.89, p<0.002 with an increase in serum IL-6 concentration. SC IL-6R(alpha protein was expressed on the fiber, but was also localized to the SC, and IL-6(+ SC increased rapidly following muscle-lengthening contractions and returned to basal levels by 72 h post-intervention, demonstrating an acute temporal expression of IL-6 with SC. Phosphorylated STAT3 was evident in SCs 4 h after lengthening contraction, and the downstream genes, cyclin D1 and SOCS3 were significantly elevated 24 hours after the intervention. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The increased expression of STAT3 responsive genes and expression of

  5. Effects of lubiprostone on human uterine smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuppoletti, John; Malinowska, Danuta H; Chakrabarti, Jayati; Ueno, Ryuji

    2008-06-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid derivative and member of a new class of compounds called prostones, locally activates ClC-2 Cl(-) channels without activation of prostaglandin receptors. The present study was specifically designed to test and compare lubiprostone and prostaglandin effects at the cellular level using human uterine smooth muscle cells. Effects on [Ca(2+)](i), membrane potential and [cAMP](i) in human uterine smooth muscle cells were measured. 10 nM lubiprostone significantly decreased [Ca(2+)](i) from 188 to 27 nM, which was unaffected by 100 nM SC-51322, a prostaglandin EP receptor antagonist. In contrast 10nM PGE(2) and PGE(1) both increased [Ca(2+)](i) 3-5-fold which was blocked by SC-51322. Similarly, lubiprostone and prostaglandins had opposite/different effects on membrane potential and [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone caused SC-51322-insensitive membrane hyperpolarization and no effect on [cAMP](i). PGE(2) and PGE(1) both caused SC-51322-sensitive membrane depolarization and increased [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone has fundamentally different cellular effects from prostaglandins that are not mediated by EP receptors.

  6. Contraction induced secretion of VEGF from skeletal muscle cells is mediated by adenosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Olsen, Karina; Nyberg, Michael Permin

    2010-01-01

    The role of adenosine and contraction for secretion of VEGF in skeletal muscle was investigated in human subjects and rat primary skeletal muscle cells. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the thigh muscle of seven male subjects and dialysate was collected at rest, during infusion of adenosine...... and during knee extensor exercise. The dialysate was analyzed for content of VEGF protein and adenosine. The mechanism of VEGF secretion from muscle cells in culture was examined in resting and electro stimulated cells, and in response to the adenosine analogue NECA, and the adenosine A(2A) receptor specific...... infusion enhanced (Pmuscle cells, NECA...

  7. Macrophages and mast cells in dystrophic masseter muscle: a light and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Mikkelsen, H

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle, the num......Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle...

  8. Circovirus inclusion bodies in intestinal muscle cells of a canary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampin, T; Manarolla, G; Pisoni, G; Recordati, C; Sironi, G

    2006-08-01

    Multiple cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed in the intestinal smooth muscle cells of an adult canary from an aviary with a history of high mortality (50%) both in adult and young birds. Grossly, a mild enteritis was the only lesion appreciable. Smears of the proventricular contents contained a few megabacteria (Macrorhabdus ornithogaster). The intestinal inclusions were found in very high numbers in all parts of the tract examined. They appeared round to oval, amphophilic and hyaline in sections stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and magenta with Feulgen stain. Inclusions of the same type were occasionally detectable in the wall of a few splenic and pancreatic arteries. No inclusions or lesions were seen in the other organs examined. Transmission electron microscopy of the intestinal wall revealed circovirus-like particles either in paracrystalline arrays or loose arrangements, mostly within the cytoplasm of the intestinal muscule cells. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis confirmed infection with canary circovirus.

  9. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  10. Molecular basis of the myogenic profile of aged human skeletal muscle satellite cells during differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrangelo, Tiziana; Puglielli, Cristina; Mancinelli, Rosa; Beccafico, Sara; Fanò, Giorgio; Fulle, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of muscle mass, strength and function. Human muscle proteins are synthesized at a slower rate in the elderly than in young adults, leading to atrophy and muscle mass loss with a decline in the functional capability. Additionally, aging is accompanied by a decrease in the ability of muscle tissue to regenerate following injury or overuse due to the impairment of intervening satellite cells, in which we previously reported oxidative damage ...

  11. Bioengineered constructs combined with exercise enhance stem cell-mediated treatment of volumetric muscle loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarta, Marco; Cromie, Melinda; Chacon, Robert; Blonigan, Justin; Garcia, Victor; Akimenko, Igor; Hamer, Mark; Paine, Patrick; Stok, Merel; Shrager, Joseph B.; Rando, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) is associated with loss of skeletal muscle function, and current treatments show limited efficacy. Here we show that bioconstructs suffused with genetically-labelled muscle stem cells (MuSCs) and other muscle resident cells (MRCs) are effective to treat VML injuries in mice. Imaging of bioconstructs implanted in damaged muscles indicates MuSCs survival and growth, and ex vivo analyses show force restoration of treated muscles. Histological analysis highlights myofibre formation, neovascularisation, but insufficient innervation. Both innervation and in vivo force production are enhanced when implantation of bioconstructs is followed by an exercise regimen. Significant improvements are also observed when bioconstructs are used to treat chronic VML injury models. Finally, we demonstrate that bioconstructs made with human MuSCs and MRCs can generate functional muscle tissue in our VML model. These data suggest that stem cell-based therapies aimed to engineer tissue in vivo may be effective to treat acute and chronic VML. PMID:28631758

  12. Epigenetic Control of Smooth Muscle Cell Identity and Lineage Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Delphine; Swiatlowska, Pamela; Owens, Gary K

    2015-12-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), like all cells, acquire a cell-specific epigenetic signature during development that includes acquisition of a unique repertoire of histone and DNA modifications. These changes are postulated to induce an open chromatin state (referred to as euchromatin) on the repertoire of genes that are expressed in differentiated SMC, including SMC-selective marker genes like Acta2 and Myh11, as well as housekeeping genes expressed by most cell types. In contrast, genes that are silenced in differentiated SMC acquire modifications associated with a closed chromatin state (ie, heterochromatin) and transcriptional silencing. Herein, we review mechanisms that regulate epigenetic control of the differentiated state of SMC. In addition, we identify some of the major limitations in the field and future challenges, including development of innovative new tools and approaches, for performing single-cell epigenetic assays and locus-selective editing of the epigenome that will allow direct studies of the functional role of specific epigenetic controls during development, injury repair, and disease, including major cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and microvascular disease, associated with diabetes mellitus. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Dynamic and polarized muscle cell behaviors accompany tail morphogenesis in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yale J Passamaneck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Axial elongation is a key morphogenetic process that serves to shape developing organisms. Tail extension in the ascidian larva represents a striking example of this process, wherein paraxially positioned muscle cells undergo elongation and differentiation independent of the segmentation process that characterizes the formation of paraxial mesoderm in vertebrates. Investigating the cell behaviors underlying the morphogenesis of muscle in ascidians may therefore reveal the evolutionarily conserved mechanisms operating during this process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: A live cell imaging approach utilizing subcellularly-localized fluorescent proteins was employed to investigate muscle cell behaviors during tail extension in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Changes in the position and morphology of individual muscle cells were analyzed in vivo in wild type embryos undergoing tail extension and in embryos in which muscle development was perturbed. Muscle cells were observed to undergo elongation in the absence of positional reorganization. Furthermore, high-speed high-resolution live imaging revealed that the onset and progression of tail extension were characterized by the presence of dynamic and polarized actin-based protrusive activity at the plasma membrane of individual muscle cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that in the Ciona muscle, tissue elongation resulted from gradual and coordinated changes in cell geometry and not from changes in cell topology. Proper formation of muscle cells was found to be necessary not only for muscle tissue elongation, but also more generally for completion of tail extension. Based upon the characterized dynamic changes in cell morphology and plasma membrane protrusive activity, a three-phase model is proposed to describe the cell behavior operating during muscle morphogenesis in the ascidian embryo.

  14. Inhibition of tracheal smooth muscle cell proliferation by phosphodiesterase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Masu

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Agents that increase intracellular cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, such as forskolin, prostaglandin (PGE2, salbutamol and 8-bromo-cAMP, have been shownto inhibit the proliferation of airway smooth-muscle (ASM cells in vitro. However, it has not yet been determined whether selective inhibitors of phosphodiesterase (PDE isoenzymes III and IV that catalyze cAMPto 5'-adenosine monophosphate have the ability to inhibit ASM cell proliferation. To evaluate the effectsof PDE inhibitors on ASM cell proliferation, ASM cells isolated from bovine tracheae were cultured in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS, with or without a non-selective PDE inhibitor (theophylline, a selective PDE III inhibitor (cilostazol, and a selective PDE IV inhibitor (rolipram. The number of ASM cells cultured with 5% FBS was significantly reduced by the presence of theophylline at 10−3 and 3 × 10−4 mol/L, cilostazol at 10−5, 10−6 and 10−7 mol/L, and rolipram at 10−4 and 10−5 mol/L. The release of lactic dehydrogenase from ASM cells cultured with any concentration of these agents was not significantly different from that with medium alone. Inhibitors of PDE III and IV were demonstrated to have an inhibitory effect on ASM cell proliferation induced by FBS. Our results suggest the value of the further development of PDE inhibitors for the treatment of hyperplasia of ASM cells characteristic of airway remodeling, in addition to bronchospasm and airway inflammation, in bronchial asthma.

  15. Clones of ectopic stem cells in the regeneration of muscle defects in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rujing Yang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about whether clones of ectopic, non-muscle stem cells contribute to muscle regeneration. Stem/progenitor cells that are isolated for experimental research or therapeutics are typically heterogeneous. Non-myogenic lineages in a heterogeneous population conceptually may compromise tissue repair. In this study, we discovered that clones of mononucleated stem cells of human tooth pulp fused into multinucleated myotubes that robustly expressed myosin heavy chain in vitro with or without co-culture with mouse skeletal myoblasts (C2C12 cells. Cloned cells were sustainably Oct4+, Nanog+ and Stro1+. The fusion indices of myogenic clones were approximately 16-17 folds greater than their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. Upon infusion into cardio-toxin induced tibialis anterior muscle defects, undifferentiated clonal progenies not only engrafted and colonized host muscle, but also expressed human dystrophin and myosin heavy chain more efficaciously than their parent heterogeneous stem cell populations. Strikingly, clonal progenies yielded ∼9 times more human myosin heavy chain mRNA in regenerating muscles than those infused with their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. The number of human dystrophin positive cells in regenerating muscles infused with clonal progenies was more than ∼3 times greater than muscles infused with heterogeneous stem cells from which clonal progenies were derived. These findings suggest the therapeutic potential of ectopic myogenic clones in muscle regeneration.

  16. Inducible satellite cell depletion attenuates skeletal muscle regrowth following a scald-burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; McKenna, Colleen F; Cambias, Lauren A; Brightwell, Camille R; Prasai, Anesh; Wang, Ye; El Ayadi, Amina; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E; Fry, Christopher S

    2017-11-01

    Severe burns result in significant skeletal muscle cachexia that impedes recovery. Activity of satellite cells, skeletal muscle stem cells, is altered following a burn injury and likely hinders regrowth of muscle. Severe burn injury induces satellite cell proliferation and fusion into myofibres with greater activity in muscles proximal to the injury site. Conditional depletion of satellite cells attenuates recovery of myofibre area and volume following a scald burn injury in mice. Skeletal muscle regrowth following a burn injury requires satellite cell activity, underscoring the therapeutic potential of satellite cells in the prevention of prolonged frailty in burn survivors. Severe burns result in profound skeletal muscle atrophy; persistent muscle atrophy and weakness are major complications that hamper recovery from burn injury. Many factors contribute to the erosion of muscle mass following burn trauma, and we have previously shown concurrent activation and apoptosis of muscle satellite cells following a burn injury in paediatric patients. To determine the necessity of satellite cells during muscle recovery following a burn injury, we utilized a genetically modified mouse model (Pax7 CreER -DTA) that allows for the conditional depletion of satellite cells in skeletal muscle. Additionally, mice were provided 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine to determine satellite cell proliferation, activation and fusion. Juvenile satellite cell-wild-type (SC-WT) and satellite cell-depleted (SC-Dep) mice (8 weeks of age) were randomized to sham or burn injury consisting of a dorsal scald burn injury covering 30% of total body surface area. Both hindlimb and dorsal muscles were studied at 7, 14 and 21 days post-burn. SC-Dep mice had >93% depletion of satellite cells compared to SC-WT (P injury induced robust atrophy in muscles located both proximal and distal to the injury site (∼30% decrease in fibre cross-sectional area, P injury induced skeletal muscle regeneration, satellite

  17. DNA Methylation in Skeletal Muscle Stem Cell Specification, Proliferation, and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhianna C. Laker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An unresolved and critically important question in skeletal muscle biology is how muscle stem cells initiate and regulate the genetic program during muscle development. Epigenetic dynamics are essential for cellular development and organogenesis in early life and it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic remodeling may also be responsible for the cellular adaptations that occur in later life. DNA methylation of cytosine bases within CpG dinucleotide pairs is an important epigenetic modification that reduces gene expression when located within a promoter or enhancer region. Recent advances in the field suggest that epigenetic regulation is essential for skeletal muscle stem cell identity and subsequent cell development. This review summarizes what is currently known about how skeletal muscle stem cells regulate the myogenic program through DNA methylation, discusses a novel role for metabolism in this process, and addresses DNA methylation dynamics in adult skeletal muscle in response to physical activity.

  18. Pre-mRNA Processing Is Partially Impaired in Satellite Cell Nuclei from Aged Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Malatesta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cells are responsible for the capacity of mature mammalian skeletal muscles to repair and maintain mass. During aging, skeletal muscle mass as well as the muscle strength and endurance progressively decrease, leading to a condition termed sarcopenia. The causes of sarcopenia are manifold and remain to be completely elucidated. One of them could be the remarkable decline in the efficiency of muscle regeneration; this has been associated with decreasing amounts of satellite cells, but also to alterations in their activation, proliferation, and/or differentiation. In this study, we investigated the satellite cell nuclei of biceps and quadriceps muscles from adult and old rats; morphometry and immunocytochemistry at light and electron microscopy have been combined to assess the organization of the nuclear RNP structural constituents involved in different steps of mRNA formation. We demonstrated that in satellite cells the RNA pathways undergo alterations during aging, possibly hampering their responsiveness to muscle damage.

  19. Serotonergic transmission and gap junctional coupling in proventricular muscle cells in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Suetsugu, Taeko; Endo, Yasuhisa

    2017-05-01

    The visceral muscle tissues of insects consist of striated muscle cells. The mechanisms responsible for delivering signals to the contractile muscles in the insect digestive tract remain unclear. We found that serotonergic nerves innervate the hemocoel surfaces of foregut and midgut muscles in the American cockroach. Electron microscopy of the neuromuscular junctions in the proventriculus (gizzard) revealed typical synaptic structures, the accumulation of large core/cored vesicles (neuropeptides) and small clear vesicle (neurotransmitter) at presynapses, and synaptic clefts. However, only a limited number of muscle cells, which were located in the outer part of the muscle layer, came into contact with synapses, which contained classical neurotransmitters, such as glutamate. A gap junction channel-permeable fluorescent dye, Lucifer yellow, was microinjected into single muscle cells, and it subsequently spread to several neighboring muscle cells. The dye movement occurred in the radial (hemocoel-lumen) direction rather than tangential directions. A gap junction blocker, octanol, reversibly inhibited the dye coupling. Messenger RNA for innexin 2, a gap junction-related protein, was detected in the proventriculus. These results suggest that motile signals in the insect digestive tract only reach the outermost part of the visceral muscles and are propagated to the inner muscle cells via gap junctions. Therefore, invertebrate gap junction-related proteins have potential as new targets for pest control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Wnt proteins regulate acetylcholine receptor clustering in muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Liang, Chuan; Bates, Ryan; Yin, Yiming; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2012-02-06

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a cholinergic synapse that rapidly conveys signals from motoneurons to muscle cells and exhibits a high degree of subcellular specialization characteristic of chemical synapses. NMJ formation requires agrin and its coreceptors LRP4 and MuSK. Increasing evidence indicates that Wnt signaling regulates NMJ formation in Drosophila, C. elegans and zebrafish. In the study we systematically studied the effect of all 19 different Wnts in mammals on acetylcholine receptor (AChR) cluster formation. We identified five Wnts (Wnt9a, Wnt9b, Wnt10b, Wnt11, and Wnt16) that are able to stimulate AChR clustering, of which Wnt9a and Wnt11 are expressed abundantly in developing muscles. Using Wnt9a and Wnt11 as example, we demonstrated that Wnt induction of AChR clusters was dose-dependent and non-additive to that of agrin, suggesting that Wnts may act via similar pathways to induce AChR clusters. We provide evidence that Wnt9a and Wnt11 bind directly to the extracellular domain of MuSK, to induce MuSK dimerization and subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation of the kinase. In addition, Wnt-induced AChR clustering requires LRP4. These results identify Wnts as new players in AChR cluster formation, which act in a manner that requires both MuSK and LRP4, revealing a novel function of LRP4.

  1. Wnt proteins regulate acetylcholine receptor clustering in muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Bin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neuromuscular junction (NMJ is a cholinergic synapse that rapidly conveys signals from motoneurons to muscle cells and exhibits a high degree of subcellular specialization characteristic of chemical synapses. NMJ formation requires agrin and its coreceptors LRP4 and MuSK. Increasing evidence indicates that Wnt signaling regulates NMJ formation in Drosophila, C. elegans and zebrafish. Results In the study we systematically studied the effect of all 19 different Wnts in mammals on acetylcholine receptor (AChR cluster formation. We identified five Wnts (Wnt9a, Wnt9b, Wnt10b, Wnt11, and Wnt16 that are able to stimulate AChR clustering, of which Wnt9a and Wnt11 are expressed abundantly in developing muscles. Using Wnt9a and Wnt11 as example, we demonstrated that Wnt induction of AChR clusters was dose-dependent and non-additive to that of agrin, suggesting that Wnts may act via similar pathways to induce AChR clusters. We provide evidence that Wnt9a and Wnt11 bind directly to the extracellular domain of MuSK, to induce MuSK dimerization and subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation of the kinase. In addition, Wnt-induced AChR clustering requires LRP4. Conclusions These results identify Wnts as new players in AChR cluster formation, which act in a manner that requires both MuSK and LRP4, revealing a novel function of LRP4.

  2. MicroRNAs dynamically remodel gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjae Park

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cells (SMCs express a unique set of microRNAs (miRNAs which regulate and maintain the differentiation state of SMCs. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of miRNAs during the development of gastrointestinal (GI SMCs in a transgenic animal model. We generated SMC-specific Dicer null animals that express the reporter, green fluorescence protein, in a SMC-specific manner. SMC-specific knockout of Dicer prevented SMC miRNA biogenesis, causing dramatic changes in phenotype, function, and global gene expression in SMCs: the mutant mice developed severe dilation of the intestinal tract associated with the thinning and destruction of the smooth muscle (SM layers; contractile motility in the mutant intestine was dramatically decreased; and SM contractile genes and transcriptional regulators were extensively down-regulated in the mutant SMCs. Profiling and bioinformatic analyses showed that SMC phenotype is regulated by a complex network of positive and negative feedback by SMC miRNAs, serum response factor (SRF, and other transcriptional factors. Taken together, our data suggest that SMC miRNAs are required for the development and survival of SMCs in the GI tract.

  3. Synchronized reconstitution of muscle fibers, peripheral nerves and blood vessels by murine skeletal muscle-derived CD34(-)/45 (-) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Akatsuka, Akira

    2007-10-01

    In order to establish the practical isolation and usage of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs), we determined reconstitution capacity of CD34(-)/CD45(-) (Sk-DN) cells as a candidate somatic stem cell source for transplantation. Sk-DN cells were enzymatically isolated from GFP transgenic mice (C57/BL6N) skeletal muscle and sorted using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), and expanded by collagen gel-based cell culture with bFGF and EGF. The number of Sk-DN cells was small after sorting (2-8 x 10(4)); however, the number increased 10-20 fold (2-16 x 10(5)) after 6 days of expansion culture, and the cells maintained immature state and multipotency, expressing mRNAs for mesodermal and ectodermal cell lineages. Transplantation of expanded Sk-DN cells into the severe muscle damage model (C57/BL6N wild-type) resulted in the synchronized reconstitution of blood vessels, peripheral nerves and muscle fibers following significant recovery of total muscle mass (57%) and contractile function (55%), whereas the non-cell-transplanted control group showed around 20% recovery in both factors. These reconstitution capacities were supported by the intrinsic plasticity of Sk-DN cells that can differentiate into muscular (skeletal muscle), vascular (pericyte, endothelial cell and smooth muscle) and peripheral nerve (Schwann cells and perineurium) cell lineages that was revealed by transplantation to non-muscle tissue (beneath renal capsule) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis.

  4. Accelerated Functional Recovery after Skeletal Muscle Ischemia-reperfusion Injury using Freshly Isolated Bone Marrow Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-03

    capacity to restore function, neural evoked muscle force or torque (which depends on the integrity of neural, vascular, and muscular elements) is an...Accelerated functional recovery after skeletal muscle ischemiaereperfusion injury using freshly isolated bone marrow cells Benjamin T. Corona, PhD...Available online 3 January 2014 Keywords: Ischemia Reperfusion Stem cell Skeletal muscle Bone marrow Injury a b s t r a c t Background: Relatively little

  5. Whole-Somite Rotation Generates Muscle Progenitor Cell Compartments in the Developing Zebrafish Embryo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hollway, Georgina E; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J; Berger, Silke; Cole, Nicholas J; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2007-01-01

    ... to the progenitors for skeletal muscle of the axis (the myotome) and to progenitors at limb levels, which are precursors of the appendicular muscles. The dermomyotome is also the source of resident adult skeletal muscle stem cells, the satellite cells ( Christ and Ordahl, 1995; Gros et al., 2005; Relaix et al., 2005; Kassar-Duchossoy et al., 2005; Schien...

  6. The role of mast cells and fibre type in ischaemia reperfusion injury of murine skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortolotto Susan K

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischaemia reperfusion (IR injury of skeletal muscle, is a significant cause of morbidity following trauma and surgical procedures, in which muscle fibre types exhibit different susceptibilities. The relative degree of mast cell mediated injury, within different muscle types, is not known. Methods In this study we compared susceptibility of the fast-twitch, extensor digitorum longus (EDL, mixed fast/slow-twitch gastrocnemius and the predominately slow-twitch soleus, muscles to ischemia reperfusion (IR injury in four groups of mice that harbour different mast cell densities; C57/DBA mast cell depleted (Wf/Wf, their heterozygous (Wf/+ and normal littermates (+/+ and control C57BL/6 mice. We determined whether susceptibility to IR injury is associated with mast cell content and/or fibre type and/or mouse strain. In experimental groups, the hind limbs of mice were subjected to 70 minutes warm tourniquet ischemia, followed by 24 h reperfusion, and the muscle viability was assessed on fresh whole-mount slices by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT histochemical assay. Results Viability was remarkably higher in the Wf/Wf strain irrespective of muscle type. With respect to muscle type, the predominately slow-twitch soleus muscle was significantly more resistant to IR injury than gastrocnemius and the EDL muscles in all groups. Mast cell density was inversely correlated to muscle viability in all types of muscle. Conclusion These results show that in skeletal muscle, IR injury is dependent upon both the presence of mast cells and on fibre type and suggest that a combination of preventative therapies may need to be implemented to optimally protect muscles from IR injury.

  7. Research progress in muscle-derived stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify global research trends of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science, Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Clinical Trials registry database (ClinicalTrials.gov). DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrievals for MDSCs from 2002 to 2011 using the Web of Science, NIH, and ClinicalTrials.gov. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (1) Web of Science: (a) peer-reviewed articles on MDSCs that were published and indexed in the Web of Science. (b) Type of articles: original research articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, proceedings papers, book chapters, editorial material and news items. (c) Year of publication: 2002–2011. (d) Citation databases: Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-E), 1899–present; Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S), 1991–present; Book Citation Index-Science (BKCI-S), 2005–present. (2) NIH: (a) Projects on MDSCs supported by the NIH. (b) Fiscal year: 1988–present. (3) ClinicalTrials.gov: All clinical trials relating to MDSCs were searched in this database. Exclusion criteria: (1) Web of Science: (a) Articles that required manual searching or telephone access. (b) We excluded documents that were not published in the public domain. (c) We excluded a number of corrected papers from the total number of articles. (d) We excluded articles from the following databases: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), 1898–present; Arts & Humanities Citation Index (A&HCI), 1975–present; Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH), 1991–present; Book Citation Index – Social Sciences & Humanities (BKCI-SSH), 2005–present; Current Chemical Reactions (CCR-EXPANDED), 1985–present; Index Chemicus (IC), 1993–present. (2) NIH: (a) We excluded publications related to MDSCs that were supported by the NIH. (b) We limited the keyword search to studies

  8. MASTR directs MyoD-dependent satellite cell differentiation during skeletal muscle regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokalled, Mayssa H.; Johnson, Aaron N.; Creemers, Esther E.; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    In response to skeletal muscle injury, satellite cells, which function as a myogenic stem cell population, become activated, expand through proliferation, and ultimately fuse with each other and with damaged myofibers to promote muscle regeneration. Here, we show that members of the Myocardin family

  9. Metabolic and transcriptional changes in cultured muscle stem cells from low birth weight subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ninna S; Hjort, Line; Broholm, Christa

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT/OBJECTIVE: Developmental programming of human muscle stem cells could in part explain why individuals born with low birth weight (LBW) have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) later in life. We hypothesized that immature muscle stem cell functions including abnormal...

  10. Apelin attenuates the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Fei Shan

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification, which results from a process osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Apelin is a recently discovered peptide that is the endogenous ligand for the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, APJ. Several studies have identified the protective effects of apelin on the cardiovascular system. However, the effects and mechanisms of apelin on the osteoblastic differentiation of VSMCs have not been elucidated. Using a culture of calcifying vascular smooth muscle cells (CVMSCs as a model for the study of vascular calcification, the relationship between apelin and the osteoblastic differentiation of VSMCs and the signal pathway involved were investigated. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and osteocalcin secretion were examined in CVSMCs. The involved signal pathway was studied using the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK inhibitor, PD98059, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K inhibitor, LY294002, and APJ siRNA. The results showed that apelin inhibited ALP activity, osteocalcin secretion, and the formation of mineralized nodules. APJ protein was detected in CVSMCs, and apelin activated ERK and AKT (a downstream effector of PI3-K. Suppression of APJ with siRNA abolished the apelin-induced activation of ERK and Akt. Furthermore, inhibition of APJ expression, and the activation of ERK or PI3-K, reversed the effects of apelin on ALP activity. These results showed that apelin inhibited the osteoblastic differentiation of CVSMCs through the APJ/ERK and APJ/PI3-K/AKT signaling pathway. Apelin appears to play a protective role against arterial calcification.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Satellite Cells from Rat Head Branchiomeric Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2015-07-20

    Fibrosis and defective muscle regeneration can hamper the functional recovery of the soft palate muscles after cleft palate repair. This causes persistent problems in speech, swallowing, and sucking. In vitro culture systems that allow the study of satellite cells (myogenic stem cells) from head muscles are crucial to develop new therapies based on tissue engineering to promote muscle regeneration after surgery. These systems will offer new perspectives for the treatment of cleft palate patients. A protocol for the isolation, culture and differentiation of satellite cells from head muscles is presented. The isolation is based on enzymatic digestion and trituration to release the satellite cells. In addition, this protocol comprises an innovative method using extracellular matrix gel coatings of millimeter size, which requires only low numbers of satellite cells for differentiation assays.

  12. Restoration of heart functions using human embryonic stem cells derived heart muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gepstein, Lior; Kehat, Izhak

    2005-02-01

    Extract: Recent advances in molecular and cellular biology and specifically in the areas of stem cell biology and tissue engineering have paved the way for the development of a new field in biomedicine, regenerative medicine. This exciting approach seeks to develop new biological solutions, using the mobilization of endogenous stem cells or delivery of exogenous cells to replace or modify the function of diseased, absent, or malfunctioning tissue. The adult heart represents an attractive candidate for these emerging technologies, since adult cardiomyocytes have limited regenerative capacity. Thus, any significant heart cell loss or dysfunction, such as occurs during heart attack, is mostly irreversible and may lead to the development of progressive heart failure, one of the leading causes of world-wide morbidity and mortality. Similarly, dysfunction of the specialized electrical conduction system within the heart may result in inefficient rhythm initiation or impulse conduction, leading to significant slowing of the heart rate, usually requiring the implantation of a permanent electronic pacemaker. Replacement of the dysfunctional myocardium (heart muscle) by implantation of external heart muscle cells is emerging as a novel paradigm for restoration of the myocardial electromechanical properties, but has been significantly hampered by the paucity of cell sources for human heart cells and by the relatively limited evidence for functional integration between grafted and host cells. The recently described human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines may provide a possible solution for the aforementioned cell sourcing problem.

  13. Vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy induced by glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, C; Angulo, J; Rodríguez-Mañas, L; Llergo, J L; Vallejo, S; Cercas, E; Sánchez-Ferrer, C F

    1998-10-01

    1. Nonenzymatic protein glycosylation is a possible mechanism contributing to oxidative stress and vascular disease in diabetes. In this work, the influence of 14%-glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin (GHHb), compared to the non-glycosylated protein (HHb), was studied on several growth parameters of rat cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). A role for reactive oxygen species was also analysed. 2. Treatment of VSMC for 48 h with GHHb, but not with HHb, increased planar cell surface area in a concentration dependent manner. The threshold concentration was 10 nM, which increased cell size from 7965+/-176 to 9411+/-392 microm2. Similarly, only GHHb enhanced protein content per well in VSMC cultures. 3. The planar surface area increase induced by 10 nM GHHb was abolished by superoxide dismutase (SOD; 50 200 u ml(-1)), deferoxamine (100 nM-100 microM), or dimethylthiourea (1 mM), while catalase (50 200 u ml(-1)) or mannitol (1 mM) resulted in a partial inhibition of cell size enhancement. 4. When a known source of oxygen free radicals was administered to VSMC, the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, the results were analogous to those produced by GHHb. Indeed, enhancements of cell size were observed, which were inhibited by SOD, deferoxamine, or catalase. 5. These results indicate that, at low concentrations, GHHb induces hypertrophy in VSMC, this effect being mediated by superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, and/or hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, glycosylated proteins can have a role in the development of the structural vascular alterations associated to diabetes by enhancing oxidative stress.

  14. Vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy induced by glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, Concepción; Angulo, Javier; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Llergo, José L; Vallejo, Susana; Cercas, Elena; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F

    1998-01-01

    Nonenzymatic protein glycosylation is a possible mechanism contributing to oxidative stress and vascular disease in diabetes. In this work, the influence of 14%-glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin (GHHb), compared to the non-glycosylated protein (HHb), was studied on several growth parameters of rat cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). A role for reactive oxygen species was also analysed.Treatment of VSMC for 48 h with GHHb, but not with HHb, increased planar cell surface area in a concentration dependent manner. The threshold concentration was 10 nM, which increased cell size from 7965±176 to 9411±392 μm2. Similarly, only GHHb enhanced protein content per well in VSMC cultures.The planar surface area increase induced by 10 nM GHHb was abolished by superoxide dismutase (SOD; 50–200 u ml−1), deferoxamine (100 nM–100 μM), or dimethylthiourea (1 mM), while catalase (50–200 u ml−1) or mannitol (1 mM) resulted in a partial inhibition of cell size enhancement.When a known source of oxygen free radicals was administered to VSMC, the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, the results were analogous to those produced by GHHb. Indeed, enhancements of cell size were observed, which were inhibited by SOD, deferoxamine, or catalase.These results indicate that, at low concentrations, GHHb induces hypertrophy in VSMC, this effect being mediated by superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, and/or hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, glycosylated proteins can have a role in the development of the structural vascular alterations associated to diabetes by enhancing oxidative stress. PMID:9831896

  15. Muscle cells challenged with saturated fatty acids mount an autonomous inflammatory response that activates macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillon Nicolas J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Within adipose tissue of mice fed a high fat diet, resident and infiltrating macrophages assume a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by the production of cytokines which in turn impact on the surrounding tissue. However, inflammation is not restricted to adipose tissue and high fat-feeding is responsible for a significant increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in muscle. Although skeletal muscle is the major disposer of dietary glucose and a major determinant of glycemia, the origin and consequence of muscle inflammation in the development of insulin resistance are poorly understood. We used a cell culture approach to investigate the vectorial crosstalk between muscle cells and macrophages upon exposure to physiological, low levels of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Inflammatory pathway activation and cytokine expression were analyzed in L6 muscle cells expressing myc-tagged GLUT4 (L6GLUT4myc exposed to 0.2 mM palmitate or palmitoleate. Conditioned media thereof, free of fatty acids, were then tested for their ability to activate RAW264.7 macrophages. Palmitate -but not palmitoleate- induced IL-6, TNFα and CCL2 expression in muscle cells, through activation of the NF-κB pathway. Palmitate (0.2 mM alone did not induce insulin resistance in muscle cells, yet conditioned media from palmitate-challenged muscle cells selectively activated macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. These results demonstrate that low concentrations of palmitate activate autonomous inflammation in muscle cells to release factors that turn macrophages pro-inflammatory. We hypothesize that saturated fat-induced, low-grade muscle cell inflammation may trigger resident skeletal muscle macrophage polarization, possibly contributing to insulin resistance in vivo.

  16. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, Thomas; Lanner, Johanna T

    2016-12-01

    Reduced oxygen (O 2 ) levels (hypoxia) are present during embryogenesis and exposure to altitude and in pathologic conditions. During embryogenesis, myogenic progenitor cells reside in a hypoxic microenvironment, which may regulate their activity. Satellite cells are myogenic progenitor cells localized in a local environment, suggesting that the O 2 level could affect their activity during muscle regeneration. In this review, we present the idea that O 2 levels regulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying myogenesis and muscle regeneration in hypoxia and depict therapeutic strategies using changes in O 2 levels to promote muscle regeneration. Severe hypoxia (≤1% O 2 ) appears detrimental for myogenic differentiation in vitro, whereas a 3-6% O 2 level could promote myogenesis. Hypoxia impairs the regenerative capacity of injured muscles. Although it remains to be explored, hypoxia may contribute to the muscle damage observed in patients with pathologies associated with hypoxia (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Hypoxia affects satellite cell activity and myogenesis through mechanisms dependent and independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Finally, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and transplantation of hypoxia-conditioned myoblasts are beneficial procedures to enhance muscle regeneration in animals. These therapies may be clinically relevant to treatment of patients with severe muscle damage.-Chaillou, T. Lanner, J. T. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity. © FASEB.

  17. HEXIM1 controls satellite cell expansion after injury to regulate skeletal muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Peng; Chen, Kang; Huang, Bihui; Liu, Min; Cui, Miao; Rozenberg, Inna; Chaqour, Brahim; Pan, Xiaoyue; Barton, Elisabeth R.; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Siddiqui, M.A.Q.

    2012-01-01

    The native capacity of adult skeletal muscles to regenerate is vital to the recovery from physical injuries and dystrophic diseases. Currently, the development of therapeutic interventions has been hindered by the complex regulatory network underlying the process of muscle regeneration. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury, we identified hexamethylene bisacetamide inducible 1 (HEXIM1, also referred to as CLP-1), the inhibitory component of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex, as a pivotal regulator of skeletal muscle regeneration. Hexim1-haplodeficient muscles exhibited greater mass and preserved function compared with those of WT muscles after injury, as a result of enhanced expansion of satellite cells. Transplanted Hexim1-haplodeficient satellite cells expanded and improved muscle regeneration more effectively than WT satellite cells. Conversely, HEXIM1 overexpression restrained satellite cell proliferation and impeded muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, dissociation of HEXIM1 from P-TEFb and subsequent activation of P-TEFb are required for satellite cell proliferation and the prevention of early myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest a crucial role for the HEXIM1/P-TEFb pathway in the regulation of satellite cell–mediated muscle regeneration and identify HEXIM1 as a potential therapeutic target for degenerative muscular diseases. PMID:23023707

  18. Possible local stem cells activation by microcurrent application in experimentally injured soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickri, Maha Baligh

    2014-11-01

    Severe injuries in skeletal muscle result in muscle weakness that delays recovery and contribute to progressive decline in muscle function. Microcurrent therapy (MCT) is a novel treatment method used in soft tissue injury and tissue regeneration therapy. The regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle tissue resides in satellite cells, the quiescent adult stem cells. The present work aimed at investigating the relation between microcurrent therapy and local stem cells in regeneration of induced skeletal muscle injury in albino rat. Twenty six adult male albino rats were divided into Sham group, Injury group (I): subjected to soleus muscle injury and subdivided into subgroups I1 & I2 sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks after injury respectively. Microcurrent group (M): subjected to muscle injury and micro-current was applied. The animals were subdivided into subgroups M1 and M2 sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks after injury. Histological, immunohistochemical and morphometric studies were performed. Atypical fibers widely separated by infiltrating cells and strong acidophilic sarcoplasm with focal vacuolations were found in injury group. In M1 subgroup few atypical fibers were found. In M2 subgroup multiple typical fibers were detected. A significant decrease in the mean area of atypical fibers, a significant increase in the mean area% of alpha SMA+ve cells and that of CD34+ve cells were found in microcurrent group compared to injury group. A definite therapeutic effect of the microcurrent was found on induced skeletal muscle injury. This effect was proved to be related to satellite cell activation.

  19. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  20. Satellite cells senescence in limb muscle of severe patients with COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Eve Thériault

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: The maintenance of peripheral muscle mass may be compromised in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD due to premature cellular senescence and exhaustion of the regenerative potential of the muscles. METHODS: Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained from patients with COPD (n = 16 and healthy subjects (n = 7. Satellite cell number and the proportion of central nuclei, as a marker of muscle regenerative events, were assessed on cryosections. Telomere lengths, used as a marker of cellular senescence, were determined using Southern blot analyses. RESULTS: Central nuclei proportion was significantly higher in patients with COPD with a preserved muscle mass compared to controls and patients with COPD with muscle atrophy (p<0.001. In COPD, maximal telomere length was significantly decreased compared to controls (p<0.05. Similarly, minimal telomere length was significantly reduced in GOLD III-IV patients with muscle atrophy compared to controls (p<0.005. Minimal, mean and maximum telomere lengths correlated with mid-thigh muscle cross-sectional area (MTCSA (R = 0.523, p = 0.005; R = 0.435, p = 0.019 and R = 0.491, p = 0.009, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence of increased regenerative events was seen in GOLD III-IV patients with preserved muscle mass. Shortening of telomeres in GOLD III-IV patients with muscle atrophy is consistent with an increased number of senescent satellite cells and an exhausted muscle regenerative capacity, compromising the maintenance of muscle mass in these individuals.

  1. Expression of an insulin-regulatable glucose carrier in muscle and fat endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaró, Senen; Palacín, Manuel; Pilch, Paul F.; Testar, Xavier; Zorzano, Antonio

    1989-12-01

    INSULIN rapidly stimulates glucose use in the major target tissues, muscle and fat, by modulating a tissue-specific glucose transporter isoform1-6. Access of glucose to the target tissue is restricted by endothelial cells which line the walls of nonfenestrated capillaries of fat and muscle7. Thus, we examined whether the capillary endothelial cells are actively involved in the modulation of glucose availability by these tissues. We report here the abundant expression of the muscle/fat glucose transporter isoform in endothelial cells, using an immunocytochemical analysis with a monoclonal antibody specific for this isoform1. This expression is restricted to endothelial cells from the major insulin target tissues, and it is not detected in brain and liver where insulin does not activate glucose transport. The expression of the muscle/fat transporter isoform in endothelial cells is significantly greater than in the neighbouring muscle and fat cells. Following administration of insulin to animals in vivo, there occurs a rapid increase in the number of muscle/fat transporters present in the lumenal plasma membrane of the capillary endothelial cells. These results document that insulin promotes the translocation of the muscle/fat glucose transporter in endothelial cells. It is therefore likely that endothelial cells play an important role in the regulation of glucose use by the major insulin target tissues in normal and diseased states.

  2. Transplantation of Embryonic Spinal Cord Derived Cells Helps to Prevent Muscle Atrophy after Peripheral Nerve Injury

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    Carolin Ruven

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to peripheral nerves are frequent in serious traumas and spinal cord injuries. In addition to surgical approaches, other interventions, such as cell transplantation, should be considered to keep the muscles in good condition until the axons regenerate. In this study, E14.5 rat embryonic spinal cord fetal cells and cultured neural progenitor cells from different spinal cord segments were injected into transected musculocutaneous nerve of 200–300 g female Sprague Dawley (SD rats, and atrophy in biceps brachii was assessed. Both kinds of cells were able to survive, extend their axons towards the muscle and form neuromuscular junctions that were functional in electromyographic studies. As a result, muscle endplates were preserved and atrophy was reduced. Furthermore, we observed that the fetal cells had a better effect in reducing the muscle atrophy compared to the pure neural progenitor cells, whereas lumbar cells were more beneficial compared to thoracic and cervical cells. In addition, fetal lumbar cells were used to supplement six weeks delayed surgical repair after the nerve transection. Cell transplantation helped to preserve the muscle endplates, which in turn lead to earlier functional recovery seen in behavioral test and electromyography. In conclusion, we were able to show that embryonic spinal cord derived cells, especially the lumbar fetal cells, are beneficial in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries due to their ability to prevent the muscle atrophy.

  3. Continuous Release of Tumor-Derived Factors Improves the Modeling of Cachexia in Muscle Cell Culture

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    Robert W. Jackman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cachexia is strongly associated with a poor prognosis in cancer patients but the biological trigger is unknown and therefore no therapeutics exist. The loss of skeletal muscle is the most deleterious aspect of cachexia and it appears to depend on secretions from tumor cells. Models for studying wasting in cell culture consist of experiments where skeletal muscle cells are incubated with medium conditioned by tumor cells. This has led to candidates for cachectic factors but some of the features of cachexia in vivo are not yet well-modeled in cell culture experiments. Mouse myotube atrophy measured by myotube diameter in response to medium conditioned by mouse colon carcinoma cells (C26 is consistently less than what is seen in muscles of mice bearing C26 tumors with moderate to severe cachexia. One possible reason for this discrepancy is that in vivo the C26 tumor and skeletal muscle share a circulatory system exposing the muscle to tumor factors in a constant and increasing way. We have applied Transwell®-adapted cell culture conditions to more closely simulate conditions found in vivo where muscle is exposed to the ongoing kinetics of constant tumor secretion of active factors. C26 cells were incubated on a microporous membrane (a Transwell® insert that constitutes the upper compartment of wells containing plated myotubes. In this model, myotubes are exposed to a constant supply of cancer cell secretions in the medium but without direct contact with the cancer cells, analogous to a shared circulation of muscle and cancer cells in tumor-bearing animals. The results for myotube diameter support the idea that the use of Transwell® inserts serves as a more physiological model of the muscle wasting associated with cancer cachexia than the bolus addition of cancer cell conditioned medium. The Transwell® model supports the notion that the dose and kinetics of cachectic factor delivery to muscle play a significant role in the extent of pathology.

  4. Sdf-1 (CXCL12) induces CD9 expression in stem cells engaged in muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzoska, Edyta; Kowalski, Kamil; Markowska-Zagrajek, Agnieszka; Kowalewska, Magdalena; Archacki, Rafał; Plaskota, Izabela; Stremińska, Władysława; Jańczyk-Ilach, Katarzyna; Ciemerych, Maria A

    2015-03-24

    Understanding the mechanism of stem cell mobilization into injured skeletal muscles is a prerequisite step for the development of muscle disease therapies. Many of the currently studied stem cell types present myogenic potential; however, when introduced either into the blood stream or directly into the tissue, they are not able to efficiently engraft injured muscle. For this reason their use in therapy is still limited. Previously, we have shown that stromal-derived factor-1 (Sdf-1) caused the mobilization of endogenous (not transplanted) stem cells into injured skeletal muscle improving regeneration. Here, we demonstrate that the beneficial effect of Sdf-1 relies on the upregulation of the tetraspanin CD9 expression in stem cells. The expression pattern of adhesion proteins, including CD9, was analysed after Sdf-1 treatment during regeneration of rat skeletal muscles and mouse Pax7-/- skeletal muscles, that are characterized by the decreased number of satellite cells. Next, we examined the changes in CD9 level in satellite cells-derived myoblasts, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, and embryonic stem cells after Sdf-1 treatment or silencing expression of CXCR4 and CXCR7. Finally, we examined the potential of stem cells to fuse with myoblasts after Sdf-1 treatment. In vivo analyses of Pax7-/- mice strongly suggest that Sdf-1-mediates increase in CD9 levels also in mobilized stem cells. In the absence of CXCR4 receptor the effect of Sdf-1 on CD9 expression is blocked. Next, in vitro studies show that Sdf-1 increases the level of CD9 not only in satellite cell-derived myoblasts but also in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, as well as embryonic stem cells. Importantly, the Sdf-1 treated cells migrate and fuse with myoblasts more effectively. We suggest that Sdf-1 binding CXCR4 receptor improves skeletal muscle regeneration by upregulating expression of CD9 and thus, impacting at stem cells mobilization to the injured muscles.

  5. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac muscle cell play a causative role in the development of diastolic dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiocytes from normal and pressure-hypertrophied cats were embedded in an agarose gel, placed on a stretching device, and subjected to a change in stress (sigma), and resultant changes in cell strain (epsilon) were measured. These measurements were used to examine the passive elastic spring, viscous damping, and myofilament activation. The passive elastic spring was assessed in protocol A by increasing the sigma on the agarose gel at a constant rate to define the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship. Viscous damping was assessed in protocol B from the loop area between the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship during an increase and then a decrease in sigma. In both protocols, myofilament activation was minimized by a reduction in [Ca2+]i. Myofilament activation effects were assessed in protocol C by defining cardiocyte sigma versus epsilon during an increase in sigma with physiological [Ca2+]i. In protocol A, the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship was similar in normal and hypertrophied cells. In protocol B, the loop area was greater in hypertrophied than normal cardiocytes. In protocol C, the sigma-versus-epsilon relation in hypertrophied cardiocytes was shifted to the left compared with normal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in viscous damping and myofilament activation in combination may cause pressure-hypertrophied cardiocytes to resist changes in shape during diastole and contribute to diastolic dysfunction.

  6. Melengestrol acetate alters muscle cell proliferation in heifers and steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissom, E K; Reinhardt, C D; Johnson, B J

    2006-11-01

    In vitro experiments were performed to investigate the effects of melengestrol acetate (MGA) or progesterone (P4) on bovine muscle satellite cells and C2C12 myoblasts. Addition of MGA at physiological and supraphysiological concentrations resulted in a dose-dependent decrease (P < 0.05) in DNA synthesis as measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation (TI). Similarly, P4 addition (0.01 nM) reduced (P < 0.05) TI. Addition of MGA (10 nM) increased (P < 0.05) IGF-I mRNA abundance but did not affect myogenin mRNA. Progesterone addition (10 nM) increased myogenin mRNA abundance (P < 0.05). In C2C12 cultures, P4 addition resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in TI. The antiprogestin RU486, in combination with MGA or P4, also resulted in reduced (P < 0.05) TI. Treatment with RU486 alone had a negative effect (P < 0.05) on TI that was similar to the progestins. Treatment of C2C12 myoblasts with MGA (100 nM) resulted in an increase (P < 0.05) in myogenin mRNA. These studies suggest that progestins may reduce satellite cell proliferation, ultimately affecting carcass composition.

  7. The quasi-parallel lives of satellite cells and atrophying muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eBiressi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy or wasting accompanies various chronic illnesses and the aging process, thereby reducing muscle function. One of the most important components contributing to effective muscle repair in postnatal organisms, the satellite cells, have recently become the focus of several studies examining factors participating in the atrophic process. We critically examine here the experimental evidence linking satellite cell function with muscle loss in connection with various diseases as well as aging, and in the subsequent recovery process. Several recent reports have investigated the changes in satellite cells in terms of their differentiation and proliferative capacity in response to various atrophic stimuli. In this regard, we review the molecular changes within satellite cells that contribute to their dysfunctional status in atrophy, with the intention of shedding light on novel potential pharmacological targets to counteract the loss of muscle mass.

  8. Single Stem Cell Imaging and Analysis Reveals Telomere Length Differences in Diseased Human and Mouse Skeletal Muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Tichy, Elisia D.; David K. Sidibe; Tierney, Matthew T.; Michael J. Stec; Sharifi-Sanjani, Maryam; Hosalkar, Harish; Mubarak, Scott; Johnson, F. Brad; Sacco, Alessandra; Mourkioti, Foteini

    2017-01-01

    Summary Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) contribute to muscle regeneration following injury. In many muscle disorders, the repeated cycles of damage and repair lead to stem cell dysfunction. While telomere attrition may contribute to aberrant stem cell functions, methods to accurately measure telomere length in stem cells from skeletal muscles have not been demonstrated. Here, we have optimized and validated such a method, named MuQ-FISH, for analyzing telomere length in MuSCs from either mice or hu...

  9. Dilinoleoyl-phosphatidic acid mediates reduced IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in rat skeletal muscle cells and mouse muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzolli, R; Mitchell, T W; Burchfield, J G; Pedersen, D J; Turner, N; Biden, T J; Schmitz-Peiffer, C

    2007-08-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is strongly associated with lipid oversupply, but the intracellular metabolites and underlying mechanisms are unclear. We therefore sought to identify the lipid intermediates through which the common unsaturated fatty acid linoleate causes defects in IRS-1 signalling in L6 myotubes and mouse skeletal muscle. Cells were pre-treated with 1 mmol/l linoleate for 24 h. Subsequent insulin-stimulated IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and its association with the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase were determined by immunoblotting. Intracellular lipid species and protein kinase C activation were modulated by overexpression of diacylglycerol kinase epsilon, which preferentially converts unsaturated diacylglycerol into phosphatidic acid, or by inhibition of lysophosphatidic acid acyl transferase with lisofylline, which reduces phosphatidic acid synthesis. Phosphatidic acid species in linoleate-treated cells or muscle from insulin-resistant mice fed a safflower oil-based high-fat diet that was rich in linoleate were analysed by mass spectrometry. Linoleate pretreatment reduced IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and p85 association. Overexpression of diacylglycerol kinase epsilon reversed the activation of protein kinase C isoforms by linoleate, but paradoxically further diminished IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Conversely, lisofylline treatment restored IRS-1 phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry indicated that the dilinoleoyl-phosphatidic acid content increased from undetectable levels to almost 20% of total phosphatidic acid in L6 cells and to 8% of total in the muscle of mice fed a high-fat diet. Micelles containing dilinoleoyl-phosphatidic acid specifically inhibited IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis in L6 cells. These data indicate that linoleate-derived phosphatidic acid is a novel lipid species that contributes independently of protein kinase C to IRS-1 signalling defects in muscle cells in response to lipid

  10. Myo/Nog cells: targets for preventing the accumulation of skeletal muscle-like cells in the human lens.

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    Jacquelyn Gerhart

    Full Text Available Posterior capsule opacification (PCO is a vision impairing condition that arises in some patients following cataract surgery. The fibrotic form of PCO is caused by myofibroblasts that may emerge in the lens years after surgery. In the chick embryo lens, myofibroblasts are derived from Myo/Nog cells that are identified by their expression of the skeletal muscle specific transcription factor MyoD, the bone morphogenetic protein inhibitor Noggin, and the epitope recognized by the G8 monoclonal antibody. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that depletion of Myo/Nog cells will prevent the accumulation of myofibroblasts in human lens tissue. Myo/Nog cells were present in anterior, equatorial and bow regions of the human lens, cornea and ciliary processes. In anterior lens tissue removed by capsulorhexis, Myo/Nog cells had synthesized myofibroblast and skeletal muscle proteins, including vimentin, MyoD and sarcomeric myosin. Alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA was detected in a subpopulation of Myo/Nog cells. Areas of the capsule denuded of epithelial cells were surrounded by Myo/Nog cells. Some of these cell free areas contained a wrinkle in the capsule. Depletion of Myo/Nog cells eliminated cells expressing skeletal muscle proteins in 5-day cultures but did not affect cells immunoreactive for beaded filament proteins that accumulate in differentiating lens epithelial cells. Transforming growth factor-betas 1 and 2 that mediate an epithelial-mesenchymal transition, did not induce the expression of skeletal muscle proteins in lens cells following Myo/Nog cell depletion. This study demonstrates that Myo/Nog cells in anterior lens tissue removed from cataract patients have undergone a partial differentiation to skeletal muscle. Myo/Nog cells appear to be the source of skeletal muscle-like cells in explants of human lens tissue. Targeting Myo/Nog cells with the G8 antibody during cataract surgery may reduce the incidence of PCO.

  11. Deficient leukemia inhibitory factor signaling in muscle precursor cells from patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Christa; Brandt, Claus; Schultz, Ninna S

    2012-01-01

    to LIF. The mRNA and protein expressions of LIF and its receptor (LIFR) were measured in skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes by use of qPCR and Western blot. LIF signaling and response were studied following administration of recombinant LIF and si......The cytokine leukemia-inhibitory factor (LIF) is expressed by skeletal muscle and induces proliferation of muscle precursor cells, an important feature of skeletal muscle maintenance and repair. We hypothesized that muscle precursor cells from patients with type 2 diabetes had a deficient response......RNA knockdown of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)3 in myoblast cultures established from healthy individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes. Myoblast proliferation rate was assessed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. LIF and LIFR proteins were increased in both muscle tissue and cultured myoblasts...

  12. Smad4 restricts differentiation to promote expansion of satellite cell derived progenitors during skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Nicole D; Soroka, Andrew; Klose, Alanna; Liu, Wenxuan; Chakkalakal, Joe V

    2016-11-18

    Skeletal muscle regenerative potential declines with age, in part due to deficiencies in resident stem cells (satellite cells, SCs) and derived myogenic progenitors (MPs); however, the factors responsible for this decline remain obscure. TGFβ superfamily signaling is an inhibitor of myogenic differentiation, with elevated activity in aged skeletal muscle. Surprisingly, we find reduced expression of Smad4, the downstream cofactor for canonical TGFβ superfamily signaling, and the target Id1 in aged SCs and MPs during regeneration. Specific deletion of Smad4 in adult mouse SCs led to increased propensity for terminal myogenic commitment connected to impaired proliferative potential. Furthermore, SC-specific Smad4 disruption compromised adult skeletal muscle regeneration. Finally, loss of Smad4 in aged SCs did not promote aged skeletal muscle regeneration. Therefore, SC-specific reduction of Smad4 is a feature of aged regenerating skeletal muscle and Smad4 is a critical regulator of SC and MP amplification during skeletal muscle regeneration.

  13. Myogenic Precursors from iPS Cells for Skeletal Muscle Cell Replacement Therapy

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    Isart Roca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of adult myogenic stem cells as a cell therapy for skeletal muscle regeneration has been attempted for decades, with only moderate success. Myogenic progenitors (MP made from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are promising candidates for stem cell therapy to regenerate skeletal muscle since they allow allogenic transplantation, can be produced in large quantities, and, as compared to adult myoblasts, present more embryonic-like features and more proliferative capacity in vitro, which indicates a potential for more self-renewal and regenerative capacity in vivo. Different approaches have been described to make myogenic progenitors either by gene overexpression or by directed differentiation through culture conditions, and several myopathies have already been modeled using iPSC-MP. However, even though results in animal models have shown improvement from previous work with isolated adult myoblasts, major challenges regarding host response have to be addressed and clinically relevant transplantation protocols are lacking. Despite these challenges we are closer than we think to bringing iPSC-MP towards clinical use for treating human muscle disease and sporting injuries.

  14. Identification and characterization of chondrogenic progenitor cells in the fascia of postnatal skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangheng; Zheng, Bo; Meszaros, Laura B.; Vella, Joseph B.; Usas, Arvydas; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Huard, Johnny

    2011-01-01

    Intramuscular injection of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) has been shown to induce ectopic bone formation. A chondrogenic phase is typically observed in this process, which suggests that there may exist a chondrogenic subpopulation of cells residing in skeletal muscle. Two prospective cell populations were isolated from rat skeletal muscle: fascia-derived cells (FDCs), extracted from gluteus maximus muscle fascia (epimysium) and muscle-derived cells (MDCs) isolated from the muscle body. Both populations were investigated for their cell surface marker profiles (flowcytometry analysis), proliferation rates as well as their myogenic and chondrogenic potentials. The majority of FDCs expressed mesenchymal stromal cell markers but not endothelial cell markers. FDCs underwent chondrogenic differentiation after BMP4 treatment in vitro, but not myogenic differentiation. Although MDCs showed chondrogenic potential, they expressed the myogenic cell marker desmin and readily underwent myogenic differentiation in vitro; however, the chondrogenic potential of the MDCs is confounded by the presence of FDC-like cells residing in the muscle perimysium and endomysium. To clarify the role of the muscle-derived myogenic cells in chondrogenesis, mixed pellets with varying ratios of FDCs and L6 myoblasts were formed and studied for chondrogenic potential. Our results indicated that the chondrogenic potential of the mixed pellets decreased with the increased ratio of myogenic cells to FDCs supporting the role of FDCs in chondrogenesis. Taken together, our results suggest that non-myogenic cells residing in the fascia of skeletal muscle have a strong chondrogenic potential and may represent a novel donor cell source for cartilage regeneration and repair. PMID:21729867

  15. Three distinct cell populations express extracellular matrix proteins and increase in number during skeletal muscle fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Mark A; Mukund, Kavitha; Subramaniam, Shankar; Brenner, David; Lieber, Richard L

    2017-02-01

    Tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural support and creates unique environments for resident cells (Bateman JF, Boot-Handford RP, Lamandé SR. Nat Rev Genet 10: 173-183, 2009; Kjaer M. Physiol Rev 84: 649-98, 2004). However, the identities of cells responsible for creating specific ECM components have not been determined. In striated muscle, the identity of these cells becomes important in disease when ECM changes result in fibrosis and subsequent increased tissue stiffness and dysfunction. Here we describe a novel approach to isolate and identify cells that maintain the ECM in both healthy and fibrotic muscle. Using a collagen I reporter mouse, we show that there are three distinct cell populations that express collagen I in both healthy and fibrotic skeletal muscle. Interestingly, the number of collagen I-expressing cells in all three cell populations increases proportionally in fibrotic muscle, indicating that all cell types participate in the fibrosis process. Furthermore, while some profibrotic ECM and ECM-associated genes are significantly upregulated in fibrotic muscle, the fibrillar collagen gene expression profile is not qualitatively altered. This suggests that muscle fibrosis in this model results from an increased number of collagen I-expressing cells and not the initiation of a specific fibrotic collagen gene expression program. Finally, in fibrotic muscle, we show that these collagen I-expressing cell populations differentially express distinct ECM proteins-fibroblasts express the fibrillar components of ECM, fibro/adipogenic progenitors cells differentially express basal laminar proteins, and skeletal muscle progenitor cells differentially express genes important for the satellite cell. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Muscle glycogen and cell function - Location, location, location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, N; Nielsen, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    that the subcellular localization of glycogen has to be considered to fully understand the role of glycogen metabolism and signaling in skeletal muscle function. Here, we propose that the effect of low muscle glycogen on excitation-contraction coupling may serve as a built-in mechanism, which links the energetic state......The importance of glycogen, as a fuel during exercise, is a fundamental concept in exercise physiology. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not evenly distributed in skeletal muscle fibers, but rather localized in distinct pools. In this review, we present the available...... evidence regarding the subcellular localization of glycogen in skeletal muscle and discuss this from the perspective of skeletal muscle fiber function. The distribution of glycogen in the defined pools within the skeletal muscle varies depending on exercise intensity, fiber phenotype, training status...

  17. Skeletal muscle to pancreatic β-cell cross-talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Camilla S; P. Christensen, Dan; Lundh, Morten

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mechanisms explaining exercise-induced β-cell health are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To define the role of muscle contraction and acute exercise-derived soluble humoral mediators on β-cell health. DESIGN: In vitro models. SETTING: University. PARTICIPANTS: Healthy subjects. INTERVENTION(S): Cond......CONTEXT: Mechanisms explaining exercise-induced β-cell health are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To define the role of muscle contraction and acute exercise-derived soluble humoral mediators on β-cell health. DESIGN: In vitro models. SETTING: University. PARTICIPANTS: Healthy subjects. INTERVENTION...... insulin secretion in the absence of IL-1β+IFN-γ. CONCLUSIONS: Unidentified circulating humoral mediators released during exercise prevent proinflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell apoptosis. Muscle-derived mediators released during exercise suppress β-cell insulin secretion. Furthermore, muscle-derived IL-6...

  18. Embryonic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reside in Muscle before Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Tanaka

    Full Text Available In mice, hematopoietic cells home to bone marrow from fetal liver prenatally. To elucidate mechanisms underlying homing, we performed immunohistochemistry with the hematopoietic cell marker c-Kit, and observed c-Kit(+ cells localized inside muscle surrounding bone after 14.5 days post coitum. Flow cytometric analysis showed that CD45(+ c-Kit(+ hematopoietic cells were more abundant in muscle than in bone marrow between 14.5 and 17.5 days post coitum, peaking at 16.5 days post coitum. CD45(+ c-Kit(+ cells in muscle at 16.5 days post coitum exhibited higher expression of Gata2, among several hematopoietic genes, than did fetal liver or bone marrow cells. Colony formation assays revealed that muscle hematopoietic cells possess hematopoietic progenitor activity. Furthermore, exo utero transplantation revealed that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells home to muscle and then to BM. Our findings demonstrate that hematopoietic progenitor cell homing occurs earlier than previously reported and that hematopoietic progenitor cells reside in muscle tissue before bone marrow hematopoiesis occurs during mouse embryogenesis.

  19. Methods for Mitochondria and Mitophagy Flux Analyses in Stem Cells of Resting and Regenerating Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Prat, Laura; Martínez-Vicente, Marta; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria generate most of the cell's supply of ATP as a source of energy. They are also implicated in the control of cell's growth and death. Because of these critical functions, mitochondrial fitness is key for cellular homeostasis. Often, however, mitochondria become defective following damage or stress. To prevent accumulation of damaged mitochondria, the cells clear them through mitophagy, which is defined as the selective degradation of mitochondria by autophagy (the process for degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged organelles in lysosomes). Recently, constitutive mitophagic activity has been reported in quiescent muscle stem cells (satellite cells), which sustain regeneration of skeletal muscle. In response to muscle damage, these cells activate, expand, and differentiate to repair damaged myofibers. Mitophagy was shown to be required for maintenance of satellite cells in their healthy quiescent state. Conversely, damaged mitochondria accumulated in satellite cells with aging and this was attributed to defective mitophagy. This caused increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of muscle stem cell regenerative capacity at old age. In this chapter, we describe different experimental strategies to evaluate mitochondria status and mitophagy in muscle stem cells from mice. They should improve our ability to study muscle stem homeostasis in adult life, and their loss of function in aging and disease.

  20. Embryonic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reside in Muscle before Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuka; Inoue-Yokoo, Tomoko; Kulkeaw, Kasem; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Shirasawa, Senji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    In mice, hematopoietic cells home to bone marrow from fetal liver prenatally. To elucidate mechanisms underlying homing, we performed immunohistochemistry with the hematopoietic cell marker c-Kit, and observed c-Kit(+) cells localized inside muscle surrounding bone after 14.5 days post coitum. Flow cytometric analysis showed that CD45(+) c-Kit(+) hematopoietic cells were more abundant in muscle than in bone marrow between 14.5 and 17.5 days post coitum, peaking at 16.5 days post coitum. CD45(+) c-Kit(+) cells in muscle at 16.5 days post coitum exhibited higher expression of Gata2, among several hematopoietic genes, than did fetal liver or bone marrow cells. Colony formation assays revealed that muscle hematopoietic cells possess hematopoietic progenitor activity. Furthermore, exo utero transplantation revealed that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells home to muscle and then to BM. Our findings demonstrate that hematopoietic progenitor cell homing occurs earlier than previously reported and that hematopoietic progenitor cells reside in muscle tissue before bone marrow hematopoiesis occurs during mouse embryogenesis.

  1. Isolation, culture and biological characteristics of multipotent porcine skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinjuan; Liu, Hao; Wang, Kunfu; Li, Lu; Yuan, Hongyi; Liu, Xueting; Liu, Yingjie; Guan, Weijun

    2017-03-02

    Skeletal muscle has a huge regenerative potential for postnatal muscle growth and repair, which mainly depends on a kind of muscle progenitor cell population, called satellite cell. Nowadays, the majority of satellite cells were obtained from human, mouse, rat and other animals but rarely from pig. In this article, the porcine skeletal muscle satellite cells were isolated and cultured in vitro. The expression of surface markers of satellite cells was detected by immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays. The differentiation capacity was assessed by inducing satellite cells into adipocytes, myoblasts and osteoblasts. The results showed that satellite cells isolated from porcine tibialis anterior were subcultured up to 12 passages and were positive for Pax7, Myod, c-Met, desmin, PCNA and NANOG but were negative for Myogenin. Satellite cells were also induced to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts and myoblasts, respectively. These findings indicated that porcine satellite cells possess similar biological characteristics of stem cells, which may provide theoretical basis and experimental evidence for potential therapeutic application in the treatment of dystrophic muscle and other muscle injuries.

  2. Conditioned medium derived from umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells regenerates atrophied muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Z-Hun; Kim, Sun-Mi; Choi, Yong-Soo

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the regenerative effects and regulatory mechanisms of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs)-derived conditioned medium (CM) in atrophied muscles using an in vivo model. To determine the appropriate harvest point of UC-CM, active factor content was analyzed in the secretome over time. A muscle atrophy model was induced in rats by hindlimb suspension (HS) for 2 weeks. Next, UC-CM was injected directly into the soleus muscle of both hind legs to assess its regenerative efficacy on atrophy-related factors after 1 week of HS. During HS, muscle mass and muscle fiber size were significantly reduced by over 2-fold relative to untreated controls. Lactate accumulation within the muscles was similarly increased. By contrast, all of the above analytical factors were significantly improved in HS-induced rats by UC-CM injection compared with saline injection. Furthermore, the expression levels of desmin and skeletal muscle actin were significantly elevated by UC-CM treatment. Importantly, UC-CM effectively suppressed expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin E3-ligases, muscle ring finger 1 and muscle atrophy F-box by 2.3- and 2.1-fold, respectively. UC-CM exerted its actions by stimulating the phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling cascade. These findings suggest that UC-CM provides an effective stimulus to recover muscle status and function in atrophied muscles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of anabolic steroids on the muscle cells of strength-trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadi, F; Eriksson, A; Holmner, S; Thornell, L E

    1999-11-01

    Athletes who use anabolic steroids get larger and stronger muscles. How this is reflected at the level of the muscle fibers has not yet been established and was the topic of this investigation. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the trapezius muscles of high-level power lifters who have reported the use of anabolic steroids in high doses for several years and from high-level power lifters who have never used these drugs. Enzyme-immunohistochemical investigation was performed to assess muscle fiber types, fiber area, myonuclear number, frequency of satellite cells, and fibers expressing developmental protein isoforms. The overall muscle fiber composition was the same in both groups. The mean area for each fiber type in the reported steroid users was larger than that in the nonsteroid users (P steroid users (P steroid users group (P anabolic steroids and strength-training induce an increase in muscle size by both hypertrophy and the formation of new muscle fibers. We propose that activation of satellite cells is a key process and is enhanced by the steroid use. The incorporation of the satellite cells into preexisting fibers to maintain a constant nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio seems to be a fundamental mechanism for muscle fiber growth. Although all the subjects in this study have the same level of performance, the possibility of genetic differences between the two groups cannot be completely excluded.

  4. Immediate and delayed transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells improve muscle force after skeletal muscle injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Tobias; von Roth, Philipp; Radojewski, Piotr; Urbanski, Alexander; Hahn, Sebastian; Preininger, Bernd; Duda, Georg N; Perka, Carsten

    2012-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is a promising approach for regaining muscle function after trauma. Prior to clinical application, the ideal time of transplantation has to be determined. We investigated the effects of immediate and delayed transplantation. Sprague-Dawley rats received a crush trauma to the left soleus muscle. Treatment groups were transplanted locally with 2 × 10(6) autologous MSCs, either immediately or 7 days after trauma. Saline was used as sham therapy. Contraction force tests and histological analyses were performed 4 weeks after injury. GFP-labelled MSCs were followed after transplantation. The traumatized soleus muscles of the sham group displayed a reduction of twitch forces to 36 ± 17% and of tetanic forces to 29 ± 11% of the non-injured right control side, respectively. Delayed MSC transplantation resulted in a significant improvement of contraction maxima in both stimulation modes (twitch, p = 0.011; tetany, p = 0.014). Immediate transplantation showed a significant increase in twitch forces to 59 ± 17% (p = 0.043). There was no significant difference in contraction forces between muscles treated by immediate and delayed cell transplantation. We were able to identify MSCs in the interstitium of the injured muscles up to 4 weeks after transplantation. Despite the fundamental differences of the local environment, which MSCs encounter after transplantation, similar results could be obtained with respect to functional muscle regeneration. We believe that transplanted MSCs residing in the interstitial compartment evolve their regenerative capabilities through paracrine pathways. Our data suggest a large time window of the therapeutical measures. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Safeguards Genomic Integrity of Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Kollu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To ensure accurate genomic segregation, cells evolved the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, whose role in adult stem cells remains unknown. Inducible perturbation of a SAC kinase, Mps1, and its downstream effector, Mad2, in skeletal muscle stem cells shows the SAC to be critical for normal muscle growth, repair, and self-renewal of the stem cell pool. SAC-deficient muscle stem cells arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle with elevated aneuploidy, resisting differentiation even under inductive conditions. p21CIP1 is responsible for these SAC-deficient phenotypes. Despite aneuploidy’s correlation with aging, we find that aged proliferating muscle stem cells display robust SAC activity without elevated aneuploidy. Thus, muscle stem cells have a two-step mechanism to safeguard their genomic integrity. The SAC prevents chromosome missegregation and, if it fails, p21CIP1-dependent G1 arrest limits cellular propagation and tissue integration. These mechanisms ensure that muscle stem cells with compromised genomes do not contribute to tissue homeostasis.

  6. Myogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for muscle regeneration in urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Zheng, Jun-hua; Zhang, Yuan-yuan

    2013-01-01

    This article was to review the current status of adult mesenchymal stem cells transplantation for muscle regeneration in urinary tract and propose the future prospect in this field. The data used in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed (2000-2013). The search terms were "mesenchymal stem cells", "bladder", "stress urinary incontinence" and "tissue engineering". Articles regarding the adult mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering of bladder and stress urinary incontinence were selected and reviewed. Adult mesenchymal stem cells had been identified and well characterized in human bone marrow, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and urine, and demonstrated the capability of differentiating into smooth muscle cells and skeletal muscle cells under myogenic differentiation conditions in vitro. Multiple preclinical and clinical studies indicated that adult mesenchymal stem cells could restore and maintain the structure and function of urinary muscle tissues after transplanted, and potentially improve the quality of life in patients. Smooth or skeletal myogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells with regenerative medicine technology may provide a novel approach for muscle regeneration and tissue repair in urinary tract. The long-term effect and safety of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation should be further evaluated before this approach becomes widely used in patients.

  7. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tong; Chen, Huan; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2016-01-01

    The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation. A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI) selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell's initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations) was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9 μm, 4.6±0.6 μm and 6.2±1.8 μm (mean±SD). In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle) was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°. A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function.

  8. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Luo

    Full Text Available The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation.A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell's initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9 μm, 4.6±0.6 μm and 6.2±1.8 μm (mean±SD. In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°.A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function.

  9. Established cell surface markers efficiently isolate highly overlapping populations of skeletal muscle satellite cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesner, Claire C; Almada, Albert E; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) has enabled the direct isolation of highly enriched skeletal muscle stem cell, or satellite cell, populations from postnatal tissue. Several distinct surface marker panels containing different positively selecting surface antigens have been used to distinguish muscle satellite cells from other non-myogenic cell types. Because functional and transcriptional heterogeneity is known to exist within the satellite cell population, a direct comparison of results obtained in different laboratories has been complicated by a lack of clarity as to whether commonly utilized surface marker combinations select for distinct or overlapping subsets of the satellite cell pool. This study therefore sought to evaluate phenotypic and functional overlap among popular satellite cell sorting paradigms. Utilizing a transgenic Pax7-zsGreen reporter mouse, we compared the overlap between the fluorescent signal of canonical paired homeobox protein 7 (Pax7) expressing satellite cells to cells identified by combinations of surface markers previously published for satellite cells isolation. We designed two panels for mouse skeletal muscle analysis, each composed of markers that exclude hematopoietic and stromal cells (CD45, CD11b, Ter119, CD31, and Sca1), combined with previously published antibody clones recognizing surface markers present on satellite cells (β1-integrin/CXCR4, α7-integrin/CD34, and Vcam1). Cell populations were comparatively analyzed by flow cytometry and FACS sorted for functional assessment of myogenic activity. Consistent with prior reports, each of the commonly used surface marker schemes evaluated here identified a highly enriched satellite cell population, with 89-90 % positivity for Pax7 expression based on zsGreen fluorescence. Distinct surface marker panels were also equivalent in their ability to identify the majority of the satellite cell pool, with 90-93 % of all Pax7-zsGreen positive cells marked by each of the surface

  10. Adipose-derived stem-cell treatment of skeletal muscle injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peçanha, Ramon; Bagno, Luiza de Lima E Silva; Ribeiro, Marcelo Baldanza; Robottom Ferreira, Anna Beatriz; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Kasai-Brunswick, Taís Hanae; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antônio Carlos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli dos Santos; Saar Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2012-04-04

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adipose-derived stem cells could contribute to skeletal muscle-healing. Adipose-derived stem cells of male rats were cultured and injected into the soleus muscles of female rats. Two and four weeks after injections, muscles were tested for tetanic force (50 Hz). Histological analysis was performed to evaluate muscle collagen deposition and the number of centronucleated muscle fibers. In order to track donor cells, chimerism was detected with use of real-time polymerase chain reaction targeting the male sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene. Two weeks after cell injection, tetanus strength and the number of centronucleated regenerating myofibers, as well as the number of centronucleated regenerating myofibers, were higher in the treated group than they were in the control group (mean and standard error of the mean, 79.2 ± 5.0% versus 58.3 ± 8.1%, respectively [p muscle repair and force at two weeks, but not four weeks, after injection, suggesting that adipose-derived stem-cell administration may accelerate muscle repair; however, the rapid disappearance of injected cells suggests a paracrine mechanism of action.

  11. SREBP inhibits VEGF expression in human smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya; Koyama, Hidenori; Emoto, Masanori; Shimano, Hitoshi; Maemura, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-03-31

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are transcription factors that regulate expression of genes encoding enzymes for lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are activated by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins have been also reported to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we hypothesized that SREBPs are involved in statin-mediated regulation of VEGF production in VSMCs. SREBP1 was robustly expressed, and was activated by atorvastatin in VSMCs, as demonstrated by increased levels of the mature nuclear form of SREBP1, and increased promoter activities of a reporter containing sterol regulatory elements by atorvastatin. Moreover, overexpression of SREBP1a dose-dependently suppressed VEGF promoter activity. Site-specific mutation or deletion of the proximal Sp1 sites reduced the inhibitory effects of SREBP1a on VEGF promoter activity. These data demonstrated that SREBP1, activated by atorvastatin, suppressed VEGF expression through the indirect interaction with the proximal tandem Sp1 sites in VSMCs.

  12. Smooth muscle cells in bovine cervical ripening and dilatation; contractility, degrading enzymes and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Engelen, E.

    2008-01-01

    Cervical ripening is a complex process of modification of cervical tissue that enables dilation of the cervix at parturition. Cervical smooth muscle tissue might play a role by contracting or by secretion of cytokines or MMPs. To assess a contractile role for the cervical smooth muscle cells in

  13. Abnormal epigenetic changes during differentiation of human skeletal muscle stem cells from obese subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davegardh, C.; Broholm, C.; Perfilyev, A.; Henriksen, T.; Garcia-Calzon, S.; Peijs, L.; Hansen, N.S.; Volkov, P.; Kjobsted, R.; Wojtaszewski, J.F.; Pedersen, M.; Pedersen, B.K.; Ballak, D.B.; Dinarello, C.A.; Heinhuis, B.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Nilsson, E.; Vaag, A.; Scheele, C.; Ling, C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human skeletal muscle stem cells are important for muscle regeneration. However, the combined genome-wide DNA methylation and expression changes taking place during adult myogenesis have not been described in detail and novel myogenic factors may be discovered. Additionally, obesity is

  14. Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Derived From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Induce Histologic Changes in Injured Urethral Sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhui; Wen, Yan; Wang, Zhe; Wei, Yi; Wani, Prachi; Green, Morgaine; Swaminathan, Ganesh; Ramamurthi, Anand; Pera, Renee Reijo; Chen, Bertha

    2016-12-01

    : Data suggest that myoblasts from various sources, including bone marrow, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, can restore muscle function in patients with urinary incontinence. Animal data have indicated that these progenitor cells exert mostly a paracrine effect on the native tissues rather than cell regeneration. Limited knowledge is available on the in vivo effect of human stem cells or muscle progenitors on injured muscles. We examined in vivo integration of smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). pSMCs were derived from a human embryonic stem cell line (H9-ESCs) and two induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines. pSMCs were injected periurethrally into urethral injury rat models (2 × 10(6) cells per rat) or intramuscularly into severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Histologic and quantitative image analysis revealed that the urethras in pSMC-treated rats contained abundant elastic fibers and thicker muscle layers compared with the control rats. Western blot confirmed increased elastin/collagen III content in the urethra and bladder of the H9-pSMC-treated rats compared with controls. iPSC-pSMC treatment also showed similar trends in elastin and collagen III. Human elastin gene expression was not detectable in rodent tissues, suggesting that the extracellular matrix synthesis resulted from the native rodent tissues rather than from the implanted human cells. Immunofluorescence staining and in vivo bioluminescence imaging confirmed long-term engraftment of pSMCs into the host urethra and the persistence of the smooth muscle phenotype. Taken together, the data suggest that hPSC-derived pSMCs facilitate restoration of urethral sphincter function by direct smooth muscle cell regeneration and by inducing native tissue elastin/collagen III remodeling. The present study provides evidence that a pure population of human smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) (human

  15. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayoubi, Sohrab; Sheikh, Søren P; Eskildsen, Tilde V

    2017-01-01

    . To this end, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have generated great enthusiasm, and have been a driving force for development of novel strategies in drug discovery and regenerative cell-therapy for the last decade. Hence, investigating the mechanisms underlying the differentiation of hi......PSCs into specialized cell types such as cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) may lead to a better understanding of developmental cardiovascular processes and potentiate progress of safe autologous regenerative therapies in pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize......Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death worldwide and current treatment strategies have limited effect of disease progression. It would be desirable to have better models to study developmental and pathological processes and model vascular diseases in laboratory settings...

  16. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  17. Fluid Flow Mechanotransduction in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhong-Dong; Tarbell, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how vascular wall endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and fibroblasts (FBs) sense and transduce the stimuli of hemodynamic forces (shear stress, cyclic strain, and hydrostatic pressure) into intracellular biochemical signals is critical to prevent vascular disease development and progression. ECs lining the vessel lumen directly sense alterations in blood flow shear stress and then communicate with medial SMCs and adventitial FBs to regulate vessel function and disease. Shear stress mechanotransduction in ECs has been extensively studied and reviewed. In the case of endothelial damage, blood flow shear stress may directly act on the superficial layer of SMCs and transmural interstitial flow may be elevated on medial SMCs and adventitial FBs. Therefore, it is also important to investigate direct shear effects on vascular SMCs as well as FBs. The work published in the last two decades has shown that shear stress and interstitial flow have significant influences on vascular SMCs and FBs. This review summarizes work that considered direct shear effects on SMCs and FBs and provides the first comprehensive overview of the underlying mechanisms that modulate SMC secretion, alignment, contraction, proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and migration in response to 2-dimensional (2D) laminar, pulsatile, and oscillating flow shear stresses and 3D interstitial flow. A mechanistic model of flow sensing by SMCs is also provided to elucidate possible mechanotransduction pathways through surface glycocalyx, integrins, membrane receptors, ion channels, and primary cilia. Understanding flow-mediated mechanotransduction in SMCs and FBs and the interplay with ECs should be helpful in exploring strategies to prevent flow-initiated atherosclerosis and neointima formation and has implications in vascular tissue engineering. PMID:21479754

  18. Muscle stem cell and physical activity: what point is the debate at?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceccarelli Gabriele

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last 15 years, it emerged that the practice of regular physical activity reduces the risks of many diseases (cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, etc. and it is fundamental in weight control and energy consuming to contrast obesity. Different groups proposed many molecular mechanisms as responsible for the positive effects of physical activity in healthy life. However, many points remain to be clarified. In this mini-review we reported the latest observations on the effects of physical exercise on healthy skeletal and cardiac muscle focusing on muscle stem cells. The last ones represent the fundamental elements for muscle regeneration post injury, but also for healthy muscle homeostasis.

  19. Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth by Connexin 43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintamani eJoshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Connexin 43 (Cx43, the principal gap junction protein in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, regulates movement of ions and other signaling molecules through gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and plays important roles in maintaining normal vessel function; however, many of the signaling mechanisms controlling Cx43 in VSMCs are not clearly described. The goal of this study was to investigate mechanisms of Cx43 regulation with respect to VSMC proliferation. Treatment of rat primary VSMCs with the cAMP analog 8Br-cAMP, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 (BAY, or the Cx inducer diallyl disulfide (DADS significantly reduced proliferation after 72 h compared to vehicle controls. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake revealed reduction (p<.001 in DNA synthesis after 6 h and flow cytometry showed reduced (40% S phase cell numbers after 16 h in DADS-treated cells compared to controls. Cx43 expression significantly increased after 270 min treatment with 8Br-cAMP, 8Br-cGMP, BAY or DADS. Inhibition of PKA, PKG or PKC reversed 8Br-cAMP-stimulated increases in Cx43 expression, whereas only PKG or PKC inhibition reversed 8Br-cGMP- and BAY-stimulated increases in total Cx43. Interestingly, stimulation of Cx43 expression by DADS was not dependent on PKA, PKG or PKC. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, only 8Br-cAMP or DADS increased GJIC with 8Br-cAMP mediated by PKC and DADS mediated by PKG. Further, DADS significantly increased phosphorylation at the MAPK-sensitive serine (Ser255 and Ser279, the cell cycle regulatory kinase-sensitive Ser262 and the PKC-sensitive Ser368 after 30 min while 8Br-cAMP significantly increased phosphorylation only at Ser279 compared to controls. This study demonstrates that 8Br-cAMP- and DADS-enhanced GJIC rather than Cx43 expression and/or phosphorylation plays an important role in regulation of VSMC proliferation and provides new insights into the growth-regulatory capacities of Cx43 in VSMCs.

  20. Engineering skeletal muscle tissues from murine myoblast progenitor cells and application of electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schaft, Daisy W J; van Spreeuwel, Ariane C C; Boonen, Kristel J M; Langelaan, Marloes L P; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2013-03-19

    Engineered muscle tissues can be used for several different purposes, which include the production of tissues for use as a disease model in vitro, e.g. to study pressure ulcers, for regenerative medicine and as a meat alternative (1). The first reported 3D muscle constructs have been made many years ago and pioneers in the field are Vandenburgh and colleagues (2,3). Advances made in muscle tissue engineering are not only the result from the vast gain in knowledge of biochemical factors, stem cells and progenitor cells, but are in particular based on insights gained by researchers that physical factors play essential roles in the control of cell behavior and tissue development. State-of-the-art engineered muscle constructs currently consist of cell-populated hydrogel constructs. In our lab these generally consist of murine myoblast progenitor cells, isolated from murine hind limb muscles or a murine myoblast cell line C2C12, mixed with a mixture of collagen/Matrigel and plated between two anchoring points, mimicking the muscle ligaments. Other cells may be considered as well, e.g. alternative cell lines such as L6 rat myoblasts (4), neonatal muscle derived progenitor cells (5), cells derived from adult muscle tissues from other species such as human (6) or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) (7). Cell contractility causes alignment of the cells along the long axis of the construct (8,9) and differentiation of the muscle progenitor cells after approximately one week of culture. Moreover, the application of electrical stimulation can enhance the process of differentiation to some extent (8). Because of its limited size (8 x 2 x 0.5 mm) the complete tissue can be analyzed using confocal microscopy to monitor e.g. viability, differentiation and cell alignment. Depending on the specific application the requirements for the engineered muscle tissue will vary; e.g. use for regenerative medicine requires the up scaling of tissue size and vascularization, while

  1. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: A myogenic precursor cell hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallestad, Kristen M.; Hebert, Sadie L.; McDonald, Abby A.; Daniel, Mark L.; Cu, Sharon R.; McLoon, Linda K., E-mail: mcloo001@tc.umn.edu

    2011-04-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin{sup -/-} (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a

  2. Formation of Nanoscale Bioimprints of Muscle Cells Using UV-Cured Spin-Coated Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmi Samsuri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a nanoscale replication method suitable for biological specimens that has potential in single cell studies and in formation of 3D biocompatible scaffolds. Earlier studies using a heat-curable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS or a UV-curable elastomer introduced Bioimprint replication to facilitate cell imaging. However, the replicating conditions for thermal polymerization are known to cause cell dehydration during curing. In this study, a UV-cured methacrylate copolymer was developed for use in creating replicas of living cells and was tested on rat muscle cells. Bioimprints of muscle cells were formed by spin coating under UV irradiation. The polymer replicas were then separated from the muscle cells and were analyzed under an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM, in tapping mode, because it has low tip-sample forces and thus will not destroy the fine structures of the imprint. The new polymer is biocompatible with higher replication resolution and has a faster curing process than other types of silicon-based organic polymers such as PDMS. High resolution images of the muscle cell imprints showed the micro-and nanostructures of the muscle cells, including cellular fibers and structures within the cell membranes. The AFM is able to image features at nanoscale resolution with the potential for recognizing abnormalities on cell membranes at early stages of disease progression.

  3. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Qingnian; Dearth, Christopher L.; Corbett, Jacob T. [Department of Kinesiology, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Pierre, Philippe [Centre d’Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy U2M, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille (France); INSERM U631, Institut National de la Santé et Recherche Médicale, Marseille (France); CNRS UMR6102, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marseille (France); Chadee, Deborah N. [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Pizza, Francis X., E-mail: Francis.Pizza@utoledo.edu [Department of Kinesiology, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by skeletal muscle cells after muscle overload contributes to ensuing regenerative and hypertrophic processes in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study is to reveal mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augments regenerative and hypertrophic processes of myogenesis. This was accomplished by genetically engineering C2C12 myoblasts to stably express ICAM-1, and by inhibiting the adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 through the use of a neutralizing antibody or cell penetrating peptide, respectively. Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured skeletal muscle cells augmented myoblast–myoblast adhesion, myotube formation, myonuclear number, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size without influencing the ability of myoblasts to proliferate or differentiate. ICAM-1 augmented myotube formation, myonuclear accretion, and myotube alignment through a mechanism involving adhesion-induced activation of ICAM-1 signaling, as these dependent measures were reduced via antibody and peptide inhibition of ICAM-1. The adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 also facilitated myotube hypertrophy through a mechanism involving myotube–myotube fusion, protein synthesis, and Akt/p70s6k signaling. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis, and establish a novel mechanism through which the inflammatory response facilitates growth processes in skeletal muscle. - Highlights: • We examined mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 facilitates events of in vitro myogenesis. • Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured myoblasts did not influence their ability to proliferate or differentiate. • Skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augmented myoblast fusion, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size. • ICAM-1 augmented myogenic processes through

  4. Influence of mesterolone on satellite cell distribution and fiber morphology within maturing chicken pectoralis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allouh, Mohammed Z; Aldirawi, Mohammed H

    2012-05-01

    Mesterolone is a synthetic oral anabolic androgenic steroid used to treat hypogonadism. There are frequent reports of mesterolone abuse in human and equine sports to increase muscle mass and strength. However, limited information is available about how this drug exerts its effects on skeletal muscle. Satellite cells (SCs) are mononuclear myogenic stem cells that contribute to postnatal muscle growth and repair. As SC activation and subsequent differentiation to new myonuclei is a major event during muscle hypertrophy, this study investigated the influence of mesterolone on SC distribution within the pectoralis muscle of chickens. Specifically, this study tested the hypotheses that mesterolone induces avian skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and that mesterolone increases the number of SCs in avian skeletal muscle. Robust immunocytochemical techniques and morphometric analyses were used to calculate the numbers of SCs and myonuclei. Also, DNA concentration and Pax7 protein levels were measured to confirm immunocytochemical findings. Mesterolone significantly increased pectoralis mass and fiber size. All SC indices and number of myonuclei increased significantly by mesterolone administration. In addition, greater DNA concentration and Pax7 protein expression were found in mesterolone-treated birds. This study indicates that mesterolone can induce avian skeletal muscle hypertrophy and that this is correlated with increased number of SCs. We suggest that SCs are key cellular intermediaries for mesterolone-induced muscle hypertrophy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Exercise and amino acid anabolic cell signaling and the regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2012-07-01

    A series of complex intracellular networks influence the regulation of skeletal muscle protein turnover. In recent years, studies have examined how cellular regulators of muscle protein turnover modulate metabolic mechanisms contributing to the loss, gain, or conservation of skeletal muscle mass. Exercise and amino acids both stimulate anabolic signaling potentially through several intracellular pathways including the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and the mitogen activated protein kinase cell signaling cascades. As novel molecular regulators of muscle integrity continue to be explored, a contemporary analysis of the literature is required to understand the metabolic mechanisms by which contractile forces and amino acids affect cellular process that contribute to long-term adaptations and preservation of muscle mass. This article reviews the literature related to how exercise and amino acid availability affect cellular regulators of skeletal muscle mass, especially highlighting recent investigations that have identified mechanisms by which contractile forces and amino acids modulate muscle health. Furthermore, this review will explore integrated exercise and nutrition strategies that promote the maintenance of muscle health by optimizing exercise, and amino acid-induced cell signaling in aging adults susceptible to muscle loss.

  6. Exercise and Amino Acid Anabolic Cell Signaling and the Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M. Pasiakos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of complex intracellular networks influence the regulation of skeletal muscle protein turnover. In recent years, studies have examined how cellular regulators of muscle protein turnover modulate metabolic mechanisms contributing to the loss, gain, or conservation of skeletal muscle mass. Exercise and amino acids both stimulate anabolic signaling potentially through several intracellular pathways including the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and the mitogen activated protein kinase cell signaling cascades. As novel molecular regulators of muscle integrity continue to be explored, a contemporary analysis of the literature is required to understand the metabolic mechanisms by which contractile forces and amino acids affect cellular process that contribute to long-term adaptations and preservation of muscle mass. This article reviews the literature related to how exercise and amino acid availability affect cellular regulators of skeletal muscle mass, especially highlighting recent investigations that have identified mechanisms by which contractile forces and amino acids modulate muscle health. Furthermore, this review will explore integrated exercise and nutrition strategies that promote the maintenance of muscle health by optimizing exercise, and amino acid-induced cell signaling in aging adults susceptible to muscle loss.

  7. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Qingnian; Dearth, Christopher L; Corbett, Jacob T; Pierre, Philippe; Chadee, Deborah N; Pizza, Francis X

    2015-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by skeletal muscle cells after muscle overload contributes to ensuing regenerative and hypertrophic processes in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study is to reveal mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augments regenerative and hypertrophic processes of myogenesis. This was accomplished by genetically engineering C2C12 myoblasts to stably express ICAM-1, and by inhibiting the adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 through the use of a neutralizing antibody or cell penetrating peptide, respectively. Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured skeletal muscle cells augmented myoblast-myoblast adhesion, myotube formation, myonuclear number, myotube alignment, myotube-myotube fusion, and myotube size without influencing the ability of myoblasts to proliferate or differentiate. ICAM-1 augmented myotube formation, myonuclear accretion, and myotube alignment through a mechanism involving adhesion-induced activation of ICAM-1 signaling, as these dependent measures were reduced via antibody and peptide inhibition of ICAM-1. The adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 also facilitated myotube hypertrophy through a mechanism involving myotube-myotube fusion, protein synthesis, and Akt/p70s6k signaling. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis, and establish a novel mechanism through which the inflammatory response facilitates growth processes in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Molecular Switch Regulating Cell Fate Choice between Muscle Progenitor Cells and Brown Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yitai; Wang, Gang; Diao, Yarui; Long, Yanyang; Fu, Xinrong; Weng, Mingxi; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Kun; Cheung, Tom H; Ip, Nancy Y; Sun, Hao; Wang, Huating; Wu, Zhenguo

    2017-05-22

    During mouse embryo development, both muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) and brown adipocytes (BAs) are known to derive from the same Pax7 + /Myf5 + progenitor cells. However, the underlying mechanisms for the cell fate control remain unclear. In Pax7-null MPCs from young mice, several BA-specific genes, including Prdm16 and Ucp1 and many other adipocyte-related genes, were upregulated with a concomitant reduction of Myod and Myf5, two muscle lineage-determining genes. This suggests a cell fate switch from MPC to BA. Consistently, freshly isolated Pax7-null but not wild-type MPCs formed lipid-droplet-containing UCP1 + BA in culture. Mechanistically, MyoD and Myf5, both known transcription targets of Pax7 in MPC, potently repress Prdm16, a BA-specific lineage-determining gene, via the E2F4/p107/p130 transcription repressor complex. Importantly, inducible Pax7 ablation in developing mouse embryos promoted brown fat development. Thus, the MyoD/Myf5-E2F4/p107/p130 axis functions in both the Pax7 + /Myf5 + embryonic progenitor cells and postnatal myoblasts to repress the alternative BA fate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lymphatic muscle cells in rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels of various ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridenbaugh, Eric A; Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Jupiter, Daniel; Nagai, Takashi; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Chatterjee, Victor; Gashev, Anatoliy A

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies on aging-associated changes in mesenteric lymph flow in situ demonstrated predominance of the severe negative chronotropic effect of aging on the contractility of aged mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLV). At the same time, contraction amplitude of the aged vessels was only slightly diminished by aging and can be rapidly stimulated within 5-15 minutes. However, the detailed quantitative evaluation of potential aging-associated changes in muscle cells investiture in MLV has never been performed. In this study we, for the first time, performed detailed evaluation of muscle cells investiture in MLV in reference to the position of lymphatic valve in different zones of lymphangion within various age groups (3-mo, 9-mo and 24-mo Fischer-344 rats). Using visual and quantitative analyses of the images of MLV immunohistochemically labeled for actin, we confirmed that the zones located close upstream (pre-valve zones) and above lymphatic valves (valve zones) possess the lowest investiture of lymphatic muscle cells. Most of the high muscle cells investiture zones exist downstream to the lymphatic valve (post-valve zones). The muscle cells investiture of these zones is not affected by aging, while pre-valve and valve zones demonstrate significant aging-associated decrease in muscle cells investiture. The low muscle cells investiture zones in lymphatic vessels consist of predominantly longitudinally oriented muscle cells which are positioned in pre-valve and valve zones and connect adjacent lymphangions. These cells may provide important functional impact on the biomechanics of the lymphatic valve gating and electrical coupling between lymphangions, while their aging-associated changes may delimit adaptive reserves of aged lymphatic vessels.

  10. Single cell morphology of muscle in patients with chronic muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Bartels, E M; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1991-01-01

    In 119 patients referred with suspected fibromyalgia, biopsies from the quadriceps muscle were analyzed for "rubber band" morphology, and isokinetic quadriceps strength was measured. Eighty-four fulfilled the criteria for fibromyalgia, 26 had chronic myofascial pain (CMP) and 9 had other diseases...... in biopsy score was found between the two matched groups (P = 0.003); median biopsy score in fibromyalgia was 0.42 and 0.25 in CMP. A cut-off value at 0.33 gave a specificity of 71% and a sensitivity of 63%. Isokinetic muscle strength did not differ in the fibromyalgia and CMP groups and was not related...

  11. Thrombospondin-2 gene silencing in human aortic smooth muscle cells improves cell attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shunsuke; Nabzdyk, Christoph S; Pradhan, Leena; LoGerfo, Frank W

    2011-11-01

    Despite decades of research, anastomotic intimal hyperplasia remains a major cause of delayed prosthetic arterial graft failure. Previously, we reported profound upregulation of thrombospondin-2 (TSP-2) mRNA in neointimal smooth muscle cells after prosthetic arterial bypass graft placement. TSP-2 is an antiangiogenic matricellular protein with specific functions yet unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that inhibition of TSP-2 in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs) would reduce cell proliferation and migration in vitro, providing a therapeutic target to mitigate intimal hyperplasia. HAoSMCs were transfected with TSP-2 small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) using a commercial transfection reagent. Gene silencing was evaluated using semiquantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. ELISA was used to measure TSP-2 protein levels in cell culture supernatants. Cell migration and proliferation were assessed using scratch wound assays and alamar blue assays, respectively. Attachment assays were performed to assess the effect of TSP-2 silencing on HAoSMC adhesion to fibronectin. TSP-2 siRNA achieved consistent target gene silencing at 48 hours post-transfection in HAoSMCs. This single transfection allowed suppression of TSP-2 protein expression for more than 30 days. TSP-2 gene silencing did not affect HAoSMC migration or proliferation. MMP-2 levels were also unaffected by changes in TSP-2 protein levels. However, HAoSMC attachment to fibronectin improved significantly in cells treated with TSP-2 siRNA. siRNA-mediated TSP-2 silencing of human aortic HAoSMCs improved cell attachment but had no effect on cell migration or proliferation. The effect on cell attachment was unrelated to changes in MMP activity. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Brun

    Full Text Available The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1-2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2, transgelin (TAGLN, calponin (CNN1, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11 according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion

  13. The PERK arm of the unfolded protein response regulates satellite cell-mediated skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M; Mann, Aman K; Gallot, Yann S; Bohnert, Kyle R; Cavener, Douglas R; Whittemore, Scott R; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-03-23

    Regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults is mediated by satellite stem cells. Accumulation of misfolded proteins triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress that leads to unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is relayed to the cell through the activation of PERK, IRE1/XBP1, and ATF6. Here, we demonstrate that levels of PERK and IRE1 are increased in satellite cells upon muscle injury. Inhibition of PERK, but not the IRE1 arm of the UPR in satellite cells inhibits myofiber regeneration in adult mice. PERK is essential for the survival and differentiation of activated satellite cells into the myogenic lineage. Deletion of PERK causes hyper-activation of p38 MAPK during myogenesis. Blocking p38 MAPK activity improves the survival and differentiation of PERK-deficient satellite cells in vitro and muscle formation in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that the PERK arm of the UPR plays a pivotal role in the regulation of satellite cell homeostasis during regenerative myogenesis.

  14. Heterogeneity of smooth muscle cells in tunica media of aorta in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of the characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells is important in understanding physicomechanical properties, functions, mechanisms of development, remodelling, regeneration of blood vessels, development and progression of their diseases like atherosclerosis. As the latter diseases become more ...

  15. Pharmacological interference of vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy induced by glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, C; Vallejo, S; Nevado, J; Angulo, J; Llergo, J L; Cercas, E; Rodríguez-Mañas, L; Sánchez-Ferrer, C F

    1999-12-15

    Nonenzymatically glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin induces vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy by releasing reactive oxygen species. We analysed the ability of drugs with antihypertrophic properties for the vascular wall and/or antioxidant activity, such as captopril, losartan, and nifedipine, or gliclazide, carvedilol, and ascorbic acid, to interfere with 10 nM glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin-induced increase in vascular smooth muscle cell size (118+/-0.5% of basal). Vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy was abolished concentration-dependently, with pD(2) values over a 100-fold interval: 6.4+/-0.3, 7.7+/-0.4, 7.3+/-0.4, 7.4+/-0.6, 8. 8+/-0.2, and 9.0+/-0.2 for captopril, losartan, nifedipine, ascorbic acid, carvedilol and gliclazide, respectively. Drugs with powerful antioxidant properties, especially carvedilol and gliclazide, are particularly effective in preventing glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy.

  16. Acute effects of hindlimb unweighting on satellite cells of growing skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Edward; Darr, Kevin C.; Macius, Allison

    1994-01-01

    The proliferative behavior of satellite cells in growing rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles was examined at short periods after initiation of hindlimb unweighting. Mitotic activity of satellite cells in both muscles decreased below weight-bearing control levels within 24 h of initiation of hindlimb unweighting. This satellite cell response was equal to or greater than 48 h before any atrophic morphological changes that take place in the muscles. Suppression of mitotic activity was most severe in the soleus muscle where continuous infusion of label demonstrated that virtually all mitotic activity was abolished between 3 and 5 days. The results of this study suggest that satellite cell mitotic activity is a sensitive indicator of primary atrophic changes occurring in growing myofibers and may be a predictor of future morphological changes.

  17. CD98 regulates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Yvonne; McCurdy, Sara; Alcala, Martin; Mehta, Nehal; Lee, Bog-Hieu; Ginsberg, Mark H; Boisvert, William A

    2017-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) migrate and proliferate to form a stabilizing fibrous cap that encapsulates atherosclerotic plaques. CD98 is a transmembrane protein made of two subunits, CD98 heavy chain (CD98hc) and one of six light chains, and is known to be involved in cell proliferation and survival. Because the influence of CD98hc on atherosclerosis development is unknown, our aim was to determine if CD98hc expressed on VSMC plays a role in shaping the morphology of atherosclerotic plaques by regulating VSMC function. In addition to determining the role of CD98hc in VSMC proliferation and apoptosis, we utilized mice with SMC-specific deletion of CD98hc (CD98hc(fl/fl)SM22αCre(+)) to determine the effects of CD98hc deficiency on VSMC function in atherosclerotic plaque. After culturing for 5 days in vitro, CD98hc(-/-) VSMC displayed dramatically reduced cell counts, reduced proliferation, as well as reduced migration compared to control VSMC. Analysis of aortic VSCM after 8 weeks of HFD showed a reduction in CD98hc(-/-) VSMC proliferation as well as increased apoptosis compared to controls. A long-term atherosclerosis study using SMC-CD98hc(-/-)/ldlr(-/-) mice was performed. Although total plaque area was unchanged, CD98hc(-/-) mice showed reduced presence of VSMC within the plaque (2.1 ± 0.4% vs. 4.3 ± 0.4% SM22α-positive area per plaque area, p < 0.05), decreased collagen content, as well as increased necrotic core area (25.8 ± 1.9% vs. 10.9 ± 1.6%, p < 0.05) compared to control ldlr(-/-) mice. We conclude that CD98hc is required for VSMC proliferation, and that its deficiency leads to significantly reduced presence of VSMC in the neointima. Thus, CD98hc expression in VSMC contributes to the formation of plaques that are morphologically more stable, and thereby protects against atherothrombosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Human Galectin-3 Promotes Trypanosoma cruzi Adhesion to Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kleshchenko, Yuliya Y.; Moody, Tapria N.; Furtak, Vyacheslav A.; Ochieng, Josiah; Lima, Maria F.; Villalta, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    Human galectin-3 binds to the surface of Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes and human coronary artery smooth muscle (CASM) cells. CASM cells express galectin-3 on their surface and secrete it. Exogenous galectin-3 increased the binding of T. cruzi to CASM cells. Trypanosome binding to CASM cells was enhanced when either T. cruzi or CASM cells were preincubated with galectin-3. Cells stably transfected with galectin-3 antisense show a dramatic decrease in galectin-3 expression and very little T...

  19. Identification of a new stem cell population that generates Drosophila flight muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunage, Rajesh D; Reichert, Heinrich; VijayRaghavan, K

    2014-08-18

    How myoblast populations are regulated for the formation of muscles of different sizes is an essentially unanswered question. The large flight muscles of Drosophila develop from adult muscle progenitor (AMP) cells set-aside embryonically. The thoracic segments are all allotted the same small AMP number, while those associated with the wing-disc proliferate extensively to give rise to over 2500 myoblasts. An initial amplification occurs through symmetric divisions and is followed by a switch to asymmetric divisions in which the AMPs self-renew and generate post-mitotic myoblasts. Notch signaling controls the initial amplification of AMPs, while the switch to asymmetric division additionally requires Wingless, which regulates Numb expression in the AMP lineage. In both cases, the epidermal tissue of the wing imaginal disc acts as a niche expressing the ligands Serrate and Wingless. The disc-associated AMPs are a novel muscle stem cell population that orchestrates the early phases of adult flight muscle development.

  20. Xin-deficient mice display myopathy, impaired contractility, attenuated muscle repair and altered satellite cell functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sajee, D; Nissar, A A; Coleman, S K; Rebalka, I A; Chiang, A; Wathra, R; van der Ven, P F M; Orfanos, Z; Hawke, T J

    2015-06-01

    Xin is an F-actin-binding protein expressed during development of cardiac and skeletal muscle. We used Xin-/- mice to determine the impact of Xin deficiency on different aspects of skeletal muscle health, including functionality and regeneration. Xin-/- skeletal muscles and their satellite cell (SC) population were investigated for the presence of myopathic changes by a series of histological and immunofluorescent stains on resting uninjured muscles. To further understand the effect of Xin loss on muscle health and its SCs, we studied SCs responses following cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury. Functional data were determined using in situ muscle stimulation protocol. Compared to age-matched wild-type (WT), Xin-/- muscles exhibited generalized myopathy and increased fatigability with a significantly decreased force recovery post-fatiguing contractions. Muscle regeneration was attenuated in Xin-/- mice. This impaired regeneration prompted an investigation into SC content and functionality. Although SC content was not different, significantly more activated SCs were present in Xin-/- vs. WT muscles. Primary Xin-/- myoblasts displayed significant reductions (approx. 50%) in proliferative capacity vs. WT; a finding corroborated by significantly decreased MyoD-positive nuclei in 3 days post-injury Xin-/- muscle vs. WT. As more activated SCs did not translate to more proliferating myoblasts, we investigated whether Xin-/- SCs displayed an exaggerated loss by apoptosis. More apoptotic SCs (TUNEL+/Pax7+) were present in Xin-/- muscle vs. WT. Furthermore, more Xin-/- myoblasts were expressing nuclear caspase-3 compared to WT at 3 days post-injury. Xin deficiency leads to a myopathic condition characterized by increased muscle fatigability, impaired regeneration and SC dysfunction. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  2. Regulation of motility of myogenic cells in filling limb muscle anlagen by Pitx2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L Campbell

    Full Text Available Cells of the ventrolateral dermomyotome delaminate and migrate into the limb buds where they give rise to all muscles of the limbs. The migratory cells proliferate and form myoblasts, which withdraw from the cell cycle to become terminally differentiated myocytes. The myogenic lineage colonizes pre-patterned regions to form muscle anlagen as muscle fibers are assembled. The regulatory mechanisms that control the later steps of this myogenic program are not well understood. The homeodomain transcription factor Pitx2 is expressed specifically in the muscle lineage from the migration of precursors to adult muscle. Ablation of Pitx2 results in distortion, rather than loss, of limb muscle anlagen, suggesting that its function becomes critical during the colonization of, and/or fiber assembly in, the anlagen. Microarrays were used to identify changes in gene expression in flow-sorted migratory muscle precursors, labeled by Lbx1(EGFP/+, which resulted from the loss of Pitx2. Very few genes showed changes in expression. Many small-fold, yet significant, changes were observed in genes encoding cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins which play a role in cell motility. Myogenic cells from genetically-tagged mice were cultured and subjected to live cell-tracking analysis using time-lapse imaging. Myogenic cells lacking Pitx2 were smaller, more symmetrical, and had more actin bundling. They also migrated about half of the total distance and velocity. Decreased motility may prevent myogenic cells from filling pre-patterned regions of the limb bud in a timely manner. Altered shape may prevent proper assembly of higher-order fibers within anlagen. Pitx2 therefore appears to regulate muscle anlagen development by appropriately balancing expression of cytoskeletal and adhesion molecules.

  3. Applications of calcium electroporation to effective apoptosis induction in fibrosarcoma cells and stimulation of normal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielichowska, Anna; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Saczko, Jolanta; Michel, Olga; Kulbacka, Julita

    2016-06-01

    The electroporation (EP) supports various types of anticancer therapies by the selective transport of cytostatics. Increase in intracellular calcium level by EP may be a new approach to fibrosarcoma treatment. Calcium is one of the most important factors of cell proliferation, differentiation and cell death (apoptosis or necrosis). Calcium level balanced by electroporation can cause different effects on normal and pathological cells. The efficiency and safety of electroporation combined with Ca(2+) ions were examined in our study. The two muscle cell lines were used: normal rat skeletal muscle cells - L6 and cancer muscle cells - Wehi-164 (fibrosarcoma). Two CaCl2 concentrations were tested: 0.5 mM and 5 mM combined with EP parameters: 1000 V/cm, 1200 V/cm, and 1500 V/cm. The results show that EP supported by Ca(2+) is cytotoxic for Wehi-164 cells and simultaneously safe for normal muscle cells. The main type of cell death - apoptosis - was confirmed by Tunnel and Annexin V/PI assay. Additionally, sPLA2 pro-tumorigenic influence was proved by immunocytochemistry. Moreover, EP with 0.5 mM of Ca(2+) slightly stimulates the normal muscle cells - L6 to increase proliferation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of heart muscle-cell diversity: a help or a hindrance for phenotyping embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijnvandraat, Arnoud C.; Lekanne Deprez, Ronald H.; Moorman, Antoon F. M.

    2003-01-01

    Despite the advances in cardiovascular treatment, cardiac disease remains a major cause of morbidity in all industrialized countries. The extraordinary potential of (embryonic) stem cells for therapeutic purposes has revolutionized ideas about cardiac repair of diseased cardiac muscle to exciting

  5. Neutrophil mediated smooth muscle cell loss precedes allograft vasculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Timothy DG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (AV is a pathological process of vascular remodeling leading to late graft loss following cardiac transplantation. While there is consensus that AV is alloimmune mediated, and evidence that the most important alloimmune target is medial smooth muscle cells (SMC, the role of the innate immune response in the initiation of this disease is still being elucidated. As ischemia reperfusion (IR injury plays a pivotal role in the initiation of AV, we hypothesize that IR enhances the early innate response to cardiac allografts. Methods Aortic transplants were performed between fully disparate mouse strains (C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6, in the presence of therapeutic levels of Cyclosporine A, as a model for cardiac AV. Neutrophils were depleted from some recipients using anti-PMN serum. Grafts were harvested at 1,2,3,5d and 1,2wk post-transplant. Ultrastructural integrity was examined by transmission electron microscopy. SMC and neutrophils were quantified from histological sections in a blinded manner. Results Grafts exposed to cold ischemia, but not transplanted, showed no medial SMC loss and normal ultrastructural integrity. In comparison, allografts harvested 1d post-transplant exhibited > 90% loss of SMC (p Conclusions These novel data show that there is extensive damage to medial SMC at 1d post-transplant. By depleting neutrophils from recipients it was demonstrated that a portion of the SMC loss was mediated by neutrophils. These results provide evidence that IR activation of early innate events contributes to the etiology of AV.

  6. Functional deltoid muscle reconstruction following an extensive squamous cell carcinoma resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Weng Jun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma frequently occurs in an individual with albinism. In this case, the growth of the squamous cell carcinoma was aggressive that it invaded the deltoid muscle. After an oncologic resection, there was a huge defect which required near total resection of the deltoid muscle. Loss of deltoid muscle will lead to the loss of abduction and anterior flexion at the shoulder. This could be debilitating in a person’s normal daily life and activities. Restoration of the shoulder abduction and flexion function with a pedicle bipolar latissimus dorsi flap transfer was chosen in this case due to the versatility and reliability of the flap.

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  8. Single-cell sequencing analysis characterizes common and cell-lineage-specific mutations in a muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Xu, Xun; Song, Luting

    2012-01-01

    sequencing of 66 individual tumor cells from a muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Analyses of the somatic mutant allele frequency spectrum and clonal structure revealed that the tumor cells were derived from a single ancestral cell, but that subsequent evolution occurred, leading...... to two distinct tumor cell subpopulations. By analyzing recurrently mutant genes in an additional cohort of 99 TCC tumors, we identified genes that might play roles in the maintenance of the ancestral clone and in the muscle-invasive capability of subclones of this bladder cancer, respectively...

  9. Differential Gene Expression Profiling of Dystrophic Dog Muscle after MuStem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babarit, Candice; Larcher, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Leroux, Isabelle; Zuber, Céline; Ledevin, Mireille; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Fromes, Yves; Cherel, Yan; Guevel, Laetitia; Rouger, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background Several adult stem cell populations exhibit myogenic regenerative potential, thus representing attractive candidates for therapeutic approaches of neuromuscular diseases such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). We have recently shown that systemic delivery of MuStem cells, skeletal muscle-resident stem cells isolated in healthy dog, generates the remodelling of muscle tissue and gives rise to striking clinical benefits in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog. This global effect, which is observed in the clinically relevant DMD animal model, leads us to question here the molecular pathways that are impacted by MuStem cell transplantation. To address this issue, we compare the global gene expression profile between healthy, GRMD and MuStem cell treated GRMD dog muscle, four months after allogenic MuStem cell transplantation. Results In the dystrophic context of the GRMD dog, disease-related deregulation is observed in the case of 282 genes related to various processes such as inflammatory response, regeneration, calcium ion binding, extracellular matrix organization, metabolism and apoptosis regulation. Importantly, we reveal the impact of MuStem cell transplantation on several molecular and cellular pathways based on a selection of 31 genes displaying signals specifically modulated by the treatment. Concomitant with a diffuse dystrophin expression, a histological remodelling and a stabilization of GRMD dog clinical status, we show that cell delivery is associated with an up-regulation of genes reflecting a sustained enhancement of muscle regeneration. We also identify a decreased mRNA expression of a set of genes having metabolic functions associated with lipid homeostasis and energy. Interestingly, ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is highly enhanced in GRMD dog muscle after systemic delivery of MuStem cells. Conclusions Overall, our results provide the first high-throughput characterization of GRMD dog muscle and throw new light on the

  10. Differential Gene Expression Profiling of Dystrophic Dog Muscle after MuStem Cell Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Robriquet

    Full Text Available Several adult stem cell populations exhibit myogenic regenerative potential, thus representing attractive candidates for therapeutic approaches of neuromuscular diseases such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD. We have recently shown that systemic delivery of MuStem cells, skeletal muscle-resident stem cells isolated in healthy dog, generates the remodelling of muscle tissue and gives rise to striking clinical benefits in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD dog. This global effect, which is observed in the clinically relevant DMD animal model, leads us to question here the molecular pathways that are impacted by MuStem cell transplantation. To address this issue, we compare the global gene expression profile between healthy, GRMD and MuStem cell treated GRMD dog muscle, four months after allogenic MuStem cell transplantation.In the dystrophic context of the GRMD dog, disease-related deregulation is observed in the case of 282 genes related to various processes such as inflammatory response, regeneration, calcium ion binding, extracellular matrix organization, metabolism and apoptosis regulation. Importantly, we reveal the impact of MuStem cell transplantation on several molecular and cellular pathways based on a selection of 31 genes displaying signals specifically modulated by the treatment. Concomitant with a diffuse dystrophin expression, a histological remodelling and a stabilization of GRMD dog clinical status, we show that cell delivery is associated with an up-regulation of genes reflecting a sustained enhancement of muscle regeneration. We also identify a decreased mRNA expression of a set of genes having metabolic functions associated with lipid homeostasis and energy. Interestingly, ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is highly enhanced in GRMD dog muscle after systemic delivery of MuStem cells.Overall, our results provide the first high-throughput characterization of GRMD dog muscle and throw new light on the complex

  11. Clonal derivation of a rat muscle cell strain that forms contraction-competent myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, G F

    1989-05-01

    A muscle cell strain capable of forming contracting myotubes was isolated from an established rat embryo cell line. The myogenic cells, termed rat myoblast omega or RMo cells, have a diploid complement of chromosomes (n = 42). In the presence of mitogen-containing growth medium, RMo cells proliferated with a cell generation time of about 12 hours. In mitogen-depleted medium, RMo cells withdrew from the cell cycle and formed myotubes that spontaneously contracted. Differentiated RMo cells produced creatine kinase isozymes in a ratio characteristic of skeletal muscle cells. RMo cells were easy to cultivate. Cells proliferated and differentiated equally well on gelatin-coated or noncoated culture dishes, at clonal or mass culture densities, and in all basal media tested. In most experiments, growth medium consisted of horse serum-containing medium supplemented with either chicken embryo extract or FGF activity; cells proliferated equally well in medium containing unsupplemented calf serum. RMo cells differentiated if growth medium was not replenished regularly. Alternatively, differentiation was induceable by incubation in mitogen-depleted medium consisting of basal medium supplemented either with 10(-6) M insulin, 0.5% serum, or 50% conditioned growth medium. RMo cells were competently transformed with cloned exogenous genes. Because it forms functional myofibrils, the RMo cell line constitutes a useful model system for studying the cell biology and biochemistry of proteins involved in contractile apparatus assembly and muscle disease.

  12. Impaired energy metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martín A; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal aging. Adult muscle stem cell (or satellite cell) replication and differentiation is compromised with age contributing to sarcopenia. However, the molecular events related to satellite cell dysfunction during aging are not...

  13. Trophic Actions of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Muscle Repair/Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Formigli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs represent the leading candidate cell in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. These cells can be easily isolated, expanded in vitro and are capable of providing significant functional benefits after implantation in the damaged muscle tissues. Despite their plasticity, the participation of BM-MSCs to new muscle fiber formation is controversial; in fact, emerging evidence indicates that their therapeutic effects occur without signs of long-term tissue engraftment and involve the paracrine secretion of cytokines and growth factors with multiple effects on the injured tissue, including modulation of inflammation and immune reaction, positive extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling, angiogenesis and protection from apoptosis. Recently, a new role for BM-MSCs in the stimulation of muscle progenitor cells proliferation has been demonstrated, suggesting the potential ability of these cells to influence the fate of local stem cells and augment the endogenous mechanisms of repair/regeneration in the damaged tissues.

  14. Further characterisation of the molecular signature of quiescent and activated mouse muscle satellite cells.

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    Viola F Gnocchi

    Full Text Available Satellite cells are the resident stem cells of adult skeletal muscle. To date though, there is a paucity of native markers that can be used to easily identify quiescent satellite cells, with Pax7 probably being the best that is currently available. Here we have further characterized a number of recently described satellite cell markers, and also describe novel ones. Caveolin-1, integrin alpha7 and the calcitonin receptor proved reliable markers for quiescent satellite cells, being expressed by all satellite cells identified with Pax7. These three markers remained expressed as satellite cells were activated and underwent proliferation. The nuclear envelope proteins lamin A/C and emerin, mutations in which underlie Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, were also expressed in both quiescent and proliferating satellite cells. Conversely, Jagged-1, a Notch ligand, was not expressed in quiescent satellite cells but was induced upon activation. These findings further contribute to defining the molecular signature of muscle satellite cells.

  15. Regulatory T cells suppress muscle inflammation and injury in muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalta, S. Armando; Rosenthal, Wendy; Martinez, Leonel; Kaur, Amanjot; Sparwasser, Tim; Tidball, James G.; Margeta, Marta; Spencer, Melissa J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate muscle injury and inflammation in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although Tregs were largely absent in the muscle of wildtype mice and normal human muscle, they were present in necrotic lesions, displayed an activated phenotype and showed increased expression of interleukin (IL)-10 in dystrophic muscle from mdx mice. Depletion of Tregs exacerbated muscle injury and the severity of muscle inflammation, which was characterized by an enhanced interferon-gamma (IFNγ) response and activation of M1 macrophages. To test the therapeutic value of targeting Tregs in muscular dystrophy, we treated mdx mice with IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes (IL-2c), and found that Tregs and IL-10 concentrations were increased in muscle, resulting in reduced expression of cyclooygenase-2 and decreased myofiber injury. These findings suggest that Tregs modulate the progression of muscular dystrophy by suppressing type 1 inflammation in muscle associated with muscle fiber injury, and highlight the potential of Treg-modulating agents as therapeutics for DMD. PMID:25320234

  16. Effects of Urotensin II and Its Specific Receptor Antagonist Urantide on Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

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    Juan Zhao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of urantide, a receptor antagonist of urotensin II (U-II, on the expression of U-II and its receptor GPR14 in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Vascular smooth muscle cells from rat thoracic aorta were cultured by explant method. Subjects in this experiment were divided into eight groups: normal control group (group C, U-II group (group M, positive control group (Flu group and urantide-treated groups (10-10, 10-9, 10-8, 10-7 and 10-6 mol/L. Cultured vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro were studied by immunocytochemistry, biochemistry, and flow cytometry. U-II (10-8 mol/L promoted the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells at each time point, influenced cell cycle, increased proliferation index and S-phase cell fraction, and dramatically promoted the expression of U-II and GPR14. In the concentration range from 10-10 to 10-6 mol/L, urantide dramatically inhibited the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and the protein expression of U-II and GPR14, especially at a concentration of 10-6 mol/L. U-II, binding with its receptor GPR14, promotes vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration, which can be inhibited by urantide. This study provides an evidence for understanding the effects of U-II and its receptor GPR14 on vascular smooth muscle cells.

  17. Expression of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein Beta in Muscle Satellite Cells Inhibits Myogenesis in Cancer Cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    François Marchildon; Émilie Lamarche; Neena Lala-Tabbert; Catherine St-Louis; Nadine Wiper-Bergeron

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a paraneoplastic syndrome that causes profound weight loss and muscle mass atrophy and is estimated to be the cause of up to 30% of cancer deaths. Though the exact cause is unknown, patients with cancer cachexia have increased muscle protein catabolism. In healthy muscle, injury activates skeletal muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, to differentiate and promote regeneration. Here, we provide evidence that this mechanism is inhibited in cancer cachexia due to persiste...

  18. THE ROLE OF SATELLITE CELLS IN CRUSH INJURY OF RAT SKELETON MUSCLE

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    DilekBURUKOĞLU

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The crush type of injury in rat skeletal muscle is often used in tissue degeneration and regeneration. After crush injury muscle tissue begins to regenerate. In this process, it is accepted that satellite cells play an important role which are very sensitive to muscle injury. The aim of this microscopic study was to examine role of satellite cells in muscle regeneration in crush injury. This research was done the department of Histology&Embryology in Eskişehir Osmangazi University in 2008. Ethic approval of this study has been received. During the study, the whole essential and ethics conditionshave been done. In the study 36 Spraque-Dawley rats were used. The rats were separated into 5 groups as test and control groups. Crush type of injury has been applied on muscles of right hind extremitiesof testing group rats by applying 3.5 kg of weight for 6 hours. In according to testing periods rats were anaesthetized intraperitoneally with ketamine 30mg/kg + xylazine 10mg/kg and sacrificied 3, 7, 14 and 21-day intervals. After crush injury, increased satellite cells were particularly observed on day 7. Alsosignificant increased of satellite cells and regenerated myofibrils were detected on day 14. However, satellite cells were seen on day-21 were similar to control group. In crush injuries, number of satellitecells were markedly increased and actively involved into regeneration process of the skeleton muscle.

  19. Preventive Effects of Poloxamer 188 on Muscle Cell Damage Mechanics Under Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sing Wan; Yao, Yifei; Hong, Ye; Ma, Zhiyao; Kok, Stanton H L; Sun, Shan; Cho, Michael; Lee, Kenneth K H; Mak, Arthur F T

    2017-04-01

    High oxidative stress can occur during ischemic reperfusion and chronic inflammation. It has been hypothesized that such oxidative challenges could contribute to clinical risks such as deep tissue pressure ulcers. Skeletal muscles can be challenged by inflammation-induced or reperfusion-induced oxidative stress. Oxidative stress reportedly can lower the compressive damage threshold of skeletal muscles cells, causing actin filament depolymerization, and reduce membrane sealing ability. Skeletal muscles thus become easier to be damaged by mechanical loading under prolonged oxidative exposure. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of poloxamer 188 (P188) on skeletal muscle cells against extrinsic oxidative challenges (H2O2). It was found that with 1 mM P188 pre-treatment for 1 h, skeletal muscle cells could maintain their compressive damage threshold. The actin polymerization dynamics largely remained stable in term of the expression of cofilin, thymosin beta 4 and profilin. Laser photoporation demonstrated that membrane sealing ability was preserved even as the cells were challenged by H2O2. These findings suggest that P188 pre-treatment can help skeletal muscle cells retain their normal mechanical integrity in oxidative environments, adding a potential clinical use of P188 against the combined challenge of mechanical-oxidative stresses. Such effect may help to prevent deep tissue ulcer development.

  20. Single cell morphology of muscle in patients with chronic muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Bartels, E M; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1991-01-01

    In 119 patients referred with suspected fibromyalgia, biopsies from the quadriceps muscle were analyzed for "rubber band" morphology, and isokinetic quadriceps strength was measured. Eighty-four fulfilled the criteria for fibromyalgia, 26 had chronic myofascial pain (CMP) and 9 had other diseases...... to the biopsy score. "Rubber band" morphology is seen more often in fibromyalgia patients than in CMP patients. The exact genesis of this phenomenon is still unknown but theories connected with the possible pathogenesis of the syndrome are presented....

  1. Atrophy, fibrosis, and increased PAX7-positive cells in pharyngeal muscles of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidaro, Teresa; Negroni, Elisa; Perié, Sophie; Mirabella, Massimiliano; Lainé, Jeanne; Lacau St Guily, Jean; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent; Trollet, Capucine

    2013-03-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset autosomal dominant inherited dystrophy caused by an abnormal trinucleotide repeat expansion in the poly(A)-binding-protein-nuclear 1 (PABPN1) gene. Primary muscular targets of OPMD are the eyelid elevator and pharyngeal muscles, including the cricopharyngeal muscle (CPM), the progressive involution of which leads to ptosis and dysphagia, respectively. To understand the consequences of PABPN1 polyalanine expansion in OPMD, we studied muscle biopsies from 14 OPMD patients, 3 inclusion body myositis patients, and 9 healthy controls. In OPMD patient CPM (n = 6), there were typical dystrophic features with extensive endomysial fibrosis and marked atrophy of myosin heavy-chain IIa fibers. There were more PAX7-positive cells in all CPM versus other muscles (n = 5, control; n = 3, inclusion body myositis), and they were more numerous in OPMD CPM versus control normal CPM without any sign of muscle regeneration. Intranuclear inclusions were present in all OPMD muscles but unaffected OPMD patient muscles (i.e. sternocleidomastoid, quadriceps, or deltoid; n = 14) did not show evidence of fibrosis, atrophy, or increased PAX7-positive cell numbers. These results suggest that the specific involvement of CPM in OPMD might be caused by failure of the regenerative response with dysfunction of PAX7-positive cells and exacerbated fibrosis that does not correlate with the presence of PABPN1 inclusions.

  2. Expression of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor mRNA in Mouse C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cells

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    Jung Hun Ohn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe analyzed whether thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-R is expressed in a skeletal muscle cell line and if TSH has influence on the differentiation of muscle cells or on the determination of muscle fiber types.MethodsTSH-R gene expression was detected with nested real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in C2C12, a mouse skeletal muscle cell line. The effect of TSH on myotube differentiation was assessed by microscopic examination of myotube formation and through the measurement of expression of muscle differentiation markers, i.e., myogenin and myoD, and muscle type-specific genes, i.e., MyHC1, MyHC2a, and MyHC2b, with quantitative RT-PCR before and after incubation of C2C12 myotube with TSH.ResultsTSH-R was expressed in the mouse skeletal muscle cell line. However, treatment with TSH had little effect on the differentiation of muscle cells, although the expression of the muscle differention marker myogenin was significantly increased after TSH treatment. Treatment of TSH did not affect the expression of muscle type-specific genes.ConclusionTSH-R is expressed in a mouse skeletal muscle cell line, but the role of TSH receptor signaling in skeletal muscle needs further investigation.

  3. Differential requirement for satellite cells during overload-induced muscle hypertrophy in growing versus mature mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Kevin A; White, Sarah H; Wen, Yuan; Ho, Angel; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2017-07-10

    Pax7+ satellite cells are required for skeletal muscle fiber growth during post-natal development in mice. Satellite cell-mediated myonuclear accretion also appears to persist into early adulthood. Given the important role of satellite cells during muscle development, we hypothesized that the necessity of satellite cells for adaptation to an imposed hypertrophic stimulus depends on maturational age. Pax7(CreER)-R26R(DTA) mice were treated for 5 days with vehicle (satellite cell-replete, SC+) or tamoxifen (satellite cell-depleted, SC-) at 2 months (young) and 4 months (mature) of age. Following a 2-week washout, mice were subjected to sham surgery or 10 day synergist ablation overload of the plantaris (n = 6-9 per group). The surgical approach minimized regeneration, de novo fiber formation, and fiber splitting while promoting muscle fiber growth. Satellite cell density (Pax7+ cells/fiber), embryonic myosin heavy chain expression (eMyHC), and muscle fiber cross sectional area (CSA) were evaluated via immunohistochemistry. Myonuclei (myonuclei/100 mm) were counted on isolated single muscle fibers. Tamoxifen treatment depleted satellite cells by ≥90% and prevented myonuclear accretion with overload in young and mature mice (p Satellite cells did not recover in SC- mice after overload. Average muscle fiber CSA increased ~20% in young SC+ (p = 0.07), mature SC+ (p satellite cells for overload-induced hypertrophy is dependent on maturational age, and global responses to overload differ in young versus mature mice.

  4. The Effects of Environmental Factors on Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and Esophagus Tissues Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fang

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are increasingly being used for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) can be differentiated from ASCs. Oxygen is a key factor influencing the stem cell differentiation. Tissue engineered esophagus has been a preferred solution......) and biochemical factor stimulation on SMCs differentiation were studied. The results showed that combined treatments promoted the late SMC-specific marker smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression. In the third part, the potential for using ASCs to replace SMCs to regenerate the smooth muscle layer...... of esophagus was studied. Our results showed that both SMCs and ASCs could attach on the porcine esophageal acellular matrix (EAM) scaffold in vitro after 24 hours and survive until 7 days. Thus ASCs might be a substitute for SMCs in the construction of tissue engineered esophageal muscle layer....

  5. Variability in Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population in Cultured Chicken Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1998-01-01

    Investigations into expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) in chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture were initiated because several beta-adrenergic receptor agonists are known to increase skeletal muscle protein deposition in avian and mammalian species. During initial attempts to study the bAR population on the surface of chicken skeletal muscle cells, we observed a high degree of variability that was later found to be the result of using different batches of horse serum in the cell culture media. The separation between total binding and nonspecific binding in cells grown in two serum samples was approximately two-fold The number of nuclei within multinucleated myotubes was not significantly different in cells grown in the two serum samples. To investigate whether these two sera had an effect on coupling efficiency between bAR population and cAMP production, the ability of these cells to synthesize cAMP was also assessed. Despite the two-fold difference in receptor population, the ability of these cells to synthesize cAMP was not significantly different. Because of the possible link between bAR population and muscle protein, we also determined if the quantity of the major skeletal muscle protein, myosin, was affected by conditions that so drastically affected the bAR population. The quantity of myosin heavy chain was not significantly different.

  6. Vascular smooth muscle cell spreading onto fibrinogen is regulated by calpains and phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulhe, F; Bogyo, A; Chap, H; Perret, B; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2001-11-09

    Fibrinogen deposition and smooth muscle cell migration are important causes of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. Involvement of calpains in vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion onto fibrinogen was investigated. Using calpain inhibitors, we showed that activation of calpains was required for smooth muscle cell spreading. An increase of (32)P-labeled phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, respective products of phospholipase C and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activities, was measured in adherent cells. Addition of the calpain inhibitor calpeptin strongly decreased phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate. However, smooth muscle cell spreading was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, but poorly modified by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002. Moreover, PLC was found to act upstream of the PI 3-kinase IA isoform. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that calpains are required for smooth muscle cell spreading. Further, phospholipase C activation is pointed as a key step of cell-spreading regulation by calpains. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  7. Microtissues Enhance Smooth Muscle Differentiation and Cell Viability of hADSCs for Three Dimensional Bioprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yipeng, Jin; Yongde, Xu; Yuanyi, Wu; Jilei, Sun; Jiaxiang, Guo; Jiangping, Gao; Yong, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Smooth muscle differentiated human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs) provide a crucial stem cell source for urinary tissue engineering, but the induction of hADSCs for smooth muscle differentiation still has several issues to overcome, including a relatively long induction time and equipment dependence, which limits access to abundant stem cells within a short period of time for further application. Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting holds great promise in regenerative medicine due to its controllable construction of a designed 3D structure. When evenly mixed with bioink, stem cells can be spatially distributed within a bioprinted 3D structure, thus avoiding drawbacks such as, stem cell detachment in a conventional cell-scaffold strategy. Notwithstanding the advantages mentioned above, cell viability is often compromised during 3D bioprinting, which is often due to pressure during the bioprinting process. The objective of our study was to improve the efficiency of hADSC smooth muscle differentiation and cell viability of a 3D bioprinted structure. Here, we employed the hanging-drop method to generate hADSC microtissues in a smooth muscle inductive medium containing human transforming growth factor β1 and bioprinted the induced microtissues onto a 3D structure. After 3 days of smooth muscle induction, the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and smoothelin was higher in microtissues than in their counterpart monolayer cultured hADSCs, as confirmed by immunofluorescence and western blotting analysis. The semi-quantitative assay showed that the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was 0.218 ± 0.077 in MTs and 0.082 ± 0.007 in Controls; smoothelin expression was 0.319 ± 0.02 in MTs and 0.178 ± 0.06 in Controls. Induced MTs maintained their phenotype after the bioprinting process. Live/dead and cell count kit 8 assays showed that cell viability and cell proliferation in the 3D structure printed with microtissues were higher at all time points compared to

  8. Effects of metal ions on proliferation of aortic smooth muscle cells and myoblastic cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorpahl, M.; Wiemann, M.; Bingmann, D. [Essen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologie; Brauer, H. [Werkstofftechnik, Univ. Essen (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    Metal ions released from implanted stents into the surrounding tissue may contribute to vascular reactions which cause restenosis in about 30%. This assumption prompted us to investigate short term effects of metal ions (Ag, Al, Cr, Fe, Mo, Ni, V, all applied as chloride salts) on proliferation of swine aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and a myoblastic cell line (C2C12). Cell confluence was 30 or 50% when metal ions were added and cell growth was monitored with the MTT-test after 2 days. A clear concentration dependence of acute toxicity of the different metal ions was found for both cell types. The order of toxicity indicated by IC50 values was V > Ni > Fe > Mo > Al > Cr. The nearly insoluble silverchloride exerted unclear effects. In experiments starting at high confluence, the apparent toxicity of Fe, Ni, and V was reduced. Al, which to our knowledge is not a major constituent in medical stents, was the only metal ion found here to cause a slightly increased proliferation, but this effect was restricted to the low concentration range (16-250 {mu}mol/l). In general, results for both cell types, C2C12 and SMC, were very similar. We conclude that short term effects of metal ions, which may be released in the interface of stent and vessel wall tissue, comprise a reduction rather than a stimulation of cell proliferation. However, restenosis may be initiated as a complex tissue reaction to primary toxic metal effects. (orig.)

  9. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing Corrects Dystrophin Mutation in Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells in a Mouse Model of Muscle Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Zhu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle stem cells (MuSCs hold great therapeutic potential for muscle genetic disorders, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. The CRISP/Cas9-based genome editing is a promising technology for correcting genetic alterations in mutant genes. In this study, we used fibrin-gel culture system to selectively expand MuSCs from crude skeletal muscle cells of mdx mice, a mouse model of DMD. By CRISP/Cas9-based genome editing, we corrected the dystrophin mutation in expanded MuSCs and restored the skeletal muscle dystrophin expression upon transplantation in mdx mice. Our studies established a reliable and feasible platform for gene correction in MuSCs by genome editing, thus greatly advancing tissue stem cell-based therapies for DMD and other muscle disorders.

  10. Nestin-GFP Transgene Reveals Neural Precursor Cells in Adult Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Enikolopov, Grigori N.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2011-01-01

    Background Therapy for neural lesions or degenerative diseases relies mainly on finding transplantable active precursor cells. Identifying them in peripheral tissues accessible for biopsy, outside the central nervous system, would circumvent the serious immunological and ethical concerns impeding cell therapy. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we isolated neural progenitor cells in cultured adult skeletal muscle from transgenic mice in which nestin regulatory elements control GFP expression. These cells also expressed the early neural marker Tuj1 and light and heavy neurofilament but not S100β, indicating that they express typical neural but not Schwann cell markers. GFP+/Tuj1+ cells were also negative for the endothelial and pericyte markers CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin, respectively. We established their a) functional response to glutamate in patch-clamp recordings; b) interstitial mesenchymal origin; c) replicative capacity; and d) the environment necessary for their survival after fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Conclusions/Significance We propose that the decline in nestin-GFP expression in muscle progenitor cells and its persistence in neural precursor cells in muscle cultures provide an invaluable tool for isolating a population of predifferentiated neural cells with therapeutic potential. PMID:21304812

  11. The significance of muscle cells for the origin of mesoderm in bilateria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Reinhard M; Ladurner, Peter

    2003-02-01

    Muscle tissue may have played a central role in the early evolution of mesoderm. The first function of myocytes could have been to control swimming and gliding motion in ciliated vermiform organisms, as it still is in such present-day basal Bilateria as the Nemertodermatida. The only mesodermal cells between epidermis and gastrodermis in Nemertodermatida are myocytes, and conceivably the myocyte was, in fact, the original mesodermal cell type. In Nemertodermatida as well as the Acoela, myocytes are subepithelial fiber-type muscle cells and appear to originate from the gastrodermal epithelium by emigration of single cells. Other mesodermal cells in the acoels are the peripheral parenchyma (connective tissue) and tunica cells of the gonads, and these also arise from the gastrodermis. Musculature in many of the coelomate protostomes and deuterostomes, on the other hand, is in the form of epitheliomuscular (myoepithelial) cells, and this cell type may also have been an early form of the mesodermal myocyte. The mesodermal bands in the small annelid Polygordius and in juvenile enteropneusts have cells intermediate between mesenchymal and epithelial in their histological organization as they develop into myoepithelia. If acoelomates were derived from coelomates by progenesis, then the fiber-type muscles of acoelomates could be products of foreshortened differentiation of such tissue. The precise serial patterning of circular muscle cells along the anterior-posterior axis during embryonic development in the acoel Convoluta pulchra provides a model for early steps in the gradual evolution of segmentation from iterated organ systems.

  12. Impaired cell surface expression of HLA-B antigens on mesenchymal stem cells and muscle cell progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Nehlin, Jan; Sabir, Hardee Jawad

    2010-01-01

    HLA class-I expression is weak in embryonic stem cells but increases rapidly during lineage progression. It is unknown whether all three classical HLA class-I antigens follow the same developmental program. In the present study, we investigated allele-specific expression of HLA-A, -B, and -C...... at the mRNA and protein levels on human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue as well as striated muscle satellite cells and lymphocytes. Using multicolour flow cytometry, we found high cell surface expression of HLA-A on all stem cells and PBMC examined. Surprisingly, HLA-B was either...... undetectable or very weakly expressed on all stem cells protecting them from complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) using relevant human anti-B and anti-Cw sera. IFNgamma stimulation for 48-72 h was required to induce full HLA-B protein expression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed that IFNgamma induced...

  13. Serum after traumatic brain injury increases proliferation and supports expression of osteoblast markers in muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadosch, Dieter; Toffoli, Andrew M; Gautschi, Oliver P; Frey, Sönke P; Zellweger, René; Skirving, Allan P; Filgueira, Luis

    2010-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury is associated with an increased rate of heterotopic ossification within skeletal muscle, possibly as a result of humoral factors. In this study, we investigated whether cells from skeletal muscle adopt an osteoblastic phenotype in response to serum from patients with traumatic brain injury. Serum was collected from thirteen patients with severe traumatic brain injury, fourteen patients with a long-bone fracture, and ten control subjects. Primary cultures of skeletal muscle cells isolated from patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery were performed and characterized with use of immunofluorescence microscopy, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analysis. Proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation were assessed with use of commercial cell assays, Western blot analysis (for Osterix protein), and the Villanueva bone stain. All serum-treated cell populations expressed the osteoblast marker Osterix after one week in culture. Cells treated with serum from all study groups in mineralization medium had increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodules within the mesenchymal cell subpopulation after three weeks in culture. Serum from patients with traumatic brain injury induced a significant increase (p = 0.02) in the rate of proliferation of primary skeletal muscle cells (1.87 [95% confidence interval, 1.66 to 2.09]) compared with the rate induced by serum from patients with a fracture (1.42 [95% confidence interval, 1.21 to 1.58]) or by serum from controls (1.35 [95% confidence interval, 1.15 to 1.54]). Human serum supports the osteoblastic differentiation of cells derived from human skeletal muscle, and serum from patients with severe traumatic brain injury accelerates proliferation of these cells. These findings suggest the early presence of humoral factors following traumatic brain injury that stimulate the expansion of mesenchymal cells and osteoprogenitors within skeletal muscle.

  14. Capacity of muscle derived stem cells and pericytes to promote tendon graft integration and ligamentization following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćuti, Tomislav; Antunović, Maja; Marijanović, Inga; Ivković, Alan; Vukasović, Andreja; Matić, Igor; Pećina, Marko; Hudetz, Damir

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the capacity of muscle tissue preserved on hamstring tendons forming candy-stripe grafts in order to improve tendon to bone ingrowth and ligamentization. We hypothesized that muscle tissue does possess a stem cell population that could enhance the healing process of the ACL graft when preserved on the tendons. Human samples from gracilis and semitendinosus muscles were collected during ACL surgery from ten patients and from these tissue samples human muscle-derived stem cells and tendon-derived stem cells were isolated and propagated. Both stem cell populations were in-vitro differentiated into osteogenic lineage. Alkaline phosphatase activity was determined at days zero and 14 of the osteogenic induction and von Kossa staining to assess mineralization of the cultures. Total RNA was collected from osteoblast cultures and real time quantitative PCR was performed. Western-blot for osteocalcin and collagen type I followed protein isolation. Immunofluorescence double labeling of pericytes in muscle and tendon tissue was performed. Mesenchymal stem cells from muscle and tendon tissue were isolated and expanded in cell culture. More time was needed to grow the tendon derived culture compared to muscle derived culture. Muscle derived stem cells exhibited more alkaline phosphatase actvity compared to tendon derived stem cells, whereas tendon derived stem cells formed more mineralized nodules after 14 days of osteoinduction. Muscle derived stem cells exhibited higher expression levels of bone sialoprotein, and tendon derived stem cells showed higher expression of dental-matrix-protein 1 and osteocalcin. Immunofluorescent staining against pericytes indicated that they are more abundant in muscle tissue. These results indicate that muscle tissue is a better source of stem cells than tendon tissue. Achievement of this study is proof that there is vast innate capacity of muscle tissue for enhancement of bone-tendon integration and

  15. Transverse propagation of action potentials between parallel chains of cardiac muscle and smooth muscle cells in PSpice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalloor Bijoy

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously examined transverse propagation of action potentials between 2 and 3 parallel chain of cardiac muscle cells (CMC simulated using the PSpice program. The present study was done to examine transverse propagation between 5 parallel chains in an expanded model of CMC and smooth muscle cells (SMC. Methods Excitation was transmitted from cell to cell along a strand of 5 cells not connected by low-resistance tunnels (gap-junction connexons. The entire surface membrane of each cell fired nearly simultaneously, and nearly all the propagation time was spent at the cell junctions, the junctional delay time being about 0.3 – 0.5 ms (CMC or 0.8 – 1.6 ms (SMC. A negative cleft potential (Vjc develops in the narrow junctional clefts, whose magnitude depends on the radial cleft resistance (Rjc, which depolarizes the postjunctional membrane (post-JM to threshold. Propagation velocity (θ increased with amplitude of Vjc. Therefore, one mechanism for the transfer of excitation from one cell to the next is by the electric field (EF that is generated in the junctional cleft when the pre-JM fires. In the present study, 5 parallel stands of 5 cells each (5 × 5 model were used. Results With electrical stimulation of the first cell of the first strand (cell A1, propagation rapidly spread down that chain and then jumped to the second strand (B chain, followed by jumping to the third, fourth, and fifth strands (C, D, E chains. The rapidity by which the parallel chains became activated depended on the longitudinal resistance of the narrow extracellular cleft between the parallel strands (Rol2; the higher the Rol2 resistance, the faster the θ. The transverse resistance of the cleft (Ror2 had almost no effect. Increasing Rjc decreases the total propagation time (TPT over the 25-cell network. When the first cell of the third strand (cell C1 was stimulated, propagation spread down the C chain and jumped to the other two strands (B and D

  16. The expression pattern of PKCtheta in satellite cells of normal and regenerating muscle in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokugawa, Seiji; Sakuma, Kunihiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Hirata, Miyuki; Oda, Ryo; Morisaki, Shinsuke; Yasuhara, Masahiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2009-06-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key enzyme in regulating a variety of cellular functions. PKCtheta is the most abundant PKC isoform expressed in skeletal muscle. However, the functional role of PKCtheta linked to muscle regeneration has not yet been identified. Using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis, we investigated the expression patterns of PKCtheta in normal and regenerating tibialis anterior (TA) muscles in the rat. The amount of PKCtheta mRNA in the muscle increased from the 4th to 6th post-surgical day. Immunofluorescence revealed PKCtheta protein in quiescent satellite cells identified by c-Met. PKCtheta immunoreactivity was not observed in many proliferating satellite cells by labeling with BrdU in the regenerating muscle. At 4, 6 and 10 days postsurgery, PKCtheta immunoreactivity was observed in half the differentiating satellite cells labeling with myogenin. After 4 and 6 days, the localization of PKCtheta coincided with those of Pax7 and TGF-beta. Thus, PKCtheta may play an important role in inhibiting differentiation and maintaining the quiescent satellite cells in muscle regeneration.

  17. Ectopic development of skeletal muscle induced by subcutaneous transplant of rat satellite cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Fukushima

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzes the ectopic development of the rat skeletal muscle originated from transplanted satellite cells. Satellite cells (10(6 cells obtained from hindlimb muscles of newborn female 2BAW Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously into the dorsal area of adult male rats. After 3, 7, and 14 days, the transplanted tissues (N = 4-5 were processed for histochemical analysis of peripheral nerves, inactive X-chromosome and acetylcholinesterase. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs were also labeled with tetramethylrhodamine-labeled alpha-bungarotoxin. The development of ectopic muscles was successful in 86% of the implantation sites. By day 3, the transplanted cells were organized as multinucleated fibers containing multiple clusters of nAChRs (N = 2-4, resembling those from non-innervated cultured skeletal muscle fibers. After 7 days, the transplanted cells appeared as a highly vascularized tissue formed by bundles of fibers containing peripheral nuclei. The presence of X chromatin body indicated that subcutaneously developed fibers originated from female donor satellite cells. Differently from the extensor digitorum longus muscle of adult male rat (87.9 ± 1.0 µm; N = 213, the diameter of ectopic fibers (59.1 µm; N = 213 did not obey a Gaussian distribution and had a higher coefficient of variation. After 7 and 14 days, the organization of the nAChR clusters was similar to that of clusters from adult innervated extensor digitorum longus muscle. These findings indicate the histocompatibility of rats from 2BAW colony and that satellite cells transplanted into the subcutaneous space of adult animals are able to develop and fuse to form differentiated skeletal muscle fibers.

  18. Absence of a differentiation defect in muscle satellite cells from DM2 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Richard; Hamel, Frederic; Beaulieu, Daniel; Patry, Lysanne; Haineault, Caroline; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Schoser, Benedikt; Puymirat, Jack

    2009-10-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type II (DM2) are dominantly inherited multisystemic disorders. DM1 is triggered by the pathological expansion of a (CTG)(n) triplet repeat in the DMPK gene, whereas a (CCTG)(n) tetranucleotide repeat expansion in the ZNF9 gene causes DM2. Both forms of the disease share several features, even though the causative mutations and the loci involved differ. Important distinctions exist, such as the lack of a congenital form of DM2. The reason for these disparities is unknown. In this study, we characterized skeletal muscle satellite cells from adult DM2 patients to provide an in vitro model for the disease. We used muscle cells from DM1 biopsies as a comparison tool. Our main finding is that DM2 satellite cells differentiate normally in vitro. Myotube formation was similar to unaffected controls. In contrast, fetal DM1 cells were deficient in that ability. Consistent with this observation, the myogenic program in DM2 was intact but is compromised in fetal DM1 cells. Although expression of the ZNF9 gene was enhanced in DM2 during differentiation, the levels of the ZNF9 protein were substantially reduced. This suggests that the presence of a large CCTG tract impairs the translation of the ZNF9 mRNA. Additionally, DM2 muscle biopsies displayed the altered splicing of the insulin receptor mRNA, correlating with insulin resistance in the patients. Finally, CUGBP1 steady-state protein levels were unchanged in DM2 cultured muscle cells and in DM2 muscle biopsies relative to controls, whereas they are increased in DM1 muscle cells. Our findings suggest that the myogenic program throughout muscle development and tissue regeneration is intact in DM2.

  19. Comparative study of the differentiation potential of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and rat muscle-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparative study of the plasticity of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and rat muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs. The study was performed on two cell populations that were isolated by aspiration from the femur bone marrow and gastrocnemius muscle biopsy of 6-week-old albino rats. Both cell populations were exposed to identical stimulation conditions. The cells were capable of undergoing osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic and epithelial differentiation, as shown by histochemistry and immunostaining techniques. The MDSC population showed behavior and characteristics similar to the bone marrow MSC population; however, the osteogenic and adipogenic potential was more reduced compared to MSCs. Our results indicate a positive expression of E cadherin and Cytokeratin 10 after 28 days under epithelial stimulation, suggesting a potential use for gastrocnemius muscle MDSCs as a promising source for regenerative therapies, including re-epithelialization and skin regeneration.

  20. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive cells and not smooth muscle cells mediate purinergic hyperpolarization in murine colonic muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurahashi, Masaaki; Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2014-09-15

    Enteric inhibitory neurotransmission is an important feature of the neural regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Purinergic neurotransmission, via P2Y1 receptors, mediates one phase of inhibitory neural control. For decades, ATP has been assumed to be the purinergic neurotransmitter and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have been considered the primary targets for inhibitory neurotransmission. Recent experiments have cast doubt on both of these assumptions and suggested that another cell type, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive (PDGFRα(+)) cells, is the target for purinergic neurotransmission. We compared responses of PDGFRα(+) cells and SMCs to several purine compounds to determine if these cells responded in a manner consistent with enteric inhibitory neurotransmission. ATP hyperpolarized PDGFRα(+) cells but depolarized SMCs. Only part of the ATP response in PDGFRα(+) cells was blocked by MRS 2500, a P2Y1 antagonist. ADP, MRS 2365, β-NAD, and adenosine 5-diphosphate-ribose, P2Y1 agonists, hyperpolarized PDGFRα(+) cells, and these responses were blocked by MRS 2500. Adenosine 5-diphosphate-ribose was more potent in eliciting hyperpolarization responses than β-NAD. P2Y1 agonists failed to elicit responses in SMCs. Small hyperpolarization responses were elicited in SMCs by a small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel agonist, cyclohexyl-[2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-methyl-pyrimidin-4-yl]-amine, consistent with the low expression and current density of small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in these cells. Large-amplitude hyperpolarization responses, elicited in PDGFRα(+) cells, but not SMCs, by P2Y1 agonists are consistent with the generation of inhibitory junction potentials in intact muscles in response to purinergic neurotransmission. The responses of PDGFRα(+) cells and SMCs to purines suggest that SMCs are unlikely targets for purinergic neurotransmission in colonic muscles. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase stimulates Warburg-like glycolysis and activation of satellite cells during muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xing; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Dodson, Mike V; Du, Min

    2015-10-30

    Satellite cells are the major myogenic stem cells residing inside skeletal muscle and are indispensable for muscle regeneration. Satellite cells remain largely quiescent but are rapidly activated in response to muscle injury, and the derived myogenic cells then fuse to repair damaged muscle fibers or form new muscle fibers. However, mechanisms eliciting metabolic activation, an inseparable step for satellite cell activation following muscle injury, have not been defined. We found that a noncanonical Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway is rapidly activated in response to muscle injury, which activates AMPK and induces a Warburg-like glycolysis in satellite cells. AMPKα1 is the dominant AMPKα isoform expressed in satellite cells, and AMPKα1 deficiency in satellite cells impairs their activation and myogenic differentiation during muscle regeneration. Drugs activating noncanonical Shh promote proliferation of satellite cells, which is abolished because of satellite cell-specific AMPKα1 knock-out. Taken together, AMPKα1 is a critical mediator linking noncanonical Shh pathway to Warburg-like glycolysis in satellite cells, which is required for satellite activation and muscle regeneration. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Establishment and cryopreservation of a giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang-Jian; Zeng, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Xiong, Tie-Yi; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Zhang, He-Min

    2015-06-01

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca is an endangered species and is a symbol for wildlife conservation. Although efforts have been made to protect this rare and endangered species through breeding and conservative biology, the long-term preservation of giant panda genome resources (gametes, tissues, organs, genomic libraries, etc.) is still a practical option. In this study, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line was successfully established via primary explants culture and cryopreservation techniques. The population doubling time of giant panda skeletal cells was approximately 33.8 h, and this population maintained a high cell viability before and after cryopreservation (95.6% and 90.7%, respectively). The two skeletal muscle-specific genes SMYD1 and MYF6 were expressed and detected by RT-PCR in the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line. Karyotyping analysis revealed that the frequencies of giant panda skeletal muscle cells showing a chromosome number of 2n=42 ranged from 90.6∼94.2%. Thus, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line provides a vital resource and material platform for further studies and is likely to be useful for the protection of this rare and endangered species.

  3. EFFECTS OF VOLUNTARY WHEEL RUNNING ON SATELLITE CELLS IN THE RAT PLANTARIS MUSCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kojima

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of voluntary wheel running on satellite cells in the rat plantaris muscle. Seventeen 5-week-old male Wistar rats were assigned to a control (n = 5 or training (n = 12 group. Each rat in the training group ran voluntarily in a running-wheel cage for 8 weeks. After the training period, the animals were anesthetized, and the plantaris muscles were removed, weighed, and analyzed immunohistochemically and biochemically. Although there were no significant differences in muscle weight or fiber area between the groups, the numbers of satellite cells and myonuclei per muscle fiber, percentage of satellite cells, and citrate synthase activity were significantly higher in the training group compared with the control group (p < 0.05. The percentage of satellite cells was also positively correlated with distance run in the training group (r = 0.61, p < 0.05. Voluntary running can induce an increase in the number of satellite cells without changing the mean fiber area in the rat plantaris muscle; this increase in satellite cell content is a function of distance run

  4. Endogenous mesenchymal stromal cells in bone marrow are required to preserve muscle function in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ryo; Tamai, Katsuto; Aikawa, Eriko; Nimura, Keisuke; Ishino, Saki; Kikuchi, Yasushi; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2015-03-01

    The physiological role of "endogenous" bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in tissue regeneration is poorly understood. Here, we show the significant contribution of unique endogenous BM-MSC populations to muscle regeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mice (mdx). Transplantation of BM cells (BMCs) from 10-week-old mdx into 3-4-week-old mdx mice increased inflammation and fibrosis and reduced muscle function compared with mdx mice that received BMCs from 10-week-old wild-type mice, suggesting that the alteration of BMC populations in mdx mice affects the progression of muscle pathology. Two distinct MSC populations in BM, that is, hematopoietic lineage (Lin)(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) and Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(-) cells, were significantly reduced in 10-week-old mdx mice in disease progression. The results of a whole-transcriptome analysis indicated that these two MSC populations have distinct gene expression profiles, indicating that the Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) and Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(-) MSC populations are proliferative- and dormant-state populations in BM, respectively. BM-derived Lin(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) MSCs abundantly migrated to damaged muscles and highly expressed tumor necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated gene/protein-6 (TSG-6), an anti-inflammatory protein, in damaged muscles. We also demonstrated that TSG-6 stimulated myoblast proliferation. The injection of Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) MSCs into the muscle of mdx mice successfully ameliorated muscle dysfunction by decreasing inflammation and enhancing muscle regeneration through TSG-6-mediated activities. Thus, we propose a novel function of the unique endogenous BM-MSC population, which countered muscle pathology progression in a DMD model. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  5. [Participation of bone-marrow stem cells in the differentiation of mdx mice striated muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaĭlov, V M; Evtifeeva, E V; Serikov, V B; Perverzev, A E; Karmanova, A V; Zenin, V V

    2006-01-01

    Two sets of experiments were carried out. The first one involved chimeric mice, obtained by intravenously injections of bone marrow derived cells taken from transgenic C57BL/6 mice, expressing GFP, to 5 Gy X-ray irradiated mdx or C57BL/6 mice. In 2 months M. quadriceps femoris of chimeric mice were destroyed by surgical clamp. Following the next 4-5 weeks, the same muscles were studied for the presence of GFP-positive striated muscle fibres. In the case of chimeric C57BL/6 mice GFP-positive striated muscle fibres were observed in 0.3 +/- 0.5 and in 0.2 +/- 0.3 % of destroyed muscle, and in lateral (control) muscle, consequently. In the case of chimeric mdx mice, positive results were observed in 1.7 +/- 0.4 and in 0.5 +/- 0.3 % of destroyed and control muscles, respectively. In the second set of experiments, the GFP-positive bone marrow cells were used for multiple intramuscular injections to M. quadriceps femoris of C57BL/6 or mdx mice in a dose of 2 x 10(5)-5 x 10(5) cells per mouse. Before injection, GFP-positive bone marrow cells were fractionated in a 63 % Percoll solution and then were exhausted from differentiated cells by magnetic manner using CD4, CD8, CD38, CD45R, CD119, Ly-6G, and F4/80 antibodies. After 2-3 weeks, as many as 0.15 +/- 0.40 and 0.1 +/- 0.2 % of GFP-positive muscle fibres were found in injected and control muscles of C57BL/6 mice, respectively. In the case of mdx mice, the frequency of GFP-positive striated muscle fibres was 2.0 +/- 0.8 and 1.2 +/- 0.6 % for injected and control muscles, respectively. A conclusion is made that bone marrow stem cells can take part in differentiation of mdx mouse muscles after their delivery by needle injections.

  6. Characterization of vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype in long-term culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Baldor, L; Low, R; Warshaw, D

    1989-02-01

    Studies of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells, during long-term in vitro subcultivation (up to 100 population doublings), have revealed phenotypic heterogeneity among cells, as characterized by differences in proliferative behavior, cell morphology, and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. In vivo, smooth muscle cells were spindle-shaped and expressed desmin and alpha-smooth muscle actin (50% of total actin) as their predominant cytoskeletal and contractile proteins. Within 24 h of culture, vimentin rather than desmin was the predominant intermediate filament protein, with little change in alpha-actin content. Upon initial subcultivation, all cells were flattened and fibroblastic in appearance with a concomitant fivefold reduction in alpha-actin content, whereas the beta and gamma nonmuscle actins predominated. In three out of four cell lines studied, fluctuations in proliferative activity were observed during the life span of the culture. These spontaneous fluctuations in proliferation were accompanied by coordinated changes in morphology and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. During periods of enhanced proliferation a significant proportion of cells reverted to their original spindle-shaped morphology with a simultaneous increase in alpha-actin content (20 to 30% of total actin). These results suggest that in long-term culture smooth muscle cells undergo spontaneous modulations in cell phenotype and may serve as a useful model for studying the regulation of intracellular protein expression.

  7. Effects of retinoic acid signaling on extraocular muscle myogenic precursor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Sadie L; Fitzpatrick, Krysta R; McConnell, Samantha A; Cucak, Anja; Yuan, Ching; McLoon, Linda K

    2017-12-01

    One major difference between limb and extraocular muscles (EOM) is the presence of an enriched population of Pitx2-positive myogenic precursor cells in EOM compared to limb muscle. We hypothesize that retinoic acid regulates Pitx2 expression in EOM myogenic precursor cells and that its effects would differ in leg muscle. The two muscle groups expressed differential retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) levels. RXR co-localized with the Pitx2-positive cells but not with those expressing Pax7. EOM-derived and LEG-derived EECD34 cells were treated with vehicle, retinoic acid, the RXR agonist bexarotene, the RAR inverse agonist BMS493, or the RXR antagonist UVI 3003. In vitro, fewer EOM-derived EECD34 cells expressed desmin and fused, while more LEG-derived cells expressed desmin and fused when treated with retinoic acid compared to vehicle. Both EOM and LEG-derived EECD34 cells exposed to retinoic acid showed a higher percentage of cells expressing Pitx2 compared to vehicle, supporting the hypothesis that retinoic acid plays a role in maintaining Pitx2 expression. We hypothesize that retinoic acid signaling aids in the maintenance of large numbers of undifferentiated myogenic precursor cells in the EOM, which would be required to maintain EOM normalcy throughout a lifetime of myonuclear turnover. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Defining the role of mesenchymal stromal cells on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in skeletal muscle cells

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    Sassoli, Chiara; Nosi, Daniele; Tani, Alessia; Chellini, Flaminia [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Mazzanti, Benedetta [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Haematology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Quercioli, Franco [CNR-National Institute of Optics (INO), Largo Enrico Fermi 6, 50125 Arcetri-Florence (Italy); Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Formigli, Lucia, E-mail: formigli@unifi.it [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation improves healing of injured and diseased skeletal muscle, although the mechanisms of benefit are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether MSCs and/or their trophic factors were able to regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity in different cells of the muscle tissue. MSCs in co-culture with C2C12 cells or their conditioned medium (MSC-CM) up-regulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and function in the myoblastic cells; these effects were concomitant with the down-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and -2 and with increased cell motility. In the single muscle fiber experiments, MSC-CM administration increased MMP-2/9 expression in Pax-7{sup +} satellite cells and stimulated their mobilization, differentiation and fusion. The anti-fibrotic properties of MSC-CM involved also the regulation of MMPs by skeletal fibroblasts and the inhibition of their differentiation into myofibroblasts. The treatment with SB-3CT, a potent MMP inhibitor, prevented in these cells, the decrease of α-smooth actin and type-I collagen expression induced by MSC-CM, suggesting that MSC-CM could attenuate the fibrogenic response through mechanisms mediated by MMPs. Our results indicate that growth factors and cytokines released by these cells may modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle repair/regeneration. - Highlights: • MSC-CM contains paracrine factors that up-regulate MMP expression and function in different skeletal muscle cells. • MSC-CM promotes myoblast and satellite cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. • MSC-CM negatively interferes with fibroblast-myoblast transition in primary skeletal fibroblasts. • Paracrine factors from MSCs modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle regeneration.

  9. Regenerative capacity of old muscle stem cells declines without significant accumulation of DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Cousin

    Full Text Available The performance of adult stem cells is crucial for tissue homeostasis but their regenerative capacity declines with age, leading to failure of multiple organs. In skeletal muscle this failure is manifested by the loss of functional tissue, the accumulation of fibrosis, and reduced satellite cell-mediated myogenesis in response to injury. While recent studies have shown that changes in the composition of the satellite cell niche are at least in part responsible for the impaired function observed with aging, little is known about the effects of aging on the intrinsic properties of satellite cells. For instance, their ability to repair DNA damage and the effects of a potential accumulation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs on their regenerative performance remain unclear. This work demonstrates that old muscle stem cells display no significant accumulation of DNA DSBs when compared to those of young, as assayed after cell isolation and in tissue sections, either in uninjured muscle or at multiple time points after injury. Additionally, there is no significant difference in the expression of DNA DSB repair proteins or globally assayed DNA damage response genes, suggesting that not only DNA DSBs, but also other types of DNA damage, do not significantly mark aged muscle stem cells. Satellite cells from DNA DSB-repair-deficient SCID mice do have an unsurprisingly higher level of innate DNA DSBs and a weakened recovery from gamma-radiation-induced DNA damage. Interestingly, they are as myogenic in vitro and in vivo as satellite cells from young wild type mice, suggesting that the inefficiency in DNA DSB repair does not directly correlate with the ability to regenerate muscle after injury. Overall, our findings suggest that a DNA DSB-repair deficiency is unlikely to be a key factor in the decline in muscle regeneration observed upon aging.

  10. Exercise-Induced Skeletal Muscle Adaptations Alter the Activity of Adipose Progenitor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zeve

    Full Text Available Exercise decreases adiposity and improves metabolic health; however, the physiological and molecular underpinnings of these phenomena remain unknown. Here, we investigate the effect of endurance training on adipose progenitor lineage commitment. Using mice with genetically labeled adipose progenitors, we show that these cells react to exercise by decreasing their proliferation and differentiation potential. Analyses of mouse models that mimic the skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise indicate that muscle, in a non-autonomous manner, regulates adipose progenitor homeostasis, highlighting a role for muscle-derived secreted factors. These findings support a humoral link between skeletal muscle and adipose progenitors and indicate that manipulation of adipose stem cell function may help address obesity and diabetes.

  11. Influence of Endothelial Cells on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotype after Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliat, Fabien; François, Agnès; Isoir, Muriel; Deutsch, Eric; Tamarat, Radia; Tarlet, Georges; Atfi, Azeddine; Validire, Pierre; Bourhis, Jean; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Benderitter, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Damage to vessels is one of the most common effects of therapeutic irradiation on normal tissues. We undertook a study in patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy and demonstrated in vivo the importance of proliferation, migration, and fibrogenic phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in radiation-induced vascular damage. These lesions may result from imbalance in the cross talk between endothelial cells (ECs) and VSMCs. Using co-culture models, we examined whether ECs influence proliferation, migration, and fibrogenic phenotype of VSMCs. In the presence of irradiated ECs, proliferation and migration of VSMCs were increased. Moreover, expressions of α-smooth muscle actin, connective tissue growth factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, heat shock protein 27, and collagen type III, alpha 1 were up-regulated in VSMCs exposed to irradiated ECs. Secretion of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 was increased after irradiation of ECs, and irradiated ECs activated the Smad pathway in VSMCs by inducing Smad3/4 nuclear translocation and Smad-dependent promoter activation. Using small interferring RNA targeting Smad3 and a TGFβ-RII neutralizing antibody, we demonstrate that a TGF-β1/TGF-β-RII/Smad3 pathway is involved in the fibrogenic phenotype of VSMCs induced by irradiated ECs. In conclusion, we show the importance of proliferation, migration, and fibrogenic phenotype of VSMCs in patients. Moreover, we demonstrate in vitro that ECs influence these fundamental mechanisms involved in radiation-induced vascular damages. PMID:17003501

  12. Vascular smooth muscle cells derived from inbred swine induced pluripotent stem cells for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiesi; Qin, Lingfeng; Kural, Mehmet H; Schwan, Jonas; Li, Xia; Bartulos, Oscar; Cong, Xiao-Qiang; Ren, Yongming; Gui, Liqiong; Li, Guangxin; Ellis, Matthew W; Li, Peining; Kotton, Darrell N; Dardik, Alan; Pober, Jordan S; Tellides, George; Rolle, Marsha; Campbell, Stuart; Hawley, Robert J; Sachs, David H; Niklason, Laura E; Qyang, Yibing

    2017-12-01

    Development of autologous tissue-engineered vascular constructs using vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) holds great potential in treating patients with vascular disease. However, preclinical, large animal iPSC-based cellular and tissue models are required to evaluate safety and efficacy prior to clinical application. Herein, swine iPSC (siPSC) lines were established by introducing doxycycline-inducible reprogramming factors into fetal fibroblasts from a line of inbred Massachusetts General Hospital miniature swine that accept tissue and organ transplants without immunosuppression within the line. Highly enriched, functional VSMCs were derived from siPSCs based on addition of ascorbic acid and inactivation of reprogramming factor via doxycycline withdrawal. Moreover, siPSC-VSMCs seeded onto biodegradable polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds readily formed vascular tissues, which were implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice and showed further maturation revealed by expression of the mature VSMC marker, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain. Finally, using a robust cellular self-assembly approach, we developed 3D scaffold-free tissue rings from siPSC-VSMCs that showed comparable mechanical properties and contractile function to those developed from swine primary VSMCs. These engineered vascular constructs, prepared from doxycycline-inducible inbred siPSCs, offer new opportunities for preclinical investigation of autologous human iPSC-based vascular tissues for patient treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal in circular muscle of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Qvortrup, K

    1993-01-01

    : Muscle lamellae were separated by main septa in continuity with submucosa. Smooth muscle cells ran radially in the septa. Two types of ICC were distinguished. One ICC type had abundant intermediate filaments and smooth cisternae and a discontinuous basal lamina. This ICC type was present in the septa...... and in the outer third of the circular lamellae. The other ICC type had a complete basal lamina and conspicuous caveolae. This ICC type was observed only in the inner third of the circular lamellae. Both ICC types were close to nerves, but only the latter type formed gap junctions with one another and with muscle...

  14. Engineering Skeletal Muscle Tissues from Murine Myoblast Progenitor Cells and Application of Electrical Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    van der Schaft, Daisy W. J.; van Spreeuwel, Ariane C. C.; Kristel J. M. Boonen; Langelaan, Marloes L. P.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.; Baaijens, Frank P.T.

    2013-01-01

    Engineered muscle tissues can be used for several different purposes, which include the production of tissues for use as a disease model in vitro, e.g. to study pressure ulcers, for regenerative medicine and as a meat alternative 1. The first reported 3D muscle constructs have been made many years ago and pioneers in the field are Vandenburgh and colleagues 2,3. Advances made in muscle tissue engineering are not only the result from the vast gain in knowledge of biochemical factors, stem cell...

  15. Platelet extracellular vesicles induce a pro-inflammatory smooth muscle cell phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Vajen, Tanja; Benedikter, Birke J.; Heinzmann, Alexandra C. A.; Vasina, Elena M; Henskens, Yvonne; PARSONS, Martin; Maguire, Patricia B.; Stassen, Frank R.; Heemskerk, Johan W.M.; Schurgers, Leon J; Koenen, Rory R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are mediators of cell communication during health and disease, and abundantly released by platelets upon activation or during ageing. Platelet EVs exert modulatory effects on immune and vascular cells. Platelet EVs may modulate the function of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Platelet EVs were isolated from platelet-rich plasma and incubated with SMC in order to assess binding, proliferation, migration and pro-inflammatory phenotype of the cells. Plate...

  16. Ageing is associated with diminished muscle re-growth and myogenic precursor cell expansion early after immobility-induced atrophy in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, C.; Frandsen, Ulrik; Mackey, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Recovery of skeletal muscle mass from immobilisation-induced atrophy is faster in young than older individuals, yet the cellular mechanisms remain unknown. We examined the cellular and molecular regulation of muscle recovery in young and old human subjects subsequent to 2 weeks of immobility...... expression analysis of key growth and transcription factors associated with local skeletal muscle milieu were performed after 2 weeks immobility (Imm) and following 3 days (+3d) and 4 weeks (+4wks) of re-training. OM demonstrated no detectable gains in MFA (VL muscle) and no increases in number of Pax7......-induced muscle atrophy. Re-training consisted of 4 weeks of supervised resistive exercise in 9 older (OM: 67.3yrs, range 61-74) and 11 young (YM: 24.4yrs, range 21-30) males. Measures of myofiber area (MFA), Pax7-positive satellite cells (SC) associated with type I and type II muscle fibres, as well as gene...

  17. Smooth muscle architecture within cell-dense vascular tissues influences functional contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Zaw; Vrla, Geoffrey D; Steucke, Kerianne E; Sevcik, Emily N; Hald, Eric S; Alford, Patrick W

    2014-12-01

    The role of vascular smooth muscle architecture in the function of healthy and dysfunctional vessels is poorly understood. We aimed at determining the relationship between vascular smooth muscle architecture and contractile output using engineered vascular tissues. We utilized microcontact printing and a microfluidic cell seeding technique to provide three different initial seeding conditions, with the aim of influencing the cellular architecture within the tissue. Cells seeded in each condition formed confluent and aligned tissues but within the tissues, the cellular architecture varied. Tissues with a more elongated cellular architecture had significantly elevated basal stress and produced more contractile stress in response to endothelin-1 stimulation. We also found a correlation between the contractile phenotype marker expression and the cellular architecture, contrary to our previous findings in non-confluent tissues. Taken with previous results, these data suggest that within cell-dense vascular tissues, smooth muscle contractility is strongly influenced by cell and tissue architectures.

  18. Sphingosine induces phospholipase D and mitogen activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, M M; Abd-Elfattah, A S; Sholley, M M

    1998-12-01

    The enzymes phospholipase D and diacylglycerol kinase generate phosphatidic acid which is considered to be a mitogen. Here we report that sphingosine produced a significant amount of phosphatidic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59 949 partially depressed sphingosine induced phosphatidic acid formation, suggesting that activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid produced and that additional pathways such as phospholipase D may contribute to this. Further, we have shown that phosphatidylethanol was produced by sphingosine when vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated in the presence of ethanol. Finally, as previously shown for other cell types, sphingosine stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  19. Local NSAID infusion inhibits satellite cell proliferation in human skeletal muscle after eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, U R; Langberg, H; Helmark, I C

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the influence of these drugs on muscle satellite cells is not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a local NSAID infusion on satellite cells after unaccustomed eccentric...... exercise in vivo in human skeletal muscle. Eight young healthy males performed 200 maximal eccentric contractions with each leg. An NSAID was infused via a microdialysis catheter into the vastus lateralis muscle of one leg (NSAID leg) before, during, and for 4.5 h after exercise, with the other leg working...... cells (CD68(+) or CD16(+) cells) was not significantly increased in either of the legs 8 days after exercise and was unaffected by the NSAID. The main finding in the present study was that the NSAID infusion for 7.5 h during the exercise day suppressed the exercise-induced increase in the number...

  20. Extracellular creatine regulates creatine transport in rat and human muscle cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Loike, J D; Zalutsky, D L; Kaback, E; Miranda, A F; Silverstein, S C

    1988-01-01

    Muscle cells do not synthesize creatine; they take up exogenous creatine by specific Na+-dependent plasma membrane transporters. We found that extracellular creatine regulates the level of expression of these creatine transporters in L6 rat muscle cells. L6 myoblasts maintained for 24 hr in medium containing 1 mM creatine exhibited 1/3rd of the creatine transport activity of cells maintained for 24 hr in medium without creatine. Down-regulation of creatine transport was partially reversed whe...

  1. Changes in satellite cells in human skeletal muscle after a single bout of high intensity exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crameri, Regina M; Langberg, Henning; Magnusson, Peter

    2004-01-01

    No studies to date have reported activation of satellite cells in vivo in human muscle after a single bout of high intensity exercise. In this investigation, eight individuals performed a single bout of high intensity exercise with one leg, the contralateral leg being the control. A significant...... increase in mononuclear cells staining for the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) and fetal antigen 1 (FA1) were observed within the exercised human vastus lateralis muscle on days 4 and 8 post exercise. In addition, a significant increase in the concentration of the FA1 protein was determined...

  2. Stochastic cellular automata model of cell migration, proliferation and differentiation: validation with in vitro cultures of muscle satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garijo, N; Manzano, R; Osta, R; Perez, M A

    2012-12-07

    Cell migration and proliferation has been modelled in the literature as a process similar to diffusion. However, using diffusion models to simulate the proliferation and migration of cells tends to create a homogeneous distribution in the cell density that does not correlate to empirical observations. In fact, the mechanism of cell dispersal is not diffusion. Cells disperse by crawling or proliferation, or are transported in a moving fluid. The use of cellular automata, particle models or cell-based models can overcome this limitation. This paper presents a stochastic cellular automata model to simulate the proliferation, migration and differentiation of cells. These processes are considered as completely stochastic as well as discrete. The model developed was applied to predict the behaviour of in vitro cell cultures performed with adult muscle satellite cells. Moreover, non homogeneous distribution of cells has been observed inside the culture well and, using the above mentioned stochastic cellular automata model, we have been able to predict this heterogeneous cell distribution and compute accurate quantitative results. Differentiation was also incorporated into the computational simulation. The results predicted the myotube formation that typically occurs with adult muscle satellite cells. In conclusion, we have shown how a stochastic cellular automata model can be implemented and is capable of reproducing the in vitro behaviour of adult muscle satellite cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of Pitx2 in maintaining the phenotype of myogenic precursor cells in the extraocular muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Sadie L; Daniel, Mark L; McLoon, Linda K

    2013-01-01

    Many differences exist between extraocular muscles (EOM) and non-cranial skeletal muscles. One striking difference is the sparing of EOM in various muscular dystrophies compared to non-cranial skeletal muscles. EOM undergo continuous myonuclear remodeling in normal, uninjured adults, and distinct transcription factors are required for the early determination, development, and maintenance of EOM compared to limb skeletal muscle. Pitx2, a bicoid-like homeobox transcription factor, is required for the development of EOM and the maintenance of characteristic properties of the adult EOM phenotype, but is not required for the development of limb muscle. We hypothesize that these unique properties of EOM contribute to the constitutive differences between EOM and non-craniofacial skeletal muscles. Using flow cytometry, CD34(+)/Sca1(-/)CD45(-/)CD31(-) cells (EECD34 cells) were isolated from extraocular and limb skeletal muscle and in vitro, EOM EECD34 cells proliferated faster than limb muscle EECD34 cells. To further define these myogenic precursor cells from EOM and limb skeletal muscle, they were analyzed for their expression of Pitx2. Western blotting and immunohistochemical data demonstrated that EOM express higher levels of Pitx2 than limb muscle, and 80% of the EECD34 cells expressed Pitx2. siRNA knockdown of Pitx2 expression in EECD34 cells in vitro decreased proliferation rates and impaired the ability of EECD34 cells to fuse into multinucleated myotubes. High levels of Pitx2 were retained in dystrophic and aging mouse EOM and the EOM EECD34 cells compared to limb muscle. The differential expression of Pitx2 between EOM and limb skeletal muscle along with the functional changes in response to lower levels of Pitx2 expression in the myogenic precursor cells suggest a role for Pitx2 in the maintenance of constitutive differences between EOM and limb skeletal muscle that may contribute to the sparing of EOM in muscular dystrophies.

  4. The role of Pitx2 in maintaining the phenotype of myogenic precursor cells in the extraocular muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadie L Hebert

    Full Text Available Many differences exist between extraocular muscles (EOM and non-cranial skeletal muscles. One striking difference is the sparing of EOM in various muscular dystrophies compared to non-cranial skeletal muscles. EOM undergo continuous myonuclear remodeling in normal, uninjured adults, and distinct transcription factors are required for the early determination, development, and maintenance of EOM compared to limb skeletal muscle. Pitx2, a bicoid-like homeobox transcription factor, is required for the development of EOM and the maintenance of characteristic properties of the adult EOM phenotype, but is not required for the development of limb muscle. We hypothesize that these unique properties of EOM contribute to the constitutive differences between EOM and non-craniofacial skeletal muscles. Using flow cytometry, CD34(+/Sca1(-/CD45(-/CD31(- cells (EECD34 cells were isolated from extraocular and limb skeletal muscle and in vitro, EOM EECD34 cells proliferated faster than limb muscle EECD34 cells. To further define these myogenic precursor cells from EOM and limb skeletal muscle, they were analyzed for their expression of Pitx2. Western blotting and immunohistochemical data demonstrated that EOM express higher levels of Pitx2 than limb muscle, and 80% of the EECD34 cells expressed Pitx2. siRNA knockdown of Pitx2 expression in EECD34 cells in vitro decreased proliferation rates and impaired the ability of EECD34 cells to fuse into multinucleated myotubes. High levels of Pitx2 were retained in dystrophic and aging mouse EOM and the EOM EECD34 cells compared to limb muscle. The differential expression of Pitx2 between EOM and limb skeletal muscle along with the functional changes in response to lower levels of Pitx2 expression in the myogenic precursor cells suggest a role for Pitx2 in the maintenance of constitutive differences between EOM and limb skeletal muscle that may contribute to the sparing of EOM in muscular dystrophies.

  5. Expression profiles of muscle disease-associated genes and their isoforms during differentiation of cultured human skeletal muscle cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdul-Hussein, Saba; van der Ven, Peter F M; Tajsharghi, Homa

    2012-01-01

    .... It is likely that elucidation of the expression patterns of muscle-specific sarcomeric proteins is important to understand muscle disorders originating from defects in contractile sarcomeric proteins...

  6. Specification and behavior of AMPs, muscle-committed transient Drosophila stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figeac, Nicolas; Jagla, Teresa; Aradhya, Rajaguru; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    During development, transient stem cells play critical roles in the formation of specific tissues. Adult Muscle Precursors (AMPs) are at the origin of all adult Drosophila muscles and as we report here represent a novel population of muscle-committed transient stem cells. Similar to vertebrate muscle stem cells, AMPs keep Notch signaling active and express Enhancer of split m6 (E(spl)m6) gene, a read-out of Notch pathway. To get insights into AMP cell specification we performed a gain-of-function screen and found that the rhomboid-triggered Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) signaling pathway controls both the specification and the subsequent maintenance of AMPs. Our findings are supported by the identification of EGF-secreting cells in the lateral domain and the EGF-dependent regulatory modules that drive expression of the ladybird gene in lateral AMPs. Interestingly, by targeting GFP to the AMP cell membranes we also demonstrated that AMPs send long cellular processes and form a network of interconnected cells. As revealed by laser ablation experiments, the main role of AMP cell connections is to maintain their correct spatial positioning.

  7. Cadherin-11 is expressed in detrusor smooth muscle cells and myofibroblasts of normal human bladder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, K.A.J.; Heesakkers, J.P.; Jansen, C.F.J.; Schalken, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It has recently been found that detrusor smooth muscle cells and myofibroblasts are coupled via gap junctions. However, gap junctions cannot account for strong physical interaction between cells, which has prompted the search for intercellular adhesion molecules. Cadherin-11 is a

  8. Mast cell numbers in airway smooth muscle and PC(20)AMP in asthma and COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liesker, J. J. W.; ten Hacken, N. H. T.; Rutgers, S. R.; Zeinstra-Smith, M.; Postma, D. S.; Timens, W.

    Introduction: Most patients with asthma and many patients with COPD show bronchial hyperresponsiveness to adenosine (BHRAMP). BHRAMP may be caused by release of mast cell histamine, which induces smooth muscle contraction. Aim of the study: To evaluate whether mast cell numbers in airway smooth

  9. Muscle Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of DMD Associated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0803 TITLE: Muscle Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of DMD Associated Cardiomyopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of DMD Associated Cardiomyopathy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cardiomyopathy 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0803

  10. Assessment of satellite cell number and activity status in human skeletal muscle biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail L; Kjær, Michael; Charifi, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    The primary aim of our study was to validate the assessment of myonuclear and satellite cell number in biopsies from human skeletal muscle. We found that 25 type I and 25 type II fibers are sufficient to estimate the mean number of myonuclei per fiber. In contrast, the assessment of satellite cells...

  11. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (Pcell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  12. Identification of G-Protein-Coupled-Receptors (GPCRs) in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells as Novel Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0372 TITLE: Identification of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells as...DATES COVERED 2 Sep 2015 - 1Sep2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identification of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells ...smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). The underlying idea of this project is that the currently limited treatments for PAH represent an unmet medical need

  13. Macrophages improve survival, proliferation and migration of engrafted myogenic precursor cells into MDX skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-François Lesault

    Full Text Available Transplantation of muscle precursor cells is of therapeutic interest for focal skeletal muscular diseases. However, major limitations of cell transplantation are the poor survival, expansion and migration of the injected cells. The massive and early death of transplanted myoblasts is not fully understood although several mechanisms have been suggested. Various attempts have been made to improve their survival or migration. Taking into account that muscle regeneration is associated with the presence of macrophages, which are helpful in repairing the muscle by both cleansing the debris and deliver trophic cues to myoblasts in a sequential way, we attempted in the present work to improve myoblast transplantation by coinjecting macrophages. The present data showed that in the 5 days following the transplantation, macrophages efficiently improved: i myoblast survival by limiting their massive death, ii myoblast expansion within the tissue and iii myoblast migration in the dystrophic muscle. This was confirmed by in vitro analyses showing that macrophages stimulated myoblast adhesion and migration. As a result, myoblast contribution to regenerating host myofibres was increased by macrophages one month after transplantation. Altogether, these data demonstrate that macrophages are beneficial during the early steps of myoblast transplantation into skeletal muscle, showing that coinjecting these stromal cells may be used as a helper to improve the efficiency of parenchymal cell engraftment.

  14. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells: differentiation and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoubi, Sohrab; Sheikh, Søren P; Eskildsen, Tilde V

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death worldwide and current treatment strategies have limited effect of disease progression. It would be desirable to have better models to study developmental and pathological processes and model vascular diseases in laboratory settings. To this end, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have generated great enthusiasm, and have been a driving force for development of novel strategies in drug discovery and regenerative cell-therapy for the last decade. Hence, investigating the mechanisms underlying the differentiation of hiPSCs into specialized cell types such as cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) may lead to a better understanding of developmental cardiovascular processes and potentiate progress of safe autologous regenerative therapies in pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the latest trends on differentiation protocols of hiPSC-derived VSMCs and their potential application in vascular research and regenerative therapy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Therapeutic isolation and expansion of human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells for the use of muscle-nerve-blood vessel reconstitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro eTamaki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle makes up 40-50% of body mass, and is thus considered to be a good adult stem cell source for autologous therapy. Although, several stem/progenitor cells have been fractionated from mouse skeletal muscle showing a high potential for therapeutic use, it is unclear whether this is the case in human. Differentiation and therapeutic potential of human skeletal muscle-derived cells (Sk-Cs was examined. Samples (5-10 g were obtained from the abdominal and leg muscles of 36 patients (age, 17-79 years undergoing prostate cancer treatment or leg amputation surgery. All patients gave informed consent. Sk-Cs were isolated using conditioned collagenase solution, and were then sorted as CD34-/CD45-/CD29+ (Sk-DN/29+ and CD34+/CD45- (Sk-34 cells, in a similar manner as for the previous mouse Sk-Cs. Both cell fractions were appropriately expanded using conditioned culture medium for about 2 weeks. Differentiation potentials were then examined during cell culture and in vivo transplantation into the severely damaged muscles of athymic nude mice and rats. Interestingly, these two cell fractions could be divided into highly myogenic (Sk-DN/29+ and multipotent stem cell (Sk-34 fractions, in contrast to mouse Sk-Cs, which showed comparable capacities in both cells. At 6 weeks after the separate transplantation of both cell fractions, the former showed an active contribution to muscle fiber regeneration, but the latter showed vigorous engraftment to the interstitium associated with differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial/endoneurial cells, and vascular endothelial cells and pericytes, which corresponded to previous observations with mouse SK-Cs. Importantly, mixed cultures of both cells resulted the reduction of tissue reconstitution capacities in vivo, whereas co-transplantation after separate expansion showed favorable results. Therefore, human Sk-Cs are potentially applicable to therapeutic autografts and show multiple differentiation

  16. Nonlinear oscillations in a muscle pacemaker cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Miranda, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    This article presents a numerical simulation study of the nonlinear oscillations displayed by the Morris-Lecar model [Biophys. J. 35 (1981) 193] for the oscillations experimentally observed in the transmembrane potential of a muscle fiber subject to an external electrical stimulus. We consider the model in the case when there is no external stimulation, aiming to establish the ability of the model to display biophysically reasonable pacemaker dynamics. We obtain 2D bifurcation diagrams showing that indeed the model presents oscillatory dynamics, displaying the two main types of action potentials that are observed in muscle fibers. The results obtained are shown to be structurally stable; that is, robust against changes in the values of system parameters. Moreover, it is demonstrated how the model is appropriate to analyze the action potentials observed in terms of the transmembrane currents creating them.

  17. Cellular pathology of atherosclerosis: smooth muscle cells promote adhesion of platelets to cocultured endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, Samantha P; Anderson, Steve I; Hughan, Sascha C; Watson, Steve P; Nash, Gerard B; Rainger, G Ed

    2006-01-06

    Although platelets do not ordinarily bind to endothelial cells (EC), pathological interactions between platelets and arterial EC may contribute to the propagation of atheroma. Previously, in an in vitro model of atherogenesis, where leukocyte adhesion to EC cocultured with smooth muscle cells was greatly enhanced, we also observed attachment of platelets to the EC layer. Developing this system to specifically model platelet adhesion, we show that EC cocultured with smooth muscle cells can bind platelets in a process that is dependent on EC activation by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1. Recapitulating the model using EC alone, we found that a combination of TGF-beta1 and TNF-alpha promoted high levels of platelet adhesion compared with either agent used in isolation. Platelet adhesion was inhibited by antibodies against GPIb-IX-V or alpha(IIb)beta3 integrin, indicating that both receptors are required for stable adhesion. Platelet activation during interaction with the EC was also essential, as treatment with prostacyclin or theophylline abolished stable adhesion. Confocal microscopy of the surface of EC activated with TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 revealed an extensive matrix of von Willebrand factor that was able to support the adhesion of flowing platelets at wall shear rates below 400 s(-1). Thus, we have demonstrated a novel route of EC activation which is relevant to the atherosclerotic microenvironment. EC activated in this manner would therefore be capable of recruiting platelets in the low-shear environments that commonly exist at points of atheroma formation.

  18. Physical activity counteracts tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26-injected muscles: an interim report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Hiroux

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis.

  19. Apoptosis in serum-deprived vascular smooth muscle cells: evidence for cell volume-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, S N; Pchejetski, D; Taurin, S; Thorin-Trescases, N; Maximov, G V; Pshezhetsky, A V; Rubin, A B; Hamet, P

    2004-01-01

    Shrinkage is the earliest hallmark of cells undergoing apoptosis. This study examines the role of this phenomenon in the onset of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis triggered by growth factor withdrawal. In hyperosmotic media, VSMC showed the same amplitude of shrinkage but were more resistant to apoptosis than endothelial, epithelial and immune system cells. As with growth factor withdrawal, apoptosis in hyperosmotically-shrunken VSMC was sharply potentiated by transfection with E1A-adenoviral protein and was suppressed by activation of cAMP signaling as well as by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD.fmk. Both cell shrinkage and apoptosis in VSMC-E1A treated with hyperosmotic medium were potentiated under sustained Na+, K+ pump inhibition with ouabain that was in contrast to inhibition of apoptosis documented in ouabain-treated, serum-deprived cells. After 1-hr incubation in serum-deprived medium, VSMC-E1A volume declined by approximately 15%. Transfer from hypotonic to control medium decreased VSMC-E1A volume by approximately 25% without any induction of apoptosis. Neither swelling in hyposmotic medium nor dissipation of the transmembrane gradient of K+ and major organic osmolytes protected serum-deprived VSMC-E1A from apoptosis. Thus, our results show that similarly to immune system, endothelial and epithelial cells, extensive VSMC shrinkage in hyperosmotic medium leads to the development of apoptosis. In contrast to hyperosmotic medium, the modest cell volume decrease occurring in serum-deprived VSMC does not contribute to triggering of the apoptotic machinery.

  20. Differentiation and Application of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Eithne Margaret; Xiao, Qingzhong; Xu, Qingbo

    2017-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play a role in the development of vascular disease, for example, neointimal formation, arterial aneurysm, and Marfan syndrome caused by genetic mutations in VSMCs, but little is known about the mechanisms of the disease process. Advances in induced pluripotent stem cell technology have now made it possible to derive VSMCs from several different somatic cells using a selection of protocols. As such, researchers have set out to delineate key signaling processes involved in triggering VSMC gene expression to grasp the extent of gene regulatory networks involved in phenotype commitment. This technology has also paved the way for investigations into diseases affecting VSMC behavior and function, which may be treatable once an identifiable culprit molecule or gene has been repaired. Moreover, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived VSMCs are also being considered for their use in tissue-engineered blood vessels as they may prove more beneficial than using autologous vessels. Finally, while several issues remains to be clarified before induced pluripotent stem cell-derived VSMCs can become used in regenerative medicine, they do offer both clinicians and researchers hope for both treating and understanding vascular disease. In this review, we aim to update the recent progress on VSMC generation from stem cells and the underlying molecular mechanisms of VSMC differentiation. We will also explore how the use of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived VSMCs has changed the game for regenerative medicine by offering new therapeutic avenues to clinicians, as well as providing researchers with a new platform for modeling of vascular disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Effects of polydopamine functionalized titanium dioxide nanotubes on endothelial cell and smooth muscle cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Si; Luo, Rifang; Wang, Xin; Tang, Linlin; Wu, Jian; Wang, Jin; Huang, Runbo; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2014-04-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) with particular structure cues could control the behavior of different types of cells, including endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Besides, polydopamine (PDA) modified surfaces were reported to be beneficial to increase the proliferation and viability of ECs and meanwhile could inhibit the proliferation of SMCs. The TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA) (PDA/NTs) to study the synergetic effect of both nanotopography (NTs) and chemical cues (PDA) of TiO2 nanotubes on the regulation of cellular behavior of ECs and SMCs. The PDA-modified TiO2 nanotubes were subjected to field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and water contact angle (WCA) analysis. In vitro cell culture tests confirmed that, comparing with flat titanium (Ti) and TiO2 nanotubes, PDA/NTs surface synergistically promoted ECs attachment, proliferation, migration and release of nitric oxide (NO). Meanwhile, the PDA/NTs performed well in reducing SMCs adhesion and proliferation. This novel approach might provide a new platform to investigate the synergistic effect of local chemistry and topography, as well as the applications for the development of titanium-based implants for enhanced endothelialization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells-derived vascular smooth muscle cells release abundant levels of osteoprotegerin

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    M Vaccarezza

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Although several studies have shown that the serum levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG are significantly elevated in patients affected with atherosclerotic lesions in coronary and peripheral arteries, the cellular source and the role of OPG in the physiopathology of atherosclerosis are not completely defined. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the potential contribution of mesenchymal stem cells in the production/release of OPG. OPG was detectable by immunohistochemistry in aortic and coronary atherosclerotic plaques, within or in proximity of intimal vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC. In addition, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-derived vascular SMC as well as primary aortic SMC released in the culture supernatant significantly higher levels of OPG with respect to MSCderived endothelial cells (EC or primary aortic EC. On the other hand, in vitro exposure to full-length human recombinant OPG significantly increased the proliferation rate of aortic SMC cultures, as monitored by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Taken together, these data suggest that OPG acts as an autocrine/paracrine growth factor for vascular SMC, which might contribute to the progression of atherosclerotic lesions.

  3. [Effects of 4-hydroxytamoxifen on prostate smooth muscle cells: an in vitro experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yi-Ming; Li, Qiu-Ming; Ni, Shao-Bin; Chen, Qi-Yin; Chen, Zhao-Yan

    2008-12-02

    To investigate the effects of 4- hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) on the proliferation and apoptosis of prostate smooth muscle cells and the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR). Prostate smooth muscle cells were isolated from the resected specimens of prostate glands of 10 patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), cultured, and exposed to estradiol (E(2)), diethylstilbestrol (DES), and OHT of different concentrations (1 x 10(-8) - 1 x 10(-5) mol/L) or mixture of E(2) (1 x 10(-8) - 1 x 10(-6) mol/L) with OHT (1 x 10(-7) mol/L). Flow cytometry was used to test the proliferation and apoptosis of the cells, and immunocytochemistry was used to test the expression of estrogen and androgen receptors. E(2) and DES promoted the proliferation of the prostate smooth muscle cells in a certain concentration range, but not dose-dependently, and OHT at the concentration of 1 x 10(-8) mol/L slightly increased the G(2)-M peak rate of the prostate smooth muscle cells, but suppressed the G(2)-M peak rate dose-dependently when its concentration was >or= 1 x 10(-7) mol/L (P or= 1 x 10(-5) mol/L and DES at the concentration >or= 1 x 10(-6) mol/L slightly promoted the apoptosis of the prostate smooth muscle cells, but not dose-dependently, and OHT at the concentrations from 1 x 10(-8) mol/L to 1 x 10(-5) mol/L promoted the apoptosis of the prostate smooth muscle cells dose-dependently (r = 0.363, P = 0.021) and this effect could not be reversed by administration of E(2) at the concentration 1 x 10(-8) - 1 x 10(-6) mol/L (P > 0.05). E(2), DES, and OHT of different concentrations all increased the ERalpha and AR positive staining rates of the prostate smooth muscle cells (all P prostate smooth muscle cells, and these functions do not depend on the estrogen receptor pathway. Low blood OHT concentration after oral administration of TAM and up-regulation of estrogen receptors by OHT may be the caused of the inefficiency of TAM for treatment of BPH.

  4. Heat induces interleukin-6 in skeletal muscle cells via TRPV1/PKC/CREB pathways.

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    Obi, Syotaro; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Takaaki; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Oguri, Gaku; Takahashi, Masao; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Sakuma, Masashi; Toyoda, Shigeru; Tei, Chuwa; Inoue, Teruo

    2017-03-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is released from skeletal muscle cells and induced by exercise, heat, catecholamine, glucose, lipopolysaccharide, reactive oxygen species, and inflammation. However, the mechanism that induces release of IL-6 from skeletal muscle cells remains unknown. Thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins such as TRPV1-4 play vital roles in cellular functions. In this study we hypothesized that TRPV1 senses heat, transmits a signal into the nucleus, and produces IL-6. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the underlying mechanisms whereby skeletal muscle cells sense and respond to heat. When mouse myoblast cells were exposed to 37-42°C for 2 h, mRNA expression of IL-6 increased in a temperature-dependent manner. Heat also increased IL-6 secretion in myoblast cells. A fura 2 fluorescence dual-wavelength excitation method showed that heat increased intracellular calcium flux in a temperature-dependent manner. Intracellular calcium flux and IL-6 mRNA expression were increased by the TRPV1 agonists capsaicin and N-arachidonoyldopamine and decreased by the TRPV1 antagonists AMG9810 and SB366791 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of TRPV1. TRPV2, 3, and 4 agonists did not change intracellular calcium flux. Western blotting with inhibitors demonstrated that heat increased phosphorylation levels of TRPV1, followed by PKC and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). PKC inhibitors, Gö6983 and staurosporine, CREB inhibitors, curcumin and naphthol AS-E, and knockdown of CREB suppressed the heat-induced increases in IL-6. These results indicate that heat increases IL-6 in skeletal muscle cells through the TRPV1, PKC, and CREB signal transduction pathway.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Heat increases the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from skeletal muscle cells. IL-6 has been shown to serve immune responses and metabolic functions in muscle. It can be anti-inflammatory as well as proinflammatory. However, the mechanism that induces release of IL-6

  5. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengpeng [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Jiang, Qinyang [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); College of Animal Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Deng, Changyan [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zheng, Rong, E-mail: zhengrong@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Kuang, Shihuan, E-mail: skuang@purdue.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-07-17

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7{sup CreER} and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes. - Highlights: • Pax7{sup CreER} was used to delete Mtor gene in satellite cells. • Satellite cell specific deletion of Mtor impairs muscle regeneration. • mTOR is necessary for satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. • Deletion of Mtor leads to reduced expression of key myogenic genes.

  6. Protein analysis through Western blot of cells excised individually from human brain and muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koob, A O; Bruns, L; Prassler, C; Masliah, E; Klopstock, T; Bender, A

    2012-06-15

    Comparing protein levels from single cells in tissue has not been achieved through Western blot. Laser capture microdissection allows for the ability to excise single cells from sectioned tissue and compile an aggregate of cells in lysis buffer. In this study we analyzed proteins from cells excised individually from brain and muscle tissue through Western blot. After we excised individual neurons from the substantia nigra of the brain, the accumulated surface area of the individual cells was 120,000, 24,000, 360,000, 480,000, 600,000 μm2. We used an optimized Western blot protocol to probe for tyrosine hydroxylase in this cell pool. We also took 360,000 μm2 of astrocytes (1700 cells) and analyzed the specificity of the method. In muscle we were able to analyze the proteins of the five complexes of the electron transport chain through Western blot from 200 human cells. With this method, we demonstrate the ability to compare cell-specific protein levels in the brain and muscle and describe for the first time how to visualize proteins through Western blot from cells captured individually. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased proinflammatory responses from asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells in response to rhinovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Nicholas JC

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exacerbations of asthma are associated with viral respiratory tract infections, of which rhinoviruses (RV are the predominant virus type. Airway smooth muscle is important in asthma pathogenesis, however little is known about the potential interaction of RV and human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM. We hypothesised that rhinovirus induction of inflammatory cytokine release from airway smooth muscle is augmented and differentially regulated in asthmatic compared to normal HASM cells. Methods HASM cells, isolated from either asthmatic or non-asthmatic subjects, were infected with rhinovirus. Cytokine production was assayed by ELISA, ICAM-1 cell surface expression was assessed by FACS, and the transcription regulation of IL-6 was measured by luciferase activity. Results RV-induced IL-6 release was significantly greater in HASM cells derived from asthmatic subjects compared to non-asthmatic subjects. This response was RV specific, as 5% serum- induced IL-6 release was not different in the two cell types. Whilst serum stimulated IL-8 production in cells from both subject groups, RV induced IL-8 production in only asthmatic derived HASM cells. The transcriptional induction of IL-6 was differentially regulated via C/EBP in the asthmatic and NF-κB + AP-1 in the non-asthmatic HASM cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates augmentation and differential transcriptional regulation of RV specific innate immune response in HASM cells derived from asthmatic and non-asthmatics, and may give valuable insight into the mechanisms of RV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  8. Expressed sequence tags for bovine muscle satellite cells, myotube formed-cells and adipocyte-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Ju Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Muscle satellite cells (MSCs represent a devoted stem cell population that is responsible for postnatal muscle growth and skeletal muscle regeneration. An important characteristic of MSCs is that they encompass multi potential mesenchymal stem cell activity and are able to differentiate into myocytes and adipocytes. To achieve a global view of the genes differentially expressed in MSCs, myotube formed-cells (MFCs and adipocyte-like cells (ALCs, we performed large-scale EST sequencing of normalized cDNA libraries developed from bovine MSCs. RESULTS: A total of 24,192 clones were assembled into 3,333 clusters, 5,517 singletons and 3,842contigs. Functional annotation of these unigenes revealed that a large portion of the differentially expressed genes are involved in cellular and signaling processes. Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID functional analysis of three subsets of highly expressed gene lists (MSC233, MFC258, and ALC248 highlighted some common and unique biological processes among MSC, MFC and ALC. Additionally, genes that may be specific to MSC, MFC and ALC are reported here, and the role of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase2 (DDAH2 during myogenesis and hemoglobin subunit alpha2 (HBA2 during transdifferentiation in C2C12 were assayed as a case study. DDAH2 was up-regulated during myognesis and knockdown of DDAH2 by siRNA significantly decreased myogenin (MYOG expression corresponding with the slight change in cell morphology. In contrast, HBA2 was up-regulated during ALC formation and resulted in decreased intracellular lipid accumulation and CD36 mRNA expression upon knockdown assay. CONCLUSION: In this study, a large number of EST sequences were generated from the MSC, MFC and ALC. Overall, the collection of ESTs generated in this study provides a starting point for the identification of novel genes involved in MFC and ALC formation, which in turn offers a fundamental resource to

  9. Quiescence of human muscle stem cells is favored by culture on natural biopolymeric films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, Claire; DiStasio, Nicholas; Rossi, Thomas; Sébastien, Muriel; Sakai, Hiroshi; Kalman, Benoit; Boudou, Thomas; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Marty, Isabelle; Bigot, Anne; Mouly, Vincent; Picart, Catherine

    2017-05-02

    Satellite cells are quiescent resident muscle stem cells that present an important potential to regenerate damaged tissue. However, this potential is diminished once they are removed from their niche environment in vivo, prohibiting the long-term study and genetic investigation of these cells. This study therefore aimed to provide a novel biomaterial platform for the in-vitro culture of human satellite cells that maintains their stem-like quiescent state, an important step for cell therapeutic studies. Human muscle satellite cells were isolated from two donors and cultured on soft biopolymeric films of controlled stiffness. Cell adhesive phenotype, maintenance of satellite cell quiescence and capacity for gene manipulation were investigated using FACS, western blotting, fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. About 85% of satellite cells cultured in vitro on soft biopolymer films for 3 days maintained expression of the quiescence marker Pax7, as compared with 60% on stiffer films and 50% on tissue culture plastic. The soft biopolymeric films allowed satellite cell culture for up to 6 days without renewing the media. These cells retained their stem-like properties, as evidenced by the expression of stem cell markers and reduced expression of differentiated markers. In addition, 95% of cells grown on these soft biopolymeric films were in the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle, as opposed to those grown on plastic that became activated and began to proliferate and differentiate. Our study identifies a new biomaterial made of a biopolymer thin film for the maintenance of the quiescence state of muscle satellite cells. These cells could be activated at any point simply by replating them onto a plastic culture dish. Furthermore, these cells could be genetically manipulated by viral transduction, showing that this biomaterial may be further used for therapeutic strategies.

  10. Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus: interaction with fibroblasts and muscle cells - new insights into parasite-mediated host cell cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Ricardo Chaves; Benchimol, Marlene

    2012-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus are parasitic, flagellated protists that inhabit the urogenital tract of humans and bovines, respectively. T. vaginalis causes the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide and has been associated with an increased risk for human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection in humans. Infections by T. foetus cause significant losses to the beef industry worldwide due to infertility and spontaneous abortion in cows. Several studies have shown a close association between trichomonads and the epithelium of the urogenital tract. However, little is known concerning the interaction of trichomonads with cells from deeper tissues, such as fibroblasts and muscle cells. Published parasite-host cell interaction studies have reported contradictory results regarding the ability of T. foetus and T. vaginalis to interact with and damage cells of different tissues. In this study, parasite-host cell interactions were examined by culturing primary human fibroblasts obtained from abdominal biopsies performed during plastic surgeries with trichomonads. In addition, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, primary chick embryo myogenic cells and L6 muscle cells were also used as models of target cells. The parasite-host cell cultures were processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopy and were tested for cell viability and cell death. JC-1 staining, which measures mitochondrial membrane potential, was used to determine whether the parasites induced target cell damage. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling staining was used as an indicator of chromatin damage. The colorimetric crystal violet assay was performed to ana-lyse the cytotoxicity induced by the parasite. The results showed that T. foetus and T. vaginalis adhered to and were cytotoxic to both fibroblasts and muscle cells, indicating that trichomonas infection of the connective and muscle tissues is likely to occur; such infections could cause

  11. Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus: interaction with fibroblasts and muscle cells - new insights into parasite-mediated host cell cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Chaves Vilela

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus are parasitic, flagellated protists that inhabit the urogenital tract of humans and bovines, respectively. T. vaginalis causes the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide and has been associated with an increased risk for human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection in humans. Infections by T. foetus cause significant losses to the beef industry worldwide due to infertility and spontaneous abortion in cows. Several studies have shown a close association between trichomonads and the epithelium of the urogenital tract. However, little is known concerning the interaction of trichomonads with cells from deeper tissues, such as fibroblasts and muscle cells. Published parasite-host cell interaction studies have reported contradictory results regarding the ability of T. foetus and T. vaginalis to interact with and damage cells of different tissues. In this study, parasite-host cell interactions were examined by culturing primary human fibroblasts obtained from abdominal biopsies performed during plastic surgeries with trichomonads. In addition, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, primary chick embryo myogenic cells and L6 muscle cells were also used as models of target cells. The parasite-host cell cultures were processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopy and were tested for cell viability and cell death. JC-1 staining, which measures mitochondrial membrane potential, was used to determine whether the parasites induced target cell damage. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling staining was used as an indicator of chromatin damage. The colorimetric crystal violet assay was performed to ana-lyse the cytotoxicity induced by the parasite. The results showed that T. foetus and T. vaginalis adhered to and were cytotoxic to both fibroblasts and muscle cells, indicating that trichomonas infection of the connective and muscle tissues is likely to occur; such

  12. Reconstitution of experimental neurogenic bladder dysfunction using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Masahiro; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Masuda, Maki; Akatsuka, Akira; Hoshi, Akio; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Postoperative neurogenic bladder dysfunction is a major complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer and is mainly caused by unavoidable damage to the bladder branch of the pelvic plexus (BBPP) associated with colateral blood vessels. Thus, we attempted to reconstitute disrupted BBPP and blood vessels using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells that show synchronized reconstitution capacity of vascular, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems. METHODS.: Under pentobarbital anesthesia, intravesical pressure by electrical stimulation of BBPP was measured as bladder function. The distal portion of BBPP with blood vessels was then cut unilaterally (experimental neurogenic bladder model). Measurements were performed before, immediately after, and at 4 weeks after transplantation as functional recovery. Stem cells were obtained from the right soleus and gastrocnemius muscles after enzymatic digestion and cell sorting as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN). Suspended cells were autografted around the damaged region, whereas medium alone and CD45 cells were transplanted as control groups. To determine the morphological contribution of the transplanted cells, stem cells obtained from green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse muscles were transplanted into a nude rat model and were examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. RESULTS.: At 4 weeks after surgery, the transplantation group showed significantly higher functional recovery ( approximately 80%) than the two controls ( approximately 28% and 24%). The transplanted cells showed an incorporation into the damaged peripheral nerves and blood vessels after differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and fibroblasts around the bladder. CONCLUSION.: Transplantation of multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of damaged BBPP.

  13. Peroxisomes and peroxisomal functions in muscle. Studies with muscle cells from controls and a patient with the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanders, R J; Barth, P G; van Roermund, C W; Ofman, R; Wolterman, R; Schutgens, R B; Tager, J M; van den Bosch, H; Bolhuis, P A

    1987-05-01

    In the present study we investigated peroxisomal functions in cultured human muscle cells from control subjects and from a patient with the Zellweger syndrome, a genetic disease characterized by the absence of morphologically distinguishable peroxisomes in liver and kidney. In homogenates of cultured muscle cells from control subjects, catalase is contained within subcellular particles, acyl-CoA:dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase activity is present and palmitoyl-CoA can be oxidized by a peroxisomal beta-oxidative pathway; these findings are indicative of the presence of peroxisomes in the cells. In homogenates of cultured muscle cells from the patient with the Zellweger syndrome, acyl-CoA:dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase activity was deficient, peroxisomal beta-oxidation of palmitoyl-CoA was impaired and catalase was not particle-bound. These findings indicate that functional peroxisomes are absent in muscle from patients with the Zellweger syndrome. We conclude that cultured human muscle cells can be used as a model system to study peroxisomal functions in muscle and the consequences for this tissue of a generalized dysfunction of peroxisomes.

  14. Matrix production of smooth muscle cells from rat aorta in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiemer, B; Springmeier, G; el-Jarad, L; Schröter-Kermani, C

    1993-01-01

    Immunofluorescence microscopic methods served to demonstrate the production of the following matrix components in cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells from rat aorta: fibronectin; nidogen; heparan sulphate-proteoglycan (HS-PG); laminin; and collagen types I, III, IV, V, and VI. A time-dependence of synthesis and secretion could be shown for a number of components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), such as laminin. The results revealed the following estimated quantitative differences of the collagen types: type I > type III > types V and VI. A filamentous/fibrillar matrix and also occasionally a typical basal lamina could be demonstrated electron microscopically around the smooth muscle cells.

  15. Myogenic Progenitor Cells Control Extracellular Matrix Production by Fibroblasts during Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher S; Kirby, Tyler J; Kosmac, Kate; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2017-01-05

    Satellite cells, the predominant stem cell population in adult skeletal muscle, are activated in response to hypertrophic stimuli and give rise to myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs) within the extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds myofibers. This ECM is composed largely of collagens secreted by interstitial fibrogenic cells, which influence satellite cell activity and muscle repair during hypertrophy and aging. Here we show that MPCs interact with interstitial fibrogenic cells to ensure proper ECM deposition and optimal muscle remodeling in response to hypertrophic stimuli. MPC-dependent ECM remodeling during the first week of a growth stimulus is sufficient to ensure long-term myofiber hypertrophy. MPCs secrete exosomes containing miR-206, which represses Rrbp1, a master regulator of collagen biosynthesis, in fibrogenic cells to prevent excessive ECM deposition. These findings provide insights into how skeletal stem and progenitor cells interact with other cell types to actively regulate their extracellular environments for tissue maintenance and adaptation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adult murine skeletal muscle contains cells that can differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve O Winitsky

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has long been held as scientific fact that soon after birth, cardiomyocytes cease dividing, thus explaining the limited restoration of cardiac function after a heart attack. Recent demonstrations of cardiac myocyte differentiation observed in vitro or after in vivo transplantation of adult stem cells from blood, fat, skeletal muscle, or heart have challenged this view. Analysis of these studies has been complicated by the large disparity in the magnitude of effects seen by different groups and obscured by the recently appreciated process of in vivo stem-cell fusion. We now show a novel population of nonsatellite cells in adult murine skeletal muscle that progress under standard primary cell-culture conditions to autonomously beating cardiomyocytes. Their differentiation into beating cardiomyocytes is characterized here by video microscopy, confocal-detected calcium transients, electron microscopy, immunofluorescent cardiac-specific markers, and single-cell patch recordings of cardiac action potentials. Within 2 d after tail-vein injection of these marked cells into a mouse model of acute infarction, the marked cells are visible in the heart. By 6 d they begin to differentiate without fusing to recipient cardiac cells. Three months later, the tagged cells are visible as striated heart muscle restricted to the region of the cardiac infarct.

  17. Adult Murine Skeletal Muscle Contains Cells That Can Differentiate into Beating Cardiomyocytes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winitsky Steve O

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It has long been held as scientific fact that soon after birth, cardiomyocytes cease dividing, thus explaining the limited restoration of cardiac function after a heart attack. Recent demonstrations of cardiac myocyte differentiation observed in vitro or after in vivo transplantation of adult stem cells from blood, fat, skeletal muscle, or heart have challenged this view. Analysis of these studies has been complicated by the large disparity in the magnitude of effects seen by different groups and obscured by the recently appreciated process of in vivo stem-cell fusion. We now show a novel population of nonsatellite cells in adult murine skeletal muscle that progress under standard primary cell-culture conditions to autonomously beating cardiomyocytes. Their differentiation into beating cardiomyocytes is characterized here by video microscopy, confocal-detected calcium transients, electron microscopy, immunofluorescent cardiac-specific markers, and single-cell patch recordings of cardiac action potentials. Within 2 d after tail-vein injection of these marked cells into a mouse model of acute infarction, the marked cells are visible in the heart. By 6 d they begin to differentiate without fusing to recipient cardiac cells. Three months later, the tagged cells are visible as striated heart muscle restricted to the region of the cardiac infarct.

  18. Apoptosis in differentiating C2C12 muscle cells selectively targets Bcl-2-deficient myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöneich, Christian; Dremina, Elena; Galeva, Nadezhda; Sharov, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Muscle cell apoptosis accompanies normal muscle development and regeneration, as well as degenerative diseases and aging. C2C12 murine myoblast cells represent a common model to study muscle differentiation. Though it was already shown that myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells is accompanied by enhanced apoptosis in a fraction of cells, either the cell population sensitive to apoptosis or regulatory mechanisms for the apoptotic response are unclear so far. In the current study we characterize apoptotic phenotypes of different types of C2C12 cells at all stages of differentiation, and report here that myotubes of differentiated C2C12 cells with low levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression are particularly vulnerable to apoptosis even though they are displaying low levels of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax, Bak and Bad. In contrast, reserve cells exhibit higher levels of Bcl-2 and high resistance to apoptosis. The transfection of proliferating myoblasts with Bcl-2 prior to differentiation did not protect against spontaneous apoptosis accompanying differentiation of C2C12 cells but led to Bcl-2 overexpression in myotubes and to significant protection from apoptotic cell loss caused by exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Overall, our data advocate for a Bcl-2-dependent mechanism of apoptosis in differentiated muscle cells. However, downstream processes for spontaneous and hydrogen peroxide induced apoptosis are not completely similar. Apoptosis in differentiating myoblasts and myotubes is regulated not through interaction of Bcl-2 with pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins such as Bax, Bak, and Bad.

  19. Bilirubin inhibits neointima formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration

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    Kelly J. Peyton

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bilirubin is a heme metabolite generated by the concerted action of the enzymes heme oxygenase and biliverdin reductase. Although long considered a toxic byproduct of heme catabolism, recent preclinical and clinical studies indicate the bilirubin exerts beneficial effects in the circulation. In the present study, we determined whether local administration of bilirubin attenuates neointima formation following injury of rat carotid arteries. In addition, the ability of bilirubin to regulate the proliferation and migration of human arterial smooth muscle cells was investigated. Local perivascular administration of bilirubin immediately following balloon injury of rat carotid arteries significantly attenuated neointima formation. Bilirubin-mediated inhibition of neointimal thickening was associated with a significant decrease in ERK activity and cyclin D1 and A protein expression, and an increase in p21 and p53 protein expression in injured blood vessels. Treatment of human aortic smooth muscle cells with bilirubin inhibited proliferation and migration in a concentration-dependent manner without affecting cell viability. In addition, bilirubin resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and this was paralleled by a decrease in the fraction of cells in the S and G2M phases of the cell cycle. Finally, bilirubin had no effect on mitochondrial function and ATP content of vascular SMCs. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that bilirubin inhibits neointima formation after arterial injury and this is associated with alterations in the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins. Furthermore bilirubin blocks proliferation and migration of human arterial smooth muscle cells and arrests smooth muscle cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Bilirubin represents an attractive therapeutic agent in treating occlusive vascular disease.

  20. Proliferation Rates of Bovine Primary Muscle Cells Relate to Liveweight and Carcase Weight in Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Chantal A.; Wadeson, Jenny; Leyton, Carolina P.; Siddell, Jason P.; Greenwood, Paul L.; White, Jason D.; McDonagh, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Muscling in cattle is largely influenced by genetic background, ultimately affecting beef yield and is of major interest to the beef industry. This investigation aimed to determine whether primary skeletal muscle cells isolated from different breeds of cattle with a varying genetic potential for muscling differ in their myogenic proliferative capacity. Primary skeletal muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the Longissimus muscle (LM) of 6 month old Angus, Hereford and Wagyu X Angus cattle. Cells were assessed for rate of proliferation and gene expression of PAX7, MYOD, MYF5, and MYOG. Proliferation rates were found to differ between breeds of cattle whereby myoblasts from Angus cattle were found to proliferate at a greater rate than those of Hereford and Wagyu X Angus during early stages of growth (5–20 hours in culture) in vitro (P < 0.05). The proliferation rates of myoblasts during early stages of culture in vitro were also found to be positively related to the liveweight and carcase weight of cattle (P < 0.05). Gene expression of MYF5 was also found to be significantly down-regulated in WagyuX compared with Angus cattle (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that early events during myogenesis are important for determining liveweight and caracase weights in cattle. PMID:25875203

  1. Cellular pathology of atherosclerosis: smooth muscle cells prime cocultured endothelial cells for enhanced leukocyte adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainger, G E; Nash, G B

    2001-03-30

    During the development of an atherosclerotic plaque, mononuclear leukocytes infiltrate the artery wall through vascular endothelial cells (ECs). At the same time, arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) change from the physiological contractile phenotype to the secretory phenotype and migrate into the plaque. We investigated whether secretory SMCs released cytokines that stimulated ECs in a manner leading to increased leukocyte recruitment and thus might accelerate atheroma formation. SMCs and ECs were established in coculture on the opposite sides of a porous membrane, and the cocultured cells were incorporated into a flow-based assay for studying leukocyte adhesion. We found that coculture primed ECs so that their response to the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha was amplified. ECs cocultured with SMCs supported greatly increased adhesion of flowing leukocytes and were sensitized to respond to tumor necrosis factor-alpha at concentrations 10 000 times lower than ECs cultured alone. In addition, coculture altered the endothelial selectin adhesion molecules used for leukocyte capture. EC priming was attributable to the cytokine transforming growth factor-beta(1), which was proteolytically activated to a biologically active form by the serine protease plasmin. These results suggest a new role for secretory SMCs in the development of atheromatous plaque. We propose that paracrine interaction between ECs and SMCs has the potential to amplify leukocyte recruitment to sites of atheroma and exacerbate the inflammatory processes believed to be at the heart of disease progression.

  2. Atrial natriuretic factor inhibits mitogen-induced growth in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, P M; De Vito, P; Fraziano, M; Mattioli, P; Luly, P; Di Nardo, P

    2002-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a polypeptide able to affect cardiovascular homeostasis exhibiting diuretic, natriuretic, and vasorelaxant activities. ANF shows antimitogenic effects in different cell types acting through R(2) receptor. Excessive proliferation of smooth muscle cells is a common phenomenon in diseases such as atherosclerosis, but the role of growth factors in the mechanism which modulate this process has yet to be clarified. The potential antimitogenic role of ANF on the cell growth induced by growth factors appears very intriguing. Aim of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of ANF on rat aortic smooth muscle (RASM) cells proliferation induced by known mitogens and the mechanism involved. Our data show that ANF, at physiological concentration range, inhibits RASM cell proliferation induced by known mitogens such as PDGF and insulin, and the effect seems to be elicited through the modulation of phosphatidic acid (PA) production and MAP kinases involvement. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Regulation of muscle stem cell functions: a focus on the p38 MAPK signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Segales

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Formation of skeletal muscle fibers (myogenesis during development and after tissue injury in the adult constitutes an excellent paradigm to investigate the mechanisms whereby environmental cues control gene expression programs in muscle stem cells (satellite cells by acting on transcriptional and epigenetic effectors. Here we will review the molecular mechanisms implicated in the transition of satellite cells throughout the distinct myogenic stages (i.e., activation from quiescence, proliferation, differentiation and self-renewal. We will also discuss recent findings on the causes underlying satellite cell functional decline with aging. In particular, our review will focus on the epigenetic changes underlying fate decisions and on how the p38 MAPK signaling pathway integrates the environmental signals at the chromatin to build up satellite cell adaptive responses during the process of muscle regeneration, and how these responses are altered in aging. A better comprehension of the signaling pathways connecting external and intrinsic factors will illuminate the path for improving muscle regeneration in the aged.

  4. Intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, J. C.; Raynaud, F.; Nguyen, D.; Piacentini, N.; Meister, J. J.

    2016-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca2+ waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca2+ wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca2+ wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca2+ dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca2+, cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca2+ wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca2+ wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca2+ wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle cells.

  5. Influence of different types of carbon nanotubes on muscle cell response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraczek-Szczypta, Aneta, E-mail: afraczek@agh.edu.pl [Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH-University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Menaszek, Elzbieta [Department of Cytobiology, Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University, Medyczna 9, 30-068 Krakow (Poland); Blazewicz, Stanislaw [Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH-University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Adu, Jimi; Shevchenko, Ross [Pharmidex Pharmaceutical Services, 72 New Bond Street, Mayfair London, W1S 1RR (United Kingdom); Syeda, Tahmina Bahar; Misra, Anil; Alavijeh, Mohammad [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Huxley Building, University of Brighton, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), before and after chemical surface functionalization on muscle cell response in vitro and in vivo conditions. Prior to biological tests the surface physicochemical properties of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) deposited on a polymer membrane were investigated. To 'evaluate microstructure and structure of CNTs scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used. During in vitro study CNTs deposited on polymer membrane were contacted directly with myoblast cells, and after 7 days of culture cytotoxicity of samples was analyzed. Moreover, cell morphology in contact with CNTs was observed using SEM and fluorescence microscopy. The cytotoxicity of CNTs modified in a different way was comparable and significantly lower in comparison with pure polymer membrane. Microscopy analysis of cultured myoblasts confirms intense cell proliferation of all investigated samples with CNTs while for two kinds of CNTs myoblasts' differentiation into myotubes was observed. Histochemical reactions for the activity of enzymes such as acid phosphatase, cytochrome C oxidase, and non-specific esterase allowed the analysis of the extent of inflammation, degree of regeneration process of the muscle fibers resulting from the presence of the satellite cells and the neuromuscular junction on muscle fibers in contact with CNTs after implantation of CNTs into gluteal muscle of rat.

  6. Immortalized human myotonic dystrophy muscle cell lines to assess therapeutic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Arandel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 and type 2 (DM2 are autosomal dominant neuromuscular diseases caused by microsatellite expansions and belong to the family of RNA-dominant disorders. Availability of cellular models in which the DM mutation is expressed within its natural context is essential to facilitate efforts to identify new therapeutic compounds. Here, we generated immortalized DM1 and DM2 human muscle cell lines that display nuclear RNA aggregates of expanded repeats, a hallmark of myotonic dystrophy. Selected clones of DM1 and DM2 immortalized myoblasts behave as parental primary myoblasts with a reduced fusion capacity of immortalized DM1 myoblasts when compared with control and DM2 cells. Alternative splicing defects were observed in differentiated DM1 muscle cell lines, but not in DM2 lines. Splicing alterations did not result from differentiation delay because similar changes were found in immortalized DM1 transdifferentiated fibroblasts in which myogenic differentiation has been forced by overexpression of MYOD1. As a proof-of-concept, we show that antisense approaches alleviate disease-associated defects, and an RNA-seq analysis confirmed that the vast majority of mis-spliced events in immortalized DM1 muscle cells were affected by antisense treatment, with half of them significantly rescued in treated DM1 cells. Immortalized DM1 muscle cell lines displaying characteristic disease-associated molecular features such as nuclear RNA aggregates and splicing defects can be used as robust readouts for the screening of therapeutic compounds. Therefore, immortalized DM1 and DM2 muscle cell lines represent new models and tools to investigate molecular pathophysiological mechanisms and evaluate the in vitro effects of compounds on RNA toxicity associated with myotonic dystrophy mutations.

  7. Immortalized human myotonic dystrophy muscle cell lines to assess therapeutic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arandel, Ludovic; Polay Espinoza, Micaela; Matloka, Magdalena; Bazinet, Audrey; De Dea Diniz, Damily; Naouar, Naïra; Rau, Frédérique; Jollet, Arnaud; Edom-Vovard, Frédérique; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Puymirat, Jack; Battail, Christophe; Boland, Anne; Deleuze, Jean-Francois; Mouly, Vincent; Klein, Arnaud F; Furling, Denis

    2017-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2) are autosomal dominant neuromuscular diseases caused by microsatellite expansions and belong to the family of RNA-dominant disorders. Availability of cellular models in which the DM mutation is expressed within its natural context is essential to facilitate efforts to identify new therapeutic compounds. Here, we generated immortalized DM1 and DM2 human muscle cell lines that display nuclear RNA aggregates of expanded repeats, a hallmark of myotonic dystrophy. Selected clones of DM1 and DM2 immortalized myoblasts behave as parental primary myoblasts with a reduced fusion capacity of immortalized DM1 myoblasts when compared with control and DM2 cells. Alternative splicing defects were observed in differentiated DM1 muscle cell lines, but not in DM2 lines. Splicing alterations did not result from differentiation delay because similar changes were found in immortalized DM1 transdifferentiated fibroblasts in which myogenic differentiation has been forced by overexpression of MYOD1. As a proof-of-concept, we show that antisense approaches alleviate disease-associated defects, and an RNA-seq analysis confirmed that the vast majority of mis-spliced events in immortalized DM1 muscle cells were affected by antisense treatment, with half of them significantly rescued in treated DM1 cells. Immortalized DM1 muscle cell lines displaying characteristic disease-associated molecular features such as nuclear RNA aggregates and splicing defects can be used as robust readouts for the screening of therapeutic compounds. Therefore, immortalized DM1 and DM2 muscle cell lines represent new models and tools to investigate molecular pathophysiological mechanisms and evaluate the in vitro effects of compounds on RNA toxicity associated with myotonic dystrophy mutations. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Toll-like receptor 2 activation and serum amyloid A regulate smooth muscle cell extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Stephanie E; Pessolano, Lawrence G; Bishop, Christopher A; Best, Michael; Rich, Celeste B; Stone, Phillip J; Schreiber, Barbara M

    2017-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells contribute to extracellular matrix remodeling during atherogenesis. De-differentiated, synthetic smooth muscle cells are involved in processes of migration, proliferation and changes in expression of extracellular matrix components, all of which contribute to loss of homeostasis accompanying atherogenesis. Elevated levels of acute phase proteins, including serum amyloid A (SAA), are associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis. Although infection with periodontal and respiratory pathogens via activation of inflammatory cell Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 has been linked to vascular disease, little is known about smooth muscle cell TLR2 in atherosclerosis. This study addresses the role of SAA and TLR2 activation on smooth muscle cell matrix gene expression and insoluble elastin accumulation. Cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were treated with SAA or TLR2 agonists and the effect on expression of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and tropoelastin studied. SAA up-regulated MMP9 expression. Tropoelastin is an MMP9 substrate and decreased tropoelastin levels in SAA-treated cells supported the concept of extracellular matrix remodeling. Interestingly, SAA-induced down-regulation of tropoelastin was not only evident at the protein level but at the level of gene transcription as well. Contributions of proteasomes, nuclear factor κ B and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β on regulation of MMP9 vs. tropoleastin expression were revealed. Effects on Mmp9 and Eln mRNA expression persisted with long-term SAA treatment, resulting in decreased insoluble elastin accumulation. Interestingly, the SAA effects were TLR2-dependent and TLR2 activation by bacterial ligands also induced MMP9 expression and decreased tropoelastin expression. These data reveal a novel mechanism whereby SAA and/or infection induce changes in vascular elastin consistent with atherosclerosis.

  9. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (Phuman aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  10. Therapies for sarcopenia and regeneration of old skeletal muscles: more a case of old tissue architecture than old stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grounds, Miranda D

    2014-01-01

    Age related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function (sarcopenia) reduces independence and the quality of life for individuals, and leads to falls and fractures with escalating health costs for the rapidly aging human population. Thus there is much interest in developing interventions to reduce sarcopenia. One area that has attracted recent attention is the proposed use of myogenic stem cells to improve regeneration of old muscles. This mini-review challenges the fundamental need for myogenic stem cell therapy for sarcopenia. It presents evidence that demonstrates the excellent capacity of myogenic stem cells from very old rodent and human muscles to form new muscles after experimental myofiber necrosis. The many factors required for successful muscle regeneration are considered with a strong focus on integration of components of old muscle bioarchitecture. The fundamental role of satellite cells in homeostasis of normal aging muscles and the incidence of endogenous regeneration in old muscles is questioned. These issues, combined with problems for clinical myogenic stem cell therapies for severe muscle diseases, raise fundamental concerns about the justification for myogenic stem cell therapy for sarcopenia.

  11. Characterization of DLK1+ cells emerging during skeletal muscle remodeling in response to myositis, myopathies, and acute injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Petersson, Stine J; Jørgensen, Louise H

    2009-01-01

    , DLK1 was upregulated in all human myopathies analyzed, including Duchenne- and Becker muscular dystrophies. Substantial numbers of DLK1(+) satellite cells were observed in normal neonatal and Duchenne muscle, and furthermore, myogenic DLK1(+) cells were identified during muscle regeneration in animal...

  12. Nicotinamide riboside kinases display redundancy in mediating nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside metabolism in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Rachel S; Ratajczak, Joanna; Doig, Craig L; Oakey, Lucy A; Callingham, Rebecca; Da Silva Xavier, Gabriella; Garten, Antje; Elhassan, Yasir S; Redpath, Philip; Migaud, Marie E; Philp, Andrew; Brenner, Charles; Canto, Carles; Lavery, Gareth G

    2017-08-01

    Augmenting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) availability may protect skeletal muscle from age-related metabolic decline. Dietary supplementation of NAD + precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and nicotinamide riboside (NR) appear efficacious in elevating muscle NAD + . Here we sought to identify the pathways skeletal muscle cells utilize to synthesize NAD + from NMN and NR and provide insight into mechanisms of muscle metabolic homeostasis. We exploited expression profiling of muscle NAD + biosynthetic pathways, single and double nicotinamide riboside kinase 1/2 (NRK1/2) loss-of-function mice, and pharmacological inhibition of muscle NAD + recycling to evaluate NMN and NR utilization. Skeletal muscle cells primarily rely on nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), NRK1, and NRK2 for salvage biosynthesis of NAD + . NAMPT inhibition depletes muscle NAD + availability and can be rescued by NR and NMN as the preferred precursors for elevating muscle cell NAD + in a pathway that depends on NRK1 and NRK2. Nrk2 knockout mice develop normally and show subtle alterations to their NAD+ metabolome and expression of related genes. NRK1, NRK2, and double KO myotubes revealed redundancy in the NRK dependent metabolism of NR to NAD + . Significantly, these models revealed that NMN supplementation is also dependent upon NRK activity to enhance NAD + availability. These results identify skeletal muscle cells as requiring NAMPT to maintain NAD + availability and reveal that NRK1 and 2 display overlapping function in salvage of exogenous NR and NMN to augment intracellular NAD + availability.

  13. Rosmarinic Acid, a Rosemary Extract Polyphenol, Increases Skeletal Muscle Cell Glucose Uptake and Activates AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlavcheski, Filip; Naimi, Madina; Murphy, Brennan; Hudlicky, Tomas; Tsiani, Evangelia

    2017-10-07

    Skeletal muscle is a major insulin-target tissue and plays an important role in glucose homeostasis. Impaired insulin action in muscles leads to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. 5' AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is an energy sensor, its activation increases glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and AMPK activators have been viewed as a targeted approach in combating insulin resistance. We previously reported AMPK activation and increased muscle glucose uptake by rosemary extract (RE). In the present study, we examined the effects and the mechanism of action of rosmarinic acid (RA), a major RE constituent, in L6 rat muscle cells. RA (5.0 µM) increased glucose uptake (186 ± 4.17% of control, p < 0.001) to levels comparable to maximum insulin (204 ± 10.73% of control, p < 0.001) and metformin (202 ± 14.37% of control, p < 0.001). Akt phosphorylation was not affected by RA, while AMPK phosphorylation was increased. The RA-stimulated glucose uptake was inhibited by the AMPK inhibitor compound C and was not affected by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). The current study shows an effect of RA to increase muscle glucose uptake and AMPK phosphorylation. RA deserves further study as it shows potential to be used as an agent to regulate glucose homeostasis.

  14. Rosmarinic Acid, a Rosemary Extract Polyphenol, Increases Skeletal Muscle Cell Glucose Uptake and Activates AMPK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Vlavcheski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a major insulin-target tissue and plays an important role in glucose homeostasis. Impaired insulin action in muscles leads to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. 5′ AMP-activated kinase (AMPK is an energy sensor, its activation increases glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and AMPK activators have been viewed as a targeted approach in combating insulin resistance. We previously reported AMPK activation and increased muscle glucose uptake by rosemary extract (RE. In the present study, we examined the effects and the mechanism of action of rosmarinic acid (RA, a major RE constituent, in L6 rat muscle cells. RA (5.0 µM increased glucose uptake (186 ± 4.17% of control, p < 0.001 to levels comparable to maximum insulin (204 ± 10.73% of control, p < 0.001 and metformin (202 ± 14.37% of control, p < 0.001. Akt phosphorylation was not affected by RA, while AMPK phosphorylation was increased. The RA-stimulated glucose uptake was inhibited by the AMPK inhibitor compound C and was not affected by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K. The current study shows an effect of RA to increase muscle glucose uptake and AMPK phosphorylation. RA deserves further study as it shows potential to be used as an agent to regulate glucose homeostasis.

  15. MeCP2 Affects Skeletal Muscle Growth and Morphology through Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Valentina; Gandaglia, Anna; Galli, Francesco; Tirone, Mario; Bellini, Elisa; Campana, Lara; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Brunelli, Silvia; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene and affecting roughly 1 out of 10.000 born girls. Symptoms range in severity and include stereotypical movement, lack of spoken language, seizures, ataxia and severe intellectual disability. Notably, muscle tone is generally abnormal in RTT girls and women and the Mecp2-null mouse model constitutively reflects this disease feature. We hypothesized that MeCP2 in muscle might physiologically contribute to its development and/or homeostasis, and conversely its defects in RTT might alter the tissue integrity or function. We show here that a disorganized architecture, with hypotrophic fibres and tissue fibrosis, characterizes skeletal muscles retrieved from Mecp2-null mice. Alterations of the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway accompany the muscle phenotype. A conditional mouse model selectively depleted of Mecp2 in skeletal muscles is characterized by healthy muscles that are morphologically and molecularly indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice raising the possibility that hypotonia in RTT is mainly, if not exclusively, mediated by non-cell autonomous effects. Our results suggest that defects in paracrine/endocrine signaling and, in particular, in the GH/IGF axis appear as the major cause of the observed muscular defects. Remarkably, this is the first study describing the selective deletion of Mecp2 outside the brain. Similar future studies will permit to unambiguously define the direct impact of MeCP2 on tissue dysfunctions.

  16. MeCP2 Affects Skeletal Muscle Growth and Morphology through Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Conti

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is an autism spectrum disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene and affecting roughly 1 out of 10.000 born girls. Symptoms range in severity and include stereotypical movement, lack of spoken language, seizures, ataxia and severe intellectual disability. Notably, muscle tone is generally abnormal in RTT girls and women and the Mecp2-null mouse model constitutively reflects this disease feature. We hypothesized that MeCP2 in muscle might physiologically contribute to its development and/or homeostasis, and conversely its defects in RTT might alter the tissue integrity or function. We show here that a disorganized architecture, with hypotrophic fibres and tissue fibrosis, characterizes skeletal muscles retrieved from Mecp2-null mice. Alterations of the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway accompany the muscle phenotype. A conditional mouse model selectively depleted of Mecp2 in skeletal muscles is characterized by healthy muscles that are morphologically and molecularly indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice raising the possibility that hypotonia in RTT is mainly, if not exclusively, mediated by non-cell autonomous effects. Our results suggest that defects in paracrine/endocrine signaling and, in particular, in the GH/IGF axis appear as the major cause of the observed muscular defects. Remarkably, this is the first study describing the selective deletion of Mecp2 outside the brain. Similar future studies will permit to unambiguously define the direct impact of MeCP2 on tissue dysfunctions.

  17. The migrations of Drosophila muscle founders and primordial germ cells are interdependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanik, Vincent; Dunipace, Leslie; Bae, Young-Kyung; Macabenta, Frank; Sun, Jingjing; Trisnadi, Nathanie; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2016-09-01

    Caudal visceral mesoderm (CVM) cells migrate from posterior to anterior of the Drosophila embryo as two bilateral streams of cells to support the specification of longitudinal muscles along the midgut. To accomplish this long-distance migration, CVM cells receive input from their environment, but little is known about how this collective cell migration is regulated. In a screen we found that wunen mutants exhibit CVM cell migration defects. Wunens are lipid phosphate phosphatases known to regulate the directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs). PGC and CVM cell types interact while PGCs are en route to the somatic gonadal mesoderm, and previous studies have shown that CVM impacts PGC migration. In turn, we found here that CVM cells exhibit an affinity for PGCs, localizing to the position of PGCs whether mislocalized or trapped in the endoderm. In the absence of PGCs, CVM cells exhibit subtle changes, including more cohesive movement of the migrating collective, and an increased number of longitudinal muscles is found at anterior sections of the larval midgut. These data demonstrate that PGC and CVM cell migrations are interdependent and suggest that distinct migrating cell types can coordinately influence each other to promote effective cell migration during development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. RNAi targeting embryonic myosin heavy chain isoform inhibited bound thrombin-induced migration of vascular smooth muscle cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sunagawa, Masanori; Shimada, Seiji; Nakamura, Mariko; Kosugi, Tadayoshi

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effect of bound thrombin, a complex of alpha-thrombin with fibrin fragments derived from clots, on proliferation and migration of cultured rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells, cell...

  19. Activation of GPER Induces Differentiation and Inhibition of Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Li

    Full Text Available Vascular pathology and dysfunction are direct life-threatening outcomes resulting from atherosclerosis or vascular injury, which are primarily attributed to contractile smooth muscle cells (SMCs dedifferentiation and proliferation by re-entering cell cycle. Increasing evidence suggests potent protective effects of G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER activation against cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanism underlying GPER function remains poorly understood, especially if it plays a potential role in modulating coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs.The objective of our study was to understand the functional role of GPER in CASMC proliferation and differentiation in coronary arteries using from humans and swine models. We found that the GPER agonist, G-1, inhibited both human and porcine CASMC proliferation in a concentration- (10(-8 to 10(-5 M and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry revealed that treatment with G-1 significantly decreased the proportion of S-phase and G2/M cells in the growing cell population, suggesting that G-1 inhibits cell proliferation by slowing progression of the cell cycle. Further, G-1-induced cell cycle retardation was associated with decreased expression of cyclin B, up-regulation of cyclin D1, and concomitant induction of p21, and partially mediated by suppressed ERK1/2 and Akt pathways. In addition, G-1 induces SMC differentiation evidenced by increased α-smooth muscle actin (α-actin and smooth muscle protein 22α (SM22α protein expressions and inhibits CASMC migration induced by growth medium.GPER activation inhibits CASMC proliferation by suppressing cell cycle progression via inhibition of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation. GPER may constitute a novel mechanism to suppress intimal migration and/or synthetic phenotype of VSMC.

  20. Developmental Changes is Expression of Beta-Adrenergic Receptors in Cultures of C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Vaughn, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists have been reported to modulate growth in several mammalian and avian species, and bAR agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through this receptor. Because of the importance of bAR regulation on muscle protein metabolism in muscle cells, the objectives of this study were to determine the developmental expression pattern of the bAR population in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells, and to analyze changes in both the quantity and isoform expression of the major muscle protein, myosin. The number of bAR in mononucleated C2C12 cells was approximately 8,000 bAR per cell, which is comparable with the population reported in several other nonmuscle cell types. However, the bar population increased after myoblast fusion to greater than 50,000 bAR per muscle cell equivalent. The reasons for this apparent over-expression of bAR in C2C12 cells is not known. The quantity of myosin also increased after C2C12 myoblast fusion, but the quantity of myosin was less than that reported in primary muscle cell cultures. Finally, at least five different isoforms of myosin heavy chain could be resolved in C2C12 cells, and three of these exhibited either increased or decreased developmental regulation relative to the others. Thus, C2C12 myoblasts undergo developmental regulation of bAR population and myosin heavy chain isoform expression.

  1. Identification and Characterization of Adult Porcine Muscle Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilschut, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, tissue-specific stem cell research has been emerging. Stem cells are characterized by a long-term expansion and a broad developmental potential in vitro. Pre-clinical studies appear promising, but still many limitations have to be overcome before broad therapeutic use of stem

  2. Suppression of vascular smooth muscle cells' proliferation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-26

    Dec 26, 2011 ... migration period, transwell chambers were fixed by methyl alcohol and stained by hematoxylin, and then the non-migrating cells were removed with a cotton swab from the upper surface. The number of cells that had migrated to the lower surface of the membrane was determined per ×200 high power field.

  3. Postembryonic fast muscle growth of teleost fish depends upon a nonuniformly distributed population of mitotically active Pax7+ precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschallinger, J; Obermayer, A; Sänger, A M; Stoiber, W; Steinbacher, Peter

    2009-09-01

    Muscle development in teleost embryos has been shown to depend on myogenic cell recruitment from the dermomyotome (DM). However, little is known as to the cellular mechanisms that account for myotome growth after the dissociation of the DM. Here we combine immunolabeling for cell-specific markers with quantitative analysis to determine the sources and patterns of activation of myogenic cells in pearlfish larvae. Results demonstrate that appearance of mitotically active myogenic precursors inside the myotome coincides with the dissociation of the DM. Such cells are preferentially aggregated within the posterior lateral fast muscle. We therefore propose a growth model in which a pool of proliferative DM-derived precursors transferred to the posterior lateral fast muscle functions as an important source of myogenic cell spread to carry forward stratified fast muscle hyperplasia. This indicates that postembryonic teleost muscle growth includes a cellular mechanism that has no direct equivalent in the amniotes.

  4. The PERK arm of the unfolded protein response regulates satellite cell-mediated skeletal muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M; Mann, Aman K; Gallot, Yann S; Bohnert, Kyle R; Cavener, Douglas R; Whittemore, Scott R; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults is mediated by satellite stem cells. Accumulation of misfolded proteins triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress that leads to unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is relayed to the cell through the activation of PERK, IRE1/XBP1, and ATF6. Here, we demonstrate that levels of PERK and IRE1 are increased in satellite cells upon muscle injury. Inhibition of PERK, but not the IRE1 arm of the UPR in satellite cells inhibits myofiber regeneration in adult mice. PERK is essential for the survival and differentiation of activated satellite cells into the myogenic lineage. Deletion of PERK causes hyper-activation of p38 MAPK during myogenesis. Blocking p38 MAPK activity improves the survival and differentiation of PERK-deficient satellite cells in vitro and muscle formation in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that the PERK arm of the UPR plays a pivotal role in the regulation of satellite cell homeostasis during regenerative myogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22871.001 PMID:28332979

  5. Nitric oxide inhibits calpain-mediated proteolysis of talin in skeletal muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, T. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside prevented many of the effects of calcium ionophore on C(2)C(12) muscle cells, including preventing talin proteolysis and release into the cytosol and reducing loss of vinculin, cell detachment, and loss of cellular protein. These results indicate that nitric oxide inhibition of calpain protected the cells from ionophore-induced proteolysis. Calpain inhibitor I and a cell-permeable calpastatin peptide also protected the cells from proteolysis, confirming that ionophore-induced proteolysis was primarily calpain mediated. The activity of m-calpain in a casein zymogram was inhibited by sodium nitroprusside, and this inhibition was reversed by dithiothreitol. Previous incubation with the active site-targeted calpain inhibitor I prevented most of the sodium nitroprusside-induced inhibition of m-calpain activity. These data suggest that nitric oxide inhibited m-calpain activity via S-nitrosylation of the active site cysteine. The results of this study indicate that nitric oxide produced endogenously by skeletal muscle and other cell types has the potential to inhibit m-calpain activity and cytoskeletal proteolysis.

  6. Detection of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, A S; Gruetter, C A

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate histamine synthesis capability of human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells by detecting histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA. HDC catalyzes exclusively the formation of histamine in mammalian cells. Experiments utilizing nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (nRT-PCR) were conducted to detect the presence of HDC mRNA. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMC) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured and RNA was extracted and amplified using two sets of HDC-specific primers. Rat liver and kidney RNA were isolated and amplified to serve as positive and negative controls, respectively. Gel electrophoresis of HAoSMC, HAEC and liver mRNA revealed bands coinciding with an expected product size of 440 base pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that the observed bands were the appropriate HDC amplicons. These findings are the first to indicate the presence of HDC mRNA in vascular smooth muscle cells and confirm the presence of HDC mRNA in endothelial cells which is consistent with an ability of these cell types to synthesize histamine in the vascular wall.

  7. Direct isolation, culture and transplant of mouse skeletal muscle derived endothelial cells with angiogenic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Ieronimakis

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Although diseases associated with microvascular endothelial dysfunction are among the most prevalent illnesses to date, currently no method exists to isolate pure endothelial cells (EC from skeletal muscle for in vivo or in vitro study.By utilizing multicolor fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS, we have isolated a distinct population of Sca-1(+, CD31(+, CD34(dim and CD45(- cells from skeletal muscles of C57BL6 mice. Characterization of this population revealed these cells are functional EC that can be expanded several times in culture without losing their phenotype or capabilities to uptake acetylated low-density lipoprotein (ac-LDL, produce nitric oxide (NO and form vascular tubes. When transplanted subcutaneously or intramuscularly into the tibialis anterior muscle, EC formed microvessels and integrated with existing vasculature.This method, which is highly reproducible, can be used to study the biology and role of EC in diseases such as peripheral vascular disease. In addition this method allows us to isolate large quantities of skeletal muscle derived EC with potential for therapeutic angiogenic applications.

  8. Distinct function of estrogen receptor α in smooth muscle and fibroblast cells in prostate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitkus, Spencer; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Hsu, Iawen; Yu, Jiangzhou; Chen, Ming; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen signaling, through estrogen receptor (ER)α, has been shown to cause hypertrophy in the prostate. Our recent report has shown that epithelial ERα knockout (KO) will not affect the normal prostate development or homeostasis. However, it remains unclear whether ERα in different types of stromal cells has distinct roles in prostate development. This study proposed to elucidate how KO of ERα in the stromal smooth muscle or fibroblast cells may interrupt cross talk between prostate stromal and epithelial cells. Smooth muscle ERαKO (smERαKO) mice showed decreased glandular infolding with the proximal area exhibiting a significant decrease. Fibroblast ERαKO mouse prostates did not exhibit this phenotype but showed a decrease in the number of ductal tips. Additionally, the amount of collagen observed in the basement membrane was reduced in smERαKO prostates. Interestingly, these phenotypes were found to be mutually exclusive among smERαKO or fibroblast ERαKO mice. Compound KO of ERα in both fibroblast and smooth muscle showed combined phenotypes from each of the single KO. Further mechanistic studies showed that IGF-I and epidermal growth factor were down-regulated in prostate smooth muscle PS-1 cells lacking ERα. Together, our results indicate the distinct functions of fibroblast vs. smERα in prostate development.

  9. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in rat skeletal muscle cells during contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silveira, Leonardo R.; Pereira-Da-Silva, Lucia; Juel, Carsten

    2003-01-01

    We examined intra- and extracellular H(2)O(2) and NO formation during contractions in primary rat skeletal muscle cell culture. The fluorescent probes DCFH-DA/DCFH (2,7-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate/2,7-dichlorofluorescein) and DAF-2-DA/DAF-2 (4,5-diaminofluorescein-diacetate/4,5-diaminofluoresce...

  10. Urotensin II-induced signaling involved in proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Iglewski

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Myriam Iglewski, Stephen R GrantDepartment of Integrative Physiology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas, USAAbstract: The urotensin II receptor, bound by the ligand urotensin II, generates second ­messengers, ie, inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol, which stimulate the subsequent release of calcium (Ca2+ in vascular smooth muscle cells. Ca2+ influx leads to the activation of Ca2+-dependent kinases (CaMK via calmodulin binding, resulting in cellular proliferation. We hypothesize that urotensin II signaling in pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (Pac1 and primary aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (PAVSMC results in phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinases leading to cellular proliferation. Exposure of Pac1 cultures to urotensin II increased intracellular Ca2+, subsequently activating Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKK, and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase Type I (CaMKI, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, and protein kinase D. Treatment of Pac1 and PAVSMC with urotensin II increased proliferation as measured by 3H-thymidine uptake. The urotensin II-induced increase in 3H-thymidine incorporation was inhibited by a CaMKK inhibitor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that urotensin II stimulation of smooth muscle cells leads to a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase-mediated increase in cellular proliferation.Keywords: urotensin II receptor, CaMKI, hypertrophy, CaMKK, protein kinase D

  11. The alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in healing human myocardial scars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, I. E.; Havenith, M. G.; de Mey, J. G.; Daemen, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    Interstitial cells in the scars of human myocardial infarctions of different postinfarction times (6 hours to 17 years old) were characterized by antibodies to alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA), vimentin, and desmin. Basal lamina deposition was studied with antibodies to the basal lamina protein type

  12. Endothelial progenitor cells give rise to pro-angiogenic smooth muscle-like progeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, Jan-Renier A. J.; Krenning, Guido; Brinker, Marja G. L.; Koerts, Jasper A.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2010-01-01

    Reciprocal plasticity exists between endothelial and mesenchymal lineages. For instance, mature endothelial cells adopt a smooth muscle-like phenotype through transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF beta 1)-driven endothelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EndMT). Peripheral blood contains

  13. Effect of extracellular vesicles of human adipose tissue on insulin signaling in liver and muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranendonk, Mariëtte E G; Visseren, Frank L J; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; de Jager, Wilco; Wauben, Marca H M; Kalkhoven, Eric; Nolte - t Hoen, Esther

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin resistance (IR) is a key mechanism in obesity-induced cardiovascular disease. To unravel mechanisms whereby human adipose tissue (AT) contributes to systemic IR, the effect of human AT-extracellular vesicles (EVs) on insulin signaling in liver and muscle cells was determined.

  14. Redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 regulates vascular smooth muscle cell migration and neointimal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashino, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoshida, Takemi; Numazawa, Satoshi

    2013-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species are important mediators for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas excess reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative stress contributes to the development and progression of vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is pivotal in cellular defense against oxidative stress by transcriptional upregulation of antioxidant proteins. This study aimed to elucidate the role of Nrf2 in PDGF-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell migration and neointimal hyperplasia. PDGF promoted nuclear translocation of Nrf2, followed by the induction of target genes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1, heme oxygenase-1, and thioredoxin-1. Nrf2 depletion by small interfering RNA enhanced PDGF-promoted Rac1 activation and reactive oxygen species production and persistently phosphorylated downstream extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Nrf2 depletion enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell migration in response to PDGF and wound scratch. In vivo, Nrf2-deficient mice showed enhanced neointimal hyperplasia in a wire injury model. These findings suggest that the Nrf2 system is important for PDGF-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cell migration by regulating reactive oxygen species elimination, which may contribute to neointimal hyperplasia after vascular injury. Our findings provide insight into the Nrf2 system as a novel therapeutic target for vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis.

  15. Role of ERK/MAPK in endothelin receptor signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qing-wen; Edvinsson, Lars; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2009-01-01

    muscle cells (VSMCs) through activation of endothelin type A (ETA) and type B (ETB) receptors. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in ET-1-induced VSMC contraction and proliferation. This study was designed to investigate...

  16. Engineering human pluripotent stem cells into a functional skeletal muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Lingjun; Qian, Ying; Khodabukus, Alastair; Ribar, Thomas; Bursac, Nenad

    2018-01-09

    The generation of functional skeletal muscle tissues from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has not been reported. Here, we derive induced myogenic progenitor cells (iMPCs) via transient overexpression of Pax7 in paraxial mesoderm cells differentiated from hPSCs. In 2D culture, iMPCs readily differentiate into spontaneously contracting multinucleated myotubes and a pool of satellite-like cells endogenously expressing Pax7. Under optimized 3D culture conditions, iMPCs derived from multiple hPSC lines reproducibly form functional skeletal muscle tissues (iSKM bundles) containing aligned multi-nucleated myotubes that exhibit positive force-frequency relationship and robust calcium transients in response to electrical or acetylcholine stimulation. During 1-month culture, the iSKM bundles undergo increased structural and molecular maturation, hypertrophy, and force generation. When implanted into dorsal window chamber or hindlimb muscle in immunocompromised mice, the iSKM bundles survive, progressively vascularize, and maintain functionality. iSKM bundles hold promise as a microphysiological platform for human muscle disease modeling and drug development.

  17. Alterations in Skeletal Muscle Cell Homeostasis in a Mouse Model of Cigarette Smoke Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Marc-André; Morissette, Mathieu C.; Thériault, Marie-Eve; Nikota, Jake K.; Stämpfli, Martin R.; Debigaré, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle dysfunction is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a disease mainly caused by chronic cigarette use. An important proportion of patients with COPD have decreased muscle mass, suggesting that chronic cigarette smoke exposure may interfere with skeletal muscle cellular equilibrium. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the kinetic of the effects that cigarette smoke exposure has on skeletal muscle cell signaling involved in protein homeostasis and to assess the reversibility of these effects. Methods A mouse model of cigarette smoke exposure was used to assess skeletal muscle changes. BALB/c mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or room air for 8 weeks, 24 weeks or 24 weeks followed by 60 days of cessation. The gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were collected and the activation state of key mediators involved in protein synthesis and degradation was assessed. Results Gastrocnemius and soleus were smaller in mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 8 and 24 weeks compared to room air exposed animals. Pro-degradation proteins were induced at the mRNA level after 8 and 24 weeks. Twenty-four weeks of cigarette smoke exposure induced pro-degradation proteins and reduced Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthase kinase-3β quantity. A 60-day smoking cessation period reversed the cell signaling alterations induced by cigarette smoke exposure. Conclusions Repeated cigarette smoke exposure induces reversible muscle signaling alterations that are dependent on the duration of the cigarette smoke exposure. These results highlights a beneficial aspect associated with smoking cessation. PMID:23799102

  18. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Yosuke, E-mail: cynagata@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  19. TBP/TFIID-dependent activation of MyoD target genes in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecova, Barbora; Dall'Agnese, Alessandra; Madaro, Luca; Gatto, Sole; Coutinho Toto, Paula; Albini, Sonia; Ryan, Tammy; Tora, Làszlò; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2016-02-25

    Change in the identity of the components of the transcription pre-initiation complex is proposed to control cell type-specific gene expression. Replacement of the canonical TFIID-TBP complex with TRF3/TBP2 was reported to be required for activation of muscle-gene expression. The lack of a developmental phenotype in TBP2 null mice prompted further analysis to determine whether TBP2 deficiency can compromise adult myogenesis. We show here that TBP2 null mice have an intact regeneration potential upon injury and that TBP2 is not expressed in established C2C12 muscle cell or in primary mouse MuSCs. While TFIID subunits and TBP are downregulated during myoblast differentiation, reduced amounts of these proteins form a complex that is detectable on promoters of muscle genes and is essential for their expression. This evidence demonstrates that TBP2 does not replace TBP during muscle differentiation, as previously proposed, with limiting amounts of TFIID-TBP being required to promote muscle-specific gene expression.

  20. Distinct and Overlapping Sarcoma Subtypes Initiated from Muscle Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Blum

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children, whereas undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas diagnosed in adults. To investigate the myogenic cell(s of origin of these sarcomas, we used Pax7-CreER and MyoD-CreER mice to transform Pax7+ and MyoD+ myogenic progenitors by expressing oncogenic KrasG12D and deleting Trp53 in vivo. Pax7-CreER mice developed RMS and UPS, whereas MyoD-CreER mice developed UPS. Using gene set enrichment analysis, RMS and UPS each clustered specifically within their human counterparts. These results suggest that RMS and UPS have distinct and overlapping cells of origin within the muscle lineage. Taking them together, we have established mouse models of soft tissue sarcoma from muscle stem and progenitor cells.

  1. Integrin mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) in renal vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, W L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Yip, K P

    2001-01-01

    Peptides with the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif induce vasoconstriction in rat afferent arterioles by increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This finding suggests that occupancy of integrins on the plasma membrane of VSMC might affect...... vascular tone. The purpose of this study was to determine whether occupancy of integrins by exogenous RGD peptides initiates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in cultured renal VSMC. When smooth muscle cells were exposed to 0.1 mM hexapeptide GRGDSP, [Ca(2+)](i) rapidly increased from 91 +/- 4 to 287 +/- 37 n......M and then returned to the baseline within 20 s (P cells/5 coverslips). In controls, the hexapeptide GRGESP did not trigger Ca(2+) mobilization. Local application of the GRGDSP induced a regional increase of cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)](i), which propagated as Ca(2+) waves traveling across the cell and induced...

  2. Hyperplasia of smooth muscle in mild to moderate asthma without changes in cell size or gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Prescott G; Dolganov, Gregory M; Ferrando, Ronald E; Donnelly, Samantha; Hays, Steven R; Solberg, Owen D; Carter, Roderick; Wong, Hofer H; Cadbury, Peggy S; Fahy, John V

    2004-05-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in mild to moderate asthma may result from airway smooth muscle cell proliferation or acquisition of a hypercontractile phenotype. Because these cells have not been well characterized in mild to moderate asthma, we examined the morphometric and gene expression characteristics of smooth muscle cells in this subgroup of patients with asthma. Using bronchial biopsies from 14 subjects with mild to moderate asthma and 15 control subjects, we quantified smooth muscle cell morphology by stereology and the expression of a panel of genes related to a hypercontractile phenotype of airway smooth muscle, using laser microdissection and two-step real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found that airway smooth muscle cell size was similar in both groups, but cell number was nearly twofold higher in subjects with asthma (p = 0.03), and the amount of smooth muscle in the submucosa was increased 50-83% (p 0.1). We conclude that airway smooth muscle proliferation is a pathologic characteristic of subjects with mild to moderate asthma. However, smooth muscle cells in mild to moderate asthma do not show hypertrophy or gene expression changes of a hypercontractile phenotype observed in vitro.

  3. The effects of age upon the expression of three miRNAs in muscle stem cells isolated from two different porcine skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redshaw, Zoe; Sweetman, Dylan; Loughna, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and an impaired ability of this tissue to compensate for trauma. Studies in rodents and humans have also shown that resident stem cells within muscle have a reduced ability to proliferate and differentiate. In this study muscle stem cells have been isolated from two muscles, the diaphragm (DIA) and the semimembranosus (SM), from young and old pigs. The levels of three micro-RNAs (miRNAs) were measured when cells were in a proliferative phase and after 24 and 72h in differentiation medium. All three miRNAs are abundant in skeletal muscle with miR-1 and miR-206 known to regulate myogenic differentiation and miR-24 is involved in cell cycle regulation. The levels of expression of Pax7 and the myogenic regulatory factors MyoD and myogenin were also measured. There were marked differences in expression of all three miRNAs between the two age groups. Both miR-1 and miR-206 were reduced in the cells from the older animals. In contrast miR-24 expression was significantly higher in cells from older animals under differentiation conditions. There were also significant differences in the relative expression of all three miRNAs between cells from the SM and DIA in both young and old animals. The changes in miRNA expression described in this study that relate to age, may play a role in the impaired differentiation capacity of older muscle stem cells. Copyright © 2014 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A population of Pax7-expressing muscle progenitor cells show differential responses to muscle injury dependent on developmental stage and injury extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappe, Stefanie; Zammit, Peter S.; Knight, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration in vertebrates occurs by the activation of quiescent progenitor cells that express pax7 to repair and replace damaged myofibers. We have developed a mechanical injury paradigm in zebrafish to determine whether developmental stage and injury size affect the regeneration dynamics of skeletal muscle. We found that both small focal injuries, and large injuries affecting the entire myotome, lead to expression of myf5 and myogenin, which was prolonged in older larvae, indicating a slower process of regeneration. We characterized the endogenous behavior of a population of muscle-resident Pax7-expressing cells using a pax7a:eGFP transgenic line and found that GFP+ cell migration in the myotome dramatically declined between 5 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf). Following a small single myotome injury, GFP+ cells responded by extending processes, before migrating to the injured myofibers. Furthermore, these cells responded more rapidly to injury in 4 dpf larvae compared to 7 dpf. Interestingly, we did not see GFP+ myofibers after repair of small injuries, indicating that pax7a-expressing cells did not contribute to myofiber formation in this injury context. On the contrary, numerous GFP+ myofibers could be observed after an extensive single myotome injury. Both injury models were accompanied by an increased number of proliferating GFP+ cells, which was more pronounced in larvae injured at 4 dpf than 7 dpf. This indicates intriguing developmental differences, at these early ages. Our data also suggests an interesting disparity in the role that pax7a-expressing muscle progenitor cells play during skeletal muscle regeneration, which may reflect the extent of muscle damage. PMID:26379543

  5. A Pitx2-MicroRNA Pathway Modulates Cell Proliferation in Myoblasts and Skeletal-Muscle Satellite Cells and Promotes Their Commitment to a Myogenic Cell Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Velasco, Estefanía; Vallejo, Daniel; Esteban, Francisco J.; Doherty, Chris; Hernández-Torres, Francisco; Franco, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of a proliferating-cell status from a quiescent state as well as the shift between proliferation and differentiation are key developmental steps in skeletal-muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to provide proper muscle regeneration. However, how satellite cell proliferation is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we report that the c-isoform of the transcription factor Pitx2 increases cell proliferation in myoblasts by downregulating microRNA 15b (miR-15b), miR-23b, miR-106b, and miR-503. This Pitx2c-microRNA (miRNA) pathway also regulates cell proliferation in early-activated satellite cells, enhancing Myf5+ satellite cells and thereby promoting their commitment to a myogenic cell fate. This study reveals unknown functions of several miRNAs in myoblast and satellite cell behavior and thus may have future applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:26055324

  6. Serum Proteases Potentiate BMP-Induced Cell Cycle Re-entry of Dedifferentiating Muscle Cells during Newt Limb Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ines; Wang, Heng; Weissert, Philipp M; Straube, Werner L; Shevchenko, Anna; Gentzel, Marc; Brito, Goncalo; Tazaki, Akira; Oliveira, Catarina; Sugiura, Takuji; Shevchenko, Andrej; Simon, András; Drechsel, David N; Tanaka, Elly M

    2017-03-27

    Limb amputation in the newt induces myofibers to dedifferentiate and re-enter the cell cycle to generate proliferative myogenic precursors in the regeneration blastema. Here we show that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and mature BMPs that have been further cleaved by serum proteases induce cell cycle entry by dedifferentiating newt muscle cells. Protease-activated BMP4/7 heterodimers that are present in serum strongly induced myotube cell cycle re-entry with protease cleavage yielding a 30-fold potency increase of BMP4/7 compared with canonical BMP4/7. Inhibition of BMP signaling via muscle-specific dominant-negative receptor expression reduced cell cycle entry in vitro and in vivo. In vivo inhibition of serine protease activity depressed cell cycle re-entry, which in turn was rescued by cleaved-mimic BMP. This work identifies a mechanism of BMP activation that generates blastema cells from differentiated muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fish oil supplementation reverses the effect of cholesterol on apoptotic gene expression in smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Linares Ana; Torres Carolina; Morales Rogelio; Alejandre Ma; Perales Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Nutritional control of gene regulation guides the transformation of smooth muscle cells (SMC) into foam cells in atherosclerosis. Oxidative stress has been reported in areas of lipid accumulation, activating proliferation genes. Suppression of oxidative stress by antioxidant administration reduces this activation and the progression of lesions. We hypothesized that fish oil consumption may protect against atherosclerotic vascular disease. The study objective was to determi...

  8. Metabolic Effects of Insulin and IGFs on Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat, Núria; Capilla, Encarnación; Navarro, Isabel; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultures of gilthead sea bream myocytes were performed in order to examine the relative metabolic function of insulin compared with IGF-I and IGF-II (insulin-like growth factors, IGFs) at different stages in the cell culture. In these cells, the in vitro effects of insulin and IGFs on 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and l-alanine uptake were studied in both myocytes (day 4) and small myotubes (day 9). 2-DG uptake in gilthead sea bream muscle cells was increased in the presence of insulin and IGFs in a time dependent manner and along with muscle cell differentiation. On the contrary, l-alanine uptake was also stimulated by insulin and IGFs but showed an inverse pattern, being the uptake higher in small myocytes than in large myotubes. The results of preincubation with inhibitors (PD-98059, wortmannin, and cytochalasin B) on 2-DG uptake indicated that insulin and IGFs stimulate glucose uptake through the same mechanisms, and evidenced that mitogenesis activator protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K–Akt transduction pathways mediate the metabolic function of these peptides. In the same way, we observed that GLUT4 protein synthesis was stimulated in the presence of insulin and IGFs in gilthead sea bream muscle cells in a different manner at days 4 or 9 of the culture. In summary we describe here, for the first time, the effects of insulin and IGFs on 2-DG and l-alanine uptake in primary culture of gilthead sea bream muscle cells. We show that both MAPK and PI3K–Akt transduction pathways are needed in order to control insulin and IGFs actions in these cells. Moreover, changes in glucose uptake can be explained by the action of the GLUT4 transporter, which is stimulated in the presence of insulin and IGFs throughout the cell culture. PMID:22654873

  9. Characterization of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cell phenotype in diabetic rats with erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, A-Y; He, S-H; Zhao, J-F; liu, Y; Liu, Y; Hu, Y-W; Zhang, T; Wu, Z-Y

    2012-09-01

    Phenotypic modulation from a contractile to a proliferative state within vascular smooth muscle cells has a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the characterization of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cell phenotype in diabetic rats with erectile dysfunction, a group of Sprague-Dawley rats (n=30) were induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg kg(-1)) and screened by subcutaneous injection of apomorphine (100 μg kg(-1)) for the measurement and comparison of the penile erections, and then three different groups were defined. Primary corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells were cultured and passaged. The cavernous tissue segments were subjected to quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to determine the expressions of smooth muscle α-actin (SMA), SM myosin heavy chain (SMMHC), smoothelin, calponin and myocardin. Cell contractility in vitro and western blot analysis of SMA and SMMHC in the cavernous tissues and cells were determined. Compared with the control group (n=8) and the diabetes mellitus group (n=5), the expressions of SMA, calponin, SMMHC, smoothelin and myocardin mRNA were decreased in the cavernous tissues in rats of the diabetic erectile dysfunction group (n=15; P=0.001 and 0.02, P=0.014 and 0.012, both Pcavernous tissues and cultured cells in rats of the diabetic erectile dysfunction group. Cells of the diabetic erectile dysfunction group exhibited significantly less contractility compared with those of other groups (PCorpus cavernosum SM cell possesses the ability to modulate the phenotype under hyperglycemic conditions, which could have a key role in the pathogenesis of diabetic erectile dysfunction.

  10. Inflammatory responses in primary muscle cell cultures in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, Nicholas J; Tacchi, Luca; Secombes, Christopher J; Martin, Samuel A M

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between fish health and muscle growth is critical for continued expansion of the aquaculture industry. The effect of immune stimulation on the expression of genes related to the energy balance of fish is poorly understood. In mammals immune stimulation results in major transcriptional changes in muscle, potentially to allow a reallocation of amino acids for use in the immune response and energy homeostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of immune stimulation on fish muscle gene expression. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) primary muscle cell cultures were stimulated with recombinant (r)IL-1β, a major proinflammatory cytokine, for 24 h in order to simulate an acute immune response. The transcriptomic response was determined by RNA hybridization to a 4 × 44 K Agilent Atlantic salmon microarray platform. The rIL-1β stimulation induced the expression of genes related to both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In addition there were highly significant changes in the expression of genes related to regulation of the cell cycle, growth/structural proteins, proteolysis and lipid metabolism. Of interest were a number of IGF binding proteins that were differentially expressed, which may demonstrate cross talk between the growth and immune systems. We show rIL-1β modulates the expression of not only immune related genes, but also that of genes involved in processes related to growth and metabolism. Co-stimulation of muscle cells with both rIGF-I and rIL-1β demonstrates cross talk between these pathways providing potential avenues for further research. This study highlights the potential negative effects of inflammation on muscle protein deposition and growth in fish and extends our understanding of energy allocation in ectothermic animals.

  11. Antioxidant effect of a phytoestrogen equol on cultured muscle cells of embryonic broilers.

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    Wei, Xiao-Jing; Wu, Jing; Ni, Ying-Dong; Lu, Li-Zhi; Zhao, Ru-Qian

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the in ovo injection of equol can markedly improve the water-holding capacity of muscles of broilers chickens at 7 wk of age through promotion of the antioxidant status. We aimed to investigate directly the antioxidant effects of equol on muscle cells in broilers. Muscle cells were separated from leg muscle of embryos on the 11th day of incubation and treated with equol and H(2)O(2), either alone or together. Cells were pretreated with medium containing 1, 10, or 100 μM equol for 1 h prior to the addition of 1 mM H(2)O(2) for a further 1 h. Photomicrographs of cells were obtained. Cell viability, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the cell supernatant, as well as intracellular total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were determined. Treatment with 1 mM H(2)O(2) caused serious damage to cells, indicated by comets with no clear head region but a very apparent tail of DNA fragments. Pretreatment with low (1 μM) but not high concentrations of equol (10 μM) inhibited cell damage, while 100 μM equol caused more serious damage than H(2)O(2) alone. Pretreatment with 1 μM equol had no effect on cell viability, while pretreatment with 10 and 100 μM equol significantly decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with H(2)O(2) alone, pretreatment with low-dosage equol markedly decreased LDH activity and MDA production in the supernatant, significantly increased intracellular T-SOD activity (P equol (10 and 100 μM) significantly enhanced LDH activity, but had no effect on MDA content, T-SOD or GSH-Px activity induced by H(2)O(2,) except for an obvious increase in GSH-Px activity caused by 10 μM equol. These results indicate that equol at low dosage can prevent skeletal muscle cell damage induced by H(2)O(2), while pretreatment with high-dosage equol shows a synergistic effect with H(2)O(2) in inducing cell damage.

  12. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

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    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels.

  13. Morphological effects of myasthenia gravis patient sera on human muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckman, Steven Paul; Skeie, Geir Olve; Helgeland, Geir; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2006-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused primarily by autoantibodies against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR), but autoantibodies to other muscle proteins may be present. Many of these proteins have structural or signalling functions, the disruption of which may affect muscle cell morphology or viability. In order to investigate the role of such autoantibodies in MG, we examined the effect of MG patient sera, of different autoantibody composition and obtained at different stages of disease severity, on primary human muscle cells. Sera from MG patients induced changes in cell morphology from typical elongated cells to an irregular phenotype, caused the formation of inclusion bodies and intracellular vesicles, and led to a disordered arrangement of actin microfilaments. Sera from the most severely affected patients also induced cell death, which did not occur via classic apoptosis. The effects were not complement-mediated and were dose- and time-dependent. As the effects observed in the cell culture system correlated with disease severity, a greater understanding of the individual factors responsible for these effects may improve our understanding of MG pathogenesis and be of value in the assessment of disease in individual patients.

  14. Two-layer tissue engineered urethra using oral epithelial and muscle derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Go; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamato, Masayuki; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kodama, Shohta

    2012-05-01

    We fabricated novel tissue engineered urethral grafts using autologously harvested oral cells. We report their viability in a canine model. Oral tissues were harvested by punch biopsy and divided into mucosal and muscle sections. Epithelial cells from mucosal sections were cultured as epithelial cell sheets. Simultaneously muscle derived cells were seeded on collagen mesh matrices to form muscle cell sheets. At 2 weeks the sheets were joined and tubularized to form 2-layer tissue engineered urethras, which were autologously grafted to surgically induced urethral defects in 10 dogs in the experimental group. Tissue engineered grafts were not applied to the induced urethral defect in control dogs. The dogs were followed 12 weeks postoperatively. Urethrogram and histological examination were done to evaluate the grafting outcome. We successfully fabricated 2-layer tissue engineered urethras in vitro and transplanted them in dogs in the experimental group. The 12-week complication-free rate was significantly higher in the experimental group than in controls. Urethrogram confirmed urethral patency without stricture in the complication-free group at 12 weeks. Histologically urethras in the transplant group showed a stratified epithelial layer overlying well differentiated submucosa. In contrast, urethras in controls showed severe fibrosis without epithelial layer formation. Two-layer tissue engineered urethras were engineered using cells harvested by minimally invasive oral punch biopsy. Results suggest that this technique can encourage regeneration of a functional urethra. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impaired arterial smooth muscle cell vasodilatory function in methamphetamine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabaei, Ghaemeh; Oveisgharan, Shahram; Ghorbani, Askar; Fatehi, Farzad

    2016-11-15

    Methamphetamine use is a strong risk factor for stroke. This study was designed to evaluate arterial function and structure in methamphetamine users ultrasonographically. In a cross-sectional study, 20 methamphetamine users and 21 controls, aged between 20 and 40years, were enrolled. Common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) marker of early atherogenesis, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) determinants of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, and nitroglycerine-mediated dilatation (NMD) independent marker of vasodilation were measured in two groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding demographic and metabolic characteristics. The mean (±SD) CCA-IMT in methamphetamine users was 0.58±0.09mm, versus 0.59±0.07mm in the controls (p=0.84). Likewise, FMD% was not significantly different between the two groups [7.6±6.1% in methamphetamine users vs. 8.2±5.1% in the controls; p=0.72], nor were peak flow and shear rate after hyperemia. However, NMD% was considerably decreased in the methamphetamine users [8.5±7.8% in methamphetamine users vs. 13.4±6.2% in controls; p=0.03]. According to our results, NMD is reduced among otherwise healthy methamphetamine users, which represents smooth muscle dysfunction in this group. This may contribute to the high risk of stroke among methamphetamine users. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Impaired Arterial Smooth Muscle Cell Vasodilatory Function In Methamphetamine Users

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    Ghaemeh Nabaei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Methamphetamine use is a strong risk factor for stroke. This study was designed to evaluate arterial function and structure in methamphetamine users ultrasonographically. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 20 methamphetamine users and 21 controls, aged between 20 and 40years, were enrolled. Common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT marker of early atherogenesis, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD determinants of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, and nitroglycerine-mediated dilatation (NMD independent marker of vasodilation were measured in two groups. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding demographic and metabolic characteristics. The mean (±SD CCA-IMT in methamphetamine users was 0.58±0.09mm, versus 0.59±0.07mm in the controls (p=0.84. Likewise, FMD% was not significantly different between the two groups [7.6±6.1% in methamphetamine users vs. 8.2±5.1% in the controls; p=0.72], nor were peak flow and shear rate after hyperemia. However, NMD% was considerably decreased in the methamphetamine users [8.5±7.8% in methamphetamine users vs. 13.4±6.2% in controls; p=0.03]. Conclusion: According to our results, NMD is reduced among otherwise healthy methamphetamine users, which represents smooth muscle dysfunction in this group. This may contribute to the high risk of stroke among methamphetamine users.

  17. Comparison of growth characteristics between skeletal muscle satellite cell lines from diploid and triploid olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-min Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. According to myosatellite cell lines (MSCs established in vitro from diploid and triploid flounder, we compared the characters of growth and differentiation of their MSCs. The results would be useful for learning the muscle development mechanism in teleosts.Materials and Methods. The skeletal muscle cells from the diploid and triploid olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus were isolated and cultured in vitro, respectively, and the cells were characterized at the morphology and molecular level; meanwhile, the performance of these cells’ proliferation and differentiation were analyzed.Results. Two new skeletal muscle cell lines (POMSCS(2n and POMSCS(3n from diploid and triploid flounder have been respectively subcultured for 67 times and 66 times. The cultured cells were mostly spindle-like mononuclear cells. They have normal flounder diploid karyotype (2n=48t and triploid karyotype (3n=72t, respectively. Muscle satellite cell gene marker (pax7b and myogenic cell protein marker (Desmin were all expressed in cells of two cell lines. Both of the cells could differentiate into the large polynucleated muscle fibre cells, and immunofluorescence reactions of myosin heavy chain (MyHC were positive. There were more cells of POMSCS(3n to differentiate into the muscle fibre cells than that of POMSCS(2n. However, POMSCS(2n cells proliferated more rapidly than those of POMSCS(3n (P < 0.05. The significant fluorescent signals were observed in both POMSCS(2n and POMSCS(3n cells after transfected with pEGFP-N3 reporter plasmid.Conclusions. The two cell lines have been established and characterized as MSCs. We suppose that it might be the differentiation capacity, rather than the proliferation activity of MSCs to play a key role in the better growth of triploid ones than diploid. Both cell lines will become the ideal tools to learn the mechanism of fish MSCs proliferation, differentiation and regeneration during muscle development in the future.

  18. Stimulatory interactions between human coronary smooth muscle cells and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Paccosi

    Full Text Available Despite inflammatory and immune mechanisms participating to atherogenesis and dendritic cells (DCs driving immune and non-immune tissue injury response, the interactions between DCs and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs possibly relevant to vascular pathology including atherogenesis are still unclear. To address this issue, immature DCs (iDCs generated from CD14+ cells isolated from healthy donors were matured either with cytokines (mDCs, or co-cultured (ccDCs with human coronary artery VSMCs (CASMCs using transwell chambers. Co-culture induced DC immunophenotypical and functional maturation similar to cytokines, as demonstrated by flow cytometry and mixed lymphocyte reaction. In turn, factors from mDCs and ccDCs induced CASMC migration. MCP-1 and TNFα, secreted from DCs, and IL-6 and MCP-1, secreted from CASMCs, were primarily involved. mDCs adhesion to CASMCs was enhanced by CASMC pre-treatment with IFNγ and TNFα ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were involved, since the expression of specific mRNAs for these molecules increased and adhesion was inhibited by neutralizing antibodies to the counter-receptors CD11c and CD18. Adhesion was also inhibited by CASMC pre-treatment with the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor atorvastatin and the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, which suggests a further mechanism for the anti-inflammatory action of these drugs. Adhesion of DCs to VSMCs was shown also in vivo in rat carotid 7 to 21 days after crush and incision injury. The findings indicate that DCs and VSMCs can interact with reciprocal stimulation, possibly leading to perpetuate inflammation and vascular wall remodelling, and that the interaction is enhanced by a cytokine-rich inflammatory environment and down-regulated by HMGCoA-reductase inhibitors and PPARγ agonists.

  19. MicroRNA-29a in Adult Muscle Stem Cells Controls Skeletal Muscle Regeneration During Injury and Exercise Downstream of Fibroblast Growth Factor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimov, Artur; Merry, Troy L; Luca, Edlira; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Mizbani, Amir; Turcekova, Katarina; Hartung, Angelika; Croce, Carlo M; Ristow, Michael; Krützfeldt, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The expansion of myogenic progenitors (MPs) in the adult muscle stem cell niche is critical for the regeneration of skeletal muscle. Activation of quiescent MPs depends on the dismantling of the basement membrane and increased access to growth factors such as fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). Here, we demonstrate using microRNA (miRNA) profiling in mouse and human myoblasts that the capacity of FGF2 to stimulate myoblast proliferation is mediated by miR-29a. FGF2 induces miR-29a expression and inhibition of miR-29a using pharmacological or genetic deletion decreases myoblast proliferation. Next generation RNA sequencing from miR-29a knockout myoblasts (Pax7(CE/+) ; miR-29a(flox/flox) ) identified members of the basement membrane as the most abundant miR-29a targets. Using gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we confirm that miR-29a coordinately regulates Fbn1, Lamc1, Nid2, Col4a1, Hspg2 and Sparc in myoblasts in vitro and in MPs in vivo. Induction of FGF2 and miR-29a and downregulation of its target genes precedes muscle regeneration during cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury. Importantly, MP-specific tamoxifen-induced deletion of miR-29a in adult skeletal muscle decreased the proliferation and formation of newly formed myofibers during both CTX-induced muscle injury and after a single bout of eccentric exercise. Our results identify a novel miRNA-based checkpoint of the basement membrane in the adult muscle stem cell niche. Strategies targeting miR-29a might provide useful clinical approaches to maintain muscle mass in disease states such as ageing that involve aberrant FGF2 signaling. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  20. Nuclear antigens in Trichinella spiralis infected muscle cells: nuclear extraction, compartmentalization and complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, C; Jasmer, D P

    1998-05-01

    Infection of mammalian skeletal muscle cells by Trichinella spiralis induces a series of changes that include: reentry of the terminally differentiated host cell into the cell cycle; suspension of infected cells in apparent G2/M; and transcriptional inactivation of the differentiated skeletal muscle gene program. Cell cycle repositioning and genetic reprogramming are chronic characteristics of host cells that can remain infected for years. Nuclear antigens (NA, 79, 86 and 97 kDa) that localize to host cell nuclei have been detected with antibodies against T. spiralis proteins. Since NA may play a role in regulating the infected cell phenotype, their origin, nuclear compartmentalization, and biochemical properties were investigated. We show that a monoclonal antibody to a defined epitope of T. spiralis glycans binds these NA, which indicates the parasite origin of these proteins. NA were not extracted under conditions that solubilized chromatin from infected cell nuclei. In contrast, NA were coextracted with B lamins (nuclear envelope) by 4 M urea. Urea extraction was pH dependent (8.0), suggesting ionic interaction of NA in protein complexes. Nevertheless, confocal microscopy demonstrated colocalization of NA with host chromatin, and not B lamins. Nuclear protein complexes containing NA were observed under non-reducing conditions, and NA were readily cross-linked in isolated nuclei by succinimidyl protein conjugating reagents. The results establish methods to extract NA from infected cell nuclei for further biochemical analysis, establish the existence of nuclear protein complexes containing NA and demonstrate colocalization of NA with host chromatin. Collectively, the results provide a foundation from which to investigate the role of NA in regulating the T. spiralis infected skeletal muscle cell phenotype.

  1. Skeletal muscle satellite cells, mitochondria and microRNAs: their involvement in the pathogenesis of ALS

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    Stavroula Tsitkanou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as motor neurone disease (MND, is a fatal motor neurone disorder. It results in progressive degeneration and death of upper and lower motor neurones, protein aggregation, severe muscle atrophy and respiratory insufficiency. Median survival with ALS is between two to five years from the onset of symptoms. ALS manifests as either familial ALS (FALS (~10% of cases or sporadic ALS (SALS, (~90% of cases. Mutations in the copper/zinc (CuZn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 gene account for ~20% of FALS cases and the mutant SOD1 mouse model has been used extensively to help understand the ALS pathology. As the precise mechanisms causing ALS are not well understood there is presently no cure. Recent evidence suggests that motor neuron degradation may involve a cell non-autonomous phenomenon involving numerous cell types within various tissues. Skeletal muscle is now considered as an important tissue involved in the pathogenesis of ALS by activating a retrograde signalling cascade that degrades motor neurons. Skeletal muscle heath and function are regulated by numerous factors including satellite cells, mitochondria and microRNAs. Studies demonstrate that in ALS these factors show various levels of dysregulation within the skeletal muscle. This review provides an overview of their dysregulation in various ALS models as well as how they may contribute individually and/or synergistically to the ALS pathogenesis.

  2. Influence of anabolic agents on protein synthesis and degradation in muscle cells grown in culture

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    Roeder, R.A.; Thorpe, S.D.; Byers, F.M.; Schelling, G.T.; Gunn, J.M.

    Muscle cell culture (L/sub 6/) studies were conducted to determine whether anabolic agents have a direct effect on the muscle cell. The effect of zeranol, testosterone propionate, estradiol benzoate, progesterone, dexamethasone and anabolic agent-dexamethasone combinations on protein synthesis and degradation were measured. Myoblast and myotube cultures were pretreated with 1 ..mu..M compounds for 12, 24 and 48 h before a 6-h synthesis or degradation measuring period. Protein synthesis was determined as cpm of (/sup 3/H) leucine incorporated per mg cell protein. Protein degradation was measured by a pulse-chase procedure using (/sup 3/H) leucine and expressed as the percentage labeled protein degraded in 6 h. Progesterone slightly increased protein synthesis in myoblast cultures. Testosterone propionate had no effect on synthesis. Protein synthesis was decreased by estradiol benzoate in myotube cultures. Protein degradation was not altered appreciably by anabolic agents. Protein synthesis was initially inhibited in myotubes by dexamethasone, but increased in myoblasts and myotubes in the extended incubation time. Dexamethasone also consistently increased protein degradation, but this required several hours to be expressed. Anabolic agents did not interfere with dexamethasone-induced increases in protein synthesis and degradation. The magnitude of response and sensitivity were similar for both the myoblast and the more fully differentiated myotube for all compounds tested. These results indicate that anabolic agents at the 1 ..mu..M level do not have a direct anabolic effect on muscle or alter glucocorticoid-induced catabolic response in muscle.

  3. Miniaturized iPS-Cell-Derived Cardiac Muscles for Physiologically Relevant Drug Response Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebsch, Nathaniel; Loskill, Peter; Deveshwar, Nikhil; Spencer, C Ian; Judge, Luke M; Mandegar, Mohammad A; Fox, Cade B; Mohamed, Tamer M A; Ma, Zhen; Mathur, Anurag; Sheehan, Alice M; Truong, Annie; Saxton, Mike; Yoo, Jennie; Srivastava, Deepak; Desai, Tejal A; So, Po-Lin; Healy, Kevin E; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-04-20

    Tissue engineering approaches have the potential to increase the physiologic relevance of human iPS-derived cells, such as cardiomyocytes (iPS-CM). However, forming Engineered Heart Muscle (EHM) typically requires >1 million cells per tissue. Existing miniaturization strategies involve complex approaches not amena